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Proud To Be German-American Stolz Deutsch-Amerikaner Zu Sein Visit us at www.DANK.org

Volume 62 Number 3

Lake Constance - Bodensee

JUNE/JULY 2014


Proud to be German-American. Stolz Deutsch-Amerikaner Zu Sein.

Happy 4th of July!

Photo Credit: Elizabeth Gibson


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Contents Of This Issue 4

From the President’s Desk by Beverly Pochatko

5

Remembering World War I

6

New rules on German citizenship

7

German American Friendship Garden

8

Chapter Chatter

15

Julius Berndt

16

Office Update

17

Anja Niedringhaus

18

Germany's Window Boxes

22

Kurznachrichten

23

Schauffhausen

26

Aus Oma's Küche

27

Calendar of Events

29

The wild horses of Dülmen

30

Odds & Ends

35

Donations

38

Kinderecke

Editorial Staff Beverly Pochatko Eve Timmerhaus Eva Timmerhaus Correspondents Anne Marie Fuhrig Christa Garcia Francine McKenna Desktop Publishing and Design Eve Timmerhaus Advertising and Classifieds Eve Timmerhaus

General Information

German American Journal -ISSN 1086-8070 is published bimonthly and is the official publication of the German American National Congress. Periodicals postage paid at Chicago IL and additional mailing offices.

POSTMASTER” Send address changes to: German-American Journal 4740 N. Western Avenue Suite 206 Chicago IL. 60625-2013 Annual Subscription Rate $15.00 www.dank.org/news.html

DANK does not warrant or assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any information published herein. DANK preserves the right to change or amend submissions for any reason without prior notice.


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From The President’s Desk Beverly Pochatko, National President

Liebe Mitglieder und Freunde, Dear members and friends of DANK, How I love this time of the year! Everything is still fresh and green and the hint of the hot summer days to come is just that! June and July are patriotic months…Flag Day June 14th, then Independence Day (July 4th), not to mention Father’s Day – which should be considered patriotic as many of our fathers and young men during the wars were either drafted or volunteered to serve for their country. Today, we even have young women and mothers who proudly serve for their country. We should be thankful to those men (and women) who serve the fight for freedom in other lands, many of whom return suffering from different types of injuries and battle fatigue. To all our military personnel, THANK YOU for believing in freedom for all! God Bless America and all our soldiers! Great things are on the horizon! Our Summer Membership Drive has begun with special dues rates! Join any time now between June 1st and October for a pro-rated fee of $20 for 2014. Dues for 2015 will be billed in November at full price ($40). Fundraising is important and we have worked so that everyone is a winner! It all goes back to remembering, “Together, we can accomplish great things”! Our only fund raiser of the year, the DANK Raffle has an early bird drawing on July 3rd and grand prize finale drawing on November 7th! Best of all, every chapter can benefit by selling tickets! Additional tickets are available by calling the office (888-USA-DANK). The Chapters are revving up for their summer picnics, festivals, parades etc. Be sure that you are one of the ‘gang’. If you can’t physically work, there are many jobs that you can help with – stuffing envelopes, etc. Just ask…remember “many hands make the work lighter!” The Executive Board and our Committees work together as a great team! They have come up with innovative ideas and a fresh perspective on what it means to be a member of DANK.” The fact that we are now ready to celebrate our 55th year of serving our members of German and German American heritage means that we are able to keep the flame of pride glowing! Have a great summer and I hope to see you at the Milwaukee German Fest!

DANK seeks to bring together Americans of German descent in the pursuit of cultivating and presenting their heritage and interests on local, regional and national levels. These were the primary reasons that the German American National Congress was founded in 1959 and they are still among the organization’s primary objectives today.

DANK National Executive Board President: Beverly Pochatko Vice President : Ronald Kabitzke Erik Wittmann Treasurer: Bob Miske Secretary: Esther Markwart Membership: Erik Wittmann DANK National Executive Office 4740 N. Western Avenue Chicago IL. 60625-2013 Phone: (773) 275-1100 Toll Free: 1-888-USA-DANK Office Hours: 9 am - 4 pm Monday, Wednesday-Friday Office Staff Eva Timmerhaus Eve Timmerhaus


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Remembering World War I By Don Heinrich Tolzmann

This year marks the centennial of the outbreak of World War I. It lasted four years, from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918, costing a total of nine million lives. What caused it? Article 231 of the Treaty of Versailles, the War Guilt Clause, gave the answer of the victors. It stipulated that the war had been “imposed upon them by the aggression of Germany and her allies.” However, rather than actually revealing the cause of the war, Article 231 only documented the vengefulness of a treaty dictated to the losers. H.L. Mencken wrote: “The appearance of a new national in the first rank causes painful concern among those already there, and history shows that efforts are always made to put it down.” He saw the arrival of Germany on the world’s stage as “the principal cause of World War I.” For Europe the status quo had been a Germany consisting of a countless number of states, which had been the cause since the Thirty Years War (1618-48). Central Europe, which means the German states, often because the battlefield for wars, especially in the Napoleonic era. Alliances could conveniently be made with one or the other German state against the other, usually against Prussia or Austria. Everything changed in 1870 with the unification of Germany under the leadership of Otto von Bismarck. Now there was a united nation-state in central Europe, a factor that clearly upset a century-old status quo of a weak and divided Germany. At the outbreak of World War I, Kaiser Wilhelm prophetically said: “The world will be engulfed in the most terrible of wars, the ultimate aim of which is the ruin of Germany.” Each member of the Triple Entente had something to gain by war. France wanted the ethnic German province of Alsace-Lorraine, which Germany had annexed in 1870. Since the thirty Years War, French foreign policy aimed at a border on the Rhine, which meant acquisition of the province, something it gradually acquired and maintained until Germany was united. Not surprisingly, its military plan called for marching through Alsace-Lorraine on the way to Berlin. Britain could not accept the possibility of Germany as the major power on the continent, something that has held true up to the recent unification of Germany, when Margaret Thatcher’s objections became known. Beyond Europe it could not accept Germany becoming a world

power with a world-class navy as well. Since the 18th century the popular song “Rule Brittania” echoed Great Britain’s view of itself as a reigning supreme above all on the ocean. It was unthinkable that an upstart like Germany should seek its “Place under the sun.” Russia for its part considered itself the guardian of Slavic peoples, something that it brought it to loggerheads with Austria-Hungary, a multi-ethnic state with Slavic populations. In the ensuing conflict it sought to ensure its pan-Slavic vision. The opportunity came on 28 June 1914, when a Serbian radical assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the heir to the throne of Austria-Hungary. This would be comparable today to the assassination of the U.S. VicePresident. This didn’t provide the spark that ignited the war, but rather the pretext of war. The assassination caused Austria-Hungary to issue an ultimatum to Serbian, which it refused to fully accept. Germany of course supported its ally. Russia, goaded on by France proceeded to mobilize its army against Austria-Hungary, setting the machinery in motion for the European powers to become engaged by means of treaty obligations. Regarding Austria-Hungary’s ultimatum it might be recalled that Woodrow Wilson ordered U.S. troops into Mexico (1914-1917) as a result of the depredations of the revolutionary Pancho Villa. Other nations in North and South America did not immediately line up against the U.S. because of this. It remained a local affair. But the assassination of the Archduke was different: it provided the opportunity for the Triple Entente to proceed with war. In the end, the Triple Entente got what it wanted: the downfall of the empires of Germany and Austria-Hungary, but their joy was short-lived, considering what followed in the ensuing years. Historian Niall Ferguson recently called the British decision to go to war “the biggest error in modern history”. The same could be said for France and Russia. Many events will be taking place in the next few years relating to the centennial of World War I. Hopefully, they will not be in the spirit of Article 231 of the Treaty of Versailles, but more on the order of Memorial Day and will give pause for reflections as to the underlying cause of the Great War, the so-called “war to end war,” which was supposed to make the world “safe for democracy.” •


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New rules on German citizenship In future, children of non-German parents who are born and brought up in Germany will no longer have to choose between two passports. Until now they have been required to decide on one citizenship by their 23rd birthday. The new bill will make it possible to hold more than one citizenship under certain conditions.

In the future, children of non-German parents, who are born and brought up in Germany, will no longer have to choose one citizenship. That was agreed in the Coalition Agreement. Until now children born in Germany, and thus entitled to German citizenship, whose parents are non-German citizens have been forced to choose between the two citizenships. Under the provisions of the new bill, children who have grown up in Germany, i.e. who have lived for at least eight years in Germany by their 21st birthday, will no longer have to choose. The same is to apply to children who have attended school in Germany for six years, and to those who have obtained a school leaving certificate in Germany or completed their occupational training here.

A good, practicable solution

The German government has thus found a way of regulating the citizenship issue appropriate to this day and age. The bill takes into account the various situations of young people who have hitherto been forced to choose one passport. If they have been born and brought up in Germany they will no longer have to

choose between German citizenship and the citizenship of their parents. The bill also stresses, however, the special value of German citizenship for coexistence.

