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THIRD STREET STREETSCAPE TRAFFIC CORRIDOR STUDY AUGUST 7, 2010

CITY OF COLUMBUS GERMAN VILLAGE SOCIETY

Third Street Streetscape Traffic Corridor Study 1.27.2010

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acknowledgements

executive summary

Many German Village residents, individuals, committees and

The City of Columbus authorized Kinzelman Kline

City administrators contributed their time and ideas to this

Gossman to prepare the Third Street Corridor Study in

planning effort. The following individuals and groups are to be

early 2009. This study addresses the public right-of-way

recognized for their significant contribution of thoughts, ideas

with a focus on the pedestrian environment. Third Street

and collaboration that were integral to the development of a

was resurfaced with asphalt pavement in 2005 and the

responsive, successful Traffic Corridor Study

City does not intend to re-surface or rebuild the street pavement in the near future. The German Village Society

PROJECT TEAM

German Village Residents

obtained the grant that made this study possible; one of

German Village Society

their primary goals is to restore the street to the historic

German Village Streetscape Committee

brick surface. Resurfacing the street with historic brick

German Village Board of Trustees

pavement must be funded through sources other than the

German Village Commission

Columbus Public Services Department.

Dr. Brian Santin, German Village Streetscape Committee Chair Mark Kelsey, Director of Columbus Public Service Department

This study resulted from a typical planning process with

Tim Bell, Transportation Division, City of Columbus

significant public input throughout the process. Key

Susan Delay, Columbus Department of Development

initial tasks included understanding the German Village

Gary Wilfong, Columbus Transportation Division Project Manager

community vision for the Third Street Corridor and

Cristina Parady, Columbus Utility Coordinator

conducting a thorough review of the historic archival material to understand the historic streetscape conditions.

design team

This was followed by an assessment of the physical

Kinzelman Kline Gossman, project lead, corridor design and

conditions. Preliminary concepts were generated to test

planning

various strategies for the physical development of the

Chambers, Murphy & Burge, historical appropriateness

corridor. The best ideas were further developed into the

Prime Engineering, site base preparation

final preferred Third Street Corridor Concept described in this document. The design team researched potential funding sources available through grants and other programs to assist the implementation of the project. An implementation strategy was generated, including phasing and preliminary budgets for each phase of work.

Third Street Streetscape Traffic Corridor Study 1.27.2010


FIND IT

table of contents Historical precedents ..............................................1

Sustainable.....................................................34

Urban Assessment

Composite Concept.........................................35

Building Density.................................................4

Key Areas

Building Heights................................................4

Livingston Gateway..........................................37

Building/Land Uses............................................5

Commercial District.........................................43

Circulation................................................5

Village Green.................................................49

Village Districts..................................................6

Residential District / Schiller Park Gateway........54

Existing Conditions............................................7

Implementation Strategy

Existing Utilities..................................................8

Phasing/

German Village Vision .................................................9

Budgets..................................................................60

Third Street Corridor Vision.........................................13

Funding Sources.............................................71

Corridor Concept.....................................................15

Next Steps......................................................79

Streetscape Components

Appendix

Roadway........................................................19

Composite Plan..............................................81

Sidewalks.......................................................23

Historical Photography.....................................82

Utilities..........................................................26

Early Concepts & Studies.................................86

Lighting.........................................................29

Private Development Recommendations............88

Plantings........................................................30

Furnishings...................................................32

Signage.........................................................33

Third Street Streetscape Traffic Corridor Study 1.27.2010

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HISTORICAL PRECEDENT

Third Street Streetscape Traffic Corridor Study 1.27.2010

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Historical Setting German Village is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is also designated as a Preserve-America neighborhood. It was and continues to be characterized by narrow brick streets and homogeneous brick architecture. The Third Street Corridor has retained many of its historic attributes: a 47’ pavement width, lack of setbacks for structures, stone curbs, tidy private gardens, primarily residential use with scattered businesses and civic uses. The street was originally paved with brick; the parking lanes remained brick until the 1990’s. Key features of the Third Street Corridor that need to be protected include: • The street width and curb location; localized adjustments for traffic calming purposes are acceptable. • The existing historic brick contained within the asphalt pavement profile must be protected. • If funding becomes available, the historic brick should be reset to re-establish the historic street pavement. • New curbs should be stone curbs to match the existing. • The sidewalks should be re-surfaced with brick. • Brick should be laid to replicate the existing patterns. • Pavements, landscaping and hardscape features should be designed to retain the eclectic nature of the corridor.

Third Street Streetscape Traffic Corridor Study 1.27.2010

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URBAN ASSESSMENT

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Building Density

LIVINGSTON

LIVINGSTON

The density and building placement contribute greatly to

Key LIVINGSTON

1-Story

Key 1-

2-Story

the historic feel and charm of the streetscape

2-

3-Story

3-

The density and building sizes are fairly consistent for the length of the corridor; minor variations contribute to the human scale and feel of the corridor.

BECK

BECK

BECK

Building Height Building heights range from one to four story structures The majority of the structures are one and a half or two

SYCAM

SYCAM

ORE

ORE SYCAM

ORE

stories.

FR

FRANK

RT ANKFO

U KOSS

FRANK

KOSS

TH

I WHITT

FORT

UTH

WHITT

ER

KOSS

Figure Ground

WHITT

IER

LER SCHIL R PA K

LER SCHIL P A RK

Building Height

Building Heights Third Street Streetscape - Traffic Corridor Study Third Street Streetscape - Traffic Corridor StudyBuilding Heights Third Street Streetscape - Traffic Corrid

Third Street Streetscape Traffic Corridor Study 1.27.2010

UTH

IER

LER SCHIL P A RK

Building Density

FORT

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Building / Land Use

Key LIVINGSTON

The predominant land use along Third Street is residential Secondary land uses include office, commercial and institutional

Circulation

BECK

BECK

Key

Key

L I V I N G S T O NCivic

Civic

LIVINGSTON

Office

Office

Retail

Retail

Residential

Residential

Open Space

Open Space

Parking Lot

Parking Lot

BECK

LIVINGSTON

Key Vehicular Circulation

Vehic Circu

Pedestrian Circulation

Pede Circu

Traffic Light

Traffi

Bus Stop

Bus S

BECK

Third Street is the primary north/south vehicular spine of

Existing Street Parking Spaces Existing Stree

German Village

approx. 215

approx. 215

Traffic signals at Livingston Avenue and Whittier Street Third Street is two way traffic with parallel parking on both

SYCAM

ORE

SYCAM

ORE

SYCAM

ORE

SYCAM

ORE

sides Most side streets that intersect Third Street are two-way traffic

FRANK

FORT

FRANK

FORT

FRANK

FORT

FRANK

FORT

Small parking lots feed into Third Street at the north end of the corridor Transit stops for COTA and buses for St. Mary’s school are

KOSS

UTH

KOSS

UTH

KOSS

UTH

KOSS

located along the corridor

UTH

Existing on-street parking is approximately 215 spaces WHITT

IER

WHITT

IER

LER SCHIL P A RK

Building / Land Use Land Use

Land Use

WHITT

IER

IER

LER SCHIL P A RK

LER SCHIL K R A P

LER SCHIL K R A P

Circulation

- Traffic Corridor Study- Traffic Corridor Stu Third Street Streetscape TrafficStreetscape Corridor Study Third-Street -Circulation Traffic Corridor Study Circulation Third Street StreetscapeThird Street Streetscape

Third Street Streetscape Traffic Corridor Study 1.27.2010

WHITT

8


RE

•Anomaly in streetscape character Commercial District Commercial District •Consistent high density on west side of street •Gaps in building frontage and density on • in building and density •Gaps Building frontage frontage breaks down on easton side north endO R E M A C S Y •Only surface parking lots along the corridor north end of street

LIVINGSTON

LIVINGSTON

(8 lots) •More generous front and side yards •Two 1-story structures & eight 3-story

• parking along the corridor •Only Largesurface setbacks for St. lots Mary’s, outdoor (8 lots) structures out of 81 courtyards and other yards •22 parcels contain office, commercial or • generous front and side3-story yards •More One 1-story structures & four civic uses

BECK

KFOR

T

•Two 1-story structures structures out of 23 & eight 3-story structures out of 81 • 6 parcels contain office, commercial or civic T R O F •22 FRANK usesparcels contain office, commercial or “Village Green” uses are residential •civic 55 parcels •Anomaly in streetscape character 27 parcels are residential •Consistent high density on • west side of street pedestrian • Significant activity •27 parcels are residential

