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Volume 58, Number 5

October / November 2010

Tall Ships Sail to Chicago’s Navy Pier By: William Fuchs

October 6 is German-American Day. Just as IrishAmericans celebrate St. Patrick’s Day and invite everybody to participate in the celebration, on German-American Day Americans of German descent invite everyone to celebrate with them. In the late 19th and early 20th century, communities with a sizable German-speaking element would celebrate in grand style the day of the German-Americans. In Indiana, it was a real Community-Fest with Indiana governors and Vice President Fairbanks (1899) as speakers. In Evansville, the grand German Day celebration in 1911 lasted for one week (September 24-30). After the United States entered WW I against Germany in 1917, anti-German hysteria swept through the country. Many states passed legislation banning German in schools, religious services, newspapers and associations. Even in regions predominantly settled by German-speaking immigrants, cultural tolerance turned to Germanophobia, followed by abrupt abandonment of German-language programs in schools and colleges, churches, and associations. Individual German settlers are documented already in Jamestown, Virginia (1608), the “birthplace” of America. However, it was on October 6, 1683, when a group of Mennonites from Krefeld disembarked from the “Concord” (the German Mayflower) in Philadelphia, constituting the first group immigration of Germans to America. Over 7 million would follow them over the next 300 years making German-Americans the largest ethnic group in the United States. In the 1990 Census 1 out of 4 Americans reported German ancestry. In 1983, for the German-American Tricentennial of this first group immigration, President Reagan proclaimed October 6 as “German-American Day,” honoring the contributions of German immigrants to the life and culture

of the United States. The tricentennial of the arrival of the first German immigrants was celebrated on that day in Washington and around the Nation. In 1986, in an effort to reinstate this old tradition, a national campaign and petition drive was begun by German-Americans and others who thought it appropriate that the nation recognize and celebrate its GermanAmerican heritage every year. Subsequently, resolutions were introduced in the House by Reps. Thomas Luken of Cincinnati and Lee Hamilton of Indiana, and in the Senate by Senators Richard Lugar of Indiana and Don Riegle of Michigan. The resolutions received great support from around the nation in a concerted effort of national, regional, and local German-American organizations and countless individuals. DANK was instrumental in promoting this campaign. There are celebrations on or around German-American Day in Washington, D.C. particularly also at the GermanAmerican Friendship Garden--followed by receptions and other events such as a German-American Day Festival. More recently an ecumenical church there are celebrations in clubs and organizations around the Nation. German-American Day is a time of celebration, of raising awareness, strengthening a sense of identity and pride in the contributions of German-speaking immigrants and their descendants to the building of this nation.  The designation “German” is used  in a cultural, not in a political sense, thus including the German-speaking Swiss, Alsatians, Austrians, Germans from Eastern Europe, and German Jews.

On August 24th, DANK President Fuchs and wife Darlene had the pleasure to attend the opening ceremony of the Pepsi Tall Ships Chicago on beautiful Navy Pier, downtown Chicago. The weather could not have been better.  Sunny, warm and a nice breeze to fill the sails.  The ships visited Chicago until Sunday, August 29.    Over 20 Tall Ship sailing vessels opened up the event with a ceremonious sail by the east end of Navy Pier, many with firing gun salutes.  At 5 PM the event was officially opened by a ceremony that was MC’d by Mark Suppelsa of WGN Chicago.  This year’s gathering was definitely an international event that included vessels from Canada, the Netherlands, Poland and Germany.  German Consul General Onno Hückmann was the official representative of Germany at the event. Of course of special interest to us was the arrival of the “Roald Amundsen” the German Brig that calls Eckernförde, on the Baltic near Kiel, her home port.  She is a converted Tall Ship that actually started out as a deep sea fishing vessel serving the East German Army as a logger in 1952.  She was converted to a Sail Training vessel in 1992 by the German nonprofit organization, “LebenLernen auf Segelschiffen” also know as LLaS eV. Mr. Fuchs and his wife were fortunate to be able to tour the ship once it docked and talk to several of the German volunteer sailors.  They described it as a feeling that could only be topped by actually going to sea in the ship. President Fuchs was curious about such a Nordic name that the vessel carries and asked Claudia Bankert, one of the International Ships Liaisons accompanying the ship.  She explained that it is a German custom to name these sailing vessels after sea explorers.  The Roald Amundsen is named after the Norwegian Polar Explorer by the same name.  There were three ships re-fitted in the Fritjof-Nansen-

See TALL SHIPS on PAGE 3

For More Information On German-American Day, Visit

Oct6.dank.org

TidBits

Associate Members

Education

Business & Tech

Auf Deutsch

Insider

Oskar & Atticus

Lifestyle

Pages 3-5 Page 6

Page 7

Pages 8-11

Page 12 Page 13

Page 14

Pages 15-17


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German-American Journal

October / November 2010

Check Us Out Online! WWW.DANK.ORG DANK Discussion Forum Official DANK Blog

Liebe Mitglieder und Freunde! Dear Members and Friends, Oktoberfest Season is upon us. In the next few months many of us in the German-American Community will be busy celebrating our Germanic Heritage with parades, festivals, music and liquid refreshments derived from hops or grapes. DANK actually started the season a little early by having a DANK Public relations booth at Milwaukee’s German Fest during the 4th weekend in July. We marketed our DANK Affinity Credit Cards and DANK Membership along with selling DANK T-Shirts and products to increase awareness of the organization and to raise funds. The weekend started out with “Donner und Blitzen” (thunder and lightning) and the down-pour of the decade that broke Milwaukee records and created much flooding. By 7 PM on Thursday night much of the festival grounds were flooded and the fest had to be closed early. Our tent was standing in a foot of water, but fortunately due to the valiant efforts of our crew, Darlene and Stephen Fuchs, who were manning the tent at the time, all our merchandise and supplies were safely rescued to higher levels and kept dry. I was able to rescue them via my truck’s tailgate. By the next morning the festival grounds crew actually had the place looking somewhat respectable and the weather kept improving every day. By Sunday we had a picture perfect day. All in all the festival was a great success to our organization which once again greeted many DANK members and friends on the festival midway and in the Cultural Tent, which sported a DANK Milwaukee chapter cultural exhibit. By the time you read this Journal, my wife and I, along with many DANK members and friends, will have participated in several other festivals, including the Von Steuben Parade in Chicago as part of the Chicago German Day celebration during the second weekend in September. On September 25 we will be representing DANK in the New York Steuben Parade on 5th Avenue, which will be followed by the Oktoberfest in Central Park. DANK members Hans & Kathy Wolf along with National Vice-President Erich Wittmann will accommodate us during this great event. Right after that we will be off to Oktoberfest in Germany. We will be coming back to the US just in time for German Unity Day, October 3 and German-American day celebrations on October 6. What a busy time but it will give our Trachten outfits a good workout. I am looking forward to seeing many of you at these events. To close out the busy fall season there are many more events that our chapters and associate organizations are celebrating that lead us right into the Thanksgiving and Christmas Seasons. I would like to entice you to read the article on the St. Nikolaus Project that describes DANK’s latest effort. I believe that we have something really good in this project and hope that it will be a smashing success. As for now, I would like to encourage you to give a DANK membership to a friend or relative. I do this myself for birthday and holiday presents. It’s the gift that keeps on giving all year. Just send us a note with the application that you are giving the membership as a gift (of course have the application filled out in the name and address of the gift recipient). This is a wonderful way to continue our “Just Add One” membership campaign. I would also like to make you aware that your can take out a personal holiday greeting in the next issue of the Journal to send to your friends and relatives at DANK. Look for the info on how to do this in this issue and for more information please call our National Office at 888-USA-DANK (872-3265) toll-free. All the best Festival and Holiday Wishes, Mit freundlichen Grüßen,

William Fuchs National President

DIE BRUECKE ZUR ALTEN HEIMAT “Building Bridges to Germany”

Newspaper Archives And More...

Visit www.DANK.org

DANK seeks to bring together Americans of German descent in the pursuit of cultivating and presenting their heritage and interests on local, regional and national levels. These were the primary reasons that the German American National Congress was founded in 1959, and they are still among the organization’s primary objectives today.

DANK National Executive Board President William Fuchs 1. Vice President Erich Wittmann

2. Vice President Donna Lippert

Treasurer Maria Thompson

Secretary Beverly Pochatko

Editorial Staff

Struggle for Survival If you started your day with the German-American Journal and a cup of coffee you’re not exactly alone, but are part of a slowly shrinking universe. Many respected papers are in trouble, including nonprofit organizations that operate on shoestring budgets. The Journal has a strong commitment to serving the German communities, yet it continues to struggle financially. The Internet boom – coupled with the economic bust and a rise in paper and postal rates – is threatening to make many ethnic papers a thing of the past. The younger generation in particular is logging on to computers instead. Newspapers have attempted to attract younger readers. A recent analysis of newspaper readership by Pew Research found that just 27% of Generation Y – those born in 1977 or later – read a newspaper regularly. That compares with 55% of those in the Silent or Greatest Generations, born prior to 1946. Severe, industry-wide financial pressure, stemming from declining advertising dollars, further threatens print media. Less advertising income means lower budgets and smaller papers, leading to reduced content and a loss of quality. It has become more and more difficult to publish the German-American Journal and make it profitable, To make matters worse, the current recession is threatening the publications that German communities rely upon to stay informed on German-American events in the United States and Germany. Although the ethnic press once seemed immune to the forces hurting mainstream newspapers across the country, a growing number of publications that serve German-American and minority communities, are laying off staff, reducing print editions or shutting down altogether. The trend is unmistakable: Fewer Americans are reading print newspapers as more turn to the internet for their news. With the percentage of people who read newspapers online growing rapidly, the decline in monetary donations may mean that the online version of the Journal could be the only version in the future. Simply put: We need $3,000 in order to publish and mail each edition of the Journal. While it’s true that $3,000 is a lot of money, we know there are a number of you Journal supporters. DANK’s editorial staff is asking each of you who values nonprofit media and intelligent cultural analysis to contribute what you can to ensure that the German-American Journal thrives. And while we can’t say what form the Journal will take in the future (our direction will depend, in part, on your feedback,) we can say that many volunteers have donated their time and talents to find an innovative publishing model that allows DANK to maintain the spirit and integrity of the Journal while also reflecting the changing world around us. As a nonprofit, reader-funded media, DANK’s fate really is and always will be in your hands. We need your help!

Darlene Fuchs Editor-in-Chief

Editor-in-Chief Darlene Fuchs darlene@dank.org Correspondents Corinna Bienger Amelia Cotter Stephen Fuchs Christa Garcia Audrey L. Hess-Eberle Matthias Knobloch Editorial Staff Margita Mandel Amanda Pedersen Beth L. Casey Chapter News Editor Beverly Pochatko erieoma@verizon.net Membership Erik Wittmann erik25@comcast.net Layout & Design Stephen Fuchs Stephen@FoxTaleEdit.com Advertising & Classifieds Amelia Cotter amelia@dank.org

Office Staff DANK National Executive Office

4740 N. Western Ave Chicago, Il 60625-2013 Call (773) 275-1100 Toll Free (866) 926-1109 Fax (773) 275-4010 Office Hours:

9 AM to 5 PM / Monday-Friday Executive Secretary Eva Timmerhaus Office@dank.org

Office Manager Amelia Cotter Amelia@dank.org

General Information German-American Journal - ISSN 1086-8070 - is published bi-monthly and is the official publication of the German American National Congress. Periodicals postage paid at Chicago, Illinois and additional mailing offices.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: German-American Journal 4740 N. Western Ave Chicago, Il 60625-2013

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Listen to LIVE radio from Germany on our website! Find ‘Radio Heimatmelodie’ along with a list of other live German radio stations that you can listen to for FREE.

Der Deutsch-Amerikaner

Submission Deadline For The December ‘10 / January ‘11 Issue:

October 25, 2010

DANK does not warrant or assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information published herein. DANK reserves the right to change or amend submissions for any reason without prior notice. ©2010 DANK. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the prior written permission of the publisher.


October / November 2010

German-American Journal

1916

3

Germany became one of the first countries in the world to adopt Daylight Saving Time (DST), in the year 1916.

Tall Ships CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Wharf at Wolgast, in the MecklenburgVorpommern region of Germany, and all three are named after explorers of the Polar Regions who roamed the seas in the early 1900’s: Fridjof Nansen, Roald Amundsen and Umberto Nobile. Ms. Bankert also pointed out that one can actually join the crew and sail on the Roald Amundsen on select voyages throughout the year. Voyages from 4 days and longer are still available at discounted prices in September as the ship begins its journey back to Europe via the Azores.  More information on voyages can be had at: http://www.sailtraining.de/fileadmin/files/ toernplan-vUS.pdf Also also attending this great flotilla was the Bounty, the real ship used in the filming of the original movie and subsequently in Pirates of the Caribbean and many other films. Many Receptions and fun filled events for the public were held on Navy Pier during the long weekend and folks could visit each ship after purchasing a pass. On Thursday, August 26, the German-American Chamber of Commerce in Chicago along with the German Consulate and the Goethe Institut Chicago hosted a reception on the Roald Amundsen with its crew, which was also attended by President Fuchs.

Captain Bauer with DANK President Fuchs and Stamm Crew Member

Send Holiday Greetings Place an ad in the German-American Journal holiday addition to wish your club members, friends, family, and loved ones a Merry Christmas. We make it easy for you to send special holiday greetings to your members, friends, customers, and colleagues this festive season. Select from the collection displayed below and tell us which design you want along with your personal greeting. Ad examples below are actual size.

Small Ad - $25.00 donation (2-1/4” wide x 3-7/8” high) Large Ad - $40.00 donation (5” wide x 3-3/8” high)

The holiday paper will be sent out by November 20th, just in time to convey your holiday wishes. The reason for this holiday season is to spread goodwill to everyone. Show support for the German-American Journal and make someone’s Christmas special by placing your holiday ad today. If you would like to design your own holiday greeting, please send it to us in the correct size as a pdf file attachment to Amelia@dank.org. Send ad info along with your check to: DANK National Executive Office 4740N Western Ave. Suite 206 Chicago, IL 60625-2013 Call Amelia at 773-275-1100 or Toll free 866-926-1109 for more info

Fröhliche Weihnachten und ein glückliches Neues Jahr

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To Jane Jones John Smith & Family

2

1 From John Smith and the members of DANK USA To Mr. and Mrs. Jane Jones

John Smith and family would like to wish the Jones family a Blessed Christmas and a Happy New Year

We wish to extend best wishes for a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

Merry Christmas and a Blessed New Year

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To Jane Jones John Smith, DANK Chapter USA


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German-American Journal

October / November 2010

Where Have All The Workers Gone?

