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Volume 57, Number 6

December 2009 / January 2010

50th Anniversary Edition Leonard Enders, the editor of the German-language newspaper Abendpost, began campaigning intensely in the paper for a new national-level German-American organization

The first DANK-Haus was purchased on Lincoln Ave in Chicago for $170,000 After 10 years of existence, DANK had a membership of over 20,000 people.

late-50’s

1950’s 1959

1983

1968

1960’s mid-60’s

DANK’s first board was elected on January 30th. The once popular DANK Charter flight program was formed with as many as 8 flights a year.

The first 3 chapters were formed: Chicago South, Chicago North and Chicago West

In October, National President, Elsbeth Seewald was invited to a state dinner at the White House to join German President Carstens in commemorating 300 years of German immigration to the US

1970’s

1980’s

DANK launched its first website

1996

1990’s

1970

1987

The second DANK-Haus was built in Benton Harbor, Michigan

On Oct. 6, President Reagan proclaimed the first GermanAmerican Day... an idea initiated by Mrs. Reichmann and Dr. Tolzmann of the Indianapolis chapter, secured by President Seewald and supported by other German-American organizations.

The 3rd DANK-Haus was built by the Chicago-South chapter in Frankfort, Illinois, after many years of planning.

2002

2000’s 2009 DANK greatly improved its presence online with the addition of the Forum, Blog, and connecting with various social networking sites.


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German-American Journal

December 09 / January 10

Check Us Out Online! WWW.DANK.ORG DANK Discussion Forum Presidents Blog

Liebe Mitglieder und Freunde! Dear Members and Friends, The 2009 DANK Annual Convention and our Gala 50th Anniversary is finally behind us. While we did lots of celebrating, our conventioneers also had four productive workshop sessions on Friday, November 6 and many fruitful meetings along with our officer election on Saturday morning. The national delegates expressed their confidence in the national officers of the past two years by voting us in for another two year term. Our whole board is also tasked to continue with our present initiatives and keep the same direction of the organization for the near future. I would like to thank the DANK Chicago South chapter for taking on the enormous task of hosting the convention this year. Their chapter, along with our national board, put a lot of work into it to make it a grand success. I wish that I could say the same of the Tinley Park Convention Center. Their lack of organization, internal communication and professionalism was apparent throughout the weekend. Amongst the many communication errors and despite being moved to a different room every day, the convention was rescued by the stepped up effort of our members, the National Executive Board and DANK Chicago South going the extra mile to create the true feel and atmosphere of a professional National Convention for our organization. We once more discovered the strength of our organization lies in the fact that we are not a group of individual chapters operating on their own but that all of us, including all chapters, are all tied together holding hands as one National Organization called DANK. The collective effort of all is what makes us strong. What many in our organization have called “National” and almost treated as a separate entity and removed from the chapters, has been reaffirmed to be actually the hub of all our chapters and members that connects us together as one unit. Our National Office in Chicago is there to provide services and the organizational infrastructure for all of us and our National Officers exist for the benefit and welfare of the whole organization and truly represent all chapters and members of DANK. It was pointed out that we have come a long way as an organization in the first 50 years and we can be proud of our accomplishments. We also look forward to many opportunities for DANK in the future and we are on a path of change to make DANK even more attractive to more members. Our organization comes out of the convention with renewed vigor and resolve to carry us forward with a positive push towards growth and involvement with the German-American community. As we are nearly at the end of the current year, we look forward to the Holiday Seasons of Thanksgiving, Advent, St. Nikolaus, Christmas and New Years. It will be a busy one for our organization and our families. I hope we can all enjoy the many blessings of these holidays and wish all our members and friends a traditional Season’s Greeting: Frohe Weihnachten und ein Glückliches Neue Jahr 2010

Newspaper Archives And More...

Der Deutsch-Amerikaner DANK seeks to bring together Americans of German descent in the pursuit of cultivating and presenting their heritage and interests on local, regional and national levels. These were the primary reasons that the German American National Congress was founded in 1959, and they are still among the organization’s primary objectives today.

DANK National Executive Board President William Fuchs 1. Vice President Erich Wittmann 2. Vice President Donna Lippert Treasurer Maria Thompson

My Wishes For Christmas In this day and age, the spirit of Christmas has truly become overshadowed by the hustle and bustle of commercialism. With Christmas displays set up in the stores well before Halloween, it’s easier than ever to get lost in the materialism of it all and lose touch with the true meaning of Christmas. Once you factor in all the gift giving, the cooking, the card exchange and all the other Christmas duties and responsibilities you have to perform, you may not only forget the true meaning of Christmas, you may also forget how the true meaning of Christmas feels. The holidays are a time to rekindle old friendships; making time to get together for coffee when otherwise you seem too busy. Calling people you generally don’t make the time for since your life has been so busy. Invite someone over for an evening of fun, again something most people do very little of anymore in their busy lives. It’s a time to let bygones be bygones, and forgive and forget when it comes to your siblings, parents, or friends who’ve maybe upset you sometime in the past year or so.

My Seven Christmas Wishes... May you be surrounded by loved ones throughout the year! May your Christmas be as special and unique as you are! May the New Year begin on a healthy and prosperous note! May God shower his blessings on you and your family! May we experience more tolerance and less bigotry in the World! May we all remember “The Reason For The Season,” Christ, Gods gift to us. May God shower his blessings on you and your family this Christmas.

Secretary Beverly Pochatko

Editorial Staff Editor-in-Chief Darlene Fuchs Darlene@GoldenFoxPro.com Editorial Staff Margita Mandel Amanda Pedersen Chapter News Editor Beverly Pochatko erieoma@verizon.net Membership Erik Wittmann erik25@comcast.net German Correspondent Corinna Bienger corinna.bienger@live.de Layout & Design Stephen Fuchs Stephen@FoxTaleEdit.com Advertising & Classifieds Darlene Fuchs Darlene@GoldenFoxPro.com

Office Staff DANK National Executive Office

4740 N. Western Ave Chicago, Il 60625-2013 Call (773) 275-1100 Toll Free (866) 926-1109 Fax (773) 275-4010 Office Hours:

William Fuchs National President

9 AM to 5 PM / Monday-Friday

Darlene Fuchs Managing Editor

Executive Secretary Eva Timmerhaus Office@dank.org

Office Manager Amelia Cotter Amelia@dank.org

General Information

Article Submission Deadline February/March Issue:

Ein Gesegnetes Weihnachtsfest und ein erfolgreiches neues Jahr. Bill and Darlene Fuchs and Family

January 1st, 2010

German-American Journal - ISSN 1086-8070 - is published bi-monthly and is the official publication of the German American National Congress. Periodicals postage paid at Chicago, Illinois and additional mailing offices.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: German-American Journal 4740 N. Western Ave Chicago, Il 60625-2013

Annual Subscription - Rate: $15.00 www.dank.org/news.html

DANK does not warrant or assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information published herein. DANK reserves the right to change or amend submissions for any reason without prior notice. ©2009 DANK. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the prior written permission of the publisher.


December 09 / January 10

German-American Journal

3

Fröhliche Weihnachten und ein glückliches Neues Jahr

Best wishes for a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

From DANK #71 Erie, PA

From: Reinhard and Donna J. Lippert To: ALL of our DANK Members

Best Wishes to All Our Law Enforcement Friends and Families!

We wish to extend best wishes for a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

Merry Christmas and a Blessed New Year

To all members of DANK Chapter 58 Pittsburgh, PA

From GAPA Milwaukee DANK Chapter Pittsburgh sends Christmas and New Year’s wishes...

To all its members, including sub-chapters Mason-Dixon and Laurel Highlands

Ein Gesegnetes Weihnachtsfest und ein glückliches Neues Jahr Fröhliche Weihnachten und ein glückliches Neues Jahr

From the Indianapolis DANK Chapter

wünscht Euch allen DANK Chapter 30 Cleveland

Fröhliche Weihnachten und ein glückliches Neues Jahr

To all the members and friends of DANK The officers of South Bend extend best wishes for a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

Fröhliche Weihnachten und ein glückliches Neues Jahr

Wünscht Ihnen Ihre deutschsprachige Informationsquelle aus Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz.

1301 W. Long Lake Rd. # 108 , Troy, MI 48098 Phone: 248-641-9944 FAX: 248-641-9946 www.wochenpostusa.com • email: info@wochenpostusa.com

To: unseren Freunden und DANK Mitgliedern From: Ernst Ott und Alexandra Pradella-Ott


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German-American Journal

December 09 / January 10

Merry Christmas and a Blessed New Year

Officers of the SubChapter Mason-Dixon

wish all members and their families a Blessed Christmas and a Happy New Year

To: The Board Members of DANK Chapter Milwaukee Merry Christmas and a Blessed New Year

From Hans and Kathy Wolf to our Friends and Family

Merry Christmas and a Blessed New Year

Schwaben Verein - Chicago To Our Members and Friends

Fröhliche Weihnachten und ein glückliches Neues Jahr

To all our Friends in the DANK Family from Hilde & Rudolf Schloesser.

DANK Chapter Chicago South & Suburbs would like to wish all their members

A Blessed Christmas and a Happy New Year.

Fröhliche Weihnachten und ein glückliches Neues Jahr

Allen unseren Lesern und Freunden wünscht die deutsche Wochenzeitung Eintracht


December 09 / January 10

German-American Journal

Fröhliche Weihnachten und ein glückliches Neues Jahr

5

Fröhliche Weihnachten und ein glückliches Neues Jahr

To: Region Two Chapters From: Donna and Rein Lippert

Der Vorstand und die Mitglieder der

DANK Gruppe Milwaukee

Frohe Weihnachten - Happy New Year

Best Wishes for a Merry Christmas and a Happy, Healthy and Prosperous New Year to all!

Bevery A.Pochatko

DANK Fox Valley Wishing All Our Members & Friends a Happy Holiday Season

’Tis the Christmas Season, also celebrated here in the Southwest USA Phoenix DANK Chapter #48, celebrating its 27th Christmas with 5 members celebrating 50 years as members of DANK.

National Recording Secretary

Wishing Everyone A MERRY CHRISTMAS AND HAPPY NEW YEAR.

Merry Christmas and a Blessed New Year

DANK Chapter #13 Benton Harbor-St. Joseph Michigan

From DANK West

Merry Christmas and a Happy Healthy New Year Euro Lloyd Travel Group

would like to wish DANK members a Blessed Christmas and a Happy New Year

Ron and Erika Zielinski Would like to wish all of our Friends a Blessed Christmas and a Happy New Year.

Transylvania Saxons


6

German-American Journal

December 09 / January 10

DEC

25

1914 - During the extensive battles of the first World War, both the German and British troops on the Western Front put their fighting aside and had a temporary cease fire in the spirit of the holiday. This Christmas Truce included the exchange of gifts and singing of Christmas carols.

Capture The True Spirit Of Christmas By: Darlene Fuchs

While for so many people this holiday season is about rampant commercialism and rushing to keep up with a hectic schedule, we should all jump off the speed train and take time to not only appreciate the true meaning of Christmas, but also to embrace the true spirit of Christmas. In order to embrace the true Christmas spirit, we need to reach down within ourselves and be willing to give. Give of ourselves, our time, our love, and our worldly possessions. Do not think of gift giving as an obligation, but think of it as a symbol of love. While no gift can accurately reflect what we feel for those who are near and dear to us, we can show them that they matter by spending time with them or by selecting a gift with meaning. Embracing the spirit of Christmas also means giving to those who are most in need. It is easy to throw some money into a Salvation Army collection, and that is certainly a

Top Christmas 5 Charities

worthy cause, but if your Christmas spirit needs a boost, then perhaps you should try something more hands-on. If you’re looking to regain some of that lost Christmas spirit, here are some tips on how to capture the true spirit of St. Nikolaus. Local churches, schools and charitable organizations can give you a list of opportunities and places in need of help. For example, collecting toys and clothing for needy children in your community, donating to your local food pantry or volunteering at a soup kitchen are all good options. Schedule a visit at the local nursing home or send a message of hope to children in desperate situations through Operation Christmas Child, which is sponsored by Samaritan’s Purse. You can also get a group together and work on a Habitat for Humanity project. It will make you appreciate what you possess. You can also find many opportunities in your local community at www.allforgood.org Get a few friends or chapter members together and embrace the spirit of St. Nikolaus by helping those in need.