SYCAM

ORE

•Building frontage breaks down on east side of street

OSSU

TH

KOSS

WHITT

KFOR

structures out of 23 •6 parcels contain office, commercial or civic uses UTH

•Consistent building frontage, scale and use S K OareS residential •55 parcels •Structures are predominately placed on “Village Green” •Significant pedestrian activity ROW •Anomaly in streetscape character •Zero 1-story structures & one 3-story Residential District •Consistent high density on west side of street •Consistent building frontage, scale and use structures out of 44 •Structures are predominately placed on •Building frontage breaks down on east side ROW •5 parcels are office or commercial use street 3-story •Zero 1-story structures & oneof •39 parcels are residential structures out of 44 •Large setbacks for St. Mary’s, outdoor •5 parcels are office or commercial use •39 parcels are residential and other yards ER I courtyards WHITT •One 1-story structures & four 3-story

UTH

IER WHITT

•Anomaly in streetscape character •Consistent high density on west side of street •Building frontage breaks down on east side of street •Large setbacks for St. Mary’s, outdoor courtyards and other yards •One 1-story structures & four 3-story structures out of 23 •6 parcels contain office, commercial or civic uses 17 parcels are residential •55 •Significant pedestrian activity

Residential District

FORT

FRANK

RE

•Large setbacks for St. Mary’s, outdoor courtyards and other yards •One 1-story structures & four 3-story

“Village Green”

IER

T

Residential District •Consistent building frontage, scale and use •Structures are predominately placed on ROW •Zero 1-story structures & one 3-story structures out of 44 •5 parcels are office or commercial use •39 parcels are residential

structures out of 23 •6 parcels contain office, commercial or civic Third Street Streetscape - Traffic Corridor Study LER uses SCHIL P A RK Third Street Streetscape Traffic Corridor Study •55 parcels are residential LER SCHIL R PA K

Village Districts District Zones

rict Zones

LER SCHIL P A RK

1.27.2010

Third Street Streetscape - Traffic Corridor •Significant pedestrianStudy activity

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Pavement

Key

Approximately 50 percent of the sidewalk pavement is

LIVINGSTON

Brick Pavement

LIVINGSTON

brick and the other half is concrete

Key

Key

Key

Brick Pavement

Brick Pavement

Brick Paveme

Street Tree

Street Tree

Street Tree

Street Tr

Crosswire

Crosswire

Crosswire

Crosswi

Architectural Landmarks

Architec Landma

Open Yard

Open Y

LIVINGSTON

Areas of both brick and concrete pavement are in poor

Architectural Landmarks

conditions and are a danger to pedestrians

Architectural Landmarks

Open Yard

Open Yard

FR

RT ANKFO

Brick pavement consists of a variety of different paver types, colors and patterns, including herringbone, running bond and basketweave

Trees There are numerous street trees of varying species and in varying conditions

BECK

BECK

BECK

KOSS

UTH

The street tree are located on an irregular spacing with large areas of sidewalk having no trees at all

Utility Lines There are approximately 70 utility lines that cross Third Street WHITT

Utility poles are wooden and many are not plumb Street lights are attached to the poles along the east side

SYCAM

ORE

SYCAM

ORE

SYCAM

IER

ORE

of the street only

LER SCHIL P A RK

Existing Conditions - Northern Half

Existing Conditions - Southern Half

Landscape Features Landscape Features Features Third Street Streetscape - Traffic Study Third Street Streetscape - Traffic Study- Traffic Corridor Stu Third StreetCorridor Streetscape - Landscape Traffic Corridor Study Landscape Features Third StreetCorridor Streetscape

Third Street Streetscape Traffic Corridor Study 1.27.2010

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Existing Utilities

Telecommunications

City of Columbus Department of Public Utilities: Division of Sewers & Drainage -Inventory: -Combined Storm/Sanitary Main Line -Storm Inlets: 33 and Manholes: 17. -Size: Main Combined Storm/Sanitary Lines: 24”-48” -Clearance: 1’ Vertical (5’ if brick) and 3’ Horizontal (10’ if brick) -Depth: Varies from 6’-15’

MELP

AEP

Storm/Sanitary Main Storm/Sanitary Clearance

Gas Main

City of Columbus Department of Public Utilities: Division of Water -Inventory: -Main Water Line -Fire Hydrant: 10 -Size: Main Water Line: 6” -Clearance: 1’ Vertical and 3’ Horizontal

Gas Clearance

Water Main Water Main Clearance

Gas Main Gas Clearance

City of Columbus Department of Public Utilities: Division of Power -Inventory: -MELP owned and operated poles within Third St ROW: 28 (+10?) -MELP owned and operated Transformers within Third St ROW: 12 AEP: American Electric Power -Inventory: -AEP owned and operated poles within Third St ROW: 33 -AEP Transformers within Third St ROW: 16 Columbia Gas -Inventory: -Main Gas Line along both East and West Sidewalks -Size: Main Gas Line: 3” -Clearance: 1’ Vertical and 3’ Horizontal Telecommunication Companies -Time Warner -ATT Ohio (formerly SBC) -WOW

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RESIDENTS’ VISION

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The following ideas were generated by the German Village Society, residents and the design team during the Corridor Walk-through and the Visioning Session. General 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22.

A celebrated, vibrant downtown neighborhood- historic integrity - a charming, pedestrian-friendly streetscape Balance a more pedestrian friendly street with the historic character Third Street should accommodate Oktoberfest German Village as the #1 tourist destination in Central Ohio Enhance the gateway at Livingston Avenue and Schiller Park Explore options for something like Worthington’s summer market Current interesting individuality & diversity should be preserved Don’t turn Third Street into Disney Main Street… be careful not to be too sterile Address the historic Gothic Revival Church of St. Mary’s as the defining landmark of the street The Schwartz Castle is a landmark, which could become part of the Gateway Explore methods to increase the available parking without increasing pavement Explore putting angled parking in certain, more commercial areas along Third Street. Favor the pedestrian environment over vehicles, if a choice must be made. Sidewalks must be ADA accessible the entire length of the corridor. Identify and address major crossings along Third Street that should have crosswalks Resolve safety issues for dangerous intersections (Beck and Third). Explore curb extensions Explore mid street traffic calming Address high speed traffic Consider COTA bus stops and routes as part of overall design Re-grade curb ramps where needed to eliminate buildup of mud and debris. Explore variations of width of Third Street, curb-to-curb.

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Pavements/Materials 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33.

Make Third Street all brick again. Brick at the intersections to enhance traffic calming and announce the pedestrian zone Explore long-term options for providing brick parking lanes Explore historic, aesthetic and traffic calming effects of brick streets Provide stone curbs and brick pavement in the street and sidewalks Restore the appropriate elevation of the stone curb Replace the brick where it was taken out when the new curb ramps were installed. One should know German Village by its high quality materials and charming environment The residents do not want concrete or asphalt pavement Maintain the same scale, proportions and materials of the surrounding predominant architecture. Brick seems to be the unifying element in the diverse German Village

Utilities 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47.

Bury all utilities Explore options to remove cross-wires and any unnecessary lines Short term, can the utility poles be straightened or the material changed? Possibly use taller, metal poles so that fewer poles are needed and wires are higher and out of view. Explore if the utility lines can be moved to the rear of properties Solve the drainage issues and diminish maintenance costs to the City Provide better street lighting that addresses both sides of the street for safety. Explore using pedestrian scale lights and eliminating the traditional tall street lights. Sidewalks need to be better lit, using a pedestrian scale light. Address the combined sewer that runs through Third Street as much as this project will permit. Consider long-term streetscape solutions for utilities, drainage, materials and so on. Pedestrian lamps reminiscent of the cast iron gas lamps are desired. There are still some remains of cast stone storm sewer inlet installed at the curb. Some of them dated to . Keep the design elements of this drainage system because of its historic significance.

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Landscape Features 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62.

Establish a minimum acceptable level of richness of materials, details and plantings Discourage turf grass in R.O.W. Place benches in the public R.O.W. so people feel comfortable sitting in them. Provide guidance on acceptable methods for tree plantings to prevent root upheaval. Address portions of the corridor that lack streetscape and pedestrian amenities. Strengthen the edge between the public and private property to maintain the scale and density of the corridor. Prevent successive properties from having a break in fencing/building frontage to preserve the historic urban character. Maintain the variety and diversity of brick patterns, details and plantings to maintain the charm of German Village. Organize magazine and newspaper stands and locate at strategic points. Group post office boxes and benches to encourage community. Provide opportunities for residents to hang plants and banners from new pedestrian lights Establish appropriate locations for bike racks throughout the corridor. Place street trees sporadically and with different species. Consider eliminating street trees in front of commercial properties to be true to the historic character Incorporate historic hitching posts, columns and limestone stepping stones to the extent possible.

Signage 63. 64. 65. 66. 67.

Reduce the amount of directional and regulatory street signage along Third Street. Change the appearance to minimize the visual impact. Explore unique street signage for German Village. Consider putting street signage on the side of buildings. Minimize the visual clutter at the Livingston gateway GVS Guidelines should be recognized but not perceived as confining the streetscape design.