Germany must look to English-speaking countries for a coherent immigration policy Source: The Atlantic Times - Seligmann Column

Germany has gained much (starting with a functioning democracy) from emulating the United States. Now we are just beginning to understand how to fine-tune immigration policy in the national interest. The reality of migration to Germany and the rules governing it do not meet the needs of the Federal Republic, Europe’s biggest national economy and, with almost 82 million people, the most populous state in the EU. History and scant experience with migration are the reasons. Responding to the barbarity of the Nazi regime, the Federal Republic’s founding fathers opted for a constitution (the Basic Law) that put special emphasis on the rights of those who suffered for following their conscience. “The politically persecuted enjoy the right of asylum,” Article 18 states. In 1949, when Germany was still more or less a pile of rubble, that was a noble position. A decade later, amid the “economic miracle,” West Germany was flourishing – and needed more workers than the country itself could supply. Launched in the late 1950s, the first big recruitment push, with companies and government agencies advertising in other European countries, was a success in numerical terms at least. Some 14 million mostly male workers came to earn money in Germany. They helped build the country’s prosperity. Few of these southern European men had solid professional qualifications. They made their living in Germany mostly as laborers. German wages were generally at least twice as high as those in their home countries. These “first phase” workers saved as much of their pay as possible. The money would enable them to later build up a livelihood back home. In the early 1970s I met some of these “guest workers,” as they were called here. They lived six, eight or 10 in a room. I then understood the slogan, “we called for labor – we got human beings.” When economic growth stalled in the wake of the 1974 energy crisis, Germany ended its foreign labor recruitment and many companies no longer extended these workers’ contracts. Some of them returned to their home countries. The others, however, had become accustomed to the better working conditions and wages in Germany. They left their cheap lodgings, rented apartments, brought their families over or founded new ones. Others opened businesses, especially restaurants, shops and skilled trades. When the economy returned to growth a few years later, prospective workers again sought positions in Germany, whose attractiveness as a place to live was unmitigated. Living standards are high in global comparison, the rule of law applies and the social welfare net is quite generous. For years the conservative camp in Germany refused

to acknowledge that these circumstances powerfully attract poorer yet active people from all over the world. In their eyes, Germany was not a country of immigration. Their blinkered ideology ignored that Germany was a magnet for many work-hungry migrants. Many therefore tried to circumvent the recruitment freeze. One promising avenue seemed to be the constitution’s guarantee of asylum. Migrants claimed to be politically persecuted in their home countries – which in most cases was not true. From the early 1980s, more than half a million people annually applied for asylum in Germany. Decisions on the applications often took longer than a year. During this time the applicants were banned from pursuing paid employment. More than 95 percent of the requests were refused. After an unproductive waiting period, the applicants had to leave the country – and Germany was left without the qualified workers it needed. Nobody benefited. In the 1990s the center-right government restricted the right to asylum. After 1998, the SPD-Green administration under Chancellor Gerhard Schröder finally pushed through a more sensible immigration policy. The chancellor tried to attract foreign professionals by introducing a “green card” that provided a temporary work visa for Germany. Yet not even this measure was effective. Ambitious IT specialists from Asia and Africa prefer English-speaking countries. Generous salaries beckon in the US. Also, the German visa’s restricted time span offered no real future prospects. In sum, the German green card was a failure. Meanwhile even conservative politicians have accepted that Germany needs immigration. The population is aging and qualified workers are leaving the country at a rising pace. To function, Germany needs skilled, educated people. Immigration has revived. The country’s 2005 Residence Act looks to countries like the US, Canada and Australia, which enjoy strong immigration. They set quotas for immigrants according to the countries’ needs. Workers with professional qualifications and young people have a good chance of being accepted as legal residents. Germany, too, wants to attract high-tech specialists, researchers and technicians – so much for the good intentions. The reality looks different. In 2008 some 682,000 people moved to Germany. Of these, fewer than 40,000 were specialists, university graduates or managers. Not even one in five were skilled workers. In the US – but also in Sweden, Norway and Switzerland, the percentage of highlyqualified immigrants is twice as high. Germany will have to draw its conclusions. The time for a rational immigration policy drawing on the experiences of longtime immigration countries has arrived. It is in Germany’s interest and in that of people who want to find a future in the country instead of winding up as welfare recipients.

Tag der Deutschen Einheit

The German Day of Unity, on October 3rd, has been declared German National Holiday in 1990, because on this day the unification of East and West Germany took place. Every year there is an official celebration on this day, in the capital of the federal state (Bundesland) which presides over the Federal Council of Germany. Traditionally, the day is celebrated - next to the celebrations in Berlin of course - with an official citizen’s fest (Bürgerfest), where all Bundesländer and the German Government introduce themselves in a so-called „Ländermeile“. Last year on October 3rd, I went to Saarbrücken, the town that held the official Bürgerfest in 2009. I went there because I attended a reunion with friends I met in 1982, when we participated in an international program, sponsored and organized by Walt Disney World in Florida. It had been the dream of Walt Disney himself to “make the world a little smaller,” by inviting students from different countries to live together, work together, learn together and of course play together for one year. The experience had shown us that, although we came from different parts of this earth, we had more in common than we had ever imagined. I still feel grateful to know all these friends from around the world. We still meet regularly ever since then. And what better place and time to do that, than on the fest that celebrates “togetherness.” The Bundesländer introduce themselves with food, drink, as well as songs and dances from their regions. This relays a good feeling to us about our home country of Germany. It shows us again the many facets this country has and instilling in us yet again the joy and pride about a country that had been torn apart and has been united again to one large Heimatland. I am already looking forward to this year’s celebrations in Bremen. There will be a symbolic wall parting Bremen for 28 days (one day for each year the original wall divided Germany) and then the wall will be torn down on October 3rd, by members of the government in a festive act. It will make us re-live the intense joy of seeing our country united once again.


October / November 2010

German-American Journal

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Embodying German-American Friendship: My Royal Summer as Queen of the Court By: Stephanie Russell-Kraft

Almost 23 years ago, President Reagan declared Tuesday, October 6, 1987, to be German-American Friendship Day. That happens to be my birthday – the very day I was born to a German mother and an American father. I’ve always joked that German-American friendship is my own personal story. I grew up in Southern California, and my American roots are undeniable. But my German grandmother, who lives in northern Bavaria, has also been one of the most powerful influences in my life. She has, at times, acted more like a mother than a ’grandmother,’ raising me the only way she knew: as a German. Customs that I took for granted in my life were often later revealed to me as being wholly German in nature, and my understanding of German culture has been deepened profoundly by my relationship with her and other German family members. From the time I was three years old, I have spent every summer at her house and so have been able to establish firm roots to anchor myself as a German in this home away from home. When I was growing up, countless German traditions, both big and small, worked their way into my childhood. Like the Weihnachtsplätzchen, the classic German Christmas cookies whose recipes have been passed down through my family for generations. For as long as I can remember, my uncle has sent us a tin of these homemade cookies every year at Christmastime. We generally devour them within hours, while opening our presents by the tree (on Christmas Eve, of course). By the time we get to them, they’re usually broken into pieces from the long haul over the Atlantic, but that doesn’t stop me and my brother from fighting over the last bits of our favorite ones. The recipes are so important to my uncle that he even spent time teaching me how to bake them during a visit to his house one summer. My cousins were more than a little bit confused at the smell of Christmas in July, but I assured them it was all for the sake of continuing tradition. I spent a considerable amount of time thinking about these cookies, and about many other aspects of my heritage, when I decided to apply to the Miss German-America contest this spring. Miss German-America is the alternate name for the

Queen of the German-American Steuben Parade of New York, one of the city’s largest and oldest ethnic heritage events. Originally a parade through Queens, it now takes place on 5th avenue at the end of every September, and is followed by a very lively Oktoberfest celebration in Central Park. I applied for the title at the end of April, and on a Sunday in mid-may, I was competing for the crown among five other contestants in the second floor ballroom of the Liederkranz Club on the Upper East Side. It was a stressful morning, but

somehow the day flew by. After a round of interviews with the judges and a series of questions in front of an audience of friends, family members, and committee members, I was selected to represent the parade as Miss German-America 2010. It was, to say the least, a very surreal moment. Before winning, I knew that I felt very connected to both German and American culture, and that I’d be well suited to represent the parade at German festivals, at the parade banquet, and on a float in the parade itself. But because I grew up 3,000 miles away from New York, I had no idea how large and vibrant the German-American community out here really is. Since being crowned, I’ve discovered what seems like a separate German universe that I had no idea even existed. Almost every weekend, I hop on the LIRR, the Metro North, or NJ Transit to meet the rest of my court (two Princesses, three Junior Princesses, and one very adorable Junior General) at whichever German festival is on tap that day. We greet visitors, invite them to the parade, and ask for donations in exchange for small blue cornflowers that we encourage everyone to pin to their hats or shirts. I enjoy German beer, sauerkraut, sausages, leberkäse, pflaumenkuchen, and more while chatting with members of the community. Over the past few months, I’ve gotten to know many members of the German-American community – some young, some old; some third-generation, and some not even naturalized yet. I’ve been overwhelmed by the generosity and hospitality that I’ve been greeted with, and I’m truly thankful for this opportunity to represent the German-American community at the Steuben Day Parade in September. I can’t wait to celebrate an early birthday, and German-American friendship day, among such a lovely crowd! Stephanie Russell-Kraft is Miss German-America 2010 and will be the Queen of the upcoming 53rd Annual German-American Steuben Parade in New York City, which will be held on Saturday, September 25 at noon on Fifth Avenue. For more information about the parade and the events of German-American Friendship Month, visit germanparadenyc.org

5th Annual Chicago Sister Cities International Festival By: Amelia Cotter You do not have to take a trip around the world to try some Colombian empanadas, buy a real Chinese umbrella, or create your very own German “Schultüte.” The Chicago Sister Cities International Festival in Millennium Park was held from August 23rd to 27th and united international crafts, dishes and a whole lot of fun. More than twenty stands offered a wide range of food and souvenirs typical of the twenty-eight sister cities. Moreover, dances were performed on the main stage, there was a cooking show, and last but not least, the DANK Haus was given a Cultural Corner spotlight where children could decorate their own Schultüte and get some treats.

This activity shows another, maybe quite unknown part of German culture, apart from the well-known Oktoberfest or Karneval. Children in Germany receive a Schultüte when they enter primary school and it usually contains sweets or things you need for school like pencils or rulers. Hamburg is Chicago’s German sister city. In 1960, the first Chicago Sister Cities agreement was signed with Warsaw, Poland, making this their 50 year anniversary. The concept of the Sister Cities and the festival is to expose people to other cultures and improve intercultural dialogue in terms of economics, education, business partnerships, technical exchanges and much more.


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German-American Journal

530

October / November 2010 The tallest church in the world, Ulm Minster, is in Germany. It is 161.53 meters (530 feet) high. It was the world’s tallest building from 1890 to 1908.

Die Schuleinfuehrung

Ein Fest für Kinder, Eltern, Verwandte und Zahnärzte

Eltern, Großeltern, Tanten und Onkels. Alle kommen Sie um diesen speziellen Tag mit dem jüngsten ABC-Schützen aus der Familie zu feiern. Für den Schützling ist es der erste wichtige Schritt auf dem Weg zum erwachsen werden. Das deutsche Schulsystem übernimmt einen Teil der Sozialisation eines Menschen. Die Matthias Knobloch Rede ist vom Tag der Schuleinführung. Alle Jungen und Mädchen freuen sich auf dieses im Leben einmalige Ereignis. Sie gieren nach Wissen, wollen Lesen und Schreiben lernen und auch eins und eins zusammenrechnen können. Ach ja - und da sind ja auch noch die Süßigkeiten – die gibt es in Mengen. Der erste Tag beginnt morgens in der Grundschule. Diese nämlich lädt alle Familienmitglieder samt Erstklässler in den Aularaum. Dort stellen sich alle Lehrer sowie der Schuldirektor den Wissberierigen und seinen Begleitern vor. Normalerweise folgt eine Theaterauffuehrung von Zweitoder Drittklässlern, die den neuen Mitschuelern auf lustige Art und Weise den täglichen Ablauf eines Grundschülers erklärt. Ich erinnere mich noch an meine Aufführung, die ich damals als ABC-Schütze zu sehen bekam. Zu dieser Zeit liefen die Batmanfilme in den Kinos und da durfte diese berühmte Aktion Fledermaus in der Schow natürlich nicht fehlen. Die rund einstuendige Veranstaltung findet ihren Abschluss durch eine vom Schuldirektor gehaltenen Ansprache, in der er oder sie erklärt, was man in der Schule alles lernen wird und wie sehr sich die Oma über eine Postkarte vom Urlaub freuen würde. Wenig später geleiten die Klassenlehrer ihre Schützlinge durch das Schulgebäude um sie schließlich mit dem Haus und ihren neuen Klassenräumen vertraut zu machen. In

Rollenspielen versuchen sich dann Lehrer und Schüler näher kennenzulernen, während die Eltern oder Großeltern vor den Klassenräumen die Zuckertüten vorbereiten. Die Rede ist nicht etwa von Zucker in Tüten sondern von einer mit Süßigkeiten gefuellten, meist bunten, sechseckigen oder runden und pyramidenförmigen Tüte. Diese gibt es in allerlei Ausführungen und Farben und soll den jungen Schülern die ersten Tage in der Schule ein wenig versüßen. Diese Schultüten kann man im Sommer in nahezu jeder Kaufhalle in Deutschland erwerben. Einige sind bereits gefuellt, doch viele Eltern ziehen es ganz einfach vor, die Tüten selber zu füllen, um sie ganz einfach persönlicher zu gestalten. Ich beispielsweise bekam ein Matchboxauto, eine Federmappe, Stifte und andere Lerngeräte. Natürlich war meine Tüte auch mit zahnschmerzbereitenden Süßigkeiten bis zum Rand gefüllt gewesen. Aus meiner Tüte heraus ganz oben schaute mich ein Kuscheltier an, welches ich noch habe und welches erst letztes Jahr zu meiner Hochzeit von meinem Bruder in seiner Laudatio erwähnt wurde. Ein ganz großes Ereignis am Tag der Schuleinführung ist natürlich der Moment in dem die Jungen und Mädchen ihre Schultüten bekommen. Neben dem eigentlichen Schulabschluss oder dem ersten Kuss auf Klassenfahrt ist die Schuleinführung mit einer prall gefüllten Tüte eines der größten Highlights im Leben eines jeden Schülers. Genau deshalb sind Eltern und Großeltern so verrückt danach diesen einmaligen Moment auf Bildern festzuhalten. Meine Schultüte war mindestens genauso groß wie ich. Ich erinnere mich noch, wie schwer sie war und wie ich meine

Naschereien vor meinem Opa verteidigen musste. Der nämlich hat genauso viel Appetit auf Süßes wie ich. Der Umsatz einer jeden Zahnarzpraxis muss in den folgenden Wochen wohl um einiges ansteigen. Leider fehlten mir die notwendigen empirischen Beweise, um meine Theorie zu bestaetigen, bin mir aber dennoch ziemlich sicher, dass so eine Zuckertüte einem Schulanfaenger bestimmt ein bis zwei Füllungen kostet. Zumindest war es bei mir der Fall und bis zu dem Tag an dem ich meine ersten Dritten erhalten werde, werden mich meine Füllungen immer an meine Schultüte erinnern, dich ich vor 21 Jahren von meinen Eltern erhalten habe. Die Nachmittagsstunden des ersten Schultags sind für die Familie reserviert. Viele feiern den Tag mit Kaffee und Kuchen, grillen am Abend oder gehen in ein Restaurant zum Abendessen. Ich beispielsweise aß gemeinsam mit meiner Familie im Roten Rathaus zu Berlin. Unabhaengig davon, wo wir zum ersten Schultag unserer Kinder wohnen werden, meine Frau und ich werden alles daran setzen, unserem künftigen Nachwuchs einen ebenfalls so schoenen Tag zu bescheren, wie ich ihn erleben konnte.