Checking the formalities

The citizenship authorities can check the formalities and thus ensure that individuals can keep their German citizenship before they reach the age of 21. Individuals can apply for this. When an individual reaches the age of 21 the authority must act, however, and check the formalities. Where relevant information is available from the central residence register, nothing else need be checked. Otherwise, individuals will have to provide evidence that they have grown up in Germany on the basis of the above criteria. This could involve submitting a school report, for instance. The draft will now start its way through parliament and should be on the statute books before the end of this year. Š Press and Information Office of the Federal Government


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German-American Friendship Garden on the National Mall Ceremoniously Rededicated On a perfect spring day and with Washington’s famous cherry blossoms in peak bloom, Ambassador Peter Ammon joined Superintendent of the National Mall and Memorial Parks Robert Vogel to officially rededicate the German-American Friendship Garden on the National Mall. Before guests including prominent representatives of the German-American community, Ambassador Ammon thanked the National Park Service and the Association of German-American Societies of Greater Washington, D.C., which worked together with the Embassy to restore and rejuvenate the Garden. “After 30 years, the garden needed a renewal,” Ambassador Ammon said. “Now it’s returned to full bloom.” Ambassador Ammon next presented the GermanAmerican Friendship Award to individuals who played a key role in the Garden’s restoration. Together with Superintendent Vogel, he then planted a symbolic final flower to complete the restoration project. Established in 1983 to commemorate the 300th anniversary of the 1683 settlement of Germantown, Pennsylvania, the German-American Friendship Garden, located on the direct sight line between the White House and the Jefferson Memorial, was first dedicated by US President Ronald Reagan and German Chancellor Helmut Kohl in 1988. The Friendship Garden restoration was launched last year under a joint memorandum signed by the German Embassy, the National Park Service, and the Association of German-American Societies of Greater Washington D.C. The memorandum activated a trust fund whose income is to be used for the upkeep of the Garden. With that, work could begin on the Garden. Perennial beds and other native plants and flowers were planted and revitalized during the fall last year. A new irrigation system was installed. Finally, the central square panel of the Friendship Garden was restored and partly redesigned. The entire project followed the original design of the late German-born landscape artist Wolfgang Oehme, and was carried out under the guidance of the landscaping company Oehme van Swede. The newly restored German-American Friendship

Ambassador Ammon speaks as Robert Vogel, Superintendent of the National Mall & Memorial Parks, looks on. Garden, open to the public year-round, is an ideal stop on any trip to Washington, DC. Make sure to check it out during your next visit! Location: The German American Friendship Garden is located on the northern edge of the Washington Monument grounds, along Constitution Avenue, directly across the street from the central entrance to the Ellipse. (© Germany.info / Zacarias Garcia)


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Chapter Chatter Happenings in Pittsburgh! Despite the rough winter and cold early spring, Chapter Pittsburgh held a number of social events during the early months of 2014. This time period ranging from a Valentine’s Day included a luncheon to a St. Patrick’s Day get together in addition to a Farewell luncheon for Life Time member and former National VP Raymond Schmidt. The Valentine’s Day luncheon was held at the Crown Plaza South Hills while the St. Patrick’s Day luncheon and Ray Schmidt Farewell party were held at our old standby Max’s Allegheny Tavern in the city’s “Deutschtown” (North Side) section. Unfortunately attendance at the events was small but those in attendance enjoyed the event and camaraderie. May, which provided more pleasant weather allowed for a Saturday afternoon get together at the Hofbräu Pittsburgh as well as a General Membership meeting on the 17th at the Mt. Lebanon Library. Chapter Pittsburgh is also continuing to sponsor Pittsburgh’s German Meet Up group, which provides opportunity for those interested in practicing their German on a bi weekly basis. Meet Ups have been held at various locations with attendance ranging anywhere from 14 to 18 persons. The chapter is looking to see if we can expand this activity since it truly seems to be enjoyed by those in attendance. Attendance is open to all individuals and not just Chapter members. As to future activities – some of our members are taking part in a River Boat Cruise from Budapest to Cologne – a 15 day river cruise on the Danube and Rhine departing July 31st. The Chapter is looking at possibly doing another European trip next year depending upon interest. The current trip has 11 persons signed up – some being Chapter members while others being friends of Chapter members. We hope to provide a review of the trip and share our experience in the fall edition of the German American Journal. The Chapter also will be hosting its annual German Picnic on Sunday, August 24th at Fairview Park (South Fayette Township) starting at 1 pm until 5 pm. All members and guests are invited with admission free to members and minimal donation to guests.

Members of DANK Pittsburgh enjoying a luncheon together.

DANK Pitttsburgh Farwell Luncheon for Life Member and former National VP Ray Schmidt . On behalf of the Pittsburgh Chapter we hope all our Mothers had a wonderful Mother’s Day and wish all our Father’s a wonderful forthcoming Father’s Day. • Erik Wittmann


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Chapter Chatter DANK Chapter Milwaukee Turned the Clock Back to the 50’s & 60’s By DANK Chapter Milwaukee member Jane Nacker and Vice-President William Bessa People of all ages found bobby socks, poodle skirts, letter sweaters, rolled up jeans, and t-shirts and came to the DANK Chapter Milwaukee 50’s-60’s Dance and Chor concert on Saturday, May 10, 2014 at the Schwabenhof in Menomonee Falls, WI. The evening started with the DANK Chor marching in to the music of the Radetzky March. After an introduction by Jill Shearer, DANK Chapter Milwaukee Chor President, the Chor performed a 40 minute program. The Chor sang songs of spring and lively fun as well as some traditional selections. Each song was followed by a strong round of applause. A stunning duet by Chor members Victoria Ohde (also DANK Chapter Milwaukee Treasurer) and Jill Shearer captivated the audience, who let out an audible exhalation of awe when the duet finished. Of course, this was followed by an extra loud round of applause.

Dirndls, poodle skirts, princesses, and men participate in the hula hoop contest. Günther (Membership Secretary), were introduced as Prinz Edwin I and Prinzessin Uschi I for the Milwaukee Spielmannszug Mardi Gras/Karneval 2013-2014 season. Chapter Milwaukee Vice-President William Bessa then provided emcee services throughout the evening. Next on stage was Pieptone of Chicago. They played Schlager music, filling the dance floor with dancers of all ages. They also played for the Twist and Jitterbug dance contests and the hula hoop contest. Winners went home with DANK tote bags containing gift certificates and treats.

DANK Chapter Milwaukee Chor warms up before the concert with Director Dr. James Norden. DANK Chapter Milwaukee President Ron Kabitzke gave an official welcome to the guests and thanked them for supporting the mission of using event proceeds to give financial assistance to German education programs. He also announced the Presidents of German related clubs and chor groups who were in attendance, as well as club Queen/Princesses in attendance. Two members of DANK Chapter Milwaukee Board, Edwin Günther (Vice-President) and Ursula

Pieptone! of Chicago performs music for dancing and dance contests. Continued on page 28


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Chapter Chatter Erie Celebrates its 24th Birthday! It all started out with an inquiry on membership and the next thing I knew, I was the Founding Member of Chapter 71! All I was interested in at the time was to learn more about my family’s German roots and former President Elsbeth Seewald reeled me in like a fish! At that time, you had to have 25 members in order to receive the Charter/Founding Letter. Working at Gannon University, I arranged for interested people to meet at our Nash Library with the idea of establishing the chapter. Our first meeting was really a getting to know you and those born in Germany told us of their experiences and their arrival in the United States. We were interested, shared some laughs and were startled all in that first meeting! But that group did join DANK that first night and then we were off and running. We really didn’t know how to run a meeting and our programs were mostly getting to learn all about our experiences. The group began its focus on our German traditions and the history of the Germans in Erie/Erie County. As we became more established, more members joined and at one time we were 267 members strong. Meetings moved to the East Erie Turnverein and when we outgrew that facility, we made our home at the Erie Männerchor Club and continue to meet there to this day. Starting in our 2nd year, we held German American Day dinners; established our annual summer family picnic; our Weihnachts celebration on the first Sunday of Advent. Guest speakers were invited to our meetings; we arranged bus day trips to German events in Old Economy Village, Harmony, Pittsburgh, PA, Akron, Cincinnati, and Cleveland, Oh; and Hamburg NY. We had fun ‘adopting’ members into our honorary Family

1st officers – (1990) left to right Bev Pochatko and Fred Huttel Jr., Wilfred Getchell, Treasurer, Charlotte Chase, Secretary, Dr. Bertl Weber Vice. Pres. Beverly Pochatko, President.

Opening toast at GHF. 1st officers – (1990) left to right Bev Pochatko and Fred Huttel Jr.

Schmidt. Including past mayor Joyce Savocchio, who really supported us through the years. Not to forget hosting German student folk dancers and theater students. As life goes on, our membership has members that have passed on and a memorial gift is sent to the charity of the family’s choice. We continue to mourn their loss and acknowledge them each November. Three years ago, we began a Volkstrauertag at a local church cemetery as a Day of Remembrance. Our current President Margaret Potocki initiated a monthly Kaffee Klatsch for those who wish to converse in German that is very successful and anticipated by our older German speaking members.. Our biggest success story is our German Heritage Festival held each Labor Day weekend. We started out with a Bavarian Fest at the Turners picnic grove (Turnwald) and unable to grow much there, decided to go on our own and 18 years ago established the GHF at St. Nicholas Grove. Our first venture brought out 285 guests and now we attract over 6,000 people from the tri-state area! It is all due to the support of our volunteer workers! Four years ago, we took on a partner, the Lake Erie Fanfare, and our venue continues to be the largest draw. We are continuously voted on as Erie’s favorite ethnic fest….and that says it all! We have many good memories of our chapter. How can I not say thank you to the officers and members for all their hard work in maintaining the Chapter through the years? Our members are the greatest and we look forward to celebrating our 25th birthday anniversary. Beverly Pochatko


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Chapter Chatter From DANK Chapter Lake County, IL Warm camaraderie and good food were enjoyed, a new member was welcomed, and special anniversaries were celebrated when members and guests of DANK Chapter Lake County, IL gathered at the In-laws Restaurant in Gurnee, IL on April 27 for the Chapter's annual Spring awards luncheon. While celebrating members' anniversaries was the main reason for the luncheon, it also was the perfect time to welcome new Chapter member Joyce Keefe. Vice President and Membership Chairman Karl Schmidt presented a DANK membership pin to Joyce. Vice President and Membership Chair, Karl Schmidt also recognized the following Chapter members eligible this year for DANK anniversary pins: Hildegard Kordas for 50 years; Wilma Giese, Hella and Erwin Goering, Stefan Heinrich for 45 years; Doug Haberkamp for 15 years; Reinhard Hudak for 5 years. The anniversary recognition program was followed by a sing-along, including both American and German

Singing to music played by Erwin Goering added to the Gemütlichkei enjoyed at the DANK Lake County, IL Spring Luncheon. songs, to music played on his button box accordion by Chapter member Erwin Goering. We once again have expert party planners Ludwina Homer and Judy Kanka to thank for a wonderful party. Judy also helped organize a fun bowling and pizza event for our Chapter last February 9. • Ursula Hoeft