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CORRIDOR VISION

BALANCE

create a between contemporary function and historic integrity

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SAFETY

HISTORIC CHARACTER

FUNCTIONALITY

4 requirements to ensure

balanced design safety historic character functionality sustainable community

SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY

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CORRIDOR CONCEPT

ECLECTIC: a range of patterns and colors of brick, plantings, and other furnishings DISTRICTS: commercial and residential VILLAGE GREEN: celebration of open space COMMUNITY: a thriving, urban community Third Street Streetscape Traffic Corridor Study 1.27.2010

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Intersections & Gateways

Districts

Composite LIVINGSTON

KEY

AVENUE

KEY

KEY COMMERCIAL DISTRICT

GATEWAY

VILLAGE GREEN MAJOR INTERSECTION

BLENKNER

STREET

HOSTER

STREET

BECK

STREET

COMMERCIAL DISTRICT VILLAGE GREEN

RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT

RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT

MINOR INTERSECTION

*

*

*

GATEWAY WILLOW

STREET

BUS STOP

SYCAMORE

STREET

STIMMEL

STREET

FRANKFORT

STREET

*

*

MAJOR INTERSECTION

MINOR INTERSECTION

*

BUS STOP

Precepts

• Retain eclectic character. COLUMBUS

• Celebrate the corridor with gateways.

STREET

• Distinguish major intersections with

*

*

KOSSUTH

LANSING

STREET

WHITTIER

STREET

CONCORD

PLACE

REINHARD

Third Street Streetscape Traffic Corridor Study 1.27.2010

STREET

*

*

curb extensions. • Commercial District: fewer street trees, more pavement. • Village Green: visually ‘borrow’ the open space for community. • Residential District: more green, tree lawns

AVENUE

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Utility Corridors

Street Trees

Composite LIVINGSTON

KEY

AVENUE

KEY

KEY

OVERHEAD UTILITIES

SIGNIFICANT TREES TO REMAIN

UNDERGROUND UTILITIES

PROPOSED TREES

BLENKNER

STREET

HOSTER

STREET

BECK

STREET

OVERHEAD UTILITIES UNDERGROUND UTILITIES SIGNIFICANT TREES TO REMAIN PROPOSED TREES

WILLOW

STREET

SYCAMORE

STREET

STIMMEL

STREET

FRANKFORT

STREET

Precepts • Clean up and eliminate visual utilities COLUMBUS

STREET

where possible. • Retain existing trees that are healthy and have reasonable life spans.

KOSSUTH

STREET

LANSING

STREET

WHITTIER

STREET

CONCORD

PLACE

REINHARD

AVENUE

Third Street Streetscape Traffic Corridor Study 1.27.2010

• Tree planting varies per district.

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STREETSCAPE COMPONENTS

-Roadway -Sidewalk -Utilities -Lighting -Plantings -Furnishings -Signage Third Street Streetscape Traffic Corridor Study 1.27.2010

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ROADWAY MATERIALS

Three options of roadway materials

brick

asphalt

brick parking lanes and asphalt travel lanes

ASPHALT

SPLIT

BRICK

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ROADWAY

HISTORIC CURBS

Maintain existing curb layout between all major intersections

maintain historic road width

replace with stone curbs

reestablish full height curbs

+/- 46’

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ROADWAY

CURB EXTENSIONS

Provide curb extensions at all major intersections

safer pedestrian crosswalks

protection to on-street parking spots

broaden cone of vision for stopped traffic at cross streets

6’ 34’ 6’

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enhance pedestrian travel

PARKING

BIKE LANE

encourages an active lifestyle

CAR LANE

CAR LANE

calm traffic by narrowing the width of the travel lanes

BIKE LANE

MULTI-MODAL

PARKING

ROADWAY

Promote multiple modes of transportation

9’

Third Street Streetscape Traffic Corridor Study 1.27.2010

4’

10’

10’

4’

9’

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walkway zone generally provides an 8 foot wide path free of objects and meets ADA standards

amenity zone includes all furnishings, lights, and signs

clear zone allows for the people to move between their car and the amenity zone AMENITY ZONE CLEAR ZONE

ZONES

WALKWAY

SIDEWALK

The sidewalk has three primary zones

+/-8’

5’

2’

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SIDEWALK MATERIALS

Sidewalk materials:

brick sidewalks with varying patterns

reuse existing brick when possible

variety of colors that matches the existing brick

match textures and styles of the existing brick

match or maintain existing patterns of brick

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SIDEWALK

ACCESSIBILITY

Maximize the accessibility along the entire corridor

follow ADA guidelines to ensure accessibility to all pedestrians

provide curb ramps at all intersections

provide a smooth surface

design a consistent cross slope across sidewalk

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UTILITIES EXISTING

Existing utilities

overhead utility lines crisscross the street and clutter the environment

other utilities run below the pavement and parallel to the curb

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UTILITIES OVERHEAD OPTION 1

Overhead utility lines

consolidate overhead wires and eliminate cross wires

provide fewer, taller metal poles to reduce visual clutter

eliminate all signs and lights from utility poles

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UTILITIES OVERHEAD OPTION 2

Below grade utility lines and transformer vaults

bury all overhead utilities underneath street

bury transformers within vaults at curb extensions as needed

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LIGHTING PEDESTRIAN ROADWAY MAST ARMS

General characteristics of the lighting design

provide even light distribution to increase visibility

black poles and fixtures with appropriate character: recommend City standard fixtures

accessorize light poles with banners and hanging baskets

all pedestrian lights preferred; or provide roadway lights on one side of street, pedestrian lights on the pother side

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PLANTINGS

LANDSCAPE BEDS

General characteristics of the landscape beds

raised stone curbing around proposed trees

flush planters around existing trees

tree lawn south of Kossuth Street

plant low groundcovers and perennials in all tree planters

EXISTING

PROPOSED

TREE LAWN

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PLANTINGS

STREET TREES GROUNDCOVERS PERENNIALS

General characteristics of the plant palette

street trees: urban tolerant, high canopy, and seasonal color

groundcovers: low, evergreen, and salt tolerant

perennials: array of seasonal colors and textures

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FURNISHINGS SEATING BIKE RACK WASTE/RECYCLING NEWS CORRALS

General characteristics of the furnishing design

furnishings should compliment historical context

durable furnishings with black finish

family of benches, waste/recycling receptacles, and bike racks

historic remnants

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SIGNAGE

INFORMATIONAL DIRECTIONAL REGULATORY

General characteristics of the signage design

family of signs distinct to Third Street

pick up on traditional German Village symbols and colors

simplify signs and posts

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SUSTAINABLE GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE

General characteristics of the sustainable design

recycle/reuse of material

use of local/regional materials

promote walkability and community

green methods to treat stormwater quality

Detain water in planters Brick Sidewalk

Drainage

Drainage

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COMPOSITE COMPOSITE CONCEPT

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1

2 3

4

KEY AREAS 1 Livingston Gateway 2 Commercial District 3 Village Green 4 Residential District / Schiller Park Gateway Third Street Streetscape Traffic Corridor Study 1.27.2010

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LIVINGSTON GATEWAY LIVING STON AVEN UE

-Brick Piers -Flush Brick Intersection

COLDWELL BANKER

-Simple, Elegant Materials

KATZINGER’S DELI

-Mast Arms

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LIVINGSTON GATEWAY

-Expanded Dining -Variety of Paving Patterns -Brick Crosswalks Mast Arm Planters

Outdoor Dining

Plant Bed News Corral

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LIVINGSTON GATEWAY

LIVING STON AVEN UE

-Asphalt Street Option

COLDWELL BANKER

KATZINGER’S DELI

-Flush Brick Intersection

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LIVINGSTON GATEWAY

SIDEWALK

CURB EXTENSION

BIKE LANE

ROADWAY

BIKE LANE

CURB EXTENSION

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SIDEWALK

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LIVINGSTON GATEWAY

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LIVINGSTON GATEWAY: ASPHALT OPTION

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COMMERCIAL DISTRICT

-Trees and Perennials in Planters -Maintain Significant Trees -More Random Tree Planting -Enhance Visibility

STARBUCKS

SYCA MORE STREE T

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COMMERCIAL DISTRICT

Bus Shelter

Bench

-Transit Stop Enhances Community:

-News Corrals

-Post Office Box

Planter Bed Litter Receptacle

-Benches

Informational Sign

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COMMERCIAL DISTRICT

-Asphalt Street Option

STARBUCKS

SYCA MORE STREE T

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COMMERCIAL DISTRICT

SIDEWALK

PARKING

BIKE LANE

ROADWAY

BIKE LANE

PARKING

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SIDEWALK

49


COMMERCIAL DISTRICT

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COMMERCIAL DISTRICT: ASPHALT OPTION