The First Day of School

A festival for children, relatives, and dentists

By: Matthias Knobloch

Grandparents, Aunts, Uncles, Cousins – Every family member is invited to share this special day with their young relative. It is the first big step in a child’s life, on their way to becoming a young man or woman. On this day, the German school system takes a leading role in human

My first day of school with my Parents Marina and Uwe in Berlin 1989

socialization. It is the first day of school. Many boys and girls look forward to this special and once-in-a-lifetime occasion. Of course, they are hungry for education. They want to learn how to write, to read, and to calculate. And they want candy. Lots of it – and it’s coming their way. The day usually starts in the late morning. The children and their parents are invited to their elementary school to meet new classmates, new teachers, the principal, or to simply get acquainted with the school building. Normally, second or third graders perform a show in the auditorium for the youngest students. They show, in a fun and entertaining way, how the new student’s every day school life will be. They sing songs for them and act out correct behaviors. I remember my first day of school in 1989. The batman movies were very famous at that time so of course they had to put that super-action bat into their role play. The play usually lasts an hour, including the principal’s speech about how amazing it is to be able to write grandmother a postcard from their vacation. That’s usually the first hurdle the first grader has to jump. It serves as a little taste of what the children can expect. Right after this show, when the young girls and boys had to sit still, their class teacher takes

them to their classrooms. The children play little games with the teacher to get to know one another. Meanwhile, the parents and some other teachers prepare the Candy Cones outside of the classrooms to hand them over to the first graders. Candy Cones – yes candy. It is a German tradition to celebrate a child’s first day of school. This treat, also called a School Cone, is a gift from their parents and is supposed to sweeten their first day in real life. One can buy cones during the summer before school in almost every supermarket in Germany. Some of them are already stuffed with hard candy, chocolate, gummy bears, lollipops and other cavitycausing treats. But many parents like to stuff their own cone. I remember that I had a Matchbox car in it. It also contained school supplies, such as pencils, notebooks or a pen, and a pencil case. In addition to candy, I also got a stuffed animal that I still have and that recently became a part of my brother’s best man speech at my wedding last year. Once the class teacher finishes up the get-to-know-one-another meeting, the class steps in front of the school building to receive their Candy Cones. Besides graduation or the first kiss on a school trip, the School Cone truly is one of the

highlights of every German student’s life. As such, parents and grandparents snap picture after picture of the new student and the School Cone. My Candy Cone was probably as tall as I was. I remember how heavy that cone was and how I had to protect my candy from my Grandfather’s sweet tooth. Every dentist’s client load must increase directly following this first day of school in Germany. Unfortunately, I was unable to find reliable statistics to prove my theory, but I am sure that those cones cost some of the young students one or two fillings. It did for me - that’s for sure. And, until I will receive my first fake teeth, my fillings will always remind me of the Cone my parents gave me 21 years ago. The afternoon of the first day of school is reserved for family events - homemade cake or cookies with coffee in the afternoon, with dinner at night or backyard barbecues. I remember that I had my dinner with my family in the Rote Rathaus, the city hall of Berlin. The American tradition is a little different. But I am certain that no matter where my children will have their first day of school, my wife and I want them to have the same once-in-a-lifetime experience that my parents gave me.


October / November 2010

German-American Journal

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Total area of Germany is 137,847 square miles

Conference on Renewable Energy and Emission Trading

Presented by German American Chamber of Commerce

By: Amelia Cotter On July 21, DANK Associate member, the German American Chamber of Commerce of the Midwest (GACCoM), presented a conference together with the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nuclear Safety, and Nature Conservation (BMU) called, “Transatlantic Climate Bridge Conference on Renewable Energy and Emission Trading—Latest Policy Updates from the US and Germany.” This half-day conference consisted of two three-person panels giving brief discussions and answering audience questions, with networking receptions in between and after the event. Consul General Onno Hueckmann was present to give the opening remarks and the conference was moderated by GACCoM’s Vice President Mark Tomkins.

During the panels, we learned that the US is the world leader in high emissions, with Germany leading in the European Union. Together the countries are making strong commitments to reduce emissions and put more emphasis on renewable energies. There is an incredible global potential for use of solar, biomass, and wind energy— which is highly popular in Germany—to produce energy for the world. The nonrenewable energy and fossil fuels we currently use comprise only the smallest percentage of the possibilities that lie ahead of us. This is hopeful news, with research and efforts continuing on a global scale to turn those physical potentials into actualities. A good point was made that simply by replacing old appliances, we contribute individually to lower emissions and higher energy efficiency, because products of all

kinds are made more resourcefully today. This way of “pitching in” requires little effort on the part of the consumer. We also learned that many companies are making legally binding commitments to reduce emissions by certain percentages by a certain year, such as 10% by 2020. Many states and Germany itself are also making commitments with periodic goals to reduce emissions while simultaneously using more renewable energies. There was a lively discussion about how just a few years ago, there had to be a choice between economic development or green energy. Today, there is no difference. The two work in tandem and green energies are a lucrative business unto themselves. The first three speakers, who discussed the state of renewable energy in Germany and the US, were: Dr. Martin Schoepe, Head of Division, International and EU

Affairs, Renewable Energy, BMU; Howard Learner, President and Executive Director, Environmental Law and Policy Center; and Silvia Pilarsky-Grosch, Vice President of German WindEnergy. The second group of speakers, who discussed policy updates on renewable energies and emission trading in Germany and the US, were: Thomas Cushing, Senior Vice President, Chicago Climate Exchange; Michael Mehling, President, Ecologic Institute, Washington, DC; and Jonathan Feipel, Deputy Director, Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity. Overall, the conference was fascinating and a variety of perspectives were presented. The entire webcast can be viewed online by visiting www.gaccom.org and looking up their “Webcast Archive” under “Events & Photos.”

GAPA Roadtrip to GermanFest Milwaukee By: Mike Haas GAPA Secretary, Editor and Webmeister A thirty-five person contingent from the German American Police Association (GAPA) Chicago chapter, lead by GAPA President Rory Trausch, met at Laschet’s Inn on Saturday, July 24 for a pre-trip breakfast set up by Matt and Manny Lodge. After sampling their great food, we climbed aboard a motor coach for the ride to Milwaukee, stopping first at the hotel to check in, then re-boarding for the ride to Henry Maier Park, the site of the German Fest grounds, to meet up with

Ray Fischer, Peter Graber and the rest of GAPA Milwaukee. After donning our commemorative event polo shirts, we marched with the Milwaukee GAPA in the GermanFest’s very own parade. Several of us assisted our Milwaukee brethren at their fest booth. The rest of us took part in enjoying the hearty German food, beer, and entertainment that Milwaukee’s German Fest is known for all over the Midwest. After the fest’s evening fireworks display, we boarded our coach back to the hotel for a good (but short) night’s rest. The next morning we headed to Mader’s

Restaurant for brunch, with several of the Milwaukee guys joining us. What a great start to a day which was followed by a relaxing ride back to Chicago recalling the great time we had. Many thanks to Tom and Dottie Moritz for organizing the trip—in case you didn’t know, no one can beat Tom or Dottie at serving drinks from the narrow aisle of a motor coach!  Also, thanks to Kevin Brumley for providing beverages for the bus ride, and to Matt and Manny for the pre-trip breakfast.


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Fall is my favorite season! So I am feeling pretty good, and still can’t believe what an exciting summer I had. I personally got to take a trip to Glacier National Park, Montana and Waterton Lakes National Park in Alberta for a week of camping and hiking. But right here at home I also got to attend the GermanFest in Milwaukee, a Green Energies conference in downtown Chicago, met the German national handball team and went to the handball game at UIC Pavilion, and got to volunteer at the Chicago Sister Cities International Festival. Eva and I are busy in the office, hosting new interns and volunteers who are hard at work helping us get lots of projects done! We have Sarah Nadler from Düsseldorf, Germany who is helping with the GermanAmerican Journal—researching, writing articles, proofreading, marketing and advertising, and many other projects. She is a student at the University of Passau studying International Cultural & Business Studies, with hopes of becoming a journalist and foreign correspondent. She is fluent in English and very good at Spanish and Russian, and her hobbies include dancing, painting, Muay Thai, reading and writing. Beth Casey, a familiar face from UIC (University of Illinois at Chicago) studying

Media, Rhetorical and Cultural Studies, and current proofreader for the Journal, is also in the office assisting with various tasks and projects. We are thankful for all the help and good company! In other news, a Life Membership pin is in the works, as well as a new Associate Membership brochure and other improvements and upgrades. Any suggestions, encouragement, or critiques for how the National Office can run better are welcome via phone, mail, or email any time. Just a reminder that we are still looking to get more raffle tickets turned in by the end of October. The drawing will take place on November 6 at the DANK National Leadership Conference board meeting. Please send yours in and let friends and family know that they’re out there and we have still have some available! We appreciate every little bit that you contribute to DANK. Have a happy fall season…enjoy the local Oktoberfests, go to a Halloween costume party, have a wonderful Thanksgiving, and don’t forget to celebrate German Unity Day on October 3 and German-American Day on October 6!

Guenter and the crew are getting ready for a hay ride

Kison Picnic By: Christine Weiss

It was a near-perfect August day. On August 8, it was a little overcast but not too warm and not too cool. We were heading towards the Kison farm in South Bend, Indiana; up and down the valleys and hills of Maple Road that were darkened by trees on both sides. I was excited to reunite with my old friends again and enjoy a pot-luck lunch with Gemütlichkeit. The picnic at Guenter and Eriks’s farm has been an annual event for 37 years. The 90-acre farm has always been a place to getaway and relax since it is far enough from the highway that you can hear the leaves rustle from a gentle breeze. Before entering the backyard, I passed a cute little fountain with a toy mill and spinning water wheel. Further down was a wooden portal that leads into the yard

with a 120-year-old barn and a working sawmill. There were about six or seven tables set up and a grill with a long table in front of it. I also saw a homemade beanbag toss game and a swing hanging from a tree branch made of rope and an old tractor tire. It wasn’t long after sitting down that the dinner bell rang signaling that the bratwursts were ready. The cafeteria table was abundant with many homemade side dishes and desserts. Coolers were loaded of beer, water, soda pop, and wine. After eating, the bell tolled again for an old-fashioned hayride. We climbed aboard an antique wagon and Guenter, sitting on his tractor, pulled us through the woods where we occasionally ducked under low hanging branches. Deep inside the dark forest was a signpost that read “Ho Chi Minh Trail.” The party wasn’t over until there was a water balloon toss, with John Tarwacki officiating. This year Rudy and Trudy Muessig won but because of his strict rules, John got the most drenched.

October / November 2010

The Zugspitze is the highest point in Germany at 2,962 metres (9,718 ft)

What Effort Have You Been Undertaking To Assist Your Organization In Growing? One year ago, we started our JUST ADD ONE campaign, which encourages our membership to reach out and make the personal effort to solicit new members. This includes family or friends. The goal: for them to join OUR organization so that we can grow and broaden our German heritage efforts across this great country of ours. This effort was not intended to lay the burden of organizational growth solely on the shoulders of our existing membership, but to share the task of increasing membership across all levels of our organization and incorporate everyone who makes up this organization. The idea is if every one of our members just signed up one new member, our organizational membership would double within a short time. While I did not expect a 100% participation from our membership, I felt the goal was both realistic and easier to achieve than through our traditional mode of gaining new members through random public solicitations. In addition to our JUST ADD ONE campaign, we as an organization also undertook steps to participate in group events/activities to bring in new members. Members of our Executive Board and other volunteers worked the German Fest in Milwaukee this July to sign up new members, as we will be doing at the forthcoming German Fest in Gutenberg, Iowa and the Pennsylvania Bavarian Oktoberfest in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. German Fest activities initiated by the National organization ended up with 27 new members. Individual chapters, such as Fox Valley and Erie, will be making ef-

forts to increase membership by seeking to have attendees at their festivals sign up with DANK. So what’s the point here? I want to share with you that it appears most of our members, and this may include you, seem to feel that increasing membership and guaranteeing an active and strong national organization is not their job or responsibility. The JUST ADD ONE campaign is not meeting its potential with only a very small new increase in new members coming from that current effort. While our group membership drives, such as at the German Fest and others to come, are providing some success, it in no way can match what would be a very simple effort by each DANK member and would occur none of the costs we are currently experiencing to do the group membership drives. It is this reality, which as Membership chair, makes me go back to all of you to ask you to reconsider your own effort and assist in getting new members by just signing up one person within the next 6 months. That effort alone by each of us would be 10 times more successful than our secondary process of just depending upon the group activities. Frankly, both efforts would be the way to help the organization grow by increasing our membership at the existing chapter level, as well as creating new chapters as we did in Uniontown, Pennsylvania. So please reconsider your own effort in assisting with gaining new members and help YOUR origination thrive and grow.

