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Volume 57, Number 4

August / September 2009

Look , Your Wur s t!

German For A Day German Day Festivities

By: Darlene Fuchs

It’s Oktober fes t This year the 176th original Oktoberfest will take place in Munich on September 19 - October 4. For German communities around the world local Oktoberfests are an opportunity to celebrate their heritage and if nothing else have an extremely “gut” time. Besides beer, Oktoberfest requires one other main essential: Wurst.

A little Sausage History It is thought that the art of sausage making was invented in Iraq in 3000 BC and other early mentions of sausage exist in China in 589 BC and Greece in 550 BC. The word sausage derives from both the French word saussiche and the Latin word salsus, both meaning salted or preserved. Back before refrigeration, people needed a good way to preserve meat and making sausages became a popular solution. Different types of sausages developed in different parts of the world depending on climate and available ingredients. In Europe, where seasons allowed periods of cold temperatures, fresh sausages were developed. Here, smoking sausages helped preserve meat during warmer summer months. In the hotter climate of southern Europe, dry sausages were developed which needed no refrigeration. Germany, which claims more than 1200 types of sausages

By: Darlene Fuchs

or Wurst, classifies sausage in two categories: fresh and slicing/spreading sausages. During Oktoberfest, fresh sausages, which includes uncooked and cooked sausages that need reheating, are typically consumed. These are made of raw pork, veal, beef, ham, egg, salts and a variety of spices and need to be refrigerated. Many are cooked in water and sometimes lightly smoked. Fresh sausages, made from cooked ingredients, include Knackwurst and Wieners. Bratwurst is a raw sausage that needs to be fully cooked. Almost all Wurst is made of pork, beef or veal seasoned with regional ingredients. Wurst tend to be a regional specialty incorporating various spices and thousands of varieties exist. According to the German minced meat law, the Hackfleischverordnung, raw sausages must be sold on the day of their creation or by the close of business the same day. Previously, grilled sausages had a shelf-life of 15 days, and sausages immediately frozen after their creation may be stored for 6 months. When people think about Germans and eating, it is mostly the masses of Sauerkraut and Bratwurst one is thinking of. Over the years this has changed, but one must appreciate this tradition, especially during the summer grilling season. Many also used to think of Americans eating millions of hamburgers, devouring moms apple pie and driving at least 2 cars. All a matter of perception - some good, some exaggerated.

German Wurst Sampling Bauerwurst: a chunky sausage that’s often grilled or cooked with sauerkraut. Nürnberger Würstchen: Nürnberg’s most famous mini grilling sausage. Bockwurst: smoked sausage made from finely minced veal and pork, then smoked, can be boiled, best with bock beer.

Thüringer: finely minced pork, beef, caraway, garlic and marjoram, are used to give it a unique taste, grilled and served with mustard.

Bratwurst: The ultimate German smoked grilling sausage, made of veal and pork, ginger, garlic, nutmeg, one of the sausages that requires full cooking.

Knackwurst: short, plump smoked sausage, made of lean pork, beef, spices and garlic, needing poaching or grilling, often served with sauerkraut.

Frankfurter: the original and possibly the world’s most famous smoked sausage, made of lean minced pork, and salted bacon, eaten hot or cold.

Weisswurst: white sausage and the Bavarian Oktoberfest specialty, a pale, mild sausage made of veal, beef, pork, cream and eggs, often served with rye bread, sweet mustard and Weißbier.

Chicago and members of DANK celebrate their German American heritage at this fun Lincoln Square neighborhood festival, and the Von Steuben Parade which was featured in a Chicago Classic movie “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” in 1986. As part of Lincoln Square’s German-American Fest, this parade salutes the U.S. military general who volunteered to help America win its independence from Britain in the 1770s. General Von Steuben converted the revolutionary army into a disciplined fighting force, instilling in them much needed inspiration and confidence. Though the German flavor of this North Side neighborhood is harder to spot these days, it comes out in full force at this event where hundreds of participants march, dance, play music or ride the many beautiful floats. The parade kicks off at 2:00 PM on Saturday, September 12th, will start at 4000 N Lincoln Ave to Wilson Ave, continue north on Western Ave joining the festivities later at the German-American Fest. Come support DANK by marching in the parade with one of the chapters dressed in your original Tracht or cheer them on as a spectator.

DANK Chicago - German Language School marching in the 2008 Von Steuben Parade

Organized by the United German-American Societies of Greater Chicago, of which DANK is a part, the festival begins on Friday evening September 11th, with the opening ceremonies at 6:00PM, continuing through Sunday the 13th at Lincoln Plaza. Lincoln Plaza is located at Western, Lincoln and Leland. Admission is free to all. For your entertainment there will be traditional cultural programs with participation of many German societies. Dance to the traditional Um-Pa-Pa music with a mix of Germans in Lederhosen, locals and college kids in a festive German environment. When you get tired, try out the food and drink: German Beer, Bratwurst and Thüringer, Sauerkraut, Potato salad, Pretzels and Landjäger. Bring your family and friends and enjoy the fun of this annual event.

