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Volume 59, Number 6

December 2011 / January 2012

Share Christmas

Donate to Local Food Pantries By: Darlene Fuchs

In legend, the Nutcracker possessed miraculous powers, bringing good fortune and protection from evil spirits. The more elaborate their decorations, the stronger their powers. The nutcracker story began with the creation of European nutcrackers in England, Switzerland, France and Germany, in the regions of Sonneberg and Exgebirge near the Bohemaian border, during the 16th and 17th centuries. The miners, who worked long hours in the mines of the Ore Mountains, endured hardship and poverty during the winter months. Carving dolls, resembling kings, military officers and other prominent members of the upper classes, became popular until the miners could return to work. The townspeople enjoyed the whimsical caricatures, because they perform the lowly task of cracking nuts. German homes didn’t typically have more than one of the dolls, and so, during rough economic times in the early 19th century, the region’s toymakers started selling them to Russia, Poland and Norway. Eventually, these one-of-a-kind standing soldiers and kings became a symbol of the region and were sold all over Europe. Demand increased and by the 1870s, factories started the commercial production of nutcrackers. According to German folklore, a nutcracker represents power and strength, guarding your family from evil spirits and danger. A fierce protector, the nutcracker bares its teeth to the evil spirits and serves as the traditional messenger of good luck and goodwill. Although nutcrackers have been around for ages, they were not always the collectible items as we know them today. In fact, nutcrackers only became a popular collectable in the United States about 60 years ago. Many of the US GI’s who were stationed in Germany during World War II, visited “Christkindlmarkets”, where they discovered the intriguing nutcrackers. When the soldiers returned home after the war, a new companion

TidBits Pages 3-4

Auf Deutsch Pages 6-7

accompanied them. The soldiers brought home this figure of power and protection to their families and loved ones. And so, the nutcrackers, with their rich heritage, arrived in the United States. Tchaikovsky’s ballet, “The Nutcracker Suite”, became very popular in the United States in the early 1950’s, igniting the passion for nutcrackers. The magic and mystery of the ballet has intrigued and enchanted audiences year after year. The strong following of this classic production greatly increased the popularity of collecting nutcrackers in America. The role of the Steinbach family, who contributed greatly to the rising popularity of nutcrackers, cannot be overemphasized. The first limited edition nutcracker piece was King Ludwig II, which was limited to 3,000 pieces. The idea of a limited nutcracker produced an overwhelming response because it contributed to the collectability of the nutcrackers and greatly increased their value. Each character is created from “living” wood, typically pine, maple, beech or linden, and may take up to three or four years to produce, with over 100 separate procedures. Craftsmen with years of experience must devote their time to the many steps in the process. Hand carving and painting is still seen on modern figures, with native craftsmen and their families using centuries-old techniques to create the stunning results now available. The East Germans stuck to the traditional nutcracker the king and the guard. After reunification West German businesses bought the East German toy companies. The business nature changed and designs became more innovative expanding the once traditional court to include women. The resilience of the nutcracker and the Steinbach family is evidenced in the quote: “If one does not work hard to earn the heritage, one will perish in the end, or at best hold the stirrups for those who are on their way up.”

Although the United States is the wealthiest nation in the world, over 37 million Americans each year, including 14 million children and 3 million seniors get food from their local food bank network. Unlike other community problems, hunger is invisible. America is the land of plenty, but for 1 in 6 Americans, hunger is a reality. St. Nikolaus did provide for the needy and the Gemanic community in the US is doing the same. Hunger transcends all economic and social levels. Urban and rural, children, seniors, working people, some in your neighborhood: hunger is there. Right now, even more Americans are struggling with hunger due the rise in unemployment and a sluggish economy.   Doesn’t every person deserve to have enough food, especially during the holidays? This Christmas you can help families across the country.  Every dollar you give helps provide meals for families struggling with hunger.  Donate food or cash to your local food pantry or charity. Or, send a donation to DANK’s National Executive Office and a donation will be made on your behalf to a food bank in your community. No one should go hungry this Christmas. One organization, one club, one local business or one person CAN make a difference! St. Nikolaus did, he is still known throughout the world for his generosity to the those in need. If you have made a donation of food or cash, call or email DANK National, with the amount you donated, so you can show you were part of the “St. Nikolaus Project.” Eve@dank.org 773-275-1100 Toll Free: 866926-1109. To find your local food bank, go to feedingamerica.org

Insider

Business & Tech

Calendar

Education

Lifestyle

Christmas Greetings

Pages 8-11 Page 14

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Pages 16-17

Page 18

Pages 5, 12, 13, 19


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German-American Journal

December ‘11 / January ‘12

CHECK OUT THE NEW DANK.ORG German Radio & T V Official DANK Blog Newspaper Archives

Liebe Mitglieder und Freunde! Dear Members and Friends, I was honored by the delegates at our National Convention to be elected to serve as your National President for the next two years. My involvement in DANK began twenty-one years ago, when I was searching for a German-American organization, to join and learn about my German heritage. I came across DANK whose goals/mission statement was exactly what I was looking for and thus began my DANK odyssey… unexpectedly becoming the Founder of Chapter 71 in Erie! My first contact was with Elsbeth Seewald, who took me under her wing and guided me. Then began my privilege of serving in various capacities on the National Executive Board, first as Region 3 Rep then as Regional President. Later I was elected to serve as a National Vice President and most recently as your National Secretary. Over the years, I have served on the Bylaws Committee, Membership, Education and Awards Committees and helped create the Standard Operating Guide for the Chapters. I was mentored by Presidents Elsbeth Seewald, Ernst Ott, Jerry Michaud, Christa Garcia and Bill Fuchs. I was given a good understanding of what is expected to be a good leader, learned as much as possible from them and my peers. I have also learned that it takes a good team working together for the common good to accomplish the many tasks set before the elected representatives and the board, knowing that not all will always agree with our decisions. I will not make promises, but….. I will work with your representatives to accomplish what can be done for the good of all the Chapters. I believe that we need to realign our goals – to bring DANK into the present – realizing that many goals for which this organization was founded have been met and now we must plan for the future. Now, we need to present to those 2nd, 3rd or more generations, a deep seated pride in their roots; overcoming the obstacles of prejudice that have existed and the courage to make the difference. As I have told many people, I do not plan to fill the shoes of my predecessor, but, to bring new foot prints to the scene and to follow the path to keep DANK viable for years to come with your help. The older generations will pass away, but our future lies in our youth. Over the next several months, our Executive Board will be working on how to best serve you, the true backbone of DANK. I welcome your thoughts and suggestions. All too often, we do things automatically without a thought of when or why they were done a certain way, or even connected it to our German heritage. For some, an association to their German heritage did not exist. As we begin celebrating the traditions of Advent and Christmas, I encourage you to take advantage of this time to reflect on the ways your family brought these traditions into your homes. Take the time before the celebrations to explain what these traditions hold for you to your children and your grandchildren. Pass them on before they are buried in the sands of time! If you just lit the Advent wreath candles in the past because it is ‘what we always did’, look into its beginnings and share this with your family…how it started. If this is not something you have done, then rekindle the embers of traditions to pass on in your family. Make your own Advent Wreath and have everyone help make it. Christmas is a time of giving, and what better way then to give the gifts of traditions and a family membership to DANK. Share your German heritage with pride! Ich wünsche euch gesegnete Weihnachten und ein gesundes Neues Jahr! May you enjoy the peace, love and joy of the season with family and friends. Mit freundlichen Grüßen,

And More...

Der Deutsch-Amerikaner DANK seeks to bring together Americans of German descent in the pursuit of cultivating and presenting their heritage and interests on local, regional and national levels. These were the primary reasons that the German American National Congress was founded in 1959, and they are still among the organization’s primary objectives today.

DANK National Executive Board President Beverly Pochatko 1. Vice President Alfred Mueller

2. Vice President James Dombrowski

Treasurer Bob Miske

Secretary Linda Voit

Editorial Staff

The Sparkle of Christmas Through the Eyes of a Child “Christmas Is My Favorite Time of the Year”, sung by Kenny Rogers states, “How wise the wise men must have been, to find the child in Bethlehem, He lives again and draws us near, Christmas time is here. A tale of love that never dies, the laughter in the children’s eyes, the child in me is always there, Christmas is my favorite time of year.” There is nothing like the sparkle in a child’s eyes when they look under their Christmas tree and find a gift especially for them. Each year during this season, we all need to celebrate and remember that the most incredible gift ever given was the birth of God’s Son on the very first Christmas. This year, that simple story, combined with carols, decorations, a trimmed tree, hot cocoa, and pretty lights will help each of us rediscover the wonder of Christmas. Christmas is the one holiday of the year that adults cannot take away from children. It began with an infant, and even today you will miss that extra sparkle of Christmas unless you happen to see it through a child’s eyes. As adults we need to separate ourselves from the commercialism and focus on the joy ---- from the young children around us. There is nothing as wonderful on Christmas greater than watching a child eyes sparkle with anticipation. It is this innocence and unassuming nature we must capture. Unfortunately, more often than not, Christmas becomes a chore for adults. We must conquer crowded shops and other stressed out shoppers, endure writing endless cards, wrap mountains of presents, cook the Christmas dinner, and deal with an onslaught of visitors. For kids, however, Christmas is pure magic. It is also a time for traditions. Thinking back to your own childhood, the chances are what you remember most are not the piles of presents you received or how many cookies you ate, but rather the family traditions that made Christmas such a special time of year. My Christmas wish for all of you is a simple one. May you and your family experience the light of hope and peace and may the magic of Christmas fill your hearts with love and joy. And remember that with little ones, everything old is new again. Die besten Wünsche für ein besinnliches Weihnachtsfest und ein glückliches neues Jahr. Thank you for all of your support over this past year.

