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Volume 58, Number 6

December 2010 / January 2011

$1 Can Provide 4 Meals This Christmas! German-American community gives generously to the Saint Nikolaus Project By: Darlene Fuchs

By: Sarah Nadler Though Christmas in Germany already starts in the supermarkets around late August with selling chocolate Santas and Christmas Stollen, the real German Christmastime probably begins with the opening of the Christmas markets. Usually at the end of November the first markets start selling everything a fan of Christmas could desire, from carved nutcrackers to small decorations from the Erzgebirge to scarves, candles and Christmas tree decorations. Culinary highlights are the obligatory glog and Glühwein (hot spiced wine) as well as fried almonds, spice bars and Tarte Flambé. Many tourists love to take part in a real German Christmas market as it is unique all over the world. The most famous one can be found in Nuremberg, and the oldest one is in Dresden. On December 1, the next Christmas tradition will occur in the form of the Advent calendar. Children can open one of the twenty-four windows everyday, each containing a piece of chocolate or a little treat. Today’s Adventskalender can be bought in supermarkets but many families still make their own home-made. Another Christmas tradition is lighting a candle for every Sunday in December. With lighting the first candle, the yearly Advent season begins. The candles are placed onto an advent wreath and refer to the light that Jesus had brought into the world. In this case it is important that the last candle is not lit after Christmas, so sometimes Advent already starts at the end of November. The wreaths are usually made of twigs and are decorated with ribbons, little figures and trinkets. Christmas time is not just a contemplative time, but to many families it is the most important and favorite time of the year. Sometimes it is even the only time where the whole family finds time to sit together or visit other rela-

tives. Biscuits and gingerbread houses are baked, and the houses and gardens are decorated with lights and Santa Clauses. Everyone looks forward to the big day. In contrast to the United States or Great Britain, Christmas in Germany is not celebrated on the morning of December 25, but on the evening of December 24. On this day, the Christmas tree is put up (sometimes it is put up a few days before) and decorated with tinsel, Christmas bulbs, bells and a lot more. The Christmas dinner is also prepared; a traditional dinner would be, for example, goose. In the evening most Germans go to church to celebrate Mass. When they come back, they find presents under the Christmas tree. Germans also do not put presents in stockings. The Christmas tree is also a strong German tradition. But who actually put the presents beneath the tree? Indeed, there is a difference between northern and southern Germany. In northern Germany, Santa Claus brings the presents, and in southern Germany it is the Christ Child. After church, the family sits together and has dinner, opens their presents, plays Christmas music, or watches the children recite poems or plays. Though December 24 is the most important day, the 25 and 26 are also official holidays and are called First and Second Christmas day. Usually time is spent with the family again, the children play with their new presents, and a lot of sweets and biscuits are eaten. Christmas officially ends on Epiphany, the sixth of January. This day is also called “Heilige Drei Koenige” (Three Holy Kings), as it is the day where the three kings visit the new born Jesus to give him gifts. On this day, children dress up as the three kings and go from door to door in order to collect donations for charities. After this, most of the Christmas trees are then thrown away and the decorations taken down, with a new year successfully ushered in.

Although the United States is the wealthiest nation in the world, over 14 million children and nearly 3 million seniors are currently hungry. Unlike other community problems, hunger is invisible. The child or grandparent sitting next to you in church may not be getting enough to eat, and nobody would know. St. Nikolaus did provide for the needy and now the Germanic community in the US is doing the same. Hunger transcends all economic and social levels. Urban and rural, children, seniors, working people, some in your neighborhood: hunger is there. In fact one in eight people does not get enough to eat. This Christmas you can help families across the country. Every dollar you give helps provide 4 meals for families struggling with hunger.  That means $100 provides 400 meals or 1,000 pounds of food. Doesn’t every person deserve to have enough food, especially during the holidays? Won’t you help us win the campaign to end hunger by supporting the “Saint Nikolaus Project?” Donate food or cash to your local food pantry or charity. Send a donation to DANK’s National Executive Office and we will make a donation on your behalf to a food bank in your community. No one should go hungry this Christmas. One organization, one club, one business or one person CAN make a difference! St. Nikolaus did, he is still known throughout the world for his generosity to the those in need. If you have made a donation of food or cash, call or email DANK National, with the amount you donated, so you can show you were part of the “St. Nikolaus Project.” office@dank.org /// 773-275-1100 /// Toll Free: 866-926-1109. Help the German-American community reach their goal of 50,000lbs. Collected to date: 40,360lbs Final total will be announced on December 6, 2010, St. Nikolaus Day. All contributors will be mentioned in the next German-American Journal.

Find your local food bank: www.feedingamerica.org

TidBits

Associate Members

Education

Business & Tech

Auf Deutsch

Insider

Oskar & Atticus

Lifestyle

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German-American Journal

December ‘10 / January ‘11

Check Us Out Online! WWW.DANK.ORG DANK Discussion Forum Official DANK Blog

Liebe Mitglieder und Freunde! Dear Members and Friends, I have now been DANK National President for nearly three years and it has been an incredible ride. With the help of our national board, and many volunteers, we have made a lot of progress in making DANK a much better and relevant organization. We have heard from many members that they have noticed; especially the improvements of this newspaper and our dank.org website. What many members don’t normally see are the behindthe-scene operations on how we conduct business, manage our meetings and communicate internally. We have been trying to work on major enhancements in that area so that DANK can function more effectively, thus allowing our chapter leaders and members to benefit. What does that mean to our members? Successful improvements in how our organization interacts internally make our chapters stronger, with more resolve to provide a positive atmosphere, allowing for better communications and activities. Much work remains to be done. While trying to reconnect with all members we are also actively engaging ideas from our organization’s younger constituents to see what DANK needs to do in order to grow into the future. Please stay tuned, but for now I would like to wish all our members and friends a very happy holiday season and let’s look forward to a happy New Year! Mit freundlichen Grüßen,

William Fuchs National President

We Need Your Help!

The DANK National Database system that exists in our office has served our organization well for the last 11 years. It consists of a database and management program that runs on dbase version IV in DOS. As you might be able to tell from the description it is also very antiquated and we have pushed this system to the limit. We are now finding that not only is the program maxed out but also the equipment such as the computer and a 20 year old printer. It is now extremely expensive to operate and make necessary repairs to this equipment. At the last national leadership conference the executive board discussed this issue and decided that DANK needs to replace the system with an updated, more economical system to operate. This will save us money in the future and give our office staff much greater capabilities to serve our chapters and members. Here is why we need your help. DANK is extremely cash strapped due to a decline of membership dues and donations. We have been very reluctant to increase membership dues and have cut our budgets tremendously over the last 3 years. We have saved thousands of dollars in all areas of operation including the DANK Journal and the operations of our National office, while trying to provide a better product for our members. We are therefore appealing to all our members and friends to assist us in financing a replacement of our National Database System, which includes newly written software, computers and printers. We have put forth a goal of $ 10,000 to do the job correctly and hope that you, our members, chapters and friends, will help us by sending donations, specifically for this purpose, to our National Office. Please make out checks to “DANK” and mail to: DANK National Database, 4740 N. Western Ave., Executive OfficeSuite 206, Chicago, IL 60625-2013. We know that you care and thank you in advance, with much gratitude, for any donation you can make. This new system will help DANK improve membership services, not only to our chapters, but also to each one of our members.

DIE BRUECKE ZUR ALTEN HEIMAT “Building Bridges to Germany” Listen to LIVE radio from Germany on our website! Find ‘Radio Heimatmelodie’ along with a list of other live German radio stations that you can listen to for FREE.

Visit www.DANK.org

Newspaper Archives And More...

Der Deutsch-Amerikaner DANK seeks to bring together Americans of German descent in the pursuit of cultivating and presenting their heritage and interests on local, regional and national levels. These were the primary reasons that the German American National Congress was founded in 1959, and they are still among the organization’s primary objectives today.

DANK National Executive Board President William Fuchs 1. Vice President Erich Wittmann

2. Vice President Donna Lippert

Treasurer Maria Thompson

Secretary Beverly Pochatko

Editorial Staff

The Road to Success in 2011 For every career-driven workaholic American, a lesson in rest and priorities may be in order. I am afraid that the opposite is the case for most. Far too many Americans, at least as far as I’m concerned, are addicted to entertainment, recreation and instant gratification. Now I’m sure that there are many that don’t fall into this category, but last time I checked those were still a minority. The ability of people of any age to sit and watch television for hours on end while procrastinating on very important tasks never ceases to amaze me. Certainly some of it can be chalked up to an affluent society, but there is more to it than that. Many people out there are looking for something to do, while avoiding what they know they should do. Many are unwilling to put in the planning, effort, dedication and self-sacrifice that are vital to meaningful accomplishment. Also, what is it with this endless search for something fun to do? I love a good movie or a weekend activity as much as the next person, but I realize that the old saying is so true, “You have to work hard to play hard.” That is because play is truly more fulfilling when you have successfully finished your work. Personal interests and projects require work. Marriage and raising children requires a lot of work also. Helping the parents you love is work, which I don’t mean at all in a negative way. Teaching and training my grandchild is work. Cleaning my house and doing the wash is work. So are all the other things I have to get done in between cooking dinner and walks. See that’s the thing, when you have a real purpose for living, work, while sacrificial at times, is also joyful. Our society has gotten confused because we think that anything joyful has to have a pleasurable sensation associated with it. Not so with childbirth and not so with a lot of other deeply meaningful things. I have decided that a winning strategy in life is to take the lot you’ve been given, maximize your pleasure and minimize your pain. Since most people haven’t the faintest idea what it means to live for something larger than themselves; this makes a lot of sense. So my hardworking readers, remember this winter that your rest, while it may be shorter it is also much sweeter. Recreation is your time to reflect on the wonder and joy of the work you do and have done, not to escape from it. Be generous to the causes you believe in by giving of your time, talents and treasures. Surround yourselves with positive people that love you and let them know how you feel about them. Let’s kick the New Year off, with the German-American Journal being full of thought provoking articles, as we journey together on the road to real success.

Darlene Fuchs Editor-in-Chief “Oops! In the October/November 2010 issue the article “5th Annual Chicago Sister Cities International Festival” was incorrectly attributed to Amelia Cotter. The author was Sarah Nadler

Submission Deadline For The Feb./Mar. 2011 Issue:

December 25, 2010

Editor-in-Chief Darlene Fuchs darlene@dank.org Correspondents Corinna Bienger Amelia Cotter Stephen Fuchs Christa Garcia Audrey L. Hess-Eberle Matthias Knobloch Editorial Staff Margita Mandel Amanda Pedersen Beth L. Casey Chapter News Editor Beverly Pochatko erieoma@verizon.net Membership Erik Wittmann erik25@comcast.net Layout & Design Stephen Fuchs Stephen@FoxTaleEdit.com Advertising & Classifieds Amelia Cotter amelia@dank.org

Office Staff DANK National Executive Office

4740 N. Western Ave Chicago, Il 60625-2013 Call (773) 275-1100 Toll Free (866) 926-1109 Fax (773) 275-4010 Office Hours:

9 AM to 5 PM / Monday-Friday Executive Secretary Eva Timmerhaus Office@dank.org

Office Manager Amelia Cotter Amelia@dank.org

General Information German-American Journal - ISSN 1086-8070 - is published bi-monthly and is the official publication of the German American National Congress. Periodicals postage paid at Chicago, Illinois and additional mailing offices.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: German-American Journal 4740 N. Western Ave., Suite 206 Chicago, IL 60625-2013

Annual Subscription - Rate: $15.00 www.dank.org/news.html

DANK does not warrant or assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information published herein. DANK reserves the right to change or amend submissions for any reason without prior notice. ©2010 DANK. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the prior written permission of the publisher.


December ‘10 / January ‘11

German-American Journal

700

3

Germany has nearly 700 zoological gardens, wildlife parks, aquariums, bird parks, animal reserves, or safari parks

Hofbräu Festzelt (festival tent) at Oktoberfest

President Fuchs toasting in the Hofbräuhaus with Fred Schumacher and Rory Trausch, President of the Chicago GermanAmerican Police Association

Dr. Möller and Mr. Steinberg, our gracious hosts, with Bill Fuchs in the middle

By: Bill & Darlene Fuchs

the Hofbräu tent to close out the evening with “Country Road” and “Hey Baby” and some new songs we still have to download onto our I-Pods. Seating room was not easy to find but Dr. Möller, the CEO of Hofbräu, extended his gracious hospitality by offering us a seat at his special Stammtisch table.  After making the rounds with his guests at the fest, an exhausted Dr. Möller joined us at the end of the evening for one last round of Oktoberfest beer.   We certainly appreciated it and are thankful for the wonderful Gastfreundlichkeit (hospitality) of HB. During our stay the “tangible joy” was evident throughout the grounds of the Theresienwiese. According to the estimate of the festival management the Oktoberfest celebrated its 200th birthday with 6.4 million guests. The next Oktoberfest takes place from September 17 until October 3 in 2011 - Don’t miss it!