TidBits

Education

Business & Technology

Calendar

The Insider

Oskar & Atticus

Lifestyle

Obituaries

Pages 3-5 Pages 6-9

Page 10

Pages 11-12

Page 12 Page 13

Page 14 Page 15


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August / September 2009

Check Us Out Online! WWW.DANK.ORG DANK Discussion Forum Presidents Blog

Liebe Mitglieder und Freunde! Dear Members and Friends, I hope everyone is enjoying the summer season and the many picnics and summer functions of our DANK chapters throughout the country. We in the National Office have been busy this summer getting the raffle tickets out to our members and preparing for German Fest Milwaukee, where our organization will have a sponsor booth for the first time in many years. Darlene, the Journal Editor and I, along with Stephen Fuchs, our webmaster, will be at the booth at various times throughout the festival. As we have printed extra copies for this event, we will be distributing the DANK Journal, membership information and signing up folks for our beautiful DANK credit cards. There will be a special festival incentive program for those that sign up for the card. We now have four beautiful designs available and by the time you read this paper we should have our fifth card available with a gorgeous official Hofbräu Munich design credit card. We are especially grateful to Fred Schumacher and Hofbräu America for working with us to make this card possible. Look for an article on Hofbräu in this issue of the Journal. Besides our DANK PR booth, our organization will also be represented in the culture and heritage tent by our Milwaukee chapter. As we look forward into the future, our 50th year of existence always comes to mind and our motto for the anniversary is: “50 Years of Pride ~ A Future of Possibilities.” We have a beautiful commemorative pin available for sale just for this occasion, which you can order by calling the DANK main office toll free at 866926-1109. Pins will also be available for sale at many chapter functions. Beside the beautiful 50 year pin, we are continuing our work on having many more wonderful DANK related products for you to purchase to enable you to show off your German-American heritage with pride. To top off our celebration of the 50th year, we will have special events as part of our National Convention, held by our Chicago-South Chapter, in Tinley Park, Illinois from the Eve of Thursday, November 5th to until Noon, Sunday, November 8th. On Friday night, Nov. 6th, there will be a special Awards Dinner & Dance at the Chicago-South Klubhaus in Frankfurt/Mokena, Illinois. We tentatively have a DANK Young Ambassador Program planned for this evening. This program would replace the Miss DANK contests that we have held in the past and I can see much potential for this concept, involving our organization’s youth, in the future. Please look for a request in this issue for prospective Young Ambassadors. Saturday night will be the big 50th anniversary banquet celebrating both the anniversary of the chapter, and our whole organization at the Tinley Park Convention center. This evening will be very special and festive. I am really looking forward to this event and expect nothing less than a Golden Gala Evening with lots of class and entertainment. We want to make sure that all our members and friends know that both of these events are open to all so mark your calendar. Our next issue of the Journal will have much more information available. Also look to our website at www.dank.org for more information. I would like to once again remind all our members and friends about our Anniversary Raffle with special prizes to win this year. Tickets should have been received in the mail by now and more can always be obtained by calling our national office toll free at 866-926-1109. Many of our chapters will also have additional tickets available for sale at their functions. I hope that the remainder your summer will be safe and enjoyable. Mit freundlichen Grüßen,

William Fuchs National President

DIE BRUECKE ZUR ALTEN HEIMAT “Building Bridges to Germany” Listen to LIVE German radio, broadcast straight from Germany, on our website! Find ‘Radio Heimatmelodie’ along with a list of other live German radio stations that you can listen to for FREE. Visit www.DANK.org

Newspaper Archives And More...

Der Deutsch-Amerikaner DANK seeks to bring together Americans of German descent in the pursuit of cultivating and presenting their heritage and interests on local, regional and national levels. These were the primary reasons that the German American National Congress was founded in 1959, and they are still among the organization’s primary objectives today.

DANK National Executive Board President William Fuchs 1. Vice President Erich Wittmann 2. Vice President Donna Lippert Treasurer Maria Thompson

Donations Are Down Your donations are a vital part of the existence of DANK and its objectives. Charitable giving in the United States fell by 2 percent last year, the largest year-over-year drop and only the second decline since the Giving USA Foundation began tracking American philanthropy 53 years ago. Individual donations dropped by about 2.7 percent from 2007 to last year and corporate giving fell by about 4.5 percent. If inflation is considered, the drop was about 5.7 percent. The only other annual decrease since the report was first published in 1956 occurred during the 1987 recession, when giving declined by 1.3 percent. The faltering economy is presenting significant challenges for America’s not-for-profit organizations, with fewer than half raising more money in 2008 than in 2007, according to the Association of Fundraising Professionals. Overall, just 46 percent of organizations raised more money last year, a new low in the survey’s eightyear history. This is probably the most challenging environment that most organizations depending on donations have seen in their lifetimes. The overall dip in donations is particularly discouraging. Not only are fewer organizations raising more, but the amount of money being raised has dropped substantially. More than 50 percent of donors say they will be giving less in 2009. An additional 5 percent have temporarily stopped giving, and almost 10 percent are still unsure of their 2009 giving level. More than a quarter will keep their giving at the same level, while only 10 percent said they will be increasing their giving this year. Charitable contributions are based on each individual’s ability to give and the value the organization’s mission provides to them. DANK welcomes gifts of all levels and appreciates your desire to support our work. With your help, we will be able to update our national computers, expand the German-American Journal, enhance the DANK website, promote German education, create a productline of DANK merchandise while preserving the Germanic heritage and culture throughout the US. As the nation’s largest German American organization DANK is a uniting force for our country’s largest ethnic community and a strong voice in representing it’s interests. It’s a difficult time. We need to learn from each other and work together more creatively and collaboratively. In this down economy, when everyone seems to be facing a decrease in profits, remember your nonprofit organization DANK. Your financial support is more important and more appreciated than ever.