Advertise Your Business Here Discounted Rates Available to Chapters & Associate Members

Contact Amelia Cotter National Office Manager (888) USA-DANK Fax: (773) 275-4010 office@dank.org


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German-American Journal

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German Men’s National Handball Team Visits DANK Haus Faces Off Against Poland at UIC Pavilion By: Amelia Cotter

The German men’s national handball team came to Chicago along with their archrival, the Polish men’s national handball team, to face off in the “Battle of Chicago,” an exhibition match held at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Pavilion on Saturday, July 17. The game was sponsored by USA Team Handball, Exlibris and World Sport Chicago, and was broadcast live in Germany and Poland in partnership with Sportfive, as well as in the US on Comcast Sportsnet. The DANK Haus hosted a meet and greet reception for the German team on July 14. The entire team, including Coach Heiner Brand and Team Captain Pascal Hens, along with Consul General Onno Hueckmann, Toyota Handball Bundesliga (HBL) President Reiner Witte and Board of Directors representative Ralf Uhding, USA Team Handball Chairman of the Board Dieter Esch, USA Team Handball Board of Directors representatives Brad Krassner and Jeff Utz, and USA Team Handball General Manager Steve Pastorino attended the reception. Many fans and members of the German-American community came out to support the team and welcome them. The German national team is ranked fifth in the world, one spot behind the number four ranked Polish national team. Fierce rivals, the Germans defeated Poland 29-24 in the 2007 World Championship finals. On July 17, about 5,000 spectators came out to see the game. The Polish fans overpowered the German presence, which was not felt as strongly. That didn’t stop the Germans from beating Poland again, this time with a closer score of 27-26. Both teams were celebrated and Hens, who was injured twice during the game, received the MVP Award. The goal of the event was to be the first of many steps toward making handball a more popular sport in the US. USA Handball wants to see handball played more in schools

Team photo with (L to R in front row) DANK Chicago President  Dagmar Freiberger, Coach Heiner Brand, Toyota Handball Bundesliga (HBL) President Reiner Witte, Consul General Onno Hueckmann, USA Team Handball Chairman of the Board Dieter Esch, Wolfgang Gremmel, andToyota Handball Bundesliga (HBL) Board of Directors member RalfUhding.

and develop more club teams, ultimately bringing the sport into mainstream American culture. Handball is a very popular sport outside of the US and has been on the Summer Olympic catalog since 1972. It is played on a court about the size of a basketball court, with two teams consisting of six players and a goalie. The teams dribble, pass, and shoot a small soccer ball-shaped ball into a goal. It combines elements of basketball, hockey, and football, with players jumping up and lopping the ball into the net past the goalie and opposing team members. The game is played in two half-hour segments with a brief halftime and a stopping clock. Unlimited fouls are permitted but team members who commit a foul are given yellow cards and eventually sent into a timeout, but then are allowed to re-enter the game. It’s fast-paced and not unusual for both teams to score at least 20 goals.

The 2011 World Men’s Handball Championship will be held in Sweden in January and both Germany and Poland will compete for the gold medal. The tournament schedule, teams, news, and games can be followed at www. handball2011.com.

The team lines up before the game. Germany won the game, defeating Poland 27-26

Hunger a Reality for One in Six Americans

Despite a difficult economy, the German-American St. Nikolaus Project responds to help neighbors in need! By: Beverly Pochatko The Saint Nikolaus Project is so exciting… nationwide, GermanAmerican organizations are working together to fill community food pantries! Some organizations and clubs have already been involved in helping their community food pantries, The St. Nikolaus Project is twofold: it benefits your local community, and the publicity will also bring awareness to the many positive contributions of German American nationwide! The Saint Nikolaus Project honors the spirit of giving to those less fortunate who have fallen on hard times. When the world is faced with a broken economic system, the poor and vulnerable suffer the most. The concept of getting GermanAmerican organizations to participate in the Saint Nikolaus Project was first unveiled at a meeting in Washington, D.C. by DANK National

President Bill Fuchs and his wife, Darlene Fuchs. When the idea was introduced to DANK’s National Executive Board, they embraced the project enthusiastically. The Saint Nikolaus Project’s first goal is to get DANK chapters to participate, who in turn are asked to contact and invite local German-American organizations, businesses, religious institutions, and German language classes in their communities to participate. Getting the word out will help us meet our second goal which is to collect 50,000 pounds of canned and non-perishable goods nationwide by St. Nikolaus Day on December 6, 2010. Third on our list of goals is to encourage all participants to have their pounds of food added to the national total. The data from the St. Nikolaus Project will enable the German-American Community to showcase the combined generosity of our many organizations and clubs. There are various ways to collect the food: a) a simple food drive, b) discounted

admission prices for guests bringing canned goods to events such as Oktoberfest, picnics, events, etc., c) work with companies or local grocers to collect canned goods at their establishments on a specific day. Having a party? Ask your guests to bring a donation for the St. Nikolaus Project! Remember our goal date is December 6th, 2010. What your club/organization can do to help reach the national goal is: send information from your local food drive to: office@dank.org or call it in Toll-Free: (888) USA-DANK. Include: 1) Name of the chapter/organization/business/ school, 2) Pounds contributed, and where the contribution was made 3) Contact Name, Address and Phone Number, and 4) Contact’s email address if available. If making cash donations ($1 = 10 pounds of food on average, throughout the US, that local food pantries can purchase from their central food banks) make note of that, too. This collection of data can be used by all participating clubs and organizations as

a public relations tool. You can also share this information through press releases with your local newspapers, or via web sites, Twitter and Facebook. Progressed data will be shown on the DANK’s national website, www.dank.org. So jump on board and join us in bringing German-American communities into a positive light by helping to reduce hunger locally and nationally. Additional information or help in getting started and available press releases can be obtained by calling the DANK National Executive office at 888-USA-DANK. Over 38,000 pounds have been collected and donated to local food pantries throughout the US.

DANK National & Fuchs FamilyHanover Park Township Food Pantry, Bartlett, IL GermanFest Milwaukee - Hunger Task Force, Milwaukee, WI DANK Erie & Erie Männerchor Gesangverein - Second Harvest Food Bank, Erie, PN American Licorice - Salvation Army Food Pantry, LaPorte, IN Help German-Americans thoughout the US reach their goal of 50,000 pounds.


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German-American Journal

October / November 2010

DANK Chapter Lake County, IL Picnic By: Ursula Hoeft

An afternoon to enjoy a beer or two, to visit with friends, to bask in the warmth of good fellowship and enjoy the out of doors. On July 18, members and guests of DANK Chapter Lake County, IL gathered at Van Patten Woods in Wadsworth, Illinois

Erwin Goering played traditional German tunes for picnickers

for the Chapter’s annual picnic. A brief shower only served to whet their appetite for the sunny weather and equally sunny ambiance that followed. There was plenty of time for a beer or two, to visit with friends and to enjoy some good old-fashioned Gemütlichkeit before, during and after a wonderful meal. Anni and Victor Kordas, assisted by members of their family, all chefs extraordinaire, once again “manned” the grill and barbequed delicious chicken and sausages. A plentiful assortment of side dishes made by club members, and delectable desserts, many of them also homemade, completed the feast. Always a highlight of the picnic, it briefly appeared that an unexpected snafu might keep the water balloon toss from taking place this year. But, thanks to her resourcefulness and willingness to “go the extra mile,” and with the help of her sonin-law Jamie Davis, Chapter President Cobi Stein made sure that this summertime tradition was upheld. It must be genetic! The considerable skill required to toss and catch a balloon filled with water seems to run in the Bode family. Left with the last unbroken balloon and

Left to Right: Grill masters Ralph Kordas, Anni Kordas, Victor Kordas, Harry Kordas, Nathan Eifert, Todd Eifert

therefore first place winners of the balloon toss were Robbie and Brian Bode whose parents Pat and Fred Bode were winners in previous years. Matt and Lou Massong’s balloon broke just moments earlier, earning them second place.

Traditional German tunes played by Erwin Goering on his button box accordion were a pleasant addition to the afternoon’s enjoyment. A long-time DANK member, Mr. Goering, recently transferred to DANK Chapter Lake County, IL.

DANK Erie and DANK Associate Lake Erie Fan Fare Form Partnership By: Beverly Pochatko

Edith Saurer, Gail Knight, Linda Janca, Frank Janca

German Heritage Festival By: Marianne L. Dietz

Homann. On a lovely summer day, singing and dancing in the outdoors was enDANK Chicago South has been busy joyed by a full house. Milwaukeefest in July was well atin the surrounding community as well as the club house.  Many people came to tended by DANK Chicago South memenjoy the festivities at the Frankfort Ger- bers and friends.  A bus load of members man Heritage Festival on May 1st at the and friends enjoyed the day in MilwauFounders Center in downtown Frankfort, kee.  Some of our members, dressed in Illinois.  This was a combined event with traditional costume, also marched in the the Village of Frankfort and offered a day parade throughout the fest grounds. The summer is not complete without a packed with German food prepared by Chef Klaus’ Bier Stube, pastries and beer.  picnic packed with lots of family fun.  The Entertainment by Peter, Paloma and Die Will Smaka Band came from Michigan to Perlen and horse-drawn carriage rides. entertain our DANK family and friends.  Gracing us with their presence were the The beer and brats were a big hit as well Mayor of Frankfort Jim Holland, the as the many games that were played by Prinz and Prinzessin from the Rheinisch- our kids, especially the money pit.  er Verein as well as our two DANK NaWe were delighted to see so many tional Youth Ambassadors, Andrea Dietz friends from far and wide visit us this and Kathe Freiberger. summer and we warmly welcome everySommerfest on June 26th at DANK one to join us for a fantastic time at our Chicago South was highlighted with Ger- Oktoberfest on Saturday, September 18th man entertainers brought to us by Armin at our clubhouse.

Pittsburgh News & Views By: Larry Sabatini Here it is again and fall is certainly in the air. The festivities of summer picnics and family reunions are but a memory and now we look forward to the Canonsburg Bavarian Fest and the Steelers games as well as a myriad of other activities. But none of this will be the same this year due to the sudden passing of our dear friend, George Steiner Sr. this past June. We will

all feel the void of his life in our chapter activities. George was a great man, dedicated to his family, church and country, his heritage and the list just goes on. There are many accolades that would easily be said that would be true of George Steiner, but these are only words and they are the best that could be said of anyone.  After knowing George, they don’t do him justice. George was a great husband and father.  To watch his interaction with his family, you could see the love, caring, and pride just bubbling over.  The spirit of George’s dedication to family flowed thru to everyone

DANK Chapter 71 - Erie, the German Heritage Festival and the Lake Erie Fan Fare. What do these three have in common? DANK started the German Heritage Festival and after 11 years began a partnership with the Lake Erie Fan Fare, an associate member of DANK. As all chapters grow or decline, it is not always in the numbers, but age, that the changes come. As many chapters have experienced, the younger members are raising families with committments to sports activities and more time for their school-age children. The founding members, who generally joined in their 50s-60s, are now in the Silver Sneakers Programs and slowing down; physical activity is getting somewhat limited and let’s face it – some have been an officer or on a committee for longer than they really wanted to be. Putting on a big venue gets to be more challenging all the way around. The difficulty lies in making decisions as to what will happen in the future. For Chapter President Beverly Pochatko, the German Heritage Festival has been her ‘baby,’ so to speak. It has blossomed from a 285 person attraction in 1996, to one that brings in over 6,000 people over the two day period on Labor Day Weekend. Food and merchandise vendors, entertainment, etc., are well established at the St. Nicholas Picnic Grove, rented from the Greek Catholic Church. She and her committee have maintained a “German Only” he came in contact with, including his good relations with his employer, who talked him out of retirement to come back part time in a different capacity. George served his church with that same energy.  Not only did George voice his Christianity, he lived it.  George was an active man, always doing good wherever he went.  If something needed fixing, George did it.  If a volunteer was needed, George, and his lovely wife Carol, were there.  If dancing was involved, they were the first and the best on the dance floor, Carol in her dirndel and George in his lederhosen, with his signature alpine hat.  We looked forward to an annual Christmas

venue,since - as she will tell you = it is about preserving our German heritage. What has been difficult is getting the volunteers to help run the festival and those dedicated people are getting fewer. Luckily, there are family and friends who step in to help. Ray Luniewski, Director of the Lake Erie Fan Fare, has been behind the scenes for about 11 years, helping with laying out the electrical system that connects the vendors, in addition to the food booth, where he is the chief cook (and bottle washer). From the beginning of their festival relationship, they bartered services:he provided the electrical set-up and in return was given a space to sell food to raise money for his group. (He provides the old-timers with the Limburger and Braunschweiger sandwiches.) Bartering often works well when one has something the other can use or needs. Last year, following a meeting of the two, a partnership was formed and each came out a winner. The Fan Fare and DANK share resources and expertise, where new life is being infused into the festival. It has become a win-win situation. That’s when they started discounting the admission price with a donation for the local Second Harvest Food Bank, a benefit for the community. What remains is locating real German merchandise vendors, which is not an easy task. But, as both partners put it: “We are here to keep our German heritage alive in the Erie area and will keep working to improve the festival for our visitors.”

visit to their house, where George’s passion for model railroading transformed his basement to a different time and place, which we welcomed being invited into. George was a unique man; he was a leader and a doer. Everyone liked volunteering with George and Carol.  It never felt like work it was fun with friends.   DANK Chapter #58 lost more than its senior vice president; we have lost a great friend.  He will be missed but his legacy lives on in his wonderful family and in all of his good works. Thank you George. We love you. Your friends from DANK.