The Salvation Army salvationarmyusa.org

World Capital Of Marzipan By: Darlene Fuchs

History records marzipan as a valued blend of crushed almonds and honey, which dates back to 1800 BC in ancient Egypt. It is believed that Marzipan was introduced to Europe by returning crusaders in the 13th century. During the Renaissance, the kings of France cherished marzipan and had it baked into small cookies called Masepains. By the 14th century, marzipan had found it’s way through much of Europe. At the time, sugar was a scarce and expensive commodity. Therefore, marzipan was typically found only at the tables of the affluent and nobility. Marzipan is a culinary paste created of ground almonds and sugar, which is then frequently sculpted into intricate shapes. Marzipan derives it’s characteristic flavor from bitter almonds, and at times a bit of rosewater. Persipan is a similar but cheaper product, which replaces the almonds with apricot or peach kernels. Marzipan was first used to form detailed figures of animals, men, trees, castles, and other shapes. The figures, made from sugar paste and jellies, were presented at the end of each course of a medieval feast. In the 18th century, when marzipan became a popular confectionery good, it was still reserved as a treat for special holiday occasions. Once sugar production from sugar beets was industrialized in the early 1800s, the price of marzipan dropped quite dramatically. In 1806, Johann Georg Niederegger took over

Toys for Tots

Samaritan’s Purse

toysfortots.org

a confectioner’s shop on Lübeck’s market square and started producing marzipan in large quantities. The launch of his factory also marks the beginning of Lübeck’s history as the renowned “world capital of marzipan.” Niederegger remains the market leader in Germany to this day, producing up to 30 tons of marzipan a day, making it now an everyday confectionery item. With the goal of preserving the integrity of the name “Lübecker Marzipan” in mind, eight marzipan manufactures in the Lübeck area formed the “Lübecker Marzipan Association” in 1974. The manufacturers distinguish their product from other marzipans by requiring strict limitations on the sugar content. “Lübeck Edelmarzipan” is restricted to a sugar content no higher than 41.5%, and “Lübeck Marzipan” no higher than 54.5%. Products must have a sugar content no higher than 67.5% to legally be deemed marzipan. In Germany, as in our own production, the quality of marzipan is taken seriously. The term “Lübeck Marzipan” has even been given protected status by the European Union (EU). Coincidentally, Lübeck is a “Sister City” with Spokane, Washington, where Marzipan Confections is located. Marzipan is hardly considered a luxury item any longer. The present uses of marzipan vary according to the region of the world. Countries use different shapes as traditional treats during specific holiday seasons, varying from the novelty New Year “Glückschwein” (lucky pig), brightly-colored Easter eggs as well as other holiday shapes, to chocolate-covered marzipan loaves and marzipan bars. It is also traditionally used in wedding cakes, Christmas cakes and Stollen.

samaritanspurse.org

Let people in your community see that DANK members and friends are caring. It is sure to bring more joy and happiness into your life. By using some of these suggestions, you will make a difference this year and it will help you to capture the true spirit of Christmas. Remember, Christmas is not really about lights and trees and piles of gifts--it’s really about peace and good will toward one another

Get

Involved

Let’s see how many members and chapters can embrace the true meaning of Christmas by helping and giving to those most in need.

Have someone from your group write a short article on “How We Made a Difference,” and send it to darlene@ goldenfoxpro.com. We’ll publish some of these stories in the next Journal, so get them in by the Jan. 1, 2010.

My Two Front Teeth mytwofrontteeth.org

Make-A-Wish wish.org

The Benefits Of Volunteering By: Darlene Fuchs There are as many reasons to serve as there are people who serve. Volunteering is not just an altruistic act. It’s an opportunity to advance in all areas of your life. Here are a few of the things you can gain when you give of your time and yourself: • • • • •

“... Americans gave, per capita, three and a half times as much to causes and charities as the French, seven times as much as the Germans, and 14 times as much as the Italians. Americans were 15% more likely to volunteer their time than the Dutch, 21% more likely than the Swiss, and 32% more likely than the Germans.”

Connect with your community Promote German goodwill Gain local recognition for your chapter Generate positive press for your chapter Attract new members

Look around and you will see something about American culture that is unlike any other country, their willingness to give across all income levels. These differences are not attributable to demographic characteristics such as education, income, age, sex, or marital status. On the contrary, if we look at two people who are identical in all these ways except that one is European and the other American, the probability is still far lower that the European will volunteer within his community to help the underprivileged than the American would. Anyone traveling to Europe will surely marvel at how different it is from the United States—and how Europeans have trouble understanding the difference. “Individualists,” they call Americans, but the facts show far more personal social concern and interaction in the United States. Here’s an example: In Europe, many leave philanthropy to the state. For Americans, the personal element—in giving, volunteering, and philanthropy, to those in need - form an indispensable principle of democracy. The belief is that Germans are spending less in donating their time for charity because, in the minds of many Germans, charity at home is something the state is supposed to do. An article from “The American” states, “… charitable giving has generally risen faster than the growth of the American economy for more than half a century.” The article also compares US philanthropic characteristics to other nations when it says,

A person starts to live when he can live outside of himself -- Albert Einstein

You may think of volunteer work as a waste of time, or something that millionaires or retirees do with their spare time. Volunteer work is for people who don’t need money or who are bored, right? Wrong. Volunteer work is not just something people with altruistic tendencies do to fill their time. It can also be an excellent source for beefing up a resume, helping your community, and making you feel good about yourself. Here’s the point – if you’re feeling blue, get out there and help someone in need. It gets your mind off of your own pain and forces you to count your blessings. Do something, anything, and do it not just to help others, but to help yourself. You’ll be glad that you did. Volunteering is not just good for the one who gets the help, but for the one who gives it too. I challenge each one of the chapters and it’s individuals to make a difference over the next year by volunteering within your own community. Do it as an event to celebrate St. Nikolaus, Mai Fest, German Day, or Oktoberfest. Make sure to let your community news media know what you are doing. Send a press release out prior to, and after, your event in order to gain visibility within your community. Then send in an article, with photos, and we will publish it in the Journal. Let’s see who can come up with the most creative way to volunteer.


December 09 / January 10

German-American Journal

7

Carrying On Traditions German-American Day Celebration By: Bill Fuchs

Advent, Advent, ein Lichtlein brennt Advent time – the most wonderful time of the year is coming nearer. This is the time when the first preparations for Christmas are being made. The Adventskranz – the wreath – has to be constructed out of fir twigs and branches of other evergreens. Four candles are stuck into the wreath and every Advent Sunday a candle is lit on the Fourth Advent, the wreath is fully aglow with Christmas anticipation. The Adventskalender – the Advent calendar – is made. 24 little presents are individually wrapped and each day the children may open one of them, the last being opened on Christmas eve. The evening of Christmas Eve, the light tinkle of a little bell tells the children that the Weihnachtsmann, or the Christkind, had been there to bring the presents. During the Advent time, the Nikolaustag – St. Nikolaus’ day on December 6th also occurs. The children place a freshly polished shoe in front of the door together with some milk and cookies for poor St. Nikolaus. In the morning, the shoe is filled with nuts, oranges, little sweets and, if you’re lucky, a little present. Adventskaffee is served with the first home baked Christmas cookies. This is the time of year when you invite friends you may not have seen for a long time. The Advent masses are very festive in the decorated churches, which symbolize the joy of Jesus’ birth. Advent time is also a time when you realize that you may not have all your presents for your loved ones, so there’s always a lot of hustling around to get everything done on time. The house has to be cleaned, the Christmas tree has to be bought, the decorations have to be unpacked. of Ownership, Management, and Circulation But overall, Advent is Statement a time of quiet reflection and of a feverish (All Periodicals Publications Except Requester Publications) anticipation for the Christmas holidays. It’s my favorite time of the year, everyone’s in a friendly, thankful mood, more so than at any other time of the year. If only the whole year could be so tranquil. When I am not in Germany, this is the time I miss the most. I haven’t foundStatement any other place in the world where the Advent of Ownership, Management, and Circulation (All Periodicals time is such an important time ofPublications the year. Except Requester Publications) Dear friends and members of DANK, I wish you a very joyful celebration of DANK’s anniversary, and thereafter a tranquil and of Ownership, Management, peaceful Adventszeit andStatement a wonderful Christmas time. and Circulation 1. Publication Title

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On October 6, 1987 President Ronald Regan signed the first Presidential Proclamation declaring that day as the official German-American Day. Ever since the tradition has carried on and is now gaining added momentum with the addition of another day to celebrate, German Unity Day (Tag der Einheit) on October 3. In Chicago DANK started the festivities on October 2, with celebrations at DANK Haus Chicago, which also celebrated the 50th anniversary and grand opening of the “Lost German Chicago” exhibit. On Sunday Chicago area German-American clubs held a grand ceremony at St. Benedict Church and on Monday the German Consulate celebrated Unity Day. On Monday night I was off to Washington DC

for the official German-American Day celebration at the German-American Friendship Garden in front of the Washington Monument. There I met delegations from GAJAC and other German-American organizations from Washington and the surrounding areas to hear proclamations by President Obama and many others. In the mid 1980’s DANK formed GAJAC, with our partners, the Steuben Society of America and the German-American Heritage Foundation of the USA, to establish German-American Day on October 6. We carry on the tradition and still request a yearly proclamation from the President. During my visit I had the opportunity to enjoy lunch with my new friends of the many delegations and Bayard Johnson of the Heritage Foundation gave me a tour of Hockemeyer Hall which will become the new GA Heritage Center and is slated to open on March 20, 2010.

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German-American Journal

1 5

4 4 0 0

10/02/08 $15.00

6 Issues

4740 N. Western Ave, Chicago, IL. 60625-2013 Same as above

German American National Congress, 4740 N. Western Ave, Chicago, IL. 60625-2013

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Nominal Free or Distribution (2) Free or Nominal Rate In-County Copies Included Free or Nominal Rate In-County Copies Included Nominal Rate (2) on PS Form 3541 d. (By FreeMail or on PS Form 3541 Rate Distribution and Free or Nominal Rate In-County Copies Included Nominal Copies Mailed at Other (3) (2) Distribution (By Mail Outside on PS Form 3541the USPS (e.g. First-Class Mail) Rate Classes Through (By Mail and Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other the Mail) Distribution (3) Free and or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other Outside (3) Classes Through the USPS (e.g. First-Class Mail) (By Mail Outside Classes Through the USPS (e.g. First-Class the Mail) and Distribution Outside theMail) Mail (4) (3) Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other the Mail) Outside (CarriersThrough or other the means) Classes USPS (e.g. First-Class Mail) Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail the Mail) (4) Free or Nominal Distribution Outside the Mail or otherRate means) (4) (Carriers (Carriers other means) Rateor Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4)) e. Total Free or Nominal (4) Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail (Carriers or other means) e. Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4)) or Nominal Distribution e. Total Free Distribution (SumRate of 15c and 15e) (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4)) f. Total

German-American Journal

Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4)) e. Total f. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and 15e) Distribution (Sum (See of 15cInstructions and 15e) to Publishers #4 (page #3)) g. Total f. Copies not Distributed Distribution (Sum (See of 15c and 15e) to Publishers #4 (page #3)) f. g. Total Copies not Distributed Instructions h. Copies g. Total (Sum of 15f and g) not Distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4 (page #3))

10/02/09

3,200

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2,410

2,191

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Dec. 2009

in the and ________________________ issue ofManager, this publication. 17. Signature Title of Editor, Publisher, Business or Owner 17. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner 17. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner

Publication not required.

Publication not required. Publication not required. Date Publication not required. Date Date Date

10/02/09

I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil Isanctions certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this (including civil penalties). Iform certify that all information on this form is true andform complete. that anyone who furnishes misleading information this or who omits material furnished or information requested on the may beI understand subject to criminal sanctions (includingfalse finesor and imprisonment) and/oron civil form or who omits material or information requested on the may beI understand subject to criminal sanctions fines or and imprisonment) and/oron civil certify that all information furnished on2this form is true andform complete. that anyone who (including furnishes false misleading information this (including civil penalties). PSIsanctions Form 3526, September 2007 (Page of 3) sanctions (including civil penalties). form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil PS Form 3526, September 2007 (Page 2 of 3) (including civil penalties). PSsanctions Form 3526, September 2007 (Page 2 of 3) PS Form 3526, September 2007 (Page 2 of 3)

Delegation of German American Clubs in the Washington, DC area.