German Cultural Garden of Cleveland Ohio On April 12th 2014 several volunteers showed up at 9:30am at the Cleveland Cultural Gardens, to do the first phase spring clean-up of the German Cultural Garden a 3 acre portion of the gardens, the second largest within the garden. The process ended around 1:30pm after filling 50 large refuse bags and placed along the curb to wait for collection. In attendance were Mike Schneider (88), Alexis (11) with parents Rhonda and Ken Schlick of the DANK Cleveland chapter, Hans and Anne Marie Kopf of Statverband, Mike Schneider’s son Erik Schneider, Ken and Rhonda’s niece Marie Hornack and her boyfriend Doug Scott. It was a beautiful day for working outdoors and it was great to see people come together to work and volunteer their time to make the German Cultural garden look much better from the fall and winter debris. Thank you to all of the volunteers! •


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Chapter Chatter DANK West and Chicago South Farming Project DANK West with the assistance of DANK South has started a farming project. Pete and Matt Mantel from DANK West have taken the lead on this project. We would like to thank DANK South and president Gary Dietz for the opportunity to farm a portion of the land at DANK South. This year's crop will include pumpkins, corn, tomatoes, and many other vegetables. We are hoping that crops grown will be sold to benefit our scholarship fund. We are always looking for volunteers! Anyone who would like to volunteer their time can contact Pete Mantel at 708.899.2115 or Fred Leinweber at 630.805.1504. •

German Fest in Parma, OH

On June 20th and 21st DANK Cleveland Chapter #30 will run the Vienna Café at the German Fest held at German Central located at 7863 York Rd in Parma, Ohio. For the past 2 years we have sold out of all Torte, Strudle and other tasty treats to the fantastic crowds that come each year. Come and have a festive time with us! •

Brandenburger Schutzenverein

Here is a photo of some of our loyal members after a Wednesday evening of shooting. If you are interested in Olympic shooting air rifles and pistols at 10 meters, come to see what we have to offer at the DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave, Chicago IL. We have many upcoming events. We just had our 23rd King and Queen Coronation Ball in March and a great time was had by all. It was attended by other German shooting clubs from St Louis, MO, Peoria, IL, Auburn Hills, MI and Cincinnati, OH and that’s after a morning of heavy shooting competition. •

DANK Benton Harbor, MI - 2014 Fish Fry Schedule June 6 • July 11 • August 1 • September 5 • October 3 • November 7 • December 5

The House Of Gemütlichkeit

DANK Haus - Benton Harbor • 2651 Pipestone Rd • Benton Harbor, MI (269) 926-6652 • www.dank13.org


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Chapter Chatter News from the Fox Valley, IL Chapter Last year we co-hosted a Germanfest in Hinkley , Illinois with much success for one day. We have already had our first planning meeting for the second Hinckley Germanfest. This year we have expanded it to two days, August 23 & 24. Much of the grounds layout will remain the same, but we are looking at having a few more activities going on, including Hinckley Immanuel having a church service in the morning. Chef Clemens may also serve a surprise international dish in addition to the same great brats we are all used to. You can stay informed of new developments by monitoring www.hinckleygermanfest.com/ Better yet, get involved with your chapter and volunteer a shift at the fest. Just click on the “Volunteer” tab. We hope to see many of our chapter members at the fest! This will be a busy soccer summer as the 2104 World Cup will be

played in Brazil beginning June 13 and ending July 13. Germany is the head of Group G and play Ghana, Portugal and the U.S.A.! Some say this is the toughest group of the tournament and is known as “The Group of Death”, because really any team could advance from this group. It will be very exciting for us to watch the Germany vs. U.S.A. match, which will be played on June 26. I hope everyone will take the time to watch this game especially. For this reason the MLS will not have regular season games for the month of June but will resume play in July. We are planning another DANK night with the Fire and hope you can join us. Please contact me at zweihunde02@gmail. com to let me know if you would prefer August 2 or September 20. For further information about the club check out their website www. chicago-fire.com. •

Thank you for keeping your Membership current! If you have not paid your 2014 dues is not too late! Support your Germanic Heritage!

DANK Chapter Listing ARIZONA Phoenix IOWA Quad Cities ILLINOIS Chicago Chicago South Chicago West Fox Valley Lake County Northern Suburbs Peoria Springfield INDIANA Indianapolis LaFayette South Bend MICHIGAN Benton Harbor Great Lakes Bay Region OHIO Cleveland PENNSYLVANIA Erie Philadelphia Pittsburgh Uniontown WASHINGTON DC Washington DC WISCONSIN Milwaukee www.dank.org


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Chapter Chatter DANK Milwaukee Chapter History On January 31, 1960 Miss DANK Milwaukee a group of 40 German Queens become Miss Americans got together DANK USA. Both locally to discuss their desire and on the national to have an organization level, the crowning of a that would represent queen has been disconthe German Ameritinued. can interest at all three On September 26, levels of government. 1971 the DANK MilwauFrom this meeting kee Chapter fulfilled came the third chapter its goal of conducting within the D.A.N.K. ora German Language 2013-2015 DANK Chapter Milwaukee Board ganization and the first School. Initiated by chapter in Wisconsin. Front L to R: Secretary Sally Shearer, President Ronald Kabitz- Vice president Oskar The Chapter received its ke, 2nd Vice President Edwin Günther, 1st Vice President Wil- Grossman, the DANK Charter from the State liam Bessa, Treasurer Victoria Ohde. Back L to R: Membership Schule began with an of Wisconsin and was Secretary Ursula Günther. Advisors to the Board are: Edward enrollment of 24 stuincorporated on June Mueller, Jill Shearer (Chor President), Jane Nacker, Doris Muel- dents. The first classes ler (Dance Director), Don Wohlfeil, James Schmidt, Gene Brun- were held at the Bavar21, 1960. ner, Kathleen Kabitzke. Not pictured: Irene Brunner. The membership grew ian Inn. Mrs. Basler was and our chapter prosthe first teacher. Soon pered. Membership meetings, gatherings and dances after, Marianne Trivalos became the school’s director became the routine of Milwaukee’s social calendar. with a staff of five teachers. The school relocated to the The Milwaukee Chapter started other chapters in Wis- Albright United Methodist Church at 5555 West Capiconsin. At one time there were as many as nine chap- tol Drive. Years later it moved to Zion Lutheran Church ters in Wisconsin. at 12012 West North Avenue. More than 1350 students The German American National Congress is the only attended the school in the years that it was in operaorganization where participation in the American tion. It continued into the 1990’s. Because there was non-partisan political life is practiced. no one willing to step forward to chair the school, it Many of our presidents and members have attended ceased operation after 27 years. conferences and meetings promoting our goals in the city, the state and in Washington, D.C. In 1987 the GerThe DANK Folk Dancers had their beginning in 1973 man American Joint Action Committee, consisting of and today it has many engagements and is still active. our German American National Congress, the Steuben The group has performed at festivals, churches, nursSociety of America and the United German American ing homes, schools and on stage at German Fest. In Committee of the U.S.A. organized the national ob- 1984 the dancers performed for Vice-President Bush. servance of German American Day. They were instruIn 1980 then Milwaukee Mayor Henry Maier was a mental in obtaining the Congressional Resolutions special guest at our chapter’s 20th anniversary celand Presidential Declarations proclaiming October 6 ebration. In his speech he issued a challenge to the as German American Day. German community to begin an annual German fesSince 1964 the Milwaukee Chapter also crowned a tival. He asked our Milwaukee DANK Chapter to take young lady as the Miss DANK Milwaukee Queen. For the lead. many years our chapter has hosted the Miss DANK USA Pageant. Our own chapter has had 5 of its 34 Continued on page 36


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Julius Berndt, Architect and Builder of the American Monument to Hermann the Cheruscan By George L. Glotzbach Julius Berndt was born in Kloster Heinrich-Au near Breslau, Silesia March 13, 1832. He attended the polytechnical school in Breslau. He came to America in 1852 at the age of 20, directly to Chicago. There he became associated with the Chicago Landverein which merged to become part of the German Land Association. The Association was seeking to establish a German colony in the west, which became New Ulm, Minnesota in 1854. Berndt settled permanently in New Ulm in 1857. He married Minna Kiesling in 1861 and twelve children were born to them. He died July 13, 1916 at the age of 84. Berndt was an architect, contractor, surveyor, and builder. He became a member of the Turnverein (Gymnast's Society) and drew the plans for New Ulm's Turner Hall, an imposing structure still in use today. He was a founder of New Ulm's lodge of the Orden der Hermann's Sรถhne (O.d.H.S. = Order of Hermann's Sons) and its first President. Berndt later became the National Secretary of the O.d.H.S. which grew to 500 chapters and over 30,000 members. In 1885 Berndt presented plans to the O.d.H.S. to build a monument to Hermann, inspired by Ernst von Bandel's imposing Hermannsdenkmal in Detmold, Germany. Hermann, known as Arminius in ancient Rome, was a son of the chief of the Cheruscan tribe (near present day Hanover), when the Romans were expanding their empire from the Rhine toward the Elbe River. Hermann, who had been a Roman citizen and soldier, secretly gathered a great force of allied tribes and by surprise anihilated three Roman Legions of 20,000 men under the command of Publius Quintilius Varus. The Battle of the Teutoburg

Forest in 9 A.D., known as the Varusschlacht, is today recognized as one of the 15 decisive battles in the history of the world. Thus the German people developed independent of Roman rule. In 1887 Berndt was commissioned by the O.d.H.S. to begin construction on two acres on a high bluff overlooking New Ulm. Building began and the cornerstone laid June 24, 1888. The statue of Hermann was created by sculptor Alphons Pelzer, himself a German immigrant, and shipped from Ohio to New Ulm in 1889. Financial problems slowed the work. The 102' tall monument was dedicated September 25, 1897. Over 20,000 O.d.H.S. delegates from 23 states attended the festivities, coinciding with the O.d.H.S.' 21st national convention. Julius Berndt had made it happen. The Hermann Monument was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. In 2000 the Monument recieved national and international recognition when the 106th Congress of the United States designated the Hermann Monument to be an official symbol for the contributions of Americans of German Heritage. The overall base and copper statue is second in size only to the Statue of Liberty in America. In 2009 New Ulm celebrated the 2,000th Anniversary of Hermann's Victory. Four days of festivities included 25 events with attendance over 16,000. Delegations from the German cities of Detmold and New Ulm's Sister Cities of Ulm and Neu-Ulm were present, culminated by a grand banquet in Turner Hall. Again, Julius Berndt was honored. Continued on page 36


