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Volume 57, Number 5

October / November 2009

Freedom Without Walls 1989 - 2009 By: Darlene Fuchs

50 Years of Pride & A Future of Opportunities DANK National Convention & 50th Anniversary German Unity Day is a national holiday in Germany, celebrated October 3rd, to commemorate the nation’s unification, when the Federal Republic of Germany and the Democratic Republic of Germany united to create one single, federal Germany in 1990. German reunification (Deutsche Wiedervereinigung) took place twice after 1945: first in 1957, when the Saarland was permitted to join the Federal Republic of Germany and again on October 3, 1990, when the five re-established states of the German Democratic Republic (GDR / East Germany) joined the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG / West Germany). Berlin was also united into a single citystate. It was at this point that the unification process was commonly referred to as die Wende (The Turning Point) by citizens of the GDR. Die Wende marks the change from socialism to democracy and capitalism in East Germany around the years 1989 and 1990. The end of the unification process is officially referred to as German Unity (Deutsche Einheit). There is some debate as to whether the events of 1990 should be properly referred to as a “reunification” or a “unification”. Many say that the initial unification of Germany occurred on January 18, 1871 at the Versailles Palace’s Hall of Mirrors. Princes of the German states gathered there to proclaim Wilhelm of Prussia as Emperor of the German Empire. Others feel that “reunification” is deeply affected by the November 9, 1989 opening of the Berlin Wall, when the checkpoints between the two countries were opened and people were allowed to travel freely. This date marked the “fall” of the Berlin wall and the physical reunification of the city of Berlin which had been divided since 1945. Others, however, argue that 1990 represented a “unification” of two German states into a larger entity.

For political and diplomatic reasons, West German politicians use the term “Deutsche Einheit” (German unity) carefully avoided the term “reunification”. German unity is the term that Hans-Dietrich Genscher used in front of international journalists to correct them when they asked him about “reunification” in 1990. On August 23rd, 1990, the new parliament of East Germany voted to approve accession with West Germany and the “Treaty of Unification” was signed by both countries’ leaders. Germany was officially united on October 3, 1990. West Germany consisted of ten states, now referred to as the Old Länder, (Alte Bundesländer) plus West Berlin. The five New Länder states, re-established federal states of East Germany – Brandenburg, MecklenburgVorpommern, Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt, Thuringia, which had been abolished by East Germany in 1952 – formally joined the Federal Republic of Germany. The Land Berlin is not considered one of the New Länder, since West Berlin expanded throughout the whole city resulting in the dissolution of East Berlin. The Berlin wall and the Brandenburg Gate were two important symbols of Germany’s division following World War II and their unification in 1990. Images of the Brandenburg Gate and the Berlin wall’s destruction are often displayed on German Unity Day. October 3rd is the official German national holiday, the Day of German Unity (Tag der Deutschen Einheit), commemorating the day that marks the unification of the former East and West Germany in 1990. Unity Day celebrations are hosted each year by whichever of Germany’s 16 regional states holds the presidency in the upper house of parliament. On October 2 & 3, 2009, the central celebrations of the Day of German Unity will be held in the Saarland state capital Saarbrücken.

By: Darlene Fuchs Liebe Mitglieder und Freunde - Willkommen zu Frankfort! “A community with 1890’s charm” nestling DANK Chicago-South’s chapter which is celebrating “50 Years of Pride and a Future of Opportunities.” Fifty years of Fasching, Schlachtfest, Frühlingstanz, Maitanz, Picnics, of course our traditional and wellknown Oktoberfest, Christkindl Markt, Adventkaffee, Weihnachtstanz, Silvester (New Year Eve), Miss DANK USA pageants, and other German Heritage day celebrations to reminisce upon. DANK Chicago South & Suburbs was the first chapter of this national organization and it is with great pleasure that they host the National Convention, while celebrating DANK’s and their chapter’s 50th Golden Anniversary. The convention will be a terrific event for you as a delegate or a guest. You are encouraged to bring along friends, club members, and family—the more the merrier. DANK seeks to bring together Americans of German descent in the pursuit of cultivating and presenting their heritage and interests on local, regional, and national levels. These were the primary reasons that the German American National Congress was founded in 1959, and they are still among the organization’s primary objectives today. DANK’s National Convention will take place from Thursday, November 5th, through Sunday, November 8th, at the beautiful Holiday Inn Hotel & Convention Center in Tinley Park, IL www.holidayinn.com/chitinleypark. Special room rates have been arranged at the discounted rate of $99 but when booking you must say that you are

See CONVENTION on PAGE 6

TidBits

Education

Business & Technology

Calendar

The Insider

Oskar & Atticus

Lifestyle

Obituaries

Pages 3-5

Pages 6-12

Page 13

Pages 14

Page 15

Page 16-17

Page 18 Page 19


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German-American Journal

October / November 2009

Check Us Out Online! WWW.DANK.ORG DANK Discussion Forum Presidents Blog

Liebe Mitglieder und Freunde! Dear Members and Friends, This is the last issue of the GA Journal before our National Convention and Officer Election to be held on the weekend of November 6th of this year. Our Chicago South chapter is graciously hosting this event at the Holiday Inn Convention Center in Tinley Park, Illinois and at their club house in Mokena, Illinois. Although this convention includes many activities for our delegates representing the chapters, there will also be some very exciting events for all of our members and friends. On Friday, November 6, at the Chicago South club house, there will be an award dinner, a dance, and the finals for the DANK National Youth Ambassador contest. It will also feature great food and music. On Saturday, Nov. 7, don’t miss the grand 50th anniversary dance of our organization. Come to celebrate the anniversary of our national organization and that of DANK’s first chapter, Chicago South. Since it’s been almost two years that I have been National President, I would like to summarize what I, with the help of my board members, have been able to accomplish during my term. Our goal was to rejuvenate our organization to make it more relative and appealing to our membership, in addition to restoring pride and upgrading our image. I believe we have come a long way but there is much more to do. We have totally revamped the German-American Journal Paper with a modern, fresh look along with interesting content for our members. At the same time, we have reduced our publishing costs by more than 50%. Our website has also been totally redesigned with updated content, forums, and a blog. We saved a tremendous amount of money by having one of our members do the redesign as a donation. Another area where we saved a very large sum of money was the total redesign or our Chicago Executive office. This was the first big project we did. Most of the work and the almost-new office furniture were donated by members and their companies. As you might be able to tell, we are trying to improve our organization by being more productive, while at the same time reducing our costs. Along those lines, we have also updated our member database, replaced several of our live board meetings with teleconferences, hired a new office manager, Amelia, while still keeping our executive secretary, Eva, on staff, and established an intern program for our office. We have also done a lot in the membership services area. We started the DANK credit card program, initiated merchandising sales, updated our membership brochures, revitalized the DANK travel program, started a sub-chapter concept, consolidated region 2 and 3 to help the chapters be closer connected in the Eastern US, and revitalized several of our almost dormant chapters. At the Milwaukee German Fest, we became a sponsor and initiated a National PR campaign that promotes DANK, our chapters, club membership, and our Credit card program. We could not have accomplished all of this without the help of our National Officers and many volunteers that donated so much of their time and skills. As I look forward, I see so much more that we need to do to accomplish our goals. I am pleased that all of our current officers will join me in running for another term in the upcoming National Election. If our chapter delegates believe in our cause and re-elect us in November, we will press on and continue our work to make our DANK members feel proud to belong to the largest German-American organization in the country. Mit freundlichen Grüßen,

William Fuchs National President

DIE BRUECKE ZUR ALTEN HEIMAT “Building Bridges to Germany” Listen to LIVE German radio, broadcast straight from Germany, on our website! Find ‘Radio Heimatmelodie’ along with a list of other live German radio stations that you can listen to for FREE. Visit www.DANK.org

Newspaper Archives And More...

Der Deutsch-Amerikaner DANK seeks to bring together Americans of German descent in the pursuit of cultivating and presenting their heritage and interests on local, regional and national levels. These were the primary reasons that the German American National Congress was founded in 1959, and they are still among the organization’s primary objectives today.

DANK National Executive Board President William Fuchs 1. Vice President Erich Wittmann 2. Vice President Donna Lippert Treasurer Maria Thompson

Top 10 Things I’m Thankful For When times get tough, count your blessings. As a people, we need to learn to be thankful for what we have. Too often we take our lives for granted. We are always thinking about what we want, and don’t take enough time to appreciate what we already have. 1) God... He is forgiving, forever faithful and his love for us goes beyond anything that we as humans can understand. As he provides for me and my family, his blessings are constant, and for this I am grateful. 2) My spouse... My husband and I may not always agree on whose turn it is to do the dishes, but we do share the same vision and goals regarding our future. He is both generous and dynamic and there’s never a dull moment. 3) My Children... Without my children I would not be the person I am today. They have taught me that a smile says I’m thankful, a hug shows unconditional love and trust is seen in the depth of their eyes. I am grateful for their successes and the simple fact that they are alive. 4) My Parents... My father was a printer, my mom stayed home and even though money was tight I don’t remember ever feeling deprived. I grew up in a home where budgeting and bargain shopping were a way of life, but most importantly, where I felt secure and loved. 5) My Friends... Other than my family and faith in God, nothing is more important to me than my friends. They are the people who give significance to our lives, people who make us special in their lives, so that our lives become meaningful. Some are funny, some talented, some full of passion, some are kindred spirits with me, some are humble, some are encouraging, some are dreamers, some are right where they want to be and others are still finding their way. I’m thankful that my friends like me just the way I am. 6) A Home... I’m not too concerned about falling real estate prices because I try not to look at my house as an investment. To me, it’s a place to share wonderful memories with family and friends. I’m grateful I have a place to call home. 7) The Internet... From online bill paying to research for my DANK Journal articles, the Internet has simplified my daily tasks. Plus, I can compare prices, stay in touch with my friends and do my holiday shopping with a few clicks of the mouse. 8) Generosity... Over the years my husband and I have been the recipients of many people’s generosity. I’m thankful for the ability to give something back to others in need. 9) Freedom... As Americans we still have most freedoms that other countries can only dream about. It is a gift we share and too often take for granted. I am thankful for the freedom of religion, press and expression more than any. It allows me to write this editorial and not worry about being persecuted. 10) Heidi... Last but not least my dog is the best medicine for a bad day. She wags her tail with her heart. Your turn. What are you thankful for? If you don’t have the ability to be thankful for what you currently have, no matter how big or small it might be, then you don’t have the ability to be happy.

Editorial Staff Editor-in-Chief Darlene Fuchs Darlene@GoldenFoxPro.com Editorial Staff Margita Mandel Amanda Pedersen Chapter News Editor Beverly Pochatko erieoma@verizon.net Membership Erik Wittmann erik25@comcast.net German Correspondent Corinna Bienger corinna.bienger@live.de Layout & Design Stephen Fuchs Stephen@FoxTaleEdit.com Advertising & Classifieds Darlene Fuchs Darlene@GoldenFoxPro.com

Office Staff DANK National Executive Office

4740 N. Western Ave Chicago, Il 60625-2013 Call (773) 275-1100 Toll Free (866) 926-1109 Fax (773) 275-4010 Office Hours:

9 AM to 5 PM / Monday-Friday Executive Secretary Eva Timmerhaus Office@dank.org

Office Manager Amelia Cotter Amelia@dank.org

General Information German-American Journal - ISSN 1086-8070 - is published bi-monthly and is the official publication of the German American National Congress. Periodicals postage paid at Chicago, Illinois and additional mailing offices.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: German-American Journal 4740 N. Western Ave Chicago, Il 60625-2013

Annual Subscription - Rate: $15.00 www.dank.org/news.html

DANK does not warrant or assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information published herein. DANK reserves the right to change or amend submissions for any reason without prior notice.

Darlene Fuchs Managing Editor Submission Deadline For The December / January Issue:

Secretary Beverly Pochatko

Nov. 1, 2009

©2009 DANK. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the prior written permission of the publisher.


October / November 2009

German-American Journal

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1942 - The first man-made object to ever reach space, the V-2 Rocket, was launched at Peenemünde Army Research Center in Germany. It is considered to be the progenitor of all modern rockets. It was later used as the world’s first ballistic missile during World War II.