GERMAN-AMERICAN DAY, 2009 BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA A PROCLAMATION Comprising the Nation’s largest ancestry group, German Americans have contributed to our collective identity since the first settlements were founded in the 17th century. Essential to the growth of America, these farmers, soldiers, entrepreneurs, and patriots gave their strength, determination, and in some circumstances, their lives, so we all may experience a brighter tomorrow. It is in this spirit that German Americans continue to enrich our national character, sharing their proud heritage with new generations from every background. Today, we celebrate German Americans for their remarkable role in our Nation’s development. Our citizens of German descent excel in every discipline and  open our minds to the GERMAN-AMERICAN DAY, 2009 expanses of human possibility. When we drive across a suspension bridge, listen to music played onBY a Steinway piano, or send childUNITED to kindergarten, traditions and THE PRESIDENT OF aTHE STATEStheir OF unique AMERICA customs surround us. German Americans have influenced our Nation in myriad ways with their industry, culture, and engagement in public life. A PROCLAMATION Germany and its people have also been active participants in  our Nation’s history. This year, we celebrate the 60th  anniversary of the Federal Republic of Germany, and Comprising the Nation’s largest ancestry group, German Americans have contributed the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. These milestones reinforce the German to our collective identity since the first settlements were founded in the 17th century. people’s dedication to democratic ideals, and we honor the bonds that tie our two nations Essential to  the growth of America, these farmers, soldiers, entrepreneurs, and patriots together. gave their strength, determination, and in some circumstances, their lives, so we all may America is aa stronger because who have established experience brighterNation tomorrow. It isofinthose this families spirit that German Americanslongstanding continue to roots our national country, as well as by those recently emigrated fromgenerations abroad. German enrichinour character, sharing who theirhave proud heritage with new from immigrants, inhabiting every city, German have given much offor themselves throughout every background. Today, wemajor celebrate Americans their remarkable roleour in history, selflessly expanding the reach of the American Dream. On this day, we celebrate our Nation’s development. and honor the past, present, and future contributions of German Americans to the rich Our citizens of German descent excel in every discipline and  open our minds to the and textured story of America. expanses of human possibility. When we drive across a suspension bridge, listen to music NOW, BARACK OBAMA, of the United States America,and by played THEREFORE, on a SteinwayI,piano, or send a childPresident to kindergarten, their unique of traditions virtue of surround the authority in me by the Constitution and the of the customs us. vested German Americans have influenced ourlaws Nation in United States, myriad ways do hereby proclaim culture, Octoberand 6, 2009, as German-American with their industry, engagement in public life. Day. I encourage all Americans to learn more about the history of German Americans and to commemorate the many Germany and its people have also been active participants in  our Nation’s history. contributions they have made to our Nation. This year, we celebrate the 60th  anniversary of the Federal Republic of Germany, and IN WITNESS WHEREOF, have hereunto set my hand this sixthreinforce day of the October, in the 20th anniversary of the Ifall of the Berlin Wall. These milestones German the year dedication of our Lordtotwo  thousand  nine,and andwe ofhonor the Independence the United  States people’s democratic ideals, the bonds thatoftie our two nations of America together. the two hundred and thirty-fourth. America is a stronger Nation because of those families who have established longstanding roots in our country, as well as by those who have recently emigrated from abroad. German BARACK immigrants, inhabiting every major city, haveOBAMA given much of themselves throughout our history, selflessly expanding the reach of the American Dream. On this day, we celebrate and honor the past, present, and future contributions of German Americans to the rich and textured story of America. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim October 6, 2009, as German-American Day. I encourage all Americans to learn more about the history of German Americans and to commemorate the many contributions they have made to our Nation. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day of October, in the year of our Lord two  thousand  nine, and of the Independence of the United  States of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth.

BARACK OBAMA


8

German-American Journal

December 09 / January 10

DEC

22

1989 - Several weeks after the fall of the Berlin Wall, the historic Brandenburg Gate was opened in a ceremony captured by media around the world. Helmut Kohl, the West German chancellor, walked through to be greeted by Hans Modrow, the East German prime minister.

My Memories Of Christmas Past Cheerleading for DANK! …Yes, try to think about that and sleep at night! But that’s what the National Executive Office is all about—cheering for the organization and supporting our members, chapters, and initiatives. As we move forward into 2010 and a new exciting year of changes, we just want to remind you that DANK is still YOUR organization. We’re undergoing some vital transformations to ensure that we stick around and grow for a very long time to come, but your input, feedback, and participation are crucial aspects of what we do. The DANK National Office represents the central administrative force behind the entire organization. We work closely with the Executive Board, chapters and all officers and members on both the local and national levels. Through our administrative tasks, strategic projects, networking at events and online, and our internship opportunities for students, we ensure positive exposure for DANK, attract new and younger members

who will be the future leaders of DANK, and act as the proverbial trade route or Business District of the organization. We look back on a great year and look forward to another one that will be even better…Thanks for being a member! Our Wish List for the New Year includes a new office computer as well as a new database system in the (near) future. We are able to do everything, just a little bit slower due to some outdated technology. If you want to know more about what we’re all about, or you need to catch up on what’s happening, just ask us! As always, our office is open from 9am-5pm Monday through Friday. We are located in the DANK Haus in Chicago, Illinois. If you look on our Imprint on the second page of this Journal, you will find our contact information and several ways to reach us. Remember, Eva and I have very different backgrounds, gifts and abilities, and we are here to make them work for you and for DANK. We are two of the few people who can say, “Hey, that’s my job!”

Sign Up For Membership Online @ www.DANK.org

Fred K. Huttel Sr. and Wife Hilde

By: Fred K. Huttel, Sr. DANK Chapter Erie Member After 80 plus years of experience, where do I start & where do I end? I was born in the central part of Germany, Schmalkalden/ Thüringen. This town was first settled in 874. The City and County was a enclave within Thüringen and belonged to Hessia. My city played a very important part during the German Reformation. It was here that the Princes and Rulers in 1530/31 established a League to support Martin Luther’s Reformation. So, therefore, my up-bringing was very much Lutheran influenced. To Martin Luther, the family was the foundation for a wholesome daily living. My memories of Christmas, I thank my parents for a wonderful childhood. Christmastime for me, during my childhood years, was a very exciting time. In November, we started with our Christmas preparations by fashioning wreaths, one for Advent with four candles, and more for the graves of our ancestors. Just after the 1st Sunday of Advent was Nikolaustag (St. Nicholas Day, December 6th.) On this day was Nikolausmarket; Santa would come to visit us children, with a switch and a sack filled with sweets, apples and nuts. The switch was used on the bad behaved children. I never got sweets! We celebrated within our family, all four Sundays of Advent by lighting up the wreath candles and listening to the Brass Band playing Chorales from the Church steeple. Now, finally, the big day is here, “Heiligabend” Christmas Eve. On this day, the stores closed at noon and everybody had ample time to prepare and celebrate the birth of the Christkind – the Christ Child. We as a family would attend the Christmas Eve Service. O, this service was so festive, beautiful and joyous - unforgettable – with all the special music. After the Church Service, we three families gathered at Grandmother’s house.

We grandchildren would stand in front of the Christmas tree to recite, by memory, a Christmas poem. There were six of us grandchildren. Each of us tried to out do our cousins. Then all of us, grownups and children, would sing all those beautiful Christmas carols. Only then were we allowed to look for our Christmas presents. It wasn’t much, but we knew Grandma loved us. By 8 PM we would make our way home to celebrate Christmas within my own family. At home, the family would sit down for a delicious meal. Afterwards we were allowed into the living room, which had been off limits for us children, all during Advent. Behold, there stood the Christmas tree in all its splendor. My father read the Christmas story from Luke 2:1-16 and afterwards we would sing, sing and sing our hearts out. After 83 years I remember all of them by memory. This time of togetherness, the love, the feeling of security within my family was deeply planted in my heart. The climax for us children was to get to those presents the Christkind had brought us and lined up under the Christmas tree – Weihnachts Baum. The Christkind knew exactly what was on our mind, as way before Advent we children had to write our “wish list”. On Christmas Day we played with our toys the Christkind had brought us. For us children it was always the most joyous time of the year. A time of love deeply etched into my heart. By now, we had a good portion of snow and we children would go sledding and skiing – plenty of good fresh air. We kids had three weeks vacation and lots of time for outside activities. On New Year’s Eve we were allowed to stay up to welcome the New Year. We would play family games and at Midnight wished each other a “Happy New Year” – good health and with a promise to love and respect each other. I have one brother, Ulrich Juergen Huttel still living in Germany.


December 09 / January 10

German-American Journal

The Way To The Finish Line By: Susanne Mickey DANK Chapter Chicago Member

It is three o’clock in the morning and I am still not sleeping. I will do a Triathlon in about 4 hours and I am too nervous to relax. I get up and put my tri stuff on and go into the kitchen to make coffee. This is my first Triathlon, I am 45 years old and I started running 3 years ago. I have accomplished a couple of Half Marathons but this Triathlon business is a whole different ball game. It will take me about 4 hours to finish, if I finish… It all started in April in a pool in Arizona when I got into a conversation with an old lady with a Speedo swimsuit on. I was in awe how well she swam and started talking. She told me that she still does Triathlons and she is training for her next race. She was 86 years old. I never felt so unaccomplished in my life. That is it I thought to myself you have to try this. So I flew home and signed up for the big Chicago Triathlon for the long Olympic distance. The damage was done and after a couple of days I started getting second thoughts. What had I done? Did I lose my marbles? I have many flaws but I am not a quitter. So off I

Susanne Mickey proudly crosses the finish line of the Chicago Triathlon

went to the pool and I started training swimming, after 30 years. The running part was easiest. I knew I can do that, after all I ran for the last 3 years. But the biking was a horse of a different color. A friend who does Triathlon’s trained me; every Sunday morning we went out for a 3 hours bike ride whether my behind liked it or not… . I trained 6 days a week for 3 months, running, swimming, biking. I thought I never survive the training. My husband thought I completely lost it. My kids did not know what to think, but my girl friends were all thinking I had a screw lose. The whole thing became my personal Mount Everest. Could I make it through the training? The way to the goal was as important as the goal itself. Now I am standing in my kitchen, it is race day and I am nauseous, I hardly can eat my peanut butter sandwich. My friend brings me to the lakefront with all my gear, bike and neoprene. It is so cold outside and it is dark. There are 9000 people trying to set up their bikes and everybody is nervous. The lines at the restrooms are endless. Three hours later, it is time to put on the neoprene and wait for the starting signal together with many people in my wave. We stand on a platform and the water is freezing. The signal comes and off in the water I go, now there is no turning back. 30 min later after a very good swim, the nerves calm down a bit and I run to my bike to change into t-shirt and shoes, dropping the neoprene. I drive around the curve going onto Lakeshore Drive and the wind hits me like a wall, peachy I thought, we will see now how good the training really was. 1.5 hours later and after seeing handicapped people on bikes, I am glad that I have my health and I count my blessings. These people are amazing. I finish the bike and change into running shoes and try to run, it is hard, the muscles in my legs are tight as a drum from the bike. Finally 5 minutes into it, I am in my cruising speed and the last part of my race begins. I have 1 hours running ahead of me, the sun is out now and I am feeling good. Everything went well so far. I chat with fellow racers, women my age on the running path. We are all proud to be there and grin at each other. I see older people running and I am amazed how they stay in such a good shape enabling them to do a triathlon and enjoying it too. Finally I see the 1 Mile marker and I start to smile at myself, the legs fall into a sprint. I have no idea where that energy comes from but it feels great. I have never felt more alive and energetic. 400 meters to go, around the corner and there is the finish line. I see my girl friends waving and screaming, I cannot believe it, I run through the goal and I start laughing. There is a felling of deep accomplishment and satisfaction and simply joy. The girls are asking me what is my next undertaking. I am not sure. I know that there will be something, I cannot put my fingers on it yet, but I know I am not done yet…

9

Oktoberfest At The South Bend Chapter

Clara Custer and Sonja Wilson enjoy the celebration with a dance

By: Christine Weiss On October the 10th our members and friends got together at Wiseguys to have a fun time Bavarian style. It was nice to see such a great turn out. Some ladies wore pretty Dirndls and others put on a Tiroler hat just to be in style for this great traditional festival. After a hearty down to earth dinner we settled back for a great evening. The Bavarian music echoed through the room and welcomed the couples to the dance floor. It was an evening of friendship, fun and laughter. It was a great time for all of us. Who would have ever known that on October the 12th, 1810 when Crown Prince of Bavaria and Princess Theresia were married and declared a five day wedding celebration to all the Bavarians that this would be the beginning of future Oktoberfests known the world over!

Pittsburgh, Erie, and Chicago Chapters Meet in Cincinnati

Reviving A Tradition Oktoberfest Was A Resounding Success By: Stefan Pigler DANK Chapter Cleveland

On Friday October 23, an old tradition of showing real old movies was somewhat revived by our chapter... We did not actually show an old movie, but the tradition that seamed forgotten since the death of Johanna Roth five years ago was reinstated. It was remotely successful, since 27 people showed up to see “The Lives of Others”. This film won the Oscar for best foreign picture in 2006. The movie deals with East Germany’s Secret Police (Stasi) monitoring the population during the 1980’s. Hardly anyone was above suspicion.   The audience of Germans and Americans appreciated this German movie, with English subtitles, a great deal, and many stayed after the movie to have a lively discussion.  In January, we are planing on doing more of the same, though with lighter subject matters, on Sunday afternoons.  On Sunday, November 15, we are holding our Annual “National Day of Mourning”  (Volkstrauertag), at the German Cultural Gardens.  Thereafter it is Christmas Party time during the whole month of December for the various German organizations, including ours.