Darlene Fuchs Editor-in-Chief

Beverly A. Pochatko National President

Editor-in-Chief Darlene Fuchs darlene@dank.org Correspondents Corinna Bienger Amelia Cotter Stephen Fuchs Christa Garcia Audrey L. Hess-Eberle Matthias Knobloch Editorial Staff Margita Mandel Amanda Pedersen Beth L. Casey Chapter News Editor Darlene Fuchs darlene@dank.org Membership Erik Wittmann erik25@comcast.net Layout & Design Stephen Fuchs Stephen@FoxTaleEdit.com Advertising & Classifieds Eve Timmerhaus eve@dank.org

Office Staff DANK National Executive Office

4740 N. Western Ave Chicago, Il 60625-2013 Call (773) 275-1100 Toll Free (866) 926-1109 Fax (773) 275-4010 Office Hours:

9am - 4pm / Monday, Wednesday-Friday Executive Secretary Eva Timmerhaus Office@dank.org

Office Manager Eve Timmerhaus Eve@dank.org

General Information German-American Journal - ISSN 1086-8070 - is published bi-monthly and is the official publication of the German American National Congress. Periodicals postage paid at Chicago, Illinois and additional mailing offices.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: German-American Journal 4740 N. Western Ave., Suite 206 Chicago, IL 60625-2013

Annual Subscription - Rate: $15.00

Submission Deadline For The February / March 2012 Issue:

December 25, 2011

www.dank.org/news.html

DANK does not warrant or assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information published herein. DANK reserves the right to change or amend submissions for any reason without prior notice. ©2011 DANK. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the prior written permission of the publisher.


December ‘11 / January ‘12

German-American Journal

3

“Ein Mann mit grossen Ideen ist ein unbequemer Nachbar.” “A man with great ideas is an uncomfortable neighbor.” Marie von Ebner-Eschenbac

DC Area Clubs Celebrate GermanAmerican Day in Friendship Garden By: www.germany.info

Under cloudless skies on a perfect early fall weather day, representatives of the Association of German-American Societies of Greater Washington (AGAS), the Chicago-based German American National Congress (DANK), and the GermanAmerican Heritage Foundation of the USA gathered on the National Mall for the 24th annual celebration of German-American Day, October 6, 2011. Gerhard Meinzer, president of AGAS, opened by welcoming attendees to the German-American Friendship Garden, dedicated in 1988 by former U.S. President Ronald Reagan and German Chancellor Helmut Kohl and located in a direct line between the White House and the Washington Monument. Tabea Münz, Pastor for German Ministries at the United Church in Washington, then led a prayer for continued positive relations between the United States and Germany. Those assembled next sang the national

anthems of both Germany and the United States. A message of greeting by German Ambassador Peter Ammon to mark the occasion was delivered by the Head of the Cultural Section of the German Embassy, Bertram von Moltke. In his message the Ambassador noted the huge contributions German immigrants made to shaping the U.S. into the country it is today. “We should not, however, only look back”, Ambassador Ammon said. “The traditionally close and friendly ties between Germany and the United States, which rest on shared values and ideals of democracy, preservation of peace, human rights, and the market economy, form the basis for common action in a rapidly changing world.” Proclamations on the importance of German heritage in the U.S. by Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley, Virginia Governor Robert F. McDonnell, and DC Mayor Vincent Gray were also read. Members of multiple German-American cultural groups attended the ceremony,

Official Hofbräuhaus Coming to Chicago

AGAS member representatives, Chicago-based German American National Congress (DANK), and the German-American Heritage Foundation of the USA, celebrate the 24th annual German-American day at the Friendship Garden in Washington DC. (Photo by Darlene Fuchs) Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation

(All Periodicals Publications RequesterSängerbund, Publications) founded including representatives from the MidThe Except Washington Atlantic Germanic Society, Alpine Dancers, 1851 and the oldest German singing society Washington Sängerbund, German- in the Washington, DC area, concluded the American Heritage Museum, historic 2011 German-American Day celebrations Prospect Hill Cemetery of Washington, with a rendition of Der Ruf Nach Frieden Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation German-American Heritage (All Society of DC, (A Call for Peace). Planning for next year’s Periodicals Publications Except Requester Publications) German European American Society of 25th anniversary celebrations can begin! Norfolk, Virginia, and German Society of Maryland. 1. Publication Title

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Frankenmuth, MI – November 8, 2011 – Plans are well underway to establish a new Hofbräuhaus in Rosemont, Illinois in the greater Chicago area. Opening date is estimated to be the end of June/ early July 2012. Ground breaking is planned for November 18, 2011. This will be the first Hofbräu franchise in the Mid-West. It joins other Hofbräuhauses in Newport, KY; Las Vegas, and Pittsburgh, PA. The Hofbräuhaus Chicago at Rosemont is patterned after the famous original Hofbräuhaus am Platzl in Munich, Germany. It was established in 1589 and has been a Munich premier attraction for centuries. Today it is visited by millions of visitors every year. Presidents and royalties have

been guests there. The atmosphere is one of international camaraderie, good food, and of course the famous Hofbräu beer. Josef Matuschka, chairman of Windy City Group which holds the franchise rights for the Chicago area, has been working on establishing a Hofbräuhaus in the Chicago area for some time. “I always knew that a Hofbräuhaus belongs in Chicago and I am very glad that we will be able to make it happen in Rosemont” says Joe. His son, Michael who is President of Windy City Group, is heavily involved in the details to make the project a reality. Mike explains “This is a major project with the goal to make the people of Chicago feel like being in Munich at the Hofbräuhaus when it opens next summer”.

Liebe Mitglieder und Freunde! Dear Members and Friends, At the 2011 DANK National Convention, held in Pittsburgh on the last weekend of October, the chapter delegates cast their votes for new DANK National Officers. I congratulate Beverly Pochatko as our new National President, along with Al Mueller, James Dombrowski, the new Vice Presidents, Linda Voit, the new Recording Secretary and Bob Miske as the re-elected Treasurer.   We have two very experienced veterans, Beverly and Bob along with Linda, who knows DANK National well, and two very dedicated but young Vice Presidents.  I wish them well

and hope that they will be able to continue leading the organization into a productive future.   I wish you a very blessed holiday season and look forward to seeing you at future DANK or German Community Events.   Viele Grüsse,

William Fuchs DANK Immediate Past President

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German-American Journal

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German-American Journal

December ‘11 / January ‘12

Christmas as a POW in World War II By: Fred Huttel, Sr. Forward by Beverly Pochatko

For many of us growing up during the Second World War we were sheltered by the love of our family – especially at Christmas. They made sure that Santa would have at least one or two presents ‘neath the Christmas tree, and there would be cookies to share. We were so happy then with just the little things in life. It is only through the memories shared by others can we even begin to think of what Christmas was like in a country where a war is being fought, with families and lives disrupted. At a Chapter meeting many years ago, Fred K. Huttel, Sr. shared with us his memory of being a prisoner of war in Barrie, Italy. Fred passed away in November 2009, but his story had a profound meaning for all of us and I’d like to share it with you. “The Second World War and the political turmoil in Europe changed the world and mankind. The word HATE is continuously heard and used; I HATE YOU! Having been a POW in the Second World War, I too used the word HATE. I hated the British - the Limeys. They treated us no different than what I see on the TV screen showing Concentration Camps. Yes, I hated the Limeys with a passion!

After 13 months camp time, out of two thousand POWs, 15 of us got work assignments. The assignment led me to a huge hospital complex in Barrie. Here at the New Zealand Complex I had to keep the sleeping quarters, the shoes and laundry for those New Zealand officers, clean, and I had kitchen duty, which was a welcome, because I would eat – I weighed less than 100 pounds! The New Zealanders would treat us as human beings and with respect. Came Christmas, we were asked if we had a wish. Yes, we said, we would like a Tannenbaum – Fir Tree . They went all the way up to the north of Italy to get us a Fir Tree and then got one for themselves. We decorated those trees the German Christmas way, the seasons are reversed. On Christmas Eve afternoon, at the Officer’s Party, we prisoners had to wait on them. During their celebration the Brigadier General asked us POWs into the room. In a short speech he thanks us for a job well done. The war is history, he said. We worship the same God and together let us celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ. No more animosity! Come and celebrate with us and let us sing, together, “Silent Night, Holy Night” each in his own language. A very peaceful existence went through my body. There was NO more HATE in my heart. This Christmas let us trim our lamp to give more light and less smoke and let’s carry the lamp in front so that our shadow will fall behind. Let’s make a grave for our ugly thoughts and a garden for our kindly feelings, with a gate open wide. Faith is the assurance of things hoped for. Take the hand of your neighbor and let’s sing “Stille Nacht, Heilige Nacht” and tell your neighbor – I love you!

Helping Shape America

German-Americans in the US Congress from 1789 to the Present

Darlene Fuchs, Journal Editor, Rüdiger Lenz,GAHF Executive Director, Bill Fuchs, DANK Nat’l President, Kathy & Hans Wolf, Mardi Gras Society of Chicago.

By: Darlene Fuchs The German American Heritage Museum, in conjunction with the U.S. Capitol Historical Society, has created a series of exhibits on the contributions of German Americans to the history of the United States Congress. The first of two planned exhibits, tells the story of two of the first three German Americans in the First Congress, Frederick and Peter Muhlenberg of Pennsylvania (1789-1791), to the members of German ancestry who serve in the current 112th Congress (2011-2013). There is also information on American Presidents honoring German immigration, the Congressional Study Group on Germany, the GermanAmerican Caucus, and current members of Congress with German ancestry. German American Caucus founders, Congressman Charles Dent, Congressman Jim Gerlach and Congressman Tim Holden, feel the purpose of this first exhibition in the Cannon House Office Building Rotunda in Washington, D.C.  is to draw attention to the contributions of millions of German immigrants to American society. It is not only to celebrate heritage but more importantly to foster our transatlantic relationship, share technology, and promote job growth in a global economy.