OCT

The Bean of Choice:

By: Darlene Fuchs

Shortly after the Civil War, in 1867, Gustav Goelitz and his younger brother Albert traveled to America from their family home in the Harz Mountain region of Germany. It is the highest mountain chain in northern Germany, occupying parts of the German states of Lower Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt and Thuringia. Within two years, Gustav Goelitz bought an ice cream and candy store in Belleville, IL, and his brother Albert sold the candy to the surrounding towns from a horse-drawn wagon. Soon after they jumped on the band wagon of candy innovations by making a new type of candy, then called “buttercream” candies, which includes Candy Corn; a sweet they’ve made since about 1900 (which is still made with the same recipe.) The great-great jelly bean ancestor first appeared in the 1800s, but jelly candies of one kind or another have been around for thousands of years. “Turkish delight;” a citrus, honey, and rose water jell, has been putting smiles on kids’ faces since biblical times. The years of World War I were apparently difficult for Goelitz Confectionary. Herman departed for California to found his own business. He set up Herman Goelitz Candy Company in Oakland in 1922 and carried on with his family’s famous recipe for candy corn. Because of the difficulty of shipping candy long distances, the industry of that era was strictly regional, so Herman’s new company was not in competition with the North Chicago Goelitz Confectionary. While licorice, chocolates, and peppermints were available, butter creams kept the business growing for the next five decades. The single best seller? Candy Corn, a soft, three-color candy that was made by a painstaking pouring process. The 1920s were good years for the two companies, but then the Great Depression spread across the country sweeping up businesses and jobs. In one year alone, 878 candy manufacturers went into bankruptcy. Cash in banks was lost and sales plummeted. Candy corn, which sold for 16¢ a pound in 1920, was going for 8½¢ ten years later. While consumption of candy declined during the Depression, it soared 30% during World War II. Even as production was limited by sugar rationing and manpower

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German Candy Makers

shortages, the Goelitz companies worked at top capacity. Because chocolate was also rationed, and most of it was consigned to soldiers fighting overseas, non-chocolate candy, such as the Goelitz companies specialized in, saw something of a resurgence. After the war, growth in candy consumption jumped up an astonishing 60 percent. It had been the worst of times and the best of times. In 1975, skyrocketing prices for sugar squeezed the candy business as buyers held back orders in hopes of waiting out the crisis. The bottom fell out of the market, and many in the industry went out of business. The North Chicago plant shut down for a couple of months to buy time. It was in this environment that the biggest change in the history of the family was about to take place. David Klein, a driver for a candy distributor in Los Angeles, had a childhood dream to create “the Rolls Royce of jelly beans.” Since Jelly Belly (formerly known as Herman Goelitz Candy Co.) enjoyed a reputation for quality, David knew they could turn the vision into a reality. The candy-makers cooked up a recipe for a new kind of

jelly bean -- intensely flavored throughout, with natural ingredients for flavoring whenever possible. In 1976, the first eight flavors of this small, intensely flavored jelly bean were born: Very Cherry, Lemon, Cream Soda, Tangerine, Green Apple, Root Beer, Grape, and Licorice. Ironically, these are still some of the most popular flavors made. They were called Jelly Belly’s Jelly Beans, the name derived

from a rhyme with Leadbelly, the 1920s blues singer. Sales grew, then grew some more. Jelly Belly beans were flying out the door at an increasing rate. California needed additional production to meet the sales so the two cousins reunited the candy making family into a single company for the first time in five decades. The gourmet beans rocketed to fame during Ronald Reagan’s first campaign for president in 1980. The press commented on Reagan’s jelly bean habit and Jelly Bellies suddenly got enormous exposure. Goelitz came up with a new flavor - Blueberry - in order to provide red, white and blue Jelly Bellies for Reagan’s inauguration and Herman Rowland donated three-and-a-half tons of beans for the festivities. A jar of Jelly Bellies were on the table for all of his meetings, making them an integral part of the Reagan administration. Herman Goelitz, Inc. supplied a standing order for up to 60 cases of Jelly Bellies every month, which were distributed throughout the White House, Capitol Hill, Air Force One, and numerous government agencies. And guess what? Jelly Belly was also the first jelly bean in outer space. As a presidential surprise for the astronauts, free floating, weightless Jelly Belly beans were sent on the space shuttle Challenger in 1983.. By 1981 plants in both Illinois and California were running round-the-clock shifts but they still could not keep up with orders. Goelitz executives worried that Jelly Bellies were just a fad, but this was not the case. The company opened a new plant and corporate headquarters in Fairfield, California, in 1986. By 1992, the company had to double the size of the plant. The company makes a full range of candy products, but Jelly Bellies account for about 70 percent of sales. Herman Goelitz still manufactures candy corn and confections for all the major seasons. The company continues to operate out of headquarters in Fairfield, California, as well as manufacturing facilities in Fairfield and in North Chicago, Illinois. Goelitz also runs one freestanding retail store to sell its candies, in addition to stores attached to its manufacturing plants. The plant near Kenosha, Wisconsin, features a store and restaurant, as well as expanded production facilities. Today, Jelly Belly is the world’s #1 gourmet jelly bean, producing 50 amazing and tasty flavors. Great grandpa Gustav would be proud.

The Lipperts Attend Germany’s 60th Birthday in Berlin By: Donna Lippert Reinhard Lippert, from Benton Harbor, Michigan, celebrated his birthday in Berlin with over 750,000 people. Well actually, he spent his birthday with thirteen other family members during a recent trip to Berlin where the new Federal President Horst Kohler, standing in front of the Reichstag Building, was sworn in. On Saturday May 23rd, 2009 as we traveled via the Deutsche Bahn from Hildesheim, to Berlin, we were not aware of the celebration that awaited us. The re-election of Horst Kohler; the constitution turning 60, and the Bundesliga crowning a new champion, Wolfsburg were a few of the attractions. Getting around Berlin proved to be very easy, due to the great transit system, throughout the city, which was vibrant with art, history, and an active night-life. After many years of isolation, Berlin seemed to be making up for lost time. Our sight seeing took us past the striking glass dome of the Reichstag building and the Potsdamer Platz, which was bustling with people from all over Germany. Berlin has a lot to offer it’s visitors, so if you have just a day, or several weeks, “Berlin ist eine Reise wert!” (Berlin is worth a trip!”) In early afternoon, we enjoyed a packed lunch at the local park, just around the corner from where all the activities

were taking place that day amongst a crowd of over 750,000 people. We then proceeded with a tour on the Spree River, passing by many historical buildings, which included the Reichstag building, Humboldt University, and the home of Angelika Merkel. After walking around for four hours, some of the weary travelers headed back the Mecure Hotel, located at Checkpoint Charlie in the midst of the Berlin Mitte and the Mauer Museum. A handful of us, continued into the wee hours of the morning. At 1:00AM the party was over. Everyone had left and the stages that had hosted the day’s events were being torn down. On Sunday, May 24th, we visited the place Check Point Charlie had been and took the opportunity to pose for a photo with an American and a British soldier. Reinhard and I also traveled to the new Deutsches Auswanderer Haus (German Emigration Center) in Bremerhaven, which opened in July/August 2005. At the age of thirteen, Reinhard left from Bremerhaven to come to the U.S.A. with his parents Robert and Ida and brother Horst on December 13th, 1951. Ask him sometime about the trip; he’d be happy to share it with you. The historical ties between Germany and the United States remain strong and deep. Millions of Germans have emigrated to the U.S. over the past three centuries and nearly a quarter of all Americans claim German

ancestry. This is why it is so very important to continue fostering the German-American heritage within your own families. Please remember to support DANK National as they celebrate their 50th Anniversary this November in Frankfurt Illinois. The festive events are sponsored by the DANK South chapter, which is also celebrating their 50th Anniversary during the weekend of November 5-8, 2009.

Donna and Reinhard Lippert visit Check-point Charlie


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German-American Journal

October / November 2009

Stories from Camp Frederick German World War II POWs in Frederick, Maryland

(Part 5 of 5) By: Amelia Cotter Many of the primary sources in this work come directly from the archives at The Frederick County Historical Society in Frederick, Marlyand.

One Soldier’s Story: Erich Pahlow POW and native Berliner Erich Pahlow is one example of a prisoner who managed to build a lifelong relationship with some of the people he met while serving in Frederick. He corresponded regularly with Charles Thomas and returned to Frederick in 1980 to visit Charles’ mother, Mrs. George Leicester Thomas, at the Buckeystown farm where Pahlow had worked. Pahlow spoke in his own words about his experience as a POW in a number of articles printed by the Frederick News-Post and Frederick Magazine. Before the war began, Pahlow lived in Berlin with his wife and three children, and worked as a commercial artist. “I had a lot of American friends and personally had no reason to be against the U.S. But when political powers go to war, the rest of us are forced to follow.” He was drafted in 1940 at the age of 30 and was captured in 1943 in Lyon, France by a young American lieutenant. “All he did was grab my gun and throw it to the ground. The American just asked me where I lived and then proceeded to tell me that he had studied in Heidelberg.” Pahlow continued by adding, “I never even had to use that gun. People don’t realize how much listless sitting and waiting there is on the battlefield. The only way to keep sane is to stay occupied, so I drew a lot and painted.” He, along with other prisoners, were taken to Oran, Tunisia and then arrived in Norfolk, Virginia after a 16-day trip on an aircraft carrier. “The crossing was the hardest part of the war for me. Each moment took me farther from home to some unknown place…I couldn’t even tell my wife that I was alive.” After picking apples in Winchester, Virginia for one season, he was transported to Frederick, where he cleared land on farms. He also had to clear the border of a lake by removing trees and debris where a dam for a Washington, D.C. reservoir would be constructed. He explained, “This was a hard job for an artist, felling trees with a saw and an ax from 8 ’til 4 every day.” He recalled going to Ft. Eustis on occasion to hear lectures about American life and democracy, and receiving lessons in English. He also remembered “a number of musicians among the P.O.W.s, who created a band with instruments donated to them by local churches and Frederick residents. They performed for the American G.I.s and officers each Saturday.” Pahlow’s greatest relief was to be able to continue painting. “I kept up my art work and was soon asked to do signs and portraits for both Americans and Germans around Frederick County. The camp provided me with supplies and even a studio facing the north—the direction I suggested for the best light.” He even painted a Dutch scene on the kitchen wall of the Thomas’s house. He was released in 1945 and said that his reunion with his wife was the greatest moment of their lives, even though they could not return to Berlin. “It was impossible… All of our friends and possessions were gone and the only inhabitants left in the city were Russian and American police. It was like a cage.” Pahlow soon received a letter of recommendation from the commanding officer at the prison camp and got a job with an advertising agency. The Thomas’s helped to support him and his family by sending clothing, food, and books. Though Pahlow had fond memories of the farm, Charles Thomas, who was ten years old when Pahlow and the prisoners came to work for his father, recalled Camp Frederick being nicknamed the “Frederick Hilton,” and remembered making a family trip to the camp to see a Christmas play the POWs put on in December 1945. He poignantly summed up how difficult it was for the prisoners and citizens of Frederick to get used to living with each other: “When the Germans first came, Americans were cold to them and feared them. Some of the first farmers to use the prisoners were even ostracized by the community. As time went on, however, those fears vanished and many people became quite close to the prisoners.”

Photo Courtesy: David Rathbun

Conclusion Through the summer of 1945 to the spring of 1946, most of the German POWs in Maryland were sent back to Fort Meade, and eventually, home. Almost all of the 32,800 prisoners in the tri-state area were gone by August of 1946, except those who had violated military law or were in the hospital. An article from the Frederick News-Post from November 29, 1945 suggests that the camp may have had plans to shut down earlier, but had decided to remain open at least until January 1 of 1945, after “work contracts for the use of some 200 Germans had been renewed for 30 days.” Not long after the POWs were gone, an auction occurred at the campsite on May 23, 1946, and over $4,500 was raised from the sale of the camp’s buildings and other salvaged materials. The Frederick Co-op Association was already at work restoring the site to its original farm field conditions. Already on November 14, 1946, former POW Peter Siegfried Muetzel wrote to Quynn Orchard in Frederick, “requesting a copy of a picture of him and three friends taken November, 1945 in Frederick.” At the time the letter was written, Muetzel was serving as a POW in an English camp, but wrote of wanting to return to the United States someday, where he had seen the Ringling Brothers Circus with his parents prior to the war. Ironically, many of the prisoners had visited the United States before the war and even had relatives or friends who had settled in the area in previous generations. Frederick itself was settled by Germans over 250 years ago, and now these young men who had ties of various kinds to the area or this country were being held here as prisoners. On the other side, enemy soldiers—who had fought for a government responsible for some of the most horrible atrocities in history—seemed to be inundating Frederick. But soon, it seemed that distrust and fear from both sides gave way to curiosity, friendship, and mutual benefits of various kinds. As stated before, this may not have been true of all POW camps located in the United States during World War II, but it appears that in the small town of Frederick, life as a POW may not have been all that bad. Nevertheless, the strange mingling of the German POWs with American soldiers and civilians during World War II demonstrates the importance of viewing those foreign to us as individuals. Ultimately, those on both sides likely learned to see their “enemies” simply as people like themselves.

Find It Online

If you have missed previous installments of this article, you can now find them on DANK’s website. Just Visit: www.dank.org/journal_archives.html and select the issue you want to read! (Part 1 located in the February/March 2009 Issue)

Without Elections There Is No Democracy Bundestagswahl on September 27th, 2009 When traveling Germany’s roads these days, you are exposed to an unusual risk. Election posters are standing along the streets in hundreds, and many of them hinder us from a clear view of the oncoming traffic. They all remind us that soon we are electing our new government. 62.2 million Germans are called to take part in the decision of who will shape politics in Germany for the next four years. Of these Germans, 3.5 millions are called upon to vote for the first time, at one of the 80,000 polling locations. Naturally, those Germans who live outside of Germany can also vote by mail. The only requirement for them is that they must have lived in Germany at least once for a period of 3 months, after May 23,1949! The “17. Deutsche Bundestag” will be comprised of 598 delegates. A total of 27 political parties are up for election. The biggest are SPD (Social-Democratic Union), CDU (Christian Democratic Union), FDP (Free Democratic Party), Die Linke (The Lefts), Grüne (The Greens), and CSU (Christian-Social Democratic Party, which is only in Bavaria). The SPD will send their prime candidate, Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier, into the race and the CDU, of course, Bundeskanzlerin Angela Merkel. Prime candidate of the FDP is Guido Westerwelle, The Greens have Renate Künast and Jürgen Trittin and The Lefts are sending Gregor Gysi and Oskar Lafontaine. Two weeks before the Election Day, there will be a TV duel, inspired by the debates in America, between Mrs Merkel and Mr Steinmeier. It will be broadcast live on September 13th by ARD, ZDF, RTL and Sat1. I sure hope that many Germans will cast their vote on September 27th. Unfortunately, the trend has been not to vote. I’m not sure whether it is because people are frustrated with politics, or because they just don’t see many differences between the parties. It is hard to say. One known fact, is that those election posters will survive the day of the election for a long time, thus keeping us on our toes when traveling on the roads – permanently smiling at us and asking us whether we went and took our part in sustaining democracy in Germany.


October / November 2009

German-American Journal

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Educational Project On Cold War History By: Sandra K. Norlin Rotary Club Des Plaines, Illinois

Sandra K. Norlin, the Rotary club secretary, gave a vivid historical introduction of the main speaker, Baerbel Simon, Chair of the Berlin Chapter of THE COLD WAR MUSEUM, Fairfax, Virginia: It was sixty years ago that 2-year old Baerbel Simon heard a roaring noise, saw the shadows and then the large white birds flying low near her home in Berlin. Although Russian tanks had surrounded Berlin and prevented the delivery of supplies, the governments of Great Britain, France and the United States were determined to extend the Marshall Plan to alleviate the deprivation of the people of Berlin by organizing and carrying out a flyover to drop over 100,000 tons of supplies. “Operation Vittles” flew in 13,000 tons of food daily from over 200,000 flights over an 11 month period. From a child’s point of view it was a miracle. Food came from the sky. Gum was a curious object that came without instructions. Chocolate drifted down in small parachutes from the “Candy Bomber,” Gail S. Halvorson. From the new allies’ point of view, it was a necessity to prevent the Soviet Union from taking over control of all of Berlin, in contradiction of the agreement to share control of post war Germany. From the historians’ point of view it was the first act of aggression in the Cold War.

