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Proud To Be German - American Stolz Deutsch - Amerikaner Zu Sein Visit us at www.DANK.org

Volume 61 Number5

Frankfurt am Main Skyline

2013 October - November


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Contents Of This Issue 4

From the President’s Desk by Beverly Pochatko

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26th Anniversary of German American Day

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World Freedom Day

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Biennial National Convention - MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS!

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German American Day in Springfield, IL

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Chapter Chatter (Chapter News and Updates)

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Celebrating St Martin's Day

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Office Update

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The Lynching of Robert Prager

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German Halloween, All Saints and All Souls Day

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48th Annual General von Steuben Day Parade, Chicago

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Kurznachrichten

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The German Wine Route

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Calendar of Events

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Odds & Ends

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Aus Oma's Küchen

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Kinderecke

Editorial Staff Beverly Pochatko Eve Timmerhaus Eva Timmerhaus George Nagata Correspondents Anne Marie Fuhrig Christa Garcia Francine McKenna Desktop Publishing and Design George Nagata Advertising and Classifieds Eve Timmerhaus

General Information

German American Journal -ISSN 1086-8070 is published bi-monthly and is the official publication of the German American National Congress. Periodicals postage paid at Chicago IL. and additional mailing offices.

POSTMASTER” Send address changes to: German-American Journal 4740 N. Western Avenue Suite 206 Chicago IL. 60625-2013 Annual Subscription Rate $15.00 www.dank.org/news.html

DANK does not warrant or assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any information published herein. DANK preserves the right to change or amend submissions for any reason without prior notice.


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From The President’s Desk Beverly Pochatko, National President Liebe Mitglieder und Freunde, Dear members and friends of DANK, Where, oh where has summer gone? There is generally a flurry of activities during the summer months and it really makes time move oh so quickly. Our chapters have had German American Day celebrations, festivals, annual picnics, participated in parades and much more. Now we are in Oktoberfest mode and soon we will be attending Volkstrauertrag ceremonies sponsored by several chapters across the country. Our upcoming national convention and election of officers takes place November 1st-3rd in Chicago. You don’t need me to tell you this is important for all our members. You have chosen your delegates to represent and speak for you; and even if you are not attending as a delegate, you are invited to attend and be a part of this biannual event. When you receive your next GAJ magazine, your new Executive Board will be in place. For the past two years, our board has worked diligently to bring new life to DANK. We are the ‘tree’ that supports the branches (chapters), and adding new leaves (members), gives us renewing life. Without your support, none of this would have been possible. In the past two years, we have welcomed 14 new Life Members…people who believe in the future of DANK. We welcomed a new chapter in the Bay City area of Michigan and have inquiries on starting new chapters in New York State. Changes have included the transition from a bi-monthly newspaper to that of a bi-monthly magazine; the unpopular yet necessary raise in membership dues for head-of-household. The office has made the transition from an old, out-dated computer database to an up-to-date programming system. At my recommendation, the Executive Board approved a ‘bare bones’ budget to curb expenses. Travel expenses to attend Executive Board meetings in Chicago were traded off by holding meetings via teleconferencing, with a substantial savings. It has not been easy, however it has paid off. Without the support of my board, Erik Wittmann, our Membership Chairman, Eve Timmerhaus, our office secretary, George Nagata, computer services, this would not have been possible. Special thanks to Bob Miske who made all the arrangements for our national convention. Most importantly, I want to thank all of you for your support for the past two years as I served as your National President. When I accepted the nomination to be your national president, I knew that the task ahead of me would be tough, and that the future of DANK depended on making the right decisions. Again, thank you for placing your trust in me to ensure the future of DANK. Mit freundlichen Grüßen, Beverly A Pochatko National President

DANK seeks to bring together Americans of German descent in the pursuit of cultivating and presenting their heritage and interests on local, regional and national levels. These were the primary reasons that the German American National Congress was founded in 1959 and they are still among the organization’s primary objectives today.

DANK National Executive Board President: Beverly Pochatko Vice President : James Dombrowski Treasurer: Bob Miske Secretary: Linda Voit Membership: Erik Wittmann DANK National Executive Office 4740 N. Western Avenue Chicago IL. 60625-2013 Phone: (773) 275-1100 Toll Free: 1-888-USA-DANK Office Hours: 9 am - 4 pm Monday, Wednesday-Friday Executive Secretary Eva Timmerhaus Office Manager Eve Timmerhaus


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26th Anniversary of German American Day A Look back: President Reagan Signs First Proclamation This year we celebrate the 26th Anniversary of German American Day. Following are remarks from President Ronald Reagan on the signing of the first German-American Day Proclamation in the Rose Garden: October 2, 1987 Well, thank you, President Jenninger, Ambassador Guenther van Well, Senator Lugar, and distinguished guests. Some say this is German-American Day. I don't know. Seeing the band here in costume, I'd say it is Oktoberfest. [Laughter] As the President [Jenner] has told us, it was 304 years ago this coming week that a small band of Mennonites disembarked from their ship, the Concord, in Pennsylvania. They made their way from Philadelphia to what is now Germantown, where they established the first German community in what is now the United States. Since that time, German-Americans have helped forge the ideals and dreams that have built our nation. It was a German-American, John Peter Zenger, who first fought for and established the tradition of freedom of the press on this continent. The Colonial Governor charged Zenger with libel, and Zenger's defense was that he had printed the truth. He won, and the principle he established lives to this day: that the press can and must be free to tell the truth. Freedom and the opportunities that freedom brings have been enduring themes in the German-American story. In 1830 one young German engineer wrote eloquently of his yearning for freedom, in particular, the freedom to try new ideas and pursue new dreams. He had seen the bureaucratic restrictions on commercial freedom in Westphalia, where he had found his first job after graduating from the Royal Polytechnic Institute in Berlin. No project could go forward, he wrote, without -- in his words -- ``an army of counselors, ministers, and other officials discuss-

ing the matter for 10 years, making long journeys and writing long reports.'' And a few months after arriving, he wrote: ``I have found all that I sought -- a free, reasonable, democratic government and reasonable, natural relationships of the people toward each other -- no unbearable taxes, no executor, no arrogant chief magistrate.'' Well, the writer of those words was named John Roebling, and he designed and, with his son, built one of the greatest monuments to engineering in American history, the Brooklyn Bridge, which has been sold many times -- or attempted to be sold by certain individuals. [Laughter] But, yes, America's genuine [German] heritage is rich. It is deep and fertile. It's helped nourish and cultivate our national heritage, our national accomplishments, and our national ideals. And that's why I'm so happy to have all of you here today. I remember back when I was a boy in Illinois, up near the Wisconsin border. The German heritage was displayed with pride. The German language, at that time, was the second most widely spoken language in the Nation. Here in America, German-Americans have helped give our nation its freedom, optimism, enterprise, and its love of peace. Today this heritage is Germany's, as well. A common dedication to democracy, freedom, and peace ties America and Germany together. It is the bedrock upon which our alliance has been built‌" Note: The President in the Rose Garden at the White House. In his opening remarks, he referred to West German President Philip Jenninger; Guenther van Well, West German Ambassador to the United States; and Senator Richard G. Lugar of Indiana. The President also referred to Mrs. Reagan, who watched the ceremony from a window in the Residence. •


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World Freedom Day’s 12th Anniversary This year marks the 12th anniversary of World Freedom Day, celebrated every year on November 9 to commemorate the fall of the Berlin Wall. President George W. Bush first declared this day a federal observance in 2001. On November 9, 1989, the people of Germany “broke through a barrier that divided their nation, demonstrating no wall is strong enough to hold back the rising tide of human liberty,” President Barack Obama said yesterday in his official proclamation about World Freedom Day. In 2000, the Postal Service issued a stamp to honor this historic moment—signifying an end to Communist rule in Eastern Europe and a victory for democracy worldwide. Conservative organization Young America’s Foundation celebrates this day as part of their Freedom Week, which encompasses Veterans Day, as well, and focuses specifically on President Ronald Reagan’s efforts in ending the Cold War and “defeating communism.” Serving from 1981–1989, President Reagan oversaw a tumultu-

ous and important time in the history of America—and the world. For roughly 40 years, the Cold War “waged” between the U.S. and the Communist controlled-USSR, with tension about an impending nuclear holocaust constantly mounting. “Peace through strength” is how Reagan characterized his foreign policy toward the Soviet Union, and he was confident he could negotiate nuclear arms reduction from that position. Ultimately, “The Great Communicator” was successful, holding a series of summit meetings with Soviet Union head of state Mikhail S. Gorbachev over several years

that resulted in nuclear disarmament and the eventual end of the Cold War in 1991. Reagan was no longer in office when the Berlin Wall came down but still received much of the credit for putting the wheels in motion. His famous speech delivered on June 12, 1987, at the Brandenburg Gate in West Berlin, in which Reagan boldly challenged Gorbachev to “tear down this wall,” is considered a turning point in the fight for freedom. For 12 years, America has formally recognized the importance of the fall of the Berlin Wall and used that symbol of justice and freedom as a reminder of where the world has been and what we are capable of achieving. As President Obama said, “on World Freedom Day, we renew our commitment to all who believe—even in the face of cynicism, doubt, and oppression— that walls truly can come down.” •


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Biennial National Convention