Birthday Bash... Munich Style! When you hear the word “Oktoberfest”, it’s almost certain that one thing comes to mind... Bavarian Beer Festival! The truth is, there is much more behind-the-scenes that lurks beneath the countless years of this world-renowned Bavarian tradition. In Germany it’s called a Volksfest, folk-festival. But, really it’s a mixture of beer festival and fun fair steeped in tradition and history. In 1810, 200 years ago, the festivities, on the occasion of the wedding between Crown Prince Ludwig and Princess Therese, initiated the tradition of the October festivals. The event had to be cancelled 24 times – during the war and post-war period and due to cholera epidemics in 1854 and 1873. Thus the 177th Wiesnfest took place in 2010 on the 200th. year anniversary. We had the chance to visit the fest again this year on this special Anniversary occasion accompanied by friends and DANK members Hans & Kathy Wolf. Thanks to our friends at Hofbräu, our two day stay in München was unbelievable. Fred Schumacher, president of Hofbräu of America, picked us up Wednesday, September 28th and the 5 of us were off to the Hofbräuhaus. There we met up with the also visiting group of friends from the GermanAmerican Police Association of Chicago, one of DANK’s associate members. Fred, the ultimate host, made sure that we all were dined and entertained Hofbräu style. The next day we set off to check out the latest Trachten Fashions in the Stores of Munich. It was amazing to find so many Americans, Brits, Aussies and lots of other nationals

buying Trachten gear for Oktoberfest. Lederhosen, Dirndls and all the accessories.  Of course, being the last week of Oktoberfest, we all found some great bargains that we just could not pass up.  Later that afternoon Fred joined us again at the Oktoberfest grounds and the celebrations continued in the Hofbräu Tent, the largest tent at the festival, seating almost 10,000 people.  We were once again treated with great VIP hospitality.  Fred introduced us to many dignitaries and we had the pleasure to have a toast with Günter Steinberg, the proprietor of the Hofbräu tent, who also presented us with the special 200th Anniversary pin. Of course we had to check out the festival grounds with the many rides and Bill even got to enjoy one of the faster rides at the festival, the break dancer, which did wonders to his hair. The special “Anniversary Celebration of 200 Years of Oktoberfest,” was located on the southern edge of the Theresienwiese. It featured many exhibits and attractions of the olden days and was simply amazing. Guests watched the horse races from a grandstand while we looked on from high atop the Riesenrad (Ferris wheel). At the exhibition traditional customs were showcased, including folk dances, whip-cracking demonstrations and Bavarian brass bands that had us celebrating as our ancestors did 200 years ago: All with beer jointly brewed for this occasion by Munich breweries and served exclusively in the anniversary tent. The trend to show up in traditional attire was an absolute “must” this year, so we also obliged. After several hours of adventuring we returned to

For more photo’s go to dank.org/blog

DEC 31 2010       DINNER 7­9PM    Dinner Champagne Toast Party Favors          Feuerzangenbowle Bleigiessen        DJ’s Music Source Balloon Drop

Reserve Now For

SILVESTERBALL

$60 BEFORE DEC 15   $80 AFTER DEC 15

Dr. Möller joining us for a beer at the end of the evening

DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Avenue,  phone 773.561.9181 Chicago, IL 60625


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German-American Journal

December ‘10 / January ‘11

Some Lucky Sailors By: Anja Witte

Ten minutes of checking out the Goethe-Institut Chicago’s website after relocating to the windy city were worth an amazing unforgettable experience and something that I would recommend to anyone. As the very lucky winner of the Goethe-Institut’s contest, my husband and I got to sail along on the German tall ship Roald Amundsen for five days as trainee sailors. Carrying a crew of 17 experienced volunteers and up to 31 trainees, the brig usually sails the waters of North Sea, Baltic Sea and Channel during the summer months and travels south to the Canary Islands in the winter. She made a rare visit to the United States this summer, touring all five Great Lakes taking part in the Great Lakes United Tall Ship Challenge. Everyone who sails along becomes part of the crew and so did we when we stepped on board in Muskegon, Michigan, on Friday, August 20th. Five days of traditional seamanship lay ahead of us. We knew that this was not going to be a cruise in the traditional sense of the word, everybody has to fully take part in running the ship, which is a lot of fun! The Roald Amundsen usually sails 24/7 with a system of three watches. Each watch is on duty twice a day for four hours at a time, one day shift and one night shift. My husband Christian got adventurous and enlisted for the 0-4 watch (12pm-4pm & midnight4am) whilst I settled for the 8-12 watch. During their time of duty, the watches are responsible for everything that is involved with moving and upkeeping the ship, be it hoisting and striking the sails, bracing, steering, lookout, daily Reinschiff (cleaning), or maintenance work. Putting on the harness and climbing aloft for

the first time, it was not easy trying to cling to the yard, a spar on a mast from which sails are set, whilst balancing on the footrope, but the view was more than rewarding. At some stage during a trip, every sailor will also get to know the Kombuese (kitchen) when assigned to Backschaft (cooking and baking for many hungry people). When not on duty, we enjoyed the width and waves – some fellows did not like them for a while – of Lake Michigan, the sunrise and sunset, chatted away with the others or got some decent well-deserved sleep in a bunk in our cozy communal cabin. After a friendly barrage of words and laughter with the US brig Niagara on Monday morning, we anchored next to each other in the late afternoon. Some enjoyed a refreshing swim in the Lake and surprisingly, Niagara’s captain swam over and invited us for a tour and movie later that night. After a delicious three-course Captain’s Dinner on the Roald’s deck, the Niagara’s jollyboat picked us up in groups and maneuvered us over. We ducked to tour their lower deck and enjoyed a showing of parts of ‘Around Cape Horn’ filmed in 1929 by Irving Johnson and the full length of ‘The Blues Brothers’ projected on one of the sails. I had to leave early to do the anchor watch, amongst other things learning how to use a bearing compass taking bearings on fixed points and noting those in the log. Lastly, sailing towards Chicago’s skyline and taking part in the 2010 Tallship’s Parade of Sails was the perfect finish for our trip and we will treasure many great memories from our days aboard Roald Amundsen. Interested? See you on a trip somewhere in Europe – we are sure to board this brig again! http://www.sailtraining.de

Nikolaustag...

Highlight for Children at Christmas Time

President Obama on German Unity Source: Germany.info

On Sunday, October 3, the people of the United States join with the people of the Federal Republic of Germany in celebrating the Day of German Unity and the 20th anniversary of the unification of East and West Germany. This was an historic achievement, as Germans peacefully reunited and advanced our shared vision of a Europe whole and free, anchored in the Euro-Atlantic institutions of NATO and the European Union.  The United States commemorates today that spirit and the many accomplishments of Germany, one of our closest allies and greatest friends.  We pay tribute to the countless contributions Germans have made to our own history and society.  We honor the courage and conviction of the German people that brought down the Berlin Wall, ending decades of painful and artificial separation.  It unleashed a spirit of hope and joy, and opened the door to unprecedented freedom throughout the European continent and around the world.  The American people are proud of our role in defending a free Berlin and in supporting the German people in their quest for human dignity.  We remain proud of our partnership with our German allies to advance freedom, prosperity, and stability around the world.  We congratulate the people of Germany on this National Day, and we express our gratitude for our vital friendship.

Lasst uns froh und munter sein, und uns recht von Herzen freun! Lustig lustig, tralalalala, bald ist Nikolausabend da, bald ist Nikolausabend da! Dann stell’ ich den Teller auf, Nik’laus legt gewiss was drauf! Lustig lustig, tralalalala, bald ist Nikolausabend da, bald ist Nikolausabend da! Wenn ich schlaf, dann träume ich, jetzt bringt Nik’laus was für mich! Lustig lustig, tralalalala, bald ist Nikolausabend da, bald ist Nikolausabend da! Wenn ich aufgestanden bin, lauf ich schnell zum Teller hin! Lustig lustig, tralalalala, jetzt ist Nikolausabend da, jetzt ist Nikolausabend da! Nik’laus ist ein guter Mann, dem man nicht genug danken kann! Lustig lustig, tralalalala, jetzt ist Nikolausabend da, jetzt ist Nikolausabend da! On December 6th, Germany celebrates ” Nikolaustag”. The visit of “St. Nikolaus” truly is one of the highlights for children while they wait for the “Weihnachtsmann / Santa Claus to come. On the eve of December 6th, shoes and boots are polished until they shine and placed outside the door, so that Nikolaus may fill them with sweets and little gifts. Of course clever children choose the largest shoe or highest boot they have, so that they will get as many sweets as possible. Also, a glass of milk and a few cookies are left for Nikolaus to refresh himself. Oh, how excited the children are when they finally have to go to bed, barely able to sleep. Nikolaus is the first sign of the coming Christmas time and from this day forward, the time until Christmas seems to never go by! I remember the mornings of December 6th, when my daughter was little and the first thing she did was run to the front door in her nightgown to see if Nikolaus had brought her something. And her shiny eyes when she discovered her shoe full of nuts, tangerines, chocolate and marzipan. I know that some families also know “Knecht Ruprecht”, who is going along with St. Nikolaus and punishes children when they were „not good, polite, or respectful“, during the year. In these cases, the children will not get their shoes filled with sweets, but with a tree branch (“Rute”,) which the parents could then use to punish the children (although of course I never heard of anyone actually doing this!). Apart from the Adventskalender and the Advents Sundays, Nikolaustag is very important for our children. It is something to look forward to with excitement and of course something that makes waiting for the Weihnachtsmann just a little bit easier.


December ‘10 / January ‘11

German-American Journal

5

Germany United @ 20 By: Matthias Knobloch

Although my age approaches 28, I’ve only known my national anthem for 20 years. “Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit...” – Unity, Justice and Freedom. Those three words are the cornerstones of Germany’s democratic system. A system that I did not know existed for the first seven years of my life. The events in November 1989 changed Germany tremendously and led to its reunification almost one year later. On October 4, 2010, I had the pleasure of attending a reception on the occasion of the 20th anniversary of German reunification. Consul General Hückmann welcomed the guests including my wife Sarah and I, DANK’s President William Fuchs with his wife Darlene, as well as DANK’s office staff Eva Timmerhaus and Amelia Cotter. The greetings of the Governor of the State of Illinois and the

Mayor of Chicago were read by their representatives shortly after the National anthems of both countries, Germany and the USA, were sung by approximately 300 guests. I proudly sang my German anthem and tried to sing the US anthem as well—an event that neither my parents nor grandparents ever could have imagined 21 years ago. Here I am standing, in the middle of Chicago, singing “Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit” together with my USborn wife, a former class enemy. History teaches us how silly people can be, and what ambition for power, arrogance and greed can lead to. Many people of one nation are still divided. Germany is now a striving, unified country which has found its way out of the economic crisis. Consul General Hückmann pointed out the achievements of the past 20 years by stating that: “Today, 20 years later, it would be a bit of an exaggeration to claim that cultural differences have been resolved and that the East has

completely caught up economically and financially with the West. But the success stories of the ‘Aufbau Ost’ become more and more visible.” A united Germany should continue to serve as a success story for unifying divided societies.

A Piece of German History By: Sarah Nadler

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Since 2008, the citizens of Chicago and interested tourists have been able to gaze at a piece of the original Berlin Wall. However, the historic exhibit can be found neither in a museum nor in a remarkable building. It is placed at the entrance of the CTA Western Brown Line Station in Chicago, publicly available and free of charge. When Alderman Gene Schulter was informed in 2006 by former Consul General of Germany Wolfgang Drautz about bringing a segment of the Berlin Wall to Chicago, he and the city of Chicago,

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German-American Journal

1 5

4 4 0 0

9/23/10 $15.00

6 Issues

4740 N. Western Ave., Suite 206, Chicago, IL. 60625-2013 Same as above

FullKnown Name 11. Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Editor (Name and(Name complete mailing address) Managing Editor and complete mailing address) Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or Other Securities. If none,mailing check address) box Editor (Name and complete Managing Full NameEditor (Name and complete mailing address) Editor (Name and complete mailing address)

Complete Mailing Address

Darlene Fuchs, 4740 N. Western Ave., Suite 206 Chicago, IL. 60625-2013 None Complete Mailing Address

Managing (Name complete mailing address) 10. Owner Editor (Do not leave and blank. If the publication is owned by a corporation, give the name and address of the corporation immediately followed by the names and addresses of all stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of stock. If not owned by a corporation, give the Managing (Name and complete mailing address) names Editor and addresses of the individual owners. If owned by a partnership or other unincorporated firm, give its name and address as well as those of 10. Owner (Do not leave the publication is owned a corporation, give the give nameitsand address of the corporation immediately followed by the each individual owner.blank. If the Ifpublication is published byby a nonprofit organization, name and address.) Managing (Name and complete mailingowning address) names Editor and addresses of all stockholders or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of stock. If not owned by a corporation, give the Mailing Address Full Name names and addresses of the individual owners. If owned a partnershipgive or Complete other unincorporated firm, givecorporation its name and address as well as by those 10. Owner (Do not leave blank. If the publication is owned byby a corporation, the name and address of the immediately followed the of each individual owner. If the publication is published by a nonprofit organization, give its name and address.) names and addresses of all stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of stock. If not owned by a corporation, give the 10. Owner leave blank. the publication is owned byby a corporation, the name and address of the immediately followed the of and not addresses of theIfindividual owners. If owned a partnershipgive or Complete other unincorporated firm, givecorporation its name and address as well as by those Mailing Address Fullnames Name(Do names and addresses all stockholders or holding 1 percent or more of give the total amount stock. If not owned by a corporation, give the each individual owner. of If the publication isowning published by a nonprofit organization, its name andofaddress.) 11. names Known (Do Bondholders, Mortgagees, and owners. Other is Security Holders Owning orgive 10. Owner not leave blank. the publication owned byby a corporation, the name and address of the immediately followed the of and addresses of theIfindividual If owned a partnership or other unincorporated firm, givecorporation its name and address as well as by those Holding 1 Percent or More Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, ororganization, Complete Address Fulleach Name names and addresses ofthe allofstockholders or holding 1 percent or more of give the total amount ofaddress.) stock. If not owned by a corporation, give the individual owner. If publication isowning published by a nonprofit itsMailing name and Other Securities. If none, check box owners. If owned by a partnership or other unincorporated None firm, give its name and address as well as those of names and addresses of the individual Complete Mailing Address Fulleach Name Full Name individual If theby publication published byauthorized a nonprofittoorganization, giverates) itsMailing name and address.) Complete Address 12. Tax Status (For owner. completion nonprofit is organizations mail at nonprofit (Check one) purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status federal income tax purposes: 13. Publication Title 14.for Issue Date for Circulation Data Below Complete Mailing Address FullThe Name

German American National Congress

4740 N. Western Ave, Chicago, IL. 60625-2013

Photo Credit: www.flickr.com, gingerbydesign

Chicago Transit Authority, the German Consulate, the former McCormick Freedom Museum, and German community decided to place it at the Brown Line Station near Lincoln Square. The decision was made in favor of this area because Lincoln Square is a historically German neighborhood and had been called Germantown in the past. Also, the wall, which is a historic memorial that serves as a warning for future generations, had to be accessible to the general public. Today many tourists, among them many Germans, but also residents on their way to work, visit the wall segment. Information panels in front of the exhibit were provided by the McCormick Freedom Museum, now the McCormick Freedom Project, and inform the visitors about the history of the wall and the Cold War. Many school classes also visit this place because it is living history. The 3.2 meter tall and three ton heavy concrete segment was a gift by the Berlin Senate and was installed in 2008. Today it still serves as a reminder of the German separation but, especially outside of Germany, it is rather a symbol of the strong love between a people, hope, and the notion that freedom in today’s world cannot be taken for granted. The segment was transported by Lufthansa for free and was stored in a warehouse until the area in station was prepared. Another, smaller piece of the wall can also be found on the facade of the Tribune Tower on Michigan Avenue in Chicago.