Celebrate By: Darlene Fuchs German-American Day, a holiday celebrated by German-Americans in the United States, is observed annually on October 6th. This celebration commemorates the anniversary of the arrival of 13 German Mennonite families on board a sailing vessel named “Concord” (the “German Mayflower”). The Germans from Krefeld, near the Rhine, landed in Philadelphia on October 6, 1983. These families subsequently founded Germantown, Pennsylvania, (now part of Philadelphia). This was the first German settlement in the original thirteen American colonies. In 1983 President Ronald Regan proclaimed October 6th as German-American

German

Each year, since 1988, the United German American Societies of greater Chicago have held a German American Gedenkfeier at St. Benedict’s Church, located at 2215 W. Irving Park Rd. in Chicago. It is well known that President Ronald Reagan proclaimed German Day to be commemorated on October 6th of each year. The German Day Organization of Chicago has set aside a Sunday afternoon, closest to

American pilots who died during the airlift. DANK Chicago, which maintains the museum at the DANK Haus German American Cultural Center, presented a plaque, which the German-American community had dedicated in honor to the 31 fallen US Air Force personnel, who had sacrificed their lives to keep the city in the part of the Free World. To further commemorate the occasion, DANK also brought along the flags of Germany and the City of Berlin.

Left - Right: Eric Freiberger, Veteran Albert Schafer, Baerbel Simon, Dagmar Freiberger and Horst Simon

German

American

Day to celebrate and honor the 300th anniversary of German American immigration and culture to the United States. On August 6, 1987, after a national campaign by DANK and many other GermanAmerican organizations, Congress approved S.J. Resolution 108, designating October 6, 1987 as German-American Day. It became Public Law 100-104 when President Reagan signed it on August 18th. A proclamation (#5719) to this effect was issued October 2, 1987, by President Reagan during a formal ceremony in the White House Rose Garden. At this time the President called on Americans to observe the day with appropriate ceremonies and activities. Here’s an excerpt from President Ronald Reagan’s 1987 German-American Day

American

By: Helga Zettl

On Thursday, July 30, Baerbel Simon told the Rotary Club of Des Plaines and invited guests the story of this remarkable period in history from both the child’s and the adult’s points of view. She shared her appreciation for the sacrifice that so many Air Force pilots made to keep her and her family alive and well during this bleak time immediately following World War II. She and representatives of the American Citizens of German Descent also brought a plaque they had commissioned to honor the memory of

Day

Day

proclamation: “The United States has embraced a vast array of German traditions, institutions, and influences. Many of these have become so accepted as parts of our way of life that their ethnic origin has been obscured. For instance, Christmas trees and Broadway musicals are familiar features of American society. Our kindergartens, graduate schools, the social security system, and labor unions are all based on models derived from Germany. German teachers, musicians and enthusiastic amateurs have left an indelible imprint on classical music, hymns, choral singing and marching bands in our country. In architecture and design, German contributions include the modern suspension bridge, Bauhaus, and Jugendstil. German-Ameri-

Commemoration

October 6th, to celebrate this proud event with the German American citizens of greater Chicago. This year’s Commemoration will be held on Sunday, October 4th, beginning at 2:30 PM. All German, Austrian and Swiss clubs are invited to participate. The celebration will begin with the presentation of the American and German flags, followed by flag carriers from each Verein who will proudly display their club flags in front of the altar.

Greetings from the President of the German Day Org., the Pastor of St. Benedict’s Church, the Consul General of the Republic of Germany and local dignitaries will follow. Each year a guest speaker is invited to share the accomplishments of Germanic immigrants and how their own talents have contributed to shape America. The afternoon program begins with the Kinderchor singing their ever popular songs and is followed by the combined choruses

can scientists have helped make the United States the world’s pioneer in research and technology. The American work ethic, a major factor in the rapid rise of the United States to preeminence in agriculture and industry, owes much to German-Americans’ commitment to excellence.” President Reagan’s 1987 proclamation went on to point out that the GermanAmerican connection has not been only a one-way exchange: “For more than three centuries, Germans have helped build, invigorate, and strengthen this country.” Over the years, presidents have signed similar proclamations designating October 6th as German-American Day. We look forward to a time when this date is designated as an official German-American Day for all to celebrate Germanic heritage and pride.

in

Chicago

from the Chicago area. The commemoration ends with the singers and congregation singing “Unser Gott wir loben Dich.” Overall, it will make you proud to be GermanAmerican. After the service, everyone is invited by St. Benedict’s Parish to stay for their Oktoberfest. The rest of the afternoon will be filled with good German music, food, and a beverage or two.


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German-American Journal

October / November 2009

OCT

06

1683 - Pennsylvania founder, William Penn, brings 13 immigrant families from Germany to the colony of Pennsylvania, making them the first immigrants of German’s to the U.S. These families were the founders of Germantown and it is the reason for selecting October 6th as German-American Day.

Why Make The Trip? 2009 National Convention

By: Darlene Fuchs Now that the summer internship program is over, it has been a little lonely around the office! But there is no lack of work to be done. We continue to chisel away at the raffle tickets, which are coming in steadily, along with new memberships and lots of inquiries and phone calls (which are always welcome). Our internship program proved to be a big success, and we have a brand new membership brochure as well as new product designs and ideas to show for it. Plenty of other contributions were made by both Rudy and Frances that will be affecting us positively for a long time to come. We also have a new Twitter page, which can be found by going to www.twitter.com/ danknational. Please feel free to follow us or ask us to follow you or your business.

As always, we continue to have a DANK fan page on Facebook. And the Forum on our national website, dank.org, has some new features. We are bringing some old discussions back to life, as well as adding new fun topics, such as the Halloweenappropriate, “German Myths and Legends.” Please feel free to join us and just jump in wherever you feel like it. Never hesitate to start a new topic, and conversations are taking place in both German and English all the time. General preparations for the National Convention and the upcoming membership dues drive in November are also underway, as well as a thorough cleaning and reorganising of our Archives. Lots of fun, never a dull moment!

Where Are We As An Organization? Before reporting on the effort to increase our organizational membership, let me THANK each and every one of you reading these words, because it means you are one of those members who has paid his/ her membership dues and is an active member of this organization. If you have not paid your 2009 dues, please do so today. Hopefully all of you are undertaking your own effort to support the “JUST ADD ONE “campaign by reaching out to a family member, neighbor, or friend and attempting to recruit new members for DANK. Ultimately, that is the most effective way of increasing membership in DANK. Where are we as it pertains to our membership drive? Well, due to the good work of our webmaster, Stephen Fuchs, we have a vastly improved DANK website that makes joining much easier. You now have the ability to pull down an application form and select what chapter you wish to join, or just become a National member. On a more direct membership drive effort, some initiatives, started over a year ago, are coming to fruition. Pittsburgh’s MasonDixon sub chapter, started less than two years ago, is reaching the point of having achieved a 40 plus members status. By this year’s end, there is the possibility of becoming its own chapter. Credit needs to be given to the sub chapter founder and Pittsburgh VP, Chris Decker. DANK Columbus joined our family last summer through the hard work of Ulrike Zika, which also simultaneously started a DANK School for that community. Efforts to get

chapters established in Syracuse, New York and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, continue to be addressed with the hope that we will have established chapters in those areas by this year’s end. Pittsburgh’s second sub chapter is about to be established with the creation of the Laurel Highlands unit. William Russell, long time Erie Chapter DANK member and his wife, are spearheading this effort. Good news was received this past month regarding Chapter Indianapolis, which held new elections and is now working at adding new members to reinvigorate that organization. Through the hard work of Katie Viebek, Chapter Peoria has become active again. However, we still have several chapters that we need to pull out of inactive status. We will work on this in the next year. The good news overall, is that we have stopped our membership slide and that Chapters like our 4 Chicago chapters – Chicago, Chicago South, Chicago West and Northern suburbs, Milwaukee, Erie, Phoenix. Fox Valley, Benton Harbor, and Pittsburgh are either increasing their numbers or holding their own. Some of our smaller chapters like Cleveland, Decatur, South Bend, and La Porte continue to serve their membership through selfless leadership and dedicated hard work within those chapters. While much work still lays ahead in getting a sizable increase in our membership, the process has begun, and with the help of all of our members, we should be able to report ongoing success!

Sign Up For Membership Online @ www.DANK.org

With the DANK convention and 50th Anniversary rapidly approaching, I took some time to reflect on my experiences attending past events. The 2009 National Convention will be my eleventh convention. There are DANK members who have attended more than I have, but I think I am in a unique position, as I have seen different sides of this event, as both a delegate and as a convention planner in 2001. Perhaps I may have some insight from my experiences that will help you to decide, ‘”why make the trip?” My first convention was hosted by DANK Chicago West. For two days in the fall of 1989, my perception of DANK was completely changed. While I knew we were a national organization, I couldn’t grasp the concept, until I was with members and friends from across the country. Singing with members from Erie, socializing with members from Milwaukee, sharing a joke with members from Springfield and being part of the bigger picture, were events that have stayed with me to this day. Looking back, these conventions have helped me realize that it was not only my job as a DANK member to get involved, but to give back. It was not enough to only enjoy the functions at my chapter, it was my responsibility to support the National organization, so that future generations of DANK could have the same, if not a better, experience. By the time 2001 had rolled around, I had dedicated numerous hours helping to plan the next exciting and engaging convention. It was not only an enjoyable opportunity to catch up with old friends and meet new members, but a way of passing on my own experiences to those attending. While I remember a couple of things from

the convention, I seem to recall much more running than anything else. What I do remember, is the honor I felt being a part of the host chapter, Fox Valley. As a DANK member, I want to see our National Convention, hosted by DANK Chicago South, be successful. Now, the 2009 National Convention and 50th Anniversary of DANK are coming November 5-8, 2009. Since it is also the 50th Anniversary of DANK Chicago South, we can all look forward to a full itinerary for the weekend. There will be an awards dinner at DANK Chicago South’s Club House on Friday, November 6th and a Gala dinner dance on Saturday November 7th. Delegates will enjoy engaging seminars on Saturday and will elect a National Board that they will support for the next two years. Guests from across the country can tour downtown Old Frankfort, or try their luck playing slots and blackjack at the local casino. I am sure there will be a “Hospitality Room” available in the evening for everyone to let their hair down while socializing with old and new friends alike. I recognize that I will be an attending guest and may not have the same experiences as I did twenty years ago. But I also know that I might not have the same motivation to uphold the ideals of DANK, had I not attended these events in the past. Each time I have attended a DANK National Convention, I have had to make some sacrifices, whether it was the finances to get there or the time needed to plan and run the event. It may have taken a couple of years for the positive experiences to sink in, but I would never question “why I made the trip?” For more information about the upcoming convention call Anita Walthier at 708-636-3074.

CONVENTION: Help celebrate our 50th year CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 with the “DANK National Convention”. Reservations must be received on or before OCTOBER 6, 2009 for the discounted rate. Please call the hotel at 708-444-1100. Since our goal is to build our organization throughout the United States, we will be holding workshops for our delegates on Friday that elaborate on their role as a board member, not for profit organizational obligations, record keeping obligations, and how to utilize the DANK website, including the newly launched DANK forum. As always, the convention this year will be a chance to expand our ever-growing networks and remind us who we are, why we joined DANK, and how we can make it better while socializing with friends and members attending from across the United States. Highlights include, the Awards Dinner & Dance along with the announcement of this year’s DANK Youth Ambassador on Friday night at Chicago South’s Club House in Frankfurt, Illinois. Saturday, after electing the new board and seeing the sights, there will be an Anniversary Gala Dinner Dance at the convention center.

We encourage members, residents from the surrounding community, and friends from near and far to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the National Organization and DANK Chicago South. We would like to thank you in advance for joining us and being a part of this historic event. Hopefully you will leave the convention more informed, more inspired, and more engaged than when you arrived – because though we have come a long way, there is much left to do. DANK Chicago South has put in many hours of hard work & effort in planning this “Golden Event”. What better way to show them our appreciation than with laughter and moments shared with friends and family; in other words “Gemütlichkeit”. Please don’t hesitate to call Anita Walthier with any questions you may have at 708636-3074.

Check Us Out Online For the most up-to-date information visit our national convention website

DANK.org/Convention


October / November 2009

German-American Journal

Upcoming DANK Youth Ambassador Contest By: Terry Viebach

In an effort to encourage young people to become more involved with DANK on a higher level, the board and convention committee have decided to change the originally planned Miss DANK contest to the DANK Youth Ambassador Contest. The chapter presidents were all sent an interest letter to see if this is something DANK should support. We have gotten positive responses and 3 chapters have already nominated candidates. The candidates should be boys or girls between the ages of 14 and 19 and must be members of DANK, either individually or through their parents’ memberships. They should have some knowledge of German American history, as well as the history of DANK in America. A test will be administered on Friday

afternoon of the convention. A prepared speech will be given on Friday evening of the convention, where the candidates will be rated on poise and the use of the German language. Using a points system, a winner will be selected. The term of office will be for 2 years, lasting until the 2011 National Convention. Candidates should be nominated by, and represent their chapter. If they live in an area where no chapters are nearby, they may enter as an independent national candidate. Nominations are still open, if any chapter has a young member who is interested. Applications will be sent out to nominated candidates within the next week, or as additional nominations are received. All applications have to be turned in by October 9th. The responsibility of the Youth Ambassador will be to participate in the Von Steuben parade in Chicago, attend DANK events as their schedule allows, and attend at least 2 National Board meetings as the youth liaison. The winner of this year’s DANK Youth Ambassador Contest will win a scholarship in the form of a saving’s bond. Please send nominations to: Terry Viebach 7939 S Lorel Dr Burbank IL 60451

Chapter Presidents can also email nominations to tviebach@yahoo.com. Just include the chapter name and the contact information for your candidate.