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VILLAGE GREEN

SAINT MARY’S CHURCH

-German Village “civic” area -Open Lawn Area -Private Ownership

SAINT MARY’S ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

-Semi-Public Use -Visual Open Space

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VILLAGE GREEN SAINT MARY’S CHURCH

-Asphalt Option

SAINT MARY’S ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

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VILLAGE GREEN

SIDEWALK

PARKING BIKE LANE

ROADWAY

BIKE PARKING LANE

SIDEWALK

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VILLAGE GREEN

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VILLAGE GREEN

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VILLAGE GREEN: ASPHALT OPTION

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RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT & SCHILLER PARK GATEWAY CONCORD PLACE

-Tree Lawns -More Street Trees -More Residential -More Green Transitions to the Park

REINHARD STREET

SCHILLER PARK

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RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT & SCHILLER PARK GATEWAY

CONCORD PLACE

-Asphalt Option

REINHARD STREET

SCHILLER PARK

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RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT & SCHILLER PARK GATEWAY

FRONT YARD

SIDEWALK

PARKING

BIKE LANE

ROADWAY

BIKE LANE

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PARKING

SIDEWALK

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RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT & SCHILLER PARK GATEWAY

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RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT & SCHILLER PARK GATEWAY: ASPHALT OPTION

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BUILD IT

STRATEGY

develop a that will enable the implementation of the streetscape to occur either as a single, large project; or as a series of smaller projects, over time, to respond to funding opportunities

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PHASING / BUDGETING

Survey

Geotechnical Investigation

Preliminary Engineering

This Traffic Corridor Study is the first part of an extensive design and documentation process that must be completed before any construction can actually begin. The next steps that must be budgeted for and executed are a survey and Preliminary Engineering. The Columbus Division of Transportation has indicated that the soft costs for this project should be in the range of 10% to 14% of the construction value; including survey, geotechnical investigations, preliminary and final engineering, and permits

Re-assess Budgets and Project Phasing

Final Engineering

This Traffic Corridor Study has been prepared using available base maps and record documents to determine the locations of utilities and other physical features This information is reasonably accurate; sufficient for a high level planning document such as this. An actual survey that includes topography, easements, underground and overhead utilities and all physical features must be procured before Preliminary Engineering can begin. Preliminary Engineering is a much more detailed design and engineering exercise. It will be valid to the extent that current, accurate survey information serves as the basis for those activities. The Preliminary Engineering will also require the collection and assessment of geotechnical information about the conditions of the existing soils and base materials. Preliminary engineering will address the corridor as a whole. Sufficient information will be developed during this phase of work to generate more detailed and precise estimates of probable construction costs. The potential phasing of the project can then be re-evaluated and fund-raising can be targeted to better-defined projects and capital costs. The Final Engineering can be performed for the entire corridor or broken down by phase.

Fund Raising

Fund Raising

Phase One Construction

Future Phased Construction

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Final Engineering

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Reinhard

Whittier

Kossuth

Frankfort

Sycamore

Beck

Livings

This page outlines a conventional phasing strategy that accomplishes complete sections of the Third Street corridor over time. A major benefit of this strategy is that the streetscape environment is completed, albeit in only a portion of the Third Street Corridor. This would demonstrate the benefits of the upgrades and potentially could enhance fund-raising efforts. Certain features of the proposed streetscape enhancements are challenging to implement in a piecemeal fashion: especially grading and utilities. There would likely be additional costs incurred to provide temporary transitions to fit the new systems into the existing conditions.

ton

PHASING / BUDGETING

These preliminary budgets are order-of-magnitude estimates of likely costs and are based on the limited information available at the time of this design study. The budgets are based on 2010 construction costs and include a modest design contingency. These budgets should be updated when Preliminary Engineering is conducted and actual survey information is available. The estimated probable cost of the construction for the Corridor will range between $7.8M and $10M. If the utilities are all buried underground and the street is rebuilt with brick, the overall cost will increase to $23.6M to $26.9M. The cost breakdown for this phasing strategy is as follows: Base Project With Upgrades Livingston Gateway $550,000 - $650,000 Livingston to Sycamore $2.5M to $3.2M $8.0M to $9.1M Sycamore to Kossuth $2.5M to $3.2M $8.0M to $9.1M Kossuth to Reinhard $2.1M to $2.7M $6.8M to $7.8M Reinhard Gateway $250,000 to $300,000

Livingston Gateway

Livingston Gateway to Sycamore Avenue

Sycamore Avenue to Kossuth Avenue

Third Street Streetscape Traffic Corridor Study 1.27.2010

Kossuth Avenue to Reinhard Gateway

Reinhard Gateway

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PHASING / BUDGETING Above Ground

This page and the subsequent diagrams outline a phased systems construction strategy that can be accomplished in smaller pieces, over time. This will allow progress to be made in achieving the vision with more modest fund-raising targets. Each phase of work indicated in this plan is described and budgeted as a complete project in itself. Phasing the work will require some duplication of efforts and temporary measures. If the project can be accomplished in fewer, larger phases, the costs, temporary measures and complexity of the process will be reduced.

Curbs

The gateway improvements are listed in this sequential phasing, but would be great stand-alone projects that would be strong physical manifestations of the vision and planning process for the Third Street Corridor. Early implementation of the recommended gateway improvements could continue the momentum generated by this planning process and build enthusiasm for the fund raising and completion of the Corridor Plan.

Sidewalks*

Roadway

Utilities

Gateways Below Ground

Planting

The cost range for each phase of work and any potential upgrades is indicated on each of the phase diagram sheets that follow.

Lighting Furnishings Signage *The decision for above ground vs below ground utilities shall be made prior to the Sidewalk Improvements Project to ensure that appropriate connections for buried utilities can be designed.

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CURBS DESCRIPTION The first phase of work will be replacement of the existing curbs with new stone curbs on both sides of Third Street for the entire corridor between East Livingston Avenue and Reinhard Avenue. The new stone curbs will be set at the same location and elevation as the existing curbs. A narrow strip of street pavement and sidewalk pavement on each side of the curb will need to be removed and replaced to enable the construction process. We recommend that when the street pavement is patched, the surface be sloped down towards the face of the curb to provide a consistent 4” to 6” exposed curb face. This will facilitate better drainage of the street pavement and re-establish a legitimate curb edge along Third Street until the street pavement can be replaced at some future date. • Stone curbs • Repair 18-inch width sidewalk • Repair 18-inch width pavement with asphalt • Salvage historic brick • Replace 50% curb inlets ASSUMPTIONS •All historic brick that is embedded within the existing street pavement in the affected area will need to be salvaged and stored for future use. •The new curb shall have downspout drain sleeves provided at appropriate locations to accommodate future sidewalk and drainage improvements. •The street drainage primarily occurs in curb inlet drainage structures. Any curb inlets that do not meet current City standards or that are in poor condition should be replaced and/or repaired at this time. Stone Curb

•Any conduit needed for future utility work should be placed beneath the new curbs at this time.

Adjacent Pavement

•New curbs shall extend around the radius at cross-street intersections. Drainage Sleeve

•Recently installed ADA wheelchair ramps will remain in place unless their location directly conflicts with future crosswalk locations. CONSTRUCTION BUDGET:

$800,000 - $1,000,000

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SIDEWALKS DESCRIPTION This phase of work centers on rebuilding the sidewalks on both sides of the street for the entire corridor between East Livingston Avenue and Reinhard Avenue. The existing sidewalks are approximately half brick and half concrete over the corridor. Most of the existing walks do not meet ADA because the surface is very uneven due to the pavement heaving from tree roots and poor base conditions. The existing sidewalk surface material and base will be removed. The subbase will be removed and/ or repaired where needed to correct the situation. All new or salvaged brick shall be placed on an asphalt setting bed over a concrete base. Existing tree and plant beds will be removed if they conflict with the new design. Where new plant beds surround existing trees to remain, edging, curbs or walls shall be completed per the design. • Re-use existing brick • All brick surface • Utility conduit placed • Some plant bed edging • Foundations for future structures, poles • Structural topsoil in plant beds ASSUMPTIONS •The type and pattern of existing brick sidewalks will be documented, for salvage and resetting in the same location. New Plant Bed

•Private and public utilities will have the opportunity to upgrade and repair their services while the sidewalk pavement is open. •Underground downspout connections will be provided between the curbs and the R.O.W. line.

Brick Pavement

•Conduit shall be placed for future underground electric, cable, telephone and other utilities that are currently overhead. •Private drive aprons shall be rebuilt with brick to fit within the re-graded sidewalk surface.