There is still time to register for the biennial convention held November 1-3, 2013 at the Holiday Inn Express located at 6600 N Mannheim Rd in Rosemont, Illinois. The Holiday Inn Express has made the following rooms available to us under the terms of the contract for the weekend of the convention: Room Rates: • Standard King: $89.00 per night • Standard Double/Double: $99.00 per night • Junior Suite: $129.00 per night • Executive King Suite: $149.00 per night. Use the code DAN when reserving rooms by calling 877-408-9681. If you wish to reserve a room online, please use the following link : http://www.ihg.com/holidayinnexpress/hotels/us/en/rosemont/chiri/hoteldetail?qAdlt=1&qChld =0&qRms=1&qIta=99801505&qGrpCd=DAN&qPSt=0& qSmP=3&qWch=0&qSHp=1&qBrs=6c.cp.cv.cw.ex.hi.ic. in.rs.sb&qSrt=BRAND_SORT&qRpp=25&qFRA=1&srb_ u=1&icdv=99801505 Rooms must be reserved by October 11, 2013 or they will be released to the public and those delegates who do not reserve them by then will be charged the regular rate. Convention kicks off Friday evening, November 1, with

a get-together at the Holiday Inn Express in the hospitality suite. This is a great way to renew old friendships, and meet new members. The hospitality suite closes at 11 pm. Saturday morning begins with registration of delegates and guests followed by the biennial meeting complete with the election of the new Executive Board. After the lunch break everyone will have the opportunity to air chapter grievances and learn from the experiences of different chapters. Saturday evening’s festivities will be held at the Hofbräuhaus in Rosemont. At 5:30 pm we will gather in the King Ludwig room where everyone will enjoy a specialized Bavarian buffet. Thanks to the generous donation from DANK Chapter Milwaukee complimentary transportation will be provided to and from the Hofbräuhaus and the Holiday Inn Express for Saturday’s banquet. Seating is limited so reserve your seats early. Sunday morning’s meeting will begin with a look to the future and then it will be time to say “Auf Wiedersehen”. Please forward the completed ticket order form below and payment to the National Office. Advanced reservations are required for dinner. •

National Convention Ticket Order Form Quantity Event Friday Evening Hospitality Room Saturday Morning Breakfast Saturday Lunch Saturday evening @ the Hofbräuhaus

-

Sunday Morning Breakfast

-

Sunday Lunch

Price per person

Total

Complimentary

0.00

Complimentary

0.00

Own Expense

-

$50.00 per person Complimentary

0.00

Own Expense

-

Delegate Fee (Must be approved delegate by local chapter board)

$30.00

Guest

$10.00

Transportation to the Hofbräuhaus Mail payment to: German American National Congress Attention: National Convention 4740 N Western Ave., Suite 206 Chicago, IL 60625

Complimentary

0.00

Total Amount Enclosed: Name: Chapter:

TICKET DEADLINE OCTOBER 12, 2013


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The St. Nikolaus Project Continues Milwaukee’s Germanfest collected 22,300 pounds of food with addition cash donations of $1,100. Everyone who brought a non-perishable food item to support The Hunger Task Force received free admission to the fest on Sunday, July 28. Hunger Task Force believes that every person has a right to adequate food obtained with dignity. Hunger Task Force works to prevent hunger and malnutrition by providing food to people in need today and by promoting social pol-

icies to achieve a hunger free community tomorrow. The German Heritage Festival of Erie, PA is happy to announce canned goods were collected to support the Second Harvest Food Bank of Northwest, PA. A $1 discount was given to everyone who brought a food donation for the St. Nikolaus Project. The mission of the Second Harvest Food Bank of Northwest Pennsylvania is to distribute food to hungry people and eliminate the waste of food.

During fiscal year 2011-12, Second Harvest distributed nearly 11 million pounds of food to 285 member agencies and 135 distribution sites for the Commodity Supplemental Food Program for low-income seniors. Hunger in the United States is an issue that affects millions of Americans. DANK continues to encourage chapters, members and associates to contribute in food pantry collections throughout the year. •

German Soccer Initiative Camp 2013 In June 2013, I received an email from the German Embassy’s network Sprachvergnügen inquiring if anyone was interested in organizing a German Soccer Initiative Camp this year. As a German native, a local high school teacher of German, and a mother of four, I was immediately interested in this opportunity to promote the study of the German language and culture here in South Bend. During the last week of July, two German coaches, Gaetano Andreisek and Matthias Frosch, shared the German soccer tradition with campers by engaging them in the same soccer training German kids receive, while introducing the campers to the German language. Each child developed skills in dribbling, passing, heading, shooting, ball control, foot work and changing direction. As the week progressed, these skills and the children’s confidence on the field

grew trem-endously. This could be seen, especially by the end of the camp, when campers could show off their soccer skills by completing various stations: a creative obstacle courses, relays, and drills for which they earned points. Based on the amount of points each camper received, campers could earn a bronze, silver, or golden DFB and McDonald’s Fußball-Abzeichen. The first German Soccer Initiative Camp took place on the fields of the Indiana Invaders (www.invadersfc.com). Some of the camp fees were donated to the Indiana Invaders who graciously allowed

us full use of their equipment and fields. The Invaders will in turn use our donation to fund a scholarship to sponsor a youth soccer player. The camp was further supported by Concordia Language Villages, Auf Ballhöhe, the Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany, the Weiss Guest House, and by the DANK community of South Bend, Indiana. With the help of DANK and the Weiss Guest House I was able to provide Pausenbrot: granola bras, cookies, fruits, vegetables, and Brezeln accompanied by bottled water, and Apfelsaftschorle. Since the camp has worked out so well, we are already in the process of putting another together for next year. If you would like to receive more information on next year’s camp, please email me: germansoccerinitiative@gmail.com Sincerely, Melanie Mello •


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German American Day

Sunday, October 6, 2013 - 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library & Museum 212 N 6th Street, Springfield, IL

As its ongoing series of ethnic diversity The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum is holding a special event for German American Day on October 6 2013 and has included DANK Chapter Springfield, IL as honored guests. Please plan on joining DANK Chapter Springfield and its members, friends and visitors to this free and once in a lifetime event full of educational, historical, cultural and musical revelry. All presentatios, music and displays are in the multi-purpose room at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library

Presentations Attorney Richard Hart 25th Anniversary of German American Day Guest Speaking German settlers of 1880s (and during time of A. Lincoln) Springfield Illinois Eileen Mackevich Executive Director of the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum Anthony Rubano Illinois Historical Preservation Society and Downtown Architecture Tour Guide Presentation about Walter Netsch, FAIA associated with Skidmore Owings, and Merrill Recitation of Gettysburg Address Pledge of Allegiance Handouts will be available in English and German Music Old State Capitol Chorale - Costumed 1800’s era singers Displays “Boys in Blue" – 19th and 20th Illinois Military Regiment A Civil War military unit composed of German and Irish soldiers Civil War letters and diaries written by German soldiers Photographic Display of: Kessberger & George (Springfield area photographers early 1900’s) Come and see what your surname means in German and there will be so much more! Reservations are appreciated so please contact: Jeff Engel (217-744-8184)


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Chapter Chatter DANK Chapter Lake County, IL picnic – or do you spell it Picknick? According to the Internet, "a picnic is a pleasure excursion at which a meal is eaten outdoors, ideally taking place in a beautiful landscape ..." And if it's on the Internet, it's true! The description fit the pleasurable time our members and friends enjoyed when they gathered at the beautiful Van Patten Woods in Wadsworth, Illinois on Sunday, July 14, for our annual summer picnic, a long-standing DANK Chapter Lake County, IL tradition. The setting was lovely, and the food was delicious and plentiful. Anni and Victor Kordas, with help from their family and friends, once again barbequed mouth-watering chicken and sausages. A plentiful assortment of side dishes, made by club members, and delicious desserts, many of them also homemade, completed the feast. Some of us also enjoyed a cold beer or two, and we all basked in the German Gemütlichkeit that's always "on the menu" when we get together. Competition in the water balloon toss was fierce,

From left: Harry Kordas, Ky Eifert, Megan Kordas, Mike Johnson

Ava Young announcing bingo numbers with help from her Oma, Fini Schmidt.

with the Kordas family once again demonstrating exceptional skill. First place winners were Megan Kordas and Mike Johnson. In second place was father/daughter team Ky Eifert and Harry Kordas. This year, bingo was back by popular demand with Ava Young, assisted by her Oma, Fini Schmidt, announcing the numbers. Join us for Volkstrauertag on November 17! Plans are being finalized for our Chapter's annual Volkstrauertag observance. We will again observe the German People's Day of Mourning at the Fort Sheridan, Illinois, Military Cemetery where nine German POWs are buried. The ceremony will begin at 1:30PM. The day will be memorialized in prayer by the Reverend Richard Käske and in song by members of the combined Rheinischer Gesang Verein and Schwäbischer Sängerbund, directed by Glen Sorgatz. As in past years, we anticipate that a representative of the Consulate General of the Federal Republic of Germany in Chicago will participate in the commemoration as well as members of other DANK Chapters and GermanAmerican organizations. We also expect that members of the Highwood VFW Post will again be with us. For more information, call 847-272-5545. • Ursula Hoeft

National Convention November 1-3 in Rosemont, IL See page 8 for ticket information!