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German-American Journal

October / November 2009

National Election Candidates William Fuchs: President

I have been DANK National President for a 2 year term now and feel that we have accomplished quite a lot so far. Please see

the President’s note on page two for more information. I believe that we can accomplish much more with additional active involvement by the chapters and individual DANK members. A grass root effort is essential to make our chapters grow and prosper. We on the National Board exist to support and help the chapters. We also have an obligation to further a common good for the whole organization, without favoring any one chapter over another. Having a well organized National Organization gives us the ability to have a strong bond tying all of our chapters together with common goals and the ability to help each other. When we all work together to achieve common goals, I truly

believe DANK can become what we all want it to be: An organization that people look up to and want to be a part of. During the last two years, I have strived to build an infrastructure for our organization that will allow DANK to grow on all levels, so that we can be a well organized National Organization. If elected again, I will continue on that path, and with the much needed help of our members, we can achieve the extraordinary. Together we can make DANK the best and proudest German-American organization in the country. Here is just a short history to help you know me better. I grew up in Gelsenkirchen, Germany,

until the age of 13, when I immigrated to the US with my parents in 1966. Occupationally, I am a captain for DELTA Airlines flying to Europe and Asia on the Airbus A-330 widebody aircraft. I have been involved in DANK since the founding of the DANK Aurora (later to become Fox Valley) chapter in 1967. In 1987, I became chapter Vice-President and 5 years later started a 13 year run as chapter president. I have served on the National Board as VP from 2003 to 2007. I was then elected as National President and have served for the last two years.

R. Erik Wittmann: Vice President I, Erik Wittmann, current National Vice President and Pittsburgh Chapter President for the past 16 years, am now a Life Member of DANK. I joined the organization in 1986 and converted to Life Member this year. As National Vice President for the last two years, I have functioned as Membership chair for the Membership Committee and served both on the Product Development and Travel Program Committees. While guardedly optimistic about the future of DANK as a national organization, I am very concerned about the lack of involvement by many of our members, both at the Chapter

and National level. Additionally, I am very concerned about the lack of cohesiveness between some of our DANK leadership, who seem to prefer personal ideology over constructive communication. I share this only to indicate that if I am elected for a second term, I plan on developing ways to minimize our conflicts and focus on organizational growth and shared leadership. I will do this by creating greater opportunity for chapter leadership to become involved in both the focus of our efforts and the carrying out of those efforts. I am a firm believer that DANK as a organization belongs to all of us and is not

the property of the Board of Directors. Thus making this organization viable is also not solely the responsibility of this Board, but all of the members. This means that the grass roots membership needs to get involved to make this organization stronger, more effective, and to make it grow in numbers. On a personal level, even though officially retired from the Pennsylvania State Government, I continue as an independent consultant to do training for both local private agencies, as well as state and federal governments in areas of disaster preparedness and disaster response. I am an avid sports fan, which includes trying

to be personally active in physical activities. I love to travel throughout the US and world, including my native Austria.

Donna Lippert: Vice President As the current DANK National 2nd Vice President, I am once again running for this position in November 2009 at the National Convention. Born and raised in Benton Harbor Michigan, I continue to be very active in my local DANK Benton Harbor/St. Joseph chapter. I am also involved at the St. Joe Kickers Sports Soccer Club, where I presently serve as the Membership Chairperson and on the Board of Directors. I completed my high school education at Michigan Lutheran High School continuing on at Lake Michigan College. There, I secured my present position as a Loss Prevention Officer of

a credit union, located in St. Joseph Michigan, which was founded in 1934. My ancestors, on both sides of my family, have German roots and I am also President of the Steinke Family Reunion, which recently celebrated their 81st anniversary. My husband Reinhard and I will be celebrating our 10th anniversary in October 2009. We currently are Life Members of DANK. I have very much enjoyed working with the current DANK National officers and all the chapters in Region Two, where I currently hold the position of Region Two President. Over the past two years, much has been accomplished on

the National level with the current leadership. I am currently on the national Education Board, the Raffle Committee, and the DANK 50th Anniversary committee. In May 2009, my husband, Reinhard, and I returned to Berlin where we witnessed the 60th anniversary of German unity and visited Check Point Charlie. Then we went on to Bremerhaven, from where Reinhard left in 1951 to come to the USA. This is why it is so very important for us at DANK National and all DANK members to keep your German-American heritage alive, so that we can look forward to celebrating future anniversaries at DANK National.

Beverly Pochatko: Secretary BeverlyAPochatko, current National Secretary and President of the Erie Chapter of DANK, the German Heritage Society. I was a 20 year member of DANK when I became the founder of the Erie Chapter in 1989. I have served in various capacities on the DANK National Board for 17 of those years; as a Regional President, as Vice President and currently as the National Secretary. Additionally, I have served on the Membership Committee, By-laws, the Standard Operating Guide, Merchandising, Education and National Awards for various Presidents. My concerns for DANK have been reflected in the various committees I have volunteered to

serve on. I worry about the membership levels not growing; how to keep our dues at the same level and not raise them; making information available to the chapters in a manner they can understand and utilize (SOG); clarifying and simplifying our National By-laws within the parameters of the law; being sure that language classes for adults are readily acceptable/ available in our education program; honoring persons for their fine contributions to keeping our DANK organization viable. The past two years has seen a variety of changes under the current National Board. If re-elected, I pledge to continue to work with the

board to address the concerns of the membership; to encourage new chapter growth and to support the ideals of DANK My family supports my efforts to preserve my German ancestry. Personal endeavors include: my DANK Chapter, the Erie Historical Society, the Erie Männerchor Gesangverein, the Siebenbürger Singers and the yearly German Heritage Festival. My secretarial skills came from 20 years of secretarial work, retiring from Gannon University two years ago. My goal for the future is to revisit Germany.

Maria Thompson: Treasurer Since becoming the DANK National Treasurer it has been my honor to serve the organization in this capacity. Over the past two years I have been a part of the many positive changes that have taken place and look forward to more years of growth. In 1983 I became the treasurer of DANK Fox Valley and continue in that capacity still today. I am also on the Board of Fox Valley German

American Team of Educational Sponsors (GATES). Outside of DANK, I worked for a finance company for eleven years and then worked in the finance department of a printing company for seven years. After doing taxes for friends and neighbors, I started my own income tax business and to this day I enjoy working in the financial field.

I believe, if DANK wants to grow, everyone from the National Executive Board to the newest member, must think strategically, plan effectively, execute efficiently and communicate clearly and logically. Together we all have a great opportunity to build relationships, connect members and show the next generations the positive impact they have by supporting DANK.


October / November 2009

German-American Journal

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Milwaukee GermanFest 2009 By: John Dienhart DANK Milwaukee continued their efforts in supporting the local German American Community at Milwaukee’s 2009 GermanFest. Several of the local chapter members are involved in key positions at the Fest running the Konditorei, supporting the GermanFest office, running several of the refreshment stands and providing logistical support. The Milwaukee chapter continues to produce one of the largest volunteer groups for the Fest year after year. DANK Milwaukee not only provides much of the volunteer support for the Fest but many chapter members in Illinois and other states drive to Milwaukee and either work as volunteers or come to support the Fest with their presence. They participate in the Dachshund races, attend the many concerts, enjoy the food and beer, and march in the Saturday parade. We wish to thank the many chapters who supported us and marched with us in the parade this year. Interestingly the Milwaukee Chapter always has the least amount of marchers because we have so many people working as volunteers and they cannot get away to participate in the parade. This was the first year that GermanFest had an air show featuring several acrobatic teams and single fliers performing over the lakefront to the amazement of the attendees. The Milwaukee Air and Water Show took place earlier in the day just to the north of the festival grounds with the US Air Force Thunderbirds performing and lighting up the crowd. The static performance

DANK Milwaukee Chapter parade participants with National National VP, Donna Lippert, in the GermanFest parade.

displays of the US Navy/Marine Corps F/A-18 Hornet and the US Air Force F-15 Eagle were amazing. There were heritage flybys of both planes with the F/A-18 and an F4 Hellcat and the F-15 and a P51 Mustang. The GermanFest acrobatic performances went into the evening with pilots using the landing lights to form crosses and other symbols. Our Milwaukee chapter Folk Dancers and Chor performed in the Showcase at GermanFest. The Chor is the only Chor in the German American community still singing at the Fest and have been performing here for decades. They also participate in the Sunday morning church service. The GermanFest Culture Heritage theme for this year was “Remembering our Past, Supporting Our Future.” Each participating society had to select a word and base their display on that word. DANK chose “DANKe” or “thanks.” Milwaukee Chapter members developed an acrostic to use as the chapter theme, “Deutsch Amerikaner Natürlich Kennen Enthusiasmus” or “Deutsch Americans Naturally Know Enthusiasm.” We used a carryover to last years display laying out once again the start of the US by those sailing over for religious freedom. They were followed by immigrants who left due to the increased mechanization and loss of jobs in Germany, high taxation, the inheritance laws at the time, and the political situations through the years. Maps were provided showing immigration patterns and densities of the Germanic people following the 9th Census and in 1900 and 1910. The Library of Congress “The Germans in America – Chronology” was on display as was a copy of the German Life article “America’s Most German-American City” by local Milwaukee Historian John Gurda from their December 1996/ January 1997 magazine. Sections from the Wikipedia article on Milwaukee were also used pointing out Milwaukee being called the “Deutsches Athen” (German Athens) and the fact there were more German speakers and German-language newspapers than there were English speakers and English-newspapers in the President, Bill Fuchs, and city. A period copy of the lyrics of the Star Spangled Banner,

Davenport Iowa chapter visits DANK Sponsorship Booth

“Das Star-Spangled Banner” was made available for viewing and a Wisconsin Historical Society list of German, Austrian and Swiss immigrants who “enthusiastically” contributed to the development of Wisconsin was provided. A goal of the Chapter was to have the visitors understand how much contribution German, Austrian and Swiss immigrants made in developing the area and the state. Milwaukee Chapter member Jim Schmidt headed up the volunteer effort and attended the monthly meetings. Chapter member John Dienhart produced the display. Several local chapter members and Chicago area chapter members supported Milwaukee in staffing the display and answering questions. There was again a “Passport to Germany” booklet for the children (and adults). Each stop the bearer had to learn the German word and something about the display to get the coveted Chapter stamp. Once filled, there were free Jelly Belly jellybeans for the successful participants. Milwaukee Chapter members John Dienhart and Bob Miske also were instrumental in helping DANK become an official sponsor of GermanFest this year. It allowed DANK to have a sponsorship booth near the main entrance of the grounds in the busy Midway. This was in addition to the chapter booth in the Culture & Heritage Tent. National President Bill Fuchs along with son Stephen and wife Darlene put together an attractive Public Relations booth with banners and posters that informed visitors about DANK. Eye-catching Brandenburg Gate T-shirts were given to those folks that signed up for membership or the attractive DANK VISA signature credit cards. Not only did many DANK members stop by for a visit but we able to sign up and welcome numerous new members to our growing DANK family. We again thank all of those who participated in the many responsibilities of the Fest.


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German-American Journal

October / November 2009

Erie Chapter Celebrates The Summer! By: Beverly Pochatko

On July 15th, the Annual DANK Family Picnic was held at Mt. Carmel Picnic Grove. This year, we invited our German Heritage Festival volunteers (non-DANK members) to say thank you for their contributions to our success. This is always a well-attended event. The evening started around 5 PM as everyone arrived carrying their favorite dish to share. As usual, there were no duplicate items! Dinner was at 6 PM which consisted of three tables ‘groaning’ under the myriad of tureen dishes that were shared. The dessert table was (in dieter’s language - sinful) to ‘die for!’ We can safely say that no one left the table hungry. After dinner, the kids enjoyed the play area with their pinwheels moving in the breeze and their bubbles floating high into the evening sky. The Millcreek Area Community Band provided a varied selection of music and there was a drawing for door prizes. The ‘gently used’ sale of Trachten from some of our members was well received. In all, over 60 persons enjoyed the beautiful summer evening. Just a week before the annual German Festival (our 13th), DANK members, friends, and family met at the Erie Brewing Company for our ‘Kick-Off’ get-together. For two hours, they came to sign up for their volunteer shifts at the Festival and as a side-event were able to enjoy hot dogs off the grill with chips, pop, and, naturally, some great beer.

EBC is our own Braumeister and has provided us with two special beers that are only available at the German Fest, along with two other favorites. Volunteers could get a tour of the brewery if they liked, but most enjoyed meeting in the Rathskeller and tasting generous ‘samples’ of their fine offerings. Just one week later the main tent (175x50’) for German Fest began to go up under the early morning blue skies. This was soon followed by the Marktplatz tents with the vendors arriving to set up early on Friday morning. Alles war in Ordnung! There is always excitement in the air as a march begins and the parade of the 16 German State flags, followed by the German, Austrian and American flags, parade through the grounds and into the festival tent. They are led by the Alpen Schuhplattlers in their colorful Trachten. After the national anthems were sung, ‘Captain’ Dan Geary, the Master of Ceremonies, welcomed everyone as they tapped the official keg and shouted “O zapft ist!”. The glasses were filled and a standing toast was given to the singing of Ein Prosit. The “Mad Bavarian”, Bob Hamilton, started out the music and shortly thereafter, the Schuhplattlers entertained with the traditional folk-dances. The sights and sounds of the Fest are a feast for the eyes and ears, but nothing can top the delicious aromas floating on the breeze from dem Essenplatz. From the sweet smell

Members Jerry Chase, Carol Snippert, MaryJane Hartman, guest, Sharon and Dale Wallin enjoy the concert band.