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DANK Executive Office Update by Eve Timmerhaus

Thanks to our members who sent in the 2014 dues and also to the people who participated in our annual raffle. Those who have not sent in their raffle stubs there is still time. The Early Bird Drawing will be held July 3 at the National Office in Chicago. There is still plenty of time to participate. The grand prize drawing will be held November 7, 2014. There are great cash prizes waiting for you. June means it’s time for our annual Summer Membership Drive! Please see page 34 for details. Our members are our best resource for growing our membership. The most important element of our DANK Chapters is our members. You are the lifeblood of our organization and without you we would not survive. Summer is finally here and that means German Fest in Milwaukee, WI. Friday, July 25, 2014 the 34 year old

festival will open their gates at 3:00 pm with complimentary admission for everyone. The fest runs Friday, July 25 through Sunday, July 27, 2014. For more information please visit the German Fest’s website: www. germanfest.com. DANK will once again have a booth on the Midway at the festival. Participation at German Fest offers us the opportunity to introduce DANK to thousands of potential visitors. We are looking for volunteers to help hand out the promotional materials and to just visit with potential visitors. If you have some time available and would like to help, please let us know (888-USADANK). The deadline for the August/September German American Journal is Monday, July 7. Anyone planning on submitting an article, please make note of this. While we do our best to be flexible with those people who write for the Journal, we have deadlines for a reason. Missed deadlines delay completing the layout, printing and mailing the Journal. Please be respectful of our schedule. Articles must be emailed to the National Office (office@dank.org). Enjoy your summer. •

We wecome our newest Life Member

Hildegard Mueller Exchange Rates

1 USD = 0.73 EURO 1 EURO = 1.37 USD

5-18-14


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Anja Niedringhaus

Extraordinary Photographer killed in Afghanistan Submitted by: John Bareither

On April 4, 2014, the world lost one of the most extraordinary photographers of the last part of the 20th century and the beginning of 21st century. Anja Niedinghaus was shot to death by an Afghan policeman doing what she loved doing. Anja started her photographic career in her hometown of Hoexter, Germany at the young age of 16. Her career began as a freelancer for a local paper. Anja’s big break came with her coverage of the fall of the Berlin Wall and landed her a position with European Pressphoto Agency in 1990. The agency based in Frankfurt, Sarajevo and Moscow would lead her to cover the brutal conflict in Yugoslavia. In 2002, she joined the Associated Press. Though she was based in Geneva, her photographic assignments would take her to the Middle East, Afghanistan and Pakistan. The AP team that she was a part of won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography for their coverage of Iraq. She won may other journalistic awards and honors for her work. During 2006-2007, she was fortunate enough to study at Harvard University under a Nieman Fellowship. "What the world knows about Iraq, they largely know because of her pictures and the pictures by the photographers she raised and beat into shape”, said AP photographer David Guttenfelder. “I know they always ask themselves. What would Anja do? When they go out with their cameras, I think that they all do." Anja’s lens captured what war and misery meant to many of her subjects. An Afghan boy on a swing holding a toy sub-machine gun; A black-clad Iraqi giving a bottle to her baby as she waits for a prisoner to be released; A U.S. Marine mourning the loss of 31 comrades. Many of her images show hope and courage among the killing. A Canadian soldier with a sunflower stuck in his helmet; A young girl testing her artificial limbs, while her sister teasingly tries to steal her crutches. Her caring for her subjects didn't stop when her camera was not in use. In 2011, she photographed a Marine who had been evacuated from Afghanistan with severe injuries. She wanted to know what happened to him and after six months of searching, she found him. She showed him her photos from that day

and gave him a piece of wheat that had stuck to his uniform when he fell. She had plucked it and saved it when she was done taking photographs. On April 12, hundreds of colleagues and friends mourned her loss in her home town of Hoexter, Germany. She was remembered for having the loudest and most infectious laugh. Fellow AP correspondents recall Anja making sausage and potatoes two days before her death. Anja went to some of the world’s most dangerous places during her career. Her belief was that it was what she was meant to do and she was happy to go. Anja’s oeuvre of battlefields, courage, hope and suffering will endure for future generations. School children in the latter part of the 21st century will learn about the conflicts of the early part of the century through the lens of Anja Niedringhaus. •


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Germany's Window Boxes and Balcony Gardens by Francine McKenna, Staff Columnist

In a never ending cycle from spring flowers through winter greenery and berries, hanging baskets, containers and window boxes, overflowing with flowers, evergreens, trailing vines, ivy, pelargonium, bushes and berries, decorate windows and balconies in Germany. Some are hundreds of feet in the air on tower blocks, others accessorize trendy apartments in upscale districts, small apartments and houses in narrow streets or hang from every floor of large prestigious villas as well as most farm houses. From adorning stores and restaurants of every description to banks, hospital entrances and railway stations, flower filled containers are found everywhere. The love of nature and forests in German culture since pre-Christian days is one reason why so much of the country's land is left to nature, wild spaces and protected areas, and most people do not live in houses with gardens but in apartments, so it is easy to understand Germany's "Blumenkasten" and balcony garden culture. In first century Rome Pliny the Elder, a Roman philosopher, wrote about window boxes as, "every day the eyes might feast on this copy of a garden, as though it were a work of nature", and when the Romans swept through Europe bringing with them everything from chestnut trees and vines to asparagus they also brought the "window box". Wherever it is possible just to see a little piece of sky

in Germany advantage is taken of all the options. A dense mass of hanging red alpine geraniums is the popular choice for window boxes on the pastel colored buildings in sunny Bavaria, which even in the summer often have snow covered mountains as a background, but throughout Germany planning the seasonal window boxes is almost an art form. Filled by plants of different heights, colors and textures, or mixtures of roses and lavender with trailing ivy. Annuals, especially in the winter months pansies with their upturned faces, petunias mixed with permanent plants or grasses that can over winter and form a background to an ever changing display, blocks of impatiens together with rambling evergreens for shady areas. The combinations are not only decorative, they sometimes verge on the eccentric. Each flower box is designed to take into consideration whether it will be sitting on an East or North balcony, window ledge or door step, or one that faces South or West, and plant centers providing "Blumenschmuck fuers Haus - Familienheim und Garten" carefully label "what goes best where". Winter's arrival means another transformation of both balconies and window boxes. Spruce, fir and holly are interspersed with winter flowering pansies or Christmas roses, spring bulbs lie in wait having doubled in quantity during summer, while for the advent and Christmas period the mini gardens suddenly become fabulously festive with the addition of lights, candle powered lanterns, additional varieties of evergreen twigs and anything with red or white berries or pine cones. The summer months see 'edibles', vegetables: zucchini and tomatoes, edible flowers, berry shrubs and fruit trees, come into their own. Experience having proved that not only are these nutritious and decorative, as long as they are looked after and have the correct soil conditions, they don't much care if they are in a pot or a garden. In Roman days a container with medicinal herbs was usually included somewhere in the mixture and today there is often a herb window box, or on a German


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balcony landscaped with its different ornamental tubs, pots and containers, one or more will be filled by the favorite herbs ideal for kitchen extravaganza's or grill evenings. Especially basil, thyme, rosemary, sage, marjoram or oregano, chives and mint. It is not at all unusual to see squash and tomato vines laden with their crops snaking up walls and along balcony rails, while marigolds are often somewhere around. Even set in between the chili, eggplant and paprika plants, as they are great at discouraging mosquitoes on balmy summer evenings when there is no better way of passing time than sitting with a glass of wine by an open window. Or outside with both wine and a glowing barbecue. However this is Germany, so there are rules to be followed for balcony living, whether it is a exclusive block or an apartment house. A balcony covered with visible 'junk' is a definite 'no no', so those unloved bits and pieces had better find another home. Grilling is allowed, as long as it is not forbidden by local rules or the rental agreement, however it has to be powered by gas or electricity, not glowing charcoal. After 10 pm there can be no further noise, not even hushed whispers, and the only aromas allowed must come from flowers not grilled sausages. Window boxes are to be fixed so water cannot drip on a balcony belonging to neighbors living below, or onto passersby on the sidewalk, and they also have to be firmly attached with special hooks

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and fasteners so that not even the strongest wind will move them. Despite Germany gradually becoming a 'no smoking' country, you can light up your cigar, pipe or cigarette on your balcony but just make very sure that no smoke blows in the direction of your neighbors and disturbs them. Although of course you will no doubt be forgiven if they are also smokers, and out there at the same time. With centuries of tradition behind them to Germans 'gardens in boxes' are a way of life, but visitors are captivated by seasonal displays in pampered window boxes and containers that appear in every size of town or village, or simply along a country road, bursting with trailing vines and colorful flowers. The use of color, textures and accents adds beauty to both city and landscapes, and, even when they do not happen to be in one of Germany's many medieval villages, give a thoroughly modern country a feeling of old world charm. •


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Chapter #78 Celebrates Maifest and First Anniversary This year's Maifest celebration, held May 3, 2014 at the Atrium Restaurant and Stein Haus in downtown Bay City, Michigan, had special meaning for members, family and friends of Great Lakes Bay Region DANK Chapter #78. Not only was this long-held tradition an occasion to welcome Spring and its anticipated warmer weather, it also marked the First Anniversary of our Chapter becoming the newest member of the National DANK organization.