Darlene Fuchs Managing Editor

Submission Deadline For The August / September Issue:

September 1st, 2009

Secretary Beverly Pochatko

Editorial Staff Managing Editor Darlene Fuchs Darlene@GoldenFoxPro.com Editorial Staff Margita Mandel mulman3@comcast.net Chapter News Editor Beverly Pochatko erieoma@verizon.net Membership Erik Wittmann erik25@comcast.net German Correspondent Corinna Bienger corinna.bienger@live.de Layout & Design Stephen Fuchs Stephen@FoxTaleEdit.com For Advertising & Classifieds, Contact: Darlene Fuchs Darlene@GoldenFoxPro.com

Office Staff DANK National Executive Office

4740 N. Western Ave Chicago, Il 60625-2013 Call (773) 275-1100 Toll Free (866) 926-1109 Fax (773) 275-4010 Office Hours:

9 AM to 5 PM / Monday-Friday Executive Secretary Eva Timmerhaus Office@dank.org

Office Manager Amelia Cotter Amelia@dank.org

General Information - ISSN 1086-8070 - is published bi-monthly and is the Official Organ of the German American National Congress. Periodicals Postage paid at Chicago, Illinois and additional Mailing Offices.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: German-American Journal 4740 N. Western Ave Chicago, Il 60625-2013

Annual Subscription - Rate: $15.00 www.dank.org/news.html

DANK does not warrant or assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information published herein. DANK reserves the right to change or amend submissions for any reason without prior notice. ©2009 DANK. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the prior written permission of the publisher.


August / September 2009

German-American Journal

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AUG

1880 - Construction of the world famous Cologne Cathedral (Kölner Dom) is finally completed. Work on the historic landmark began back in 1248... 632 years earlier. For 4 years (1880-1884) it was the worlds tallest structure until its height was surpassed by the Washington Monument.

World Heritage Made In Bavaria A short cultural history of Lederhosen

By: Rudi Schröck “The Atlantic Times” 11/2008 Some belittle this piece of Bavarian folklore, others love it. And some wear Lederhosen as a political statement. A large man wearing a traditional Bavarian hat enters the bar of the Hotel Waldorf-Astoria in New York. In a thick accent, he tells the bartender the only English sentence that he has mastered completely: “Please give me a glass of whiskey!” The guests in the bar who sit at small tables go silent and stare at the man with the hat and whiskey. What they are really staring at is not his unusual headdress or the glass in his hand − they are staring at his pants. These are a pair of embroidered, massive Lederhosen that end just above the knees and have a sewed-on extra pocket on the right side that holds a knife with a Gamskrickerl-grip (a so-called “Hirschfänger” or deer hunter). The Lederhosen are held in place by two leather suspenders, which are connected across the chest by a broad, horizontal strip, the “saddle” and embroidered with the traditional flowers of the Alps, edelweiss and gentian. Most eye-catching on the strange leather trousers of the man in the Waldorf-Astoria’s bar, however, is the oversize codpiece embroidered with flowers called “Hosntürl” (little trouser door) in the Bavarian dialect, which is open on the sides and is fastened by means of two buttons at the trouser waistband. The scene with the man in the Lederhosen in the middle of New York City is historically accurate and took place almost daily between 1938 and 1967. Every time the successful Bavarian author Oskar Maria Graf, who had fled from the Nazis to the United States, would stroll through the bars of Manhattan − it was almost always in his beloved Lederhosen because he was homesick for Bavaria even as he had found his second home in democratic America. The Lederhosen are a piece of Bavarian cultural history even though they have long been replaced by blue jeans or suit pants in day-to-day life. But at the many Bavarian traditional festivals in the countryside, at church processions and the anniversary of the Trachtenverein – the association that is dedicated to preserving traditional culture and costumes – or of the Schützenverein (shooting club), that is where the Lederhosen is as indispensable as beer at the Oktoberfest. The leather pants owe this position to a historic process that began in the Rococo period of the 18th century. Back then, it became fashionable in courtly society to enact farmers’ weddings and “Schäferspiele” (a type of theater) where the nobles would transform themselves into peasants from the countryside by means of their attire. In the aspiration for a simple life, the eyes turned toward the mountains, toward the clothing of farmers and hunters from the Alps in particular. That is where the short Lederhosen and the slightly longer “Kniebundhose” were the male attire of everyday life. They were crafted from goat- or sheepskins that were dyed black using logwood. The nobles, however, who held the monopoly on the right