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Chapter Chatter Great Lakes Bay Region hosts Jugendkapelle Gunzenhausen On August 23, 2013 the Atrium Restaurant in downtown Bay City, MI was alive with the sounds of music as the Jugendkapelle Gunzenhausen performed to a capacity crowd. While enjoying a sumptuous German-themed buffet including Sauerbraten, Wiener Schnitzel, and salmon, the appreciative audience listened as the 29-member youth band under the musical direction of Mario Hendreich performed a wonderful selection of traditional, symphonic and modern music during their first stop on their American tour. During the 2-hour concert a “hat” was passed around during the intermission. An envelope with over $325 was given to the most grateful director and tour manager as “Taschengeld” (pocket money) for use by the band members for sou-

venirs, etc. during their tour. The concert ended with a rousing rendition of “Stars and Stripes Forever” which had the entire audience standing and cheering. Following the concert the accordions came out and many stayed to join the spontaneous sing-alongs. Many thanks to Walter Hagen, DANK Chapter Bay City Region Chapter Treasurer and Goodwill Ambassador for being most instrumental in arranging this concert. Everyone is looking forward to the Oktoberfest celebration and the festivities being planned for the first annual German-American Day Party. Thomas Bork, Vice President DANK Chapter Bay City Region

Bay City Mayor Christopher J Shannon

october 6


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Chapter Chatter Pittsburgh’s German Fest The first German Fest in the Pittsburgh area was held Aug. 24 at The Crowne Plaza Hotel in Upper St. Clair. Erik Wittmann, President of DANK Chapter Pittsburgh said last year’s convention was such a success that he was prompted to hold an annual event. The Chapter is trying to maintain the Germanic tra-

dition with the Fest. German performers including the Augsburg German Band and the Bavarian Schuhplattler Dancers . Proceeds from the German Fest are earmarked for the DANK Education Fund. The fund provides financial support to local schools that offer German classes and for scholarships for students focusing on a German language curriculum. •

Erie’s German Heritage Festival Labor Day and our 17th annual German Fest are now a memory of the past. We always ‘throw’ a good party. This year, we were recognized by the media and voted “Number One Ethnic Festival” in Erie County. Guests at the fest said that we were the top rated German Festival in Pennsylvania and that’s why they come to participate. We had visitors from California, Texas, Florida, North Carolina, Michigan, New York, Ohio and Germany! We had a great event that is geared for families and it is nice to see them come year after year! One thing is for sure, we never take the word of the weather forecaster as a certainty. What was predicted was mid-70’s and fair. What we experienced was rain overnight and then the mid-60’s, partly

cloudy on Saturday. Sunday started out beautiful but turned to darkening skies and rain with “Donner und Blitzen” late afternoon - so severe we were advised to shut down for safety reasons at 4:30 P.M. with two and a half hours to go! Well, do you know how difficult it is to make fest goers under huge, crowded tents realize that they had to leave? It wasn’t easy! Seeing this has happened only twice before in seventeen years, we felt blessed! It could have been much worse, attendance was down slightly, but everyone had a great time. The Fest officially opened following a Parade of Flags led by the American, German and Austrian national Continued on page 35


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Chapter Chatter Volkstrauertag Fort Custer National Cemetery

November 17, 2013, Augusta Michigan Many souls braved the winter wind against a sunny sky for last year’s day of mourning at Fort Custer located in Augusta, Michigan, held last November 2012 to honor the twenty-six (26) graves of the World War II German Prisoners of War who died during their internment in the USA. This ceremony started in 1953 as a gesture of peace between the Americans and Germans. This year commemorates the 60th Anniversary of the ceremony and this year will be a more special event than in years past. This is a wonderful event to attend, and I would LOVE to see more support from the local German clubs in and around the Augusta/Battle Creek area and outside their county and others by attending the event or at least making a wreath or even laying down roses at the graves of those “forgotten” soldiers who died here in the USA as POW’S here in Michigan during war times. Even schools in and around the Augusta/Battle Creek area could become involved with those schools teaching the German Language. If you know of any local high schools that teach the German language, please do pass this message on to them. Those learning the German

language may be interested in learning about how these soldiers came to the USA/Michigan in the first place. The Battle Creek Enquirer the local paper from the Battle Creek area has always been so gracious to be out their during the touching ceremony and a choir from Sterling Heights also attends and in the past a choir from Canada has been there. These folks know how very special the event is so please mark your calendar to attend in November 2013. If you have any questions, please do contact me via e-mail ladybug3656@yahoo.com as I would love to share driving directions and the notice that Randy O’Neill from Battle Creek mails out when the time gets closer so that you can “spread the word”. After the heart-warming ceremony, those at the service travel to the Air Force Sergeant’s Association Club, located in Falcon Hall in Battle Creek Michigan, to warm up with some good coffee and delicious treats provided by the wonderful ladies at Falcon Hall and also a time to reflect on the day’s significance and special “60th” Anniversary of the “Forgotten 26”. Story by Donna J. Lippert, DANK Benton Harbor/St. Joseph Membership Chair

DANK Chapter Listing ARIZONA Phoenix IOWA Quad Cities ILLINOIS Chicago Chicago South Chicago West Fox Valley Lake County Northern Suburbs Peoria Springfield INDIANA Indianapolis LaFayette South Bend MICHIGAN Benton Harbor Great Lakes Bay Region NEW JERSEY Pascack Valley OHIO Cleveland PENNSYLVANIA Erie Philadelphia Pittsburgh Uniontown WASHINGTON DC Washington DC WISCONSIN Milwaukee www.dank.org


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As German-American Heritage Museum Director Lentz Moves On, A Look Back “History is best told by stories told Germany.info in a recent about persons. That’s what this interview. “And then they museum is about.” asked me if I have any ideas.” Rüdiger Lentz should know. As Executive Director of the From Eisenhower to Doris German-American Heritage Day Museum of the USA (GAHM), Lentz’s ideas became the baLentz put his expert storysis for launching the GAHM, a telling skills, honed over a noteworthy addition to the lengthy journalism career, to landscape in a world-class use while launching, develmuseum city, after he acceptoping, creating every aspect ed the GAHF board’s invitaRüdiger Lentz , Executive Director of the of the museum—the first of tion to lead the new instituGerman-American Heritage Museum of the USA its kind in DC—over the past tion. (GAHM), three and a half years. Since opening in March 2010, speech. In the rear of the main exThe many fascinating stothe museum has been giving ries over 400 years of German im- hibition hall, a multimedia kiosk of- young people, especially the many migration and integration, first to fers a window on the Germany of school groups that visit, a unique the American colonies, then to the today. perspective on American history. United States of America, are told It’s encouraging, Lentz says, to through a timeline which is the “You Need a Museum Here” witness the “wow-effect” when kids The GAHM’s own story begins with who are interested in American hisbackbone of the permanent exhibition in the museum on 6th Street a striking Victorian row house on tory realize the significant part Gerin DC’s Penn Quarter, and by the 6th Street in downtown DC, itself man-Americans have played. changing exhibitions which draw with an intriguing German-Amer“They come up the stairs and see, visitors, around half of them school ican background. Built in 1888 as hey, it’s Elvis Presley, it’s Eisenhowa private home by German immi- er, it’s Doris Day, and many others. groups, to the museum. In telling the stories of the seven grant John Hockemeyer, the build- Household names who are still fato eight million Germans who have ing’s extension housed a popular mous are suddenly [gaining] a difimmigrated to America since 1607, German-American men’s club with ferent meaning, background, and the museum speaks to the around a bowling alley and liquor license. that’s good.” In 2008, Bern E. Deichmann, then 45 million Americans who trace One of the most successful tempresident of the German-American porary exhibitions focussed on their heritage to Germany. In addition to the history of Ger- Heritage Foundation of the USA German-Americans in the US Conman immigration to America, (GAHF), was considering purchas- gress. Organized in cooperation visitors to the GAHM learn about ing Hockemeyer Hall to help raise with the US Capitol Historical Sociprominent German-Americans, the profile of the Foundation, rep- ety, its opening in October 2011 atand how German culture and tradi- resenting 70 German-American tracted the German ambassador to tions have become deeply woven clubs with 20,000 members across the US and deputy foreign minister into the American fabric. The cur- the United States, in the US capital. at the time, as well as many memDeichmann approached Lentz, bers of Congress. rent exhibition is devoted to the then head of “Deutsche Welle” in more than 40 places in the USA bearing the name “Berlin,” in hon- Washington, for advice. “Seeing [Hockemeyer Hall], I said or of the 50th anniversary of John Continued on page 37 you need a museum here, ” Lentz F. Kennedy’s “Ich bin ein Berliner”