The initial 14-panel exhibit opened on October 4, 2011, in the rotunda of the Cannon House Office Building. A second exhibit will follow in 2012, focusing on German Americans in the United States Congress in the 19th and 20th centuries. Both exhibits are designed to travel in Germany and throughout the United States. Like most immigrants to the United States, those from Germany came here seeking economic opportunity, religious freedom, and political liberty. The U.S. Capitol Historical Society and the German American Heritage Museum gratefully acknowledge the donors who made this exhibit possible: AtlantikBrücke E.V.; Deutsche Post DHL; Deutsche Welle; Draeger-Stiftung; Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany, Washington, D.C.; United States Diplomatic Mission to Germany. Rüdiger Lenz, the head of the German-American Heritage Museum in Washington, put it this way: “These exhibits are intended to expand the public’s awareness of the service and contributions of German Americans in the U.S. House and the U.S. Senate and their integral role in reflecting America’s diverse history and culture within the nation’s political structure.” A web version of the exhibit will soon be posted on www.uschs.org,

Der Adventskalender Who does not know the children’s question: “How long until Christmas”? “How many nights until Santa Claus is coming”? Initially, the “Adventskalender” helped count down the days. The origins can be traced back into the 19th century, the first home-made Advent Calendar was probably made in 1851. The first, more popular forms of the Advent Calendar, came out of the protestant environment, in which families gradually hung up 24 pictures. Or straws were put into the Holy Crib, one for each day, until Christmas Eve. The first printed Advent Calendar was sold in 1904. It was a large sheet of paper with 24 pictures that were cut out, with another sheet of paper onto which the pictures were pasted. Each day the children were allowed to cut out and paste one little picture. The “Adventskalender” with 24 doors that could be opened, became really popular in the 1950s, when it was mass-produced and consequently affordable. Designs were mainly scenes from romantic little towns with a Christian influence. From 1958 on, the first calendars, filled with chocolate, came out. Behind the chocolate there were Christmas pictures which referenced the Advent time. The biggest Advent Calendar today can be found in Leipzig. The doors are 2x3 meter big and one of them is opened every day. Today, in addition to the chocolate filled calendars, we often make calendars ourselves, with 24 little presents, which can be packaged in different ways. The live or “Lebendiger Adventskalender” aims to bring people together. Everybody is invited to get together as they prepare for Christmas and God’s coming to the world by sharing carols, pictures, lights and thoughts. In a community, village, or neighborhood, people meet at somebody’s window or door every evening between the 1st and the 23rd of December. Neither church membership, nor other social standings are important. The meeting point is in front of the window or door of the respective host or hostess. That window, or calendar “door”, is composed of the real window, displaying the date, lights, pictures and other elements. The hosts can then lead a short ceremony with carols, stories, reflections or prayers. Of course, serving Christmas cookies and Gluehwein or hot chocolate is also customary at these private ceremonies. On the 24th of December, the Holy Night, all the churches open their doors for prayers and reflection. The need for closeness in times of wars and crises have possibly contributed to the continuation of people preparing for Christmas. Since the 1990‘s these traditions have been re-discovered and revived in many parts of Germany. Whichever form of Advent Calendar a family chooses, it is a choice everyone makes for themselves. In some of my friends’ families, Christmas would not be Christmas without the 24 socks filled with little Christmas treats, hanging on a clothes line in the living room. It is a lot of fun to wrap 24 tiny presents, complete with ribbons and all, just in time for the first day of December. It is a blessing to see how the children wake up every single morning, anxious to find out what’s in their calendar today, and help them count off the days until Christmas Eve. I wish everyone at DANK as well as families and friends a wonderful “Adventszeit” and a calm Christmas season with lots of time for prayers and giving thanks.

Rüdiger Lenz and Bill Fuchs with Presidential Candidate, Congressman Ron Paul at the exhibit in the Cannon House in Washington, DC


December ‘11 / January ‘12

German-American Journal

From Ron & Erika Zielinski To Our Family and Friends We Wish You Happy Holidays

Merry Christmas

Steuben Society of America

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German-American Journal

December ‘11 / January ‘12

“Der Mann ist lyrisch, das Weib episch, Heirat dramatisch.” “Man is lyrical, woman epic, marriage dramatic.” Novalis

Eine Reise ins Mittelalter Der Weihnachtsmarkt in Magdeburg

By: Eileen Demange

Wenn es draußen langsam kälter wird und die Tage immer kürzer werden, dann kommt bei den meisten Deutschen schon die Vorfreude auf den Weihnachtsmarkt auf. Mit Familie oder Freunden über den Weihnachtsmarkt zu schlendern, umgeben von einem süßen Duft und sinnlicher Musik, ist für viele das Schönste an Weihnachten. Leckereien wie gebrannte Mandeln, Quarkbällchen, etliche Sorten von Bratwürsten, Leber mit gebratenen Zwiebeln, Handbrot, Leberkäse, als auch der Duft von frischem Glühwein, und vieles mehr, machen einem die Entscheidung nicht immer leicht. Fast in jeder größeren deutschen Stadt findet man einen Weihnachtsmarkt - einer schöner als der andere. Einen Weihnachtsmarkt, den ich ganz besonders liebe, nicht zuletzt wegen meiner Herkunft, befindet sich in Magdeburg. Dieser hat für groß und klein viel zu bieten. Für Kinder, aber natürlich auch für Erwachsene, ist die Märchengasse ein ganz besonderes Erlebnis. Hier können sie sich Märchenszenen mit beweglichen Figuren ansehen und es wird unter anderem die Geschichte vom gestiefelten Kater, Rotkäppchen und Frau Holle erzählt. Am Ende des Marktes, nachdem man die Märchengasse durchquert hat, macht man eine kleine Zeitreise in das Mittelalter. Man tapst auf Stroh, trifft Personen, die mittelalterlich gekleidet sind, sieht überall Stände, die traditionelle Handwerke repräsentieren und natürlich auch Essen, das dieser Zeit entspricht. Doch am allermeisten sticht hier, neben dem allgegenwärtigen Geruch von Weihrauch, der Glühweinstand “Die Mundschenke“ hervor. Dieser Glühweinstand entspricht der lutherschen Zeit, also etwa dem 15. Jahrhundert. In mittelalterlicher Kleidung verkaufen die jungen Studenten, zu denen

auch ich gehöre, köstlichen Glühwein. Es macht Spaß hinter der Theke Menschen zu beobachten, die bei einem guten Glas Glühwein die schönsten Momente des Jahres Revue passieren lassen und sich auf die verdiente Weihnachtspause freuen. Es wird roter und weißer Glühwein in vollen Zügen verkauft. Aber auch Himbeer –oder Holunderglühwein für die, die den herben Geschmack nicht mögen. Die Mundschenke hat viel zu bieten. Der „goldene Zimtapfel“ ist neben dem Glühwein eines der heiß begehrtesten Getränke am Stand. Es handelt sich hierbei um heißen Apfelsaft mit Zimtapfellikör, in dem sich kleine silberne Sterne befinden. Kleiner Tipp: heißer Apfelsaft mit einem Schuss Amaretto ist unter den Mitarbeitern sehr beliebt. Wer das nicht kennt, dem kann ich zur Weihnachtszeit nur ans Herz legen, dieses Getränk einmal zu probieren – es ist ein unvergesslicher Genuss. Doch ebenso ein anderer Glühweinstand auf dem Mittelaltermarkt „Das Abt“ bietet einen hervorragenden Glühwein in alten Tonkrügen. Hier werden Sie von historisch gekleideten Nonnen bedient, die noch weiter in das Mittelalter zurück reichen. Bei Ihrem nächsten Besuch in Deutschland, falls dieser gerade zur Adventszeit stattfindet, sollten Sie den Magdeburger Mittelaltermarkt besuchen und einen wunderbaren Glühwein an einem dieser beiden Stände für 3 Euro genießen. Es empfiehlt sich als Andenken einen der tollen Behälter mitzunehmen, für den man gerade einmal 3 Euro Pfand bezahlt. Auf dem altertümlichen Weihnachtsmarkt, für den ich so schwärme, ist das

mittelalterliche Badehaus eine weitere Attraktion, die es zu besuchen lohnt. Doch nicht nur der Mittelaltermarkt überzeugt. Natürlich gibt auch der traditionsgemäße Markt, wie wir ihn überall kennen, viel her. Wenn man diesen entlang geht, steht am anderen Ende des Marktes ein Riesenrad, mit welchem man eine wunderbare Sicht über Magdeburg hat. Es ist traumhaft damit eine nächtliche Runde zu drehen, da dann die beleuchteten Domtürme zu sehen sind, die besonders bei Nacht etwas Magisches haben. Einen Blick über den Weihnachtsmarkt und gleichzeitig auf das Wahrzeichen der Stadt zu haben, ist schon sehr einzigartig. Der Magdeburger Weihnachtsmarkt hat, wie man sieht, sehr viel zu bieten. Zusätzlich gibt es

täglich Weihnachts-Livemusik, eine Weihnachtsmannsprechstunde und an den Wochenenden spannende Märchenaufführungen. Nicht umsonst genießt der Magdeburger Weihnachtsmarkt den Ruf, einer der kinderfreundlichsten in Deutschland zu sein. Auch die einzigartige Kulisse des historischen Rathauses, mit dem weltbekannten „Magdeburger Reiter“, überzeugt jeden Gast aus nah und fern, einmal über den Markt zu schlendern, um sich verzaubern zu lassen. Na, haben Sie Lust bekommen auch einmal über den Magdeburger Weihnachtsmarkt zu gehen? Ein Besuch auf einem der täglich am längsten geöffneten Weihnachtsmärkte Deutschlands lohnt sich auf jeden Fall. Unter der Woche ist der Markt von 11 bis 22 Uhr und am Wochenende bis 23 Uhr geöffnet.