October / November 2010

German-American Journal

11

From the Pennsylvania Shore of Lake Erie By: Beverly Pochatko

Here it is the end of summer already, but where oh where did the time fly? With all the heat (and a fair share of rain), the crops came in earlier than usual. Who would have thought that grapes would be harvested mid-August and not September; that the luscious, juicy peaches would hit their peak two weeks early and not over Labor Day. Mother Nature sure sped things up this year, but the crops were in and just about gone before we knew it and it was a scramble to get to the farmers to get fresh fruit and vegetables before they were all done for the season. I should have known something was up when the birds stripped my elderberry bushes early August instead of the beginning of September. On time, as scheduled was the Chapter’s annual picnic held on July 18th at Mt. Carmel Picnic Grove. Family, friends and our festival volunteers gathered on a perfect summer evening – not too hot but just right. The Chapter supplied Ox-roast was joined by the delicious offerings of our members causing the table to groan. Okay, that’s a figure of speech, but the tables were definitely filled to capacity from favorite salads to Siggy Wunner and Margaret Potocki’s Apfel Kuchens. Ingrid Plathner provided musical entertainment singing and playing her guitar. All in all, everyone had a great time. On August 19th, everyone gathered at the Erie Brewing Company to sample their

Tyler Bello loading the food bank truck for the St. Nikolaus Project collection.

craft beers and to sign up as volunteers for the 14th annual German Heritage Festival. We certainly enjoy the hospitality of the brewery in their Rathskeller and touring the brewery itself. The specially brewed German Alt Bier and German Blonde were just about ready for the festival that evening. September 3rd, the set-up crew arrived early in the morning to get the smaller tents in place after the huge fest tent was anchored in place and work began by covering the tables with the blue and white Bavarian patterned rolls of plastic. Mother Nature did not cooperate and we experienced heavy rains and high winds. Following lunch, vendors began to arrive to set up and we prepared the souvenir glasses booth and

Cleveland German American Fest Kicks Off Summer Season

our DANK booth. The Männerchor Gesangverein was there getting for their basket raffle. By early evening, much of our work was done. Saturday morning found some volunteers at the grove by 8:30 AM (with tents askew from the winds) but was ready to open at 11 AM. The skies were not promising and it was a cold wind that swept across the hillside. At noon, the procession began – first the sixteen state flags of Germany followed by the German, Austrian and American flags carried by members of the Chapter and the Gesangverein, followed by the Alpen Schuhplattler and Trachtverein of Pittsburgh. The German flag so proudly carried by Fred Huttel Sr., was carried by his son Fred. Jr. in his father’s

memory. Singing of the national anthems was the prelude to the opening remarks of radio personality, Brenda Savelli of Classy 100 Radio, our Honorary Bϋrgermeisterin, followed by the official tapping of the keg by Beverly Pochatko assisted by Fre Huttel Jr. By then, everyone was in the mood and the two-day long party began. Despite the cold weather on Saturday, Sunday was a typical fall day but windy. General attendance was over 6,000 adults. The St. Nikolaus Project collected over 2500 lbs of canned goods for the Second Harvest Food Bank – the final weigh-in is still pending at this time. Monday was a true Labor Day as by 9 AM the crew was back, tearing down and storing the tents and set-up supplies in our trailer for next year. While the full report is not in, we know that we once again successfully presented our German Heritage to the community at large. We’ll have our volunteer recognition night in September to thank everyone for their help. Without our volunteers, this event would not be possible. (Check-out www.DANKErie.org/festival ) On September 22nd, the Chapter will celebrate Oktoberfest – more about that in our next column. Enjoy the beautiful autumn weather – get out and really look at the breath taking colors that nature provides before we hit the bleakness of winter, the snow and the cold when Mother Nature takes a rest. It won’t be all that long until she awakes and we’ll see the buds of spring!

“German Night” Baseball Game By: Stefan Pigler

The minor league “Lake County Captains” of Eastlake, Ohio (Suburb of Cleveland), held a “German Night”, Friday July 30th. Various German organizations of the Greater Cleveland area participated with lots of enthusiasm, and had lots of fun doing it. Many people showed up in their “Trachten”, which made for a very colorful event, in gorgeous weather. The Donauschwaben Youth group performed a few dances before the game, while the Deutsche Musikverein played some fine tunes at the entrance gate. Later they re-located to the beer tent, and played waltzes, marches and polkas throughout the entire game. German food and beer were naturally also available. DANK had set up a table with literature,

and Linda and Hermann Voit were able to get lots of information into people’s hands. One representative of each organization was selected to throw out the first pitch. Mark Bohn did it for the Stadtverband, and Stefan Pigler for DANK. Right after that, a small choir sang both National Anthems, to a very nice round of applause. All of the above mentioned people were part of that hastily thrown together choir group. After the game there was a huge fireworks display. All of the 2,500 plus people, in attendance stayed for that. This was the first time the Captains have held such an event, and some of the preparations on our part were not up to par, but we’ll be better prepared for next year. Oh, the game? The Captains lost 1:0 to Michigan.

Stefan Pigler, President of Cleveland chapter, Paul Holt, member & Burt Leornard helper. Photo by Kanka Mark Bohn

By: Stefan Pigler The German American Fest, sponsored by the “Federation of German American Societies of Greater Cleveland” was held on June 18th and 19th. DANK Chapter #30 is always a high profile participant in this event. Every year, we work a bar or a beer truck, in order to make the money that is needed throughout the year to run our chapter. We also distributed a good amount of literature, and we were asked a lot of questions by the public. This year we were able to recruit a couple and a single man to our group. The literature we make available, sometimes leads to good historical and political discussion.

Naturally, we also took part in the fun by dancing and consuming the great German cuisine with a bit of beer. Several youth and adult dance groups performed throughout the event, and we had three great brass bands here in Cleveland, as well as several dance bands, who always do a bang up job. Before the festival there was a lot of planning and preparation to be done. The entire board and a few other volunteers helped in this endeavor. Vice President Mark Bohn did the bulk of the work, since he retired at the ripe old age of 52. We are looking forward to the many Oktoberfests that we have in our area. We will be well represented.

Philadelphia – Syracuse Here We Come! By: Erich Wittmann I am happy to announce that we have received interest from several people, in both the Philadelphia area and Syracuse, NY area, to resurrect our chapters in those cities. Philadelphia has been a very strong chapter and continues to have a core of very loyal members. Syracuse, however, closed their chapter over 10 years ago. It is exciting to see individuals in those areas wishing to either grow their existing chapter or res-

urrect one that went dormant. So if you are a member in either of those cities and wish to assist in developing a growth and activities plan, contact the National office or myself. We will be undertaking a membership effort in both of those cities, with the help of those individuals who contacted us, and anyone else wishing to join in. So PHILADELPHIA AND SYRACUSE, let’s show your communities that German heritage is alive and well by assuring strong chapters in both of these communities.


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German-American Journal

90

October / November 2010

German is the main language of about 90 million people (18%) in the EU

A Translator’s Prize

The 15th Helen and Kurt Wolff Prize 2010

This prize is named after Helen and Kurt Wolff who immigrated to New York in 1941, founded Pantheon Books, a publishing house devoted mainly to the Christa Garcia translation of German and other European literature. They became co-publishers with Harcourt, Brace Jovanovich. Helen Wolff was honored for her work with numerous US and German academic and literary awards. This year’s recipient was Ross M. Benjamin for his translation of “Speak, Nabokov” by Michael Maar published by Verso. The Awards Ceremony consisted of a musical introduction by the Obsidian Brass, a Welcome address by the director of the Goethe Institute, Werner Ott, jury statements, laudatory remarks, the award presentation by Onno Hueckmann, German Consul General, and excerpts read from the translation by the prize recipient himself, followed by a reception. The Award Presentation was held on June 21, 2010, at the Chicago Cultural Center in the Millennium Room on the 5th floor. Consul-General Onno Hückmann presents the 2010 Helen and Kurt Wolff Translation prize to Ross Benjamin June 21st, 2010: “Mr. Benjamin, Ladies and Gentlemen, It is a great honor for me to be here today to present the 2010 Helen and Kurt Wolff Translation Prize to Mr. Benjamin on behalf of the Federal Minister for Foreign Affairs, Guido Westerwelle. But let me first of all thank the members of the Translation Prize jury. It takes of course a huge amount of hard work as well as impressive dedication to the German language to select the winning entry every year. – May I also thank Prof Krishna Winston and Prof David Dollenmeyer for their very instructional and inspiring introduction to Mr. Benjamin’s prize-winning translation. – I’d like to say a big “thank you”, too, to the staff of the Goethe-Institut Chicago, who takes care of all the administrative side as well as the organization of the award ceremony itself. – And last but not least, thank you very much indeed, Mr.  Ott, for your kind opening words. “Solus Rex: Die schöne böse Welt des Vladimir Nabokov” is the German title of the book Mr. Benjamin has translated. He turned this into a brief and catchy “Speak, Nabokov”. This palpable difference encapsulates to my mind what Emperor Charles V (1500-1550) was getting at when he said: “Spanisch spreche ich mit Gott, Italienisch mit Frauen, Französisch mit Männern und Deutsch mit meinem Pferd” – “Spanish I speak with God, Italian with women, French with men and German with my horse.” What he meant was that every language has a different addressee. That applies to foreign languages, of course, but also to the language used by different generations or different

The happy moment has arrived: Ross Benjamin receives the plaque, flowers and the prize: a check

professions. This is why the work of gifted translators such as Mr. Benjamin is so crucial for intercultural exchange. Finding the right language, after all, a language that will be understood by the addressee, is essential if people are to gain a deeper appreciation of a culture that is different from their own. Worldwide there are at least 150 million German speakers. Almost 20% of all books published around the world are in German. German is the second most commonly used language in research and scholarship and – hard to believe – also on the internet (8% of all websites are in German, compared to 50% in English). 14% of all EU citizens outside Germany speak German, which makes it the most widely spoken language in Europe after English. And of course German was and still is a language of culture, the language of “poets and philosophers”. But there is another side, too. In the United States German doesn’t have much of a following. Only a small elite in fact – some 55,000 high school or college students – learn German. Interest in the German language is largely limited to people with higher education. Compare the 200,000 Americans able to read and speak German to the more than two million in France. It’s true the French are not renowned for their interest in other

(L-R) Werner Ott, Director of the Goethe Institut in Chicago, Ross Benjamin, Recipient of the Helen and Kurt Wolff Prize 2010, Onno Hueckmann, German Consul General in Chicago

languages. All the same, about four million French people are currently learning German – some 7% of the population. In the United States it’s more popular to learn Mandarin. Despite this, the close relationship between Germany and the United States is a reality, the long and deep friendship our two countries enjoy is rooted in our common heritage. German thinking has played a part in making the United States and American culture what they are today. Compared to Mandarin, let’s say, there’s no doubt that German has had the greater influence on American culture. As I see it, this is still true today and will remain so in the future. Nevertheless, transatlantic bridge-building will always need input and hard work. The only way to maintain the close connection between Germany and the United States is a joint effort. If we Germans want to continue sharing our thoughts, our reflections, our culture with the American people, we need to find the right language. A language that appeals and fires people’s imagination. With the Helen and Kurt Wolff Translation Prize we are also sending a message. The message that we care deeply about German-American cultural exchange and will continue doing our utmost to promote it. We have come here today to honor someone who, both in his own person and in his work, epitomizes this concept. Ross Benjamin is a master bridge-builder, an American who makes German culture accessible and comprehensible to the American public. To my mind, this is something that can be done only by a true expert and a true artist who combines mastery of German with an insider’s knowledge and understanding of American culture. Mr.  Benjamin, you’ve performed a remarkable feat. You’ve put into the hands of your fellow Americans a key that looks and feels American, yet it’s the key to a German treasure. At the same time you’ve offered us insights into how people here perceive our literature. You’ve truly helped build a bridge linking both sides of the Atlantic. So it is with admiration and gratitude, Mr.  Benjamin, that I now present you, on behalf of the Federal Minister for Foreign Affairs, with the 2010 Helen and Kurt Wolff Translation Prize. The first part of the award is a check for 10,000  US dollars. And the second part is the official certificate, which reads as follows: Heartfelt congratulations!”


October / November 2010

German-American Journal

13

Thanks to our illustrator, Michael Randall and our editor, Matthias Knobloch. Like “The Adventures of Oskar and Atticus” on Facebook to learn the German word of the day and receive fun updates on the real Oskar and Atticus! Write to them at Oskar@dank.org or Atticus@dank.org

Oskar und Atticus feiern Deutsch-Amerikanischen Tag! By: Amelia Cotter

Oskar & Atticus Celebrate German-American Day! By: Amelia Cotter

Oskar and Atticus were home again after their beautiful trip to Germany. They were excited about fall and their favorite holiday, Halloween. They were watching a horror movie. Dani came out of her room, stood in front of the television, and explained to the guys that there are a few other important days in October besides Halloween. “There’s Germany Unity Day on October 3 and German-American Day on October 6.” “We can’t see the television,” Oskar said, but Dani only heard a little whimper. Dani continued to speak. “On German Unity Day we celebrate the reunification of East and West Germany in 1990. And on GermanAmerican Day the Americans celebrate the Germans and German-Americans who’ve made important contributions to the United States.” “That was too much information and I didn’t understand everything anyway,” thought Oskar. “Hmm, seems interesting after all,” said Atticus and nodded his head. “So anyway, you all don’t need to be watching any more horror movies. They are way too scary for a little dog and a little snake.” Dani turned off the television and went back in her room. As soon as Dani shut the door and left the two alone again, Oskar and Atticus hid themselves in the bathroom and turned off all the lights. They wanted to try to make contact with spirits. “We have to try not to laugh too loud. With the echo in here Dani can probably hear everything,” said Oskar. Atticus held back his laughter as the two lit candles and prepared themselves for a séance. “Who do we want to contact?” asked Oskar. “I have a cousin who died a few years ago. I’d like to ask him what it’s like in Snake Heaven.” “Okay, what was his name?” “Jimicus.” Oskar blinked. “…Your name is Atticus and you have a cousin named Jimicus?” “Yeah, why not?” “I’m just saying that it’s a little funny.” “It’s not funny at all. Jimicus was a very big ball python, but very friendly. He was from the jungles of Africa.” Oskar blinked again. “You’re from Germany, but your cousin was from Africa?” Atticus nodded and laughed. “He also lived in America for many years. That’s how the world is today.” Oskar shrugged his shoulders. “Okay, then let’s get started here.” Loudly and slowly he said, “Jimicus…Jimicus von Snake…Are you here?” The boys waited and waited. They heard only water dripping in the bathtub. “Jimicus…Jimicus…” “What are you two doing?” asked Dani from

her room. “Is everything okay?” Oskar and Atticus were very quiet. After a few minutes they started up again, this time quieter. “Jimicus…” “What?” a voice asked. Oskar and Atticus turned around. Out of the bathtub slithered the transparent ghost of Jimicus! “Ahhhh!” cried Oskar. “He’s not that big at all! He’s not even a meter long!” “Cousin, is that you?” Atticus asked with big eyes. The snakes hugged each other, as snakes sometimes do. “Yep, it’s me,” said Jimicus very friendly. “Cool party, what are you guys doing? You’re Oskar? I’m Jimicus. I love a good séance.” Atticus wasn’t listening to his cousin. He was astounded to actually be seeing him again. “What’s it like in Snake Heaven, my friend?” he asked. “It’s wonderful. Beautiful. It’s a jungle, just like we have on earth. Only in heaven there are bigger trees and branches that we can lie on all day long.” “Oooooh,” said Oskar and Atticus in unison. Atticus looked very happy. “So,” Jimicus kept talking, “I am here for a reason, boys. I heard that German-American Day will be celebrated here soon, and you guys aren’t interested. You’re not going to a parade or anything?” “Probably not,” answered Oskar. “Why? That day is really important, especially for you all, because you, Atticus, come from Germany but you live in America. And because you, Oskar, come from America, but you have German roots through your mom, Dani.” “Even though I was adopted?” asked Oskar, who was suddenly excited about it. “Of course!” “Then we’re definitely going with Dani!” said Oskar. “I love Germany!” “Yeah,” Atticus was also excited, “she’ll probably be really happy.” “Ya’ see? Everyone can take part. So, now I have to go. It was nice to meet you Oskar, and good to see you again, Mr. Atticus!” Atticus and Jimicus hugged each other again. Jimicus slithered back into the bathtub and disappeared. “Wow, that was crazy!” Oskar cried. Atticus added, “I have to say, I am also a little shocked.” …October got there quickly and Oskar and Atticus were excited about fall, Halloween, German Unity Day, and German-American Day. They were with Dani for every minute of the celebration and the parade. (Jimicus was there, too, watching everything from Snake Heaven.) The guys were happiest about the GermanAmerican Day parade. On this day Dani bought each of them a bag of popcorn and their own balloon.