The Hermann Monument in New Ulm, Minnesota

to hunt, chose real leather skins from deer and chamois for their costumes – elaborately decorated and durable for a lifetime. After the Napoleonic Wars and with the establishment of the new imperial rule in Austria in the early 19th century, this traditional garb became an important component of the celebrations in honor of one’s home country – in Tyrol, Salzburg or in the Steiermark as well as in the Kingdom of Bavaria. The famous scene in the movie “Sissi” in which Duke Max approaches his daughter (played by Romy Schneider) in Lederhosen is not kitsch but corresponded to reality. The same goes for crown prince Luitpold, who enters as a hunter in Lederhosen, surrounded by peasants who assisted in the hunt. The legendary Bavarian poacher, the “Wildschütz Jennerwein” wore the same pants every day – of course made from embroidered leather with a Hirschfänger-dagger in the side pocket. Temporarily, the almighty Catholic Church did not play along with this traditional costume. It banned the short leather pants and the décolleté traditional Dirndl dresses of the women during processions and church services because they were deemed “obscene.” But the old country lore, “That what is prohibited, turns us on!” prevailed among the devoutly religious but latently anarchistic Bavarian people. The success of the Lederhosen could no longer be stopped. The fact that Bavarian folk writers like Ludwig Thoma and Ludwig Ganghofer preferred Lederhosen further helped the emancipation of the former garb of poachers and peasants to a socially acceptable dress code. The style icon experienced its international breakthrough after World War I. Numerous tourists from the Alpine region took the Lederhosen abroad. “Abroad” − according to the Bavarian concept − included not only England or France but also Prussia and northern Germany. A particular catalyst in the spread of the Lederhosen was music. The operetta “Im weißen Rößl” by Ralph Benatzky, which premiered in Berlin in 1930, was an ode to the Alpine garb of Lederhosen and Dirndl. Banned by the Nazis because it had Jewish co-authors, the Lederhosen musical enjoyed huge successes in London and in New York (It ran on Broadway as “The White Horse Inn”). In our days, the Bavarian costume is experiencing another revival. Not only the “Landhaus-Mode” (country home fashion), which booms during Oktoberfest time has assured the Lederhosen (and the Dirndl) a guaranteed spot in the top 10 of the regional fashion classics. The internationally renowned designer Markus Meindl from Kirchanschöring in Upper Bavaria is considered the “Lederhosen Guru” with his true-to-the-original creations. Even California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger lets him costume him. And of course, football players of German champions Bayern Munich, like to counter the “Pull the Lederhosen off the Bavarians” chants by the fans of their opposing

teams by arriving in Lederhosen for away games. Anyone who takes stock of the pants worn by the male patrons of the largest festival in the world, Munich’s Oktoberfest, will find that two models clearly dominate: Lederhosen and blue jeans. But those who think that jeans are an American invention are partially wrong: They were created by a Jewish Bavarian from Buttenheim near Bamberg, Levi Strauss, who emigrated to the United States in the 19th century and tailored the robust pants from denim cotton for gold diggers. The most wonderful types of pants in the world, blue jeans and Lederhosen are original Bavarian designs.

Hermann’s Victory Celebration By: George L. Glotzbach Hermann, a Cheruscan chieftain, spearheaded the struggle to defend Germanic tribes against the Roman imperial army. In the autumn of the year A.D. 9 Hermann assembled a coalition of tribes and annihilated three Roman Legions (about 20,000 men) commanded by Quinctilius Varus in the Teutoburg Forest. The defeat, known as “die Varusschlacht” (Varus Battle) resulted in Caesar Augustus, and Rome, abandoning efforts to conquer Central Europe thereafter. The victory established early Germanic freedom and unity.

The 2000th anniversary of Hermann’s triumph is being commemorated jointly in Deutschland and here in America in New Ulm, Minnesota, one of the most Germanic cities in America, the home of the magnificent Hermann Monument. Invited guests include the Bürgermeisters of the German cities of Bramsche-Kalkriese nearby where the battle was fought, Haltern where Varus had his winter camp, and Detmold where the colossal statue of Hermann stands. Also included are the Bürgermeisters of Ulm and Neu-Ulm, New Ulm’s Sister Cities. Events begin with a Reception September 17, 2009 for invited dignitaries. The Grand Banquet opens the festival Friday, the 18, 2009 at Turner Hall. Saturday’s festivities include

Statue Of Bavarian Author, Oskar Maria Graf

an Academic Symposium hosted by Martin Luther College, an educational presentation by New Ulm’s combined public, Catholic, and Lutheran high school systems, a German Car Show, an afternoon of traditional New Ulm German music, a Roman Legion encampment, a Diorama presentation of the battle, an evening of contemporary regional entertainment, and a huge Fireworks display over the Monument at dusk. Sunday a Parade of over 100 units will conclude the celebration. This is an open invitation for everyone interested in German-Americana to attend. For more information contact: Email: joel.albrecht@ci.new-ulm.mn.us Website: hermannmonument.com


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August / September 2009

Stories from Camp Frederick German World War II POWs in Frederick, Maryland

(Part 4 of 5) By: Amelia Cotter Many of the primary sources in this work come directly from the archives at The Frederick County Historical Society in Frederick, Marlyand.