Traveling Back in Time to the Middle Ages The Christmas Market in Magdeburg By: Eileen Demange When it begins to get cold outside and the days grow shorter, the anticipation of the Christmas market is coming in most of Germany. To walk with family or friends across the Christmas market, surrounded by the sights and sounds, are most people the best things about Christmas. Goodies like almonds, different types of sausages, liver with roasted onions, loaves of bread, German Leberkäse, the flavor of fresh mulled wine…In nearly every German city you can find a Christmas market – and each one is better than the last. A Christmas market that I really love, if for nothing else because of my origin, is the one in Magdeburg. It has it’s appeal for young and old. For children and of course also for adults, the fairy-tale alley is a special experience. Here they can watch fairy-tale sequences with movable figures. When you walk across fairy-tale alley

at the end of the market it’s as if you are traveling through time to the Middle Ages. You walk over straw, meet people who are dressed in medieval garb, see booths everywhere which represent traditional trades, and of course, you have food that is specific to that time period. But the most eye-catching is, beside the omnipresent smell of incense, the mulled wine booth called the “Mundschenke.” This equates to the time of Luther, circa 15th century. In medieval dresses the young students (I am one of them) sell the exquisite mulled wine. It’s fun to watch the people behind the counter who review with a good glass of mulled wine the best times of the year and look forward to their well-earned Christmas vacation. Both red and white mulled wine are sold. But also raspberry and elderberry mulled wine are available. The “Mundschenke” has a lot to offer. The “golden custard-apple” is beside the mulled wine the best sold beverage at

the booth. That is hot apple juice with custard-apple liqueur in which are small silver stars. Small tip: hot apple juice with a shot of amaretto is very popular among the staff. To these people who don’t know that beverage I warmly recommend trying at Christmas time – it is an unforgettable pleasure. But also another mulled wine booth of the mediaeval market, the “Abt,” provides an excellent mulled wine in old clay cups. Here you will be served by traditionally medieval dressed “nuns.” On your next visit to Germany, when it’s Advent season, you should visit the Christmas market in Magdeburg and enjoy a delightful mulled wine for three Euros at one of these two booths. It is recommended to take with you one of these amazing clay cups as a memento. At the historical Christmas market, for which I am so enthusiastic, another attraction you really should visit is the mediaeval bathhouse. Also, the traditional Christmas market as known everywhere, has a lot to offer. When you go there, there is a Ferris wheel from which you have a wonderful view of

Magdeburg. You can see the illuminated cathedral towers which have something magical to them at night. To have a glance through the Christmas market and at the same time on this historic city is very unique. The Magdeburg Christmas market has, as we have seen, so much to offer. In addition, there is daily live Christmas music, a Santa Claus hour and on weekends, exciting fairy tales. The Magdeburg Christmas Market enjoys a reputation as one of the most child-friendly in Germany. And the unique setting of the historic City Hall with the famous “Magdeburg Rider” convinces each guest from far and wide to visit the market and become enchanted, too. Do you feel like going to the Magdeburg Christmas Market now? A visit to one of the longest open daily Christmas markets in Germany is well worth it. During the week the market is opened from 11am to 10pm and on weekends until 11pm.


December ‘11 / January ‘12

German-American Journal

Gesundes neues Jahr!

Am 31. Dezember um Mitternacht heißt es mal wieder Prost Neujahr. In den USA wie auch in Deutschland stoßen alle in Feierlaune versetzten Silvesterenthusiasten mit Sekt auf das neue Jahr an. Aber wie genau feiert man Silvester zwischen Ostsee und den Alpen, dem Rhein und dem Erzgebirge? Der Neujahrsabend wird Matthias Knobloch im deutschsprachigen Raum Silvester genannt, da der 31. Dezember 334 nach Christus die Beerdigung von St. Sylvester mit einem festlichen Leichenschmaus gefeiert wurde. Auch andere Länder nennen ihren “New Year’s Eve” nach dem in der

Katacombe von Priscilla im italienischen Rom begrabenen St. Sylvester. Nun wie genau feiern den die Deutschen ihren Silvesterabend? Eine der ersten Traditionen am 31. Dezember ist die Linsensuppe auf dem Mittagstisch. Der Legende nach symbolisieren die Linsen Kleingeld oder Thaler welche man als weiteres Einkommen im kommenden Jahr in der Tasche haben soll. Den Abend verbringen die Deutschen auf verschiedenste Art und Weise. Viele gehen zu den großen öffentlichen Feiern, welche open air in vielen großen Städten abgehalten werden. Andere ziehen es vor, in Clubs, Bars oder zu privaten Feiern zu gehen. Berlin beispielsweise organisiert alljährlich die größte open air party Europas mit Millionen von Partywilligen. Im Mittelpunkt der großen Silvesterparty steht natürlich das Brandenburger Tor, welches wie ein Magnet vor allem die junge Generation zu den Musikbühnen und den Feuerwerken zieht. Die Deutschen sind übrigens bekannt dafür, hunderte

Happy New Year! By: Matthias Knobloch When the clock strikes midnight on December 31 of each year, people in both, the United States and Germany toast to the New Year with a glass of champagne. Is that the only thing both countries have in common on New Year’s Eve? We shall see: German-speaking countries call the 31st of December “Silvester” instead of New Year’s Eve. The name’s roots in the existence of St. Sylvester, whose feast took place on the 31st of December 335 - the day of his burial in the Catacomb of Priscilla in Rome, Italy. Some other countries also refer to New Year’s Eve as the Feast of Saint Sylvester or Saint Sylvester’s Day. Now, what do Germans do on Silvester? The Silvester day starts out with “Linsensuppe” for lunch. Traditionally, each lentil in the lentil soup symbolizes one Euro Coin (historically Thaler) that one will have extra in the coming year. At night, some people choose to go to parties held outside in the streets of big cities, or to clubs, bars, or private house parties. Berlin, for instance, hosts one of the largest Silvester Parties in all of Europe with millions of people attending every year. The center of this huge party is the Brandenburg Gate, the symbol of freedom and unity. Many Germans, especially youth, meet up to celebrate with friends and family members. Bands

play and fireworks are fired up. Germans are famous for spending large amounts of money on firecrackers and fireworks for the holiday. Naturally, for this reason, fireworks can be seen across the country on Silvester, particularly at midnight. The tradition of lighting fireworks comes from the belief that theyscare away bad ghosts and spirits so that the people can start the new year fresh, leaving all bad things behind. Given the powerful and professional nature of the firework rockets for sale for Silvester, only people 18 years and older are allowed to buy and use them. However, bad burn injuries are the most common ailment in emergency rooms on Silvester night, demonstrating that sadly, children and teenagers underestimate the danger of these rockets and firecrackers. The film “Dinner for One” became a “must watch” comedy sketch on Silvester in Germany, and it is typically broadcast several times that night. The sketch presents the 90th birthday of an upper-class Englishwoman and actually has nothing to do with New Year’s Eve. The line “the same procedure as every year” from this sketch has become a catch phrase in Germany. While many watch the film regularly every year, some people refrain from watching TV that night and either go to or organize a party. Dancing, drinking and laughing together with friends and family members are a must at each New Year’s Eve Party. A typical German beverage that night is Feuerzangenbowle, a traditional German

7

von Euros für Knallkörper und Raketen auszugeben. Der Himmel an Silvester sieht in Deutschland logischerweise und wortwörtlich knallbunt aus. Das Feuerwerk sollte in animistischen Glauben früher „böse Geister“ vertreiben und drückt heute auch Vorfreude auf das neue Jahr aus. Das Feuerwerk ist in der Regel nur für volljährige Personen und kann auch nur von solchen erworben werden. Dennoch kommt es jedes Jahr zu zahlreichen Unfällen mit schweren Verbrennungen, verursacht von Knallkörpern – traurigerweise auch bei vielen Minderjährigen. Ein durchaus deutsches Phänomen ist die alljährliche Ausstrahlung des Films „Dinner for One“. In diesem Sketch, brittischer Herkunft, geht es darum, wie eine 90 Jährige und sehr wohlhabende Dame ihren Geburtstag mit ihren längst verstorbenen Freunden feiert. Obwohl der Sketch mit Silvester eigentlich nichts zu tun hat, wird dieser von einigen Fernsehstationen am Silvesterabend sogar mehrfach ausgestrahlt. Der Spruch „the same procedure as every year“ hat diese Komödie berühmt gemacht. Obwohl sich eine geraume Anzahl von Deutschen diesen Film zumindst einmal am 31. Dezember ansehen (ich gehöre nicht dazu), ziehen es viele vor, den Fernseher an diesem Abend auszulassen. Feierlichkeiten bei gemütlchem Zusammensein mit der Famile und den Freunden stehen eher im Vordergrund. Dazu trinken wir Deutsche nicht nur Bier! Ein traditionelles alkoholisches Getränk ist beispielsweise auch die Feuerzangenbowle, welche aber auch an Heiligabend getrunken werden kann. Ein mit Rum getränkter Zuckerhut wird angezuendet und der karamelisierte Zucker tropft nach und nach in den mit dem restlichen Rum gefüllten Topf. Ein wahrhaft süßer Genuss mit Potential für einen erfolgreichen Abend. Eine weitere Silvestertradition is das Bleigießen. Das über einer Kerzenflamme verflüssigte Blei wird in kaltes Wasser gegeben um dann aus der sich daraus ergebenen Form schließlich die Zukunft ablesen zu können. Selbstverständlich werden die gebildeten Formen meistens als Geld, neue Autos, Liebe oder gar als Kindersegen interpretiert. Wer als Teenager allerdings nicht als uncool abgestempelt werden möchte, der feiert lieber mit Gleichaltrigen in das neue Jahr. Schließlich kann man dann auch etwas mehr trinken - das weiß ich auch aus eigener Erfahrung. Aber egal mit wem oder wo man in das neue Jahr rutscht, überall werden die letzten Sekunden heruntergezählt und wenn es dann schließlich Null Uhr ist, liegen sich alle in den Armen und wünschen sich gegenseitig ein frohes und gesundes neues Jahr. In diesem Sinne wünsche ich allen Mitgliedern von DANK ein frohes Weihnachtsfest und einen guten Rutsch in das Jahr 2012.

alcoholic drink for which rum-soaked sugarloaf is set on fire and drips into wine or Glühwein. To the sizzling noise of the burning rum-sugar, some like to do some “Bleigießen”, another German tradition on Silvester. This tradition is practiced by people melting lead on a spoon with the heat of a candle and then dropping the lead into cold water. The shape made by the molten lead is supposed to tell one’s fortune. Of course many foresee a lot of money, new cars, love, or the blessing of a newly born child. Teenagers usually prefer

to celebrate with their peers as partying with their parents on Silvester is out and may lead to ridicule. But, no matter where or with whom people celebrate, all count down the last seconds of the old year, and when the clock strikes midnight, people hug each other wishing one another, “a happy and healthy new year.” Having said this, I wish every member of DANK and reader of this Journal a very merry Christmas and a happy new 2012.