Many in attendance remember fondly, almost a year ago to the day, when Bob Miske and Erik Wittman presented our Board of Directors with our Chapter's charter and

cordion and led the happy crowd in sing-a-longs, as did Walter Hagen who directed the "well lubricated" participants in a rousing rendition of the Schnitzelbank Song. Monte Oswald, Chapter #78 President, also took this occasion to briefly review our past year's accomplishments as well as future goals, and this event again gave our member's an opportunity to engage with the public and promote the benefits of membership in the National DANK organization. shared their wisdom on how to make our club viable and growth oriented. We will always be in their debt for the sage advice given. The festivities began with a delicious smorgasborg of germanthemed culinary treats including Weinerschnitzel tender enough to cut with a fork and sauerbraten that was as close to Mom's as you could get. While enjoying this feast the attendees were treated to live german music throughout the evening, and during intermissions Harold Miller, our Chapter's own "Musik Meister", brought out his ac-

DANK Chicago South Maifest Spass, Gemütlichkeit, lachen, tanzen, singen, essen und trinken were all being done in Frankfort at the German American Heritage Center where DANK Chicago South held their Maifest on May 10, 2014. Maifest is the traditional German celebration of the arrival of spring; and my goodness after this past winter in Chicago it was well worth celebrating! Trachten was all around with men in “Bundhosen” and women wearing their beautiful “dirndls”. “Die Festhalle” was decorated in a traditional German flair including the Maibaum from the expertise Continued on page 28

We look forward to the many rewards and challenges that our Chapter's second year will bring. •


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Herr von Ribbeck auf Ribbeck im Havelland Theodor Fontane Herr von Ribbeck auf Ribbeck im Havelland, Ein Birnbaum in seinem Garten stand, Und kam die goldene Herbsteszeit Und die Birnen leuchteten weit und breit, Da stopfte, wenn's Mittag vom Turme scholl, Der von Ribbeck sich beide Taschen voll, Und kam in Pantinen ein Junge daher, So rief er: »Junge, wiste 'ne Beer?« Und kam ein Mädel, so rief er: »Lütt Dirn, Kumm man röwer, ick hebb 'ne Birn.«

So klagten die Kinder. Das war nicht recht Ach, sie kannten den alten Ribbeck schlecht; Der neue freilich, der knausert und spart, Hält Park und Birnbaum strenge verwahrt. Aber der alte, vorahnend schon Und voll Mißtraun gegen den eigenen Sohn, Der wußte genau, was damals er tat, Als um eine Birn' ins Grab er bat, Und im dritten Jahr aus dem stillen Haus Ein Birnbaumsprößling sproßt heraus.

So ging es viel Jahre, bis lobesam Der von Ribbeck auf Ribbeck zu sterben kam. Er fühlte sein Ende. 's war Herbsteszeit, Wieder lachten die Birnen weit und breit; Da sagte von Ribbeck: »Ich scheide nun ab. Legt mir eine Birne mit ins Grab.« Und drei Tage drauf, aus dem Doppeldachhaus, Trugen von Ribbeck sie hinaus, Alle Bauern und Büdner mit Feiergesicht Sangen »Jesus meine Zuversicht«, Und die Kinder klagten, das Herze schwer: »He is dod nu. Wer giwt uns nu 'ne Beer?«

Und die Jahre gingen wohl auf und ab, Längst wölbt sich ein Birnbaum über dem Grab, Und in der goldenen Herbsteszeit Leuchtet's wieder weit und breit. Und kommt ein Jung' übern Kirchhof her, So flüstert's im Baume: »Wiste 'ne Beer?« Und kommt ein Mädel, so flüstert's: »Lütt Dirn, Kumm man röwer, ick gew' di 'ne Birn.« So spendet Segen noch immer die Hand Des von Ribbeck auf Ribbeck im Havelland.

Alles Gute zum Vatertag!


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Kurznachrichten Türkische Parlamentswahlen

Berliner Olympiastadion soll Wahllokal werden Die Premiere rückt näher - das Berliner Olympiastadion soll Wahllokal werden. Inzwischen hat die türkische Botschaft in Berlin offiziell nachgefragt, ob die etwa 140.000 in der deutschen Hauptstadt lebenden Türken dort im August bei der Wahl des nächsten türkischen Präsidenten ihre Stimme abgeben können. Ein Sprecher des Auswärtigen Amtes bestätigte Eingang einer sogenannten Verbalnote. Das Konzept von türkischer Seite sei zur Überprüfung der Sicherheitsfragen an das Bundesinnenministerium weitergeleitet worden. Darüber hatten zuvor "Bild"-Zeitung und "B.Z." berichtet. Nach Informationen der beiden Blätter sollen an insgesamt sieben Standorten in Deutschland solche Wahllokale eingerichtet werden: neben Berlin in Sport- und Messehallen in Hannover, Düsseldorf, Essen, Frankfurt/Main, Karlsruhe und München. Bundeskanzlerin Angela Merkel (CDU) hatte bereits bei einem Treffen mit Ministerpräsident Recep Tayyip Erdogan - selbst ein möglicher Präsidentschaftskandidat - im

Februar die Unterstützung der Regierung zugesagt. "Wir werden in einem sehr engen Austausch sein, wie wir diese Wahlen organisatorisch so stattfinden lassen, dass das Wahlrecht der Menschen, die in Deutschland leben und die eine türkische Staatsbürgerschaft haben, auch gut ausgeübt werden kann", sagte sie damals. •

Unterschied zwischen Ost und West

Deutsche schlucken immer mehr Pillen Die Menschen in Deutschland nehmen immer mehr Arzneimittel - mittlerweile sind es im Schnitt 1,5 Präparate am Tag. Das geht aus einer veröffentlichten Analyse des Wissenschaftlichen Instituts der AOK (WIdO) hervor. Insgesamt 642 Millionen Arzneimittelpackungen haben die knapp 70 Millionen Versicherten der gesetzlichen Krankenkassen demnach 2013 in Deutschland von niedergelassenen Ärzten verordnet bekommen. In diesen Arzneimitteln waren 38,1 Milliarden Tagesdosen enthalten. In den vergangenen zehn Jahren hatte der Verbrauch pro Versicherten in der gesetzlichen Krankenversicherung um nahezu die

Bier-Export boomt

Im ersten Quartal 2014 setzten die in Deutschland ansässigen Brauereien und Bierlager insgesamt rund 20,5 Millionen Hektoliter Bier ab. Wie das Statistische Bundesamt (Destatis) weiter mitteilt, stieg damit der Bierabsatz gegenüber dem entsprechenden Vor-

Hälfte zugenommen. Dabei nehmen die Menschen in Ostdeutschland mehr Medikamente, auch weil sie im Durchschnitt deutlich älter sind. •

jahreszeitraum um 2,8 %. In den Zahlen sind alkoholfreies Bier und Malztrunk sowie das aus Ländern außerhalb der Europäischen Union (EU) eingeführte Bier nicht enthalten. •


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Kurznachrichten

Studie: Jeder zweite Zuschauer isst beim Fernsehen Kaum ein Deutscher guckt konzentriert Fernsehen. Vier von fünf Zuschauern beschäftigen sich gleichzeitig mit etwas anderem. Das steht in einer neuen Studie der BAT-Stiftung für Zukunftsfragen. Jeder Zweite isst, während er eine Sendung ansieht, jeder Dritte nickt zeitweilig ein und jeder Vierte liest noch nebenbei, ergab die Umfrage. Frauen sind dabei noch deutlich aktiver als Männer, während der Fernseher läuft. Und bei einem Punkt ist dieser Unterschied besonders groß: 42 Prozent der weiblichen Befragten machen neben dem Fernsehen noch die Hausarbeit, bei männlichen sind es nur 4 Prozent. •

Zensus 2011: Viel weniger Ausländer und etwas mehr Eheleute

Wohl älteste Deutsche tot Gertrud Henze mit 112 Jahren gestorben

In Deutschland leben weniger Ausländer als bisher angenommen - aber dennoch so viele wie nie zuvor. Und: Auf 100 Menschen im Erwerbsalter kommen etwas mehr Rentner, Jugendliche und Kinder als die Statistiken bisher ausgewiesen haben. Außerdem sind mehr Menschen verheiratet als gedacht. Diese Ergebnisse des Zensus 2011 hat das Statistische Bundesamt in Wiesbaden veröffentlicht. Es war die erste Bevölkerungszählung seit mehr als zwei Jahrzehnten. •

Deutschlands vermutlich älteste Frau ist tot. Gertrud Henze ist in der Nacht zu Dienstag im Alter von 112 Jahren in einem privaten Wohnstift in Göttingen gestorben. Die frühere Bibliothekarin sei friedlich eingeschlafen, sagte ein Sprecher des Stiftes. Sie sei bis zuletzt trotz körperlicher Einschränkungen mobil gewesen und habe mit wachem Geist am Leben teilgenommen. Henze, die am 8. Dezember 1901 auf der Insel Rügen geboren wurde, habe ihren Körper der Wissenschaft geschenkt, sagte der Sprecher. Nach Angaben des Wohnstifts war Henze die älteste Frau in der Bundesrepublik. Das Statistische Bundesamt in Wiesbaden führt allerdings keine Liste zu den ältesten Deutschen. •

Fleisch wird teurer Die Verbraucher in Deutschland müssen sich in den kommenden Monaten auf steigende Fleischpreise einstellen. Insbesondere Rindfleisch werde aufgrund der angespannten Lage in Argentinien teurer, erklärte die Zentralgenossenschaft des europäischen Fleischergewerbes. 2013 verzehrten die Konsumenten in Deutschland pro Kopf knapp unter 60 Kilogramm Fleisch und damit 1,5 Kilogramm weniger als im Vorjahr. Dabei war Schweinefleisch mit fast 40 Kilo pro Kopf mit Abstand beliebter als Geflügel, Rind und Kalb. •