Oskar und Atticus waren wieder zu Hause nach der schönen Reise nach Deutschland. Sie freuten sich schon auf Herbst und ihren Lieblingsfeiertag, Halloween. Sie schauten zusammen einen Horrorfilm an. Dani kam aus ihrem Zimmer, stand vor dem Fernseher und erklärte die Jungs, dass es auch ein paar andere wichtige Tage im Oktober gibt außer Halloween. „Es gibt den Tag der Deutschen Einheit am 3. Oktober, und DeutschAmerikanischer Tag am 6. Oktober.“ „Wir können den Fernseher nicht sehen“, sagte Oskar aber Dani hörte nur ein kleines Heulen. Dani erklärte weiter, „Am Tag der Deutschen Einheit feiern wir die Vereinigung von Ost- und Westdeutschland im Jahr 1990. Und am DeutschAmerikanischen Tag feiern die Amerikaner die Deutschen und Deutschamerikaner, die wichtige Beiträge in den Vereinigten Staaten gemacht haben.“ „Das war zu viel und ich habe sowieso nicht alles verstanden“, dachte Oskar. „Hmm, es scheint doch interessant zu sein“, sagte Atticus und nickte mit dem Kopf. „Naja, ihr braucht keine Horrorfilme mehr anzuschauen. Die sind viel zu gruselig für einen kleinen Hund und eine kleine Schlange.“ Dani schaltete den Fernseher ab und ging zurück in ihr Zimmer. Sobald Dani die Tür zumachte und die Beiden wieder allein lieβ, versteckten sich Oskar und Atticus im Badezimmer und machten die Lichter aus. Sie wollten versuchen, Kontakt mit Gespenstern zu machen. „Wir müssen versuchen, nicht so laut zu lachen. Mit dem Echo hier drin kann Dani bestimmt alles hören“, sagte Oskar. Atticus verbiss sich das Lachen als die Beide kleine Kerzen anzündeten, um sich auf eine Seance vorzubereiten. „Mit wem wollen wir sprechen?“ fragte Oskar. „Ich habe einen Cousin, der vor ein paar Jahren starb. Ich möchte ihn fragen, wie es ihm im Schlangenhimmel geht.“ „Okay, wie hieß er?“ „Jimicus.“ Oskar blinkte. „…Du heißt Atticus und du hattest ein Cousin, der Jimicus hieß?“ „Ja, wieso nicht?“ „Ich meine, dass es nur ein kleines bisschen lustig ist.“ „Lustig ist es gar nicht. Jimicus war eine sehr große Königspython, aber sehr freundlich. Er kam aus dem Dschungel in Afrika.“ Oskar blinkte nochmal. „Du kommst aus Deutschland, aber dein Cousin kam aus Afrika?“ Atticus nickte seinen Kopf und lachte. „Er hat auch viele Jahre in Amerika gewohnt. So ist die Welt heutzutage.“ Oskar zuckte die Schultern. „Okay, dann machen wir mal weiter.“ Er sagte laut und langsam, „Jimicus…Jimicus von Schlange… Bist du hier?“ Die Jungs warteten und warteten. Sie hörten

nur einen Wassertropfen in der Badewanne. „Jimicus…Jimicus…“ „Was macht ihr?“ fragte Dani von ihrem Zimmer. „Alles klar?“ Oskar und Atticus waren sehr still. Nach ein paar Minuten fingen sie wieder an, diesmal leiser. „Jimicus…“ „Was?“ fragte eine Stimme. Oskar und Atticus drehten sich um. Aus der Badewanne schlitterte das durchsichtige Gespenst von Jimicus! „Ahhhh!“ schrie Oskar. „Der ist gar nicht so groß! Der ist noch nicht mal einen Meter lang!“ „Cousin, bist du das?“ fragte Atticus mit großen Augen. Die Schlangen umarmten sich, wie Schlangen das manchmal tun. „Ja, ich bin’s“, sagte Jimicus sehr freundlich. „Coole Party, was macht ihr? Du bist Oskar? Ich bin Jimicus. Ich liebe eine gute Seance.“ Atticus hörte seinem Cousin nicht zu. Er war erstaunt, ihn eigentlich wiederzusehen. „Wie ist es im Schlangenhimmel, mein Freund?“ fragte er. „Sehr schön. Wunderschön. Es ist ein Dschungel, genauso wie auf der Erde. Nur im Himmel hat man größere Bäume und Zweige, wo man den ganzen Tag liegen kann.“ „Oooooh“, sagten Oskar und Atticus zusammen. Atticus sah ganz glücklich aus. „So“, sprach Jimicus weiter, „ich habe auch hier ein Ziel, Jungs. Ich habe gehört, dass hier bald Deutsch-Amerikanischer Tag gefeiert wird, und ihr interessiert euch nicht. Geht ihr nicht zu einer Parade oder so?“ „Bestimmt nicht“, antwortete Oskar. „Wieso? Dieser Tag ist sehr wichtig, vor allem für euch, weil du, Atticus, aus Deutschland stammst aber du wohnst jetzt in Amerika. Und weil du, Oskar, aus Amerika kommst, aber du hast deutsche Wurzeln durch deine Mama, Dani.“ „Obwohl ich adoptiert war?“ fragte Oskar, der sich plötzlich freute. „Natürlich!“ „Dann gehen wir auf jeden Fall mit Dani!“ sagte Oskar. „Ich liebe Deutschland!“ „Ja“, Atticus war auch sehr begeistert, „sie wird sich bestimmt freuen.“ „Sieht ihr? Alle können daran teilnehmen. Na, dann muss ich schon wieder gehen. Es war schön, dich kennenzulernen Oskar, und dich wiederzusehen, Herr Atticus!“ Atticus und Jimicus umarmten sich nochmals. Jimicus schlitterte wieder in die Badewanne und verschwand. „Wow, war das verrückt!“ schrie Oskar. Atticus meinte, „Ich muss ehrlich sagen, ich bin auch ein Bisschen geschockt.“ …Oktober war schnell da und Oskar und Atticus freuten sich auf Herbst, Halloween, den Tag der Deutschen Einheit und auf den Deutsch-Amerikanischen Tag. Für die Feier und Parade waren sie jeden Moment mit Dani dabei. (Jimicus war auch da, und schaute alles vom Schlangenhimmel an.) Die Jungs freuten sich am meisten auf die Parade beim Deutsch-Amerikanischen Tag. An diesem Tag kaufte Dani den Beiden sogar je eine Tüte Popcorn und einen Luftballon.

This story, like all stories, has a lot of conjunctions. These are words that connect two separate ideas in a sentence. There are two kinds of conjunctions: coordinating and subordinating. Coordinating conjunctions combine two similar clauses, or thoughts, while subordinating conjunctions connect a clause to a dependent clause, or a new thought that expands the first thought. Common coordinating conjunctions: und (and), oder (or), denn (because), aber (but), sondern (rather) Common subordinating conjunctions: daß (that), wenn (if, when), weil (because), sobald (as soon as), bis (until), bevor (before), nachdem (after), als (as, when), seit (since), damit (so that), ob (if), obwohl (although)


14

German-American Journal

October / November 2010

1786 Germany Weighs Bill to Stop Employer Spying Source: www.germerica.net

Employers have turned to Facebook and other social networking sites to ensure its employee’s behavior is on the up and up. In Germany, that practice may become illegal. German news outlets are reporting that Interior Minister Thomas de Maizière is working on new privacy legislation that would outlaw corporate snooping on social networking profiles. It would restrict the amount of information that current as well as prospective employers could gather and use. Employers would still be able to use search engines in order to gather information on an employee, however it would be banned from being used in employment decisions if it came from a third party. It also does not cover social networking sites intended for professionals. The law apparently has the blessing of the cabinet, but now must be passed onto parliament for a full vote. With European governments typically having much stricter privacy controls than their US counterpart, its not out of the question that the law would indeed pass.

History of Snooping - Germany has historically been very cognizant of privacy, even though the government itself has a history of spying on its citizens, the Gestapo being the most notorious example. Both Maizière and privacy experts do say that the law could be quite difficult to enforce. For example, it may be difficult to prove that employers were indeed snooping -- although friending a current or prospective employee to find out personal information would be illegal. With many adding new friends on their social networking profiles with little thought as to an actual real-life friendship, employers may gain access to this information anyway -- and could easily give another reason for hiring or termination to cover their true intentions of adding the person. If somehow the victim can prove he or she was spied on, the new law would permit them to sue the company in court and claim damages.

Factories of the Future Germany ranks among the world’s leading business locations. A large number of

German companies value the strengths of Germany as a business location and manufacture many of their high-quality goods in their own country By: Oliver Sefrin | magazine-deutschland.de

family company produces exclusively in Germany.

Volkswagen Manufaktur This company sets standards in modern automobile production, and its huge glass facade reveals the manufacturing process to the outside world: fitters have been assembling the VW flagship “Phaeton” at the transparent plant in Dresden since 2002. The skilled precision work is carried out almost entirely by hand.

Meyer Werft Oceangoing juggernauts: the family company was established in 1795 in Papenburg, Emsland. It uses state-of-the-art technology to build cruise liners, ferries, tankers and container ships at the shipyard’s huge construction docks.

Airbus Hamburg, one of the world’s leading locations in the aerospace industry: Airbus develops, manufactures and assembles a significant amount of the components for the world’s largest passenger aircraft A 380 and other designs at its plant in Hamburg. A. Lange & Söhne An international brand with tradition: in the town of Glashütte in Saxony, watchmakers at the factory of A. Lange & Söhne have been meticulously handcrafting mechanical masterpieces of precision timekeeping from hundreds of individual parts since 1845. Trigema From cotton yarn to the finished garment: Trigema in the Swabian town of Burladingen is Germany’s largest manufacturer of T-shirts and tennis outfits. The

Comparing Markets DOW

Porsche Automobile elite: the various models of the historic company from Stuttgart represent the quintessence of the sports car. The fourth and latest Porsche series, in the shape of the Panamera, has been in production at the plant in Leipzig since 2009. Bosch World-class technology: the company, which was founded in Stuttgart in 1886, has launched many trailblazing inventions and products in the fields of motor vehicle, industrial and building technology as well as in the consumer goods market. Enercon Energy for the future: Enercon in Aurich, north Germany, has discovered wind power as a business model. Today the company is Germany’s number one wind turbine producer and the world’s wind technology leader.

German Wage Increases Are Not Enough

Wages have risen less in Germany over the past 10 years than anywhere else in the European Union, a trend irritating France and other neighboring countries.

Source: www.thelocal.de Gross wages in the first quarter of 2010 were 21.8 percent higher on average than in 2000, while other labour costs were 18.9 percent greater, according to Destatis. The figures were the lowest rate of 21 countries. The European Union posted an average wage increase of 35.5 percent over the same period, and a rise of 36.1 percent in labour costs such as contributions to unemployment funds. Data from Belgium, Finland and Ireland were not provided, while figures from Denmark, Greece and Italy remained confidential but were used to calculate the EU average, Destatis said. Wage moderation has helped Germany remain the biggest European economy and has contributed to strong growth seen in the first half of 2010. Less competitive countries such as France have complained that German wage constraint undermines consumption and say Germany relies too heavily on exports to keep its economic engine humming along. French salaries have risen by an average of 30.5 percent since 2000, while non-wage costs have gained 39.1 percent, the data showed. German salaries are established by each branch following negotiations between bosses and worker representatives, and there is no generalised minimum wage in the country.

iTunes Top 10 Song Downloads United States

DAX

The world’s oldest savings bank was established in Oldenburg (Lower Saxony) in 1786.