X

Has Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months 13. Publication Title 14. Issue Date for Circulation Data Below Has Changed with this statement) Data Below 13. Publication Title During Preceding 12 Months (Publisher must submit explanation of 14.change Issue Date for Circulation

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13. Form Publication Title 14. Issue Date for NOTICE: Circulation Data PS 3526, September 2007 (Page 1 of 3 (Instructions Page 3)) PSN 7530-01-000-9931 PRIVACY See ourBelow privacy policy on www.usps.com 15. Extent and Nature of Circulation No. Copies of Single Issue Average No. Copies Each Issue 11. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Published Nearest to 15. Extent and Nature of Circulation No. Copies of Single Issue During Preceding 12 Months 1 Percent orof More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or 15. Holding Extent and Nature Circulation Average No. Copies Each Issue No. Copies Filing Date of Single Issue Other Securities. If none, check box None Average No. Copies Each Issue Published Nearest to 15. Known 11. Extent Bondholders, and Nature ofMortgagees, Circulationand Other Security Holders Owning or During Preceding 12 Months Published Nearest to No. Copies FullHolding Name 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or Complete Mailing Address12 Months During Preceding Filing Date of Single Issue Average No. Copies Each Issue Filing DateNearest to a. Total Number of Copies (Net press run) Published If none, check boxand Other Security Holders Owning or DuringNone Preceding 12 Months 11. Other KnownSecurities. Bondholders, Mortgagees, Filing Date Full Name Complete Mailing Address Holding 1 Percent or More Total run) Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or a. Total Number of Copies (Netofpress a. Total Number of Copies (Net press run) Outside-County PaidSecurity Subscriptions on 11. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other HoldersStated Owning Other Securities. IfMailed none, check box None one) 12. 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Tax Has Status by nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at nonprofit rates) (Check one) Not(For Changed Preceding (4) PS Form 3526, September 2007Other (Page 1 of12 3 Months (Instructions PageUSPS® 3)) PSN 7530-01-000-9931 PRIVACY NOTICE: See our privacy policy on www.usps.com Sales, and Paid Distribution Outside the USPS (e.g. First-Class TheHas purpose, function, and nonprofit status ofMail®) this organization and the explanation exempt status for federal tax purposes: Changed During Preceding 12 Months (Publisher must submit of change withincome this statement) Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail Through 12. 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Total Has PaidNot Distribution (Sum of Preceding 15b (1), (2), and (4)) Free or Nominal Rate Outside-County (1) Copies included on12 3541 PS Form 3526, September 2007 (Page 1PS of Form 3 (Instructions PSNexplanation 7530-01-000-9931 PRIVACY See our privacy policy on www.usps.com Has Changed During Preceding Months (Publisher must3)) submit of change with thisNOTICE: statement) c. Total Paid Distribution (Sum of 15b (1), (2), (3), and (4)) Page Free or Nominal Rate Outside-County (1) Free or Nominal Rate Outside-County Copies 2007 included on 1PS 3541 PS Formor3526, (1) September (Page ofForm 3 (Instructions Page 3)) PSN 7530-01-000-9931 PRIVACY NOTICE: See our privacy policy on www.usps.com d. Free Copies included on PS Form 3541 Free or Nominal Rate Outside-County In-County Copies Included Nominal (1) (2) d. Rate Free or Copies included on PS Form 3541on PS Form 3541 d. 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(By FreeMail or on PS Form 3541 Rate Distribution and Free or Nominal Rate In-County Copies Included Nominal Copies Mailed at Other (3) (2) Distribution (By Mail Outside on PS Form 3541the USPS (e.g. First-Class Mail) Rate Classes Through (By Mail and Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other the Mail) Distribution (3) Free and or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other Outside (3) Classes Through the USPS (e.g. First-Class Mail) (By Mail Outside Classes Through the USPS (e.g. First-Class the Mail) and Distribution Outside theMail) Mail (4) (3) Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other the Mail) Outside (CarriersThrough or other the means) Classes USPS (e.g. First-Class Mail) Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail the Mail) (4) Free or Nominal Distribution Outside the Mail or otherRate means) (4) (Carriers (Carriers other means) Rateor Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4)) e. 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German-American Journal

Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4)) e. Total f. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and 15e) Distribution (Sum (See of 15cInstructions and 15e) to Publishers #4 (page #3)) g. Total f. Copies not Distributed Distribution (Sum (See of 15c and 15e) to Publishers #4 (page #3)) f. g. Total Copies not Distributed Instructions h. Copies g. Total (Sum of 15f and g) not Distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4 (page #3))

9/23/10

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74%

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in the and ________________________ issue ofManager, this publication. 17. Signature Title of Editor, Publisher, Business or Owner 17. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner 17. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner

72%

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Publication not required. Publication not required. Date Publication not required. Date Date Date

10/23/10

I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil Isanctions certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this (including civil penalties). Iform certify that all information on this form is true andform complete. that anyone who furnishes misleading information this or who omits material furnished or information requested on the may beI understand subject to criminal sanctions (includingfalse finesor and imprisonment) and/oron civil form or who omits material or information requested on the may beI understand subject to criminal sanctions fines or and imprisonment) and/oron civil certify that all information furnished on2this form is true andform complete. that anyone who (including furnishes false misleading information this (including civil penalties). PSIsanctions Form 3526, September 2007 (Page of 3) sanctions (including civil penalties). form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil PS Form 3526, September 2007 (Page 2 of 3) (including civil penalties). PSsanctions Form 3526, September 2007 (Page 2 of 3) PS Form 3526, September 2007 (Page 2 of 3)

DANK Participates in Chicago Peace Day Celebration By: Sarah Nadler Cook County Treasurer Maria Pappas hosted a Peace Day reception on September 17 for representatives from the various cultures and cultural organizations in Chicago, including those in the German American community, in conjunction with the Chicago Build the Peace Committee. Members of DANK and the German Consulate were present at Pappas’ reception for two musical performances, which included Bill Buchholtz, a Native American flute player, and the Other 3 Tenors, who sang a German drinking song from Heidelberg. It was particularly touching to the German-Americans present that of all songs, a German song about love and friendship would be chosen to represent world peace. The reception provided a great opportunity for cultural representatives and members of the different Consulates to come together and make new

connections. Chicago Peace Day has been celebrated for over 30 years. The first Peace Day was proclaimed on September 7, 1978 with the aim to focus on peaceful cooperation between all countries in the world and to unite people of all ages, cultures and faiths in the city. The official International Peace Day is September 21.


6

German-American Journal

December ‘10 / January ‘11

German American Day Commemoration 2010 in Chicago

Photo Credit: William Milleker

By: Helga Blaumueller On Sunday, October 3, 2010 the United German-American Societies of Greater Chicago had invited the German community to participate in the 27th German American Day Commemoration. This annual event takes place at St. Benedict’s Church in Chicago, Illinois, which had been

established by German immigrants. The President of the United GermanAmerican Societies of Greater Chicago, Erich Himmel, with Alderman Gene Schulter of the 47th Ward and Vice-Consul Helmut Rausch, from the Consulate of the Federal Republic of Germany led the procession into the church. Most of the dignitaries of the German American Community, with

their respective flag bearers followed. The procession of the affiliated clubs and choruses, represented with their flags and presidents, were quite impressive as they were introduced by Helga Zettl. Master of Ceremony, Irene Rotter introduced President Erich Himmel. After Mr. Himmel’s opening remarks the choruses and the audience sang the

American Anthem and the German National Anthem. The benediction was given by Assistant Pastor Rex Pillai. Alderman Eugene Schulter, official Representative of the Mayor, Richard M. Daley, read the proclamation of the city council in which the many contributions of German immigrants in the development of the City of Chicago were honored. Armin Homann, a well-known German radio show host, gave a testimonial to the important role the German clubs and choirs play in the German Community. Mr. Homann encouraged everyone to support the clubs and choirs to enable them to continue their important work and to keep up the German language. His Speech was given in German. Vice-Consul Rausch spoke of the 20th Anniversary of the reunification of the two German States. The Reunification process moved at a quick pace and has established one German Nation that is a dependable partner within in the European Union and in the global community of Nations. The celebration was enhanced by the participation of the German American Children Chorus, under the direction of Carol Himmel, and by the male Choruses, the ladies Choruses and the mixed Choruses of the United German-American Chorus of Greater Chicago, under the direction of Catherine Wendt. Conductor Glen Sorgatz performed several trumpet solos and he was accompanied by Jerry Jelsema, on the organ.

t Las r u O rah! Hur

t Las r u O rah! Hur

Complimentary Drinks 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm & 9:00 pm - 12:00 am

Your Choice of Prime Rib or Orange Roughy for dinner

Champagne at Midnight

Donation $90.00* Per Person

For Ticket information, Please call Annelies at: (708) 562-7038

RAFFLE

1 Roundtrip ticket to USA-48 for 2 lucky winners courtesy of

A Proud Sponsor of The German American National Congress New Year’s Eve Ball


December ‘10 / January ‘11

German-American Journal

439

7

Germany comprises 16 states (Bundesländer), which are further subdivided into 439 districts (Kreise) and cities (kreisfreie Städte)

Deutsche Musik: Gestern und Heute

Was verbinden Amerikaner eigentlich mit dem Begriff, “aktuelle deutsche Musik”? Einige werden wahrscheinlich mit den Schultern zucken, oder zumindest die deutsche Metal-Band Rammstein erwähnen. Die Mehrheit jedoch haftet immer noch an dem Bild des Lederhosentragenden, Volksliedersingenden Deutschen. Und Sarah Nadler die älteren Generationen sind felsenfest davon überzeugt, dass Bach, Beethoven und Wagner die deutschen Charts erobern werden. Tatsächlich nimmt Deutschland hinsichtlich Musikveröffentlichungen und -produktionen weltweit den zweiten Platz ein. Obwohl englisch- als auch fremdsprachige Musik im deutschsprachigen Raum durchaus sehr beliebt ist, ist die deutsche Musik mit ihren deutschsprachigen Texten wieder hoch im Kurs. Viele bekannte Komponisten wie Strauss und Beethoven sind mit ihren herausragenden Kompositionen und exzellenten musikalischen Leistungen in die Geschichte eingegangen. Mozarts Oper „Die Zauberflöte“ war die erste Oper mit deutschem Text und Beethoven komponierte sogar während zunehmender Taubheit viele imposante Werke. Ihre Meisterwerke sind zwar heute noch berühmt, können aber den Großteil der Jugendlichen nicht mehr begeistern. Deutsche Volksmusik war bereits Ende des neunzehnten Jahrhunderts sehr beliebt, genauso wie viele Trinklieder. Mit der Nachkriegszeit brach dann die Ära des berühmt– berüchtigten Schlagers an, dessen Stil hauptsächlich durch bekannte amerikanische Lieder beeinflusst wurde, die ins Deutsche übersetzt wurden. Heutzutage sind Schlager immer noch beliebt in Deutschland und werden regelmäßig auf Veranstaltungen wie Karneval oder dem Oktoberfest gespielt. Mit Anbeginn der Beatles und Rolling Stones Ära verschwanden fast alle deutschen Bands in der Versenkung.

Wir sind Helden

Photo Credit: Billy & Hells (www.billyundhells.de)

Die britische Invasion fand viele deutsche Anhänger- sowie Nachahmer. Nur drei Jahre nach Gründung der Rolling Stones wurde die deutsche Band Scorpions ins Leben gerufen. Obwohl es eine deutsche Band ist, sangen sie auf Englisch – und waren damit erfolgreich auf der ganzen Welt. Bedeutete das also, dass die deutsche Sprache als ungeeignet für die Musikszene galt? Die Neue Deutsche Welle jedoch bewies das Gegenteil. Deutsche Texte können Künstlern sehr wohl zu großem Erfolg verhelfen. Viele deutsche Titel schafften es sogar in die US-Hitparaden, wobei die Neue Deutsche Welle hauptsächlich von Künstlern wie Nena und Falco vorangetrieben wurde. Die Band Kraftwerk war übrigens die erste Band, die die US-Charts mit deutschen Texten stürmte.

Zu Zeit sind die deutschen Charts mit amerikanischen und britischen Künstlern überrannt. Stirbt die deutsche Musik etwa aus? Die Antwort ist ganz klar nein. Viele Amerikaner wissen nämlich nicht, dass sich deutsche Künstler, wohl gemerkt mit deutschen Texten, den Weg zurück in die deutschen und internationalen Charts erkämpfen. Songs von Alternative Rock Bands wie Wir sind Helden, Silbermond und Juli, werden im Radio rauf und runter gespielt und weisen häufig Ähnlichkeiten mit dem Sound der Neue Deutsche Welle Liedern auf. Ihre Musik ist einfach und einprägsam, ihre Texte, welche von Liebe, Freundschaft und dem Leben handeln, selbst geschrieben. Das sind jedoch noch längst nicht die einzigen deutschen Musikexportgüter. Deutscher Hip - Hop gewinnt immer mehr an nationalem Einfluss. Stellvertreter hierfür sind beispielsweise Die Fantastischen Vier, Peter Fox und Jan Delay. Ihre Texte handeln von ihren Heimatstädten bis hin zu Alltagsproblemen, wobei sie ihre Reime nicht im Geringsten vor denen ihrer amerikanischen Kollegen verstecken müssen. In Vergessenheit geraten sollten ebenso nicht Herbert Grönemeyer, Westernhagen und die Toten Hosen, welche auch in den USA bekannt sind, und zudem viele junge Fans haben. Ihre Karrieren begannen zwar früher als die der oben genannten Künstler, dennoch veröffentlichen sie immer noch sehr erfolgreich ihre Musik. Zum Schluss noch ein paar Worte über Deutschlands Exportschlager Rammstein. Vielen Deutschen ist es immer noch schleierhaft, warum gerade diese Band es geschafft hat, so erfolgreich im Ausland zu sein. Wahrscheinlich resultiert ihr Erfolg aus ihren ausgefallenen Shows und ihrem besonderen Musikstil, der es ihnen ermöglicht, sich von der Masse abzuheben. Hinzu kommt, dass sich die deutsche Sprache hervorragend für dieses Musikgenre zu eignen scheint. Wie es aussieht, ist die deutsche Musik keineswegs ausgestorben. Sie hat viele Formen, eigene sowie geliehene, und lässt sich inzwischen weder aus Deutschland, noch aus dem Ausland, wegdenken.

German Music: Yesterday and Today

By: Sarah Nadler

What comes to the minds of Americans when they hear the term, “current German music?” Some of them will probably shrug their shoulders, or mention the German metal band Rammstein. The majority, however, still cling to the image of a Lederhosen-wearing and folk songsinging nation. And older generations may still believe that Bach, Beethoven and Wagner will conquer the German charts. In fact, Germany is the second most vital country for music release and production in the world, and while music sung in English and other languages is popular there, German music with German lyrics is still a strong force. Many well known classical musicians like Strauss and Beethoven have gone down in history with their incredible compositions and excellent musical performances. Mozart’s opera, “The Magic Flute” was the first opera with German lyrics. Beethoven composed numerous monumental works, all while being totally deaf. Their masterpieces are still famous today, but are usually not the type of music that German teenagers are crazy about. German folk music was already popular by the end of the nineteenth century, along with drinking songs. The post-World War II period then ushered in the infamous era

of “Schlager.” The style was influenced by famous American songs translated into German. Today, Schlager and folk music are still popular and are played at events like Karneval and Oktoberfest. By the beginning of the Beatles and Rolling Stones era, almost all German bands had vanished. The British Invasion found a lot of fans in Germany—and copycats. Only three years after the Rolling Stones were founded, the band the Scorpions was formed. Although they are a German band, their lyrics were in English and their songs were successful all over the world. So, was the German language seen as an unattractive language with respect to music? The “Neue Deutsche Welle” (“New German Wave”) proved that wrong. German lyrics can lead to big success for German recording artists. Many German songs even managed to get onto the American charts. The Neue Deutsche Welle was dominated by artists like Nena (“99 Red Balloons”) and Falco (“Rock me Amadeus”). Kraftwerk, with their song “Autobahn,” were the first German band with German lyrics to hit US Charts. That being said, today’s German charts are overcrowded by American and British artists. Is German music dying out? The answer is definitely no! Most Americans do not know that German musicians—as

in, German artists with German lyrics—are fighting their way back into the German and international billboards. Alternative rock bands like Wir sind Helden, Silbermond and Juli have an easy, catchy, pop sound that bares similarities to the Neue Deutsche Welle. Their lyrics tend to cover modern topics like love, life and friendship. But this is not the only exportable German music genre. There is also German hip-hop, represented by artists such as Die Fantastischen Vier, Peter Fox and Jan Delay. Their lyrics vary in theme, from songs about their hometowns to day-to-day problems. The rhymes are by no means inferior to those rapped by their American counterparts. We should also not forget those of the older generations. Herbert Groenemeyer and Westernhagen, and also the punk rock band Die Toten Hosen, are still popular among youths, and should be well known in the US. Their careers started much earlier than

most artists mentioned above, but they are still successfully releasing music. Last but not least, perhaps a few words should be spent on Germany’s largest musical export, Rammstein. It is still puzzling to many Germans how this band became so successful overseas. It is probably a result of their remarkable shows and music style, which help them stand out from the crowd. Additionally, hard rock is a genre for which the German language is well-suited. Clearly, German music is not dead at all. It has had many forms, both original and borrowed, and it remains strong both in Germany and abroad.