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Schaffhausen

Eastern Switzerland Over the medieval Old Town of Schaffhausen looms the imposing Munot fortress. The houses of the Old Town are richly decorated with oriel windows and lavishly painted facades. The town, located on the Upper Rhine between the Black Forest and Lake Constance, and surrounded by vineyards, is a popular destination for holidays and day-trips. The town of Schaffhausen is in the northernmost corner of Switzerland, in the “knee” of the Rhine in Eastern Switzerland on the border with Germany. It owes its origins to the Rheinfall waterfall: the settlement arose where shippers needed somewhere to unload and stack their goods when avoiding the rapids that were impassable for ships. The traffic-free Old Town of Schaffhausen is considered one of the prettiest in Switzerland, on account of its many oriel windows and lavishly painted facades. Many of the fine guildhouses and merchant’s houses date from Gothic and Baroque times. The lively Old Town is very good for shopping. The town began with the street market in what is now the Vordergasse. This is also where you will find the High Gothic St. Johann church

with its remarkable acoustics. The emblem of the town, the Munot fortress, can be seen for miles. The ring-shaped stronghold was built between 1564 and 1589 to a design by Albrecht Dürer. You can see far and wide from the battlements. Every evening at 9 p.m., the Munot guard who lives in the tower rings the Munot bell, which used to be a sign that the town gates and inns should close. In the area to the north of Schaffhausen, in the hilly region of the Randen, and on the vine-clad slopes of the Klettgau, there are lovely walks and cycle rides and you can enjoy a tasty drop of Pinot Noir. Learn about how the wine is made during a one-hour walk along the Trasadingen Wine Trail or in the Museum of Viticulture in Hallau. The riverside landscape along the Over the mediaeval Old Town of Schaffhausen looms the imposing Munot Rhine is a lovely area for cycling, fortress. The view from here should not be missed. – along with a glass of the walking and boating. The popular local Pinot Noir wine, and of course the celebrated Rhine Falls. Untersee Lake-Rhine boat trip from


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Schaffhausen to Kreuzlingen is nearly 50 km long. The section of river between Schaffhausen and the wellpreserved little mediaeval town of Stein am Rhein, with its frescos and painted houses, is particularly charming. The Benedictine monastery of St. Georgen now houses the monastery museum. Over the town towers the castle of Hohenklingen. Highlights • Old Town – one of the most delightful Old Towns in Switzerland, with wonderful Baroque houses and 170 oriel windows, which were a status symbol on the houses of rich merchants. • Rheinfall at Schaffhausen – Europe’s largest and

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most powerful waterfall, where the water crashes down 21 metres, across a width of 150 metres. The natural spectacle is at its best in July when water levels are highest. Boat trip on the Rhine from Schaffhausen to Stein am Rhein and on across the Untersee to Konstanz and Kreuzlingen – one of the finest river trips in Europe. Former Benedictine abbey of Allerheiligen – the monastery church with its 11th century cloisters is an important Romanesque historic building, with a herb garden and museum about the town’s history and industry. •

Rhine Falls Over a width of 150 metres and a height of 23 metres, an average of 700,000 liters of water cascade over the rocks every second. A boat ride to the famous rock in the middle of the Falls and the short walk to the top, is an unforgettable experience for every visitor. •

UNESCO World Heritage Day, 2014 Germany will be celebrating the tenth edition of its annual UNESCO World Heritage Day on 1 June 2014. This year's main event is hosted by Muskauer Park, which straddles Poland and Germany. The purpose of the day is to draw attention to Germany's World Heritage sites and to raise their profile as bearers of UNESCO ideals. Children and young people are a particular focus. Activities are being organized to get these age groups more interested in cultural heritage and the preservation of historical monuments. All of Germany's UNESCO World Heritage sites are called upon to take part by hosting special guided tours and activities. •


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Aus Oma's K端che Rumtopf Start your Rumtopf in early summer so you can enjoy the rum soaked fruit at Christmas. Fruit preserved with sugar and rum. Rumtopf, which literally means rum pot, is a German dessert, traditionally eaten around Christmas. A mixture of various kinds of fruit, rum and sugar are placed into a large stoneware pot (the rum pot) and matured for several months until the fruit is very soft and completely saturated with rum. Making rumtopf is relatively easy yet one must be patient as the final result can only be seen after the second or third month, which means it takes at least 2-3 months until the complete stage. Ingredients: Fresh fruit (approximately 1 pound) Sugar (approximately 1/2 pound) Good quality (unflavored) dark rum to cover the fruit by 1 inch The idea is to start with whatever fruit is fresh and relevant right now. You're looking for ripe fruit (not over ripe) full of flavor. The best fruits to use are: Cherries (any variety, pitted and stemmed) Apricots (halved, pitted) Nectarines (halved, pitted) Peaches (halved, pitted, quartered or sliced) Pears (cored, peeled and sliced) Plums (remove seed and halve or quarter) Grapes (sweet seedless red or green are perfect) Strawberries (remove stem and leaves) Raspberries Red currants (removed from stem) Pluots (remove seed and halve or quarter)

The following fruits do not work as well: Blackberries or blueberries (they can be bitter and discolor the other fruit) Watermelon and canteloupe (can make the mixture watery) Rhubarb (can make it too sour) Bananas (too mushy) Citrus (too acidic) Apples (they get a wierd texture) Directions: Wash the inside of a large ceramic crock with a lid (Rumtopf ). Wash and dry the first chosen fruit. Remove and stems, seeds, and pits. Place the one pound of fruit and the half pound of sugar into the Rumtopf. Pour in enough rum to cover the fruit by at least one inch. Cover the opening of the rumtopf tightly with plastic (to prevent evaporation) and place the lid firmly on top. Store in a cool place away from heat and sunlight. You may even store it in the refrigerator. Every month add another layer of fruit. For each additional layer of fruit follow the instructions above. Throughout the summer, repeat the process for each new fruit layer until your Rumtopf is full. If all the fruit you want to use is available on the same day, you may fill up the Rumtopf with layers of fruit and sugar and rum. Then allow the entire mixture to sit for another 4 to 6 weeks. Check periodically to make sure their is no extra fermentation taking place. If you see bubbles beginning to develop, you have fermentation. If this happens, add rum that is 151 proof to suppress the fermentation.


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Calendar of Events June 4 Milwaukee, WI. Board meeting at 5:30 pm. Singing at 7:30 pm. 6 Benton Harbor, MI. All you can eat Monthly Fish Fry. Doors open at 5:30om. Food served at 6:00 pm. $9 per adult, $4 per child. (ages 2-12). 2651 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI. 7 Chicago, IL. Kino Kaffee und Kuchen, 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave., Chicago, IL. 11 Milwaukee, WI. Dancing 6:00 pm. Singing 7:00. 14 Chicago, IL. Kino Kaffee und Kuchen, 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave., Chicago, IL. 16 Chicago, IL. 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil - Viewing Party. FREE and open to the public. Beer and snacks available for purchase. 1:00 pm. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave. Chicago IL. 773-561-9181. 18 Milwaukee, WI. Singing 7:00 pm. 18 Erie, PA. Meeting at the Erie Männerchor Club. 7:00 pm. Program TBA. 21 Chicago, IL. 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil - Viewing Party. FREE and open to the public. Beer and snacks available for purchase. 4:00 pm. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave. Chicago IL. 773-561-9181. 21-22 Benton Harbor, MI. Concertina Weekend. The doors will be open from 12 - 8 pm. DANK Haus, 2651 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI. 22 Bristol, IN. DANK Chapter South Bend meets at Bonnervile Mill Park. 1:00 pm. 53373 CR 131. Bring a lunch.

Party. FREE and open to the public. Beer and snacks available for purchase. 1:00 pm. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave. Chicago IL. 773-561-9181. 28 Chicago, IL. Kino Kaffee und Kuchen, 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave., Chicago, IL. 29 Milwaukee, WI. Chapter Picnic. Noon. Location: Sacred Heart. 30 Chicago, IL. 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil - Viewing Party. FREE and open to the public. Beer and snacks available for purchase. 1:00 pm. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave. Chicago IL. 773-561-9181

July 2 Milwaukee, WI. Singing 7:00 pm. 9 Milwaukee, WI. Dancing 6:00 pm. Singing 7:00. 11 Benton Harbor, MI. All you can eat Montly Fish Fry. Doors open at 5:30om. Food served at 6:00 pm. $9 per adult, $4 per child. (ages 2-12). 2651 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI. 12 South Bend, IN. Backyard Picnic at Annemarie’s House. Potluck. 1:00 pm. 16509 Bennington Ct, Grangerm IN. 12 Frankfort, IL Summer Picnic/Bonfire/Campout. Music by Paloma. DANK Chicago South, 25249 S Center Rd., Frankfort, IL 16 Milwaukee, WI. Singing 7:00 pm. 19 Erie, PA. Picnic at Scott Park.

25 Milwaukee, WI. Dancing 6:00 pm. Singing 7:00.

20 Wadsworth, IL. DANK Lake County Chapter Picnic. Van Patten Woods ,Wadsworth, IL.

26 Chicago, IL. 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil - Viewing

25-27 Milwaukee, WI. German Fest.


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Continued from page 9 Earlier in the day, William Bessa and DANK member Don Wohlfeil met the Pieptone group at one of the Milwaukee radio stations that plays German music. Robert Deglau, DJ for the WJYI 1340AM radio show, Continental Showcase, interviewed the group in anticipation of the evening dance. Pieptone’s music has been played on this show, as well as another WJYI 1340AM radio show, Heimatecho, with DJs Bob Ziegenbein and Greg Drust. Other activities throughout the night included a delightful dance performance by the Milwaukee Donauschwaben Jugendgruppe. In addition, raffle tickets were sold for the ten different baskets that contained German and American beer, German wines and liquor, and snacks. For those with other interests, several baskets contained sodas instead of alcoholic beverages. Tickets were also sold for the 50-50 raffle. It was fittingly won by a long-time DANK Chapter Milwaukee member celebrating her birthday with family and friends, on the eve of Mother’s Day. Food was available for purchase throughout the evening. The food area was run by Jill Shearer. Jill and her crew created tasty and visually appealing vegetable Continued from page 20 of Lorin Schab, John Stern, Gary Dietz, Kathy Kruss, Dan Duffy and Bob Kaiser. Compliments to Sandy & Mike Murray along with Marianne Dietz for preparing a delicious menu of roasted pork dinner. Their diligent kitchen team consisted of Linda Wilson, Karin and Mike Konrath, Chris Beutow, Marlene Kaiser, Norene Kurth and Angelika Thomas. The pastries of Bienenstich and Schwarzwälderkirschtorte were delightful. Special feature of the Maifest was the German style beer brewed especially for our Maifest by the Brewmeister Neil Byers at Chicago’s South side Beverly neighbor-