Data Taken Sept. 18, 2010

Germany

7/14/10:

$10,366.72

7/14/10:

€6,209.76

1 Only Girl (In the World) • Rihanna

1 DJ Got Us Fallin’ In Love • Usher

9/17/10:

$10,607.85

9/17/10:

€6,209.76

2 Just the Way You Are • Bruno Mars

2 Dynamite • Taio Cruz

$ Change:

+ $241.13

€ Change:

+ €0.00

3 DJ Got Us Fallin’ In Love • Usher

3 We No Speak Americano • Yolanda Be Cool & Dcup

% Change:

+ 2.33%

% Change:

+ 0.00%

4 Just a Dream • Nelly

4 Club Can’t Handle Me • Flo Rida

5 Like a G6 • Far East Movement

5 Teenage Dream • Katy Perry

EUR/USD

6 Teenage Dream • Katy Perry

6 Wonderful Life • Hurts

7/14/10:

$1.2723

7 Club Can’t Handle Me • Flo Rida

7 Nein, Mann! • Laserkraft 3D

9/17/10:

$1.3056

8 Dynamite • Taio Cruz

8 Over the Rainbow • Israel Kamakawiwo’ole

$ Change:

+ $0.0333

9 I Like It • Enrique Iglesias

9 Désolé • Sexion d’Assaut

% Change:

+ 2.62%

10 Take It Off • Ke$ha

10 Shame • Robbie Williams & Gary Barlow

Source: Yahoo! Finance

Shaded Row: Song found on both lists

Source: iTunes


October / November 2010

German-American Journal

512.9

15

In 2002, Germany was Europe’s largest consumer of electricity, totaling 512.9 terawatt-hours

Giles Hoyt Receives Germany’s Highest Civilian Honor By: Dr. Ruth Reichmann

Giles Hoyt, Professor Emeritus of German and past Director of IUPUI’s Max Kade German-American Center in the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI received the Bundesverdienstkreuz, the Federal Cross of Honor on Wednesday, June 23rd. Consul General of Germany Onno Hueckmann, traveled from Chicago to make the presentation. Dr. Hoyt has been a pivotal figure in the field of German, reaching far beyond the academic sphere. An internationally recognized scholar, his service to Indiana UniversityPurdue University, Indianapolis (IUPUI), as well as to the German-American community, particularly in Indiana and the Midwest, spans more than three decades. Hoyt tirelessly fostered German-American relations, deepened knowledge and understanding on both sides of the Atlantic, and built bridges between Germany and the United States and the citizens of both nations. He has served on the board of numerous organizations, both locally and nationally, dealing with German language and culture and GermanAmerican relations. Professor Hoyt was instrumental in the establishment and development of the IUPUI Max Kade German-American Research and Resource Center, a national model for interdisciplinary German and German-American Studies. Together with his wife, Dr. Dolores Hoyt, and friends and colleagues Drs. Eberhard and Ruth Reichmann, Hoyt created the Hoyt-Reichmann Faculty Chair in German American Studies and German Language and Culture with a $1.3 million gift commitment to the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. The Bundesverdienstkreuz was instituted in 1951 by German President Theodor Heuss. It is the Federal Republic of Germany’s highest tribute for services to the nation and the only honor that may be awarded in all fields of endeavor. It may be awarded to Germans as well as foreigners for achievements in the political, economic, social or intellectual realm and for a myriad of outstanding

Professor Hoyt and Consul General Hueckmann during the presentation ceremony

services to the nation in the fields of social, charitable and philanthropic work. The ceremony took place at the Indianapolis Deutsche Haus-Athenaeum and was hosted by the Max Kade GermanAmerican Center. Indiana’s Honorary Consul to Germany, Sven Schumacher, served as the event emcee and remarks were also made by German Professor and Max Kade Center Director Dan Nuetzel and Liberal Arts Dean William

Blomquist. Numerous individuals and organizations supported the event, demonstrating the close ties between the IUPUI Max Kade Center and German Program and the Indianapolis German American community. More than 100 community friends, university colleagues, former students, and German-American organization representatives attended the presentation ceremony.

Fünf Wünsche Assists In Making Important Family Conversations About End Of Life Care show German and English text side-by-side so that medical personnel who speak only English can easily tell what is desired. The Fünf Wünsche advance directive allows the user to designate a “health care agent,” the person who will make health care decisions if the user is unable to communicate them him or herself. It also directs the health care agent in making decisions about life support treatment, should that become necessary. Funf Wunsche helps you decide: • • Tallahassee, Fla. – German-speaking Americans can now join millions of others who use the Five Wishes (Fünf Wünsche) advance directive, “the living will with a heart and soul.” The document meets the legal requirements of 42 states, but is useful in all 50 and around the world for helping people make and state important health care decisions. An added benefit to Fünf Wünsche is that key portions of it

• • •

Who you want to make health care decisions for you when you can’t make them. The kind of medical treatment you want or don’t want. How comfortable you want to be. How you want people to treat you. What you want your loved ones to know.

“What makes Fünf Wünsche different from all other advance directives is that it doesn’t deal just with medical and legal issues, but also the personal, family and spiritual concerns that people say matter most,” Aging with Dignity President Paul

Malley said. “Instead of confronting people with questions about feeding tubes and ventilators, we focus the conversation on things like comfort, dignity and family relationships,” Malley said. “It brings tremendous peace of mind to all.” Aging with Dignity is a national nonprofit organization whose founder and Five Wishes creator Jim Towey served as Mother Teresa’s legal counsel for 12 years until her death. His experience as a volunteer in her homes for people with AIDS inspired Five Wishes. The document was introduced nationally in 1997, and today more than 14 million copies are in circulation, distributed by more than 23,000 partner organizations

including physicians, hospitals, hospices, places of worship, attorneys, financial planners and others. It is the closest thing there is in America to a national living will. A 2006 grant from the United Health Foundation made it possible to offer Five Wishes in a total of 26 languages including German. Individual copies of Fünf are $5, but only $1 each in of 25 or more. To obtain a to www.agingiwithdignity.org (888)-5-WISHES.

Wünsche quantities copy, go or call


16

German-American Journal

October / November 2010

Las Vegas: City of Affordable Opulance By: Audrey L. Hess-Eberle Euro Lloyd Travel Group/Chicago

Like a brilliant sapphire that shimmers in the light of the desert’s sun, Las Vegas is one of the most spectacular and dynamic cities on earth. Now home to over 2 million people, she did not even exist at the turn of the century. Flamboyant in both enterprise and spectacle, she proudly and almost unbelievably boasts 19 of the world’s 25 largest hotels as she thrills over 37 million tourists each year with no-expensespared casinos, accommodations and entertainment. Where else can you travel to and see hotels representing themes and places in the world to which you might have traveled, or dreamt of visiting in a mere 4.2 mile strip of hotels? Of course you are aware of the Elvis Presley impersonators, but the city is more characterized for its endless creations of novelty. Sparkle is never lost, but replaced, updated, polished, perfected and surpassed. From fantasy themes of castles and a black onyx-hued Egyptian Pyramid, the next craze was for replica cities like New York, New York, Paris, Monte Carlo, and Venice. The current building trend is for high end properties that straddle ostentatious and elegant sophistication. Can you afford Las Vegas? Can you afford to not experience her just once in your lifetime? The Bellagio Hotel - Built upon luxurious European elegance of an Italian theme, the Bellagio transcends all hotels with luxury, appealing to couples. A retreat offering 3933 guest rooms and suites, she sports a 65,000 Sq Ft Spa and Salon for pampering. ‘O’ Cirque Du Soleil performances are entirely upon or around water and are viewed five days weekly. From her dancing fountains, to her Botanical Gardens and

Conservatory, quiet pools and courtyards, she has all you will need. 3 night hotel package rates start from ….. $347 per person, double occupancy. The Venetian Resort Hotel Casino Inspired by the artistic vision of Venice with its sweeping blend of Renaissance architecture in a city of canals and serenading gondoliers, The Venetian transforms you to another place and time in luxury. Ramble through the Piazza San Marco with its cobblestone walkways and restaurants, down the ¼ miles of Shoppes spanning the Grand Canal, then on to the Canyon Ranch Spa Club to climb a 40 foot indoor rock wall followed by a nap at one of the many pools and cabanas. But, you have also come to Las Vegas for other activities. Their replicated façade of the Doge’s Palace is no less then the back drop for their 120,000 square foot marble-floored casino. 3 night hotel package rates start from ….$350 per person, double occupancy. The Mandalay Bay Resort – Experience a moment lived in breath-taking tropical paradise with this retreat beyond your wildest dreams. From an 11-acre tropical up-scale water environment including wave pool and sand beach, a thrilling shark reef aquarium, to spectacular theatre productions plus House of Blues entertainment, the Mandalay will transform your levels of enjoyment. 3 night hotel package rates start from ....$251 per person, double occupancy. Luxor Hotel – This deluxe 30-story onyx-hued pyramid hotel is a distinctive landmark against the Las Vegas sky. She boasts a magnificent new lobby with one of the world’s largest atriums, and features Egyptian-themed rooms, King Tut’s tomb and museum, 3-D IMAX attractions, popular night clubs and casinos, plus a

EURO LLOYD TRAVEL Announcing AIR FARE SPECIALS for members of DANK If you have not traveled to Germany lately, or just thought you might skip the trip to Europe this year, you can not afford to pass up the low discounted travel airfares being offered by all airlines. Please identify yourselves as DANK members when calling our office.

Current Late Fall airfares (sales can occur at any time) for travel to and from Germany, including taxes and fuel surcharges, start from: Chicago Indianapolis Milwaukee Madison Cleveland Detroit

$732 $725 $723 $725 $685 $732

Audrey L. Hess-Eberle or Tiffany Nedwed EURO LLOYD TRAVEL GROUP Partner of Lufthansa City Center The Monadnock Building 53 W. Jackson Blvd. - Suite 863 Chicago, Illinois 60604

*Call for special airfares to other European cities and beyond. *Low discounted Domestic and international airfares. *European Rail passes and single tickets. *Car rentals with special low dollar rates in most European countries. *Cruises world-wide. *Worldwide tours – independent, hosted and fully escorted.

Call now for information: 1-800-572-3149 or 1-312-362-0218 email: chi@eurolloyd.com Visit us at: www.eurolloyd.com

Rates are subject to availability for your date of travel, with various airline non stop or connection options. Friday, Saturday, Sunday Weekend surcharges apply for each direction.

spa and shopping concourse. 3 night hotel package rates start from ….$133 per person, double occupancy. New York, New York Hotel and Casino – This unique property recreates the sounds and sights of America’s most famous metropolis combined with the fun and excitement of gaming. With a classic Manhattan skyline, to a Central Parkthemed casino, to the Manhattan Express roller coaster and fabulous New York style restaurants, you will experience this American city in replica. 3 night hotel package rates start from ….$137 per person, double occupancy. No destination quite compares to the excitement and activity of Las Vegas – a city

that remains open 24 hours a day with an unrivaled variety of gambling, entertainment and modern technology. It has truly earned its nickname: ‘Entertainment Capital of the World’. Remember – Lake Mead, The Grand Canyon and Hoover Dam are within a reasonable drive for extended vacation options. With dozens of more hotels and price ranges from which to choose, your budget can be met while you experience the best your money can buy. For any of the above, or to any destination that your heart may lead you, by land, sea, train, or air, call us at Euro Lloyd Travel 800-572-3149 – your official D.A.N.K. travel service.


October / November 2010

German-American Journal

17

Understanding German Windows By: David Paulus, P.E., PhD.

If you’ve spent time in Germany you might remember your first experience with a Drehkippfenster, or “turn-andtilt window” – an attractive, easy-to-operate window that cools in the summer months, warms in the winter, and elicits a brief moment of panic in most people the first time they see it tilting toward them. Tilt-and-turn windows open in two different ways, either by swinging into the house like a door, or by tilting into the house at the top. They offer superior ventilation, ease of cleaning, security and energy efficiency in comparison to typical North American windows. Although new to America, the first hardware for these windows (Drehkippbeschlag) was invented in 1935. After World War II, tilt-and-turn windows became the most common type of window in Germany and their popularity eventually spread over all of Europe. Hardware In a tilt-and turn window, locking points surround the entire sash (the movable part of the window). When the handle is in the down position, these locks are engaged around the entire perimeter, providing outstanding security that exceeds North American standards. Moving the handle to thehorizontal or up position disengages the locking points on three sides - allowing the sash to either swing in like a door or tilt in from the top. Frame and Sash Materials and Design The most common materials for these windows are wood or uPVC (unplasticized vinyl). The profiles  are much heavier than those used in North American windows. Multiple chambers resist heat transfer and add strength, as do heavy galvanized steel reinforcements. Four- or five-chamber vinyl frames easily outperform North American  products of any material, both thermally and structurally. A few

North American companies manufacture their tilt-and-turns from wood to high German standards – those that do, such as Archispec LLC in Hartford, Wisconsin, use German machinery. In 2008, Rehau AG + Co introduced a revolutionary new material for tilt-and-turn windows. Rau-Fipro is a weldable composite material that combines the best characteristics of vinyl and fiberglass, improving thermal performance and allowing only half as much energy loss as the U.S. EnergyStar ® standard! Only four window manufacturers in North America have been selected to build these windows, and only one of these – WASCO Windows in Milwaukee, WI – services the residential market in the U.S. (Two others are in Canada, and the other U.S. based manufacturer caters to the commercial market.) The Geneo tilt-and-turn will be available in 2011. Glazing The typical tilt-and-turn window has three panes of insulated glass with a thickness of at least 34 mm (1 3/8 inches)! The strength of the hardware and profiles allow such heavy glass to be used -- a double hung built with this glass would not even fit inside a wall. Drawbacks While tilt-and-turn windows offer superior energy efficiency, ventilation, security and ease of cleaning, there are drawbacks. Since they turn in like a door, furniture placement needs to be a consideration. Blinds are

bestattached directly to the sash, and drapes are best set out far enough to allow the window to tilt in. The rods should extend far enough beyond the window so it can clear the drapes when it swings open. Tilt-and-Turn Windows in the states If you want true German tilt-and-turn windows in the United States, you have three options. You could order them from Germany or Austria, but shipping, servicing the warranty or finding replacement parts would be difficult. If you require real wood, find a small, custom manufacturer that builds to German specifications, such as Archispec. (One hint: If the company advertises in the mainstream media, it  isn’t building to German specifications.) With interior woodgrain laminates and exterior painting, uPVC windows can approach the beauty of wood while providing higher energy efficiency and greater longevity. Companies like WASCO Windows purchase their hardware and vinyl profiles from a German supplier (much easier to ship than completed windows) which are then fabricated on German made machinery from companies such as Stürtz and U-R-B-A-N. You get the quality and advantages of German-made windows without the warranty or service issues.