8

German-American Journal

December ‘11 / January ‘12

“Liebe ist das einzige, was wächst, indem wir es verschwenden.” “Love is the only thing that grows by squandering it.” Ricarda Huch

By the time this edition goes to print we will have elected our new Executive Board. Many thanks to the outgoing Board for their support and dedication over the last two years.  We look forward to working with the new Board and all DANK members to keep our German heritage alive. The office would like to express our thanks to Erik Wittmann, and the volunteers of DANK Pittsburgh and Region Three for all the hard work in hosting this year’s convention. We hope everyone recognizes the amount of time and effort needed to make this event a success. The next big project in the office will be

mailing the 2012 Dues Statements.   Yes, it is already that time of the year!   Once again, we  are asking the membership to pay their 2012 dues early. We are mailing the statements in November to allow plenty of time for payment before the March 31st  deadline.   To be a member in good standing a person’s dues must be paid by the end March. The  dues remain $30.00 for a single person or head of household member and $10.00 for the spouse. Children under 18 years are still free. Eva and I wish all our members and friends “Frohe Weihnachten und ein glückliches Neues Jahr”.

DANK Haus Raffle Prizes Donated Back By: Amelia Cotter

If you are gifting a membership:

Your Name

Your Phone #

Sign Up For Membership Online @ www.DANK.org

The DANK Haus held a raffle from April through early October to benefit its Fine Arts Committee, with a grand prize of a one-time Skyline Lounge rental and second prize of dinner for two on the sixth floor terrace. The winners, Sara Hartig and Charles Bills, were announced at the Bach & Beyond concert on Sunday, October 16,

and both graciously decided to donate their prizes back to the DANK Haus. This was a symbolic gesture of giving, both toward the Fine Arts Committee as well as the façade restoration, as all funds that the DANK Haus can save throughout the year contribute in some small way. The DANK Haus sold $1,615 in raffle tickets, which will benefit our Fine Arts initiatives throughout 2012.


December ‘11 / January ‘12

German-American Journal

9

Moonlight Picnic in South Bend By: William R. Troutman

It turned out to be a beautiful evening on the eighth of October. We had our picnic at the Kison farm starting at 7:00pm and it was so romantic! First there was a Feuerzangenbowle demonstrated by our President Christine Weiss. For anyone who doesn’t know what this is: it is a cone of sugar doused in rum which is set on fire so that it drips into a pot of hot spiced wine. It produces what is called Gluehwein and it was enjoyed by all on a chilly night. There is even an old German movie named after it. Next, we ate our pot luck dinner by candle light and the light of an almost full moon. There were no clouds in the sky nor any mosquitoes and only just a bit chilly after sundown but Guenter remedied that by building a campfire. After dinner we were entertained by the

Guitarists Dean Wachs and Andy Peck

classical guitar duo of Dean Wachs and Andy Peck who performed wonderfully. Dean and Andy have given many recitals in South Bend including the auditorium

at Saint Mary’s College. Ours wasn’t the first moonlight picnic. I got the idea from a book entitled “German Settlers of South Bend” by Gabrielle Robinson. She

writes: “The moonlight picnic was another favorite event, which much of South Bend turned out to enjoy. Sitting at open-air tables with a Stein of beer and a bratwurst sandwich were German immigrants and native-born notables. There one could meet John Chockelt, the wagon maker; Godfrey Poehlman of the Meyer and Poehlman hardware store; businessmen Moses and Meyer Livingston; Andrew Russwurm, the harness maker; and many more. But the picnics were also popular with Mayor William George, John M. Studebaker, Schuyler Colfax, Dan Leeper, and other South Bend honoraries. It was another means by which the Turners could promote both their German culture and social interactions with the local society.” We brought back the historic event that happened in the middle of the 19th century. Many thanks again to Guenter and Erika Kison for sponsoring our event.

DANK Haus Façade Project a Continuing Success!

Private Donors

Our Goal: $150,000

Raised: $32,000

The Dank Haus Would Like To Thank Its Generous Donors As Of October 25, 2011:

Friend Of The Dank Haus Sponsors ($1500-$9,999) Illinois Tool Works Foundation $3000 Margareta Gataric $3000 Anonymous, $2500 Martin Hartig, $2000 Anonymous, $2000 Hans & Christina Boden, $1500 Gapa Chicago, $1500 Glunz Beer $1500 The Huettenbar, $1500

Steve Erbach $1000 Dombrowski Family $1000 Hans & Christa Scheel $1000 Kim Duncan $1000 Gerald StrEib $1000 Peter Contos $600 Daniel Reichart $520 Margareth Schubert $500 Sara Hartig $500 Ed Ott & Kamilla Vokounova $500 Transylvania Saxons $500 Isabella Stadler $300 Bach & Beyond $300 Anonymous $280 Linda & Rory Trausch $250 Christine Clark $250 Elizabeth And Floyd Miller $200 Katharina Drotleff $200 Hildegard Haenisch $200 August Pfeifer $200 German American Senior Citizens Club $200 Donation Box $169 Guenther Boeger $125 Hidai Bregu $100 Wambach Roofing $100 Walter Kirchherr $100 Anne Wegener $100 Ludwig Interiors $100 Rosemary Reiner Kaye $100 Gertrud Noedl $100 Anton & Karin Winkhardt $100 Erhard & Dora Totzke $100 Christa M. Antonaitis $1000 German American Children’s Chorus $100 Joseph Fields $100 Marie Sauser $100 Jacqueline Methling $100 Birgit Kobayashi $100 Pauline Ziltner $100 Dr. William A. Pelz $50 Horst & Anna Wagener $50 Otto Perlenfein $50 Mark & Mary Bookman $50 Kahntact Usa, Inc. $50

Deidre Baumann $50 HedWig Mayrens $50 Adalbert Bielski $50 Keith Moderson $50 Hedwig Beer $50 Portage Park Animal Hospital $50 Ida Gantner $30 Eva K. Timmerhaus $30 Kristina Schramm $25 Richard & Margot Ertman $25 Johann & Rosemarie Morgen $25 Michael Wolkov $25 Anonymous $25 Yvonne Frazier $20 Lynda Maxwell $20 Scott Will $20 Hans & Inge Behrens $10 We truly appreciate your support of our efforts! Please help us continue reaching our goal, and ensure that the DANK Haus remains the “Jewel of Western Avenue” for years to come. Mail or bring your tax-deductible contribution to: DANK Haus German American Cultural Center 4740 N. Western Ave. Chicago, IL 60625 773.561.9181 development@dankhaus.com


10

German-American Journal

December ‘11 / January ‘12

Chicago area contingent

Pittsburgh Convention You Should Have Been There!

By: Erik Wittmann

Fifty delegates took the time and interest to participate in this year’s National Convention held in Pittsburgh. The three day event, which started off on Thursday evening at the Pittsburgh Hofbrauhaus and closed on Sunday with a brunch, following a business session led by the new Board of Directors. During this time, a mini tour of Pittsburgh was provided to our delegates. Two business sessions one educational session for the chapters and the second led by Bern Deichman of the German American Heritage Museum. Saturday morning’s business session led to the election of a new executive board: Beverly Pochatko, of Erie PA, was elected president, Alfred Mueller and James Dombrowski, both of Chicago IL, vice presidents, Linda Voit, of

Cleveland OH, secretary and Robert Miske, of Sheboygan WI, returning as treasurer. Social highlights involved a wonderful Oktoberfest on Friday night, featuring the Augsburg German Band and the Alpen Schuhplattler und Trachtenverein d’Pittsburgher. DANK delegates were joined by many of the Pittsburgh Chapter members, as well as guests and all exclaimed that it was a great event. Saturday night was the highlight of the weekend with the Convention Banquet and Pittsburgh Chapter’s 30th Birthday bash, beginning with cocktails and appetizers. Guests were met with music played by members of the Pittsburgh Junior Symphony Ensemble. The Ballroom was beautifully decorated, due to the great work of the Pittsburgh chapter’s banquet committee. The program included many activities, including the

DANK President Emeritus, Bill Fuchs, recieving the “Ernst ten Eicken Award,” in recognition of his vision for the future of DANK

Jack Wagner, Pennsylvania’s Auditor General as GermanAmerican Man of the year

naming of Jack Wagner, Pennsylvania’s Auditor General, as German-American ”Man Of The Year!” Among the dignitaries present were Bishops William Waltersheid of the Diocese of Pittsburgh and Bishop Kurt Kusserrow of the SW Pennsylvania Lutheran Synod, as well as several orders of religion with German origins. Entertainment was provided by the Hank Haller Ensemble, the sixty-five member chorus of the Pittsburgh District of the North American Sängerbund and the GTEV D’Lustigen Isartaler dancers. The overwhelming response of the attendees was that they fully enjoyed all aspects of this 2011 Convention, including the endless stocked Hospitality Suite, managed by Region 3 chapters, Cleveland, Erie and Pittsburgh. Please enjoy the photos recapping the 2011 National Convention.

Newly elected, DANK President, Beverly Pochatko, recieving the “Elsbeth Sewald Award” for her commitment to promoting the German language and culture

National VP, Al Mueller, National Sec, Linda Voit, National Treasurer, Bob Miske, National President Beverly Pochatko


December ‘11 / January ‘12

German-American Journal

11

The Flag Flies High

In honor of German-American Friendship Day

! !tteeiinnbbaacchh +uuttccrraacckkeerrss

! CCrryyssttaall

! BBeeeerr !tteeiinnss

! TTrraavveell BBooookkss aanndd DDVVDDss

! HHuummmmeell FFiigguurriinneess

! DDoollllss

! CCllootthhiinngg

! OOlldd WWoorrlldd DDiirrnnddllss aanndd BBlloouusseess

! TThhoommaass KKiinnkkaaddee CCoolllleeccttiibblleess ! JJeewweellrryy ! !tteeii;; aanndd HHeerrmmaannnn BBeeaarrss

! MMuussiicc CCDDss aanndd DDVVDDss

! TTaappeessttrriieess

! Fmmppoorrtteedd FFoooodd !ppeecciiaallttiieess

! BBeeaarriinnggttoonn BBeeaarrss

Left to Right: Dale Major - City of Davenport Parks & Recreation Dept, NoreenSteenbock  D.A.N.K. Davenport Chapter,  Paul Bohnsack, American Schleswig-Holstein Heritage Society, Ruth E. Reynolds, Kory A. Darnall - Schuetzenpark  Gilde, Janet Brown-Lowe - German American Heritage Center.

By: Kory Darnall In honor of German-American Friendship Day, several organizations and individuals from the Quad Cities area donated a 20ft flagpole, as well as flags from Germany,Schleswig-Holstein and the State of Iowa to be flown in Davenport, Iowa’s

historic City Cemetery, It is in this cemetery that many of the the City’s founders are buried, most of whom immigrated  from Germany. The Schleswig HolsteinKampfgenossen von 1848, 49 and 50 were also donors, although there are no living members.