Personal Accounts and Memories Several personal letters, interviews, and articles survive which give various insights into what it must have been like to be a German POW in Frederick, or what it was like to encounter or work with one. These experiences represent a broad array of perspectives, from the POWs themselves to the residents of Frederick who found them to be nice young men and good workers, or a threatening menace to their community. According to Judge Robert Clapp, Jr., a soldier during the war who had kept up with local events, “people in general were very receptive to the idea of the German prisoners being here.” Catherine Handley, wife of a foreman at the Stoner and Powell lime plant at Fountain Rock on Biggs Ford Road, stated, “People were a little intimidated about the prisoners coming here, but we really needed manpower to have that lime when farmers came for it, or to load on the train. But we found they were just people. They were good workers, and after a while there was no apprehension.” “They were big, blond German boys. Too bad we didn’t take any pictures,” said Middletown resident Betty Powell, who grew up on a farm where the prisoners had worked. Cyril Klein said they “had a well 600 feet deep and they still didn’t have enough water.” He also remarked that the men were happy to have been “captured by the Americans, rather than by the Russians…They were deathly afraid of the Russians. They were also deathly afraid of airplanes. Every time a plane would go over they would all stop what they were doing and watch it.” Dr. Howard Ash spoke of a sick call every day at 4 p.m. Dr. Ash said prisoners were only to get a few sandwiches a day, but farmers felt sorry for them and gave them a “good country meal.” He also stated that one of the prisoners found work in Silver Spring at a surgical instrument factory after his time as a POW had ended. Woodrow Hanley of Walkersville claimed to have written back and forth with several of them for years since the war ended. Wilson Stull recalled a time when he accompanied a driver, his friend John J. Keilholtz, to pick up the prisoners at the end of a workday. He said that they had been working that day with no guard, and at that on the way home, Keilholtz stopped at a liquor store, bought a fifth of whiskey, and “about 50 yards from the main gate of the camp, he pulled over behind some bushes and the seven of [them] killed that bottle of booze.” Stull had talked to a 19-year-old prisoner who spoke English, and who told him that he was “forced to join the German army under penalty of death.” Carroll James, a Hagerstown resident, recalled stopping by a farm east of Thurmont, where he spotted POWs working with no guard in sight. Harold Stull (no relation to Wilson) received ten POWs on his farm between October and November 1944 to

help him and his wife shuck corn. He also recalls a navy man there named Hans von Reiter who had attended Oxford and spoke perfect English. On the days that Reiter worked, there was no guard. “The army had entrusted the work party to him.” Reiter’s aunt lived in Silver Spring and had always sent him new clothes. Stull remembered one American soldier who had returned from the war and was placed as a guard. “I guess the visions of his friends being killed by the Germans was crystal clear in his mind because on the first day, a couple of the prisoners gave him a bit of trouble and he beat the hell out of them with the butt of his rifle.” Harold Stull also recalled that some of the soldiers were in their forties and were pulled from the farms to be put into the army. Others were college professors who “knew more about Frederick County history than most residents.” A collection of letters to and from Richard Lebherz, an American soldier and resident of Frederick County who was deployed to France and Germany in World War II, gives some further insights into the sentiments surrounding the German POWs. In a letter to Richard from Mrs. B.O. Thomas, Sr., a friend of the family, dated September 26, 1944, she described the activities of the POWs: “German Prisoners are in the old CCC Camp across the road. They have been digging a ditch across to the old well for their water. They laugh and play with Billy. Billy carries a wooden gun and imitates the armed guard with them. At rest periods they carry Billy around and pass him from one to the other to hold. It does not seem possible that these same men are capable of the horrible crimes they have committed in enemy country.” Later, on November 9, 1944, Thomas wrote another letter to Lebherz mentioning the POWS, this time in a more negative light. The letter does not state why she changed her mind about her feelings towards them, but the passage concerning the POWs comes directly after a paragraph about a memorial service to be held for the Frederick soldiers who had died in the war. She wrote, “I have no illusions about the Prisoners here. I wish we did not have to look at them ever. I feel sure they are Nazi Youth as some of them are very young. It will take us older people a long time to over come our distrust,—if we ever do. More and more I know the difficulty of the command ‘Love Thy Neighbor as Thyself.’” Lebherz’s aunt Mayetta Hershberger, an executive of the U.S. Employment Service, sent a letter to Richard on October 4, 1944, also discussing the prisoners briefly: “We have now three hundred German prisoners of war here and my office is responsible for seeing that they are put to work. They are stationed at the old C.C.Camp across from the Catoctin Country Club. They certainly are a sad looking lot and so very young.” On November 19, 1944, Patsy Heffelfinger, believed to be the Chief of Civilian Personnel at Camp Detrick, wrote to Richard: “In case you haven’t come face to face with any living Nazis this is to inform you that we have them working at the depot and whenever they are injured an MP brings them to me and I