Book Review: The Palatine Book By: Gary Palmer Review By: Beth L. Casey

Gary L. Palmer’s latest novel, The Palatine, was recently released on March 25th of this year. The Palatine is Palmer’s first historical novel and serves as his contribution not only to our German ancestors and the immigration movement of the 17th and 18th century, but also to the literary world. Following his 2003 memoir, Chagrin Falls, The Palatine is a must read. In fact, the spectacular cover art was painted by Palmer’s wife, Barbara. With 320-pages neatly divided into 23 chapters, this paperback novel is stunning from cover to cover. The Palatine is based on Palmer’s

well-researched family history of his maternal great-great-great-great-great grandfather. Palmer’s research plays in not only to the fictional story of Heinrich Althaus is packed full of action, adventure and excitement but also mixes with a beautiful sense of reality, history and imagery. “The smoke that blanketed the scene like a dense morning fog made the scene even more dreamlike. If only it were a nightmare.” The Palatine packs so much imagery per page that you will feel your palms sweat and you’re your heartbeat quicken as you follow him through his adventures. Palmer’s main theme of courage in the face of adversity and throughout the book it is exampled flawlessly in The Palatine.

As the pages turn one not only gets to know the courageous and good-hearted Heinrich but also feels as if they are right there next to him. From the very first page on, Palmer dazzles the reader with the life and events of Heinrich. Palmer tells the story of Heinrich with a simple charm under dreary circumstances that is highly engaging. The Palatine belongs to be on the German-American literature must read list. The Palatine by Gary Palmer is 322 pages long, published by Black Rose Writing, and is available through most major booksellers as well as Amazon.com and other bookselling websites.


18

German-American Journal

October / November 2010

*** Calendar Of Events ***

This area is designated for DANK chapters and Associate Members to inform their members and the public of events they are having. We rely on the submissions of each chapter or organization, therefor all events may not be included. Please contact our National Office at 773-275-1100 or visit www.DANK.org for the most recent listing of events or for information on how to make sure your event is listed in the next issue. (Associate Member Events Listed In Italics)

OCTOBER 2010 1

Benton Harbor: Fish Fry, 6-8pm. Doors open 5:30pm, band plays 7-10pm. $8 all you can eat. 2561 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI 49022. For info: 269-926-6652

1

Chicago: Kulturkueche, 7:30pm. Cooking demo and tasting, limited to 22 attendees and cost is $12. RSVP required. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more info call 773561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

17

Benton Harbor: Membership/Election Meeting, 4pm. 2561 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI 49022. Call 269-9266652 for more information

6

Chicago: Lost German Chicago Exhibition Celebration, 11am. Free. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more information call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

17

Chicago South: Membership/monthly meeting. 25249 Center Rd, Frankfort, IL. Contact Nancy at 708-448-8731

6

17

Pascack Valley, NJ: Regular meeting, Oktoberfest. For more information, please call 201-391-2185

Chicago: Kino, Kaffee, und Kuchen, 1pm. $4 members, $6 non-members. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

6

17

Springfield: Dr. Lynn Fisher Presentation, 1pm Springfield Motor Boat Club. Reservations: contact Jeff Engel at 7448148 or jeffchuck1@aol.com

South Bend: Membership Meeting/Election, 11am. Francis Branch Library, 52655 Ironwood Rd., South Bend, IN. For info, call Christine: 574-272-8163 or Trudy: 574-271-6922

10

Chicago: Treffpunkt DANK, 7:30pm. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. Info: 773-561-9181 or visit dankhaus.com

11

Fox Valley: Open Membership Meeting, 3pm. St. Charles VFW, 119 N. 3rd St., St. Charles, IL. Info: 630-377-9845

1-3 Fox Valley: 8th Annual Oktoberfest at downtown Batavia

Riverwalk, Batavia, Illinois. Friday 5-11pm, Saturday 12-11pm, Sunday, 12-8pm. Admission is free, portion of proceeds benefit area scholarships for students. Visit germanfun.org/oktoberfest.htm for more information or call the DANK Fox Valley Info Line at 847-622-3696

20

Erie: Celebrating our German Heritage—Dinner and video, “The German American,” with social hour to follow. The Erie Männerchor Club, 1617 State St. Call 835-1939 for more info. Reservations appreciated

22

Chicago: German Cinema Now, 7pm. Free admission and popcorn, refreshments available. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. Info: 773-561-9181 or visit dankhaus.com.

12

Chicago: Sportsklub DANK, 7:30pm. No cover, cash bar. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more info call 773561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

23

Benton Harbor: Oktoberfest featuring Eddie Korusa Band, 6pm. 2561 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI 49022. Call 269-926-6652 for more info

13

Chicago: Lost German Chicago Exhibition Celebration, 11am. Free. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

23

Chicago: Lost German Chicago Exhibition Celebration, 11am. Free. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

13

Chicago: Kino, Kaffee, und Kuchen, 1pm. $4 members, $6 non-members. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

2

Chicago: Lost German Chicago Exhibition Celebration, 11am. Free. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

2

Chicago: Kino, Kaffee, und Kuchen, 1pm. $4 members, $6 non-members. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

2

South Bend: Campfire at Kison’s Farm, 6pm. Potluck. 63620 Maple Rd., South Bend, IN. For more info, call Christine at 574-272-8163 or Trudy at 574-271-6922

2

Springfield: Oktoberfest. Springfield Motorboat Club. Reservations: the Springfield Motorboat Club at 529-1511

23

14

3

Lake County: German-American Commemoration Celebration at St. Benedict’s Church in Chicago, IL. Info: Ludwina Homer, 847-249-0073 / Cobi Stein, 847-234-3920

Chicago: Kino, Kaffee, und Kuchen, 1pm. $4 members, $6 non-members. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

Lake County: Volkstrauertag Wreath Laying Ceremony at Fort Sheridan Cemetery. Contact Ludwina Homer, 847-2490073 or Cobi Stein, 847-234-3920 for info

24

Chicago: Annual Election, 3pm. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. Info: 773-561-9181 or visit dankhaus.com

17

24

Lake County: Brunch and Membership Pin Ceremony at the In Laws Restaurant, Gurnee, IL. Contact Ludwina Homer, 847-249-0073 or Cobi Stein, 847-234-3920

Erie: Membership Meeting/Election with social hour to follow, 7pm. The Erie Männerchor Club, 1617 State St. Call 835-1939 for more information

19

24

Pittsburgh: Membership Meeting, Panera Bread at Galleria, Route 19, Mt. Lebanon, PA. For info, Visit germaninpittsburgh.org or call 412-563-2352

Chicago: Stammtisch, 7:30pm. No cover, food and drink available. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

20

27

Chicago: Treffpunkt DANK, 7:30pm. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. Info: 773-561-9181 or visit dankhaus.com

Chicago: Lost German Chicago Exhibition Celebration, 11am. Free. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

20

29

Chicago: Jazz on the Terrace, 8:30pm. No cover. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more info call 773-5619181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

Chicago: Kino, Kaffee, und Kuchen, 1pm. $4 members, $6 non-members. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

8

9

9

10

12 13

Chicago: Sportsklub DANK, 7:30pm. No cover, cash bar. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For info call 773-5619181 or visit dankhaus.com Chicago: Lost German Chicago Exhibition Celebration, 11am. Free. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com Indianapolis: German-American Day and 2nd Annual GermanFest Celebration, 12-6pm. The Athenaeum, 401 E. Michigan St., Indianapolis, IN. For info, contact Jim Gould at 317-655-2755, ext. 1, or email jimgould@ athenaeumfoundation.com Lake County: Membership Meeting/Election. Bertrand’s Lanes, Waukegan, IL. Contact Ludwina Homer, 847-2490073 or Cobi Stein, 847-234-3920 for more information Springfield: Board Meeting, 6:30pm. 552 S. MacArthur. Contact Jeff Engel at 744-8148 or jeffchuck1@aol.com Chicago: Kino, Kaffee, und Kuchen, 1pm. $4 members, $6 non-members. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

15

Chicago: Treffpunkt DANK, 7:30pm. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. Info: 773-561-9181 or visit dankhaus.com

16

Chicago: Lost German Chicago Exhibition Celebration, 11am. Free. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

16

16

Chicago: Kino, Kaffee, und Kuchen, 1pm. $4 members, $6 non-members. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com Chicago: Stammtisch, 7:30pm. No cover, food and drink available. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For more info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

30

30

30

Knobloch, Matthias Knobloch, Sarah

Chicago-South , IL

Hainds, Sarah Kalnins, Asja K. Manning, George *Pesce, Frank J.

Meyer, Henry H. Meyer, Lenore L.

Chicago-West, IL

Chicago, IL

Lake County, IL

Buechner, Dora C. Hainds, Christian D. Hainds, Josef Hainds, Sarah

Prince, Arthur

*Wettlaufer, David G. *Wettlaufer, Ellen *Wettlaufer, Ian *Wettlaufer, Sophie

3pm. John Heinz Regional History Center, Strip District. Visit www.germaninpittsburgh.org or call 412-563-2352

Benton Harbor: Oktoberfest featuring Hank Haller Band, 6pm. 2561 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI 49022. Call 269-926-6652 for more information

21

Chicago: Lost German Chicago Exhibition Celebration, 11am. Free. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

Pascack Valley, NJ: Regular meeting. Autumnfest with hot apple cider and Berliners. For more information, please call 201-391-2185

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Chicago: Kino, Kaffee, und Kuchen, 1pm. $4 members, $6 non-members. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

Pittsburgh: Dinner at Hofbraeuhaus, 5pm. South Side. Guests welcome. Visit www.germaninpittsburgh.org or call 412-563-2352 for more information

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Chicago: Kino, Kaffee, und Kuchen, 1pm. $4 members, $6 non-members. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. For info call 773-561-9181 or visit www.dankhaus.com

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Chicago South: Entertainers from Germany sponsored by Armin Homann. 25249 Center Road, Frankfort, IL. Contact Nancy at 708-448-8731 for more information

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South Bend: German Advent Service, 4pm. St. Paul Church, 51490 Laurel & Auten Rd., South Bend, IN. Info: call Christine at 574-272-8163 or Trudy at 574-271-6922

NOVEMBER 2010 5

Benton Harbor: Fish Fry ,6-8pm. Doors open 5:30pm, band plays 7-10pm. $8.00 all you can eat. 2561 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI 49022. Call 269-926-6652 for info

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Chicago: Kulturkueche, 7:30pm. Cooking demo & tasting, limit 22 attendees, $12. RSVP required. DANK Haus, 4740 N. Western Ave. Info: 773-561-9181 or visit dankhaus.com

Welcome New Members National Members

20-21 Pittsburgh: Heritage Days, Sat. 10am-4pm & Sun. 11am-

Fox Valley, IL

*Kelish, Gregory S. Ludwigsen, Jocelyn Richter, Herbert F. *Ruehl, Raeanne *Ruehl, Randy W.

Springfield, IL Hartman, Sandy

Benton Harbor, MI Green, Charlotte Green, Darril J.

June 25 - August 18, 2010 Schultz, Lorna Schultz, Steve M. Seehofer, Kurt L. Wilson, Ladd Wilson, Veronica L.

Indianapolis, IN

Burtzo, Ingrid McKinney, Kaetchen

Milwaukee, WI

*Clarey, Joanne T. *Clarey, Matthias

*Clarey, Morgen *Clarey, Steve *Gotzler, James *Jackson, Katherine M. *Karow, Debbie L. Knapper, Andrew J. *Mann, Robert *Meyer-Miszewski, Cassidy Jo *Radmanovic, Katarina *Smith, Mitchell K. *Stenzel, Richard H. *Sweeney, Robert J.

Washington, DC Watson, Howard

Philadelphia, PA

*Chaykowsky-Keeley, Rita *Keeley, Brian C.

Pittsburgh, PA

Ashbaugh, Patrice Ashbaugh, Robert N. *Welcome new members who signed up at Milwaukee GermanFest!


German-American Journal German-American Journal

October / November 2010

Sudoku Challenge Sudoku 9x9 - Puzzle 4 of 5 - Hard

Merchandise For Sale

Difficulty Level: HARD

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Moon Landing Coin

50th Anniversary Pin

Silver - Sold Out

$7.50

Bronze - $19

Bicentennial Poster

Bumper Sticker

$12.70

$2.00

DANK Flag Pin

$7.50

Cookbook

$17.00

All Prices Include Shipping And Tax! Call Our Office To Purchase Toll Free: 866-926-1109 Bulk Discounts Available With Purchases Of More Journal Than 5 And German-American Sent To The Same Address Sudoku 9x9 - Solution 4 of 5 - Hard

OBITUARIES Irmgard B. Reile Irmgard B. Reile, geb. 24 Feb. 1925 in Dueren, hat uns am 5 Juli 2010 verlassen. Sie hinterlaesst: Dagmar Glauer, geb. Reile, Tochter, Gordon Reile, Sohn Enkel: Lisa Glauer, Katrin Glauer, Stefanie Glauer, Eric Reile, Olivia Reile, Florence Reile, Joslyn Reile, Urenkel: Dalia, Yeray, Ayoze, Jade, Brandon, Benjamin, Leah und Elfriede Kempen, Schwester. Mitglied von DANK Chicago. “Wenn Ihr an mich denkt, seid nicht traurig, erzaehlt von mir, und traut Euch zu lachen. Lasst mir einen Platz zwischen Euch, so wie ich ihn im Leben

George A. Steiner 1939 - 2010

DANK Chapter Pittsburgh mourns the unexpected passing of George Steiner. In March, George celebrated the 50th Anniversary of his marriage to the love of his life, Carol (Schumm) Steiner, with family and friends. He was the father of Diane (John Smith), Sharon (Shawn Welsh), and George (Catherine) Steiner Jr. and beloved grandfather to Laura & Luke Smith, Jacob Welsh, Samantha & Gabrielle Steiner. He is also survived by his brothers John (Carole) Steiner and Lee (Cindy) Steiner. George’s smile will also be missed by his many friends and neighbors. George served in the US Army, was a retired truck driver and an active member of Concord Presbyterian Church. He enjoyed working in his yard, collecting and displaying model trains and relished the challenge of repairing anything. Many of his friends will remember his love of dancing with Carol. George, a loyal member of DANK since 1996 loved life itself. He served in various capacities on the Chapter Board, and was Senior Vice President at the time of his passing. He was extremely proud of his heritage and was not ashamed to proclaim it to anyone. George will be missed by all who knew and loved him. “Schlaf in Ruhe!

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Head On Over To Our National Website to get the latest updates and information on DANK.

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German-American Journal

Please Support the Businesses That Advertise in the German-American Journal

October / November 2010

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German-American Journal | October/November 2010  

Volume 58, Issue 5

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