Downspout Connection

•Where existing trees are designated to remain, the plant beds shall be fully constructed, including structural topsoil, curbs and other edge treatments. •No new landscaping is included, except seeding of all new plant beds and tree lawns. CONSTRUCTION BUDGET: $3.5M - $3.8M

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OVERHEAD UTILITIES

Telecommunications

AEP

MELP

DESCRIPTION This phase of work focuses on reducing the visual impact of overhead utilities on both sides of the street for the entire corridor between East Livingston Avenue and Reinhard Avenue. Currently AEP has lines on one side of the street and Columbus Division of Power has lines on the opposite side of the street. Each utility serves mostly customers on the opposite side of the street from where their lines are located. There are approximately 70 occurrences of utility lines crossing this section of Third Street. The existing utility poles have numerous lines attached; some of which may be redundant or inactive. We recommend that the existing wooden utility poles be replaced with metal poles. The metal poles should be taller and hopefully fewer in number. All inactive, redundant lines shall be removed. The majority, if not all, of the cross wires shall be eliminated. • Replace wooden poles with high mast arm metal poles • Eliminate cross wires • Remove unneeded lines ASSUMPTIONS •The new metal utility poles will have no signs or light fixtures attached to them. •Overhead utility lines on cross streets that intersect Third Street are not included in this work. •Any street lights or signs currently mounted on utility poles will need to be relocated to dedicated posts. CONSTRUCTION BUDGET: $1.8M - $2.1M

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UNDERGROUND UTILITIES DESCRIPTION A potential upgrade to clean up the overhead utilities is to bury them. The existing overhead lines, located on both sides of Third Street, include AEP, Columbus Division of Power, AT&T, Sprint, WOW and other cable and telecommunications companies. Each private or public utility that is required to bury its lines must be reimbursed for the expense as part of the project costs. Existing utilities beneath the pavement reduce the available space for underground electric lines to a ten-foot strip adjacent to the curb on both sides of the street. Preliminary investigations indicate that the electric service may require the entire width, other utilities such as cable and telecommunications would need to be placed beneath the sidewalk pavement. This 10-foot wide parking aisle is where historic brick is buried beneath the asphalt pavement. Transformers that are currently mounted on utility poles will need to be located in underground vaults. The number of transformers should be able to be reduced, but these must be carefully located to reduce the visual impact. • Bury overhead utilities • Sub-grade vaults for transformers • Street repaired with asphalt • Sidewalk repaired with brick to match existing ASSUMPTIONS •The historic brick in the street pavement will be salvaged and stored for future use. •Overhead utility lines on cross streets will remain.

Underground Utilities

•The underground connections will go back to the nearest existing utility pole on cross streets and other perpendicular connections. Connection to Property

•Private property owners will likely be caused to move and/or upgrade their electric panels. CONSTRUCTION BUDGET: $13.8M - $15.8M

Underground Utilities

PROJECT UPGRADES •Repair street pavement with historic brick. Additional cost: $1.2M - $1.4M

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GATEWAYS DESCRIPTION The Plan calls for enhanced gateways at the intersections of Livingston Avenue and Reinhard Avenue to announce the entrance onto this important corridor. Brick pavement is to be provided in the intersections of Livingston Avenue and Reinhard Avenue with Third Street. Brick and stone piers are located on the north side of Livingston Avenue to frame that entrance. If the street pavement is surfaced in brick, we recommend that the brick pavement in these intersections be a different color and pattern to further distinguish the intersections. The mast arms at Livingston Avenue will be relocated into the curb extensions to maintain the appropriate relationship to the traffic lanes. Benches, planters and special planting will further enhance both of the gateways. •Livingston Avenue intersection •Reinhard intersection •Brick pavement in intersection, distinct color •Brick crosswalks •Relocate mast arms •Benches, planters, plantings •Brick piers at Livingston Avenue •Provide pedestrian signals ASSUMPTIONS •The curb extensions on Third Street at these intersections shall be constructed as part of this phase of work. •The Livingston Avenue gateway has been coordinated with current plans for the I-71/I-70 Improvements. Further coordination will be required as the highway plans advance and are implemented. •We recommend this work be deferred until the decision is made on whether or not to bury overhead utilities along the Third Street Corridor, but the gateways improvements could be completed as stand-alone projects at almost any point. •This budget assumes that the curbs, street improvements and overhead utility work have been completed in previous phases of work. CONSTRUCTION BUDGET:

Livingston Avenue Gateway $550,000 - $650,000

Reinhard Avenue Gateway $250,000 - $300,000

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PLANTINGS DESCRIPTION Plant street trees and other plant materials in plant beds and tree lawns. Plants will primarily consist of trees, low evergreen ground covers and some seasonal perennials that are tolerant of urban conditions such as drought, salt and alkaline soils. •Street Trees •Evergreen Groundcovers •Seasonal Perennials ASSUMPTIONS •Plant beds and tree lawns will have been constructed during the previous sidewalk phase. •Structural topsoil will have been provided during the previous sidewalk phase. •All new plants will be watered and maintained during the initial one-year period by the German Village Society and resident volunteers to provide consistent, timely maintenance and enhance the establishment of the plant materials. •All permanent planting in plant beds and tree lawns shall be installed as part of the planned streetscape improvements in accordance with the approved design. CONSTRUCTION BUDGET: $275,000 - $350,000

Street Tree Planting Bed

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LIGHTING DESCRIPTION Replace existing street lights with a combination of new pedestrian and street lights. The existing City of Columbus standard light fixtures are very compatible with the historic setting of German Village and are recommended for the Third Street corridor. The Plan calls for taller street light fixtures on one side of the street and shorter pedestrian scale pole lights on the opposite side of the street. We recommend the corridor be evaluated to ascertain if pedestrian scale pole lights on both sides of the street will provide adequate light levels. If pedestrian scale lights provide adequate lights; these should be provided instead of standard street lights as an upgrade to the project. •Street lights •Pedestrian light poles

Pedestrian Light

ASSUMPTIONS •New lights shall be connected and powered via underground lines installed in conduit. •The conduit was previously installed in the sidewalk phase of work. •All existing light poles and foundations shall be removed as part of this work. •Foundations for new light poles have been constructed during the sidewalk phase of work. CONSTRUCTION BUDGET: $750,000- $850,000

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FURNISHINGS DESCRIPTION Provide comprehensive streetscape furnishings including seating, bike racks, kiosks, transit shelters, news corrals, waste and recycling containers, and planters. The furnishings will help to further define the special environment of German Village. •Seating •Bike Racks •Kiosks •Transit Shelters •News Corrals •Waste and Recycling Containers •Planters ASSUMPTIONS •All needed electrical conduit will be installed during the sidewalk phase of work. •All needed foundations will be installed during the sidewalk phase of work. •All furnishings will be bolted down to the concrete sub-base and will not require an additional foundation (except transit shelters). CONSTRUCTION BUDGET: $150,000 - $200,000 Bike Rack

Planter Bench

Litter Receptacle

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SIGNAGE DESCRIPTION Provide comprehensive streetscape signage including informational and historical signage, seasonal banners, directional signs, and regulatory signs. The signage will help to further define the historic legacy of German Village while providing direction to both pedestrian and vehicular traffic. •Historical Signs •Seasonal Banners (to be placed atop pedestrian light poles) •Directional Signs •Regulatory Signs

Informational Sign

ASSUMPTIONS •All signs will be core drilled through concrete sub-base and set within aggregate sub-grade below the sidewalk. No further foundations will need to be poured.

Banner

Directional / Regulatory Sign

•Signs will not be illuminated and therefore not require conduit to be run prior to completing the sidewalk phase of work. CONSTRUCTION BUDGET: $80,000 - $120,000

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ROADWAY DESCRIPTION Build new curb extensions and patch existing pavement as needed on Third Street with a surface of asphalt. The brick that currently exists within the pavement profile in the curb extension areas will be salvaged and stored for future use. The existing subbase and base materials may be replaced or repaired as needed to provide for sound construction. Curb extensions shall be provided at designated intersections to slow traffic and enhance pedestrian safety. The curb extensions will require that some catch basins be added or relocated to preserve and enhance the drainage patterns. • Provide curb extensions • Stripe in bike lanes on existing pavement and when construction occurs ASSUMPTIONS • Any remaining historic brick in the street pavement will be salvaged and cleaned for re-use. • Private and public utilities will upgrade and/or repair any utilities in need of attention while the street pavement is open. • The gateway improvements are not included as part of the basic work of this phase. • Existing mast arms will be relocated at the Whittier Street intersection. • Assume 20% of subbase will need to be removed and replaced. CONSTRUCTION BUDGET: $475,000 - $600,000 POTENTIAL UPGRADES • Construct the street surface with salvaged historic brick. The quantity available may need to be supplemented. Additional Cost: $3,800,000 - $4,200,000

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FUNDING SOURCES

Third Street is a significant streetscape project; it will be complex, expensive and will require a joint public and private effort to come to fruition. The City of Columbus Public Utilities Department has indicated that certain upgrades desired by the local community, such as brick pavement and burial of utilities are beyond the normal scope of improvements funded by the City. These upgrades must be paid for with private funds, grants and other sources of financing outside of the Columbus capital budget.