Stammtisch... Elvis Style By: Sarah Dandelles A cold and gray Chicago evening in August, was the scene of the second annual “Elvis” Stammtisch Open Haus in the Dank Haus’ German Cultural Center’s sixth floor Skyline Lounge. For two-plus sets, Chicago’s own Elvis Presley tribute artist, Ronnie Vegas, performed Elvis classics and other favorite party tunes to a busy dance floor and a crowd of seated attendees, who were wearing festive leis for the occasion. During breaks, visitors looked out across the city from the crisp, outdoor terrace, ducked back into the cozy bar area, and visited with old and new friends. An estimated 150 people attended the event – more than half of which were new faces. “Stammtisch Open Haus” is in it’s 4th year as Chicago North Chapter’s popular monthly open-door event, with a variety of entertainment features each month. Examples include a recent Schuhplattler demonstration, German board games and table tennis, and live entertainers like Vegas. The

event is held on the third Friday of each month, from 7:30p.m. to midnight, with no entry charge. Food and beverages are available at the bar. A special item on the August menu was Plum Cake, which sold out quickly! This year was the second to feature Vegas, a Chicago native who has been performing as Elvis Presley on Chicago’s north side. Even Vegas’s own mother came to the show and graced the DANK Haus dance floor– it was an audience of all ages. Highlights of the performance included a 50-person conga line that snaked through the sixth floor space and Vegas’s surprise third set encore performance of specially requested tunes like “Burning Love.” The performance was followed by Vegas’s manager and DJ Barbie Kolb spinning dance favorites to round out the evening. Elvis has left the DANK Haus building and summer has left Chicago behind, but with luck the DANK Haus will welcome Vegas and fans back for another August night to remember next year. See you then?

Top L-R: Meg Miller, Sarah Dandelles, Paul Schwab, Anke Drexler, Steve Ehrbach, Matt Hoppe, Michaela Schmidt, Ronnie Vegas’s mother, Angelique Wisler, Dagmar Freiberger Center: Elvis Tribute Performer Ronnie Vegas / Lower L-R: unknown, Jason McInnes

“Opening Ceremony” (L to R) Dan Geary, Master of Ceremonies, Bev Pochatko, Fred Huttel, Jr., and Ray Lunieswski Co-chair

of funnel cakes and fresh popped kettle corn, to the brats sizzling on the grill and the pungent smell of sauerkraut and sauerbraten, to the freshly baked strudel; it’s bound to build up one’s appetite. The children had a blast in the Kinderplatz, jumping in the Castle Bounce and riding the trackless train, while others were quietly petting the animals in Granny’s Ark petting zoo. Mom & Dad, along with Gramma & Grampa, enjoyed the music provided by the Mad Bavarian, Hank Haller’s Band, and the Augsburg German Band, some even got out on the dance floor! Taking a break from the music, they strolled the Marktplatz and stopped to buy items from Germany at Ernst Licht’s booth, “Little Germany” or the European Imports. St. Obnoxious gathered a crowd with their t-shirts. Many people visited the genealogy area to learn more about their ancestry and how to find them. New this year, the Viennese Cafė was a big hit with the fresh whipped cream puffs, German chocolate cake, and cookies for the youngsters, as well as freshly brewed coffee. Entertainment there was provided by renowned accordionist Henry Doktorski. When the Fest drew to a close, the volunteers and organizers were already looking forward to next year. Vendors are already under contract and the tents and everything that went into the Fest are stored again for another year.

News From Region 3 By: Chris Decker Representatives of Region 3 met at the Apollo Männer Chor in Sharon, PA, on August 6th. The location was central for almost all. Driving in to attend the meeting from Cleveland was Stefan Pigler, Linda Voit, Herman Voit Erik Wittmann, Jim & Patty Schmitt, Chris Decker, Ernst Jung attended from Pittsburgh. From Erie, Beverly Pochatko, Margaret Potocki, and Margaret Carter attended. Chapters Columbus, Philadelphia, Passiac and New Castle were not represented at the meeting. For most everyone, the two hour drive was rather nice and we all arrived safely. We were graciously welcomed by the Apollo Männer Chor to their home. Later, they served us a delicious meal of goulash, spaetzle, cabbage, and three delicious desserts. To top things off, they entertained us after lunch with a few musical selections. We could not have asked for better hosts! Each of the Chapters gave a brief synopsis of their Chapter’s activities. Everyone’s concern was on how to increase membership and attendance at meetings, including regional participation. All agreed that we need to incorporate ‘fun’ activities to make meetings enjoyable. Having German language classes can be a recruiting tool for some. It’s finding the right ‘niche’ for the individual chapter. The importance of submitting information to the national office was discussed, especially if there is a change of officers or contact information. Equally

important is the Calendar of Events that is published in the GAJ and on our web-site. You can’t find a better way to let others know about what is happening in your area, and perhaps getting them there to join you. The Reimbursement Policy for Regional Reps was discussed and a motion was passed to support the policy. Each of the Chapters agreed that, beginning in 2010, we need to raise our Regional member dues from $50 to $75. Most everyone agreed that as a volunteer organization some of us don’t always submit expense reports, but rather consider it a donation of our time. Everyone was encouraged to attend the National Convention in November. The Election Of Officers Took Place: President: Chris Decker

Vice Presidents: Presidents of all Regional Chapters on the Board (to provide equal representation) Treasurer: Patty Schmitt

Secretary: Beverly Pochatko Regional Delegates: Chris Decker, Margaret Potocki and other alternates to be determined. Our next meeting will be held in early May hosted by Cleveland at an Amish destination See you all at Convention!


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Summer Time Is Picnic Time In South Bend By: Christine Weiss

Our splash pool party took place at AnneMarie and Ron Szulczyk’s house on July the 18th. The sun that was hidden in the morning behind clouds appeared in midday making it impossible to resist a dip in the pool. Home made salads; casseroles and Bratwurst on the grill followed by delicious desserts brought good company and a fantastic day. The 9th of August was our next picnic at Kison’s farm. This is always the highlight of the summer. Even so it was the hottest day of the year the turnout was tremendous. The picnic tables were placed under shady tall trees and a light breeze moved through the air making it very bearable and comfortable to enjoy the day. The table was set for a feast with many choices of food to

choose from, inviting everyone for a good luncheon. Like every year, Günter brought out his tractor wagon and invited whoever wanted to go for a ride. Young and old alike climbed up the ladder and took a seat and

off we went up the hill and through the woods. Because of the narrow path through the woods, it became a challenge to bend down in time to avoid getting hit by the oncoming branches, contributing to laughter and screaming by the entire party.

Ladies of DANK (L to R): Inge Bradburn, Rose Born, Bärbel Kelley, Hedi McCoy, Sonja Wilson

An Enjoyable Summer Afternoon By: Ursula Hoeft

The competition was fierce! Water balloon toss competition is not a sport for amateurs! The winners of this year’s event admitted that they have years of experience under their belts. First place went to Ralph Kordas and Nate Eifert; Pat and Fred Bode came in second. The water balloon toss was just one of the attractions that folks enjoyed at the DANK Chapter Lake County, Illinois picnic on July 12. A giant sausage - would you believe about 8 feet tall? - wearing a ball cap, known by Milwaukee Brewers baseball fans as Frankie Furter (and by Chapter members as Pat Bode), greeted them when they arrived. You should have seen the children’s eyes when they saw the huge hot dog! There was plenty of time for a beer or two, to visit with friends and to enjoy some good old-fashioned German

“Water Balloon Toss Winners” (L to R): Fred and Pat Bode; Nate Eifert and granduncle Ralph Kordas

Gemütlichkeit. The weather was absolutely perfect, too! And, of course, there was food - lots and lots of food thanks to Anni and Victor Kordas and members of their family who once again did the barbequing. The chicken was delicious - perfectly cooked - and judging by the faces of those who were eating them, the sausages they also grilled may have been about the best Wurst (an oxymoron?) they had ever eaten. Delicious side dishes made by club members and scrumptious desserts, most also homemade, completed the feast. It was a perfect afternoon with plenty of good food, good drink, good fellowship, and excitement, too, as the last intact water balloon was caught and a cheer went up from the crowd!

Gwennie Young enjoying a Wurst while mom Adina and sister Ave watch. Photo Courtesy: Judy Kanka

Mason Dixon Making A Difference

By: Ernst Jung

Dank 158 has been busy growing in size and expanding it’s activities. The announcement of President Chris Decker to step down, due to other DANK workloads, resulted in a general election with the following results: President Ernst Jung, VP Chris Decker, Secretary Lois Henck, Treasurer Ilona Dean. VP Chris Decker, who helped found the organization, has graciously promised to support in anyway he can and has expressed his regrets of not being able to carry on as President. The subchapter thanked him for all of his past efforts and applauded his many accomplishments, including bringing the membership up to 40 members. The many social events of his administration have helped Uniontown become part of a successful DANK organization. One of their strong points is communication. Chris Decker started an e-mail listing for notification of meetings

and special events. At present only 5 members require mail notification, saving the organization 44 cents monthly for members with e-mail addresses. The social programs have been well received. Past activities included a travelogue, sing-along, covered dish supper, dine out, and a Saturday afternoon of card and board games with extravagant refreshments. The game time, due to popular request, has been repeated at regular evening meetings. One of the first items on President Jung’s agenda was to give everyone a 2009 calendar to assist in planning the year’s events. The group voted to follow Teacher Jung’s recommendation to suspend conversational German classes until the fall and to keep up the monthly meetings during the summer. President Jung announced that the subchapter had become too big to continue being led by only one or two individuals. The solution was to establish committees

The children were very easy to please with simple games which they took very seriously, trying their best. Afterwards they were rewarded with chocolates and candy. All the children had to sit in a circle with an open lunch sack, and one by one each received one goody at a time. Like fireworks at the end of a show, our water balloon tossing game finished the day. While some folks packed up and left shortly after that, others stayed a little longer enjoying one more glass of beer, wine or a cup of coffee while the evening slowly settled in. I would like to say a hearty thank you to Anne-Marie and Ron Szulczyk and Erika and Günter Kison for welcoming us again to their home and making it a great day for all of us.

Hot Hot Hot... DANK South’s Picnic By: Anita Walthier & Nancy Moser

On August 9, 2009, one of the hottest days of the year, DANK Chicago South held their annual picnic. The warm winds brought little comfort but yet the picnic fired up.  Thirst was quenched by cold beer from the tappers, as most Germans would know.  Thanks to Kathy Kruss and Mike Konrath for keeping it flowing.  Despite the heat, the Grill Team of Frank Janca and Adolf Fandl, with help from Edith Saurer, proved to be a selling success.  The Chefmeisters Kathy Fandl and Paula Malloy, along with all their volunteers in the “Küche..”Es hat alles gut geschmeckt.”  Hats off to Terry Viebach for entertaining the kids with games and prizes.  It was a perfect day for a water balloon contest.  President Bill Schmidt did a great job selecting the raffle prizes.  We would like to recognize all of the hard working “behind the scenes” volunteers. The Hirsch Band provided dancing pleasure “mit Gemuetlichkeit” We are always happy to have Eva Timmerhaus, from DANK National, and daughter, Evi, attend our functions.   The Mayor of Frankfort, Mr. Jim Holland (our own club member), came out to celebrate the picnic. If it weren’t for YOU, our members, we wouldn’t have been able to be here for 50 years, celebrating our German heritage. So, thank you for all of your support! As you are all aware of our 50th Anniversary on the weekend of November 5-8th 2009, please remind all your friends and family to come to this fabulously planned event.  The highlight will be the Grand Ball on Saturday evening.

to help function more efficiently by distributing the work load. Some of the important committees are: Planning and Organization, Education, Refreshments, Publicity, Oktoberfest and Program Development. We are already seeing the effectiveness of some of these changes. Meetings have since commenced after a ½ hour Social Intercourse hour during which committees have a chance to discuss their activities among themselves. This has surprisingly worked out very well. During one of these pre-meeting committees teacher Jung was convinced by 3 other education members not to change the text book for the next semester. This year’s German class had a dozen members that graduated in June, all of which passed a strict oral exam and many of them plan to continue class in the fall. For the upcoming Oktoberfest, scheduled for September 12th, Chris Decker secured a location in nearby Hopwood, at Hutchinson Park, for the afternoon and will provide entertainment with his famous Augsberg Band performing. He is trying

to coordinate a Uniontown railroad trip to Hopwood while opening the event to the public. Tickets will be available through members. The publicity committee has been successful in getting the attention of the local newspapers, resulting in new visitors interested in DANK. Other members of the subchapter volunteered to participate in a local benefit luncheon for autistic children. A basket raffled off for $75.00 included tickets for Oktoberfest, an Augsburg CD, a DANK cookbook along with German beer and desert items. This gave Mason Dixon a great opportunity to promote DANK and the German culture. Currently the Mason-Dixon, sub chapter of Pittsburgh, has close to 50 members. The chapter was formed out of the core Pittsburgh Chapter. Interested members from the Mason-Dixon area reached out to their community for new members creating a localized sub chapter. Their continued efforts wll bring the flourishing group closer to their goal of becoming an independent chapter by 2010.


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Ambassador and Consul Send General Visit Cleveland By: Stefan Pigler On Monday August 31, 2009, the German Ambassador to the United States, Dr. Claus Schariot, paid a visit to our fair city.. He was invited to speak at the Cleveland City Club. The City Club is the oldest Free Speech forum in the United States and every week hosts speakers from all over the world. The speeches are carried on local public TV outlets and several Radio Stations, some even outside of Ohio. Past speakers include foreign heads of state, U.S. Presidents, local and national polititians, as well as academicians and industry leaders. Previous to his speaking engagement the Ambassador and the new Consul General OnnoHueckmann, as well as Diana Thimmig, Honorary German Consul in

Cleveland, addressed an assembly of the local German community at the German Cultural Center. In his remarks, Dr. Schariot stressed the importance of the co-operation between the United States and Germany, as well as the rest of Europe, on important issues, such as global climate change, future energy sources, and issues dealing with global security. He also complemented the various groups present for keeping up the German Culture here in the U.S. in addition to the work that is being done with the Youth in the Language School and the sports and dance groups. Consul General Onno Hueckmann also spoke briefly. He mentioned the places he had served previously and said that his door will always be open to any of us.

Holiday

Christmas is a time for festivities and celebrations. It’s a time to celebrate happiness with friends and family. It’s a time to spread joy and good cheer and bring smiles to faces. Place an ad in the Journal to wish your friends, family, club members, and loved ones a Merry Christmas and fill their hearts with warmth and joy. Your ad will also help us offset the ever increasing expenses of publishing the Journal. We make it easy for you to send special holiday greetings to your friends, relatives, members, customers, and colleagues this festive season. Select from the collection displayed and tell us the design you want along with your personal greeting. Send the ad information along with your check to: DANK National Executive Office 4740N Western Ave. Suite 206, Chicago, IL 60625-2013.