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Celebrating St. Martin's Day on November 11 "Lantern, lantern, sun, worthy to become moon, and stars. . . " This bishop, so he hid in refrain echoes through a stable filled with the autumn streets of geese. The squawkGermany every year on ing of the geese November 11. Happy was so loud that the children with colortownspeople found ful, handmade lanterns him and selected him promenade through the as the new bishop. streets, cheerfully singThe tradition of the ing songs they learned St. Martin’s goose, by heart. The candles in which is typically the lanterns flicker playserved on the eveThe lantern procession celebrating St Martin’s Day. fully, bringing a sparkle ning of St. Martin’s (©picture-alliance/dpa) to the children’s eyes. feast day following the Brimming with excitement, each child hopes to catch procession of lanterns, most likely evolved from this a glimpse of the man dressed in a medieval soldier’s legend. However, in many locales this custom has now uniform and his proud steed as they lead the proces- been replaced by the serving of mulled wine, hot cosion of children. coa, and "Weckmänner" – baked goods in the shape St. Martin was born Martinus the son of a Roman of a man holding a clay pipe in his mouth. After the military tribune in Savaria, in what is now Hungary, in long procession of lanterns in the cool autumn air, this 316/317 A.D. and joined the Roman army as a youth. At repast warms the soul and fills an empty stomach. the age of 18 he was baptized and in 371 became the To this day, the origin of the much-loved procession third bishop of Tours, a city in France. He performed of lanterns is still unclear. To some, however, it is a submissionary work and helped the poor and ostracized. stitute for the St. Martin bonfire, which is still lit in a Legend has it that at the gates of Amiens, Martin met few cities and villages throughout Europe. It formerly a poor, scantily clothed beggar, who asked him for symbolized the light that holiness brings to the darkhelp from the freezing cold. But Martin had nothing ness, just as St. Martin brought a flicker of hope to the with him other than his military cloak, so he decided lives of the poor through his good deeds. Even though to share it with the man. With one stroke, he split his the tradition of the large, crackling fire is gradually bewarm cloak in two and gave one half to the man, who ing lost, the procession of lanterns is still a delightful, was deeply grateful. After perform- practiced custom. Both young and old enjoy seeing ing this act of generosity, Martin the children lighting up the darkened streets with left the military service and their lanterns and singing: "Up and down the streets, had himself baptized a again the lanterns illuminate: red, yellow, green, blue, Christian so he could dear Martin come and look!" • help people in need Written by Denise Kotulla. and value love greater than Translation: German Embassy force. © Germany.info Yet this act of mercy is not the only story about St. Martin still told today. There is also another legend about how he was named bishop. Being a modest man, he did not feel himself


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GERMAN AMERICAN JOURNAL

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER2013

DANK Executive Office Update by Eve Timmerhaus

This is the last issue you will receive before the National Convention, November 1-3, 2013 in Rosemont, IL. You will find details on the weekend’s activities on page 7. Have you made your hotel reservations for the Holiday Inn Express? Hotel rooms must reserved by October 11, 2013 to receive the special discounted rate. If you book after this date, you will be charged the regular room rate. Saturday evening, November 2, we will celebrate at the Hofbräuhaus in Rosemont, IL. The Germanthemed restaurant captures Munich’s legendary Gemütlichkeit . We have reserved the King Ludwig room and will enjoy a dinner buffet with traditional Bavarian specialties. Delicious menu details are published on page 39. The festivities will also feature a live band

from Germany! Dinner reservations for dinner must be made in advance, so please send in your payment today! Hofbräuhaus Chicago is located at 5500 Park Place in Rosemont, in the MB Financial Park at Rosemont. We encourage you to take advantage of our complimentary transportation provided to and from the Hofbräuhaus and the Holiday Inn Express. If you are interested in riding the “DANK Trolley” please let us know. Seating is limited. It has been customary to publish a short bio on DANK National Board nominees before a convention, however we have not received any nominations before this issue went to print. If you are interested in running on the National Board contact your chapter for information. Thanks to all who are planning on joining us and being a part of this important event. We hope you will leave the convention with more information DANK and be more motivated than when you arrived. You still have time to send in your raffle tickets! The drawing will be held at the National Convention! It has been one year since we unveiled the fresh new updated look of the Journal. Thanks to all our readers for your support and encouragement. Since publishing the first issue in 1959, the German-American Journal has been a resource for DANK members and those wanting to stay informed with their Germanic heritage and we hope to continue that tradition. The editorial staff continues to encourage our readers to submit articles to be featured in the German-American Journal. •

Exchange Rates

1 USD = 0.74 EURO 1 EURO = 1.35 USD

9-23-13


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The Lynching of Robert Prager Robert Prager was born in Dresden, Germany. As a young man of 19, he came to the United States in 1905 and settled in a town just east of St. Louis, Missouri. He found work in a St. Louis bakery believing that America was the land of opportunity and that if he worked hard he could build a wonderful life. Robert was dismissed from the bakery job because of too many differences with the owners. His second job was that of a coal miner in nearby Maryville, Illinois. He worked long hours in the coal mine and his health soon began to suffer even to the point of going blind in one eye. He lived alone in a one room apartment with no wife or children and only his beloved cat for comfort. A very quiet and shy man with a thick accent, he was not successful at making friends and he soon became the butt of jokes and was bullied by the other townspeople. He was often ridiculed for his patriotism and his love of America. But when the anti-German hysteria took root in his area, due to America's involvement in World War I, the bullying soon took a worse turn. On April 4, 1918, Prager was confronted by a group of miners and warned to stay away from Maryville. United Mine Workers union leaders Moses Johnson and James Fornero, who feared for Prager's safety, tried to get the Collinsville police to put him into protective custody, but they declined. The two men instead took Prager back to his home in Collinsville. The next day, Prager returned to Maryville where he prepared a document attacking Fornero. He posted copies of this document around the town and returned to Collinsville that evening.

The police later put him in jail for fear of mob activity. Perhaps the most horrendous anti-German act was the lynching in April 1918 of 29-year-old Robert Paul Prager, a German-born mine employee, who was accused of making "disloyal utterances." A mob took him from the basement of the Collinsville, Illinois jail, dragged him outside of town, and attempted to hang him from a tree. Before the lynching, he was allowed to write a last note to his parents in Dresden, Germany. Prager was rescued by a policeman, Fred Frost, who returned him to the jail. The mayor, John H. Siegel, calmed the crowd for a time, and it was decided to close the town's saloons early. However, the officer who was sent to close the saloons brought the news that "a German spy" was being held in the jail. The mob reassembled and gained entrance to the jail again and found Prager hiding in the basement. The police stood aside as the mob marched him to an area referred to as Mauer Heights. After allowing Prager to write a brief letter to his parents in Germany and pray, he was hanged in front of a crowd of two hundred people at 12:30 am on the 5th of April. In his letter to his parents he wrote: Dear Parents, I must on this, the 5th day of April, 1918, die. Please pray for me, my dear parents. In the trial that followed, the defendants wore red, white, and blue ribbons, while a band in the court house played patriotic songs. It took the jury 25 minutes to return a not-guilty verdict. The German government lodged a protest and offered to pay Prager's funeral ex-

penses. The judge complimented them on their patriotism and said their actions "greatly honor this country." Interestingly, most of the men were of German ancestry themselves, although their families had been in the country for many generations. The people of Collinsville feel a great sense of shame and sorrow over this crime and to this day Robert Prager's grave is always decorated and well-cared for. The following is a poem written by Leslie Suppan: I gave you everything My new country, my love! You took me in with open arms and you repaid me with treachery You strangled me and drained my life from me And the final irony? The tools you used for my death were men with the same blood as me children of the same Father living on the breast of the same Mother In hatred, in self-loathing they killed me because I reminded them of who they were." Credits: Leslie Suppan, Illinois State Historical Society, St. Louis Globe Democrat, Wikipedia


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GERMAN AMERICAN JOURNAL

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2013

German Halloween, All Saints and All Souls Days by Francine McKenna, Staff Columnist

Witches played an important and powerful role as forest goddesses in the Germany of pagan times, and until the 18th century German maps pictured them flying over North Germany's Brocken peak, in the Harz mountains, where they were believed to live. However any sign of Halloween, the witches and demons very own celebration, was hard to find in the country before the late 1990's. The Celtic fire festival of Samhain, (Sah-ween), on 31 October All Hallow's Eve, marked the end of the Celtic annual calendar for our ancestors, an agricultural community, and their New Year was ushered in with light from a large bonfire. All over preChristian Europe the festival for the Lord of the Dead was for the Celtic tribes the most important celebration of the year, and Halloween's origins were in these festivities held on the eve of Samhain. Summer's end, the final harvest, animals are brought in from the fields and it's a time of preparation for winter. A brief few hours during which it was believed that, along with ghosts, fairies and demons, the spirits of the dead could return from what the Celts called the "Otherworld", unnoticed by the living, to visit those relatives and friends they had left behind. Bonfires were lit not only as part of the Samhain celebrations, and to warm up the cool winter air, but as a tribute to the dead while hopefully encouraging them to stay at a safe distance. As the Christian Church moved throughout Europe it replaced pagan celebrations with Christian festivals, and November 1st, Samhain, became Hallowmas, All Saints Day or All Hallows, a celebration of the lives of saints and martyred Christians.