Find It Online

If you have missed previous installments of this article, you can now find them on DANK’s website. Just Visit: www.dank.org/journal_archives.html and select the issue you want to read! (Part 1 located in the February/March 2009 Issue)

either do the honors or send them to their Dr. I’ve been both smiled at and Heil’d! Frankly, if every one of them accidently [sic] slit their throats I’d inwardly feel a sense of relief.” In a letter from Lebherz, who was in France at the time, to his parents on December 11, 1944, he responded to the news of a German POW camp being in Frederick with disgust: “Aunt Mayetta wrote me that there are three hundred German Prisoners across from The Club, and I can imagine now Frederick must be perplexed as to how they should be treated. I hope not kindly at any rate. How ridiculous life can make things. There they are in Frederick hoping to get back to Germany, and here I am dreaming of getting back to Frederick. Now, does that make sense. Nevertheless, don’t let yourselves be fooled by them with their look of innocences [sic], as many of the ones you will see, probably have killed many American soldiers with no feeling except fanaticism and cold emotional tactics. Don’t be fooled! That is the most important thing at the present moment. We must not allow Germany to fool us once again.” Richard’s mother, Mary Lebherz, wrote to him on March 19, 1945, “Yesterday we went up to the German prison camp, and it just burned me up, to see how well they are treated over here, and to know how they treat our boys over there.” Recently, on February 11, 2004, a very sentimental letter was sent to the Frederick News-Post in response to an article entitled “The Golden Mile: Then and now,” which was published February 1 and had mentioned Camp Frederick. Dolly M. Burdette of Bunker Hill, West Virginia recalled that when she and her husband were newlyweds, her husband had worked as head dairyman on a farm in Ceresville and had driven the POWs to and from work. He “would pick up about 10 POWs, and they climbed in the back of the farm truck, with one guard. I remember the prisoners as being young, handsome, polite and hard workers.” She also stated that after the war ended, some of the prisoners said they “did not want to go home. They would rather stay here because this is the greatest country in the world.” She then thanked the paper for bringing back those happy memories. To be continued...

Photo Courtesy: David Rathbun


August / September 2009

German-American Journal

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“Friends Always”

Germany And The U.S. Commemorate The 60th Anniversary Of The Berlin Airlift The years 2008 and 2009 mark the 60th anniversary of the Berlin Airlift, one of the most important dates in the history of U.S.-German friendship. The German Embassy has made the commemoration of the Berlin Airlift a focus of its outreach activities. Their motto for the 60th Anniversary is: “Friends Always”. A 68-panel photo exhibition which documents the historical significance of the Berlin Airlift will be featured. In 1948, the Soviets blocked the western portion of Berlin. In response, the U.S. and her Allies took to the skies flying in provisions for West Berlin’s over 2 million residents, an effort that grew into

the Luftbrücke – an unending conveyor belt of planes landing at Tempelhof Airport. “The Airlift is considered one of the greatest humanitarian actions of all times. It is almost unbelievable that the United States and her Allies were able to sustain the city of Berlin for 322 days (…)”, says Klaus Scharioth, German ambassador to the United States. During the Airlift, the aircraft supplied the city with 700 tons a day in June 1948 to 12,940 tons daily by April 1949. On May 12, 1949 the Soviets finally gave in and reopened land and water routes into Berlin. Airlift missions finally ended in late September 1949.

August through September of 2009, the “Friends Always” travelling exhibit titled “The Berlin Airlift – A Legacy of Friendship” will be on display at following locations: July 31 - August 31 August 5 – 16 August 19 – 29 September 12 September 14 - 30

Strategic Air and Apace Museum www.sasmuseum.com Indiana War Memorial, Indianapolis www.AllGermanSolutions.com Columbus Learning Center, Columbus, IN Open House / Fly-in at Commemorative Air Force (CAF), Indiana Wing - Indianapolis Executive Airport, Zionsville National Museum of the US Air Force www.nationalmuseum.af.mil

Brandenburger Schuetzenverein Celebrates 17th Annual Coronation Ball By: Gabriele Strohschen March 21st was quite a day for the Brandenburger Schuetzenverein (BSV)! It all started early in the morning, when in the old tradition of BSV hospitality, the members gathered at the bar. NO! Not to drink at 6:30 AM but to sit and “schmier” butter on fresh-baked German Rye and Laugenbroetchen (pretzelrolls). WHY? Because we made platters (and platters and platters …) of hearty sandwiches for our guests who joined us from the St. Louis Schuetzenverein, the DeutschAmerikanischer Schuetzenverein Auburn Hills, Michigan, The Cincinnati Club, and the Sportsverein Peoria. They had made the long drive to Chicago for the team competition that morning. By 8:00 AM, the Brandenburg meeting room in our DANKHaus was filled with Schuetzenbrothers and sisters from the midwest, either filling up on the incredible spread of sandwiches, deviled eggs, herring, fruit salad and so many other delicacies made by our members, or having just a little shot of Jaegermeister or a beer. As it turned out, our friends could have used a little more Zielwasser (aiming water) – because it was the Brandenburger Schuetzenverein who took first place in the competition.