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12

German-American Journal

December ‘11 / January ‘12

“Fröhliche Weihnachten und ein glückliches Neues Jahr”

From: Al Mueller, Al Schaefer & Ed Sutter

May Peace, Love, and Joy

fill your hearts and homes during this Holy Season and into the coming year! Ich wünsche euch gesegnete Weihnachten und ein glückliches neues Jahr! National President


December ‘11 / January ‘12

German-American Journal

13

Merry Christmas and a Blessed New Year

To All Our Members From Harald D. Pitz, President & Board Members


14

German-American Journal

December ‘11 / January ‘12

“Glück, das ist einfach eine gute Gesundheit und ein schlechtes Gedächtnis.” “Good fortune - that’s simply good health and a faulty memorie.” Ernst Freiherr von Feuchtersleben

What is a Lehrerfortbildungsseminar?

When you encounter a German word such as “Lehrerfortbildungsseminar”, it is necessary for you to dissect this compound word into its parts and start reading it from the back to the front as you must do with all long compound words in German. The last noun here obviously means seminar, all other nouns function Christa Garcia as adjectives to the word ‘seminar’. Bildung means education, Fortbildung then means to continue (the) education. Whose education you might ask? The education of the “Lehrer” There you have it then: a seminar to further the education of teachers. Each fall DANK German language teachers, public and private school German teachers participate in the now already established German teacher in-service seminar. It is always held on a Sunday in October since several German school teachers have to teach on Saturdays. This year the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) has given a small grant again to cover partial costs for one of the presenters who flew in from Anchorage, Alaska. The other two presenters were covered by their respective institutions: the ZfA=Zentralstelle fuer Auslandsschulwesen (Central Agency for Schools Abroad) and the Goethe Institut in Chicago. This year’s agenda was information-packed and tightly coordinated: During the first half hour, fourteen students from the DANK German Language School Chicago and the LaSalle Language Academy were honored and received their ‘DSS-Deutsche Sprachdiplom’, their official certificate from Germany for the German language tests passed last spring. The German Vice Consul of Chicago, Gunnar Christiansen, made the official presentation. Most of the fourteen students were able to attend in person to receive their Zentrale Deutschpruefung Certificate = Niveaustufe A2 and/or B1. This was especially important for these students since the LaSalle Language Academy has dropped German from their offerings. The German Vice Consul General, Gunnar Christiansen, gave certificates to the following students: Paryss Oquendo, Alexander Rodrigues, Katerina Fiedler, Daniel Clifton, Julia Galassini, Highg LawsonGarner, Erik Haneberg, Daisyareli Martin, Sebastian Schnabl, Laura E.Van Koughnett, Noemi I. Wilson-Perez, aTobias Wimmer, Jada Kiara Yolich and Harry Lutsch. Each of the students received in addition beautiful hardbound books, medals and flash drives from the German Consulate in Chicago. They were reminded to store useful information about Germany for the future. Students, parents and teachers (Alexandra Pradella-Ott and Virginia Apel) received warm applause for their many years of guidance and instruction of these students.

Two of the three students receiving the Diplon Zertifikat from the German Vice Consul, Gunnar Christiansen

Alexandra Pradella-Ott with some of her students, who also went with her to Halle, Germany, this summer.

The teachers attending this year’s “Lehrerfortbildungsseminar” came from as far away as Downers Grove South High School, Westmont Montessori School, Libertyville and Plainfield, Arlington Heights, Long Grove, Palatine and from the DANK German Language School Northern Suburbs. Most of the teachers living in the city of Chicago were present and enjoyed visiting with their colleagues again. Two teachers from the German School Chicago, the newly established Immersion School on Montrose Ave, participated as well. Everyone also got acquainted with two students from the University of Illinois Circle Campus from whom we learned that UIC has 300 German majors enrolled at the present time! Students are now realizing the practical utility of learning German in order to get a good, well-paying job. Students are beginning to realize “the fact that the Federal Republic of Germany is the world’s fourth-largest economy and is projected to face a severe shortage of skilled labor in the near future!” (New York Language Conference: “Strategies for Sustainable Promotion of German in the USA”) Two of the workshop presenters had traveled to Chicago from Washington D.C. and from Anchorage, Alaska. The workshop descriptions published in the program were as follows: Gert Wilhelm, Language Coordinator ZfA now living in Washington D.C. – “Richtig praesentieren”: Wie kann ich eine gute Praesentation im Unterricht vorbereiten?“ - How can the teacher help students prepare and evaluate a good presentation? - (One of the requirements for achieving the diploma level is the successful German presentation of a

Teachers hard at work

research project.) Jo Sanders (Anchorage, AL) Jo is the founder and principal of the Rilke Schule in Anchorage, AK (an Immersion School) which has grown to 356 students in just five years. Her topic(s) centered around: „Building a Successful German Program by managing and motivating your students while incorporating strategies and materials for getting your students to speak more, using drama in the classroom at all levels, and applying multiple intelligences to assure that all students learn in a cooperative learning environment.” The short topic was: “Wir knacken die harten Nuesse: gemeinsame Loesungen fuer gemeinsame Probleme.” (We crack the hard nuts: mutual solutions for mutual problems.) A third presenter was Roma Schultz,expert for instruction from the Goethe Institut, Chicago. Her topic was entitled: “Sprache und Denken – Acht Uebungen zum faecheruebergreifenden Deutschunterricht, die Kreativitaet foerdern und Schueler auf das Leben vorbereiten.“ (Eight exercises for content instruction in German which require creativity and which prepare students for life.) These activities can be incorporated into various subject areas, i.e. German and sport - German and geography - German and Math were the essential sub-themes. Roma combined physical as well as challenging mental exercises in a funfilled workshop. Special thanks also goes to Katja Fullard, Ph.D., head of the Language Department of the Goethe Institut Chicago who hosted more than twenty teachers as well as students and parents to create this special ‘Netzwerk’ (network) on Sunday, October 23, 2011.


December ‘11 / January ‘12

German-American Journal

15

“Der Neid ist die aufrichtigste Form der Anerkennung.” “Envy is the sincerest form of recognition.” Wilhelm Busch

Smart Posters Make It Easy to Shop While Waiting For The Train

Microsoft’s Streetside Generates Less Criticism in Germany than Google’s Street View By: Stephen Fuchs | GermanPulse.com

By: Stephen Fuchs | GermanPulse.com Several train stations in Germany started adding new shopping billboards where travelers can scan an item with their smartphone and have the product delivered to their home. The posters show a large range of products, consisting mainly of cosmetic items, that look like they are arranged on a shelf. Budnikowsky, a German drugstore chain, was behind the recent billboards that cropped up in Berlin, Hamburg, Munich, Düsseldorf, Frankfurt, Hannover, Stuttgart, Augsburg, Nuremberg, Würzburg and Ulm in October. The drugstore chain believes that travelers will be drawn to the convenience of not needing to browse through an entire online shop to find the product they need or make

an extra stop at a physical store. With more and more people carrying smartphones and becoming comfortable with online shopping, this may start a new trend that brings the physical retail store shopping experience to the online world. However, the response during the trial hasn’t been the greatest. Commuters seem to find the idea amusing but not fully practical. The current layout appears somewhat cluttered at the moment, and many of the items on display are ones that people want to be able to touch and smell. The posters were only on display for a short amount of time, but Budnikowsky isn’t opposed to repeat the campaign if the demand exists. It is a unique concept that might take off if the right market is found.

Roughly a year ago, Google found itself in a heated debate when the company decided to brings its popular Street View service to the streets of Germany. More than 244,000 Germans filed a complaint with the company on the grounds that the images posted online could violate their privacy by showing their homes to the world. Now Microsoft has decided to bring their own version of Street View called Streetside to the same areas, but surprisingly with a much smaller negative response. Though still in the early stages, Microsoft has stated that they have received less that 90,000 requests to remove images captured by their cameras. Have the German’s grown to accept this new concept or has the media brought less attention to Microsoft being in town? In an interview with the Süddeutsche Zeitung, Microsoft spokeswoman Dorothee Ritz stated that “Compared with other services, the acceptance of our service is great” and that the German’s have developed a “growing appreciation for geo-data services.” Microsoft has also stated that they are promising to make it easy for people to request their property be blurred out on the online service. Google recently said that it stopped capturing images in Germany, but with the reduced backlash against Microsoft providing the same service, German’s may find Google Street View cars in the neighborhood soon enough.

Germany’s First Carbon- German Euro Hawk Drone Neutral Brewery to Be Used For Spying

Comparing Markets DOW

Deutsche Welle recently released a video segment featuring the first eco-friendly brewery in Germany. Gottfried Härle, who runs the brewery, was laughed at when people first discovered the concept, but now he sees visitors from all around the world who want to learn how he makes tasty beer without releasing carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.

The German military has unveiled their new “Euro Hawk” drone that will soon be used to carry out spy missions both domestically and abroad. It will soon be used in conflict areas such as Afghanistan to scan the terrain and pick up on TV and radio signals as well as intercept phone calls and text messages.