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John Smith and family would like to wish the Jones family a Blessed Christmas and a Happy New Year

Consul General Hueckmann and Ambassador Scharioth visit Cleveland Donauschwaben club.

October / November 2009

Greetings

If you would like to send your own holiday greeting, please send it to us in the correct size as a pdf file attachment to Darlene@GoldenFoxPro.com. The holiday paper will be sent out by November 20. If the person you are sending greetings to is not a DANK member and you would like them to see your seasons greetings, include their name and address with your order and we’ll send them a complimentary copy of the German-American Journal holiday addition. The reason for this holiday season is to spread goodwill to everyone. Show support for the German-American Journal, and DANK, by making someone’s holiday special. Small: $20 donation / Large: $35 donation Call Amelia for more information at 773-275-1100 or 866-926-1109.

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From John Smith and the members of DANK USA To Mr. and Mrs. Jane Jones

We wish to extend best wishes for a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

Fröhliche Weihnachten und ein glückliches Neues Jahr

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To Jane Jones John Smith & Family Merry Christmas and a Blessed New Year

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To Jane Jones John Smith, DANK Chapter USA


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German-American Journal

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OCT

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1933 - Albert Einstein, known for his many contributions to scientific discoveries, decided to flee what was then a Nazi controlled Germany and moved to the United States. He continued his work in the US and in 1921 he received a Nobel Prize in Physics.

Total German Immersion In The United States By: Gert Wilhelm Translated By: Christa Garcia There is a long tradition of speaking German in the USA. There are certain regions in this country, not only in the traditional states with high German immigration in which the German heritage and tradition is still far above 30%. The teaching and learning of German, is especially strong on the East Coast, Upper Midwest, and the West Coast. Only 2-3% of US students are presently learning German. Spanish has the largest number of language learners – language programs for Japanese, Chinese, and Arabic presently receive hefty financial support, in part or in total from Japan, China and Arab countries. Many US high schools and colleges do not even require a foreign language to qualify for a diploma, which is partly the reason why the study of German has become so diminished. There is, however, a new up and coming way of learning the German language. These are the Immersion Schools, which offer a total immersion into the German language. In the past most students learned German in High School or College or in the traditional Weekend and Saturday schools – these were mostly students from German heritage background. The Immersion Schools attract students from families who have the expressed desire to expand their cultural horizons – research has found that 50% of such students have never had a connection to the German language at home. Modern ‘globally aware’ parents

hope to offer their kids an education in a practically total immersion of a foreign language. The traditional schools supported by the ZfA (the Central German Agency for Schools Abroad) have always offered total immersion classes in foreign countries – in the beginning they were the expert-schools for parents who were working in foreign lands. Nowadays these new immersion schools bring together two different cultures with the aim to offer dual as well as international diplomas. Maja Oelschlaegel, School Director of the German International School of Silicon Valley, expressed total surprise regarding the different types of ‘Immersion Schools’ here in the U.S. The new thing about this type of ‘German’ school is not so much that it is in a foreign land, the innovative part for this type of school is whether it is a public or a private school, this type of school plunges into total immersion of the German language. The roots of these kinds of programs lie in the traditional Saturday and Weekend Schools which have been very successful – some of those schools have then progressed into Total Immersion Schools. Every year there is a conference of all German Immersion Schools in the USA - supported by the ZfA – this year’s took place at the Rilke-Schule in Anchorage, Alaska. The next Conference, planned for 2010, will take place in the Midwest. It will be organized by the new Midwest ZfA Language Coordinator, Gert Wilhelm. Naturally there are many questions that

parents have in light of the fact that the study of German in high school is diminishing in this country. Their questions relate to how their kids will compare to other kids in English reading and writing. These are serious questions that must be considered by all schools, regardless of type of school. Proof of satisfactory achievement scores on state and national tests must be shown. Studies of Immersion school test results have shown that in Math and Reading, as well as other subjects, kids achieved above average scores compared to U.S. scores. Naturally there must be a plan which specifies how and when English is integrated into the curriculum. There are different ways to accomplish that task – again a truly interesting point for those schools. Most of the Immersion Schools enroll students that are 3 or 4 years old –much like the American system of pre-school and Kindergarten. In German schools they keep their students until they obtain diplomas in grade twelve. Presently the Immersion Schools transfer their students to a Middle or High School which offer an intensive German language program. How this will

Rückblick: First Year of German Language School Columbus By: Ulrike Zika Can you believe the Columbus German Language School is already celebrating its first year of existence? Despite the stormy start with hurricane force winds and a major blackout, I think we accomplished quite a lot and approached our goals of preserving the German language in Ohio and fostering the culture and customs of German speaking countries. We started at the end of September with two children and one adult class, facing the challenge of big differences in age and knowledge of the German language. Thankfully, after the article in the Columbus Dispatch in October (thank you for your insistence Anna!), we found additional qualified teachers and were able to add another class. We were still facing age differences but were now able to provide more skill-based instruction. A heartfelt thanks to our teachers and volunteers, you were wonderfully flexible and took the multiple challenges in stride! November: We held a procession in Fancyburg Park celebrating St. Martin. I am convinced the children will remember the song “Ich geh mit meiner Laterne” and walking around at dusk with their self-made lanterns. December: The visit of St. Nikolaus was quite entertaining for the adults and hopefully not frightening for the children. Everyone did a wonderful job answering St. Nikolaus and reciting poems or singing songs. The Christmas Party at the Männerchor was a nice way of starting the Holiday Season. Thanks for all the wonderful contributions! The children sang Weihnachtslieder and crafted ornaments. January: The students in the advanced German class took their first test of the year, the AATG Level 2 High School test. We are very proud that all participants (unfortunately

some were not able to attend) did extremely well, the majority of our students scored above the 85th percentile in the Nation (total of 26,000 participants). Congratulations to all! February: The Kindergarten students dressed up and went on a Faschingsumzug throughout the school, just one many great activities Stefanie planned. They were served traditional homemade “Faschingskrapfen” afterwards. What a treat! We also added a second adult class. We are lucky enough to have found Gerrie to teach. April: Two classes performed their play, the “Rattenfänger von Hameln” at the Easter Party. It was very entertaining and a wonderful opportunity to demonstrate their German knowledge. Thank you Katja and Stephen! May: The older children in the advanced class took the DSD-A2 test of the Bundesverwaltungsamt. Passing the A2 is the minimum requirement for a position in Germany. The DSD-tests are tiered (from A1 to C1) and the C1 level allows admittance at German Universities. Next Year: We are committed to provide a fun and enjoyable learning environment to students of all ages and ability levels. Now that we have a better understanding of tests and levels available, we plan to give all of our older students the opportunity to participate in tests. Since the end of March, the Ohio German Language School is registered as a non-profit corporation in Ohio. We are now in the process of applying for tax-exempt status. Many thanks to Rob Ellis! The webpage is up and running, thanks to Silvia Westerwick, Zeynep Benderlioglu and Thomas Kerler. Please check it out, www.GermanSchoolColumbus.org

develop in the future remains to be seen. Hopefully this will lead to an increased cooperation between schools, eventually offering dual or international diplomas the way the German schools do. Elke Miller, Director of the German Kindergarten in Los Angeles, summarizes her thoughts after a Conference of German Immersion Schools in the USA: “As a total beginner to such a conference this was naturally highly interesting. I have always asked myself how other people started these types of schools and especially built them up. I found more than satisfactory answers to these questions. Such a conglomeration of knowledge, experience and engagement in a group of people is worth gold! I myself have returned to Los Angeles highly motivated and immediately organized the first meeting to found the German-American Immersion School of Los Angeles.”

Lessons From Germany: Past & Present The Transatlantic Outreach Program, in cooperation with DANK and the IUPUI Max Kade GermanAmerican Center, invites interested “teams” of German and Social Studies educators to attend an allday (9:00-4:00) workshop to be held at the Athenaeum in Indianapolis on Saturday, October 3. Coinciding with the German Day of Unity during the 20th Anniversary year of the Fall of the Berlin Wall, educators will discuss the history of German immigration in the United States as told through the “Germans in America” TV series. Additionally, attendees will examine contemporary German issues using “TOP” teaching materials and learn about allexpenses-paid study tours to Germany. Those interested in learning how German and Social Studies educators can work together to internationalize curriculum and promote cross-cultural dialogue should RSVP for the workshop by September 14, 2009. Complimentary teaching materials (books, maps, posters, video) as well as breakfast and lunch will be provided. Small travel stipend may be available.

For More Information... TOP Info Available @ Goethe.de/top Claudia Grossmann, Ph.D.

German Program Director Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis Dept. of World Languages and Cultures (317) 274-3943 or cgrossma@iupui.edu


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October / November 2009

Come check out our Fan page on Facebook! You’ll find us under “The Adventures of Oskar and Atticus.” And don’t forget to send us your adventure ideas and thoughts at: Oskar@dank.org or Atticus@dank.org. We can’t wait to hear from you!

“Oskar and Atticus Find A (Lucky) Penny!”

„Oskar und Atticus finden einen (Glücks-)Pfennig!“

By: Amelia Cotter

By: Amelia Cotter

Dani was late for work and had to leave the house in a hurry. She accidentally let her lucky penny fall out of her wallet. Oskar, who always and forever and above all sniffed everything, found the penny on the floor in no time. “What is this?” he asked himself. “One cent! We’re rich! I’ll go tell Atticus.” Atticus was sleeping under his little house. Oskar knocked on the side of his terrarium. Atticus’ head slid out. “Hello, little man.” Oskar’s tail hit the floor with happiness. “Hello, my reptilian friend! I found money!” Atticus wasn’t wearing his glasses and looked at the penny with big eyes. He slithered out of his little house. “So much money! We have to buy Halloween costumes tomorrow anyway! Well done, you little detective!” “Why can’t we go today?” asked Oskar excitedly. “Because I just ate,” said Atticus and nodded his head backward. Oskar looked at his big belly. “What did you eat?” Oskar asked softly. “I swallowed a mouse.” Oskar shut his eyes quickly. “Yuck!” The next day Atticus and Oskar went to the Halloween store together. Oskar found himself a pirate costume and Atticus decided it would be funny to be a clown. “Because in my daily life I am the exact opposite,” he explained proudly. He even wore his colorful wig already. They went to the register and gave the girl the penny. “Guys, unfortunately this is not enough.” “What?” they asked at the same time, disappointed. The wig slid lifelessly to the floor beside Atticus. “It won’t work. Sorry.” She gave the penny back. “Wait a second,” said Atticus and put his glasses on. He took the penny. “Oh, my goodness. Of course it doesn’t work.” “Why?” asked Oskar, who was about to cry. “This is not a normal penny. This is a ‘Pfennig,’ an old German Mark. They aren’t used anymore. Today the Euro is used in Germany, because Germany belongs to the European Union.” Oskar nodded his head. “Please tell me more. I’m insanely interested in the subject!” “There are one cent, two cent, five cent, 10 cent, 20 cent, 50 cent, one Euro, und two Euro coins. Then there’s paper money, and it all looks different from the old Marks, as well as from the American dollar.” The girl behind the counter heard Atticus’ speech and fell sound asleep. But Oskar’s small brain was very busy. “Brilliant. I have learned so much today.” Atticus was about to start talking more, but a voice from above said loudly, “I’ll buy the costumes!” Dani was there again, as always! The girl behind the counter woke up with a snort. “Dani!” thought Atticus very thankfully and picked up his wig, smiling. Dani saw that the little penny was sitting on the tip of Oskar’s tail. “Hey, my lucky penny!” Dani took her penny back. “I wondered why I’ve had such bad luck today.” She bought the costumes and the three went home happy. Soon Halloween came. Dani dressed up as a bee and went on a walk with her favorite pirate and her favorite clown. The leaves were all red, yellow, and orange, and the air was cold and smelled like fire. “How lovely,” thought Oskar. “Astounding, what just ONE cent can buy!”

Dani war spät zur Arbeit und musste sich beeilen, aus dem Haus zu kommen. Sie ließ ihren Glückspfennig aus Versehen aus ihrem Portemonnaie fallen. Oskar, der immer und ewig und überall an Allem schnüffelte, entdeckte den Pfennig innerhalb von kurzer Zeit auf dem Boden. „Was ist das“?, fragte er sich. „Ein Cent! Wir sind reich! Ich erzähle das gleich Atticus.“ Atticus schlief unter seinem Häuschen. Oskar klopfte an die Seite seines Terrariums. Der Kopf von Atticus spähte heraus. „Hallo, kleiner Mann.“ Oskars Schwanz schlug schnell vor Glück auf den Boden. „Hallo, mein reptilischer Freund! Ich habe Geld gefunden!“ Atticus trug seine Brille nicht und guckte den Pfennig mit großen Augen an. Er schlitterte aus seinem Häuschen. „So viel Geld! Morgen müssen wir sowieso Halloweenkostüme kaufen! Gut gemacht, du kleiner Detektiv!“ „Warum können wir nicht heute gehen?“ fragte Oskar aufgeregt. „Weil ich gerade gegessen habe“, sagte Atticus und legte den Kopf in den Nacken. Oskar sah seinen großen Bauch an. „Was hast du gegessen?“ fragte Oskar leise. „Ich habe eine Maus geschluckt.“ Oskar schloss schnell seine Augen. „Pfui!“ Am nächsten Tag gingen Atticus und Oskar zu einem Halloweenladen. Oskar suchte sich ein Piratenkostüm aus und Atticus entschied sich, dass es lustig wäre, ein Clown zu sein. „Weil ich im alltäglichen Leben ganz das Gegenteil bin“, erklärte er stolz. Er trug sogar schon eine bunte Perücke. Sie gingen zur Kasse und gaben dem Mädchen den Pfennig. „Jungs, das wird leider nicht reichen.“ „Was?“ fragten die Beiden enttäuscht. Die Perücke rutschte leblos auf den Boden neben Atticus. „Das geht nicht. Es tut mir Leid.“ Sie gab den Pfennig zurück. „Moment mal“, sagte Atticus und setzte seine Brille auf. Er nahm den Pfennig. „Ach, du meine Güte. Natürlich geht das nicht.“ „Wieso“?, fragte Oskar, der kurz vor dem Heulen war. „Das hier ist kein normaler Cent. Es ist ein Pfennig, eine alte deutsche Mark. Sie werden nicht mehr benutzt. Heutzutage benutzt man den Euro in Deutschland, weil Deutschland zur Europäischen Union gehört.“ Oskar nickte seinen Kopf. „Bitte erzähl weiter, dieses Thema interessiert mich wahnsinnig!“ „Es gibt ein Cent, zwei Cent, fünf Cent, 10 Cent, 20 Cent, 50 Cent, ein Euro, und zwei Euro Kleingeld. Dann gibt es noch Scheine, und das Geld sieht anders aus als die alte Mark oder der amerikanische Dollar.“ Das Mädchen hinter der Kasse hörte die Rede von Atticus und war tief und fest eingeschlafen. Aber Oskars kleines Gehirn war sehr beschäftigt. „Großartig. Ich habe heute so viel gelernt.“ Atticus wollte noch weiter erzählen, aber eine Stimme von oben sagte laut, „Ich kaufe die Kostüme!“ Dani war wieder da, wie immer! Das Mädchen hinter der Kasse wachte mit einem Schnarcher auf. „Die Dani“!, dachte Atticus sehr dankbar und hob seine Perücke lächelnd vom Boden auf. Dani sah, dass der kleine Pfennig auf der Spitze von Oskars Schwanz saß. „Hey, mein Glückspfennig!“ Dani nahm ihren Pfennig zurück. „Ich habe mich schon gefragt, warum ich heute so viel Pech gehabt habe.“ Sie kaufte die Kostüme und die drei gingen glücklich zusammen nach Hause. Bald kam Halloween. Dani verkleidete sich als Biene und ging mit ihrem Lieblingspiraten und ihrem Lieblingsclown spazieren. Die Blätter waren alle rot, gelb, und orange, und die Luft war kalt und roch nach Feuer. „Wie schön“, dachte Oskar. „Erstaunlich, was man mit nur EINEM Cent kaufen kann!“