Rammstein


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81,757,600

2010 Estimated population of Germany

Oktoberfest Celebrated GAPA Style

GAPA Hofbräu Festzelt guests

By: Rory Trausch Fall is here, and it’s a nice time of year, with trees breaking out in colors galore and the air feeling crisp and clean. It’s a natural for our favorite time of year – Oktoberfest season! A small group of the same cast of characters gathered at O’Hare Airport for our trip to THE fest – Oktoberfest in Munich,

with sponsorship by our dear friends at Hofbrau. We left Chicago on Saturday and next stepped off the plane in Munich on Sunday, September 26th. After resting and freshening up, we met later that evening at the Rathskeller restaurant, just beneath the Glockenspiel, to celebrate the 60th birthday of our treasurer, Hans Hunger. The next couple of days, everyone was on their own, and some of us took short

trips outside Munich, sight-seeing and shopping. The group then re-convened on Wednesday night the 29th, at the Hofbrau Haus, where we were met by GAPA member Fred Schumacher, who, lo and behold, had with him our friends from DANK, president Bill Fuchs and his wife, Darlene, and Hans Wolf and his wife, Kathy. The whole group of us enjoyed delicious food, thirstquenching Hofbrau beer, great music, and tons of “kameradshaft.” We were the stars of the show, as everybody in attendance, especially the French contingent at the next table, enjoyed our rendition of the GAPA national anthem. As if that wasn’t blissful enough, two days later on Friday, we were treated to an evening at the Hofbrau tent at the Weisen grounds. We were set up with two VIP tables in the balcony – what a view! Fred Schumacher joined us again, and this time he brought with him his trusted executive assistant, Amy Smock, and our dear friend from Hofbrau Munchen, Rudi Seider. On behalf of everyone who attended, I

GAPA President Rory Trausch & Fred Schumacher President, Hofbräu of America

wish to thank our friends at Hofbrau for the experience of a lifetime. Their hospitality is unrivaled. I also wish to thank our Trip Chairman - really a committee of Tom and Dottie Moritz - for their work in getting this trip together. The 17 of us who went on this trip experienced a fantastic week full of sights, lots of laughs, and lots and lots of German beverages! For those of you who could not make it, perhaps you should look forward to 2012, when GAPA goes rolling down the river (the Rhine River).

GAPA atop the eagle’s nest in Berchtesgaden

The Cold War Museum By: Amelia Cotter

The Cold War Museum is a 501(c) (3) charitable organization dedicated to education, preservation, and research on the global, ideological, and political confrontations between East and West from the end of World War II to the dissolution of the Soviet Union. From the 1940s until the 1990s the rivalry between the democratic Free World and the nations of the Communist bloc affected Americans’ daily lives and events throughout the world. This “Cold War” actually became a “hot” one in Korea, Vietnam, and the Gulf War but generally took the form of espionage and diplomatic maneuvers, with the United States, the Soviet Union and China as the major combatants. The Cold War Museum seeks to memorialize the people and events of those years and educate future generations about that era.

The Board of Directors for the Cold War Museum was updated in February 2010 and includes legal experts, leading authorities in museum and non-profit management, Cold War historians, and Intelligence and Cold War veterans. Board Members are: Mr. Francis Gary Powers, Jr. (Chair), Mr. John C. Welch (Vice Chair), Mr. Don Workman of Baker & Hostetler LLP (Secretary), Mr. Robert “Bob” J. Hinz, CPA of Rubino & McGeehin (Treasurer), Col. Garald “Gary” Bottorff, USAF (Ret.), Brigadier General John A. Hurley, USAFR (Ret), and Dr. Christian Ostermann, Director of the Cold War International History Project. International Associates are: Mr. Werner I. Juretzko (Former Stasi Prisoner), European Affairs; Ms. Baerbel Elisabeth Simon, German Affairs; and Mr. Chris Sturdevant, Chairman of Cold War Museum, Midwest Chapter.

Honorary Board Members are: Mr. Dino Brugioni, Mr. David Eisenhower, Mr. Gail S. Halvorsen (Berlin Airlift-Berlin Candy Bomber), Dr. Sergei Khrushchev, Mr. Joseph C. Lentini (USS Liberty Survivor), and Mr. Thomas C. Reed, Former Secretary of the USAF. Advisory Board Members are: Mr. Robert M. Doherty, Esq.; Delegate David B. Albo; Congressman Gerald Connolly of Fairfax County; The Honorable Tom M. Davis; Mr. Frederick J. Ferrer; Mr. R. Cargill Hall, Emeritus Chief Historian, NRO; Major General Tiiu Kera, USAF (Ret.); Ms. Dee Powers Rogers, Director of Human Resources at Delta Airlines; and Mr. John T. Stirrup, Gainesville District

Supervisor, Prince William Board of County Supervisors. Part Board Members are, in part: Major General Ronald K. Andreson, USA (Ret.); Major General Michael E. Ennis, U.S. Marine Corps, Deputy Director for Community HUMINT, Central Intelligence Agency; Ms. Elizabeth V. Eubanks, Collections Manager; Dr. Gerald L. Gordon, President and CEO of Fairfax County EDA; Lt. Col. Chuck Hancock, USAF (Ret.); Mr. Gordon Lunn, Nike Historical Society; Mr. Neal McBride; Ms. Linda McCarthy, Founding Curator, CIA Museum; Brig. General Dick Reynard, USA (ret); and Mr. Dale Rumberger, Past Principal of South County Secondary School.


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I had a very active fall season enjoying the many different German American Day and German Unity Day celebrations in the area. I attended Chicago Mayor Richard Daley’s German Day celebration, which happened to fall on the same day that he announced he won’t be running for mayor of Chicago again. It felt like a rather historic evening, and the mayor actually seemed more relaxed than usual. The rest of us also enjoyed ourselves as always. I also attended the Consulate’s reception for German Unity Day, which was terrific, as well as the German Day service held at St. Benedict’s church. All of these were wonderful experiences and I was honored to attend and meet new people, as well as have the chance to see all the friends I’ve made in the German-American community already.

The office has been busy working on expanding our Associate Membership, and changing and adding new fun things to the Journal, our Blog and even DANK’s YouTube channel. We have also been diligently working away at processing the last minute raffle tickets and new memberships. Our big task is now, of course, to organize our annual dues drive. This will occupy us over the course of the next couple of months and we hope to be able to process and send out your new membership cards and membership packages as quickly as possible. As always, don’t hesitate to call us or send us an email if you have any questions or need something. From Eva, Beth, and I in the National Office, Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

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Twenty-seven million Germans are members of a sports club

The Perfect Christmas Gift! With the Christmas Season approaching, I know many of you are thinking about the joy of the pending Advent and Christmas Season and the burden of giving gifts to those who are hard to shop for or those who seem to have everything. Be they family members, friends or neighbors who are of Germanic ancestry, why not give them a DANK membership- the gift that continues to give all year long and recognizes their Germanic heritage. Why buy a knickknack or something that collects dust or something they need to exchange because it is the wrong size, when you can give them a membership that provides social opportunities at the Chapter level, learning

options such as language programs, or trips with local chapter members. All it takes is filling out an application in their name, a submission of payment and then mailing it to the National office with a request that the membership card, along with a Christmas greeting, be sent to them indicating your purchase of a membership for them. If you prefer to hand them the membership note yourself- just insert a note requesting that the membership and Christmas note be sent to you instead of the gift recipient. This act of giving a membership will benefit both your organization and show you want the recipient to become a member of the DANK family.

Advertise Your Business Here Discounted Rates Available to Chapters & Associate Members

Contact Amelia Cotter National Office Manager (888) USA-DANK Fax: (773) 275-4010 office@dank.org Left to Right: Darlene Fuchs, Irene Rotter, Treasurer Pappas and William Fuchs.

United Nations Day

DANK Represents Germany in Chicago By: Beth Casey

United Nations Day is devoted to highlighting the aims and achievements of the United Nations and has been celebrated on October 24 since 1971. The United Nations works together to develop a global partnership for development and strategies to tackle world issues and epidemics such as promoting gender equality and empowering women; combating HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases; ensuring environmental sustainability; achieving universal primary education; improving maternal health; reducing child mortality; and to eradicate extreme poverty and hunger. On October 22 at two in the afternoon, Bill Fuchs, DANK National President and Darlene Fuchs, German-American Journal Editor and DANK National Office intern Beth Casey were honored to

represent DANK and Germany at Cook County Treasurer Maria Pappas’ United Nations Day Reception in Chicago. At the reception, representatives from each country were lined up and called alphabetically by nation. Beautiful and traditional costumes paraded down an aisle to share with the guests of the reception the native attire. At the end of the aisle, representatives got to have their picture taken with Cook County Treasurer Maria Pappas as the flags of every country in the United Nations decorated the wall behind them. Following the presentation of the countries, guests and representatives were welcomed to stay for refreshments. In that moment, people from all over the world—dressed in different attire with different religious and cultural values— had one thing in common: a love for cake and coffee.

Sign Up For Membership Online @ www.DANK.org


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German-American Journal

December ‘10 / January ‘11

Pittsburgh 2011 Planning Committee

While the next National Convention is still a whole year away, it is time to think about attending our next National Convention, which will be held in Pittsburgh, America’s Most Livable city. The dates of the convention are October 28-30, 2011 but plans are already underfoot with all of Region three’s Chapters participating in the program development. Plans being developed call for this not to be just a business convention, but a gathering with social activities that will

allow all attending to enjoy their Germanic heritage and have a long weekend of fun. The planning committee is making arrangements for both delegates and non delegate members to have a long enjoyable weekend. Starting with the next edition of the Journal, look for updates on the Convention and all the activities that go with it. Airlines, such as Southwest, USAir, Delta, United, Continental, Air Tram and others, serve Pittsburgh, with many offering

great discounts if travel plans are booked early. We are looking at hotel space that will be affordable but yet of distinction. Plans being discussed include activities for those coming in a day or two earlier or staying beyond the Sunday convention ending. So think of making combining this convention with plans to also make it a mini vacation. Look at future editions for more details about what is being planned.

Freemason’s Medallion From Solingen By: Sarah Nadler

We recently received a letter from a DANK Quad-Cities, Iowa member that included pictures of a nineteenth century medallion he found with his German grandfather’s belongings, and questions about its origin and meaning. Upon doing some research, we soon found that the medallion would have been worn by freemason workers in the area of Solingen, North-Rhine Westphalia in the mid-nineteenth century. The medallion is framed on both sides

by a gold laurel wreath and three swords, with a deep blue background. Solingen was known as “Klingenstadt,” or “Blade City.” In the center of the front of the medallion is the letter “W,” with a golden crown above it. These symbols represent Wilhelm, Prince of Prussia, who was the namesake of the St. Johannis freemasons lodge in Solingen, which was nicknamed the “Prinz von Preußen zu den drei Schwertern” (“Prince of Prussia at the Three Swords”). The lodge was founded on May 22, 1840, as noted on the medallion, and still exists today.

Fun In The South Bend By: William R. Troutman

First off, I want to say that I’m very proud of my German heritage, and I like to surround myself with people of the same sentiment. I applaud members like Guenter and Erika Kison, Christine Weiss, Ron and Annemarie Szulezyk, and Sonja Wilson for opening up their homes so that we could come together for some good food, conversation and Gemuetlichkeit. That said, we had a wonderful time at Sonja Wilson’s beautiful home in Osceola Indiana on Sunday, September 12. The event was called “The End of Summer Party” and the weather outside really showed it. Even though it was raining and chilly; it didn’t stop anyone from participating. Upon arriving, Ron Szulezyk was busy cooking the Bratwurst and there was a long table full of delicious

side dishes and desserts. Sonja was a perfect host and after lunch, all the men gathered in a glass room addition to watch the Notre Dame game. Wieder Vielen Dank Sonja. The next event was just perfect. On Saturday, October 2, we all met Guenter and Erica for something called “Campfire at Kison’s farm”. It was an overcast day and a bit chilly; a great day to enjoy a bowl of hot soup or chili and drink a cup of hot Gluewein. All of this was served on picnic tables in a rustic 120-year-old barn, just in case of rain. There were also plenty of side dishes, Sloppy Joes, various deserts and hot coffee. After eating, Guenter built the biggest campfire I’ve ever seen and we warmed ourselves on the cool fall day. I can’t thank Guenter and Erika Kison enough for all the events they’ve hosted throughout the years. I will never forget them.

Left to Right: Anne-Marie, Helga, Ron, Trudy, Sonja, Hilde, Donna, Rudolf, Günter , Reinhard, Ulla and Erika enjoying a hearty meal before the lightning of the campfire.

The Prussian eagle is featured on the back of the medallion. Beneath the eagle it says in Latin: “Sub umbra alarum tuarum,” or “Beneath the shadow of your wings,” which refers to a psalm in the Bible and was a slogan used by the workers. All freemasons were given this medallion as a symbol of their tie to freemasonry. They also referred to this type of medallion as a “Bijou,” which is French for “jewel.” The accompanying photo is not of the exact medallion in question, but was found at www.freimaurer-in-solingen.de/index.

php?id=34, where more information on this topic can be located. Unfortunately, the site is only in German.