Check out the video at German Pulse: bit.ly/tWrwVM

Check out the video at German Pulse: bit.ly/rMAGHE

iTunes Top 10 Song Downloads United States

DAX

Data Taken Nov. 21, 2011

Germany

9/16/11:

$11,509.09

9/16/11:

€5,573.51

1 We Found Love • Rihanna feat. Calvin Harris

1 Good Feeling • Flo Rida

11/21/11:

$11,547.31

11/21/11:

€5,606.00

2 It Will Rain • Bruno Mars

2 We Found Love • Rihanna feat. Calvin Harris

$ Change:

+ $38.22

€ Change:

+ €32.49

3 Sexy and I Know It • LMFAO

3 Geronimo • Aura Dione

% Change:

+ 0.33%

% Change:

+ 0.58%

4 Good Feeling • Flo Rida

4 Someone Like You • ADELE

5 Someone Like You • ADELE

5 Video Games • Lana Del Rey

EUR/USD

6 The One That Got Away • Katy Perry

6 Rain Over Me • Pitbull feat. Marc Anthony

9/16/11:

$1.3794

7 Without You • David Guetta & Usher

7 Pumped Up Kicks • Foster the People

11/21/11:

$1.3486

8 Moves Like Jagger • Maroon 5 feat. Christina Aguilera

8 Sexy and I Know It • LMFAO

$ Change:

- $0.0308

9 Rumour Has It / Someone Like You • Glee Cast

9 Called Out In the Dark • Snow Patrol

% Change:

- 2.23%

10 Stereo Hearts • Gym Class Heroes feat. Adam Levine

10 Marry You • Bruno Mars

Source: Yahoo! Finance

Shaded Row: Song found on both lists

Source: iTunes


16

German-American Journal

December ‘11 / January ‘12

“Arbeit ist oft die einzige Erholung von der Last des Daseins.” “Work is often the only relaxation from the burden of existence.” Peter Rosegger

Out of Africa - Link to the Past By: Audrey L. Hess-Eberle Euro Lloyd Travel Group/Chicago There is no way to put words into such an experience as travel to East and South Africa. Gregory Peck  and Ernest Hemingway tried in their own fashion to offer depictions of great ‘White Hunters’ -   bush cocktails at sunset, shimmering campfires,   afternoon and evening game-drives -   as an entourage of porters moved them deeper into the Bush.   The very word ‘Safari’ means journey.  I believe and have personally experienced, that it means much more than that. As the cradle of Mankind, one finds an enormous strength and beauty in the wild places of Africa. Unlike yesteryear, there are many tour companies and modes of travel, from custom/deluxe Hemmingway-Tented or private wing safaris, to lodge stays, or rugged overland-by-truck safaris (ask me). Climb the incredible 17,058-foot Mount Kilimanjaro; experience the seldom seen Africa on foot, camel or horseback. Gorilla Trek, soar by hot air balloon over the plains animals of the Masai Mara (Kenya) and Serengeti (Tanzania), or visit the Leakey Hominoid Excavations at Lake Turkana, or Olduvai Gorge. But before we get too carried away with the sublime, let us offer you a more down-to-earth trip with some of these options (unless you really insist we fulfill your Bucketlist fantasies), that you and your family can comfortably experience and be spiritually changed by, forever. Africa – her living, vibrant laws of nature will speak to you in ways you had not heard before. No metal bars to peer through – only a paradise lost in which you are found. And oh yes – perhaps somewhere, a Zebra is barking its remembrance of me.

Game Reserve. Afternoon game drive. Day 3 - Morning and afternoon Game-drives in Masai Mara – Africa’s greatest wildlife reserve. Optional balloon safari available. Day 4 - Fly to Nairobi. Drive to Amboseli National Park, game-drive en route. Overnight lodge framed against the glorious Mount Kilimanjaro. Day 5 - Morning and afternoon game-drives in Amboseli where vast herds of elephants roam along with lion, buffalo, cheetah, giraffe, baboon, gazelle, hippo and wildebeest.

Travel to Stellenbosch for wine tasting. Day 3 - Drive to Camps Bay, Clifton and Llandudno to Hout Bay for optional cruise to Seal Island. Drive to Cape of Good Hope Nature Reserve to view penguin colony. Day 4 - Fly to Kruger National Park for afternoon gamedrive. Dinner under the stars. Days 5 and 6 - 4WD vehicle game-drives in search of elephant, leopard, cheetah, kudu, giraffe, cape buffalo, hippo and other species. Interpretive bush walks, bird watching, game viewing from hides and river fishing.

TANZANIA Day 6 - Travel into Tanzania, to Lake Manyara National Park. Your lodge is located on the edge of the Great Rift Valley escarpment. Day 7 - Full day game-drive in Lake Manayra National Park where buffalo, wildebeest, giraffes and zebra herds congregate on the grassy plains. Marvel at tree-climbing lions, and some 380 species of water birds. Day 8 - Ascend through the highlands to the rim of the 102 square mile Ngorgongoro Crater, a volcanic caldera. Descend 2000 feet to the crater floor – a sanction where 25,000 animals reside…the big cats, wildebeest, zebra, gazelle, buffalo, hypos, and flamingos. Day 9 - Visit Olduvai Gorge, archeological site excavated by the Leakeys. Continue to the Serengeti National Park, for an unequalled wildlife spectacle and game-drive. Day 10 - Morning and afternoon game-drives along the river through the Serengeti. Balloon safari available. Day 11 – Transfer to Arusha for return or onward flight.

ZAMBIA Day 7 – Game-drive in Kruger, fly to Livingston, Zambia. Evening sundowner cruise on the Zambezi River. Day 8 – Tour Victoria Falls. Afternoon optional activities - Elephant-back Safari, bungee jumping, flight of angels.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

KENYA AND TANZANIA - 11 days from $4,695 per person all year, Deluxe Hotels and Lodges

SOUTH AFRICA/ZAMBIA/BOTSWANA - 17 days from $4940 per person all year.

KENYA Day 1 - Arrive in Nairobi – at leisure. Day 2 - Fly across the Great Rift Valley to Masai Mara

SOUTH AFRICA Day 1 - Arrive in Cape Town - at leisure. Day 2 - Full day of Cape Winelands and cellar tour.

EURO LLOYD TRAVEL Announcing AIR FARE SPECIALS for members of DANK If you have not traveled to Germany lately, or just thought you might skip the trip to Europe this year, you can not afford to pass up the low discounted travel airfares being offered by all airlines. Please identify yourselves as DANK members when calling our office.

Current Winter airfares (special sales can occur at any time) for travel to and from Germany, including taxes and fuel surcharges, start from: Chicago Indianapolis Milwaukee Madison Cleveland Detroit

$890 $890 $890 $890 $879 $944

Audrey L. Hess-Eberle or Tiffany Nedwed EURO LLOYD TRAVEL GROUP Partner of Lufthansa City Center The Monadnock Building 53 W. Jackson Blvd. - Suite 863 Chicago, Illinois 60604

*Call for special airfares to other European cities and beyond. *Low discounted Domestic and international airfares. *European Rail passes and single tickets. *Car rentals with special low dollar rates in most European countries. *Cruises world-wide. *Worldwide tours – independent, hosted and fully escorted.

Call now for information: 1-800-572-3149 or 1-312-362-0218 email: chi@eurolloyd.com Visit us at: www.eurolloyd.com

Rates are subject to availability for your date of travel, with various airline non stop or connection options. Friday, Saturday, Sunday Weekend surcharges apply for each direction.

BOTSWANA Day 9 – Transfer by road and boat to Chobe National Park, Botswana. Combined wetlands, dry woodlands and savannas are home to huge elephant populations. Afternoon sunset cruise. Day 10 – Morning and afternoon game-drives in open 4WD vehicles in Chobe. Return to lodge for sunset cruise on the Chobe River. Day 11 - Afternoon game-drive. Return to Johannesburg for departure flight. OPTIONAL - 7 day KENYA EXTENSION (from $3,265 pp) to Nairobi, Sweetwaters Game Reserve, Mount Kenya, and Masai Mara Game Reserve. Call today for more information, on this and other cruises or tours, various destinations. Identify yourselves as a DANK member. Ask for Audrey or Tiffany. Phone: 312-362-0218 /// Toll Free: 800-572-3149 Email: chi@eurolloyd.com

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December ‘11 / January ‘12

German-American Journal

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John Steinbeck: A Writing Legend

By: John Bareither John Ernst Steinbeck is an American writer whose novels are timeless classics. He was born on February 27, 1902 in Salinas, California. His paternal grandfather, Johann Adolf Grobsteinbeck shortens the family name to Steinbeck after immigrating to the United States. There is still a farm in Heiligenhaus, Germany that still bears the Grobsteinbeck name. His Irish mother, Olive Hamilton, shared John’s love of reading and writing. Steinbeck grew up in the small rural

California community of Salinas. Salinas was a frontier community at the time with some of the most fertile crop land in the United States. He spent his summers working at the Spreckels ranch with migrant workers. His experiences on the ranch and with his migrant co-workers made him aware of mans inhumanity to man. He used the town of Salinas and experiences on the ranch for the back drop for many of his novels. The works that he is most notable for are: “Of Mice and Men (1937); The Grapes of Wrath(1939) and lastly East of Eden (

The Wittelsbach Dynasty

By: Steven Mueller

For nearly 800 years, the House of Wittelsbach ranked as one of the most resilient and influential of all European dynasties. Members of this remarkable family reigned not only in Bavaria, but also in many foreign lands and territories. At their zenith, the Wittelsbachs brought forth a powerful array of dukes, kings, and Holy Roman emperors who left their political and cultural imprint upon the whole of European history. Included in this book are biographies of the dynasty’s most fascinating personalities, as well as

useful information on their numerous castles and palaces. The author, Steven Mueller, is an internationally respected historian and researcher. He is himself a direct descendant of European royalty, having numerous ancestors from the Houses of both Wuerttemberg and Wittelsbach. As a result, he is directly related to nearly every royal family in Europe. “The result of copious research, this book is the most accurate, reliable, and up-to-date work of its kind available in the English language.”  - European Explorer Monthly

CHRISTMAS GIFT  IDEAS!!     You've  enjoyed  Gunter  Nitsch's  books.  Now  share  them    with  your  friends  and  family!     Weeds  Like  Us  (available  at  www.weedslikeus.com)     STRETCH:  Coming  of  Age  in  Post-­War  Germany   (available  at  www.weedslikeus.com)     Eine  lange  Flucht  aus  Ostpreussen   (available  at  www.amazon.de)     The  English-­‐language  books  are  also  available    by  calling  888.280.7715  and  through  your    local  bookseller  or  preferred  on-­‐line  retailer.  

1952).A theme that resounds in all of these books are people left with very difficultDecisions! The theme of difficult decision makes him my favorite author and I am sure many other readers also. Travels with Charley: In Search of America (Published in 1960) This was Steinbeck’s final book. The book recounts his decision to take a trip with his French poodle (Charley)across the United States. He takes his trip throughout the United States in a specially designed camper he christen Rocinante, after the

horse of Don Quixote. His trip started in Long Island, New York, and approximately followed the outer border of the United States-encompassing nearly 10,000 miles. Many of us may have missed Steinbeck’s 100th birthday in 2002. Not to fear, his 110th birthday will be February 27, 2012. We could all celebrate by making a difficult decision, reading one of his books, watching a movie based on one of his novels, take a trip across the country with a friend-human or animal! Why is Steinbeck a Writing Legend: Life is filled with difficult decisions and history does repeat itself.