This story is about money. Oskar finds an old Pfennig—or German penny— which can also be called a Pfennig in English. This kind of penny belongs to the outdated German system of using Marks as currency. Marks were used in Germany and West Germany (during the separation of East and West Germany) until 1999. Then they were replaced by the Euro. Oskar and Atticus were confused because both types of pennies are similar in size and color. Atticus explains that the Euro is now the official currency of the European Union, an association of 27 countries and states in Europe that work together to strengthen their political and economic systems. The Euro is used in 16 of these 27 states, including Germany. But carrying around or wearing an old Mark, especially a Pfennig, is considered good luck. That’s why Dani has one in her wallet all the time.

In the next installment: Oskar and Atticus Eat Christmas Cookies! /// In der nächsten Folge: Oskar und Atticus essen Weihnachtskekse!


October / November 2009

German-American Journal

15

NOV

22

2005 - Angela Merkel, born in Hamburg, became the first female Chancellor of Germany. Forbes Magazine, from 2006 to 2009, has name her the most powerful woman in the world. In 2008 she received the Charlemagne Prize for her work to reform the European Union.

Facebook and StudiVZ Settle iTunes Top 10 Song Downloads Taken: Sept. 18

United States 1. Paparazzi Lady GaGa 2. Party In the U.S.A. Miley Cyrus 3. I Gotta Feeling Black Eyed Peas 4. Whatcha Say Jason DeRulo 5. Down Jay Sean 6. You Belong With Me Taylor Swift 7. Use Somebody Kings of Leon 8. Happy Leona Lewis 9. She Wolf Shakira 10. Obsessed Mariah Carey

By: Stephen Fuchs In July, 2008, the popular social networking site, Facebook, launched a lawsuit against it’s German competitor StudiVZ. Facebook claimed that the German company had infringed on their “look, feel, features and services”, and that the only difference was that StudiVZ changed the color of the website’s background from blue to red. This accusation came shortly after Facebook had settled it’s own lawsuit battle with the creators of ConnectU, who claimed that Mark Zuckerberg, founder of Facebook, had stolen their social networking concept. ConnectU was created around the same time by Harvard University with the intention to create a place for it’s students to connect and communicate online. With

that case settled, Facebook decided to go after it’s own clones around the world. While Facebook may be able to claim that they are the social networking leader worldwide, StudiVZ is the leader in the German-speaking world with over 10 million active users. Because of this number, it is believed that StudiVZ was chosen as the first target due to that fact that Facebook is having a difficult time gaining traction in Germany. As the lawsuit went on over the year, details emerged showing that Facebook had attempted to purchase StudiVZ back in 2007. Both companies met several times in an effort to secure a deal, but Facebook was unwilling to pay more than the $134 million that the site was initially bought for in January 2007. This shows that Facebook clearly wanted a piece of the German market that StudiVZ was doing so well in. After battling the lawsuit for over a year, it has been reported that both companies reached a settlement in September. StudiVZ is paying Facebook a financial settlement, however the details and amount have not been disclosed. Both sides consider this outcome a victory as Facebook gets paid and StudiVZ is allowed to continue operating in its current form. With this case now complete, it will be

DANK Has Gone Social Connect with DANK online Become A Fan of DANK on Facebook Visit DANK.org and click the Facebook icon on the left navigation bar. Follow DANK on Twitter twitter.com/danknational

What’s New @ DANK.org A Clock With No Numbers?

By: Stephen Fuchs

By: Stephen Fuchs

Germany

New Events Page

1. Paparazzi Lady GaGa 2. Heavy Cross Gossip 3. If a Song Could Get Me You Marit Larsen 4. Like a Hobo Charlie Winston 5. I Gotta Feeling Black Eyed Peas 6. Pussy Rammstein 7. Celebration Madonna 8. She Wolf Shakira 9. Bulletproof La Roux 10. Schöne neue Welt Culcha Candela

In September, DANK revamped the listing of Chapter Events and made it easier to find the details you are looking for. Every posted event has it’s own page that lists all the details of the event, including information on the food, entertainment, and cost of the event. Also included is an easy link for getting driving directions to the event’s location. As an extra bonus, each listing is formatted to look great when printed out, and will all fit on a single sheet of paper. Find It @ DANK.org/chapter_events.html

# - Song Found On Both Lists

$

interesting to see which site, if any, Facebook chooses as it’s next target. It’s believed that there are at least ten other copycat sites around the world, with the popular Chinese site Xiaonei being the closest of clones. The site’s only noticeable difference is the use of the Chinese language. Even more interesting may be how Facebook itself is playing off of the success of Twitter by introducing a very similar @ friend tag function to the site.. Of course Facebook is not doing anything illegal by copying certain features made popular by Twitter, as long as it does not clone the actual look and feel. Right now they are merely trying to make themselves work more like the competition.

National Convention Site A new site has been created for the upcoming National Convention that runs from November 5-8. On the website you will find the detailed schedule of events, information on the various workshops, accommodation information and more! If you are planning on attending this years convention, head over to this website for the must up-to-date information. After the convention, this site will have a recap of the events, along with great pictures of all the fun times.

German company, Biergert & Funk, has created a clock that goes against the traditional method of telling time with numbers. Instead, the time is displayed using a series of words that spell it out for you. The company has released an English version of the clock, but it comes with a hefty pricetag of €885 ($1,300). More recently, a version has come out for the iPhone and iPod touch, and it is available for a much more reasonable price of 99¢

Find It @ DANK.org/convention

source: www.apple.com

Comparing Markets

DOW

DAX

2 month (July 17, 2009 - Sept. 17, 2009)

2 month (July 17, 2009 - Sept. 17, 2009)

2 Month Closing Range 8,743.94 - 9,783.92

2 Month Volume Range

5,141,380,000 - 6,668,110,000

2 Month Closing Range 4,978.40 - 5,731.14

2 Month Volume Range 30,019,000 - 36,632,800


16

German-American Journal

October / November 2009

11

NOV

1918 - At 11:00am, Germany signs an armistice agreement with allies to officially put an end to WWI in a railroad car outside of Compiègne, France. This date is annually honored with two minutes of silence on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month.

Always Oktoberfest at the Chicago Brauhaus By: Darlene Fuchs

Lincoln Square, located on Chicago’s north side, may have lost many of the Germans who settled there over the first half of the 20th century, but located in the heart of the cities “German Village,” Chicago Brauhaus serves the

best German food in town. Massive wooden tables and the folksy blue-and-white checkered flags create a Bavarian atmosphere where one can celebrate Oktoberfest yearround. Servers in traditional Bavarian garb promptly accommodate parties of any size, and big family gatherings are common here. Reservations are recommended on weekends, especially during Oktoberfest, which is September 16th - October 31st. Appetizers are hearty: there’s Matjes Herring; a thin, flavorful marinated fillet in fresh sour cream with a boiled potato on the side, as well as Hackepeter (steak tartar) with all the trimmings -- anchovies, raw onions and capers. After all of this, try some delicious hearty German Kassler Rippchen (pork shank) with Sauerkraut and Bratkartoffeln (German fried potatoes) or the Brauhaus Sampler Platter. Steins of cold beer come in 1/2-liter or 1-liter and if you and your friends are up to sharing, there is the 35 ounce glass boot that seems to be a favorite year-round. At gatherings in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, beer boots are frequently passed among the guests for a festive drinking challenge. Just make sure to ask a friend for the correct “drinking technique” so that you are not left with a face full of beer. The dance floor fills quickly in the evening, with young and old alike, as everyone dances along to the sounds of

the world famous Brauhaus Trio. Chicago’s Brauhaus has been serving authentic German food, in a beer garden atmosphere, for over 40 years. One could say it is always Oktoberfest at the Chicago Brauhaus. However, it is closed Tuesdays. See their ad on the back page.

Chicago Brauhaus 4732 N Lincoln Ave Chicago, IL 60625 (773) 784-4444 ChicagoBrauhaus.com

Romancing The Christmas Markets Of Germany By: Audrey L. Hess-Eberle Euro Lloyd Travel Group/Chicago

an aroma of gingerbread, toasted almonds, potato pancakes, grilled sausages and hot mulled wine (gluehwein) being served at Though just a few months away, it is time outside booths and warming stations. This to consider making plans to visit Germany is winter, after all. A ‘village’ of elaborately this fall and winter, and take advantage of decorated stands and little houses emerges some of the lowest airfares in a long time. to fill each Town Square, offering We yearn to connect treasure of Christmas tree with a more magical time ornaments, hand carved – to experience a spirit of crèches, decorations, wonder, beauty and love. carved ‘smoking’ men, The luminous world of wooden toys, glassware, the Christkindlmarkts jewelry, linens – to name (Christmas Markets) just a few. scattered throughout From the steps of German cities beckons balconies of historic people from all over the town halls and churches, world to share with them children’s choirs enhance in the spirit of this festive the holiday mood while season. trombone players render Founded in centuries Christmas hymns echoing Audrey L. Hess-Eberle of tradition dating back to from surrounding towers. 1310 (Munich), Christmas Markets offer Advent concerts, organ recitals and plays expressions of a festive mood as found are amongst cultural events offered in these nowhere else in the world. During Advent, towns and cities. from November 29 until December 24, Opening with solemn ceremony on dressed in festive lights and dusted with Thursday before the first Advent Sunday, joy and expectancy, Town Hall Squares are Augsburg hosts one of the most beautiful transformed into a dazzling wonderland Christmas Markets dating back over 500 filled with visual glowing beauty of years. Their Renaissance City Hall is turned decorations and lights. All is accented with into a huge Advent Calendar through whose windows Christmas Angels appear and play Christmas music. The incomparable ambiance of Dresden’s Striezelmarkt, dates back to 1434. Held in the old market square, products from surrounding regions, such as porcelain from Meissen, toys from Erzgebirge or Ore Mountains, Saxon crafts and glass from Bohemia, highlight the market visit. Stollen is a Dresden specialty of fruit bread. Every year, the town bakers and confectioners bake a stollen that weights three tons, becoming the town’s center of attraction. Just how would like to serve that to your guests?! Euro Lloyd can offer many tour packages to single or combined Christkindlmarkts towns and villages. Most packages consist

of 1 to 3 night stays at hotels or inns (or longer), including breakfast, sightseeing tours of the towns, candlelight dinners at famous restaurants, and special concerts. So whether you want to visit the charm of Dortmund under the biggest Christmas tree in the world (remember, Germany started the Christmas tree tradition enjoyed today), eat Swabian soup in Esslingen to warm your toes, or applaud the Miner’s Parade of the Erzgebirge Mining Association in Chemintz, Saxony, the German Christkindlmarkts will help you realize the

reasons that we have so much to be thankful for, while celebrating in an atmosphere of pure wonder. Come – Explore with Us!

EURO LLOYD TRAVEL

Announcing AIR FARE SPECIALS for members of DANK If you have not traveled to Germany lately, or just thought you might skip the trip to Europe this year, you can not afford to pass up the low discounted travel airfares being offered by all airlines. Please identify yourselves as DANK members when calling our office. Call our office early for air fare quotes for the National Convention to Chicago in November!

Special summer roundtrip airfares for travel to and from Germany, including taxes, start from: Chicago Indianapolis Milwaukee Madison Cleveland Detroit

$649 $733 $733 $733 $693 $659

Audrey L. Hess-Eberle or Tiffany Nedwed EURO LLOYD TRAVEL GROUP Partner of Lufthansa City Center The Monadnock Building 53 W. Jackson Blvd. - Suite 863 Chicago, Illinois 60604

*Call for special airfares to other European cities and beyond. *Low discounted Domestic and international airfares. *European Rail passes and single tickets. *Car rentals with special low dollar rates in most European countries. *Cruises world-wide - Caribbean, Alaska, Mediteranean on all major cruise lines. *Worldwide tours – independent, hosted and fully escorted.

Call now for information: 1-800-572-3149 or 1-312-362-0218 email: chi@eurolloyd.com Visit us at: www.eurolloyd.com

Rates are subject to availability for your date of travel, with various airline non stop or connection options. Friday, Saturday, Sunday Weekend surcharges apply for each direction.