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New York Steuben Parade Experience By: Hans Wolf

After receiving an official invitation, I, my wife Kathy, Bill Fuchs, DANK National President and Darlene Fuchs, traveled to New York the night before the Von Steuben festivities, September 23rd, so as not to miss out on the full impact of this two day event! The Parade committee moved the date of the 53rd Steuben Parade, scheduled to fall on the third Saturday of September (which fell out on Yom Kippur), back a week to enable German-American Jews to march. Lars Halter, the general chairman of the Steuben Parade, started off Friday’s Welcoming Ceremony, at City Hall, with introductions. He impressed me the most, as a young new talent in the East Coast German community. Various dance groups performed, including a group dressed in 1910 Royal Kaiserliche outfits, and a number of dignitaries were honored. Among them was our friend Bill who received a Certificate of Recognitions for DANK’s dedication to the promotion of German Heritage and culture in New York City and beyond. Wearing my Schalke 04 shirt, was commented on by a number of German soccer fans. It’s a price one pays when you are from Gelsenkirchen. During the ceremony we met Rick Lanman, a local attorney representing the German-American Jewish Gay society, who engaged us in a colorful discussion. Rick’s idea, a dual German and American citizen, was, “To create a Jewish Contingent honoring German Jewish contributions to American culture, along with taking “steps” towards exploring German pride before and after the Nazi era, to improve the world, so I’ll March.” Friday evening, September 24th, there was a Gala Banquet, a highlight for the German-American society, and Benefit for the Parade. Held at the Grand Ballroom of the New York Hilton & Towers, the black-tie reception and banquet was another eye opener. Oozing with pomp and elegance, we met a number of dignitaries, including the legendary “Dr. Ruth” Westheimer and Dr. Michael Moeller, CEO of the world-famous Hofbräuhaus, co-Grand Marshall’s. Dr. Ruth Westheimer, who lost many family members in the Holocaust, gave a very memorable speech referencing her ties to Germany. She said, “The main reason that I am

Dr. Michael Möller, Bill Fuchs, Stefan Gastager, president, Hofbräuhaus Las Vegas

Hans Wolf, Darlene Fuchs & Kathy Wolf in Steuben parade

LEFT: Bill Fuchs, DANK National President receives Certificate of Recognitions for DANK’s dedication to the promotion of German Heritage and culture. RIGHT: Masskrugstemmen contest.

here tonight can be found in the Jewish concept of Tikkun Olam. It is a prayer to describe individual acts that make the world a better place.” She went on to say, “I came close to losing my life several times and so, I treasure life too much to waste time with anything negative.” As we danced to music provided by, “The Jimmy Sturr Orchestra”, I reflected on this inspirational evening, which was full of long lasting memories. It was 12 Noon, sunny and 88°F, as thousands of marchers and 25 floats in the Steuben Parade assembled. Large German American groups from Germany, Austria and Switzerland visit every year to be part of New York’s Steuben Parade. DANK National, represented by the four of us along with our banner, lead the Continental Division. Behind us was the Aqua String Band from Philadelphia, who usually lead the Mummers Parade in Pennsylvania. This band, 50 strong, looked like a Karneval band with their outrageous costumes. Their music, along with a German rapper on the Brandenburg Gate float, which was sponsored by the Consulate General of Germany in New York, was a great inspiration to our 18 block march up 5th Avenue along Central Park.

The crowds excitement gave me tears and goose bumps all at the same time. Besides the participants immediately surrounding us, we saw little of the two hour parade. The whole experience, seeing thousands of people cheering and waving German flags, was wonderful. DANK’s National President Bill Fuchs secured 4 tickets to the sold out Oktoberfest at Rumsey Playfield in Central Park. We met up with Fred Schumacher and Dr. Michael Moeller of Hofbråu, who reserved precious seating for us in their VIP area. There we met members of a German Karneval Club, who were already in a party mood. Jam-packed, with party revelers in a variety of German trachten, it reminded me of MayFest in Chicago. The Alpine Squeeze band was pounding out German tunes from a large center stage. Bill, of course, wound up on stage timing the Finals of the Second Annual US Championship, Masskrugstemmen contest, organized by Hofbräu North America.The goal is to hold a full one liter stein of beer, with one arm, fully outstretched and parallel to the floor, for as long as possible! There is so much more to tell, it was great representing DANK in such a large international gathering. We hope many of you will join us next year.

DANK Haus German American Cultural Center Annual Report By: Nicholle Dombrowski In 2010, DANK Haus German American Cultural Center expanded its Core Programming schedule by 40%, offering a different activity each Friday night for German American culture. New to the schedule are Kultur Küche and Sports Night while German Cinema Now shifted from Sunday evenings to boost attendance. Stammtisch, our fundamental, signature event, has a renewed sense of purpose and direction as the general welcome to the DANK community and mission. Between Core Programming and Special Events, the DANK Haus German American Cultural Center exposed the public to German American culture on 196 separate occasions. Event attendance records show over 7,000 visitors to the

DANK Haus through September. We partner with the City of Chicago Office of Tourism, three tour companies and over 25 Illinois, Wisconsin and Indiana schools since the installation of the museum exhibit, “Lost German Chicago.” German Language Education increased enrollment for both Children and Adults. Both Krabbelgruppe and Preschool doubled in size, a 10 week summer session was added for adult learners and 2 new classrooms were constructed. Over 40% of our instructors hold Masters in German and over 85% are native speakers. In 2010, we aligned with the Chicago Cultural Alliance, a consortium of Chicago’s ethnic museums, cultural centers, and historical societies. The Alliance connects our member museums and centers to flagship arts and cultural institutions, universities, schools,

businesses and government agencies. This opportunity affords us access to a rich pool of resources and information that we would not be able to obtain alone. Through the CCA and our own initiatives, DANK Haus German American Cultural Center was able to attend many festivals and fairs to inform the public of our educational and cultural activities. We were present at the Chicago’s Children Museum, Navy Pier, the 5th Annual Chicago Sister Cities festival, Millennium Park, a Chicago Public School teacher in service and served as keynote speaker at the University of Illinois at Chicago German Department honors program. DANK was host to many of the highlights of the community calendar: National Turner Convention, St Hubertus dinner, Rosenmontag, Schubert Lyra Spring Concert, Willi Resetarits Concert

and the German National Handball team Official Welcome. Our structure consists of 814 members, 12 unpaid Board members, 7 regular committees, 1 working committee and 2 taskforces. We have 1 paid Executive Director, 2 Facility staff, 14 part time Educators and 3 unpaid interns. There are 27 key volunteers who are pivotal in producing 196 public cultural events in one year. There are over 275 volunteers that ensure our major fundraiser, Maifest, earns 12% of the annual operating budget and performs as an outreach activity. 2011 and beyond planning is underway. Share your passion for German American culture, your talents and your time with the DANK Haus German American Cultural Center. Join a Committee and Volunteer today!


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If You Build It, They Will Come!

Fox Valley Oktoberfest Reappears in Full Glory! As the clock ticked closer to five o’clock, Friday, October first, over hundred volunteers (gathered from both DANK Chapters Fox Valley and Lake County, along with numerous local friends) stood by at their stations with bated breath, wondering if people would come to this monumental undertaking. The first guest arrived, then the second, and so on. By evening’s end, almost two thousand people enjoyed the Getmütlichkeit of the 2010 Fox Valley Oktoberfest in Batavia. Thanks to the cooperation of the City of Batavia (now nicknamed Bavaria) the big top Oktoberfest tent was poised at the newly renovated Riverwalk area, while the Carnival booths and rides were positioned on adjacent Houston Street, which was closed to car traffic for the festivities. Yes, they came. Not only did the Carnival lights attract guests, but also the fond memories of past Fox Valley Oktoberfests; which were sadly missed for three years. Truly a welcomed neighborhood Fest, many families even walked to the site from their homes. The weekend was filled with non-stop entertainment. Hirsch and die Perlen bands provided live German /American Music, while Ginger and Rolf Doerfle filled in the gaps with their International DJ magic. Such

D’Lustigen Holzhacker entertain the crowd.

Buam

dancers

Credit: Arturo Thai-Garcia

a slice of Bavaria was this fest, that when D’Lustigen Holzhacker Buam finished entertaining with their Shuplattler dances, they seemed to blend into the crowd! Tracht has always been commonplace at this Fest. The pleasant aroma of freshly made German food wafted throughout the Fox Valley. Schnitzels, Pomme Frites, and Waffles were made fresh, mere seconds

before consumption. Brats, Heisse Hunde, Sauerkraut, Kartoffel Salat, and Strudels rounded out the menu. A big thanks to the German Language/Food service students from Oswego East and Saint Charles North High Schools for their exemplary help in the kitchen. Part of the Fest’s profits benefit both the Batavia Food Pantry and “GATES” (German-American Team of Educational Sponsors). M.C., Cobi Stein, welcomed the Batavia Boy Scout Troop #21 Color Guard to Saturday’s opening ceremony. Willi Gohs presented Andrea Haupt a bouquet of flowers after she sang both the USA and German National Anthems. He followed by thanking Batavia, Illinois Mayor Schielke and all the members of the City Council and Elected Officials for their various roles in bringing this Oktoberfest to Batavia. Chicago Rheinischer Verein’s gracious Prinzenpaar, Seine Tollitaet Prinz Josef(I) and Ihre Lieblichkeit Prinzessin Debbie(I) were also introduced to the crowd. The Sunday morning of Oktoberfest started with a non-denominational church service. Many thanks were given for beautiful Fall weather and the wonderful times shared here, on this site, amongst families, friends, and new acquaintances. Reverend Ronald Weidler of the Immanuel

Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod) in Batavia offered this worship service. The Fox Valley Oktoberfest committee would like to thank everyone who helped make this a wonderful event. A gracious thank you to the City of Batavia, all the Volunteers, and of course our Guests who put the “G” in “Gemütlichkeit!

Andrea Haupt sings the national anthems at Credit: Arturo Thai-Garcia the opening ceremony.

Pennsylvania’s Lake Shore News DANK Region Three Elections

Carol Snippert, Pat Kane, MaryLou Bartlett, Margaret Potocki and Margaret Carter visit Christmas in the woods.

By: Beverly Pochatko Where, oh where has summer gone? Just like spring, it was all too short! The fall foliage is so beautiful ,but with high winds and cold coming in from the north, this too shall pass as we start hibernating again. We were pleased to welcome new members, John & Mildred Becker, Russell Wertz, Mark Anthony and Patrick Eggleston. Mark and Patrick joined earlier in the spring and we ‘slipped up’ and missed them. We mourned the passing of two former members of

our Chapter in October: Rolf Scheufele a member from 1991-2003 when he and his wife retired to Rock Hill South Carolina, and former Chapter President James N. Thompson, who led the Chapter in 1998 and 1999. Our recent bus tour to Christmas in the Woods in Columbiana Ohio was successful. There were over 159 vendors plus many food booths. My favorite was the Peach Valley,where I had a hot apple dumpling with two scoops of vanilla ice cream! What a delicious treat. Everyone really enjoyed themselves and did some pre-holiday shopping. We are already looking into setting up two bus trips for next year…perhaps going to visit the NY State Amish communities. The Chapter gathered to celebrate our German heritage on October 20th. Some members joined us for dinner and then following a brief meeting, watched the PBS video of “The German Americans”, which was well received. Afterwards we had a social hour with Kaffee und Stollen. Our nominating committee is beginning their search for our election of officers; our Christmas committee is working on plans for our annual Christmas get-together on December 5th at the Männerchor Club. We will be doing another big push collecting for the St. Nikolaus Project before the Christmas Party and word is out that we will have another Fasching Party next year. Everyone had fun last year wearing costumes, etc. We look forward to 2011 and wish everyone a blessed holiday season filled with love, family and friends.

DANK Lake County Elects 2010-11 Board By: Ursula Hoeft On October 10, members of DANK Chapter Lake County, Illinois met at Bertrand Lanes in Waukegan, Illinois for a General Membership Meeting and to elect Board members for the 2010-2011 year. With DANK Region One/Milwaukee DANK Chapter President Edwin Günther presiding, the following Board Members were unanimously elected by voice vote: President: Cobi Stein Vice-Presidents: Karl Schmidt, Werner Stein, Greg Hoeft Corresponding Secretary: Ludwina Homer Publicity Secretary: Ursula Hoeft Co-Recording Secretaries: Richard Kaeske Judy Kanka Financial Secretary and Treasurer: Walter Veile

Membership Chairperson: Judy Kanka Archivist: Karl Schmidt Auditors: Helmut Appelt, Brigitte Kaeske, Elisabeth Kueller Advisors: Anni Kordas, Victor Kordas, Bernd Kraemer, Hanni Kraemer, Stefan Kueller, Fini Schmidt To let them know that she feels the Chapter was lucky to have had such a hard-working Board, Chapter President Cobi Stein presented a box of Lucky Charms cereal, a token of her appreciation, to each of the 2009-2010 Board members. The Chapter’s luck is sure to continue since almost all its newly-elected Board members served on the previous year’s Board. The new Board “hit the ground running.” Members were already busy discussing plans for future events over coffee and cake following the meeting.

By: Beverly Pochatko

Our region is composed of Chapters Cleveland, Columbus, Pittsburgh (and sub-chapter Laurel Highlands,) Uniontown, New Castle and Erie. On Saturday, October 23rd, 2010, we traveled to Cleveland, Ohio, for our fall meeting. Attending were: Stefan Pigler and Erica Reschke of Cleveland, Bev Pochatko, Margaret Potocki, Margaret Carter and Carol Snippert of Erie; Erik Wittmann, Chris Sabatini of Pittsburgh and Chris Decker of Uniontown. We were very appreciative of Stefan Pigler, President of the Cleveland Chapter, who hosted the meeting at the Cleveland Männerchor Club. In discussing Chapter concerns, the most common problem within the chapters is getting more active members involved. We discussed ‘reaching out’ to assist other Chapters at fund-raising events such as festivals, participating much the same as we have nationally (membership and credit card) – bringing a DANK presence to the event. Erik Wittmann said he appreciated the support from the Erie, Pittsburgh and Uniontown members who volunteered at the Canonsburg Bavarian Festival. New members were signed up and many took applications and information home with them. The dates of the National Convention will be November 4-6th, 2011, in Pittsburgh. It is going to be more than just a convention – it will also be a fun event that non-delegates will enjoy as well. Since the chapters of the Region are co-hosting the event, some duties will be assigned to them, such as the program committee and the convention booklet. A theme is being worked out to make the event fun and exciting. The election of regional officers was held for 2010-2012 in accordance with the National Bylaws. President: Chris Decker - Uniontown; Treasurer: Patty Schmitt - Pittsburgh; Secretary: Margaret Carter – Erie. The Vice Presidents are: Erik Wittmann – Pittsburgh, Bev Pochatko – Erie, Stefan Pigler – Cleveland. Two Vice President seats are vacant – Columbus and New Castle. Representatives to the National Executive Board are Chris Decker and Margaret Potocki. Two alternates are to be determined. We discussed the possibility of running teleconferences (when election is not involved) to discuss business from national and about the upcoming National Convention. Everyone agreed this would be for the benefit of the Region – saving attendees the travel and time involved. When we do meet again, it was suggested that we combine the meeting prior to a social event that is happening at the host chapter level.


14

German-American Journal

December ‘10 / January ‘11


December ‘10 / January ‘11

German-American Journal

15


16

German-American Journal

102

December ‘10 / January ‘11

The Nobel Prize has been awarded to 102 German laureates.

Future of German Language in America Excerpts from original article by Katja Fullard and Werner Ott, Goethe Institut Chicago, and published by German World Magazine (Issue Fall 2010 / Education Special). Reprinted with kind permission by German-World.com, Inc. www.germanworld.com

German is the third most commonly taught language in the United States, a position it has maintained over the past sixty years. The number of students learning German at both the high school and college levels in the United States has been increasing over the last decade. Yet German accounts for only about 6 percent of U.S. foreign language enrollments today, less than a third the level of the 1960s. It has yet to recover from the precipitous drop in German enrollments since 1990, and is failing to match the growing pace of enrollments in other major languages. Moreover, programs at both the high school and college level continue to be cut even some very healthy programs. In short, while German remains an important language in America, it is under assault from many different quarters. To address these issues, a conference on “The Future of German Language in America” was held July 23-24 at Waldsee German Language Village, one of 15 different immersion language programs sponsored by Concordia Language Villages and Concordia College in Minnesota. Leaders from education, business, media and diplomacy from Germany and from across the United States gathered to discuss basic, practical measures that can be taken immediately or in the near future to increase the popularity of German study in the United States. The conference was sponsored by the Goethe-Institut Chicago together with Concordia Language Villages, the American

Association of Teachers of German (AATG) and the Germany Embassy to the United States. Participants included representatives of other educational organizations such as the German Studies Association, Women in German, die Zentralstelle für das Auslandsschulwesen, and leaders of Waldsee itself a highly successful immersion language program celebrating its 50th anniversary in the summer of 2010. Klaus Scharioth, Ambassador of the Federal Republic of Germany to the United States, discussed priority issues with the conference participants, who focused on ways that the German government, as an interested party, could enhance and support the study of German in the United States. Members of the conference unanimously agree on the following basic proposals: 1. Image The image of Germany in the United States is highly positive at present. Americans respect in particular the quality of German products and associate the Federal Republic of Germany with quality workmanship and engineering. We believe that Germany can build on this already positive image by creating a media campaign to enhance and support it. This campaign can reinforce the image of quality, but it could also bring in the idea of Sprachvergnügen, that learning German is both fun and easy. We believe that the campaign should encompass multiple messages aimed at the broader population not yet involved with German education or business, and in particular pupils in grades 4-6 at American elementary schools.  These students will be making choices about which foreign language to study in the nottoo-distant future, and hence a campaign targeted on them might be particularly effective.