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DANK Chapter Milwaukee Vice-President William Bessa (left) and Member Don Wohlfeil make final raffle basket preparations. and authentic German sandwich plates. Baked goods were donated by the DANK Chor. The event enjoyed support from multiple German Chor groups and German related groups in the Milwaukee area. Event proceeds will be used to support German education programs. • DANK Chapter Milwaukee is on facebook! “Like” us at www.facebook.com/dankmilwaukee. hood—Horse Thief Hollow Brewing Company. A full house of family fun was enjoyed by all especially with the musical entertainment of Chicago’s top notch band the Phenix. Happy raffle winners were Doris Knight, Bernie Uhlein, and Ilse Richter. We are thrilled when other German clubs support us thanks to St. Hubertus, DANK Fox Valley, DANK Chicago West and North, as well as former Prinz and Prinzess’ from the Chicago Rheinischer Verein. Most of all a heartfelt thanks to our own members who give their continual support to their organization vielen Dank. Please join us for future south side German fun. • Respectfully submitted, Anita Walthier


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The wild horses of Dülmen

The Dülmen horse is the “Endangered Livestock Breed 2014”

When people think of wild horses, many think of mustangs in the United States or Camargue horses in southern France. But there are also such wild animals in Germany: the Dülmen horses. At the International Green Week in Berlin, they will be presented as the “Endangered Livestock Breed 2014”. There are only 485 of these animals. The Dülmen horses are on the “Red List of Threatened Species” in Europe and have been classified by the Society for the Conservation of Old and Threatened Livestock Breeds as “critically endangered”. The wild horses from Westphalia are said to have been already described by Caesar’s annalist: small shaggy animals that move very swiftly. The first documentary evidence that mentions the existence of the oldest breed of small horses in Germany is from 1316.

The original habitat of the Dülmen horses is near the eponymous town of Dülmen between the Ruhr area and Münster. In Germany of the early nineteenth century there were still isolated hunting grounds where the horses lived in the wild. But because of the redistribution of agricultural land in the postNapoleonic period, the animals lost their native habitat. In 1850 Alfred, Duke of Croy, caused the last of these wild horses, a small herd of about twenty animals, to be captured and placed in an enclosure in the Merfelder Bruch that he provided. It is thanks to Croy that the Dülmen horses were not exterminated. Today about 360 of the ponies live in the Dülmen reserve. Outside this wild life preserve, there are today about 125 of the animals in the Federal Republic. In order to control the population in the reserve, since 1907 all wild horses have been herded into an arena on the last Saturday in May and the one-year old stallions captured with bare hands. The herd is then released back into the wild and only the young stallions are sold. Outside the wild, Dülmen horses are prized as riding and family horses and are suitable for use in rural conservation. • © www.deutschland.de

July 30, 2003 Last classic VW Beetle rolls off the line July 30, 2003, the last of 21,529,464 Volkswagen Beetles built since World War II rolls off the production line at Volkswagen's plant in Puebla, Mexico. One of a 3,000-unit final edition, the baby-blue vehicle was sent to the Volkswagen Museum in Wolfsburg, Germany, where the company is headquartered. • "Fünf Mark die Woche musst Du sparen, willst Du im eigenen Wagen fahren."


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Odds & Ends Message in a Bottle, Found in the Baltic Sea, Is 100 Years Old A 100-year-old message bobbling about in the Baltic Sea since 1913 has been traced by a German museum to its original writer. Discovered by Konrad Fischer, a German fisherman, found the bottle in the Baltic Sea near Kiel, Germany. The glass container and its message are believed to be the oldest message in a bottle ever found. The brown bottle is marked with “Kiel” – the capital and most populous city in the northern German state of Schleswig-Holstein – and inside was a postcard that had lost much of its writing over the decades. In 1913 Richard Platz, who was 20 years old at the time, was on a hike with a nature group when he threw the bottle in the Baltic Sea. Much of the original message was lost, though stamps attached to the century old postcard were still attached. The message requested that the finder return the bottle and message to the originator’s

home address in Berlin. Investigators used the address as a starting point to trace the sender’s family lineage. Holger von Neuhoff of the International Maritime Museum was impressed with the find. “This is

Hamburg works towards car-less future Hamburg, Germany’s second largest city, has stated its intention to ban vehicular traffic in its center by 2034 as part of a broad initiative to make the city more bicycle- and pedestrian-friendly. Under the plan, called the Green Network, 40% of the city will be given over to greenways and park land. The plan is modelled partially on one in progress in Copenhagen, Denmark, where lengthy bicycle paths are being built to connect surrounding communities with the city. Hamburg city spokeswoman Angelika Fritsch says that in 15 to 20 years, residents and visitors will "be able to explore the city exclusively on bike and foot." •

certainly the first time such an old message in a bottle was found, particularly with the bottle intact,” Neuhoff said. Platz’s 62-year-old granddaughter Angela Erdmann, who lives in Berlin, was the recipient of the bottle. Erdmann never knew her grandfather on her mother’s side; Platz died in 1946 at the age of 54. When presented with the bottle, Erdmann was quite moved to hold a piece of a family line she knew little about. “It was almost unbelievable,” Erdmann said. “That was a pretty moving moment. Tears rolled down my cheeks.” The bottle and its postcard will be on display at the International Maritime Museum in Hamburg, Germany. Thereafter, researchers will attempt to recover the rest of the postcard's message using document salvage techniques. •


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Odds & Ends German G8 Presidency 2015 Germany will take over the G8 presidency in 2015 and host the annual meeting of Heads of State and Government of the G8 on June 4 and 5. The Chancellor has decided that the summit will take place at Schloss Elmau. The nearby hotel Kranzbach will also be used. The summit is an opportunity to address current international challenges and priority issues in an international context. The Elmau and Kranzbach hotels are located in the Bavarian Alps, near Garmisch-Partenkirchen, about 100 kilometers south of Munich. The venue meets all logistic and safety requirements. Its delightful scenery provides an attractive setting for the talks and meetings between the Heads of State and Government. The summit will take place on June 4 and 5, 2015. Germany will take over the presidency of the G8 ("Group of Eight") in 2015 and will therefore also be the host of the annual meeting of Heads of State and Government of the G8 members: France, Germany,

Great Britain, Italy, Japan, the United States of America, Canada (since 1976) and Russia (since 1998). Germany last held the presidency of the G8 in 2007; the summit had taken place in Heiligendamm, Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania. •

Ambassador Peter Wittig Starts His Work in Washington Peter Wittig is the Ambassador of the Federal Republic of Germany to the United States. He most recently served as Permanent Representative of Germany to the United Nations. Ambassador Wittig joined the German Foreign Service in 1982 and has served in Madrid, New York (Permanent Mission to the United Nations), at Foreign Office headquarters as private secretary to the Foreign Minister and as Ambassador to Lebanon. As Ambassador to Cyprus, he also was the Special Envoy of the German Government for the Cyprus Question. In 2006 Ambassador Wittig was appointed Director-General for the

United Nations and Global Issues in the Foreign Office in Berlin. Before starting his career in the German Foreign Service, Wittig studied history, political science and law at Bonn, Freiburg, Canterbury and Oxford Universities and taught as Assistant Professor at the University of Freiburg. He has written articles on the history of ideas and on foreign policy. Peter Wittig is married to journalist and writer Huberta von Voss-Wittig. The couple has four children, Valeska, Maximilian, Augustin and Felice . •


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Odds and Ends Researchers in Germany Laud Health Benefits in Chocolate Chocoholics, rejoice! Researchers in Germany recently shed light on yet another reason why this delectable sweet should be a staple in everyone's diet. A team of researchers at the Düsseldorf University Hospital worked together with scientists from the US and Great Britain to analyze the health properties of cocoa, the key ingredient in chocolate. Dr. Christian Heiß and Dr. Roberto Sansone, the leaders of the Düsseldorf team, found that small amounts of chocolate consumed regularly can lead to a decrease in blood pressure. The study was conducted on men and women between the ages of 50 and 80. For two weeks, half of the group would drink a chocolatey morning drink and the other half would remain cocoa-less. In the end, the participants with the daily dose of chocolate had more elasticity in their arteries. In the younger participants, both diastolic and systolic blood pressure was reduced by the chocolate diet. In older participants, only the diastolic pressure was reduced. Chocolate intake leads to a clear widening of the inner vascular walls, said Heiß and Sansone at the 80th anniversary of the German Cardiac Society last week. Larger pas-

sageways mean less strain on the heart, which lowers blood pressure. While the team doesn't recommend replacing medicine with chocolate, it is clear that moderate cocoa intake daily can help to reduce mild high blood pressure. • © Germany.info

German Astronaut to Spend Six Months in Space German geoscientist Alexander Gerst will spend half a year at the International Space Station (ISS), making him the eleventh German astronaut to reach space and the third German at the ISS. Gerst lifted off May 28 with American colleague Reid Wiseman and Russian colleague Maksim Surayev, and joined join three other astronauts already stationed at the ISS. Gerst, a 37-year-old scientist from Künzelsau, Baden-Württemberg, is serving as a flight engineer during the six-month expedition, and will conduct a variety of European and international science experiments ranging from material sciences to medicine. "Sometimes I wake up in the

morning and am unsure if this was all just a dream," Gerst told the Westdeutsche Zeitung, expressing his excitement for the journey. The ISS is the largest artificial body in the Earth's orbit. It is located between 205 and 270 miles from Earth and can sometimes be seen with the naked eye. The space station has been continuously occupied since Expedition 1 arrived in November 2000. Gerst will be a part of Expeditions 40 and 41. The German scientist was chosen for the mission by the European Space Agency and has undergone training since 2009. He will lift off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan and return from his mission in November 2014. •

© Germany.info


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Odds and Ends Berlin’s Airport 2014 Opening Cancelled Berlin's much-delayed Brandenburg International Airport will remain closed until 2016, adding yet another year to the string of setbacks and pushing the airport almost five years behind schedule. This latest delay is blamed on several reasons, including the unplanned reconstruction of the northern runway owing to stricter rules for noise protection. German media reports that airport chief Hartmut Mehdorn informed the government that the opening of the German capital’s new international airport will take place "at the earliest in March 2016", assuming there are no more hurdles placed in his path. It's the seventh proposed opening date for the new airport, which now sits idle despite appearing complete from the outside. The airport’s price tag has climbed accordingly from

€2.5 billion to the current €4.3 billion. When it opens, the airport will have a capacity for 30 million passengers per year, growing to 50 million when more planned terminals open. The airport will likely have an important impact on the flow of European travel when it finally opens. •

Munich has legalized public nudity Munich, Germany’s third largest city, has legalized public nudity by introducing six designated nudist zones. Since last autumn - when statewide laws stopping nude sunbathing expired - the issue of public nudity has been debated in the city. It has now been decided that nudists are officially welcome to strip. The six designated nudist areas are not fenced off or hidden away, although their location in parkland grants them a degree of privacy.