October / November 2009

German-American Journal

17

Kindercone Connects Generations

Introducing The Schultüte Tradition To German And American Families Passing along a 200-year old German tradition to the next generation just got a little easier here in America. For the first time, the tradition of the Schultüte (also Zuckertüte) is being introduced to American families by KinderCone LLC, a company founded by Vivian Lie, a mother of four who was born and raised in Germany and now lives in Chicago. As all Germans know, the first day of first grade is a milestone event in a child’s life, and this transition is celebrated universally with the presentation of the anxiously anticipated Schultüte. In cities across the U.S., children are now getting a taste of how Germans celebrate this special day thanks to the gift of KinderCone from their parents, grandparents and family friends. KinderCone is the first American company to re-create this tradition outside of Europe, and the concept has been well received by parents and children alike, who love the cone’s fun and educational contents and embrace the idea of celebrating the first day of school. “When my oldest daughter Lillian took that big step from kindergarten into first grade a few years ago, I wanted her to have the same sense of appreciation and love that I felt as a child growing up in Germany. So I made and decorated a Schultüte and presented it to her on the first day of school. She looked like any other child that day except for the big, colorful Schultüte, which she proudly carried in her arms.  When I saw the excited looks she received from other children, I realized what a great idea it would be to share this tradition with other families and to help Germans living in the U.S. pass on this custom to the next

Excited school children show off their KindreCones

generation. It’s a small gift, but it makes that first day so special and much more fun for young children. That’s when I began creating the concept of KinderCone.” says Lie. The tradition of the Schultüte dates back to the early 19th century, and throughout the many generations since then, the tradition has found its way into the arms of almost every German child to attend school in Germany. As Jutta Feingold recalls, “I remember very well. We had nothing, but I did have a Schultüte. In 1946 when I went to school we had nothing at all, and we lived in Cottbus in Eastern Germany at the time. My Schultüte had candies and fruit in

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versions that can be used for other gift-giving occasions. “I just launched our website store this summer (www.kindercone.com) and I’ve been so happy with how well the idea has been embraced. I hope I can make the first day of school a new gift-giving tradition in America, and in doing so, help parents and grandparents, and really all family members, celebrate the importance of school and educating the children in our families” says Lie.

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it; it was a big deal to have an orange and chocolates, and there were pencils too!” Feingold moved to the United States in 1966 and now lives in Chicago and Florida with her husband. She’s giving a KinderCone to her granddaughter Emily and cannot wait to pick her up from school with it. “I think (KinderCone) is a wonderful thing and it’s so exciting. All the kids and parents can celebrate it and this way it is so special. This will create special memories for a long time.” In contrast to a German Schultüte, which is sold empty and is typically filled by the parent, KinderCone was created to be a comprehensive first grade gift. The cone includes a KinderJournal: Me, Myself and First Grade, a plush character (Karli the cat), who is the main character in the journal, a set of KinderCone pencils, and KinderCone temporary tattoos. The cone itself is a limited-edition design that is handmade in Germany by an authentic Schultüte manufacturer that has been making cones for over 75 years. Lie wrote the story in the KinderJournal and collaborated with Nina Goebel, a German illustrator, to design the characters and cones. Full-size KinderCones are also sold empty for parents who would like to extend the tradition to children who might be in other grades and in smaller

Stephen Fuchs www.FoxTaleEdit.com 630.776.4502

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18

German-American Journal

October / November 2009

*** Calendar Of Events ***

This area is designated for DANK chapters and Associate Members to inform their members and the public of events they are having. We rely on the submissions of each chapter or organization, therefor all events may not be included. Please contact our National Office at 773-275-1100 or visit www.DANK.org for the most recent listing of events or for information on how to make sure your event is listed in the next issue. (Associate Member Events Listed In Italics)

OCTOBER 2009 2

Benton Harbor: Fish Fry 6-8pm. Doors open 5:30pm, band plays 7-10pm. 2561 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI 49022. Call 269-926-6652 for more information.

2

German American Heritage Center of Davenport, IA: Members only preview of “The Immigrant Experience” Exhibit, 4-8pm. 712 West Second St., Davenport, IA 52802. Call 563-322-8844 for more information.

3

Milwaukee: Board Meeting, 3:30pm.

3-4

4

German American Heritage Center of Davenport, IA: Grand opening of “The Immigrant Experience” Exhibit, 10am-4pm. 712 West Second St., Davenport, IA 52802. Call 563-3228844 for more information. Lake County: German-American Commemoration Celebration at St. Benedict’s Church in Chicago, IL. Contact Ludwina Homer, 847-249-0073 or Cobi Stein, 847-234-3920 for more information.

4

American/Schlwesig-Holstein Heritage Society: “German-American Day” Festival and Concert. Church Service at 10am, Food 11am, Music 11am-2pm. 700 Waverly Road, Davenport, IA. Call 563-322-5489 for more information.

4

17

South Bend: Oktoberfest at Wise Guys Restaurant, 6pm. 3421 W. Sample St., South Bend, IN. Contact Christine, 272-8163 or Trudy, 271-6922 for more information.

11

Chicago West: General Membership Meeting, 1:30pm. Contact Harald Pitz, 708-562-7038 for more information.

11

Lake County: General Election Meeting in the Tumbleweed Room at Bertrand Lanes, Waukegan, IL. Contact Ludwina Homer, 847249-0073 or Cobi Stein, 847-234-3920 for more information.

14-17 German American Heritage Center of Davenport, IA: National Zither Congress with Tomy Tomerson. Details TBA. Call 563-322-8844 for more information.

German American Heritage Center of Davenport, IA: National Zither Congress Court, 7pm. St. Ambrose University’s Galvin Fine Arts Center, Davenport, IA. Call 563-322-8844 for more information.

18

Pascack Valley: Meeting. Oktoberfest theme.

18

Phoenix: General Membership Meeting.

21

Erie: Erie’s German Heritage Society presents Erie Maennerchor Club, 6pm. 1617 State St., Erie, PA 16501. Celebrating our German Heritage. Contact Bev for reservations at 456-9599.

24

Benton Harbor: Oktoberfest with Squeezebox Band, 6pm. 2561 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI 49022. Call 269-926-6652 for more information.

25

Benton Harbor: Membership Meeting, 4:00pm. 2561 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI 49022. Call 269-926-6652 for more information.

31

Benton Harbor: Oktoberfest with Hank Haller Band, 6pm. 2561 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI 49022. Call 269-926-6652 for more information.

NOVEMBER 2009 5-8

Chicago South: DANK National Convention, Holiday Inn at Tinley Park, Illinois. Contact Nancy, 708-448-8731 for more information.

6

Benton Harbor: Fish Fry 6-8pm. Doors open 5:30pm, band plays 7-10pm. 2561 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI 49022. Call 269-926-6652 for more information.

7

Chicago South: Chicago South Chapter 50th Anniversary Celebration, Holiday Inn at Tinley Park, Illinois. Contact Nancy, 708-448-8731 for more information.

7

German American Heritage Center of Davenport, IA: Traditional Christmas Ornament Making Workshop, 2pm. 712 West Second St., Davenport, IA 52802. Call 563-322-8844 for more information.

WELCOME NEW MEMBERS Bohnhoff, Erika K. Cotter, James Dichtelmiller, David G. Doyle, Liam Doyle, Magdalena Doyle, Michael P. Doyle, Susanna Ellibee, Chris Feitz, Nicholas Gies, Anthony E. Gies, Robin Jones, Robert Jostlein, Angela Kennealy, James Kennealy, Lorie M. Masino-Cotter, Marian L. McGuire, Mina M.

the Stuart IL. Band: 847-249for more

17

German American Heritage Center of Davenport, IA: Volksmarsch, 8am-4pm at Schuetzenpark. Call 563-322-8844 for more information.

10

Lake County: Oktoberfest, 6:30pm in Room at Gorton Center, Lake Forest, Hirsch. Contact Ludwina Homer, 0073 or Cobi Stein, 847-234-3920 information.

Mitzner, Kathleen H. Mitzner, Robert P. Palos, Alessandra M. Palos, Alexander Palos, Aurelia Reichert, Angela Kathleen Reichmann, Alexander Reichmann, Jeremiah Reichmann, Lorna Reis, Jacob Schilling, Gretchen M. Schnell, Dolores Schnell, Richard H. Schwabe, Bridgit Schwabe, Chandler Schwabe, Earl Schwabe, Mitzi

Seitz, Enkh-Ulzii Seitz, Franz Seitz, Karl-Ludwig Seitz, Roswitha Shearer, Sally M. Shourd, Lorn R. Wallett, Albert J. Yaniga, Claire Yaniga, Emma Yaniga, Fred Yaniga, Freddy Yaniga, Monica Milwaukee Fest Ames, Edward A. Belanger, Alan J.

8

Chicago West: General Membership Meeting, 1:30pm. Contact Harald Pitz, 708-562-7038 for more information.

8

German American Heritage Center of Davenport, IA: Program on the Davenport Shooting Club and the Old and New Schuetzenpark, 2pm. $5.00 non-members, free to members. 712 West Second St., Davenport, IA 52802. Call 563-3228844 for more information.

14

Benton Harbor: Dance featuring Phil Mann, 6-11 pm. 2561 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI 49022. Call 269-926-6652 for more information.

14

Milwuakee: Board Meeting 3:30pm.

14

German American Heritage Center of Davenport, IA: Scherenschnitte Class (Ages 16+), 2pm. $10.00 non-members, $5.00 members. 712 West Second St., Davenport, IA 52802. Reservations required. Call 563-322-8844 for more information.

15

Lake County: Volkstrauertag Wreath-Laying Ceremony at Fort Sheridan Cemetery. Contact Ludwina Homer, 847-249-0073 or Cobi Stein, 847-234-3920 for more information.

15

Pascack Valley: Regular Meeting. Autumn Fest with Hot Apple Cider and Donuts.

15

Phoenix: General Membership Meeting.

15

American/Schlwesig-Holstein Heritage Society: Quarterly Meeting at the American Legion in Walcott, 1:30pm. Program on Christkindlmarkts to be given by Dean and Ruth Rohweder. Call 563-322-5489 for more information.

17

German American Heritage Center of Davenport, IA: Book discussion, “Those Who Save Us,” by Jenna Blum, 7pm. Bettendorf Public Library. Free, open to the public. Call 563-322-8844 for more information.

21

German American Heritage Center of Davenport, IA: Christkindlmarkt begins. Call 563-322-8844 for more information.

28

South Bend: Membership and Election Meeting, 11am. Centre Township Branch Library, 1150 Kern Rd., South Bend, IN. Contact Christine, 2728163 or Trudy, 271-6922 for more information.

29

South Bend: German Advent Service at St. Paul Church, 4pm. 51490 Laurel and Auten Rd., South Bend, IN. Contact Christine, 272-8163 or Trudy, 271-6922 for more information.

7/1/09 to 8/25/09 Betz, Leroy Betz, Mary Fuchs, Dale Fuchs, Maggie Hoffmann, Marjorie Hoffmann, William J. Hudak, Reinhard Iwen, Caitlin E. Kelly, Irmgard Kirsch, Joanna Kirsch, Phillip Konicek, Joel Kriegel, Jeffrey C. Kroenke, Darren E. Myers, Charles R. Myers, Karen Paulus, Dr. David M.

Paulus, Katja S. Paulus, Mary Pulda, Andrew Pulda, Donald M. Pulda, Erich Pulda, Joseph Raupach, Kenneth G. Rinaldi, Karen B. Rinaldi, Nick Riniker, Margaret Riniker, Robert P. Steinbrenner, Carl A. Vacula, Suellen Associate Member Wisconsin Historical Society

Thank you to everyone that visited the DANK booth at Milwaukee’s GermanFest and a special welcome to those of you that joined the organization. Please check out our web page at dank.org where will find information, past Journals and special benefits you receive for being a member of DANK. We encourage all of our new members to get involved as DANK leads the way in preserving our German language, heritage and culture.


(add chapter name under logo for $2) October / November 2009

German-American Journal German-American Journal

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Joseph Pochatko passed away peacefully on July 16th, 2009. He had been in failing health for the past year. Born in Sheffield, PA he was the son of the late Michael C. and Anna Pollock Pochatko. He served in the U.S. Army and later retired after 43 years from Zurn Energy (formerly Erie City Iron Works). After retiring, he and his wife, Beverly, traveled to Germany. Joe enjoyed traveling, cooking and gardening. His love of flowers and gardening was reflected in the meticulous care of his flower gardens. He was a member of DANK 71 – the German Heritage Society and the East Erie Turners. He was preceded in death by a son, Philip Pochatko; five brothers and three sisters. Survivors include his wife of 48 years, Beverly Jant Pochatko, two sons, Martin J. and Karl W. Pochatko, two daughters: Melissa (John) Lesniewski, Kathryn (Allen) Sorensen, seven grandchildren, three great grandchildren and his brother Paul Pochatko of Hope Mills, NC, a sister-in-law Helen (George) Pochatko and many nieces and nephews. Celebrating his life, a Mass was said at St. Stanislaus RC Church on July 20th. Following the Mass, his burial was in Laurel Hill Cemetery with full military honors.

Norbert Hartwig Holzinger (1943 - 2009) Norbert Hartwig Holzinger, U.S. Army Veteran, Retired Sergeant of the Chicago Police Department and dedicated husband & father, died of cancer July 16, 2009. He was 66. Born March 27, 1943 in Munich, Germany, Holzinger immigrated to the United States in 1961. He enlisted in the Army and served as an MP. After transferring to the Army Reserves, Holzinger joined the Chicago Police Department in 1968 and spent the next 38 years serving and protecting the City of Chicago. Holzinger was the founding president of the German American Police Association of Chicago, an ethnic police society that promotes fraternalism, good will and cultural traditions. He was also a member of DANK Chicago North since 1976. Survived by his wife, Mary Ellen Holzinger, nee Johnson; his brother, Dieter Holzinger; his son Karl (Anita) Holzinger; his daughter Charlotte (Billy) Gonzalez; his step-daughters Christine (Peter) Anthony, Donna Scoles, Susan (Mark) Feller; nieces and nephews, grandchildren and greatgrandchildren. Preceded in death by his parents Rudolf & Charlotte Holzinger; his step-son Raymond Parker.


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German-American Journal | October/Novemeber 2009  

Volume 57, Issue 5