Multiple messaging to different audiences also means using different media depending on the particular audience to be reached for instance brochures and paper-oriented campaigns are wasted on young people more attuned to electronic messaging and interactive communication. Far more should be done using such media to attract Americans to German. When young people are asked about why they have enrolled in successful German language programs, they respond that the programs are “cool” or “fun” as well as educational. Those who do not choose German often respond that the image of German is not “cool.” If the German government and related German language organizations seek to attract new generations of Americans to German, they should make a concerted effort to convey the accessibility of the German language and the lighter, “edgy” or simply fun aspects of German culture. Deutsch -- it’s übercool!

2. Partnerships More time and energy needs to be invested in partnerships and networking. Although we represent various organizations that have a direct, strong interest in the success of German teaching and commerce in the United States, we have not always previously been aware of each other’s activities or even existence. The United States is a very large country with a highly decentralized education system, and for that reason many teachers of German across the country are working alone or in very small groups, sometimes with relatively little contact with other groups or people. We know, however, that the most successful German programs are those with robust networks. We therefore strongly recommend the need

for more such conferences, modeled on the Waldsee conference itself, both nationally and locally. In particular we believe that it would be extremely useful for each of the German consuls general to organize or facilitate such conferences in their regions on an annual or semiannual basis. At such conferences representatives from the AATG, universities and colleges, the German-American Chamber of Commerce, the Goethe Institutes, etc, might get together to network, strategize, and promote best practices in their own individual regions. We recommend that such conferences be kept relatively small perhaps twenty-five participants at most. Key organizations participating, in addition to the ones already mentioned, are the DAAD, representatives of the German diplomatic community, ZFA, GACC/BABC/GABA, DANK, immersion schools, Samstags- and Verbandschulen, the media, and the German National Tourist Office. Other partnerships are possible through creative joint venturing. For example, German-American Chamber meetings or other events hosted by German consulates or companies could include a language component hosted in partnership with a relevant language organization. Mutual advertising and electronic information exchange are other valueadded activities. Copies of the German World Education Special Fall 2010 are available to DANK members for $ 2.50/pc. incl. shipping and handling. An annual subscription to German World Magazine is offered to DANK members for $ 15/year. For more information contact German World at (323) 876 5843 or subscriber@germanworld.com

The Strategy Paper

German as a Foreign Language in the United States

Less than a month ago, on September 29, 2010, the Cultural Division-Deputy Head of Cultural Affairs Department, Bertram von Moltke, at the Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany in Washington DC held a very important final think tank session on the strategy paper which had been in progress for the past four months. The Christa Garcia topic was Deutsch als Fremdsprache German as a foreign language. This research paper gave an overview of the teaching of the German language, or lack thereof, with specific recommendations and suggestions on how to remedy the present decline of the study of German in the USA.   A number of VIPs connected to the Teaching and Promoting of the German language, were in attendance at this think-tank -   the following organizations  have provided research for this strategy paper and some of their representatives had to personally sign the final version of this Strategiepapier: AATG (American Association of Teachers of German),   Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst, (German Academic Exchange Services), DANK German Language Schools, Center for Transatlantic Relations, John Hopkins University Director of Concordia Language Villages (Waldsee), Deutsch-Forum USA, President,

LEFT: (L-R) Renate Ludanyi, Ph.D., President, German Language School Conference,  Prof. Dan Hamilton, Director, Center for Transatlantic Relations, John Hopkins Uni/SAIS & Concordia Summer Language Camp, Eva Marquardt, Director of the Language Department, Goethe Institute, New York, Bertram von Moltke, German Embassy (Leriter des Kulturreferats), Christa Garcia, DANK German Language Schools. ////// RIGHT: Frank Mueller - Language Coordinator XZfA - East Coast, Helene Zimmer-Loew, Executive Director - AATG, Carol Anne Costabile-Heming, President, AATG, Kerstin Hopkins, President, Deutsch-Forum USA.

President of the German Language School Conference, Director of the Goethe Institute New York, the Central Agency of Schools Abroad (ZfA), Carnegie Mellon University, German American School Association of Northern California, Kansas State Department of Education, German Studies Association, German American School of Portland, German Language School of Boston, Franklin & Marshall College, Niles Township High School District 219, IL, McDaniel College, and Women in German (GACOM) This was only a small representation of the many other

participants who worked on-line throughout the summer to generate a broad spectrum of  factual information. The invitation went out early in the summer to designated scholars and practitioners in the field to comment and insert their research in this open on-line paper, called Strategiepapier. The German Embassy staff edited and oversaw this gigantic undertaking. The conference participants crystallized their findings in September and made practical recommendations.


December ‘10 / January ‘11

German-American Journal

17

Thanks to our illustrator, Michael Randall and our editor, Matthias Knobloch. Like “The Adventures of Oskar and Atticus” on Facebook to learn the German word of the day and receive fun updates on the real Oskar and Atticus! Write to them at Oskar@dank.org or Atticus@dank.org

Oskar & Atticus besuchen den Christkindlmarkt By: Amelia Cotter

Oskar & Atticus Visit the Christmas Market! By: Amelia Cotter

“Today is the worst day of my life,” Atticus said as he stood before Oskar in his winter coat and bright blue hat, looking sad. “Oh, you’re adorable, Mr. Atticus,” Oskar said and laughed. He was also wearing his winter coat as well as small balloons in different colors on his feet. “Look, I have to wear balloons so my feet don’t get cold!” Atticus laughed sarcastically. “Ahaha. That is true.” Dani came into the room and packed the guys up in their travel carriers. “We’re going to the Christmas market today and it’s going to be lots of fun!” She was very excited. “That sort of thing is way too cold for a snake like me!” Atticus whined. “Come on, we’ll eat a lot and drink a lot and maybe even buy presents! I like presents,” Oskar said and smiled happily. Atticus sighed and rolled himself into a little ball under his hat, which was a bit too big for him. “I’m going to sleep. Good night.” As soon as Atticus closed his eyes the three were at the market. It was full of children and adults, some of whom had dogs like Oskar. Dani was really excited about the Christmas market. She got herself a Glühwein and started looking at the different glass ornaments. Oskar and Atticus wanted to get some potato pancakes with apple sauce. Atticus sat on Oskar’s back and the two stood with their money in a long line, waiting to order their food. “Look, that dog with the big ears looks like a deer!” a little girl cried as she saw Oskar. “Oh, will it never end?” Oskar complained. The girl came closer and pet Oskar between the ears. “Oh, that’s nice though,” he said and wagged his tail. The girl laughed and gave Oskar a big hug. “I’m Mandy. I like you. You’re my new best friend.” “For God’s sake,” Atticus said, disgusted. “Let him go!” “Ooh, a snake,” Mandy said as she reached one finger out and pet Atticus down

his long back. “Stop it, you evil child!” But she did not stop. Atticus tried to wiggle free. The he said hesitantly, “That’s…that is actually very nice of you. Like a massage.” The boys stayed still while Mandy scratched and pet them. Then Mandy picked Atticus up and kissed him gently on the head. “We can all be best friends,” Atticus said dreamily. It was almost time for the new friends to order their food. “What would you like?” the server, a young woman, asked Mandy. “Oh. I don’t have any money,” Mandy said. She looked at the food and rubbed her tummy. “Are you sure?” the server asked. “Yeah. My mom and I just came here to look at everything. We can’t buy anything.” “Nonsense,” Atticus said. “We’ll get you something.” Oskar nodded his head. “Yeah, we’ll share as many potato pancakes as possible,” he said, giving Mandy all his money. She looked down at it. “Wow, thanks! Okay, we would like potato pancakes with apple sauce.” She gave the server the money. The server came back with a big plate full of potato pancakes and apple sauce. Then the three sat down on a bench and shared the huge meal. “Thank you!” Mandy said again. Soon Dani and Mandy’s mom arrived. “It seems like it’s been a very good day for you all,” said Dani. Mandy’s mom smiled. “Come on, little mouse, we have to go now.” Mandy hugged Oskar and Atticus tightly, then waved to them and left. Atticus looked confused. “Was that kid really a mouse?” Oskar had to think about it. “No, I believe she was a person. A very hungry person.” “Good, good. Then it was necessary for us to have helped her out.” “But of course,” Oskar agreed enthusiastically. “You’re good boys, Dani said proudly. “And now, let’s go explore the market some more!”

„Heute ist der schlimmste Tag meines Lebens“, sagte Atticus, als er traurig vor Oskar in seinem Wintermantel und hellblauer Mütze stand. „Ach, du bist niedlich, Herr Atticus“, sagte Oskar und lachte. Er trug auch seinen Wintermantel und kleine Ballons in verschiedenen Farben auf seinen Füssen. „Guck mal, ich muss Ballons tragen damit meine Füße nicht kalt werden!“ Atticus lachte sarkastisch. „Ahaha. Das stimmt.“ Dani kam ins Zimmer und packte die kleinen Jungs in ihre Reisetaschen. „Wir gehen heute zum Christkindlmarkt und das wird uns ganz viel Spaß machen!“ Sie war sehr aufgeregt. „Das ist viel zu kalt für eine Schlange wie mich!“ meckerte Atticus. „Komm, wir werden viel essen und trinken und vielleicht Geschenke kaufen! Ich mag Geschenke, “ sagte Oskar und lächelte ganz glücklich. Atticus seufzte und rollte sich zu einem kleinen Ball unter seiner Mütze zusammen, welche ihm etwas zu groß war. „Ich gehe schlafen. Gute Nacht.“ Sobald Atticus seine Augen geschlossen hatte waren die drei auf dem Markt. Dieser war voll mit Kindern und Erwachsenen, und auch mit ein paar Hunden so wie Oskar. Dani freute sich riesig auf den Weihnachtsmarkt. Sie holte sich einen Glühwein und schaute sich die verschiedenen Glasornamente an. Oskar und Atticus wollten sich Kartoffelpuffer mit Apfelmus holen. Atticus saß auf Oskars Rücken und die Beiden standen mit ihrem Kleingeld in einer langen Schlange und warteten darauf, das Essen zu bestellen. „Guck mal, der Hund mit den großen Ohren sieht aus wie ein Reh!“, schrie ein Mädchen als sie Oskar sah. „Oh, wird das nie zu Ende gehen?“ beklagte sich Oskar. Das Mädchen kam näher und streichelte Oskar zwischen den Ohren. „Oh, das ist aber schön“, sagte Oskar und wackelte mit seinem Schwanz. Das Mädchen lächelte und gab Oskar eine große Umarmung. „Ich bin Mandy. Ich mag dich. Du bist mein neuer bester Freund.” „Um Gottes willen“, sagte Atticus empört. „Lass ihn mal los!“ “Ooh, eine Schlange”, sagte Mandy

während sie mit ihrem kleinen Finger Atticus über seinen langen Rücken streichelte. „Hör auf, du böses Kind!“ Sie hörte aber nicht auf. Atticus versuchte sich frei zu wackeln. Dann sagte er zögernd, “Das ist…das ist eigentlich ganz nett von dir. Wie eine Massage.” Die Jungs waren ganz still als sie Mandy kratzte und streichelte. Dann nahm Mandy Atticus in ihre Arme und küsste ihn zärtlich auf den Kopf. „Wir können alle beste Freunde sein“, sagte Atticus ganz ruhig. Für die neuen Freunde war es nun Zeit, ihr Essen zu bestellen. „Was möchtest du?“ fragte die Kellnerin die Mandy. „Oh. Ich habe gar kein Geld”, sagte Mandy. Sie schaute das Essen an und rieb sich ihren Bauch. „Bist du sicher?“ fragte die Kellnerin. „Ja. Meine Mama und ich sind nur hier um alles anzusehen. Wir können nichts kaufen.“ „Unsinn“, sagte Atticus. “Wir kaufen dir was.” Oskar nickte mit dem Kopf. „Ja, wir teilen so viele Kartoffelpuffer wie möglich“, sagte er und gab Mandy das Kleingeld. Sie schaute es an. „Wow, danke! Okay, wir hätten gerne Kartoffelpuffer mit Apfelmus.“ Sie gab der Kellnerin das Geld. Die Kellnerin kam mit einem großen Teller voll mit Kartoffelpuffern und Apfelmus. Dann saßen die drei Freunde auf einer Bank und teilten das große Essen. „Dankeschön!” sagte Mandy nochmal. Bald kamen Dani und Mandys Mutter. „Es scheint, dass es ein schöner Tag für euch gewesen ist“, sagte Dani. Mandys Mutter lächelte. „Komm, kleine Maus, wir müssen jetzt los.” Mandy umarmte Oskar und Atticus ganz fest, dann winkte sie ihnen zu und verschwand. Atticus sah verwirrt aus. „War das Kind denn eine Maus?” Oskar musste darüber nachdenken. “Nein, ich glaube sie war ein Mensch. Ein sehr hungriger Mensch.“ „Gut, gut. Dann war es nötig, das wir ihr geholfen haben.“ „Ganz genau“, stimmte Oskar enthusiastisch Atticus zu. „Ihr seid gute Jungs“, sagte Dani stolz. „Und jetzt, lass uns den Markt zusammen weiter erforschen!“

Christmas markets are an important part of the German holiday season. They can be found in just about every German city and town, and in some American cities, too. There are all kinds of goodies to eat, like roasted almonds, chocolate covered bananas and marshmallows, and “Baumkuchen,” a layered cake with a hard shell of chocolate on the outside. Oskar and Atticus ordered another favorite, potato pancakes with apple sauce (which can also be ordered with sour cream), and shared them with their new friend Mandy. You can buy all kinds of gifts at Christmas markets, like ornaments, toys, scarves, and gloves. Christmas markets are a great place to spend a day with friends and family.


18

German-American Journal

December ‘10 / January ‘11

104,779

The German company BASF is the largest chemical company in the world, employing some 104,779 people over 80 countries.

The Dock of Dreams Luxury liners from Meyer Werft ply the world’s oceans. The family business has been building ships for over 200 years in Papenburg – a town that is not even on the coast.