Nevertheless that did not stop All Hallows Eve, ultimately Hallowe'en, continuing to be a feast for the "un-dead", and throughout the ages 31st October continued to be the focal point of much tradition and festivity in both Scotland and Ireland. In Germany, especially in the Catholic areas, November 1st is a local holiday. For over half of the country's population there is no work, no school, just a quiet day of religious remembrance in which to visit the graves of those who have passed, and decorate them with fresh flowers, wreaths and special candles which are lit and burn throughout the night into Allerseelen, All Souls Day. Traditionally the days leading to the holiday are used to prepare for "All Saints", Allerheiligen, and "All Souls" Day. Hours are spent tidying graves and plants removed to be replaced by fresh ones, but although it has never been one of the country's traditional festivals, and is still not celebrated throughout the country, these days the week is often shared with Halloween. Shops, offering everything from luminous skeletons and ghosts to Halloween sweets and chocolates, are decorated in shades of orange and black, with swinging black bats, spiders in webs, and of course witches' pointed hats and brooms. While pumpkins, until recently known only as a popular vegetable in Germany, appear hollowed out, carved and illuminated, on doorsteps, gateposts and in windows. This sudden recognition and embracing of a centuries old tradition has not been inspired by longtime Halloween celebrating neighbors the Scottish and Irish, where turnips are used as lanterns, children go "guising", dressing up and singing, telling a joke or re-


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citing a poem in return for gifts. And where there is no tradition of playing "tricks". It is instead the US version of the festival, as it has been portrayed by Hollywood films and in the seasonal specials of imported television serials and soap operas, which is gradually becoming part of the German holiday celebrations. However, as the traditional St. Martin's Day candle lit processions take place just days later, "Trick or Treat" or "sweet and sour" as it is called in Germany is still a rarity, although there begin to be acts of vandalism in the name of festival which are dealt with very quickly by the police. Halloween can now be celebrated in genuine medieval "Haunted" Castles, at Witches Fairs held in cobblestone towns, in amusement parks which turn October 31st over to horror nights, ghosts and ghouls, watching "back to back" horror films at the cinema, or at one of thousands of private or communal celebrations. A Halloween party scene has taken off in some areas of the country and is enjoyed by children, as well as those who have left childhood far behind, but unlike German "Karnaval" even at a private Halloween theme party it is not necessary for the guests to wear costumes, although the idea is catching on with children. However the recently introduced and obligatory Grusel Food, "Horror Food", is a winner, as long is it only looks but doesn't taste grauenhaft, which is

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"gruesome". Severed Fingers made from frankfurters with sliced almond or chopped onion fingernails and tomato ketchup blood, and Edible Eyes from cherry tomatoes filled with white cheese stuffed black olives, or lychees with black grapes, are consumed with enthusiasm together with all the other everyday Halloween delicacies such as Halloweenkaese, a cheese flavored with ginger and pumpkin. In general man-made or secular celebrations do not become popular in Germany but despite the reservations of many, and initially possibly because of some clever marketing by Germany's toy industry, as the first real opportunity of the winter season "to party" Halloween has developed into something of a cult, and is becoming increasingly popular, especially amongst the young and in the Rhineland which is the part of the country with the most Carnival season fans. It certainly appears that having arrived back in Germany die Hexen - the witches, as well as die Gheister - the ghosts, and die Teufel - the demons, show no signs of leaving anytime soon. Nevertheless in the days that follow it is once again the candlelit graves, church services, memories and lives of those who have passed which are celebrated, just as they have been for centuries and in a way a "Festival for the Dead", as was Samha. •

You can follow Francine McKenna oneline at www.bellaonline.com/site/germanculture "German Culture at BellaOnline" or on Facebook at German Culture, for views of German Life, Culture, People - 'Past and Present' - and all things German.


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The 48th Annual General von Steuben Day Parade

The Chicago parade celebrates Baron Friedrich von Steuben, who served as Major General inn the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. He taught the army the essentials of military drills, tactics and disciplines. The annual Von Steuben Parade is Chicago’s German American event of the year.

Photos by George Nagata


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Kurznachrichten Bayerische Gemeinden verlieren einen Feiertag Von Mira Gajevic Die jüngste Volkszählung hat für einige Gemeinden in Bayern drastische Folgen: Zwar müssen sie nicht wie Berlin Milliarden Euro zurückzahlen, aber schmerzhaft ist es schon, denn ihnen wird künftig ein gesetzlicher Feiertag gestrichen. Der Zensus hatte überraschend ergeben, dass in den Orten Speichersdorf, Baiersdorf und Memmingerberg inzwischen mehr Protestanten als Katholiken leben. Da Mariä Himmelfahrt in Bayern aber nur in den Gemeinden ein Feiertag ist, in denen überwiegend Katholiken leben, haben die Bewohner der drei Ge-

"Ein Notorischer Schwarzfahrer ist vom Amtsgericht..." Schwarzfahrer muss hinter Gitter

Ein notorischer Schwarzfahrer ist vom Amtsgericht Kassel zu einer Gefängnisstrafe verurteilt worden. Der Mann muss für ein Jahr und sechs Monate hinter Gitter. Dem Mann war vorgeworfen worden, 129 Mal ohne Fahrkarte mit der Bahn gefahren zu sein. Verurteilt wurde er wegen des Erschleichens von Leistungen in 94 Fällen, wegen Diebstahls in drei Fällen sowie wegen versuchten Diebstahls, vorsätzlicher Körperverletzung und Beleidigung. Für den Prozess waren über 100 Zeugen geladen worden, vor allem Zugschaffner. Jährlich entsteht dem Verkehrsbetrieb rund 1,5 Millionen Euro Schaden durch Schwarzfahrer. •

Mariä Himmelfahrt in Bayern.

meinden in Franken und Schwaben jetzt das Nachsehen. Immerhin, eine Gnadenfrist haben sie bekommen. Nächstes Jahr müssen sie an Mariä Himmelfahrt dann arbeiten. •

Unfall auf Toilette laut Gericht kein Dienstunfall Ein Unfall auf der Toilette wird nicht als Dienstunfall anerkannt. Das hat das Verwaltungsgericht München entschieden. Demnach ist nur der Weg zur Toilette - oder auch zur Kantine - geschützt, nicht aber der Aufenthalt. Da bedeutet: Beim Essen oder auf der Toilette ist ein Beamter, Privatmann. Im konkreten Fall war einem Polizisten in den WC-Räumen eine Zwischentür aus der Hand gerutscht. Er hielt sie an der Seite fest, die Außentür fiel zu, und klemmte den rechten Mittelfinger des Mannes ein. •

Kind von Kuh getreten: Elfjähriger verlor Zeh Seine Tierliebe hat ein elfjähriger Deutscher während des Urlaubs im österreichischen Kitzbühel mit dem Verlust eines Zehs bezahlt. Der Junge hatte barfuß auf einer Weide in Westendorf gespielt und versucht, die Kuh zu streicheln, meldete die österreichische Nachrichtenagentur APA am Donnerstag unter Berufung auf die Polizei. Das Tier trat dem Kind auf den Fuß und verletzte es so schwer, dass es per Hubschrauber in eine Klinik nach Innsbruck geflogen und dort operiert werden musste. •


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Kurznachrichten Das Fest zum Tag Der Deutschen Einheit Die Geschichte eines Nationalfeiertags

Am 3. Oktober 2013 feiert Deutschland den Tag der Deutschen Einheit zum 23. Mal. Der Nationalfeiertag wird auch mit offiziellen Feierlichkeiten begangen. Dazu gehören ein ökumenischer Gottesdienst und ein Festakt, zu denen die Spitzen der Verfassungsorgane, zahlreiche Bundespolitiker, Ministerpräsidenten, das Diplomatische Korps und Bürgerdelegationen aus allen Bundesländern erwartet werden. Wie alles begann Nach dem Mauerfall im November 1989 wurde die Angliederung der DDR an die BRD beschlossen. Seinen formalen Abschluss fand der Prozess der Wiedervereinigung am 3. Oktober 1990, dem offiziellen Beitritt der DDR zur Bundesrepublik. Seit diesem Zeitpunkt ist der Tag der Deutschen Einheit der deutsche Nationalfeiertag.

2013 in Baden-Württemberg Die offizielle Feier zum Tag der Deutschen Einheit findet seit 1990 in einer Großstadt - meist der Landeshauptstadt - jenes Bundeslandes statt, das zu diesem Zeitpunkt den Vorsitz im Bundesrat innehat. Jedes Jahr stellt ein anderes Land den Vorsitzenden. Seit dem 1. November 2012 ist der baden-württembergische Ministerpräsident Winfried Kretschmann an der Spitze des Bundesrates und daher Baden-Württemberg Gastgeber des Tags der Deutschen Einheit 2013. •

Duden ist Sprachpanscher 2013 Die Mitglieder des Vereins Deutsche Sprache e.V. haben den Duden zum Sprachpanscher des Jahres 2013 gewählt. Wie kaum eine andere Organisation trage der Duden seit Jah­ren dazu bei, dass sich sprachliches Imponiergehabe im Glanze einer quasi amtlichen Zu­ stimmung sonnen dürfe. „Wer in einem Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache als Ersatz für Fußball den lächerlichen Angeber-Anglizismus ‚Soccer’ vorschlägt, hat es nicht besser verdient“, begründete der Vereinsvorsitzende Walter Krämer diese Negativauszeichnung. „Wo bleiben der Nachsteller – statt ‚Stalker’, der Netzhandel – statt ‚E-Business’ – oder der Klapprechner, der immerhin über 34.000 Treffer bei Google aufweist?“ Nach seinen eigenen Grundsätzen, nämlich ohne weitere Wertung alle Wörter aufzunehmen, die hin­reichend oft in der deutschen Sprache vorkommen, müssten auch diese Wörter im Duden stehen. Das an sich schon angreifbare ‚System Duden‘ widerlege sich damit selbst. Zweiter unter fünf Kandidaten wurde Bundesfinanzminister Wolfgang Schäuble, der durch sein Insistieren auf Englisch selbst in Anwesenheit von Dolmetschern

allen Versuchen in den Rücken falle, Deutsch als echte Arbeitssprache glaubhaft in der EU zu verankern. Der Titel „Sprachpanscher des Jahres“ wird seit 1998 vergeben. Er steht für das unnötige Verdrängen deutscher Begriffe durch Importe aus dem angelsächsischen Ausland sowie für die Demontage des Deutschen als Sprache von Kultur und Wissenschaft ganz allge­mein. Bekannte Sprachpanscher der Vergangenheit sind die Firma Karstadt (Sprachpan­scher des Jahres 2012), René Obermann (Deutsche Telekom 2011), Hartmut Mehdorn (Deutsche Bahn 2007) oder Klaus Zumwinkel (Deutsche Post 2005). •