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German-American Journal

December ‘11 / January ‘12

*** Calendar Of Events *** This area is designated for DANK chapters and Associate Members to inform their members and the public of events they are having. We rely on the submissions of each chapter or organization, therefor all events may not be included. Please contact our National Office at 773-275-1100 or visit www.DANK.org for the most recent listing of events or for information on how to make sure your event is listed in the next issue. (Associate Member Events Listed In Italics)

DECEMBER 2011 2

Pittsburgh, PA: DANK Pittsburgh Christmas Party held at Teutonia Mäennerchor on North Side of Pittsburgh.German Buffet dinner 5-7 p.m. in the first floor “Rathskeller”. Adults $15, Children under 12 $8. For more information: www. germaninpittsburgh.org

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Benton Harbor, MI: Fish Fry. 6-8 p.m. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Band Plays 7-10 p.m. 2651 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI 269-926-6652

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Chicago, IL: Kulturkueche, Make Oma Proud – demonstration, recipes, tasting and drink. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave., Chicago, IL. 773-561-9181

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Chicago, IL: Kino, Kaffee, und Kuchen, Doors open at Noon. Vorfilm at 1pm Feature at 2pm. $4 for members, $6 for non-members. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

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Milwaukee, WI. DANK Folk Choir meets at Sacred Heart Parish, 7:00 p.m. For more information: 262-675-6336

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Benton Harbor, MI: DANK Benton Harbor Christmas Party Potluck with White Elephant gift exchange. DANK Haus, 2651 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI Tel: 269-926-6652

Chicago, IL: Stammtisch, 7:30pm. Monthly Open Haus. No cover, food and drink available. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

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Chicago, IL: Sportsklub DANK, 7:30pm. No cover, cash bar. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. Table Tennis, Fussball Table, Bags – Fussball on Big Screen! For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

Chicago, IL: Kino, Kaffee, und Kuchen, Doors open at Noon. Vorfilm at 1pm Feature at 2pm. $4 for members, $6 for non-members. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

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Louisville, KY: Christmas Concert and Dinner. 5-9:00 p.m. 1840 Lincoln Ave., Louisville, KY. Tel. (502) 451-3100

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Milwaukee, WI. DANK Folk Choir meets at Sacred Heart Parish, 7:00 p.m. For more information: 262-675-6336

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Louisville, KY: German-American Club Gesangverein New Year’s Eve Dance. Music by Rheingold Band. 9pm-1am. 1840 Lincoln Ave., Louisville, KY. Tel. (502) 451-3100

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Chicago, IL. New Year’s Eve Party. Music by Polkaholics. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

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Chicago, IL: Kino, Kaffee, und Kuchen, Doors open at Noon. Vorfilm at 1pm Feature at 2pm. $4 for members, $6 for non-members. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com Chicago: Lost German Chicago Exhibition open to public, 11am. Free. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

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Chicago: Lost German Chicago Exhibition open to public, 11am. Free. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

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Chicago, IL: School Christmas. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

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Benton Harbor, MI: DANK Benton Harbor Kid Christmas Party for members. 3 p.m. DANK Haus, 2651 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI Tel: 269-926-6652

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South Bend, IN: DANK South Bend Christmas Party Potluck, 2PM at St. Paul Church, 51490 Laurel and Auten Rd., South Bend, IN. More Info: 272-8163 or 271-6922

Frankfort, IL: DANK Chicago-South Christmas Festival with dancing music by Lothar Gehrig. 2-8:00pm. DANK Haus, Chicago South, 25249 S Center Rd, Frankfort, IL 60423. More information: www.dankchicagosouth.org or 815-464-1514

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Lake Forest, IL: Join DANK Chapter Lake County, IL for their annual Weihnachtsfeier. Potluck luncheon.   Please bring a dish to share to serve 10 to 12 people.  American Legion Post 264, 801 North McKinley Rd., Lake Forest, IL.  Call Ludwina Homer, 847-249-0073 Louisville, KY: German-American Club Gesangverein, Children’s Christmas Party. Santa arrives at 3pm. Children of all ages are welcome. 2-5:00 p.m., 1840 Lincoln Ave., Louisville, KY. Tel.: 502-451-3100

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Erie, PA: DANK Erie, Annual Christmas celebration in the Gold Room in addition to good food, there will be a visit from Santa Claus for the youngsters, door prizes and ending with coffee/cookie social

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Milwaukee, WI: Milwaukee Board Meeting 5:30 PM

Maureen Uhler Justin Davidson

Chicago-South , IL Rita Schauer Angelika Thomas Thomas Knuth Christel Baylie

Chicago, IL

Barbara Ely Joe Strunk Ryan Haas Brian Sobolak & Shylo Bisnett Erika & Chip Lupaccino Peter Lucier & Rachel Drzewicki Nicholas & Catherine Yurschak Wendy Taube John & Barbara Hendrickson Julie Pomerleau & Jeffrety Stafford

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Milwaukee, WI: Milwaukee Board Meeting 5:30 PM

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Milwaukee, WI. DANK Folk Choir meets at Sacred Heart Parish, 7:00 p.m. For more information: 262-675-6336

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Pascack Valley, NJ: DANK Pascack Valley Annual Christmas Party. For more information: 201-391-2185

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Milwaukee, WI. DANK Folk Dancers meets at Sacred Heart Parish, 6:00 p.m. For more information: 414-764-1895

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Chicago-West. Christmas party, 1:30PM

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Milwaukee, WI: DANK Milwaukee Christmas Party at Sacred Heart Parish. 2:00 p.m.

Milwaukee, WI. DANK Folk Choir meets at Sacred Heart Parish, 7:00 p.m. For more information: 262-675-6336

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Macedonia, OH: DANK Cleveland Christmas Party, Reinecker’s Bakery and Party Center, 8575 Freeway Dr., Macedonia, OH. 5:30PM

Milwaukee, WI. DANK Folk Choir meets at Sacred Heart Parish, 7:00 p.m. For more information: 262-675-6336

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Milwaukee, WI. DANK Folk Dancers meets at Sacred Heart Parish, 6:00 p.m. For more information: 414-764-1895

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Chicago, IL: DANK Chicago Membership Meeting. Learn about Chapter activities, hear committee reports. Get involved! . DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

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Milwaukee, WI. DANK Folk Choir meets at Sacred Heart Parish, 7:00 p.m. For more information: 262-675-6336

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Milwaukee, WI. DANK Folk Dancers meets at Sacred Heart Parish, 6:00 p.m. For more information: 414-764-1895

Welcome New Members National Members

January 2012

August 20 - October 19, 2011

Chicago-West, IL Julie Shaver Peter Mantel

Fox Valley, IL Jennifer Brower

Springfield, IL

Dave Stout Barbara McKean Linda McDermith Wanda Volz Eric Koeppel

Benton Harbor, MI

Doug & Joelene Von Koenig Susanna Stauffer

Chicago Northern Suburbs, IL Sonya Raich Michaela McGill Judy Bowen Julia Klein & Spencer Savoie

South Bend, IN Nancy Demaegd

Pittsburgh, PA

Charles Wright Michael & Jennifer McSorley Kristen Engle Sean Garret-Roe Andreas Maihoefer Thomas & Maureen Uhler Joel Kresch Charles & Claudia Sperl Judy Shirley Gerald Kaltenbach Ron Miller

Erie, PA

Linda Brown Leo Gruber George Grosse-Hohl Alexandra & Jason Laser


December ‘11 / January ‘12

German-American Journal

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Euro Lloyd Travel Group in Chicago

would like to wish DANK members a blessed Christmas and a Happy, Healthy New Year

Obituaries Hermann Nuyken

Guenter W. Hasse

Hermann Nuyken, 81, died at 7:30 am Sunday, September 4, 2011, at The Courtyard Healthcare, Goshen. He battled cancer for the last three years. He was born Jan. 19, 1930, in Callenstein, Prussia, to Karl and Melanie (Engelhard) Nuyken. He married Dorothy Parmalee in June of 1963. She died in 1986. Hermann then married Patricia Roth in Elkhart on July 22, 1989. She survives. Also surviving is one brother, Max Nuyken, Bremen, Germany. He was preceded by his parents, his first wife, and two brothers, Klaus and Wessel Nuyken. While in Prussia, Hermann hosted U.S. students with the help of the agency Experiment in International Living. He moved to the U.S. in 1959 because of the Experiment project and worked at Dodge Manufacturing in Mishawaka as a mechanical engineer for 20 years. During that time he earned his MBA at Michigan State University. In the 70s, Hermann started Michiana Solar, producing solar panels and geothermal products. Hermann and a friend, Richard Bottorf, began the sister city relationship of Mishawaka and Soest, Germany. He also became a United States citizen in April of this year. Hermann was the Vice President of DANK South Bend and will be missed by all.

Mr. Guenter W. Hasse, 84, of La Porte, Indiana, died Friday, September 23, 2011, at Indiana University Health La Porte Hospital. He was born August 19, 1927, in Jannewitz, Pomerania, the son of Ernest Hasse and Margarete (Stahl) Hasse. Guenter worked as an electrician for 50 years, retiring from IBEW Local 531. He was a member of Trinity Lutheran Church, IBEW Local 531, La Porte, IN., and German American National Congress. Guenter enjoyed gardening and traveling. On February 2, 1957, in Chicago, IL, he married Magda (Mangelsen) Hasse, who survives.He is also survived by his two sons, Robert Hasse of Idyllwild, CA and Erick W. Hasse of La Porte, IN; a daughter, Sigrid (Steve) Arnoult of Rancho Cucamonga, CA; and four grandchildren, Michael, Christopher and Marcus, and Eric Douglas. Guenter was preceded in death by his parents, one brother, Hans Hasse, and one sister, Margarete.


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German-American Journal

December ‘11 / January ‘12

Please Support the Businesses That Advertise in the German-American Journal

2012 Sun Kissed Collection Coming Soon!

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German-American Journal | December '11 - January '12  

Volume 59, Issue 6