By: Martin Orth | magazinedeutschland.de Although Bernard Meyer likes going on cruises, he likes being at home in Emsland even more. That is where he has his house, his family, his company. This businessman doesn’t care much for luxury. He doesn’t play golf or collect works of art, and he drives a mid-range car to work. Bernard Meyer is a marine engineer. Cruises are part of his business. For Bernard Meyer represents the sixth generation of his family running Meyer Werft, the large shipyard in Papenburg. He has turned the 200-year-old provincial family business into a global player. Meyer Werft builds cruise ships that are over twice as high as the Brandenburg Gate. These floating towns have room for up to 4,000 people – more than the populations of the popular North Sea islands of Wangerooge, Spiekeroog and Langeoog put together. The luxury liners are built in gigantic dry docks (also known as building docks), which are easily big enough for an Airbus A380 to fly through. And almost 300,000 visitors flock to visit the Emsland shipyard every year – a bigger audience than that of the worldfamous Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra. And that isn’t counting the tens of thousands of spectators who, three times a year, watch the spectacular transfer of a ship along the River Ems from Papenburg to the North Sea 40 kilometres away. The last time this happened was in mid-

March, when the Celebrity Eclipse was delivered. As always, this needed a lot of precision work on the Ems. The narrow river has to be dammed every time to enable the giant ships to be towed to sea. Bernard Meyer is always there in his jeans watching the scene, shaking people’s hands and welcoming them with the typical local greeting “Moin”. Bernard Meyer has deep roots in this region. The 62-year-old comes from Papenburg, a town with 35,000 inhabitants in the flat Emsland region. Here, in the northwestern corner of Germany, people are used to living with the tides. Ebb and flow. It seems to make them more relaxed. These folks have little time for vanities or big speeches. They are down-toearth people who stick together. Bernard Meyer steers his business like a captain, with far-sightedness and a sense of responsibility for its 2,500 employees – in both turbulent and calmer times. Of course, this also means changing course from time to time. After taking over the business from his father in 1982, it was his idea to focus on cruise ships. The Homeric was the first cruise ship to be launched from Meyer Werft in 1985. Thiry-five luxury liners will have left the shipyard by 2013. Building cruise ships is a masterly achievement of engineering and logistics. Some 15 to 18 million parts are built into every ship. Up to 2,000 partner companies are involved. At peak times, 6,500 people work on the site. Although Meyer Werft is the general

Comparing Markets DOW

contractor, its own share of each project is only about 25%. For, in contrast to the automotive or aircraft industries, virtually every ship is unique or one of a very small series of two to six vessels, which differ mainly in the way they are fitted out. The shipyard cannot do all this alone, so it’s a matter for highly specialized suppliers. For instance, because it builds luxury liners, Meyer Werft is also Germany’s largest theatre builder – albeit with unusual specifications. Unlike on land, a lift, for example, has to work even at an inclination of 20 degrees. Quite apart from the fact that the floating town also has to carry its own municipal utilities with it. The biggest laser centre in Europe is at the core of production technology in Papenburg’s shipbuilding operation. In the digital factory, the steel parts are welded together according to CAD plans – with the help of a process specially developed by Meyer Werft: hybrid laser welding. It guarantees higher speed, less distortion (thanks to a lower level of heat input), improved strength and therefore lower costs compared to conventional steel processing. Using this technology, whole sections with profiles and side walls are made out of huge steel plates. Eight sections make up a block in which all the fixtures needed for cable tracks, plumbing and air-conditioning ducts are already installed. So the ship is basically assembled in the dry dock according to the Lego principle out of about 70 of these blocks, each of which weighs up to 800 tonnes. The design principle of cruise ships always follows similar patterns: the engines below, the public areas including bars and restaurants in the middle, above these the decks with the cabins, and right at the top the leisure area with swimming pools and solariums. On the Disney Dream this part is crowned by a 245-metre whitewater slide. The cruise market is booming worldwide with annual growth rates of 5 to 10%. More and more people want to experience the Caribbean or the Mediterranean, the Baltic Sea or Alaska and enjoy the comforts and amenities of a cruise ship at the same time. Three major US shipping companies share the market: Carnival (Aida), Royal Caribbean (Celebrity) and Star Cruises. Disney only recently discovered this business but is pushing its way onto the market as a shipping company with all the

iTunes Top 10 Song Downloads United States

DAX

power of a global player. At present cruise ships are still produced exclusively in Europe – at Meyer Werft, in Italy at the state company Ficantieri, in France and Finland. Meyer serves all the major cruise lines. What is Meyer Werft’s recipe for success? First of all, the concept of the “family business”. This guarantees continuity and long-term thinking instead of the short-term pursuit of profit and frequent changes at the top. Another hallmark of the company’s success has been its early international orientation. Back in the 1950s Bernard Meyer’s father built up a close business relationship with the island nation of Indonesia. A total of 24 passenger ships from Papenburg are now in regular service there. Today, Meyer Werft exports exactly 100% of its cruise ships. And last, but not least, there is the company’s clear commitment to the “Made in Germany” label. Some 75% of every cruise ship comes from partner companies, and in this case 80% of these are German. Bernard Meyer is sitting on the fourth floor of his company headquarters, a modest building compared to the shipyard docks. The executive floor is equipped like the bridge of a cruise ship: all in white, noble hardwood floors, large windows overlooking the industrial port. Blueprints and contracts are piled on Meyer’s desk. Bernard Meyer is a marine engineer through and through. “BM”, as he is called at the yard, can often be seen in the building docks. When he is not visiting customers in Miami or on a cruise, he sits at his desk working out strategies. For example, Meyer Werft has entered into a strategic alliance with the German lamp and lighting specialist Osram. Fuel consumption on the Celebrity Eclipse, which was delivered in the spring, was reduced by 30%, partly by using energy-saving LED lighting systems and other innovations. An in-house research department is constantly working on further improvements. When the Disney Dream was undocked on October 30 and manoeuvred into the North Sea in mid-November, tens of thousands came to admire another masterpiece of the Papenburg shipbuilding industry. The Disney Dream is the largest (370 metres long, 37 metres wide, 19 floors) and the most expensive (over 600 million euros) cruise ship ever built in Germany.

Data Taken Nov. 20, 2010

Germany

9/17/10:

$10,607.85

9/17/10:

€6,209.76

1 Forget You • Glee Cast

1 Just the Way You Are • Bruno Mars

11/19/10:

$11,203.55

11/19/10:

€6,843.55

2 We R Who We R • Ke$ha

2 Barbra Streisand • Duck Sauce

$ Change:

+ $595.70

€ Change:

+ €633.79

3 Singing In the Rain / Umbrella • Glee Cast

3 We Are the People • Empire of the Sun

% Change:

+ 5.62%

% Change:

+ 10.21%

4 Firework • Katy Perry

4 Freaky Like Me • Madcon

5 The Time (Dirty Bit) • The Black Eyed Peas

5 The Time (Dirty Bit) • The Black Eyed Peas

EUR/USD

6 Only Girl (In the World) • Rihanna

6 Only Girl (In the World) • Rihanna

9/17/10:

$1.3056

7 Like a G6 • Far East Movement

7 I Need A Dollar • Aloe Blacc

11/19/10:

$1.3673

8 Just a Dream • Nelly

8 Over the Rainbow • Israel Kamakawiwo’ole

$ Change:

+ $0.0617

9 Bottoms Up • Trey Songz

9 Hold My Hand (Duet with Akon) • Michael Jackson

% Change:

+ 4.73%

10 Grenade • Bruno Mars

10 Like a G6 • Far East Movement

Source: Yahoo! Finance

Shaded Row: Song found on both lists

Source: iTunes


December ‘10 / January ‘11

German-American Journal

60,000 Holiday Shopping Guide

19

The largest department store in continental Europe is the KaDeWe (Kaufhaus des Westens) in Berlin, with over 60,000 square metres of selling space

By: Beth Casey

Don’t know what to get your favorite German-American this holiday season? Hate battling the snow and waiting in long lines? Find the perfect gift for that special someone on your holiday shopping list. From great budget finds to little stocking stuffers, DANK brings you the best presents of the season. Get a jump on your shopping with our top picks. The best part? You won’t have to stand in any lines—everything on our list is available online.

Flag Scarf Vibrant colors and

unique design make this scarf a great gift idea or a simple accessory for any sporting event. The light-weight scarf is made from machine washable, 100% high quality triple-knit polyester. $9.95, available at www.flagline.com

Mozart Kugeln A deluxe confection

exquisitely filled with pistachio marzipan made from fresh green pistachios, almonds and rich hazelnut nougat, enrobed with delicious milk and dark chocolates. Each piece is elegantly wrapped in foil with the traditional portrait of Mozart. 12 pieces per box. Imported straight from Germany for $15.75 with free shipping for orders over $50. Available at www.chocosphere.com

Oktoberfest Man Apron

This hilarious apron is 100% polyester. Imported. For an extra $3 they will also box and wrap the gift, with seven different papers to choose from and matching ribbon. $17.50, available at www.germanplaza.com

Little Snowman German Smoker

Children’s Books in German This website has many books for children of all ages and ability levels in German, at a reasonable price. Pictured is “Fliegender Stern” by Ursula Wofel, $9.94. All books available at www.alphabet-garten.com

This “Little Snowman” has his black top hat on, and a little red and yellow bird is perched on his outstretched arm. He stands only 4.75 inches tall. Made by Richard Glaesser in Seiffen, Germany. Put a mini incense cone inside and he will actually “smoke.” $24.99, available at www.christkindl-markt.com

Brandenburger Erntekönigin

Master of Science Student Becomes Harvest Queen of 2010 Season By: Sebastian Hebert

Every year, the State of Brandenburg is celebrating the end of the harvest season. In 2010 yields have gone back to lower amounts, due to the very hot and dry summer. And if this was not enough, just before grain harvesting it started raining all over Germany! But nevertheless about 35,000 people came to Jaenickendorf (45 miles south of Berlin,) on Saturday, September 11th, 2010. Enjoying 77°F, the many spectators watched a parade of new and old land machines, showcasing 60 in all. And of course the best harvest crown, made by countrywomen, was given first place by the visitors of the 7th Brandenburg harvest festival. A highlight of the harvest festivities

actually is the crowning of the harvest queen. This year a Master of Science. student of Agriculture from the HumboldtUniversitaet zu Berlin, won the competition in Brandenburg, Germany. The title requires one has comprehensive agricultural knowledge. Juliane Hinz, 24, one of four competitors, won the competition. She lives in the Loewenberger Land (North of Berlin) and is now representing Brandenburg agriculture at official expositions. One of the first events was the ceremonial handing over of a harvest crown from Lower Saxony, to the acting Federal President of Germany, by Christian Wulff, in the Franzoesische Friedrichstadtkirche in Berlin. Germany has many queens elected during various fall festivals each year. The queens proudly wear banners honouring the

names of many fall fruits and crops. During Green Week in Berlin, the world’s largest agriculture and horticulture food fair, one will find queens from different towns feasting together around a big table. In south-western Germany, besides harvest festivities, the grapes are reaching their peek of the season. Every region has its own Wine Queen, selected at various carnivals. In Neustadt an der Weinstrasse, one Wine Queen representing German, is selected and crowned after showing the experts her know-how and skills regarding wine. Just 22-years old, Mandy Grossgarten from the Ahr region, is now the 62nd Wine Queen of Germany. Wine Queens from various regions participate in the competition, which has been held since 1949 by the Deutsche Weininstitut (DWI).

Juliane Hinz - Brandenburger Erntekönigin 2010-2011


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German-American Journal

December ‘10 / January ‘11

Peru: Ancient Land of Mysteries By: Audrey L. Hess-Eberle Euro Lloyd Travel Group/Chicago

Rich in history and cultural traditions, fantastic archeological treasures set amidst the soaring Andean peaks — this can only be Peru! Occupying the central section of the west coast of South America and boarded by 1410 miles of Pacific Ocean, Peru is a land of cultural diversity – a country of mountains inland, the Amazon River and jungle to the north, fertile lands and a continuing indigenous culture. Known as the ‘City of Kings’, the current capitol of Lima, (a Unesco World Heritage Site), is known as the historic and tourist Mecca of South America – a vibrant blend of historic Spanish colonial architecture alternating with skyscrapers and fashionable suburbs. But it is also the old Colonial Peru of sweeping vistas and the scattered remains of current and ancient cultures that you have come to see, for this is the land of the Incas. A short flight inland takes you to Cuzco, archaeological capital of Peru, and the old capital and Sacred Valley of the Inca Empire. Lying in the hollow of a valley at almost 11,000 feet above sea level with mountains rising sharply on three sides, the city of Cuzco is built largely upon Inca walls and foundations – an artistic legacy of magnificent temples, palaces, churches and artifacts. Visit Pisac village and its colorful handicraft market, then include a visit to Awana Kancha, a living museum of the Peruvian Andes where you will learn the centuries-old methods of spinning, dyeing and weaving traditional textiles. Tours can include a visit to the spectacular Ollantaytambo ruins, the only Inca settlement that has been continually inhabited since its inception. But there yet remains one sight that will take your breath away. From Cuzco, you ride three hours through mountains, through the lush Urubamba Valley to the fabled Incan city, Machu Picchu, aboard the Vistadome train, or luxurious Orient-Express Hiram Bingham. Upon arrival, you are transferred by bus to ascend the snake-like road up to the spectacular Lost City of the Incas, Machu Picchu. Hidden by mountains and semi-tropical jungle, Machu Picchu is considered the most spectacular sight in South America and arguably the most spectacular setting in the world. It was unknown for centuries by the modern world, until 1911 when Hiram Bingham, an American historian, rediscovered it by pursing folk lore, rumors and legends. Known only to local people, Bingham discovered and brought it to the attention of the whole world. While still a bit mysteries, archaeologists and anthropologists think it

was a religious center for the ancients. Built by pre-Columbian masters, this sacred site is perched high upon what was an inaccessible plateau that rendered it as a natural fortress from any invading enemy. For reasons of safety and because of their religion, the Incas built most of their cities and fortresses on mountain slopes and the upper part of the Andes. For more convenience, these buildings were placed on firm terraces which linked with each other by means of steep and narrow stairways. Terraces for agriculture, water control and soil erosion lace across and down the steep slopes leading up to Machu Picchu. If time permits, we also suggest that you include visits to meet the indigenous Uros people of the floating islands on Lake Titicaca, or several nights in Paracas National Reserve, Peru’s only coastal wildlife sanctuary. Cruise the Ballestas Islands and see the fantastic wildlife, or view by air, the geometric and animal figures of the mysterious

Nazca Lines etched into the parched soil – some up 1,000 feet long!. As a mystical dwelling place for the Inca people, we still feel today their spirit and the wonder of their accomplishments. The mysteries of Peru still live on. What will they whisper into your ears? 6 day tours starting at $1815 plus air 8 day tours starting at $2010 plus air 12 day tours starting at $2449 plus air Call Today for more information, varied itineraries and lengths of stay, independent, hosted or escorted travel to South America and the World. Identify yourselves as a D.A.N.K. member. Ask for Audrey or Tiffany. Phone: 312-362-0218 /// Toll Free: 800-572-3149 /// Email: chi@eurolloyd.com

Book Review: Kanada: Erlebnisse eines (Aus-) Wanderers Book By: Thomas Mueller Review By: Sarah Nadler Kanada is 182 pages with over 100 full-color photographs and is written by the German emigrant Thomas Mueller, who moved to Canada with his family in the early 1980s. The book deals with his impressions of the land and people, which are mainly nature-based, including his journey from eastern to western Canada, his farm, hunting, fishing, and his favorite activity, hiking.