By: Ernst Jung Mason Dixon Sub Chapter

Congratulations to all who helped make this 2nd annual Uniontown DANK Oktoberfest a resounding success, attended by over 100 people.  The Oktoberfest Committee did an excellent job and everyone who pitched in to help them deserve much credit. The food was excellent, the music very German, the ladies deserts were great, and the Gemuetlichkeit abounded. The cause for the growth in the attendance can be attributed to “word of mouth” by the club members. The club gained one new member that day and was successful by ending up in the “black” after the bills were all paid. Again, it took the volunteering of the dedicated members to make this year’s Oktoberfest a success and they deserve a big round of applause.

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Over 100 people enjoyed Oktoberfest’s Gemütlichkei

By: Erik Wittmann 28 Pittsburgh DANK members and guests, plus 4 DANK members from the Erie Chapter, traveled to Cincinnati to meet up with about 30 DANK members from the various Chicago chapters to celebrate Oktoberfest- Zinzinnati style! An invitation for Pittsburgh to come to Cincinnati was issued by Cobi Stein from the Lake County DANK chapter several months back. Through the effort of Cobi and Erik Wittmann, with help from others, both Chicago and Pittsburgh made separate travel arrangements but shared a group of rooms at the Millennium Hotel in Cincinnati . Additionally, the two groups joined forces and had dinner at the Hofbrau House in Newport Kentucky. Furthermore, many members of both groups enjoyed a “ Just Ducky” sightseeing tour of both Cincinnati and Newport, Kentucky. Zinzinatti Oktoberfest is the second largest Oktoberfest, next to Munich’s, and was very enjoyable. Many of our participants indicated that they may want to go back next year, or possibly go to another major festival, in conjunction with other chapters who have the same interest. The two pictures show both Pittsburgh and Erie Chapter members mingling with the massive crowd darning the opening ceremonies.


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German-American Journal

December 09 / January 10

DANK Chicago’s 50th Shines On The Next 50 Sure we could have had a dinner dance with dancing, dinner and awards in a big ballroom. Oh wait, we did - but we went even bigger. We lit up the entire building to celebrate the thrilling future primed by the past. Plans for the 50th Gala were already so large that adding in a museum opening, a gallery opening, full facility tours and sporting displays, barely posed any issues. Guests began the evening with a glass of sekt in hand in the Scharpenberg Gallery at the opening of Legacy Project. In its inaugural year, Legacy Project is a treasure in film and photography of 8 senior DANK members’ personal recollections of life in Germany, their emigration, and the German American experience. Beautifully presented on three screens, some of the subjects’ children had never even heard what was shared in the interviews. The project will be handled each year - we already have an eye on the next round of subjects. On the opposite side of the Gallery , the exhibit “Lost German Chicago” awaited its official opening by Maikonigin Katie Luecht and Alderman Schulter. Once the ribbon fluttered away, guests streamed into the newly renovated and professionally curated exhibit. Visitors moved from section to section , exclaiming over the memories pulled forth by menus and photographs and gazing upon artifact after artifact in their public debuts. DANK and GAPA museum docents were on hand to share a story, confirm a fact, or act as a resource.

The evening drifted up to the Marunde Ballroom, which was awash in roses and candlelight. President, Dagmar Freiberger, and new General Consul Hückmann welcomed the attendees form the stage. Bill Fuchs, DANK National President, presented Dagmar Freiberger, President of DANK Chicago with a plaque honoring the 50 years of accomplishments and congratulations on their many successes. Hans Lohr received the Marting Hartig Volunteer of the Year award for his tireless devotion at the Kino, Kaffee und Kuchen program, which is a well attended and prosperous part of the calendar. Sara Hartig received the inaugural member of the Year award. The award was inspired by Sara’s ever present voice and hands at DANK programming. Unfortunately, there are no awards for the best potato salad. Sara would have won that also. Next to grace the spotlight were Waltraud Tooren, Werner Massat, Ferdinand Fritsche and Erich Wiencke - all members since January 1, 1959 . They kicked off the 50th Gala by releasing a multitude of shimmering balloons on the dance-floor. After enjoying the buffet and a time or so under the disco ball, guest drifted back to the museum, up to the Terrasse, down to watch Brandenburg Schützen Verein marksmanship and enjoy a rare glimpse of Schlaraffia Chicagoana’s space. 50 years properly celebrated, the 51st year already zooming upward.

DANK National President Bill Fuchs presents DANK Chicago President Dagmar Freiberger with a congratulatory plaque for their 50 years of success

Visitors enjoy the opening of the museum

50 Year Celebrants of DANK Chicago

Caught up in the memories of the German-American experience


December 09 / January 10

German-American Journal

11

Pappas Honors DANK German American National Congress 50th Anniversary

Cook County Treasurer Maria Pappas presents a letter of congratulations to national president, DANK German American National Congress, William Fuchs and editor of their national publication, Darlene Fuchs in her office, for 50 years of ongoing contributions to the German American community. “For half a century, DANK has been in the forefront of ensuring friendship between the United States and Germany, which I support and salute most heartily,� Said Treasurer Pappas.

Cook County Treasurer Maria Pappas presents an award of excellence in her office to Stephen Fuchs, layout and design editor of the German American Journal, for the 50th anniversary of DANK German American National Congress and for ongoing contributions to the German American community.


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German-American Journal

December 09 / January 10

2009 DANK National Convention Recap

2009-2011 DANK National Elected Board. (L-R) Donna Lippert: Vice President, Beverly Pochatko: Secretary, Bill Fuchs: President, Erik Wittmann: Vice President, and Maria Thompson: Treasurer.

By: Darlene Fuchs Another great DANK Convention is now in the record books. From all reports the DANK Convention, hosted by DANK South in Tinley Park, was a great success. For those who attended, you know what I mean, but for those that did not make it this year, you missed an outstanding time. From beginning to end the convention was full of new information with a positive outlook for the future. During the 4 day weekend delegates filled the Holiday Inn hotel rooms, laughed, swapped stories in the

hallways and sat through almost six hours of seminars and workshops. Registration opened on Thursday, November 5th, to a line of eager delegates wanting to be the first with their badges and totes, sponsored by Hofbräu. Bob Miske and his crew had the registration process organized and well thought out. On Friday, during the seminars, several attendees took note of the new and younger presenters. Others observed a different spirit and an air of anticipation as a celebratory video of DANK’s 50 years of pride, produced by Stephen Fuchs, kicked

off the day’s events. “Now, more than ever, we need innovative ideas to help move our organization forward,” was the overwhelming tone of the seminars. The delegates learned creative new strategies for running and growing their chapters and the legal requirements one must be aware of. They were asked to challenge their assumptions, test out new ideas and go home with concrete plans to improve their chapter’s effectiveness. Friday evening the DANK National Awards Ceremony and the Youth Ambassador Inauguration were held at DANK Chapter Chicago South’s club house. National President, Bill Fuchs, presented Bill Schimidt, who graciously accepted a plaque dedicated to DANK South in grateful acknowledgment of 50 years of outstanding service on behalf of the German-American National Congress and all German-Americans. Additional awards went to the following people: “Honored German American Awards” were presented to Martin Walthier, Reinhard Lippert and Rudolf Schloesser for their outstanding commitment to their chapters. “Dedication and Service Award” was presented to Eva Timmerhaus, “Germans in History Award” went to Wolf Fuhrig and the “Special Merit Award” was given to Eberhard Fuhr. Stephen Fuchs was presented the “Heritage Award” for his outstanding service to DANK and the German American community. He created the DANK website and designed the new DANK Journal layout. The “Elsbeth Seewald Award” was awarded to Dora Totzke for her invaluable commitment to promoting the German language and

culture. The “Willi Scharpenberg Award” was presented to  Maria Thompson for her unmatched generosity and ceaseless devotion to German-American ideals. R. Erik Wittmann was presented the “Ernst ten Eicken Award” for bringing remarkable vision, inspirational leadership and a seriousness of purpose to the organization. Through his vision of a greater DANK community, he has helped faltering chapters find a solution and a means to create new chapters. It was a honor for National President, Bill Fuchs to present DANK Chicago South members Jakub Setter and his wife Margaretha Setter the newly designed 50 year longevity pins. Later in the evening baskets full of goodies, provided by various chapters, were won by individuals holding lucky raffle tickets. During the evening the Youth Ambassador finalists, Andrea Dietz, Miss DANK

Andrea Dietz and Katharina (Kate) Freiberger

Award Recipients of Service and Dedication to DANK

Honored German-American Award presented to Reinhard Lippert

Honored German-American Award presented to Rudolf Schloesser

Honored German-American Award presented to Martin Walthier

“Dedication and Service Award” was presented to Eva Timmerhaus in appreciation for her many years of outstanding service and dedication to DANK and the whole German American Community.

Stephen Fuchs was presented the “Heritage Award” for his outstanding service to DANK and the German American community. He created the DANK website and designed the new DANK Journal layout.

R. Erik Wittmann was presented the “Ernst ten Eicken Award” for bringing remarkable vision, inspirational leadership and a seriousness of purpose to the organization.


December 09 / January 10

German-American Journal

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Our vision should be to educate people of our existence and to foster growth and direction for the future leaders of our organization. Our name says it well, DANK “Thanks” for those that created our organization and “Thanks” to those who will lead us into a future of opportunities. This may require a pioneer spirit from some of our delegates and complete faith in the leaders of DANK. Realizing that supporting the members and chapter leaders is essential to the organization’s mission, we must welcome input and participation as we work together to revitalize DANK. Convention Delegates taking in the new information during Friday’s workshops.

Former Miss DANK’s (L-R): Claudia Lieder-Craig, Margaret Frank-Limmer, Katie Viebach, Gertrude FrankPodobas, and Marianne Dietz

Chicago South and Katharina (Kate) Freiberger from DANK Chicago North gave speeches in both English and German for the final phase of the competition. The winner, Ms Dietz, graciously requested that she and runner-up Katharina co-share the title of DANK Youth Ambassador during her acceptance speech. Her overture received a standing ovation.

Bill Schimidt accepted a plaque dedicated to DANK South in acknowledgment of 50 years of service on behalf of DANK and all German-Americans.

The future looks good as National Treasurer Maria Thompson explained her annual report in Saturday’s business meeting. For the first time in several years DANK saw expenditures decrease, moderate new membership growth and a steady increase in inquiries for starting new

groups. The nominations for the DANK National Executive Board’s elected positions where finalized prior to the convention. The Presidency was again uncontested and Bill Fuchs was unanimously re-elected. There were two nominees for the Vice Presidential positions: Erik Wittmann and Donna Lippert. Jerry Schliephake was nominated from the floor and acccepted the nomination. After the votes were counted Erik Wittmann and Donna Lippert were reelected to the positions of Vice-President. Beverly Pochatko was uncontested for the position of Secretary and Maria Thompson was uncontested for the position of Treasurer, both are expected to serve for the next two years. After the elections, Werner Juretzko, who witnessed the end of World War II, described his activities as a US spy in East Germany, the difficult and dangerous tasks, the life which lead him into the newly created Soviet-occupied zone and finally his arrest. He talked about the Secret Police and the methods used against the captured young men. On Saturday night delegates and guests attended the Gala Ball Celebration to support the 50th Anniversary of DANK. Andrea Haupt, opera singer, sang the American and German National Anthems for the delegates and guests. The evening commenced with the emcee welcoming everyone and then inviting Bill Schimidt, President of DANK South, Mayor Jim Holland of Frankfort, Consul General Onno Hückmann and DANK National

President Bill Fuchs forward to bring greetings and congratulations to all present. Dr. Wolf Fuhrig later spoke about the comparison of how Mr. Koerner, a German immigrant, helped Abraham Lincoln seek the presidency. Sunday morning was off to a slow start as the first meeting of the new DANK National Executive Board was held. During this time questions from the delegates were addressed and the course of action for the next two years was determined. In the months leading up to the 2011 convention we will learn from countless others, whose legacy leaves a lasting impression on our lives. We must focus our efforts on our communities and it’s needs, while providing an array of opportunities and outreach in order to become a positive organization that will attract new members.

Winners of the DANK 50th Anniversary Raffle: 1st prize: $1000 Gunter Kison of South Bend, IN 2nd prize: HD TV Anita Kaylor of Estero, FL 3rd Prize: $500 Cindy Madura of Erie, PA 4th Prize: $250 Ted Joachim of Bridgman, MI 5th prize: $100 Patricia Jones of Chicago, IL 6th prize: $50 Jack Williams of Menomonee Falls, WI

Some DANK South Convention Committee Members (L-R): Martin Walthier, Gary Dietz, Kathy Kruss, Christine Walthier, Bill Schmidt, and Anita Walthier.

Online Exclusive See pictures from the Pajama Party that went late into the night just after Saturday’s Gala Dinner exclusively on the DANK National Blog!