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The German Wine Route:

a symphony of grapes in the sun-kissed Palatinate region

The German Wine Route, running through the Palatinate countryside from Schweigen-Rechtenbach to Bockenheim, certainly doesn't stint on its delights. Simply follow the signs showing a bunch of grapes and enjoy 85 kilometres of pure joie de vivre, fine wines, congeniality and award-winning cuisine. The Palatinate region and wine – truly a match made in heaven. In Germany's second largest winegrowing region, the vines are so tightly clustered that the rolling

landscape resembles a vast emerald lake, through which Dionysus and Bacchus, the two gods of wine, might playfully cavort. The sunny Palatinate is a real mecca for wine lovers, where grapes grow like there's no tomorrow, vintners become inn keepers and congeniality rules. But the Wine Route also has plenty to offer fine food connoisseurs, art lovers and those who

simply adore having fun; primarily: the art of enjoying life to the full, at the many convivial wine festivals, for example, or Bad Dürkheim's celebrated Wurstmarkt wine festival. Wine-tasting sessions at local vineyards are civilised occasions, with a variety of tastefully presented fine wines, and the traditional rustic Palatinate dishes are a definite must too, as is a peek at the world's largest wine barrel in Bad Dürkheim. The surrounding countryside, peppered with castles, palaces and the remains of Roman settlements, is enchanting, and the route is lined by small towns – often more than 1,000 years old, wine-growing villages, romantic corners, museums and sites of historical interest. The German Wine Route can be experienced in either direction, of course, so it's ideally suited to repeat visits. And, imitation being the sincerest form of flattery of course, the fact that the Wine Route has been copied so often elsewhere is proof of its brilliance.


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Wines of the Palatinate region White wines Riesling Riesling, the most familiar and most successful grape grown in the Palatinate, accounts for an area of 5,000 hectares and frequently wins numerous awards for the region. This wine's special characteristics are its fruity citrus aroma, its distinctive sweetness and its reserved acidity. It also makes excellent Eiswein (sweet wine made from grapes exposed to frost) and sparkling wine (Sekt). Deidesheim, Forst and Wachenheim are especially known for their Rieslings. Müller-Thurgau This is the second-most planted variety in the Palatinate after Riesling. Its modern, dry variant is known as Rivaner. Müller-Thurgau wines tend to be mildly acidic with delicate notes of nutmeg and walnut. The ideal accompaniment for light food. Morio Muskat An interesting cross created by Peter Morio in the 1920s and cultivated in only 1.5% of the Palatinate's wine growing area. These wines have a robust flavour and a pronounced nutmeg bouquet. This variety is not to be confused with muscatel, one of the world's old-

Gewürztraminer can be enjoyed as an aperitif or dessert wine; dry Gewürztraminer is excellent with food. Although presently planted in only 1.5% of the Palatinate wine growing area, this bold, spicy wine with its rich bouquet is certain to increase its percentage.

Red wines

est grapes, which accounts for less than 1% of Germany's total wine growing area but is grown in the Palatinate. Gewürztraminer One of the oldest grape varieties, grown in various places including Rhodt, which has a 400-year-old Gewürztraminer vineyard. These wines range in colour from straw yellow to golden yellow and have a rose fragrance. Lychee, peach and citrus fruit aromas add subtlety to the strong, exotic fruit aroma of the reddish grapes. Noble sweet

Nadine Poss is crowed the 65th Wine Queen The 22 year old student from Windesheim was crowned on live German television. The German Wine Queen is the highest representative of the German wine industry and represents approximately 20,000 German winemakers at approximately 250 public appearances in Germany and abroad. On her side are Wine Princesses (l) Ramona Diegel from Rheinhessen and (r) Sabine Wagner from the Rheingau. •

Dornfelder The Palatinate's Dornfelder wines with their mediterranean character are causing quite a stir. They are dry, distinctive, velvety and full of flavour, the ideal accompaniment to roast foods and cheese. Portugieser This red grape was introduced to the Palatinate in 1860. Two Portugieser styles are popular today: full-bodied with a light burgundy undertone or mellow and uncomplicated with little bouquet. Spätburgunder (Pinot Noir) These grapes account for only 7% of the Palatinate wine growing area. The “pinot noir” designation has been in use since 2003. By remaining longer in the barrel, these wines improve, become smoother and are able to develop their fruit aromas. •


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German American Day - October 6th, 2013 On October 6th German-Americans will once again celebrate their ethnic holiday, German-American Day. German-American Day, proclaimed in 1987 by President Ronald Reagan has already become a tradition. It commemorates the first German immigrants who arrived on th4e Pennsylvania coast on October 6th 1683. It is shared nationwide with government officials, legislators, state governors, mayors and all Americans. Fifty-seven million Americans are of German ancestry and constitute the largest ethnic group in the United States. For more than three centuries, Germans have helped build and strengthen this country. German-Americans constitute the historically staunchest supporters of the democratic values and principles of this country. They were the first to oppose and object to slavery, General von Steuben and his German-American soldiers fought for and helped to make American independence possible. On German-American Day October 6, 2013, German-Americans will remember their history and heritage, and their participation in the creation of and contribution to the prosperity of the United States We can be proud of our heritage and achievements German American is our day – celebrate it with our fellow citizens. •

German American Friendship On October 6, 1683, a group of 13 families from Krefeld, in presentday North Rhine-Westphalia, arrived at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The settlement they founded, Germantown, was the first community founded by Germans in what would become the United States of America. To celebrate the national GermanAmerican Day, marking this historical event and over 300 years of German heritage in the United States, the Los Angeles-based Tricentennial Foundation presented a poster contest on the theme of GermanAmerican friendship. The winner of this year’s Grand Prize Winner is David M. Hayes of Colorado. This poster will be used to promote German American friendship. •

Grand Prize Winning Entry of the 2013 German American Friendship Poster Contest by David M Hayes


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Calendar Of Events

5 Milwaukee, WI. DANK Milwaukee Board Meeting. 5:30PM. 5 Chicago, IL. Kino, Kaffee und Kuchen. “Hohe Tannen”. Doors open at Noon, Vorfilm at 1PM, feature film at 2 PM. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave. Chicago. For more information: 773-561-9181. www.dankhaus. com 6 Springfield, IL. GERMAN AMERICAN DAY celebration at Lincoln Presidential Museum. 6 Chicago, IL. German American Day Commemoration Ceremony. St. Benedicts Church, 2215 W Irving Park Rd., Chicago IL. Ceremony begins at 2:30 PM. 9 Milwaukee, WI DANK Milwaukee Dancing 6:00. Singing 7:00. 12 Chicago, IL. Kino, Kaffee und Kuchen. “Von der Liebe besiegt”. Doors open at Noon, Vorfilm at 1PM, feature film at 2 PM. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave. Chicago. For more information: 773-561-9181. www. dankhaus.com 14 Springfield, IL. Chapter Board Meeting. 6:30 PM 16 Milwaukee, WI DANK Milwaukee Singing,. 7:00 PM. 16 Springfield, IL. SMBC 3rd Wednesday Meal with Guest Speaker. 16 Erie, PA. Dinner - Celebrating our German Heritage - Erie Männerchor Club, 1607 State St. Open to the public. Join us for dinner at 5:00. Reservations required (814-520-5036). 19 Chicago, IL. Kino, Kaffee und Kuchen. “Koenig Ludwig II”. Doors open at Noon, Vorfilm at 1PM, feature film at 2 PM. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave, Chicago,

Singing 7:00PM

26 Chicago, IL. Kino, Kaffee und Kuchen. “Happy End am Wolfgangsee”. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave. Chicago. For more information: 773-561-9181. www. dankhaus.com 30 Milwaukee, WI. DANK Milwaukee Singing. 7:00 PM.

November 1-3 Rosemont, IL. DANK National Convention. Holiday Inn Express. For more information and ticket information call 888-USA-DANK. 1 Benton Harbor, MI. All You Can Eat Fish Fry. Doors open at 5:30 PM. $9 per adult and $4 per child (ages 2-12). Food is served at 6 PM. Desserts will be available for an extra charge. Cash Bar. (Coffee is included free with dinner). Live Polka Band playing from 7-10PM. 2 Rosemont, IL. Join us for dinner at the Hofbräuhaus in Rosemont, IL. Buffet dinner $50 per person. For reservation call 888-USA-DANK. 2 South Bend, IN. Membership and Election Meeting. 11AM. Francis Branch Library. 52655 Ironwood Rd., South Bend, IN. 2 Chicago, IL. Kino, Kaffee und Kuchen. ”Der Kongreß amüsert sich”. Doors open at Noon, Vorfilm at 1PM, feature film at 2 PM. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave. Chicago. For more information: 773-561-9181. www. dankhaus.com 9 Chicago, IL. Kino, Kaffee und Kuchen. “Nur der Wind”. Doors open at Noon, Vorfilm at 1PM, feature film at 2 PM. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave. Chicago. For more information: 773-561-9181. www. dankhaus.com.