Columbus Capital Funds

Fund raising will be significant task in the implementation of the Third Street Corridor Plan. The funding needed to complete the engineering and construction of the recommendations will likely come from a number of sources, both public and private. The Implementation Strategy has been devised to respond to the potential funding and enables the construction to progress in smaller, incremental steps. The Preliminary Engineering process should address the corridor as a whole: many of the streetscape components are systemic features that span the length of the corridor and greatly impact one another.

Private Donations

Grants

Preliminary Engineering Final Engineering

This section provides a summary of potential funding sources that may be possible for the Implementation of the Third Street Corridor improvements. Some of the grants and other sources identified apply to the design and engineering process; others are targeted towards actual capital expenditures.

Phased Construction

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In this country’s bicentennial year, German Village and many other historic centers, were fortunate enough to take advantage of preservation funding made available by the Historic Preservation Act of 1966 and the excitement of the bicentennial celebrations. Almost four decades later, the fruits of those investments are apparent as the concepts touted by the HPA of 1966 have become more mainstream. For those who have been proponents of recycling and restoring our built environment, each project that brings a few more people to the reality of preserving our history is a milestone worth marking. However, the ways of “doing business” have changed. Clearly, the voice of the United States government echoes these sentiments in unique programs like the Save America’s Treasures and Preserve America programs. Not every grass roots effort can meet the criteria for these programs. Raising funds to continue the good work is a continuous struggle. The included information is a condensed version of research toward that end. The granting and financing opportunities that are listed herein represent the beginning of a concentrated effort to secure funding for preservation programs for Third Street and for German Village. It should be understood that most major projects cannot be funded by grants alone. Most projects require a good sound base of support that includes volunteers, staffers, private and public funding, grants, loans, community fund-raising events, and generally good fund-raising counsel. And there is one more thing… …effort. The information included herein is divided into three categories – State Programs, Non-Profit Programs, and Corporate and Family Foundation Programs. Each program is noted with its application date or the cycle on which it is reviewed or awarded. The grant amounts are listed, if they are fixed, with the contact information, the match amounts and the eligibility restrictions. It is important to note that the eligibility restrictions do not always eliminate possibilities. With creative counsel and open-minded trustees, often public and private partnerships can be established which expand the opportunities. One significant piece of information listed herein is the DESCRIPTION. The descriptions often address the goals or the mission of the agency or of the particular fund. If the goal of the particular project accurately addresses the goals of the fund or funding agency, the chances are greatly increased for an award. To be quite pointed, in the past, there was an expectation of cash falling from the sky just because it is a “great project”. Reality will demonstrate that the organizations who are the most successful at receiving grants are those who are not afraid to 1) ask, 2) do homework, 3) work collaboratively, 4) expect restrictions, and 5) be patient. It is important to note as well, groups who work closely with the agency are more likely to understand the shared goals. What is it that makes this project worth funding?

FINDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR GERMAN VILLAGE SOCIETY AND CITY OF COLUMBUS ORGANIZATION/GRANT PROGRAM

APPLICATION DATES

DESCRIPTION

GRANT AMOUNT

MATCH

ELIGIBILITY

CONTACT

STATE PROGRAMS

Ohio Historical Society/Ohio Historic Preservation Office Certified Local Governments CFDA Projects to develop comprehensive plans for the preservation of #15.904 historic, architectural, and archaeological resources, to survey and/or nominate properties to the NRHP, to develop master plans and/or feasibility studies for NRHP properties, to acquire and to develop properties listed on the NRHP, and conduct public education June 1, 2010 programs related to historic preservation.

Ohio General Assembly State Capital Appropriations Bill

Ohio Department of Development Economic Development Program

Biennial state capital appropriations bill funds acquisitions, rehabilitation, restoration, and exhibit curation for local historical Talk to your organization improvement projects sponsored by state legislators. Bill legislator by enacted spring of even numbered years. Funded projects are summer of odd administered by the Ohio Cultural Facilities Commission. Although numbered years. there is not a formal application process, the commission offers (Capital Bill guidance on how to pursue funding on its web site: enacted spring www.culture.ohio.gov of even numbered years.)

$5,000 minimum request. Grants typically $9,000 to $15,000

CLG

State Senator or Representative from your district. www.ohio.gov

Varies

Provides funds to units of local government to provide gap financing for local business development. Except for local infrastructure needs, Economic Development Program funds are repaid to the local community's Revolving Loan Fund to provide funding for additional Open Window business assistance activities. Cycle

Microenterprise Business Development Program

60 / 40

Grants Manager Ohio Historic Preservation Office Ohio Historical Society 567 E. Hudson Street Columbus, OH 43211-1030 (614) 298-2000 (614) 298-2037 (Fax) www.ohiohistory.org/resource/histpres ohpo@ohiohistory.org

Provides grants to eligible cities and counties and non-profit organizations to assist in the development of local microenterprise businesses and to create and retain long-term jobs in the private sector. Microenterprises are defined as for-profit entities with five or fewer employees, one of whom owns the business. FY 2010: August 6, 2010

None

LG

Office of Housing and Community Partnerships Economic and Community Development Ohio Dept. of Development 77 S. High Street Columbus, OH 43216 (614) 466-2285 www.odod.state.oh.us

Office of Housing and Community Partnerships Economic & Community Development Ohio Dept. of Development 77 S. High Street Columbus, OH 43216 (614) 466-2285 LG, NP, NPO www.odod.state.oh.us

Ohio Department of Natural Resources Chambers, Murphy & Burge copyright 2010

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES‐‐THIRD STREET CORRIDOR‐‐KKG

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FINDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR GERMAN VILLAGE SOCIETY AND CITY OF COLUMBUS ORGANIZATION/GRANT PROGRAM

APPLICATION DATES

Natureworks February 1, 2010 Yearly Cycle

DESCRIPTION

GRANT AMOUNT

MATCH

ELIGIBILITY

Nature Works provides up to 75% state reimbursement funds for acquisitions, development or rehabilitation of public park and recreation areas. 75/25

LG, PD, CD

Ohio Department of Transportation Transportation Enhancement Program

The Federal Highway Administration's Transportation Enhancement Program provides funds for projects that enhance the transportation Solicitations experience by improving the cultural, historic, aesthetic and environmental aspects of transportation infrastructure. Each state begin January 1 Yearly decides how to use it's enhancement funds. In Ohio, funds are split Cycle; Letter of between Ohio's 17 MPOs and the rest of the state. MPO and Interest due to statewide funds are distributed competitively. Funds can be used for District office construction or major rehabilitation only. February 1 Yearly Cycle

National Scenic Byways

April (Applications available in February)

Ohio Arts Council (OAC) Capacity Building

Ongoing

The National Scenic Byways Program provides technical and financial assistance to help preserve America's scenic roads and promote tourism and economic development. The National Scenic Byways Discretionary Grants program provides funding for byway-related projects each year, as part of the Federal Highway Administration's Discretionary Grants Program. Projects to support and enhance National Scenic Byways, All-American Roads and State-designated byways are eligible. Applications are prepared online but submitted through the State's byway program agency.

Capacity building funds are designed to strengthen Ohio's non-profit arts and cultural sector by helping applicants improve internal governance and leadership, cultivate strategic community linkages, and develop financial and human resources for long-term stability. Building organizational capacity is a long-term, evolutionary process that organizations must engage in purposefully. The program provides funding for work in three areas of capacity: Organizational Governance and Leadership, Strategic Community Linkages and Assets and Resources Development.

Typical: $500,000 to 80/20 $1,000,000, cash only No Max

Varies

GE, MPD

CONTACT Mary Fitch ODNR, Real Estate & Land Management 2045 Morse Road, Bldg. C-4 Columbus, OH 43229-6693 (614) 265-6477 mary.fitch@dnr.state.oh.us Randy Lane, Program Manager Ohio Dept. of Transportation Office of Local Projects 1980 W. Broad St., 2nd Floor Columbus, OH 43223 (614) 644-8211 www.dot.state.oh.us/local

Paul Staley Ohio Department of Transportation Central Office 1980 West Broad Street Columbus, OH 43223 (614) 728-5078

80/20

Ohio Arts Council 727 E. Main St. Columbus, OH 43205-1796 (614) 466-2613 www.oac.state.oh.us $500 to $5,000

50/50

CAC, CE, LI, NPO

Ohio Humanities Council (OHC)

Chambers, Murphy & Burge copyright 2010

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES‐‐THIRD STREET CORRIDOR‐‐KKG

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FINDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR GERMAN VILLAGE SOCIETY AND CITY OF COLUMBUS ORGANIZATION/GRANT PROGRAM

APPLICATION DATES

Major Grants

February 1 September 1 (Proposals considered twice a year.)