Congratulations go to the shooters of the BSV who did us proud. Congratulations are also in order for our fellow clubs, who so competently competed: St. Louis (2nd Place); Peoria (3rd Place; Auburn Hills 4th Place; and Cincinnati 5th Place). A big thank you goes to our Schiesswart, Herbert Wichner, for his wise choices in lining up the shooters and for working so efficiently with Elly Wichner to keep things moving smoothly during the competition. Stop by and gaze at the wonderful Pokal (trophy), which is once again back in our showcase at the DANK Haus! The evening of the Coronation Ball at the Schwaben Center was absolutely delightful. The coronation of King Troy Schulten and Queen Abby Wrehde was inspirational, as they marched in gracefully – a moment of honored ceremony and tradition that had the audience smile. Applause accompanied the outgoing King Albert Schaefer and Queen Inge Totzke … and then the band Paloma struck up the music for the newly crowned King and Queen to open the evening’s celebration with the first dance. Well, if you think Schuetzen can shoot, you should see them dance! It didn’t take long for everyone to twirl around that dance floor – an absolutely marvelous time was had by all. The last table decoration of lovely roses

A Quiet Anniversary!

60 Years of the Bundesrepublik (Federal Republic) of Germany At the beginning of the Cold War between the USA and the Soviet Union, the Germans had to sacrifice their unity, and soon they were separated by a deathly row full of mines, and guarded by men with a shoot-to-kill order. The SED-Regime had to immure their people so as not to loose them, and so they built a wall around the border in Berlin. An elaborate system of spying was supposed to control the people. But in the end, the East Germans fought back, and they managed the turnaround. Because at one time or another, every wall falls, and what belongs together, grows together. The wall was erected, and the Bundesrepublik Deutschland was founded. It took 40 years for this wall to fall and for the people to be united as one Volk again at the same time. These 40 years were and will always be an ugly blotch on Germany’s history books. People on both sides of the wall felt sore about it. And maybe, since the wall and the name Bundesrepublik Deutschland were the outer signs for the separation of the one people, – just maybe that is the reason why the 60th anniversary of the Bundesrepublik Deutschland is not celebrated within Germany the way some might expect. The politicians of course celebrated in Berlin earlier this year, and there were many people who wanted to celebrate with them. The newspapers and TV stations told us about it and the merchants used the event for their commercials – but there are no flags around in the houses or the front yards in my neighborhood, the way you might expect at a time like this. Another point is of interest to the “Volk” though – not that 60 years have passed since the BRD - and the DDR - were founded, but 20 years have passed since the wall fell. The wall falling is a topic people talk about when they sit in the cafes or restaurants, it is talked about on the way to work in the underground, and on the children’s’ playgrounds. Alas – it is not the main topic in people’s conversations either, but at least they show interest in this part of our history. Maybe this is because the fall of the Berlin wall is something people can remember – it has only been 20 years ago after all. Maybe this is also because the great blemish of Germany has vanished and people are happy to be united again. Or maybe it is even a sign that Germans are just not too interested in politics these days, because they just might have to worry about so many other things. However it may be, the joy of celebrating the 60th anniversary of the BRD has not transferred from the politicians to the people. No public displays of joy and euphoria like we all know the Germans can show - just look at pictures and reports about the Germans during the Soccer World Championship, or at the visit of now President Obama in Berlin. 60 years Bundesrepublik Deutschland, 60 years German Constitution – a quiet celebration.

and balloons had long been cleared before we finally stopped dancing. It was an honor to welcome Reinhard Richter, President of the Rheinischer Verein and his wife Ilse and the 2008 Prinz and Prinzessin Eric and Esperanza Schleifer at the event. And do know that our St. Louis friends surely know how to lead a Polonaise – or maybe the BSV taught them to do it. Our Master of Ceremony for the evening was Bob Doane, who deserves a Diener and a Knicks (a bow and a curtsey) for so valiantly pronouncing all those German words and guiding the ceremony. In any event, it was a well organized, well-executed and so much enjoyed affair. Our appreciation goes to BSV president Hermann Heinemann for his support. On the business side of things, the BSV raised some money with the ball, mostly because of the successful raffle. We thank everyone who purchased tickets! Wonderful Praesentierkoerbe (food baskets) had been crafted by the women of the BSV and donations from various establishments made for much appreciated prizes! The grand cash prize was won by Lothar Speer, teacher at the DANK’s Adult German classes. Last but not at all least, all of the Heinzelmaennchen – und Frauchen (elves)

behind the scene who made everything happen, deserve a great big thank you for their dedication, generosity and hard work! Without all of them this special day wouldn’t have been so special. Our BSV carries on an old German tradition and we are an integral part of preserving the cultural significance of Schuetzenvereine in our North American selected homeland. The word Schuetzen means protectors. During the Middle Ages when cities were protected by walls and gates, it was the responsibility of various guilds to protect and guard the citizens within and to keep the undesirables out. These guardsmen were called Schuetzen. In later years, police protected the citizens and the position of the Schuetzen became obsolete. The Schuetzen started a club, met regularly for shooting practice, conducted a shooting contest, and combined all of this activity with a festival. This took place usually in the summer. The best Schuetze became King for the duration of the event. This tradition is hundreds of years old and still very popular all over Germany. Next year, we hope to welcome DANK members and friends to join us for the annual coronation ball to honor and celebrate with us this wonderful tradition of our original homeland!