19 South Bend, IN. Moonlight picnic at Kison’s Farm. 7PM. Potluck. 63620 Maple Rd., South Bend, IN.

16 Chicago, IL. Kino, Kaffee und Kuchen. “Der Orgelbauer von St. Marien”. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave. Chicago. For more information: 773-561-9181. www.dankhaus.com

23 Milwaukee, WI. DANK Milwaukee Dancing 6:00PM.

17 Fort Sheridan, IL. DANK Lake County, IL will again


PAGE/SEITE 28 GERMAN AMERICAN JOURNAL OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2013 observe Volkstrauertag, the German day of Mourn20 Erie, PA. Brieg Meeting; Program: Discussion by ing, at Fort Sheridan, IL cemetery, where nine German members on family traditions. Open to the public. POW’s are buried. The service will begin at 1:30PM. It Join us for dinner at 5:00PM. Reservations required is a public event that the Chapter has sponsored for (814-520-5036). more than 30 years. For more information, call 847272-5545. 23 Chicago, IL. Kino, Kaffee und Kuchen. ”Casino de Paris”. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave. Chicago. For 17 Erie, PA. Volkstrauertag, Asbury UM Cemetery, more information: 773-561-9181. www.dankhaus. West 26th and Asbury Road. 1:30 PM. com 17 Augusta, MI. Volkstrauertag at Fort Custer National Cemetery. For more information: ladybug3656@ yahoo.com.

24 Milwaukee, WI. Chapter elections. 1:30PM. 30 Chicago, IL. NO KINO.

Sängerfest Held in Erie, PA

One hundred thirty five singers convened at Erie’s Männerchor Club September 21, 2013 to participate in a day-long event marking the 42nd Sängerfest of the Siebenbürger Sachsen Sängerbund. Hosted by the Erie Männerchor Gesangverein, members of the Siebenbürger Sängerbund and the Pittsburgh Bezirk came together to share their love of music. The Sachsen Sängerbund consists of the Eintracht Saxonia Sachsenchor of Cleveland, the Eintracht Männerchor of New Castle and the Erie Männerchor Gesangverein, the latter two also being members of the Pittsburgh Bezirk including the Teutonia Männerchor und Damenchors, Bloomfield Liedertafel of Pittsburgh, and the Schweizer Männerchor Helvetia of Allegheny City. The singers had a full day of activities beginning

with rehearsal for the massed chorus. Following lunch, the individual chorus’ each presented a ‘mini concert’. The singers and guests enjoyed a full buffet dinner and the background musical accompaniment by pianist Nicholas Nafibyan. Beverly Pochatko, President of the Sachsen Sängerbund and the Männerchor Gesangverein addressed the group, as did Nicholas Lipnichan, President of the Pittsburgh Bezirk. A minute of silence was observed in memory of the deceased singers of the choruses. Service Awards were presented to three members of the Einstracht Saxonia Sachsenchor of Cleveland who received 50 year pins, and one who received a 20 year pin. The Eintracht Männerchor had two 20 year recipients and one 25 year pin. She then called upon Thomas Manning, President of the ATS (Alliance of

continued on page 29


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49,840,035 Germans live mostly in the Midwest

Map from Ancesty & Ethnicity in American, 2012, Grey House Publishing. The largest ancestral group, stretching from coast to coast across 21st century America is German, with 49,840,035 people. The hight of immigration for Germans was in the mid-19th century as thousands were driven from their homes by unemployment and unrest. The majority of German-Americans can now be

found in the Midwest. Famous German-Americans include, Ben Affleck, Tom Cruise, Walt Disney, Henry J. Heinz, Bruce Willis and Oscar Mayer. Despite having no successful New World colonies, the first significant groups of German immigrants arrived in the United States in the 1670s and settled in New York and Pennsylvania. •

Erie Sängerfest cotinued fom page 28

over the years, however – true to their Germanic background, have not given up. So determined are they that the Pittsburgh Berzirk will be hosting the National Sängerfest in 2016, bringing together more than 1200 singers from across the country. If you enjoy singing, consider joining a German Chorus and join in the camaraderie of others who share your heritage through song. •

Transylvanian Saxons) for his remarks. The Evening Concert was filled with excellent choral selections for the Damenchor, the Männerchor, and then as a Gemischterchor. The number of singers in each chorus, not only in these two districts but across the country, has declined


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Odds & Ends Otto Frederick Rohwedder “The Father of Sliced Bread” Rohwedder was a German-American inventor and engineer who created the first automatic bread-slicing machine for commercial use. He was born on July 7, 1880 in Des Moines, Iowa, the son of Claus and Elizabeth Rohwedder, of ethnic German descent. The youngest of three brothers and sisters he studied optometry and graduated in 1900 with a degree in optics from what is now the Northern Illinois College of Ophthalmology and Ontology in Chicago. Rohwedder pursued a career as a jeweler, opening and operating three jewelry stores of his own in St. Joseph, until 1916. Convinced he could develop a bread-slicing machine, he sold his jewelry stores to fund the development effort and manufacture the machines. However, in 1917 a fire broke out

at the factory where Rohwedder was manufacturing his machine. It destroyed his prototype and blueprints. With the need to get funding again, Rohwedder was delayed for several years in bringing the bread slicer to market. In 1927, Rohwedder successfully designed a machine that not only sliced the bread but wrapped it. He applied for patents to protect his invention and sold the first machine to a friend and baker, Frank Bench, who installed it at the Chillicothe Baking Company, Chillicothe, Missouri in 1928. The first loaf of sliced bread was sold commercially on July 7, 1928. Sales of the machine to other bakeries increased and sliced bread became available across the country. In 1939, Rohwedder sold his patent rights to the Micro-Westco Co.

of Bettendorf, Iowa and joined the company. He became vice-president and sales manager of the Rohwedder Bakery Machine Division. In 1951 at age 71, he retired from Micro-Westco Co. Rohwedder is known as the “father of sliced bread”. He died in Concord, Michigan on November 8, 1960 and was buried at Riverside Cemetery in Albion. His original bread-slicing machine is now housed at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC. •

John Emerson, New US Ambassador to Germany Berlin has a new US Ambassador: attorney and banker John B. Emerson is a political appointee with strong personal ties to Germany. Expectations are high on both sides of the Atlantic. In his arrival statement Ambassador Emerson said that he is “thrilled to return yet again to Germany and Berlin." For John B. Emerson and his wife Kimberly, the Berlin appointment is a return to their German roots. Their heritage is German through his paternal and her maternal grandparents. He began to study German at age 12, Emerson told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in July, New US ambassador to Germany, John B Emerson, center, and from adding that "may have had more to do with the left: his daughter Hayley, his wife Kimberly, and his daughters Jackie fact that my father and grandmother would and Taylor, pose for the media after their arrival in Berlin, Germany speak it when they didn't want me to know what they were discussing.” •


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Odds & Ends Attic Mummy The Mystery Intensifies In August, 10 year old Alexander Kettler was playing in his grandmother's home in Diepholz, Germany, when he stumbled across something unusual: a sarcophagus. The boy's father, Lutz-Wolfgang Kettler, thought that his own father must have brought it and other souvenirs back from his travels in North Africa in the 1950s. According to local daily newspaper Kreiszeitung, the mummy got a CT scan and X-rays and the results, which showed human bones, came as a surprise even to Kettler. "No one expected that," he says. "Everyone thought it was a fake." The authorities have confiscated the mummy and will now be examined by forensic experts in Hamburg. "If it turns out that the death occurred 3,000 years ago, then we won't pursue the case any further," said Jann

Scheerer, spokesman for the Verden public prosecutor's office. "But we will if the person responsible for the obviously violent death could still be alive." Kettler has mixed feelings about the authorities getting involved. "It's a somewhat uncomfortable situation," he admits. The 53-year-old is mostly interested in how his now deceased father acquired the mummy. •

Germany’s Mud Olympics Raise Money for Charity Participants enjoy playing in the mud during the mud flats olympics (Wattenluempiada) on July 28, 2013 in Brunsbuettel, Germany. Over 400 people compete in the annual event takes place in the muddy tidal flats common to the north German coast and includes football, handball, volleyball and mud sledding. The festivities place an emphasis on spirit rather than sports skills. While the event is simply good fun, it’s also used to raise money for charity. The 2013 event raised 25.900,30 Euro, marking the total donations over 200,000 Euro since 2004. The money will benefit the Schleswig-Holstein Cancer Society. •

Tübingen Duck Races

Every October since 1999 over 7,000 yellow rubber ducks are let loose in River Neckar that courses through the town of Tübingen, near Stuttgart, Germany. This is almost a third of the city population. The competition starts at midday and anyone with a rubber duck can participate. Spectators stick their name and number on the ducks, release the toy in the water and cheer along the riverbank as the mass of yellow bob up and down the designated stretch of the Neckar. A metal weight is attached to their underside so that they don’t topple over on the way. The ducks race from Alleenbrücke to Neckarbrücke is taken very seriously, because there is €10.000 worth of prizes to be won. •


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Send Holiday Greetings! Dear DANK Members and Friends, Place an ad in the German American Journal Holiday Edition to wish your friends and family a very Merry Christmas/Happy Holidays. We have made it easy for you to send special holiday greetings. Select from the collection displayed and check the design of your choice. Write a short holiday message in the space provided in the sample ads. We have different color designs to choose from. Price is $40 per color ad. Send the ad information by November 10, 2013 along with your check to: DANK National Executive Office 4740 N Western Ave., Suite 206 Chicago, IL 60625-2013

Call Eve Timmerhaus at 773-275-1100 or Toll-Free 888-USA-DANK if you have any questions. If you have your own holidays design, please email it to us in the correct size indicated above and as a .JPEG to office@dank.org. The holiday edition of the German American Journal will be in the mail by December 1, 2013 in time for everyone to see your holiday wishes. Please show your support or the NEW German American Journal! Fröhliche Weihnachten und ein glückliches Neues Jahr, DANK National Executive Board DANK National Executive Office.