Regular Grants

DESCRIPTION

GRANT AMOUNT

MATCH

ELIGIBILITY

Humanities must be the central focus. Best suited for projects with regional or statewide impact; those which attract large & diverse audiences, humanities institutes for teachers or professionals, film/video documentaries and media projects. $5,001$20,000

50/50

NP

Short term projects of limited scope; one component of a larger project which receives funding from several sources, lectures for special occasions, panel discussion, and other singe-site programs. First business day of each month (minimum 8 weeks prior to project start).

Mini-Grant Applications accepted yearround (minimum of 5 weeks prior to project start).

$2,001$5,000

50/50

NP

Short term projects of limited scope; one component of a larger project which receives funding from several sources, lectures for special occasions, panel discussion, and other singe-site programs.

Up to $2,000

50/50

NP

CONTACT Jack Shortlidge Ohio Humanities Council 471 E. Broad Street, Suite 1620 Columbus, OH 43215-3857 (614) 461-7802 (800) 293-9774 (614) 461-4651 (Fax) www.ohiohumanities.org

Frank Dunkle or Jack Shortlidge Ohio Humanities Council 471 E. Broad Street, Suite 1620 Columbus, OH 43215-3857 (614) 461-7802 (800) 293-9774 (614) 461-4651 (Fax) www.ohiohumanities.org

Frank Dunkle Ohio Humanities Council 471 E. Broad Street, Suite 1620 Columbus, OH 43215-3857 (614) 461-7802 (800) 293-9774 (614) 461-4651 (Fax) www.ohiohumanities.org

NON-PROFIT PROGRAMS Heritage Ohio Ohio Main Street Program

A program of professional advice and guidance in the use of the proven Main Street Four-Point Approach to start or strengthen revitalization efforts. 1. Call for Application Workshop 2. Letter of Intent

Chambers, Murphy & Burge copyright 2010

noncash technical assistance

LG

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES‐‐THIRD STREET CORRIDOR‐‐KKG

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Heritage Ohio 846 1/2 East Main Street Columbus, OH 43205 (614) 258-6200 www.heritageohio.org

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APPLICATION DATES

National Trust for Historic Preservation Joanna Favrot Fund

February 1, 2010

Provides nonprofit organizations and public agencies grants for projects that contribute to the preservation or the recapture of an authentic sense of place. Individuals and for-profit businesses may apply only if the project for which funding is requested involves a National Historic Landmark. Funds may be used for professional advice, conferences, workshops and education programs.

February 1, June 1 and October 1

Established by the Jeffris Family Foundation to support important historic preservation projects in the states of Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri and Ohio. Applicants must be able to demonstrate the viability of their project through the submittal of early planning studies, and must be ready for the preparation of a Historic Structure Report or other advanced planning studies, leading toward a community-centered capital fund drive.

Jeffris Heartland Fund

National Trust Preservation Funds

DESCRIPTION

February 1, June 1 and October 1 (Contract the NTHP Regional Office prior to submitting application).

National Trust Community Investment Corporation (NTCIC) N/A

GRANT AMOUNT

$2,500 $10,000

MATCH

50/50 Cash only

$5,000 $50,000

National Trust Preservation Funds provide two types of assistance to nonprofit organizations and public agencies: 1) matching grants for preservation planning and educational efforts, and Matching 2) intervention funds for preservation emergencies. Matching grant grants funds may be used to obtain professional expertise in areas such as are $500 architecture, archeology, engineering, preservation planning, land-use $5,000 planning, fund raising, organizational development and law as well as to provide preservation education activities to educate the public. The NTCIC makes equity investments in real estate projects that qualify for federal historic rehabilitation tax credits and when available, state historic tax credits and New Markets Tax Credits. NTCIC works with a wide variety of property owners including for-profit developers, non-profit organizations and local governments. Our focus is on projects that have a strong economic revitalization impact on the surrounding community. The timing of the equity contributions is flexible and negotiable. Frequently used pay-in benchmarks include admission to the LLC, placement in-service, Part 3 approval, and project stabilization.

ELIGIBILITY

NP, GE

NP, LG

50/50 Cash only

N/A

CONTACT

National Trust for Historic Preservation Midwest Regional Office 53 W. Jackson Blvd., Suite 350 Chicago, IL 60604 (312)-939-5547 mwro@nthp.org

Koren Vanzo, Program Assistant National Trust for Historic Preservation Midwest Regional Office 53 W. Jackson Blvd., Suite 350 Chicago, IL 60604 (312)-939-5547 mwro@nthp.org

National Trust for Historic Preservation Midwest Regional Office 53 W. Jackson Blvd., Suite 350 NP, LG, CDC, Chicago, IL 60604 (312) 939-5547 CE mwro@nthp.org

National Trust Community Investment Corporation 1785 Massachusetts Ave., NW Washington, DC 20036 (202) 588-6001 NP, LG, CDC, (202) 588-6436 (Fax) CE ntcicfunds.com ntcic_mail@ntcicfunds.com

National Park Service - Department of the Interior

Chambers, Murphy & Burge copyright 2010

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES‐‐THIRD STREET CORRIDOR‐‐KKG

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FINDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR GERMAN VILLAGE SOCIETY AND CITY OF COLUMBUS ORGANIZATION/GRANT PROGRAM

APPLICATION DATES

Preserve America Most recent: Application deadline February 12, 2010

National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Challenge Grant CFDA # 45.130

May 5, 2010

DESCRIPTION The Preserve America matching-grant program provides funding to designated Preserve America Communities to support preservation efforts through heritage tourism, education and historic preservation planning. NOTE: Designated Preserve America communities, neighborhoods, SHPOs, THPOs, CLGs that have applied for PA status

GRANT AMOUNT

$20,000 $250,00

NEH challenge grants help institutions and organizations secure longterm improvements in and support for their humanities programs and resources. Awards are made to museums, public libraries, colleges, research institutions, historical societies and historic sites, public television and radio stations, universities, scholarly associations, state $30,000 humanities councils, and other nonprofit entities. Where clearly $1,000,000 related to the humanities, direct expenditures from Challenge Grant awards are allowable for items that have inherent longevity such as renovation of facilities.

MATCH

50/50

ELIGIBILITY

See note in description

CONTACT Heritage Preservation Grants National Park Service 1201 Eye Street NW (2256) Washington, DC 20005 (202) 354-2020 www.preserveamerica.gov

Office of Challenge Grants National Endowment for the Humanities Room 420 1100 Pennsylvania Avenue N.W. Washington, DC 20506 (202) 606-8309 www.neh.gov challenge@neh.gov

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CORPORATE and FAMILY FOUNDATION PROGRAMS

Corporate Grant Programs American Electric Power (AEP)

N/A

The Eaton Charitable Fund

N/A

Chambers, Murphy & Burge copyright 2010

AEP Sponsors special programs to encourage economic development, education, the environment, hunger, housing, health, and safety within its traditional service territory. Priority is based on the perceived overall benefit to the community in Arkansas, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia. The highest priority is local organizations that serve the needs of Eaton employees and offers to them the opportunity to provide leadership, voluntary services, and personal financial support. Program support and capital grants are given to health, human services, civic, and cultural organizations. Support to educational institutions is given but the trust has a preference for engineering, scientific, technological and business-related projects. The fund also has expressed interest in arts and cultural programs, higher education, children and youth services, family services, community development, neighborhood development, and economic development. Eaton lends it support through general or operating funds, capital campaigns, building/ renovation, program development, employee matching gifts and in-kind gifts.

NP

Varies

NP

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES‐‐THIRD STREET CORRIDOR‐‐KKG

Third Street Streetscape Traffic Corridor Study 1.27.2010

Varies

Deffers by State… Ohio Contact Info: AEP Ohio 850 Tech Center Drive Gahanna, OH 43230 http://www.aep.com/citizenship/comm unity/corpGive/ Eaton Charitable Fund Eaton Center 1111 Superior Avenue Cleveland, OH 44114-2584 216/523-4944 http://www.eaton.com/ecm/groups/pu blic/@pub/@eaton/@corp/documents/ content/ct_242488.pdf

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FINDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR GERMAN VILLAGE SOCIETY AND CITY OF COLUMBUS ORGANIZATION/GRANT PROGRAM

APPLICATION DATES

JP Morgan Chase

DESCRIPTION

Coporate and Family Foundations Duke Energy Foundation Applications for following year reviewed middle of current year

Surdna

Varies

Varies

The Nationwide Foundation makes operating, project and capital grants. Capital grants are limited and considered on a case-by-case basis. In order of emphasis, Nationwide supports efforts that meet: Sept. 1, 2010 emergency and basic needs, stabilization needs, individual (Application not development needs, and community enrichment needs (such as arts available until and culture organizations, higher education and civic improvement). May 2010)

CONTACT

NP (with additional restrictions)

Deffers... Central Ohio Contact Info: Jeffrey Lyttle P.O. Box 710157 Columbus, OH 43271-0157 jeffrey.r.lyttle@chase.com Questions regarding Cybergrants / application process, please e-mail damion.d.heron@chase.com http://www.jpmorganchase.com/corpo rate/Corporate-responsibility/ corporate-responsibility.htm

NP, GE

Lisa Teasdell Duke Energy Foundation Manager Lisa.Teasdell@duke-energy.com MUST APPLY ONLINE http://www.duke-energy.com/ community/foundation.asp

MUST APPLY ONLINE http://www.nationwide.com/aboutus/nationwide-foundation.jsp Varies

NP

(212) 557-0010 questions@surdna.org MUST APPLY ONLINE http://www.surdna.org Varies

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES‐‐THIRD STREET CORRIDOR‐‐KKG

Third Street Streetscape Traffic Corridor Study 1.27.2010

ELIGIBILITY

The Duke Energy Foundation seeks to improve the quality of life in its community through the areas of environment, economic development and community vitality.