One nudist zone is situated in a main tourist spot along a stream, which is barely 10 minutes away from Munich’s main square. Public nudity in Munich has gone on for years, and it is common to see people walking around unclothed in several spots in the city, such as the Englischer Garten, and various spots along the Isar River. Nudity is not restricted to Munich; the practice is common across Germany, where the first naturist beach was set up back in 1920. •

Germany's longest word:

Donau­dampfschiffahrts­elektrizitäten­hauptbetriebswerk­bauunterbeamten­gesellschaft The 79 letters translates into 15 words in English: "Association for subordinate officials of the head office management of the Danube steamboat electrical services."


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DANK Summer Membership Drive Continues Through October 30th From June 1st to October 30th, DANK is offering a special pro-rated membership fee to new members who join during this time period only. The fee, $40 per single/head of household has been reduced to $20; spouses from $10 to $5. ($25/couple). This will cover membership dues for the balance of 2014. As a new member, you will receive four issues of our German American Journal: June/July, Aug/Sept, Oct/ Nov, and the Dec/Jan 2014 issues - (a $10 value); you will be joining the brotherhood of thousands of people who actively acknowledge and preserve their Germanic heritage; meet other like members and share in

the camaraderie of a chapter at special events such as German American Day, Oktoberfests, Christmas parties and more. Many chapters offer discounted prices to chapter members; opportunities to travel, language classes and more. Most importantly they will be helping us to preserve the heritage entrusted to us when the German immigrants gathered to lay the foundation of respecting and honoring our German heritage. To join or enroll new members go to www.DANK.org and join on-line. Or for more information contact our National Office: 888-USA-DANK . •


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Thank you! We would like to thank the generous members and friends listed below who have supported the works of the German American National Congress through their donations. German American Day Roland Buck Ruth Reichmann Christiane Manko-Morgan Raymond Lintner Education Fund Theresa Stontisch Pamela Dixon Dora Buechner Hannelore Schoenauer Joanne Keenan Erika Eddy Katie Viebacg Klaus Ruetschlin

Daniel Bolle Gudrun Watson Christiane Manko-Morgan James Garlitz Newspaper Fund Sabine Baker Theresa Stonitisch Albert Pizzato Catherine Schwab Buck Roland Alfred Chlubek Heinrich Taube Erika Lange Joyce Bistrabsky

Jill Shearer Walterhageman Daniel Bolle George Rykowski Renate Zerngast Glen Flagler Andrew Scherer Christiane Manko-Morgan Lee Ann Kohler Brandon Myers Arthur Schwotzer Raymond Lintner David Ungerman

DANK Education Fund at Work! If you have been one of the members who has donated to the DANK Education Fund, an independent 501c3 Fund, totally separate from the DANK organization, you may have wondered how is that money used. Over the years we have supported German Language Programs provided by our various Chapters , donated financial support to outside groups requesting assistance with German language and Cultural programs as well as support Education/ Cultural efforts at the local level when requests were in keeping with the Mission of the Fund. One of the most recent supportive efforts was provided to DANK Chapter Chicago who is experiencing a growth of interest with teaching the German language to children. While the Education Fund had wanted to assist more fully, we were limited in the amount we could provide, thus a $750 grant was awarded to DANK Chapter Chicago to meet their $8000 Fund raising challenge. Obviously the Education Fund is limited by the donations provided to

it by DANK members and others and has to consider other requests in order to keep the Fund in good standing. So if you wish to help grow the Education Fund while getting a tax write off you can always contribute to this Fund in any amount you are able. Donations to the fund have varied in size from $500 (Mrs. Magdalena Eisenloeffel –Chapter Pittsburgh) to donations of $5 or $10 by numerous members as well as non-members. If you wish to provide a donation in your name or someone else we would be happy to accept any amount and send an acknowledgement to the persons in whose name the donation was made. Let’s keep our German culture and heritage alive by assisting the DANK Education Fund. Donations can be forwarded to the DANK Office – made out to the DANK Education Fund and they will be forwarded accordingly. Thank you! • Erik Wittmann DANK Education Fund Chair


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Continued from page 14 In January, 1981 German Fest, Inc. was issued a charter. The original 5 members were Walter Geissler, Chairman, Marianne Trivalos, Kaspar Peters, Rolf Hoffmann and Anton Siladi. The first German Fest was held on August 14-16 1981. DANK members have held key positions with German Fest during the 30 years of its existence. The best way to describe Milwaukee’s German Fest is, “Often imitated but never duplicated.” Skeptics said that the Fest would never happen, the societies will not work together. Some tried for the past fifty years. Through the efforts of many hard working volunteers German Fest has become a reality. Out of 30 German American Societies, 20 participated in the first Fest. DANK Milwaukee did not give up this time, and German Fest is still going. In 1983 Inge Stibbe convinced the chapter to sponsor a singing group within the chapter. Doris Mueller was the first director. Roland and Martin Stibbe provided the guitar accompaniment. The DANK Folk Singers began as a ladies singing group and later added a men’s section. In 1999 the name was changed to the Milwaukee DANK Chor.

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Also started in 1983 was our Chapter’s own youth group. The youth group was called the Zukunft Gruppe. Anni Hammermeister’s son Wolfgang was the first president of the youth group. Our Chapter has had 4 regional Presidents on the National DANK Board, Oskar Grossman, Anni Schmidt, Adeline Kraenzler and Edwin Günther. Bob Miske has been a National Treasurer and convention coordinator and Christel Miske has been a National Secretary. Currently, Ron Kabitzke is the Chapter President and the DANK National 1st Vice-President, and Bob Miske is still the DANK National Treasurer. The past few years have seen changes in the way our DANK Milwaukee Chapter provides help for German language education. Since we no longer have our own school, we now aid our area schools with gifts of computers, providing resources for teachers and students and with cash grants to teachers of the German language and culture. We are still promoting our German heritage through dance and song throughout the Milwaukee area with every opportunity made available to us. •

Hermann has become the symbol of New Ulm, today in 2014 the most German city in America with 66% of its citizens claiming Germanic ancestry. Over 12,000 people visit Berndt's Hermann Monument every year, and thousands more picnic in the park surrounding it. Visitors may climb the spiral staircase to an observation platform which commands a magnificent view of New Ulm and the Minnesota River Valley for 15 miles. For more information go to the website: ww.HermannMonument.com • On the cover: Lake Constance/Bodensee. Measuring 40 miles in length and 7.5 miles at its widest point, Lake Constance, which is sited at the tripoint of Switzerland/Germany/Austria, is the third largest lake in Central Europe. More than half of the shoreline os Lake Constance is in Germany. There are three distinct areas. The German stretch on the north shore, between Bregenz in Austria and the town of Konstanz and the Swiss border, is known as Obersee; Uberlingen, the north-western arm; and Untersee, the "lower lake" in the south-west. The views are from German shore across to the Swiss Alps are stunning. The area is rich in catles, baroque churches, excuisite town swaures and curious museum, while the hinterland is dotted with pretty villages. •


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We are sadden to hear the passing of Carol Erzinger. Following is a letter originally written to DANK Chicago South November, 20, 2013. Unfortunately we just received this information. We offer our heartfelt condolences to the family and friends of Mrs. Erzinger. Dear Friends of Unsere liebe Mutter, Carol Erzinger passed away peacefully at home surrounded by her Family on 4-21-13. I did contact the Chicago South chapter via information I found on your website and her Newsletter is now addressed to “The Family of Carol Erzinger”, but apparently and unfortunately it did not reach those of you who knew her personally. Her friends of DANK meant very much to her. As you know, she was very active with and dedicated to the Kankakee chapter for many years. She served as President, Vice President, and Treasurer, as did her brother, John Schierholz, who survives her. While working full time and raising me, she took on many responsibilities to ensure Kankakee’s success and involvement, arranging various fund raising events, social gatherings, and bus trips to the Milwaukee German Fest for many years. She ensured that I was involved as well, as she was so very proud that she was 100% German and wanted me to be as proud of my heritage as was she. When the Kankakee chapter dissolved, she ensured that the Treasury went to the benefit of the Chicago South Treasury. I would be very grateful if you would honor her 30+ years of active dedication to DANK with a small tribute in your newsletter, as the friends that she knew were not limited to Kankakee or Chicago

South. She was so fond of you all and had so much FUN, not to mention the sehr gutes bier! She is missed so very much by her family and so many friends. I will continue to attend varied functions at Chicago South as my schedule allows. She would be very proud of me to continue the tradition. Danke Schoen, Beth Erzinger and Family

Juliana Mueller Juliana Mueller age 85 late of Mokena, IL. Passed away peacefully at her home on April 19, 2014. Loving Mother of Ronald (Mary) Mueller. Devoted Oma of Steven (Kristen), Richard and Michael. Great grandmother of Elena Juliana. Fond Aunt of many nieces and nephews. In lieu of flowers memorials would be appreciated for the charity of your choice. Juliana was a member of D.A.N.K. South and D'Lustigen Holzhacker Baum, Chicago, IL.


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Kinderecke

Der Apfelbaum Krone Bl채tter

Apfel

Zweige

Stamm

Wurzeln


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Allen unseren Mitgliedern wünschen wir ein frohes Pfingstfest

„Leser, wie gefall' ich dir? Leser, wie gefällst du mir?“ Friedrich von Logau



German American Journal | June/July 2014