DANK.org/blog

Erik Wittmann and Andrea Haupt (singer for the American and German National Anthems) enjoying Saturday’s Gala Dinner and Ball

You never know who or what you may find waiting for you there!


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German-American Journal

December 09 / January 10


December 09 / January 10

German-American Journal

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German-American Journal

December 09 / January 10

A Walk Down Memory Lane Celebrating DANK Chicago South’s 50th Anniversary By: Anita Walthier Deutsch Amerikanische National Kongress, abbreviated D.A.N.K. as we all know it, had an elected National board in late 1958. On June 23, 1959 the first chapter of this organization was established as DANK Chicago South & Suburbs, with only 27 members. This chapter was founded at the Melody Club House located at 60th & Elizabeth Street and the first president elected was Josef (Joe) Noe. Membership grew rapidly and attendance increased at the meetings and dances held in the Dorchester Inn in Dolton. Despite a tornado’s massive destruction that hit the south side of Chicago and its suburbs on June 10, 1967, Miss DANK Heidi Schladitz passed her crown to Christine Kobi, who represented the chapter in the Chicago Von Steuben Day parade, followed by Miss Angelica Gehrig, who was crowned Miss DANK in 1969. DANK’s sponsored flights to Germany and other destinations via Lufthansa Airlines, caused the chapter to grow tremendously in the late sixties and early seventies. Hiawatha campground, the setting for DANK South’s annual picnics, is where two members Jimmy Kron and Lothar Gehrig started “The Tempos.” which is part of the current band renamed the “Phenix.”

In 1972, the National organization became incorporated and Mr. Gottfried “Fred” Gold became the president of Chicago South. Younger members started to join the chapter, bringing new ideas to the meetings. Political dignitaries participating in club sponsored activities were honored to recieve the DANK Space Medallions. The Space Medallions were a representation of the German scientist Werner von Braun, who was partially responsible for sending rockets, with American astronauts, to the moon. This was one German step for man-kind and another German-American connection between the two countries. Vice President Heinz Stroble followed Fred Gold as president of Chapter South. During his presidency, the chapter held its first Schlachtfest, with an attendance of over 500, which was celebrated at Palos Country Club in the years to come. Former President, Guenther Frank, was re-elected in 1974. He was honored when his daughters, Gertrude and a few years later Margaret, were elected Miss DANK and then Miss DANK USA. Other Miss DANK’s throughout the 1970’s were Roseanne Hubbard, Waltraud Geiser, and Suzanne Wenk. The DANK Chicago South Youth Group started up under president Herbert Frand and adviser Charistine Kobi, who is a former Miss DANK. They held their first dance at Smitty’s lounge, in Crestwood, with a hard rock & roll band to attract the younger generation. To keep the German culture alive, other youth group functions incorporated German music and their participants eventually rose to approximately 30 members. The whole idea behind establishing a Youth Group was to foster future Chicago South board members in order to keep the Chapter vital. Unfortunately, as the young people went their own ways the group dissolved. In 1983, DANK South president Guenther Frank and board, invited members & guest to celebrated 300 years of German immigration into the United States by cohosting a German celebrity, Peter Sebastian, along with Armin Homann. August 4, 1984 marked the club’s 25th Anniversary with Heidi Kuppelwieser as the Miss DANK

USA representative. At the end of 1984, Manfred Quast became president followed by Gerald Lepinske and then John Schmidt, who was voted into office in 1985. Chicago South started the Chapter’s first German Language School for adults in Chicago’s Mt. Greenwood neighborhood, with the help of John Schmit, Tim Garrett, and coordinator Sharon Wolf. The school also taught the German language to children ages 4-12, who in the late 1980’s formulated a youth group once again. Throughout the chapter’s existence, there was always discussion of building a club Haus. In 1987, under president Jerry Lepinski, 7 acres were purchased in Mokena, Illinois and a “DANK South Alpine House” sign was constructed by members Paul Moser and Martin Walthier. Membership grew to over 400 families and the chapter incorporated itself as the Frankfort-Mokena Heritage Society. Unfortunately, due to residential development and zoning changes, the property was sold and the search for a location continued. Theresa Lepinski was elected Miss DANK Chicago South in 1986, who then crowned Miss Erika Wuetig, 1986-87, to reign as queen. This was also a historic time in German culture when President Ronald Reagan declared National German American Day. In 1987, Tim Garrett was elected president and served for 14 years. Erika Wuetig carried the torch of Miss DANK to her sister, Elke, as Miss DANK 1987-88. In 1989, Sandra Biedron became Miss DANK and in 1991 was the 2nd runner up in the Miss DANK USA pageant. DANK Chapter Chicago South proudly received the 1st place Mayor Choice Award after participating in the annual Frankfort Fall Festival parade. Over 250,000 people attended the event, which took place over Labor Day weekend. In 1995, members showed their support when Melanie Bertrand became runner up in the Miss DANK USA pageant, which was held in Milwaukee during the 35th Anniversary and National Convention. The following year Melanie’s best friend, Melanie Salzman, became Miss DANK South and in turn, she crowned Daria Baker in 1997. Through the efforts of Paul Bertrand and Mayor Rossi, (Village of Frankfort) a sister city was established between Weidhausen, Germany, DANK Chicago South & Suburbs, and the Village of Frankfort. In 1998, Kathryn

Viebach became Miss DANK Chicago South. Kathryn (Katie) was a former student of the language class, a youth group member, and she is currently the President of DANK chapter Peoria. As the century was ending, so did the search for the future site of the DANK Chicago South clubhouse. On November 16, 2000, 5 acres of land were finally purchased in Frankfort, Illinois. The “Baucommitte” consisted of President Tim Garrett, Jerry Lepinske, Ed Wolf, Martin Walthier, Guenther Kranz, Dr. Paul Bertrand, Gail Knight, and general contractor/member Paul Moser. The ground breaking took place June 15, 2001. The hopes and dreams of many were enfolding as members worked together to make the dream a reality. The opening ceremonies took place in August of 2002, along with the crowning of Miss DANK, Paulette Bertrand, followed by Amanda Breski, who was crowned in 2003. The DANK organization now had 3 established clubhouses: Chicago-North, Benton Harbor-Michigan, and Chicago South-Frankfort, Illinois. After many accomplishments, Tim Garrett turned over the presidency to William “Bill” Schmidt in 2004. Krista Boehm was the reigning Miss DANK, who turned over her reign to Katarina Hartung in 2005. In 2006 Frankfort village mayor Jim Holland suggested a joint event with DANK South and that was the beginning of German Heritage Days, which continues to be a successful event. During Joe Osterhout’s term as president in 2006, an extension to the patio-beer garden and storage shed were built and the pavilion was dedicated to Josefa (Josephine) Walthier, who was a member for 41 years. At the last DANK National Convention in November 2007, former president Tim Garrett was presented the Ernst ten Eicken award, Miss DANK Katarina Hartung was awarded the Rising Star and later that year Andrea Dietz was appointed Miss DANK Chicago South. During the last decade Chicago South has grown due to the dedication and teamwork the members have contributed. It is what holds the future open with vast opportunities for the generations to enjoy.


December 09 / January 10

German-American Journal

17

DEC

02

1990 - Helmut Kohl won the first free, fair and democratic all-German election by a landslide to become Chancellor of Germany. Kohl previously held the title of Chancellor of West Germany beginning in 1982. This was the first election after Germany’s reunification.

DANK Chicago North School Teacher Nominated For 2009 GLSC Merit Award By: Francy McNamara

The GLSC is firmly committed to supporting and promoting the German language. Our DANK German Language Schools are members of this organization. GLSC recognizes outstanding teachers and administrators of its member schools. At its annual national conference in New York at the German Consulate, the GLSC presents two Merit Awards annually. The criteria for selection as a qualified candidate for the GLSC Merit Award require exemplary commitment and outstanding performance. Award recipients are selected nationwide from qualified candidates.” Two DANK German Language Teachers have previously been awarded the GLSC Merit Award: Gertrud Golsch and Margaret Bohac (DSS Arlington). GLSC Trustee and DANK Superintendent Christa Garcia is proud to announce the 2009 Merit Award Nominee Virginia Apel, DSS Chicago: Virginia’s Colleague States: “Since starting at the DANK Chicago North School in 1993 Virginia Apel has

Virginia Apel studying at the ZfA-Teacher  Training Seminar on Oct. 11, 2009

been the backbone to the school, the faculty staff and foremost the students. In all my years with the school I have heavily relied on her support, her ideas, her creativity, her foresight, her diligent and active involvement in all aspects of the curriculum,

Mapping German Immigration In The Midwest Source: www.spurensuchemidwest.org The factual significance of German immigration to the Midwest – and the US as a whole, for that matter – seems to be strangely at odds with its public perception. Thus Chicago’s immigration specialist Melvin G. Holli asks: ‘Why is there so little German-American ethnicity in the slipstream of public consciousness?’ Each history of Chicago is, of course, divided in the time before and after, the dividing event being the Great Fire. notwithstanding the question as to whether Mrs. O’Leary’s cow had or had not, the Great Fire marked ending and beginning … and a little known episode underlines both presence and presence of mind of German immigrants. It is the story of the German engineer Trautmann, whose presence of mind and courage the Chicago Water Towers owe their survival. Erected in New Gothic style in 1869, the water works were amongst the few buildings withstanding the flames: ‘The night crew at the Waterworks was on alert, guarding every exposed part of the building. The water-storage tower was only slightly damaged…’ (Donald L. Miller, City of the Century, New York 1997, p 153) In charge was chief-engineer Frank Trautmann, some forty years working in the Chicago landmark on Michigan Avenue. He had arrived in New York in 1825, working for a ship company first and later moving on to Chicago. When, on October 8th, 1871 flames raced towards the pumping station, Trautmann and his assistants used wet sails from nearby

Lake Michigan to cover the roof and after two days water supplies could be restored to the burned-out city. Events like these and the role of German-American personalities are made visible on a time line, showing the German-American Heritage of Chicago (and the Midwest). One entry is dedicated to Herman Joseph Berghoff who opened the doors of the Berghoff Café in 1898 as a showcase for his celebrated Dortmunderstyle beer. Originally located at the corner of State and Adams Streets, one door down from its present location, the café sold beer for a nickel and offered sandwiches for free. Until 1917, when the United States entered the First World War, German Americans had been one of America’s favored immigrant groups, but since then those of German descent at times met with fierce hostility and quietly preserved their cultural traditions away from the public eye. German-American involvement in American life since World War Two, furthermore, has barely been studied. Whether the lowered profile, which contrasts with that of other ethnic groups, will continue in the twenty-first century, may depend on the success of local studies such as pertaining to the Midwest and also on the impact of the Society of German American Studies. (SGAS) www. ulib.iupui.edu/kade/ But what about the other regions of the Midwest? (M.G. Holli is Professor Emeritus of history at the University of Illinois at Chicago; in his contribution: German American Ethnic and Cultural Identity from 1890 Onward, in: Holli and Jones (eds), Ethnic Chicago. A Multicultural Portrait, Grand Rapids, MI 1995, p. 93-109)

finding, reviewing and purchasing teaching material, planning events, being very organized and displaying authority that is guiding in a forward direction one likes to follow, being on track with current and future events by holding frequent teacher meetings and preparing the staff for their duties. Her tireless involvement in making the school a better and more fun place for students, parents and the staff has left a profound image of our commitment to teaching and the continuation of the German language in an area where so many German descendants still live and work and mingle with business enterprises and events close to the German culture that is unique to the Chicago area. Her involvement in all aspects of the school is proven by the results of the DANK Chicago North School in terms of an excellent staff with many having served over 20 years, with a repeating student body of about 100 attendees having achieved outstanding academic results, school material that is challenging and stimulating for the children as well as exciting for the teachers to use in class. Virginia has been active in getting things

done, with some help of course, as even she can not do it all alone. But just by seeing the class rooms, new paint, new furniture in kid- friendly colors, new CD players, new TVs, new TV tables and black boards, new books and filing cabinets and lockers on rolls. And don’t forget, she got brooms and dustpans for all classrooms and even came in on her free time to wash windows!!! Virginia has been 100%+ committed to the school, the staff by tirelessly promoting teacher seminars at the DANK School (always bringing goodies to eat and coffee and yes, real cream) or nationally through the ZfA and the Goethe Institute. She thinks foremost of the students with hands-on efforts, uncounted hours of labor, creative thinking, planning and executing jobs on time. We just can’t do without her. Virginia Apel deserves this Merit Award! Previous DANK Merit Award Winners 2007: Margret Bohac Chicago Northern Suburbs 2003: Gertrud Golsch Chicago Northern Suburbs

National DANK Education Committee Report

German language teachers from Illinois, Michigan and Ohio at the In-Service Workshop on Oct. 11, 2009 (photo credit: Christa Garcia)

By: Christa Garcia All of the DANK German Language School children were asked quite a while ago to participate in a poster contest about a famous German-American in anticipation of German American Day October 6. The posters submitted were judged by the National DANK Education Committee, Dr. Anne Marie Fuhrig, Alexandra Pradella-Ott and Christa Garcia according to 1. choice of subject matter of a famous GermanAmerican, 2. artistic layout, and 3.neatness and correctness of German spelling. Each child had to give a short description of the person displayed and the German American significance. Four winners emerged from those posters submitted. The four GermanAmericans chosen were: Noah Schilling, 11 years old – John Augustus Roebling, Dylan Thomas, 13 years old, Franz Sigel, Jane Knox, 12 years old – Anni Albers, and Charlie Bauer, 10 years old, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. These posters were exhibited

at our DANK National Convention in November at the Convention Hotel. The new German Language Coordinator, Gert Wilhelm, was introduced at the last National DANK Executive Meeting. His credentials are rather impressive: He received degrees in German Language and Literature, English and German as a Foreign Language (DaF-Deutsch als Fremdsprache) and taught many years in high schools in Hamburg, Germany. He then became the administrator at the Deutsche Schule in Barcelona, Spain. In the US he was located in St. Louis as the Language Expert/Goethe Institute before accepting the ZfA position here in Chicago. Gert Wilhelm held his first Teacher training seminar for 21 teachers including teachers from Michigan and Ohio on Sunday, October 11, 2009 at the DANK Haus. His topic: „Fortbildung zu den Stufenpruefungen DSDI (A2/B1) und DSD II (B2/C1).“ The workshop was organized by DANK Superintendent Christa Garcia.