Herbstlied Bunt sind schon die Wälder, Gelb die Stoppelfelder, Und der Herbst beginnt. Rote Blätter fallen, Graue Nebel wallen Kühler weht der Wind. Wie die volle Traube Aus dem Rebenlaube Purpurfarbig strahlt! Am Gelände reifen Pfirsiche mit Streifen Rot und weiss bemahlt. Sieh, wie hier die Dirne Emsig Pflaum` und Birne In ihr Körbchen legt! Dort mit leichten Schritten Jene goldne Quitten In den Landhof trägt!

Flinke Träger springen, Und die Mädchen singen, Alles jubelt froh. Bunte Bänder schweben Zwischen hohen Reben Auf dem Hut von Stroh. Geige tönt und Flöte Bei der Abendröte Und im Mondenglanz; Junge Winzerinnen Winken und beginnen Deutschen Ringeltanz.

Johann Gaudenz Freiherr von Salis


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Summer Membership Drive continues through October 30th! From June 1st to October 30th, DANK is offering a special pro-rated membership fee to new members who join during this time period only. The fee, $40 per single/head of household has been reduced to $20; spouses from $10 to $5. ($25/couple). This will cover membership dues for the balance of 2013. (Please Note: This rate also applies to new members joining in September to participate in German language schools. They will also renew in January at the new rate of $40/head of household for 2014.) As a new member, you will receive four issues of our German American Journal: June/July, Aug/Sept, Oct/Nov, and the Dec/Jan 2014 issues - (a $10 value); you will be joining the brotherhood of thousands of people who actively

acknowledge and preserve their Germanic heritage; meet other like members and share in the camaraderie of a chapter at special events such as German American Day, Oktoberfests, Christmas parties and more. Many chapters offer discounted prices to chapter members; opportunities to travel, language classes and more. Most importantly they will be helping us to preserve the heritage entrusted to us when the German immigrants gathered to lay the foundation of respecting and honoring our German heritage. To join or enroll a new member, use the application form in this newspaper; get an application form from your chapter to send in; or go to www.DANK.org and join on-line. •

Remember to use our Summer Membership Drive prices valid June 1 - October 30th!


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Erie's German Heritage Festival continued from page 12 page flags, followed by the sixteen German State Flags and the singing of the national anthems. The bier keg was officially tapped by Fred Huttel, Master of Ceremonies and “O’zapft ist” proclaimed by Festival co-chair and founder, Beverly Pochatko. Everybody’s favorite - Bob Hamilton, the Mad Bavarian opened the musical performances, and Erie’s Haener Brothers Band provided music as well on Saturday. Our Pittsburgh-based folk dancers, the Alpen Schuhplattler had a great program of folk dancing and added ‘das Fliegerleid’ and really got the people moving…the dance floor was packed! Herm Helay, accordionist from Pittsburgh, provided entertainment in the Viennese Café on Saturday. Sunday’s entertainment was provided by the Mad Bavarian, The Augsberg German Band, and the Alpen Schuhplattlers in the main fest tent. Kirk Hamza of Edinboro played accordion music in the Viennese Café. The food was great – from the Limburger sandwiches to the Sauerbraten dinners; strudels, kettle korn and funnel cakes. Of course, German Bier was on tap as well. At the DANK Information booth, we talked to a lot of people and passed out information, signed new members and sold quite a few of our national raffle tickets. We had a Wine Basket Raffle won by Marge Santebene and a Bier Tailgate Raffle won by Traci Dressner, both of Erie. It was nice to meet up with four-five visitors from Germany who said they were impressed with the festival overall and thanked us for doing it! It really made us feel good. So here’s a toast to next year and our German Heritage Festival. •

On the Cover: Frankfurt am Main, the center of banking and commerce. It has Germany’s largest airport and is characterized by modern skyscrapers. It is also a city that bears witness to major aspects of German history. Attractions in Frankfurt are: Die Hauptwache, Paulskirche, Dom, Historische Garten, Roemerberg, Goethehaus, Frankfurter Wertpapierbörse. Frankfurt is noted for its unusual variety in the field of art, culture and entertainment.

Join DANK at the Hofbräuhaus Saturday, November 2 in Rosemont, IL. Enjoy a specialized Bavarian menu and fresh microbrewed beer! Live entertainment from Germany! See order form on page 6

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We Welcome our New Members National Frederick Sebastian Randy and Mary Jo Albrecht Robert Einem Kenneth, Dana , Megan and Samantha Harris Steven and Samantha Wolf Chicago Brian and Benjamin Von Rueden Thomas Spee Jeffrey Wolf Mark Braun Steven Bruehl and Cesar Barradas Jochen Renz and Agnes Ptaszik Alexnder Palos George O’Neill Kara Wagner Emily Hunter Jeffrey Weinmann Karen Vierneilsel Michael Voeller Melissa Schuch Mark and Amy Alznauer William Johnston

Olaf Ewald Jerry Drouillard Chicago West Olga and Benjamin Karwoski Kirsten Weidenfeler Springfield, IL Jacqueline, and Robert Warren Milwaukee Richard Gutekunst Chicago Northern Suburbs Scott Gilday Nancy, Maximillian and Maria Gahbauer Jean Friffin Tanja, Ben Anja and Simon Wiersum Lee, Enno and Dinah Klinkenborg Mary Jan, Randall and James Reese Daniel, Bridget, Martin, and James Schadegg

Wes Tyack Sonja and Anja Ruppel Carsten Holm Phoenix, AZ Matthew Putz Pittsburgh, PA Richard and Donna Garlitz Richard Garlitz, Jr James and Peg Garlitz Brandon Myers Christine Reinhardt John and Cynthia Erskine John and Diane Hoenig Fri-tz Retsh John Webber Erie, PA Ryan Maloney Gerald Koos

The voters have spoken. Angela Merkel wins! Angela Merkel won an overwhelming endorsement from German voters. Merkel is now set to become the fourth chancellor since the war to win a third time. “To the voters, I promise that we will handle it responsibility and with care. We will do everything we can in the next four years to ensure that they’re once again successful years to come for Germany.” Merkel’s victory gives her another four years at the helm. If she serves the whole term as she said she intends, she will have spent 12 years as German leader, more than the 11 1/2 years managed by British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. •


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Aus Oma's Küche Wiener Schnitzel

Austria's National Dish Ingredients 8 veal cutlets about 90 g each 4 eggs 200 g breadcrumbs, very fine 100 g flour, fine 300 ml butter 100 ml vegetable or peanut oil Salt, lemon slices and fried parsley for garnish. Preparation Tenderize the veal to about 2-4 mm, and salt on both sides. On a flat plate, stir the eggs briefly with a fork. (The egg becomes too thin if you beat it too much). Lightly coat the cutlets in flour then dip into the eggs, and finally, coat in breadcrumbs. Heat the butter and oil in a large pan (allow the fat to get very hot) and fry the schnitzels until golden brown on both sides. Make sure to toss the pan regularly so that the schnitzels are surrounded by oil and the crumbing becomes fluffy.

Remove, and drain on kitchen paper. Fry the parsley in the remaining oil and drain. Place the schnitzels on a warm plate and serve garnished with parsley and slices of lemon. Cooking Time: 3-5 minutes Suggested side dishes: Parsley-tossed potatoes and salad (cucumber, tomato, potato or lettuce). Tips: Genuine Wiener Schnitzel need to be fried in a frying pan, not in a deep fryer. Also, the use of butter is essential to give the schnitzel a typical nutty taste. •

Rüdiger Lenz - Continued from page 14 In addition to being displayed in the Senate and House on the Hill and the GAHM, the exhibition will now be traveling to Germany. “Rüdiger as the first executive director really built out a row house into a very attractive museum that people can enjoy, feel comfortable visiting, and inspires them to think and learn more about their own family’s contribution to the American fabric,” says Marc Wheat, current president of the GAHF. “We hope to plant the idea that Americans need to rediscover their German-speaking heritage, and it’s not as hard as they might think.”

A New Chapter in Berlin As Lentz leaves the GAHM for a new challenge, leading the Aspen Institute Germany in Berlin, he can look back on a successful start for the institution. “We’re sad to see him go,” says Wheat, “but we also know it’s a great vote of confidence in Rüdiger and the work he has put into making the GAHF an important fixture in the transatlantic relationship.” In Berlin Lentz will become the first German director of the Aspen Institute, a respected think tank on transatlantic affairs which marks

its 40th anniversary in 2014. The institute’s commitment to finding common solutions to problems through a non-ideological approach is one shared by Lentz, and so he looks forward to his return, after many years, to life on the River Spree. “Being a transatlanticist for three decades, I think it’s good that I come back and bring something with me which might help to find some solutions or to have a lively dialogue and discussion about many issues. So I’m very open minded, and I think it will work out.” © Germany.info


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Kinderecke Kopf Haare

Auge Nase

Ohr Kinn

Mund

Hals Schulter

Arm

Kรถrper

Hand Finger

Knie Bein

Rechter Fuss

Linker Fuss


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German american journal 61 5