In general, the book describes how he perceives Canada—the environment, the people, the wilderness, and the silence. The story is supplemented with the many personal illustrations, including photographs of his farm, family and the great outdoors. Though the writing style tends to be oldfashioned and unstructured, the pictures compensate for that. It will be an interesting read for Germans who live or have lived in Canada, because it may bare resemblance to their own experiences. For those who do not have that strong connection it may be

difficult to follow the sometimes verbose style of writing. With his book, Mueller wants to address all emigrants living in Canada and the US, but that does not mean it will not be interesting for readers all around the globe. Mueller’s struggle with Crohn’s disease and tremendous will to survive, his belief

in patience, and his reflections on Canada are not only frequently echoed in his work, but they reveal the writer’s attitude towards life and his focus on the future. Kanada: Erlebnisse eines (Aus-) Wanderers can be ordered on Amazon. com or Amazon.de and has its own website, www.kanada-erlebnisse.de

EURO LLOYD TRAVEL Announcing AIR FARE SPECIALS for members of DANK If you have not traveled to Germany lately, or just thought you might skip the trip to Europe this year, you can not afford to pass up the low discounted travel airfares being offered by all airlines. Please identify yourselves as DANK members when calling our office.

Current Winter airfares (special early-bird-sales can occur at any time) for travel to and from Germany, including taxes and fuel surcharges, start from: Chicago Indianapolis Milwaukee Madison Cleveland Detroit

$788 $830 $830 $830 $788 $830

Audrey L. Hess-Eberle or Tiffany Nedwed EURO LLOYD TRAVEL GROUP Partner of Lufthansa City Center The Monadnock Building 53 W. Jackson Blvd. - Suite 863 Chicago, Illinois 60604

*Call for special airfares to other European cities and beyond. *Low discounted Domestic and international airfares. *European Rail passes and single tickets. *Car rentals with special low dollar rates in most European countries. *Cruises world-wide. *Worldwide tours – independent, hosted and fully escorted.

Call now for information: 1-800-572-3149 or 1-312-362-0218 email: chi@eurolloyd.com Visit us at: www.eurolloyd.com

Rates are subject to availability for your date of travel, with various airline non stop or connection options. Friday, Saturday, Sunday Weekend surcharges apply for each direction.


December ‘10 / January ‘11

German-American Journal

21

New Ulm Confirms Its German Heritage By: George L. Glotzbach

By a vote of 62% to 38% the people of New Ulm, MN confirmed their German heritage and culture. New Ulm is the most German city in Amerika, according to the 2000 U.S. Census, with 67% of the 14,000 population claiming Germanic ancestry. For many years large wooden signs at the highway entrances to the city have featured New Ulm’s signature, Hermann the Cheruscan, whose magnificent statue towers above the town from a bluff to the west.   Over time these signs began to deteriorate to the point they needed replacement.  The City Council appointed a committee to design four new permanent signs, and appropriated $57,400 for their construction. The committee reported their plan for design and wording on the signs to the City Council September 21.  There was advance notice the signs were to say “Welcome to New Ulm, Established 1854”.  Two representatives of old New

Ulm families, Dr. Ann Vogel and Mr. George Glotzbach, appeared before the Council to urge that the wording be changed to “Willkommen New Ulm, Established 1854”. The objective being to announce the city’s German heritage to newcomers, and affirm it to locals as well.  And, because New Ulm is a tourist-oriented town, it would be good for business.  The Council returned the matter to the committee which decided to put the question to a vote. The public was invited to vote online via New Ulm’s daily newspaper, The Journal, or via paper ballot at City Hall.  Voting ended Oktober 13 with a landslide victory for “Willkommen”, 883 votes to 555 for “Welcome”, a plurality of 328.   City Councilor Les Schultz has announced “We had decided that whatever the vote was, whether it was 51 to 49 percent, that’s what we would do”.   Pro-Willkommen supporters had mounted a vigorous campaign.   “This great victory is well worth the effort”, says Glotzbach, “because these new signs are planned to last 100 years!”

Recipe: Glühwein By: Beth Casey Glühwein is a classic German holiday beverage that will keep you toasty in the coldest of months! This warm mulled red wine is mainly popular at the Weihnachtsmarkt (Christmas market). These holiday markets open in late November and sell an array of ornaments, advent calendars, gifts, delicious food and other Christmas items. Making Glühwein is quite simple and the perfect beverage to serve at holiday parties. Ingredients:

Mulling spices:

1 bottle of red table wine 1 orange ¾ cup sugar ¾ cup water

¼ tsp cardamom seeds ¼ tsp cloves ½ tsp allspice, whole 1 ½ cracked whole nutmeg 5 anise stars 1 stick cinnamon

1. Pour red wine and water into a covered saucepan on a low heat. 2. Cut orange in half and squeeze the juice into the saucepan, after juicing, drop the peel into the saucepan as well. 3. Mix mulling spices in a bowl. Make a cheesecloth sachet and drop the sachet into the wine. Heat on low for 20 minutes. Make sure not to boil, this will evaporate the alcohol in the wine. 4. Remove mulling spice sachet and orange peel from sauce pan. Stir in sugar. 5. Serve in decorative glasses with a side of gingersnaps.

Watch a short video of Beth making her Glühwein recipe at www.youtube.com/ danknational


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German-American Journal

December ‘10 / January ‘11

*** Calendar Of Events ***

This area is designated for DANK chapters and Associate Members to inform their members and the public of events they are having. We rely on the submissions of each chapter or organization, therefor all events may not be included. Please contact our National Office at 773-275-1100 or visit www.DANK.org for the most recent listing of events or for information on how to make sure your event is listed in the next issue. (Associate Member Events Listed In Italics)

DECEMBER 2010

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Chicago: Sportsklub DANK, 7:30pm. No cover, cash bar. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

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Benton Harbor, MI: Fish Fry, 6-8pm. Doors open 5:30pm, band plays 7-10pm. $8.00 all you can eat. 2561 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI 49022. Call 269-926-6652 for info

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Chicago: Kulturkueche, 7:30pm. Cooking demo and tasting, limited to 22 attendees and cost is $12. RSVP required. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

Chicago: Lost German Chicago Exhibition Celebration, 11am. Free. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

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Chicago: Kino, Kaffee, und Kuchen, 1pm. $4 for members, $6 for non-members. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

3

Pittsburgh: Annual Weihnachtsfeier/Advent Party, German Buffet Dinner 5-7pm, Christmas Party in the Ballroom 7:15-10pm. Teutonia Männerchor-Phineas St. Visit www. germaninpittsburgh.org for more information.

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Chicago South & Suburbs, IL: Advents Kaffee/Christmas Party. 25249 Center Road, Frankfort, IL. Contact Nancy at 708-448-8731 for more information

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Pittsburgh: Christmas Caroling at Nursing Home and visit to German-speaking residents, 1-3pm. Members who wish to participate, please meet in the Galleria Mall on Washington Rd in Mt. Lebanon at the indoor courtyard in front of Panera Bread. All are welcome. Visit www.germaninpittsburgh.org for more information

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Chicago: Lost German Chicago Exhibition Celebration, 11am. Free. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

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JANUARY 2011 2

Fox Valley, IL: Open Membership Meeting, 3pm. St. Charles VFW, 119 N. 3rd St., St. Charles, IL. Call 630-377-9845 for more information

8

Chicago: Pilates Klasse, 9:15am. $10 per class, bring mat. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

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Chicago: Treffpunkt DANK, 7:30pm. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

15

Chicago: Kino, Kaffee, und Kuchen, 2pm. $4 for members, $6 for non-members. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

15

Chicago: Pilates Klasse, 9:15am. $10 per class, bring mat. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

Chicago: Kino, Kaffee, und Kuchen, 1pm. $4 members, $6 non-members. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

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Benton Harbor, MI: DANK Christmas Program, 3pm. 2561 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI 49022. Call 269-9266652 for more information. Members only

Chicago: Kinderschule Christmas, 2:30pm. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-5619181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

Chicago: Adult German Class Spring Registration, 6pm. Beginner to advanced. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

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Pascack Valley, NJ: Annual Christmas Party. For more information, please call 201-391-2185. Members only

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Springfield, IL: Adult Christmas Party, 1pm. Springfield Motor Boat Club. For more information, contact Jeff Engel at 744-8148 or jeffchuck1@aol.com

Chicago: Stammtisch, 7:30pm. No cover, food and drink available. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

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Chicago: Kino, Kaffee, und Kuchen, 2pm. $4 for members, $6 for non-members. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

Chicago: Advents-und Weihnachtsfeier, 3pm. Bach & Beyond. $10 for members, $20 for non-members. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

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Erie, PA: Annual Christmas Celebration, 12:30pm. The Erie Männerchor Club, 1617 State St. Call 835-1939 for more information. Reservations required

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Chicago: Stammtisch, 7:30pm. No cover, food and drink available. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

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5

Fox Valley, IL: Open Membership Meeting, 3pm. St. Charles VFW, 119 N. 3rd St., St. Charles, IL. Call 630-3779845 for more information

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Chicago: Lost German Chicago Exhibition Celebration, 11am. Free. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

Chicago: Pilates Klasse, 9:15am. $10 per class, bring mat. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

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Lake County, IL: Luncheon and Weihnachtsfeier at Gordon Community Center. Contact Ludwina Homer, 847-249-0073 or Cobi Stein, 847-234-3920 for more information.

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South Bend, IN: Christmas Party, 2pm. Potluck. St Paul Church, 51490 Laurel & Auten Rd,, South Bend, IN. For more information, call Christine at 574-272-8163 or Trudy at 574-271-6922

Chicago: Kino, Kaffee, und Kuchen, 1pm. $4 for members, $6 for non-members. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www. dankhaus.com

Chicago: Adult German Classes begin, 6:30pm. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com Chicago: Treffpunkt DANK, 7:30pm. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

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Pittsburgh: Christmas Caroling at Nursing Home and visit to German-speaking residents, 1-4pm. Visit www.germaninpittsburgh.org or call 412-563-2352 for more information

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Chicago: Treffpunkt DANK, 7:30pm. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

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Chicago: Silvesterball, 7pm. Formal New Year Music Source. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

Chicago: German Cinema Now, 7:30pm. Free admission and popcorn, refreshments available. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

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Benton Harbor, MI: Christmas Party Potluck, 6pm. 2561 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI 49022. Call 269-9266652 for more information. Members only

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Chicago: New Years Eve Party/Polkamadness with the Polkaholics, 8pm. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

Chicago: Kino, Kaffee, und Kuchen, 2pm. $4 for members, $6 for non-members. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

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Chicago: Pilates Klasse, 9:15am. $10 per class, bring mat. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

Welcome New Members National Members

Crowell, Linda Dziabacinski, Rosemarie *Isaak, Beth J. *Isaak, MD, Frederick S. Odinson Crowell, Dr. Fritz Casper Walter, Lyndi *Joined at Guttenberg, Iowa Oktoberfest

Chicago-South , IL Berens, John Carl Berens, Patricia Burfeind III, William F. Erdmann, Helmuth R.

Chicago, IL

Baggarley, Linda M. Beutel, William A. Bourgeos, Fran Bourgeos, Lucas Cummins, Aaron J. Davidson, Bruce Davidson, Laurie Depenthal, Florian Dixler, Kevon L. Egli, Regula E. Flaig, Nikki Flanigan, Laura M.

Fritsch, Amy L. Fritsch, Benjamin J. Fritsch, Elisabeth L. Fritsch, Jody Guynn, Allyson Hoffman, Rhona A. Hunter, Brendon J. Kabelitz, Andreas Kabelitz, Owen Kabelitz, Rachel Kabelitz, Robert Kitchen, Charles B. Kitchen, Donna Langer, Mary Lubinus, Heinrich E. Lubinus, Johann H. Lubinus, Samuel Maltby, David S. Marien, Mina L. Massel, Maria McLaughlin, John B. Mitsuuchi, Michell M. Mitsuuchi, Patrick Morrissey, Lauren P. Morrissey, Nathan Murphy, Jacqueline E. Noreuil, Augustus Noreuil, Lynne Noreuil, Theodore O’Kane, Nevyn

August 19 - October 18, 2010

Olthorse, Jeffrey Owen, Mary Jeanette Owen, Mary Lucille Owen, Penelope Rueda, Maria E. Sachs, Julie Semar, Beata Semar, Landon Semar, Leyla Semar, Markus Shepard, Jacob Shipley, Mark Snider, Charles Sobrepena, Sally G. Steiner, Ava Steiner, Camille Steiner, Heiko A. Steiner, Max Treptow, Rebecca K. & Family Velinski, Victoria

Lake County, IL Tyler, Marina

Fox Valley, IL

*Albrecht, William E. *Anderson, Carol *Anderson, Larry H. *Becker, Brian E. *Becker, Lisa

*Birch, Melissa *Brauner, Larry S. *Dettloff, Gerald *Dettloff, Judith *Frantz, Ernie E. *Gross, Patricia E. *Gross, Richy Hall, Brooke Hall, Matthew Hall, Monika *Hein, John M. *Hess, Richard H. *Martens, Douglas B. *Pheanis, Mark *Reisner, Harold *Reisner, Marlene *Roesch, John M. Willis, Lauren Isabel *Joined at Fox Valley Oktoberfest

Benton Harbor, MI Enix, Timothy Lee Gnodtke, Harry H.

Milwaukee, WI Reichert, Julie A

Chicago Northern Suburbs, IL Richter, Casey Richter, Ethan Richter, Jeremy Richter, Valerie Titze, Annika Titze, Heinz O. Titze, Karsten Titze, Kirsten Titze, Lars

Uniontown, PA

Kohrman, Patricia L. Kohrman, Richard J. Wadler, Andrew J.

Pittsburgh, PA Stickel, Colletta Stickel, Glenn Wilkosz, Ruby S.

Erie, PA

*Becker, John *Becker, Mildred *Wertz, Russell Carl *Joined at German Heritage Festival of Erie


German-American Journal German-American Journal

December ‘10 / January ‘11

Sudoku Challenge Sudoku 9x9 - Puzzle 5 of 5 - Hard Difficulty Level: HARD

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$1

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Merchandise For Sale

DANK Polo Shirt with Blue Trim

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Moon Landing Coin

50th Anniversary Pin

Silver - Sold Out

$7.50

Bronze - $19

Bicentennial Poster

Bumper Sticker

$12.70

$2.00

DANK Flag Pin

$7.50

Cookbook

$17.00

All Prices Include Shipping And Tax!

DANK Is On YouTube

Call Our Office To Purchase Toll Free: 866-926-1109 Bulk Discounts Available With Purchases Of More Than 5 And Sent To The Same Address

German-American Journal

www.YouTube.com/DANKNational

Sudoku 9x9 - Solution 5 of 5 - Hard

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Check Us Out Online Head on over to our National Website to get the latest updates and information on DANK and the Germanic-American community.

www.dank.org

dank.org/forum

dank.org/blog


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German-American Journal

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December ‘10 / January ‘11

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German-American Journal | December '10/January '11  

Volume 58, Issue 6

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