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German-American Journal

December 09 / January 10

“The Adventures of Oskar and Atticus” now has over 100 Fans on Facebook! Thank you, Fans! And don’t forget to send us your ideas, story titles, or a picture you’ve drawn of Oskar and Atticus to: Oskar@ dank.org or Atticus@dank.org. They’ll write back and we may even print your work in a future edition of the Journal!

Oskar and Atticus Eat Christmas Cookies! By: Amelia Cotter

It was a gray winter day. The Christmas tree glowed in the living room and it smelled like baking in the kitchen. Atticus wanted to sleep in the tree, but found a nice warm place on the coffee table where he could sleep in peace in front of the tree instead. “Ah,” he said softly and fell asleep comfortably. But soon there came the big curious nose of Oskar, sniffing over Atticus and his sleeping place. “Atticus,” whispered Oskar. “Yes,” Atticus whispered back, pretending like he wasn’t annoyed. “What is that you’re sleeping on?” “That’s my sleeping rock, Oskar,” answered Atticus calmly, still whispering. “All snakes have something like this. Nice and warm, meant for a snake just like me.” “That’s not a rock, Atticus.” “Yes it is.” “No, it’s a cookie. And you’re lying on a plate full of cookies and Dani will be mad if she finds you there!” “What!” Atticus was suddenly wide awake and looked around. Everywhere he saw colorful cookies in the form of trees, bells, people, and ice skates. “Gross!” he said and slithered off the table next to Oskar. “The cookies look tasty.” “What are they exactly?” “Christmas cookies!” Oskar sniffed the air. “Gingerbread and butter cookies, to be exact. I just want to eat one. One of each, of course.” “Just one,” Atticus said sarcastically and laughed. “No way. I know you and you’ll eat a whole bunch right away.” “No, not at Christmas!” These cookies

are very special and are mostly only eaten by people around this special time of year. Would you also like one?” “No. Well, okay, I’ll try…” Oskar carefully took a butter cookie with his mouth and put it on the floor in front of Atticus. “Take a piece!” Atticus’ tongue flicked over the cookie, which was decorated with green sugar. “Yuck! Tastes likes sh—“ “Atticus!” “Shoes! You can have it.” Oskar ate the whole cookie without question, and wagged his tail happily. He had green sugar on his nose and in his whiskers. “Merry Christmas, Atticus!” “Merry Christmas, Oskar. And a Happy New Year. I’m glad because you’re glad.” “So much gladness!” The two heard quiet laughing in the background. Dani was standing in the corner. “That was sweet, you two, but there are no cookies here for dogs and snakes. They’re only for the friends that are coming to the Christmas party! Come on, we have to get you ready so that you look handsome for our guests.” Oskar and Atticus smiled. “But there will also be a little present for the animals here soon,” she said and winked. She took the boys in her arms and gave each one a Christmas kiss. “A present,” said Atticus. Maybe a genuine warm sleeping rock for me!” Oskar nodded his head. “And a telescope for me, because next year I would like to look at the different planets.” Atticus blinked. “Right, other planets. Maybe you’ll find the one you came from.” Oskar’s tail wagged again.

This story has lots of verbs in it, just like every story we read! Verbs are action words that tell us what someone or something is doing. In this story we see some bold verbs that are in “simple past, third person singular” form. A simple past verb is one type of verb that describes what happened in the past and is used a lot in German writing. Third person singular means the verb is talking about one individual’s actions in “he” or “she” form. There are verbs of all tenses (present, past, or future) in the story, but we picked out some easy ones that everyone should know. Use the story and chart below to try and understand more about verbs in the simple past tense. As a challenge, try to find the infinitive (the root verb) of some verbs and other ways of writing the verbs depending on what is happening, when, and who’s involved. Simple past, third person singular:

Infinitive:

war

was

sein

to be

hatte

had

haben

to have

fand

found

finden

to find

sagte

said

sagen

to say

kam

came

kommen

to

come

sehen

to see

sah

saw

nehmen

to take

nahm

took

essen

to eat

ate

geben

to give

gab

gave

Oskar und Atticus essen Weihnachtskekse! By: Amelia Cotter

Es war ein grauer Wintertag. Der Weihnachtsbaum leuchtete im Wohnzimmer und in der Küche roch es nach Backen. Atticus hatte vor im Baum zu schlafen, aber fand stattdessen einen schönen warmen Platz auf dem Kaffeetisch, wo er in Ruhe vor dem Baum schlafen konnte. „Ah“, sagte er leise und schlief gemütlich ein. Aber bald kam die große neugierige Nase Oskars und schnüffelte an Atticus und seinem Schlafplatz. „Atticus“, flüsterte Oskar. „Ja“, flüsterte Atticus zurück, and tat so, als ob er nicht genervt war. „Was ist das, worauf du schläfst?“ „Das ist mein Schlafstein, Oskar“, antwortete Atticus ruhig, immer noch flüsternd. „Alle Schlangen haben so was. Schön und warm, genau für eine Schlange wie mich gedacht.“ „Das ist kein Stein, Atticus.“ „Doch.“ „Nein, das ist ein Keks. Und du liegst auf einem Teller voller Kekse und Dani wird böse, wenn sie dich da findet!“ „Ach was!“ Atticus war plötzlich hellwach und guckte um sich herum. Überall sah er bunte Kekse in der Form von Bäumen, Glocken, Menschen, und Schlittschuhen. „Eklig“! sagte er und schlitterte vom Tisch neben Oskar. „Die Kekse sehen lecker aus.“ „Was sind sie genau?“ „Weihnachtskekse!“ Oskar schnüffelte in der Luft. „Lebkuchen und Butterkekse, genauer gesagt. Ich möchte nur Einen essen. Einen von Beiden natürlich.“ „Nur Einen“, sagte Atticus sarkastisch und lachte. „Auf keinen Fall. Ich kenne dich und du wirst sofort eine ganze Menge davon essen.“ „Nein, nicht zu Weihnachten! Diese Kekse sind sehr besonders und werden meistens von den Menschen nur um diese

besondere Jahreszeit gegessen. Möchtest du auch einen haben?“ „Nein. Naja, okay, ich probiere mal…“ Oskar nahm einen Butterkeks sehr vorsichtig in seinen Mund und legte ihn auf den Boden vor Atticus. „Nimm dir ein Stück!“ Die Zunge von Atticus flitze über den Keks, der mit grünen Zuckerflocken bestreut war. „Pfui! Schmeckt wie Sch—“ „Atticus!“ „Schuhe! Du kannst ihn haben.“ Oskar aß ohne weitere Frage den ganzen Keks auf, und wedelte glücklich mit dem Schwanz. Er hatte grünen Zucker auf der Nase und in seinem Bart. „Frohe Weihnachten, Atticus!“ „Frohe Weihnachten, Oskar. Und ein Frohes Neues Jahr. Ich bin froh, weil du froh bist.“ „So viel Fröhlichkeit!“ Die Beiden hörten ein leises Lachen im Hintergrund. Dani stand in der Ecke. „Das war süß, ihr Beiden, aber es gibt keine Kekse hier für Hunde und Schlangen. Die sind nur für die Freunde, die zur Weihnachtsparty kommen! Kommt, wir müssen euch vorbereiten, damit ihr hübsch für die Gäste ausseht.“ Oskar und Atticus lächelten. „Aber es wird bald auch für die Tiere hier ein kleines Geschenk geben“, sagte sie und winkte. Sie nahm die Jungs in die Arme und gab Beiden einen Weihnachtskuss. „Ein Geschenk“, sagte Atticus. „Vielleicht einen richtigen warmen Schlafstein für mich!“ Oskar nickte mit dem Kopf. „Und für mich ein Fernglas, weil ich im nächsten Jahr die verschiedenen Planeten ansehen möchte.“ Atticus blinkte. „Richtig, andere Planeten. Vielleicht findest du den, von dem du her kommst.“ Oskars Schwanz wedelte noch mal.

In the next installment: Oskar and Atticus Play in the Snow! /// In der nächsten Folge: Oskar und Atticus spielen im Schnee!


December 09 / January 10

German-American Journal

19

JAN

19

1978 - The last Volkswagen Beetle made in Germany leaves the VW assembly line in the town of Emden. Production was then shifted over to Brazil and Mexico in order to reduce the operating costs. It wasn’t until July of 2003 though that the last Beetle was assembled in Puebla Mexico.

The Digital Search For Clues

Fraunhofer Scientists Reconstruct Shredded Stasi Documents By: Rainer Stumpf Magazine-Deutschland.de

iTunes Top 10 Song Downloads Taken: November 22, 2009

United States 1. Bad Romance Lady GaGa 2. TiK ToK Ke$ha 3. Fireflies Owl City 4. Replay Iyaz 5. Party In the U.S.A. Miley Cyrus 6. Half of My Heart John Mayer 7. Whatcha Say Jason DeRulo 8. Need You Now Lady Antebellum 9. Meet Me Halfway Black Eyed Peas 10. 3 Britney Spears

A gigantic puzzle lies stored in the archives belonging to the Agency of the Federal Commissioner for the Documents of the State Security Service of the former German Democratic Republic (BStU). There are about 15,000 sacks full of shredded documents from the former Ministry of State Security, the internal and foreign intelligence service of the GDR. Each of the estimated 45 million DIN-A4 pages were sliced into between eight and 30 pieces when the East German dictatorship disintegrated after the fall of the Wall in 1989. Only a fraction of these documents have been successfully reconstructed so far, because the paper puzzle is too complex.

It would take 30 people 600 to 800 years to put the estimated 600 million pieces of paper back together again. But scientists at Berlin’s Fraunhofer Institute for Production Systems and Design Technology (IPK) have developed a computer-aided process to analyse the mutilated pieces of the historically valuable documents automatically and speed up the recovery effort. The scientists were commissioned by the German Bundestag and the BStU to construct a so-called ePuzzler. The application is currently in the pilot phase, but initial results are already very promising. Before the digital reconstruction process can begin, each shred of paper has to be scanned, but this has been made simple thanks to a newly developed scanner. The snippets are drawn into the scanner and

New GM Supports The DANK National Restructuring Of Opel Blog Improved By: Stephen Fuchs

Germany 1. TiK ToK Ke$ha 2. Down (feat. Lil Wayne) Jay Sean 3. Meet Me Halfway Black Eyed Peas 4. Bad Romance Lady Gaga 5. This Is Who I Am Vanessa Amorosi 6. Party In the U.S.A. Miley Cyrus 7. Bulletproof La Roux 8. Russian Roulette Rihanna 9. Haven’t Met You Yet Michael Bublé 10. 3 Britney Spears

# - Song Found On Both Lists

$

source: www.apple.com

Comparing Markets

scanned on both sides without having to be laminated or treated in any other way beforehand. The digital images are then analyzed, sorted into categories and stored in a database. The Fraunhofer system uses a great diversity of features in the search for matching pieces. They range from the shape of the snippets to the colour and individual motifs on the paper. When the contours of two puzzle pieces coincide, the computer fits them together to form a larger piece and continues this process until finally a whole document is complete. Then the process starts again with the next document. It’s anticipated that the pilot project will be concluded in the second half of 2010. It will then be decided whether the system will be used to analyze all of the decimated documents.