The Surdna Foundation makes grants to nonprofit organizations in the areas of environment, community revitalization, effective citizenry, Review in Feb, the arts, and the nonprofit sector. May, & Sept. Submit 3 to 4 months prior to desired review

Chambers, Murphy & Burge copyright 2010

MATCH

JP Morgan Chase awards funding in the following areas: community asset development, youth education and community life.

N/A

Nationwide Foundation

GRANT AMOUNT

NP, 501(c)(4)

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WHAT ARE THE NEXT STEPS

Publicize the plan (all) Conduct preliminary engineering (City) Capital budgeting (City) Assign fund raising tasks (GVS) Prepare grant applications (GVS) Final design and engineering (City) Phase Construction Third Street Streetscape Traffic Corridor Study 1.27.2010

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APPENDIX COMPOSITE PLAN HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPHY EARLY CONCEPTS & STUDIES PRIVATE DEVELOPMENT RECOMMENDATIONS

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1.27.2010

Third Street Streetscape Traffic Corridor Study REINHARD AVENUE

LANSING STREET

WHITTIER STREET

LANSING STREET

KOSSUTH STREET

COLUMBUS STREET

COLUMBUS STREET

FRANKFORT STREET

SYCAMORE STREET

WILLOW STREET

AVEN UE

BECK STREET

HOSTER STREET

BLENKNER STREET

LIVING STON

COMPOSITE PLAN

85


HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPHY

475 S Third

LIVINGSTON

479 S Third

1975

480 S Third

492 S Third

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HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPHY

541 S Third

571 S Third

1880’s 1990

1963 624 S Third

BECK

595 S Third 1960’s

Third Street Streetscape Traffic Corridor Study 1.27.2010

1960’s

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HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPHY

627 S Third

631 S Third

1961

650 S Third

664 S Third

RE

SYCAMO

1890

1912

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HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPHY

769 S Third

793 S Third

858 S Third

911 S Third

KOSSUTH

R

WHIT TIE

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Concept 1: LIVINGSTON

AVENUE

BLENKNER

STREET

HOSTER

STREET

BECK

STREET

Concept 3:

Concept 2: LIVINGSTON

• Minimalist approach • Mixture of brick and concrete sidewalks • Curb extensions • Striped crosswalks • Flush brick intersection at Reinhard Avenue • Variety of street tree planting treatments

LIVINGSTON

AVENUE

BLENKNER

STREET

HOSTER

STREET

BECK

STREET

• Brick “threshold” at Livingston Avenue • Brick sidewalks • Striped crosswalks • Consistent street width • Uniform street tree planting

FRANKFORT

AVENUE

BLENKNER

STREET

HOSTER

STREET

BECK

STREET

• Brick sidewalks • Curb extensions • Gateway crosses Livingston • Flush brick intersections at Livingston, Whittier and Reinhard • Raised brick intersections at Blenkner, Sycamore and Frankfort • Striped crosswalks at all other intersections • Landscape reflects different districts

STREET

STREET

WILLOW

STREET

WILLOW

STREET

SYCAMORE

STREET

SYCAMORE

STREET

SYCAMORE

STREET

COMMERCIAL DISTRICT

WILLOW

COLUMBUS

STREET

COLUMBUS

COLUMBUS

STREET

STREET

STIMMEL

STREET

FRANKFORT

STREET

FRANKFORT

STREET

FRANKFORT

STREET

COLUMBUS

STREET

COLUMBUS

STREET

COLUMBUS

STREET

KOSSUTH

STREET

KOSSUTH

STREET

KOSSUTH

STREET

LANSING

STREET

LANSING

STREET

LANSING

STREET

KOSSUTH

LANSING

STREET

KOSSUTH

STREET

LANSING

STREET

STREET

WHITTIER

STREET

WHITTIER

STREET

WHITTIER

STREET

CONCORD

PLACE

CONCORD

PLACE

CONCORD

PLACE

REINHARD

AVENUE

REINHARD

Concept 1: Eclectic Concept 1: Concept 1: Eclectic

L I VThird I N G Street S T O NStreetscape A V E N U -E Traffic Corridor Study

REINHARD

AVENUE

Concept 2: Uniformity Concept 2:

Concept 2: Uniformity

• Minimalist approach • Mixture of brick and concrete sidewalks • Curb extensions • Striped crosswalks B L E N K N E R S T R E E T • Flush brick intersection at Reinhard Avenue • Variety of street tree planting treatments HOSTER STREET

BECK

STREET

L I V IThird N G S Street T O N Streetscape A V E N U E- Traffic Corridor Study

HOSTER

STREET

B E C K S T R E E T Traffic Corridor Study Third Street Streetscape

1.27.2010

FRANKFORT

STREET

STREET

LANSING

STREET

AVENUE

Concept 3: Districts Concept 3:

Concept 3: Districts

• Brick “threshold” at Livingston Avenue • Brick sidewalks • Striped crosswalks BLENKNER STREET • Consistent street width • Uniform street tree planting

KOSSUTH

RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT

STIMMEL

COMMERCIAL DISTRICT

STREET

VILLAGE GREEN

STIMMEL

STREET

Third Street Streetscape - Traffic Corridor Study

• Brick sidewalks • Curb extensions • Gateway crosses Livingston • Flush brick intersections at Livingston, Whittier and Reinhard • Raised brick intersections at Blenkner, Sycamore and Frankfort • Striped crosswalks at all other intersections • Landscape reflects different districts 90


46’ 4’ 10’ 10’ 4’ 9’

THIRD STREET

46’ 14’

9’

14’

Parking

Drive Lane

9’

9’

Parking

Drive Lane Parking

Bike

Drive Lane

Drive Parking Lane Bike

Detectable warning pavers, typ.

THIRD STREET

THIRD STREET

Striped crosswalk, typ.

5’

9’

9’

Concrete band, typ. Brick paved crosswalk, typ. Curb extension, typ. Detectable warning pavers, typ.

Flush Intersection w/ Brick Intersection Studies

Bike

Drive Lane

Parking

9’

10’

Parking

Drive Lane

Bike

46’ 8’ Median

10’ Drive Lane

9’ Parking

Curb extension, typ. Detectable warning pavers, typ.

9’

Flush Intersection with Paved Crosswalks

5’

Drive Lane

46’ 10’ 4’ 9’

Concrete band, typ. Brick paved crosswalk, typ.

THIRD STREET 5’

Brick paved intersection

Parking

THIRD STREET

Flush Intersection w/ Striped Crosswalks

4’ 10’

9’

5’

Curb extension, typ. Detectable warning pavers, typ.

Designated Bike Lanes

Existing Conditions

Existing Condition

10’ Wide slope transition 6’ Wide slope transition

Brick paved intersection

Channelized Intersection

Curb Extensions

9’

10’

46’ 8’

10’

9’

Parking

Drive Lane

Turn Lane

Drive Lane

Parking

9’

10’

49’ 13’

Parking

Drive Lane

Drive Lane

17’ Parking

Concrete band, typ. Brick paved crosswalk, typ. Curb extension, typ. Detectable warning pavers, typ.

9’

Raised Intersection with Brick

Third Street Streetscape - Traffic Corridor Study Early Intersection Studies

Turn Lane / Flush Median

Third Street Streetscape - Traffic Corridor Study Early Traffic Calming Studies

Traffic Calming Studies

Third Street Streetscape Traffic Corridor Study 1.27.2010

Back In Parking

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PRIVATE DEVELOPMENT

•Stone or terra cotta planters •Stone or terra cotta planters General characteristics of the private development

maintain building frontage line with wrought iron fencing,

hedge row and landscaping

express owner’s individuality in front yard gardens

stone or terra cotta planters

Private Development

Third Street Streetscape - Traffic Corridor Study

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German Village 3rd Street Corridor Study