DETROIT – Given an improving business environment for GM over the past few months, and the importance of Opel/ Vauxhall to GM’s global strategy, the GM Board of Directors has decided to retain Opel and will initiate a restructuring of its European operations in earnest. “GM will soon present its restructuring plan to Germany and other governments and hopes for its favorable consideration,” said Fritz Henderson, president and CEO. “We understand the complexity and length of this issue has been draining for all involved. However, from the outset, our goal has been to secure the best long term solution for our customers, employee, suppliers, and dealers, which is reflected in the decision reached today. This was deemed to be the most stable and least costly approach for securing Opel/Vauxhall’s long-term future.” On a preliminary basis, the GM plan entails total restructuring expenses of about € 3 billion, significantly lower than all bids submitted as part of the investor solicitation. GM will work with all European labor unions to develop a plan for meaningful

contributions to Opel’s restructuring. While Opel continues to outperform against its viability plan assumptions and immediate liquidity is stable, time is of the essence. “While strained, the business environment in Europe has improved.” Henderson said. “At the same time, GM’s overall financial health and stability have improved significantly over the past few months, giving us confidence that the European business can be successfully restructured. We are grateful for the hard work of the German and other EU governments in navigating this difficult economic period. We’re also appreciative of the effort put forward by Magna and its partners in Russia in trying to reach an equitable agreement.” Henderson added that GM also hopes to build on its already significant business in Russia and to resume work directly with GAZ to contribute to both the modernization of its operations and the joint development of the Russian vehicle market on a mutually attractive basis. More details on the next steps in the restructuring will be provided as the plans and developments warrant.

In October DANK’s online blog saw some much needed improvements. When launched back in February, it was branded as the “President’s Blog” and focused more on the experiences of National President Bill Fuchs’ travels around the world rather than DANK. While the experiences written about were enjoyed by many, the blog was not being updated frequently enough to keep visitors coming back on a regular basis. So we went back to the drawing board and made some exciting changes. Now re-branded as the “DANK National Blog”, the site is covering more topics and has more contributors adding content. Topics include news regarding DANK, our website, additional articles that were not included in this Journal, a Video of the Week, and more. For those of you who enjoyed reading Bill Fuchs’ travel adventures, they aren’t going anywhere. Making these changes allows us to post content on a more frequent basis and allows DANK to connect better with our members. For the first time in DANK’s history, people not able to attend the National Convention could follow certain events LIVE on the blog as they happened and read recaps and see pictures of other events throughout the convention weekend. This has been a large and much needed improvement and we recommend that you check out these exciting changes. Head on over to www.DANK.org/blog and remember to check back frequently for the latest news.

DOW

DAX

2 month (Sept. 18, 2009 - Nov. 18, 2009)

2 month (Sept. 18, 2009 - Nov. 18, 2009)

2 Month Closing Range 9,820.20 - 10,426.31

2 Month Volume Range

5,607,970,000 - 4,293,340,000

2 Month Closing Range 5,703.83 - 5,787.61

2 Month Volume Range 80,596,500 - 28,561,500


20

German-American Journal

13

1942 - During a test flight of a prototype aircraft, the Heinkel He 280 jet fighter, bad weather caused the plane to ice up and pilot Helmut Schenk became the first person to ever put an ejection seat to use. The seat worked perfectly, but the aircraft was lost and never found.

JAN

The Night Began In The Morning

December 09 / January 10

The Rise And Fall Of A Western Secret Agent By: Werner Juretzko The women call out to their own soldiers hysterically: “Why don’t you help us, you bastards! What are you men?” No arm is raised in their defense. Here and there tears can be seen in the eyes of battle fatigued soldiers, who have seen so much already, and which has shaken the fury of war upon them. What makes a spy a spy? One can hardly believe that a person would be persuaded, just like that, to risk his life, and perhaps even that of his family. Werner Juretzko, born in 1932, witnessed the end of World War II. From these experiences, he describes his activities as an agent, the difficult and dangerous tasks, and the life which lead him into the newly created

Soviet-occupied zone, and finally his arrest. At this point the martyrdom really gets underway: The Stasi (secret police) interrogators want to know everything right down to the very last detail. The methods used against the captured young men wore them down. Werner Jurezko and his fellow prisoners eagerly anticipated one thing: to finally be convicted and out of the hands of the Stasi. They wished to be punished and sent to a normal prison, where they would serve out their time. How terrible these months of interrogation must have been, causing detainees to regard a prison as a promise of redemption. Shocked readers will begin to understand these events as they are reconstructed.

Die Nacht begann am Morgen Aufstieg und Fall eines westlichen Geheimagenten By: Werner Juretzko Die Frauen rufen ihren eigenen Soldaten hysterisch zu: »Warum helft ihr uns nicht, ihr Schweine! Was seid ihr für Männer?« Kein Arm wird zu ihrer Verteidigung gehoben. Hier und da sieht man Tränen in den Augen der schlachtgeprüften Soldaten, die so manches schon gesehen haben, was die Kriegsfurie über sie geschüttet hat. Jedoch so etwas noch nicht. Was macht einen Spion zu einem Spion? Einfach so lässt sich wohl kaum einer überreden, sein Leben und vielleicht auch noch das seiner Angehörigen aufs Spiel zu setzen. Werner Juretzko, Jahrgang 1932, hat das Ende des Zweiten Weltkrieges als Junge miterlebt und schildert aus diesen Erfahrungen

Congratulations To Members Of DANK By: Audrey L. Hess-Eberle Euro Lloyd Travel Group/Chicago A special commemorative anniversary is upon us – the 50th Anniversary of the German American National Congress – D.A.N.K. As we become older and reflect back into the history of our roots, we search more and more for those links and ties that determine who we are, and from whence we came, namely, our heritage. It does not matter in which country we were born, but rather that we know who we are, and the traditions that helped shape that heritage. D.A.N.K. offers us that link to our German roots, whether we were born in Germany, or are first or second generations and beyond. To that end, I would like to encourage you to fully embrace what DANK can offer to you…fellowship, familiarity, and the opportunities to explore more about your German traditions. You might even learn to create a few new ones. In the coming months, you will see some exciting growth of your DANK organization.

We at Euro Lloyd Travel Group have the privilege to be part of that growth, offering you special travel opportunities, whether as individuals or a participant of a DANK travel group. What better way to enjoy and support DANK and get to know the fun-loving and curious side of your fellow members, and possibly yourself….. We look forward to serving you for years to come. Our heartfelt congratulations to you, members of D.A.N.K.!!

heraus seinen Weg in die Agententätigkeit, seine Aufträge, die ihn in die neu geschaffene sowjetisch besetzte Zone führen, und schließlich seine Verhaftung. Doch da geht das Martyrium erst wirklich los: Die Stasi will alles mehr als genau wissen. Die Methoden, die sie dabei anwendet, zermürben den jungen Mann. Er und seine Mitgefangenen erwarten eines sehnlichst: endlich verurteilt zu werden und nicht mehr in den Händen der Stasi zu sein, sondern in einem Zuchthaus die Strafe absitzen zu können. Wie furchtbar diese Monate der »Ermittlung« sein müssen, dass ein normales Gefängnis als hoffnungsverheißende Erlösung angesehen wird, kann der erschütterte Leser im Laufe der Erzählung nachvollziehen.

EURO LLOYD TRAVEL Announcing AIR FARE SPECIALS for members of DANK If you have not traveled to Germany lately, or just thought you might skip the trip to Europe this year, you can not afford to pass up the low discounted travel airfares being offered by all airlines. Please identify yourselves as DANK members when calling our office.

Special summer roundtrip airfares for travel to and from Germany, including taxes, start from: Chicago Indianapolis Milwaukee Madison Cleveland Detroit

$553 $729 $729 $729 $681 $568

Audrey L. Hess-Eberle or Tiffany Nedwed EURO LLOYD TRAVEL GROUP Partner of Lufthansa City Center The Monadnock Building 53 W. Jackson Blvd. - Suite 863 Chicago, Illinois 60604

*Call for special airfares to other European cities and beyond. *Low discounted Domestic and international airfares. *European Rail passes and single tickets. *Car rentals with special low dollar rates in most European countries. *Cruises world-wide - Caribbean, Alaska, Mediteranean on all major cruise lines. *Worldwide tours – independent, hosted and fully escorted.

Call now for information: 1-800-572-3149 or 1-312-362-0218 email: chi@eurolloyd.com Visit us at: www.eurolloyd.com

Rates are subject to availability for your date of travel, with various airline non stop or connection options. Friday, Saturday, Sunday Weekend surcharges apply for each direction.

Audrey L. Hess-Eberle


December 09 / January 10

German-American Journal

Trends In German Media

By: Jo Groebel Magazine-Deutschland.de Germany is considered to be a country of books, of deep thought, and of highbrow media. However, Germany has also become a country of DJs and daily soaps. In popular German culture music and TV series, blockbusters in the cinema and the tabloid press are just as important as in other countries – and as the highbrow culture of the poets, the theater and the opera. Naturally enough there are also some characteristics that are peculiar to the media scene in Germany. These include the emphasis on federal sovereignty in cultural affairs and broadcasting and the dual existence of public and private media, something that cannot be taken for granted in other countries. As regards freedom of the press and speech, in international terms Germany comes off very well. There is pluralism with regard to opinion and information. The press is not in the hands of the government or political parties, but rather in that of societal players. For more than fifty years now the freedom of the press and speech has been the common property of everyone and protected by the Constitution. Article 5 of the Basic Law expresses how the Constitution interprets the freedom of the press: “Every person shall have the right freely to express and disseminate his opinions in speech, writing and pictures and to inform himself without hindrance from generally accessible sources. (...) There shall be no censorship.”

The Press

In addition to books, for some 500 years now newspapers and magazines have been a medium that as regards content, form and dissemination may well have been constantly modernized, but whose basic structure has remained more or less the same, despite the continued emergence of new media. The German newspaper market is characterized by a large number of publications and regional differences. Alongside 333 regional daily newspapers there are ten national dailies, alongside ten quality publications and nine so-called popular newspapers that concentrate on general interest matters. In this category the influential “Bild”Zeitung, which is published by Axel Springer Verlag and has a circulation of 3.6 million, is the only national newspaper to play an outstanding role. Overall the total circulation figures for some 350 German daily newspapers come to 24 million. However, the financial footing of the classic daily press is under pressure: The younger generation is reading fewer newspapers, advertising revenue is declining, and all manner of content is nowadays procured from the Internet, which among almost all age groups has now advanced to become a leading medium. Almost two thirds of all Germans are meanwhile “online” – or 48.7 million people over ten years. Nevertheless there is one sold newspaper for more than every third German, and the number of readers is even higher. In terms of politics and culture several publications are considered to be highly influential, for example national quality newspapers such as “Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung“, “Süddeutsche Zeitung“ and the traditional weekly “Die Zeit“. An increasing number of special interest publications have been appearing alongside the popular magazines. The entire range of popular magazines includes some 2,300 publications and boasts a total circulation of more than 120 million. “Stern“, “Focus“ and “Spiegel“, news magazines that play an active role in discussion in society or have themselves been the subject of important discourse, are among the most widely-read publications. Of these, “Spiegel“, a po-

21

litical journal with perhaps the greatest long-term influence of any weekly publication, is outstanding.

Internet and user-generated content

As in most other countries, the German media world faces fundamental challenges by the Internet and mobile communications. First, technically speaking so-called convergence is now a reality, meaning one device or platform unifies telephony, Internet access, video, music and TV. Second, the lines between customized communication for the individual and mass communications thus get obscured. The customary professional press and radio products still tend to constitute the lion’s share of media content. Yet above all the younger generation is increasingly using community communication, such as blogs, as an alternative information source alongside the traditional media. As at the end of 2007, according to the German “Blogcharts”, the most frequently linked blogs in Germany include Basicthinking.de, bildblog.de (which focuses critically on the newspaper “Bild”) and spreeblick.com. Today, the majority of active blog-users states that these sources are more credible they believe than the usual journalism. The result: In many German media houses forms of products are arising that combine in a new unit the customary work of editors, with its strong craftsmanship and sense of trust, with socalled user-generated content. Thus, in the best case, German media’s professional standards are upheld and married to the “democratic” and spontaneous elements of media products created by the public itself. Under the heading of “Digital Germany”, not only the communications scene is changing, but political participation, culture and the country’s digitalization-driven economy are being linked ever more closely to current international trends.

Broadcasting

Radio and television also play their part in the overall reach of the German media. Having begun in the 1920s (radio) and the 1950s (television) as public network institutions, since the 1980s the colorful spectrum of a dual system made up of public network channels and private stations has emerged. Nowadays some 460 radio stations, for the most part local and regional in character, compete with each other. Some 75 public network radio stations vie with around 385 commercial stations. Overall, in its history radio has undergone a change of function. After the introduction of television it tended to develop more as a parallel medium, and in terms of listening hours achieves about the same figures as TV. There are differences in the television structure on two levels, national and regional, and between general and special interest channels. Germany has some of the largest public (ARD and ZDF) and private (RTL, Sat1, ProSieben) broadcasting houses in Europe and the world. Depending on the technical platform (terrestrial, satellite, cable, broadband, mobile), and on whether reception is analogue or digital, more than 20 different public TV channels can be viewed, including the two national channels ARD and ZDF, as well as regionally produced offerings broadcast nationwide, such as WDR, MDR, BR and special interest channels like docu-channel Phoenix and kid’s TV KIKA. Then there are three international broadcasters: Deutsche Welle, Franco-German arte, and Austro-German-Swiss cultural channel 3sat. The digital strategy pursued by ARD and ZDF also endeavors to provide a TV media library available round-the-clock and new online and mobile products. Here, there is a constant threat of conflict with the private channels, who fear competition will be distorted by the strong influence in the market of the “subsidized” stations.

Independent Advertising Sales Professional Growing company with German ownership seeks a talented individual with the great German-American work ethic to sell display and online advertising for our print and interactive publications. Commissions are paid weekly. Contact lists are provided to limit cold sales. German language skills are not required. Our firm is a three time Future 50 award recipient from the MMAC. We have seven European sister companies as well as our parent company in Germany. If you are an active, self motivated professional that enjoys working independently and is not opposed to limited regional travel, please e-mail us your career and contact information to info@novoprint.com.


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German-American Journal

December 09 / January 10

*** Calendar Of Events ***

This area is designated for DANK chapters and Associate Members to inform their members and the public of events they are having. We rely on the submissions of each chapter or organization, therefor all events may not be included. Please contact our National Office at 773-275-1100 or visit www.DANK.org for the most recent listing of events or for information on how to make sure your event is listed in the next issue. (Associate Member Events Listed In Italics)

DECEMBER 2009 4

4

Benton Harbor: Fish Fry 6-8pm. Doors open 5:30pm, band plays 7-10pm. 2561 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI 49022. Call 269-926-6652 for more information. Pittsburgh: Christmas Party at Teutonia Männerchor. 857 Phineas St., North Side. Dinner from 5 to 7pm, festivities begin in Ballroom upstairs at 7:15pm. For more details, visit www.germaninpittsburgh.org.

5

Milwaukee: Board Meeting, 3:30pm.

5

Chicago South: Christmas Dance. 25249 Center Road, Frankfort, IL. Contact Nancy at 708-4488731 for more information.

5

6

Springfield: Christkindlmarkt/Chicago Bus Trip. Bus departs at 8am from Fairhills Mall, returns around midnight. Cost is $40 per person, meals not included. Call Jeff Engel at 744-8148 for more information.

6

Benton Harbor: DANK Christmas Program (members only please), 3:00pm. 2561 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI 49022. Call 269-9266652 for more information.

12

Springfield: Christmas Party at Springfield Motor Boat Club, 5pm. Dinner served at 6pm. Cost is $20 per person. Call Jeff Engel at 744-8148 for more information or to RSVP by December 9.

6

South Bend: Christmas Party—Potluck, 2:00pm. Hilltop Lutheran Church, 4114 Ironwood Rd., South Bend, IN. Call Christine 272-8163 or Trudy 271-6922 for more information.

13

Chicago West: Christmas Party, 1:30pm. Redeemer Lutheran Church, Elmhurst, IL. Call Harald Pitz at 708-562-7038 for more information.

6

Springfield: Board meeting, 6:30pm at Engel’s on Edwards. Call Jeff Engel at 744-8148 for more information

13

Lake County: Luncheon and Christmas Party. Gorton Center, Stuart Room, Lake Forest, IL. Contact Ludwina Homer, 847-249-0073 or Cobi Stein, 847-234-3920 for more information.

6

German American Heritage Center of Davenport, IA: Annual Zither and Bell Choir Concert, 2:00pm. $5 for non-members, free to members. Call 563-322-8844 for more information.

13

Milwuakee: Christmas Party, Sacred Heart Church.

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Phoenix: Board Meeting.

8

German American Heritage Center of Davenport, IA: Christmas Sing-a-long, 7:00pm. Free and open to public. Call 563-322-8844 for more information.

11

Benton Harbor: Christmas Party—Potluck (members only please), 6:00pm. 2561 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI 49022. Call 269-9266652 for more information.

Erie: Erie’s German Heritage Society Celebration of Christmas. At Saga Club with a visit from “the man.”

WELCOME NEW MEMBERS Allen, Amanda Nora Altendorf, Waltraud Altendorf, Wolfgang Athans, Peter Baggarly, Linda Bartling, Christiane M. Bartling, Jael S. Bartling, Noemi M. Bartling, Robin Blair, Liane Bliesze, Mary Bliesze, Siegfried Brixie, Silke Brixie, Steven G. Chipley, Alice Cook, Paula M. Cowey, Donald Cowey, Heidi Deubler, Eric Deubler, Maria Deubler, Martin Deubler, Mathew Diener, Andrew J. Dornseif, George G.

Ehlert, Ellen Ehrfeld, Wolfgang Ferris, Jim Ferris, Kay Galassini, Nancy Galiano, Sandy Geelan, Lee M. Geelan, Stacey Glatz, Thomas J. Gould, Julie A. Gratzl, Anna Gratzl, Isabella Gratzl, Stefan Josef Hartig, Curt B. Hartig, Ella Hartig, Margaret Hartig, Will Hasse, Dorothy Hasse, Erwin Haushalter Casler, Patricia Hebble, William Hildebrand, Lisa Hildebrand, Paul Hipwell, Alicia

Hipwell, Anne Hipwell, Graham Hipwell, Steven Hirsch, Milton G. Hirsch, Pamela Janus, Mark T. Jaquith, Jason Jensen, Christine Kaffenberger, Jeremiah A. Kasch, Bradley M. Kissane, John M. Kohut, Sue J. Kuehne-Ehrfeld, Regina Lambert, Sarah Lundy, Amanda Madden, Amelia Madden, Rachel Madden, Tom G. Manning, Josefine Martin, Jonathan Martin, Nathan Martin, Rachel Martin, Samuel McNamara, Carol

8/26/09 to 10/28/09 McNamara, Martin McNerney, Joe P. McNerney, Patty Monahan, Anna E. Muschler, Barbara D. Muschler, John Carl Muschler, Shelby Pennock, Becky S. Peters, Eileen Peters, Jim Publ, Luise Puffpaff, Sue M. Romero, Annika K. Romero, Jr., Jose L. Schauer, Patrick J. Schnur, Darlene Schnur, Robert Schnur, Samantha Schultz, Edward Schultz, Edward Schultz, Linda Schultz, Linda Steffen, Camilla Sutton, Kathleen Ann

Sutton, Raleigh Syed, Rasheed I. Syed, Sabeei Syed, Salik Szulczewski, Walter Thaller, Andrea Thaller, Megan Thaller, Ryan Thaller, Samantha Travis, Becky Vezner, Denise J. Vezner, Hope Weiterschon, Walter Vezner, Kris Patrick Vezner, Maya Von Loewe, James Weiterschon, Ingrid M. Werle, John Wimmer, Jr., John Joseph Winkhardt, John A. Wise, Zinnia Ziegler, Joseph Zuschlag, Janice Zuschlag, Roland

“Merry Christmas,” A Relatively New Phrase By: Darlene Fuchs A season full of joy, a holiday brimming with cheer—Christmas uncorks the festive spirits in the hearts of all. We greet each other with our good wishes and embrace the Christmas holiday spirit. Just like giving presents, Christmas greetings also play a major part of our celebrations. Year after year people send cards to both close friends and distant acquaintances, expressing our thoughts and feelings. The commercial Christmas card as we know it, originated in London in 1843. That winter Sir Henry Cole had decided he was too busy to write individual Christmas greetings to his family, friends and business colleagues. He asked his friend, the painter John Callcott Horsley, to design a card with an image and brief greeting that he could mail instead. Horsley designed a three panel card, with the two side panels depicting good

deeds (clothing the naked and feeding the hungry) and the center panel showing a family Christmas party with a small child, drinking wine together, which proved some controversy. At the bottom of the center panel was the inscription “A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to you.” Two batches totaling 2050 cards were printed, colored by hand and sold that year for a shilling each. Twenty years later several British firms were publishing Christmas cards for the general public. The father of American Christmas cards was a Boston lithographer and German immigrant, Louis Prang, who, in 1873, reproduced a multi-color holiday card, autographed by Christmas Carol author Charles Dickens. He began printing a variety of cards in Roxbury, Massachusetts, in 1874. By the 1880’s he was producing more than five million a year. Color and detailing were so vivid that it was difficult to distinguish the artist’s originals from

reproduced prints when hung side by side on a wall. Taking full advantage of his newly found technology, Prang employed the finest artists of his day to paint cards. This year make it a point to wish people

you meet in the stores a Merry Christmas, make donations to those less fortunate than yourself and let your friends and family members know you love them, by sending them a Christmas greeting.


December 09 / January 10

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Doris “DJ” Brouse, 73, of Springfield died at 10:38 a.m. on Wednesday, October 14, 2009, at Memorial Medical Center. Doris was born in St. Louis, MO, the daughter of Elmer and Marguerite (Laub) Siefert. She married Robert Brouse on September 22, 1973, in Indianapolis, IN. Doris was a DANK Springfield member for 10 years. She coached soccer, loved painting arts and crafts, taught calligraphy, and taught herself German. She loved to travel, especially traveling to Germany. She was a pet lover and loved working in her garden. She was preceded in death by her parents. She is survived by her husband of thirty-six years, Robert; three sons, Robert R. Brouse III and Gregory D. Kramer, both of Springfield, and Gary M. Kramer of Dubai; one daughter, Gayle (husband, Dan) Dolinger of Newark, DE; daughter-in-law, Susan Kramer; eight grandchildren, Jeff Kramer, Daniel and Matthew Frazier, Coleen Pescia, Crystal and Patrick Dolinger, and Chris and Jayne Greenwald; 4 (almost 5) great-grandchildren; an uncle and numerous cousins in the St. Louis area.

Marion Judge

Eberhard Reichmann

Marion Judge was born in Kenosha, on July 13, 1919, daughter of the late Emil and Greta (Przybyla) Juska. She was just a few months old on Sept. 8, 1919, when her father was struck by a Northwestern train on Sheridan Road. Her mother returned to Berlin, Germany with her in 1921. She spent the war years with her mother, and three daughters in Bernau, Germany. After the war, when Germany was to be divided by the four major powers, she went to the American consulate to prove and declare her American citizenship. In 1948, she and her daughter, Heidi, immigrated to Kenosha. The following year, her oldest daughter, Marita, came to the United States, and in 1950, her mother and youngest daughter, Brigitta, joined them. She was the President of DANK, Kenosha/Racine Chapter for 25 years. In 1984, she became the host of WGTD’s Sundays “German Hour.” She received the Cecilia Simmons Award in 1985. Marion served on the Kenosha Symphony Board, and was a Friend of The Kemper Center. She was also a member of the Berliner Baeren, MGV Harmonia, Senior Action Council and Sister Cities Association. In 1987, she was a guest at the White House, when President Reagan signed the Proclamation for the first German American Day, Oct. 6. Husband John Judge preceded her in death in 1977. Marion is survived by her daughters, Marita Freitag, Heidi (Thomas) Marcoe, Brigitta (Sister Gretchen Krueger, OP); grandchildren, Lisa (Marcoe) Thomas and Barry Jon Freitag; and great grandchildren, Taryn, Logan and Mitchell Thomas.

Eberhard Reichmann passed away on October 16, 2009 at Hospice in Columbus surrounded by family and friends. He was born on Dec. 8, 1926 in Stuttgart Germany and emigrated to the United States in 1953. He completed his doctorate in German Studies at the University of Cincinnati in 1959, the same year he started his career at Indiana University Bloomington. Eberhard Reichmann taught at IU for 32 years, retiring in 1991. The retirement was in name only since he continued as an active scholar and teacher producing numerous books, articles and lectures mostly in the field of German-American Studies. Eberhard Reichmann was a talented musician, able to play several instruments. He was an excellent stylist in writing in English, German or his native Swabian dialect. He served as the Chief Editor of the IUPUI Max Kade German-American Center and the Indiana German Heritage Society, both of which he was instrumental in founding. Together with his wife and collaborator for 53 years, Ruth Reichmann, he served the German and international community of his beloved Indiana in many capacities. Eberhard Reichmann was a DANK member of the Indianapolis chapter. The Reichmanns helped fund an endowed professorship in German-American Studies at IUPUI, an example of their generosity and dedication. He is survived by his wife, Ruth Reichmann, children Robert “Tony” Reichmann and Maria Reichmann Chapin, grandchildren Zachariah, Sarah, Elijah, Jeremiah (Lorna) and great-grandson Alexander.


German-American Journal

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German-American Journal | December '09/January '10  

Volume 57, Issue 6