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German-American Journal

August / September 2009

23

AUG

1990 - The East German parliament decided that their territory (including East Berlin) would agree to the laws of West Germany on October 3 of that year. As a result of this agreement, German Reunification was on its way and East Germany ceased to exist on the 3rd of October.

National Convention

“50 Years Of Pride, A Future Of Opportunities” “50 Years of Pride, a Future of Opportunities” - That’s the motto for the National Convention & we at DANK South the 1st Chapter are proud to host this year’s convention. The National Convention and 50th Anniversary Gala Ball will be held the weekend for November 5 through 8, 2009 at the Holiday Inn Hotel & Convention Center in Tinley Park, Illinois. We would like you, our DANK members, to know that this convention is open to you since you are the organization. We are hoping that your chapter will bring as many members as possible to this gala event. 50 Years is a Milestone, so let us remember the past years proudly with old friends and bring on the new opportunities with new friends. Let us display our German Pride proudly.

A Brief Itinerary For The Convention Weekend Thursday, November 5, 2009 • Delegate Registration at Tinley Park Convention Center • Hospitality in Executive Board Room Friday, November 6, 2009

Making A Chapter Connection On behalf of the National Board and the Membership Committee, I am hoping all or our members throughout the USA are having a wonderful summer! As we continue to attempt to grow our organization, we certainly do not wish to ignore our current members and chapters. It is with this in mind that members of the National Board have discussed a ambitious plan to visit every one of our chapters where there may be an interest on the local chapter to have a visit from the National or Membership Board. Speaking personally, I still recall the positive experience of visiting within the last year our Peoria, Decatur, Indianapolis, Chicago and Columbus Chapters. While I may not have had the opportunity to meet everyone in a chapter, it provided a wonderful opportunity to assess both the interests of our members/chapters as well

as the issues they see as problematic with the organization. Thus I am requesting that chapters who are interested in having a visit from the National Board please contact me and let me know when your group is having a social event or would be willing to call a meeting of your membership so that we may exchange ideas and issues. We would like to establish a schedule for both visits prior to the National Convention and afterwards so that we as an organization can better understand the issues our membership find important or wish to see addressed as well as to validate the things we are doing. Please contact me directly at erik25@comcast. net to let me know of your interest so that a viable travel schedule can be arranged. Enjoy your summer and looking forward to hearing from some of you!

• • • •

Seminars & workshops Social Hour at DANK Chicago South Club House DANK Awards Dinner & Dance Tentative – DANK Youth Ambassador Nomination

Saturday, November 7, 2009 • • • •

DANK Business Meetings Elections of National Officers Tours to Casino’s & Old Frankfort Gala 50th Anniversary Banquet & Dance

Sunday, November 8, 2009 • 1st Meeting of new board • Town Hall Meeting For more information, contact Anita Walthier at 708-636-3074. Hope to see you at the National Convention & 50th Anniversary Dinner Dance! Thank-you, DANK Chicago South Convention Committee

Join DANK Online

Joining DANK is now even easier than before. Complete the entire membership process online. DANK currently accepts all major credit cards when you use our web site to apply for your membership. Just Visit:

www.dank.org/membership.html

Today!


August / September 2009

German-American Journal

7

DANK National Executive Office Update

By: Amelia and Eva

Summer is proving to be quite the exciting time in the office. We have some new friends (and old friends) joining us in the office frequently, and are working on several new projects. Introduced below are our two summer interns, Frances Li and Rudy Schultz. Recently, Frances Li, our Marketing and Development intern, completed her four weeks with us, leaving behind a whirlwind of good work. In just a short time, she assisted with soliciting advertising for the Journal and our website, helped create a database of potential Associate Members,

brainstormed with us to figure out some long-term advertising, product, and general marketing strategies, and did some research for us, too. We thank her for her productive time here. Rudy Schultz, our Graphic Design intern, will continue working with us until the end of August. He has been designing an array of images for us to use for our new products and merchandise including urban and traditional designs that will be sure to interest a wide variety of audiences. He is also working on a “Chapter Wall of Fame” for the National Office, which will involve an emblem or logo from each of our chapters. Please send us your thoughts

and ideas. Rudy is also—last but not least—willing and ready to help chapters design or redesign layouts for their websites. If you have other ideas for projects with which he could help, please feel free to contact us and we’ll see what we can do! Eva and I have also been staying out of trouble, preparing the annual raffle and counting out the tickets to send off to everyone. Soon enough, we hope, we’ll be counting most of them in again. And as always, please call, email, write, or send a singing telegram if you need anything from us.

My name is Rudolf (or Rudy) Schultz and I am a 21-year-old student about to begin my senior year in the Interactive Arts and Media major at Columbia College Chicago. I have always had an interest in art and graphics, although I only started designing four years ago. I grew up in Palatine, Illinois and now live in the Wicker Park/Bucktown area of Chicago. I am 3/8 German, took four years of German in high school, and participated in a two-week exchange in Krefeldt. I am incredibly thrilled to be working for DANK as part of its internship program, and cannot wait to see my work bring DANK to new levels of renown.

My name is Frances Li and I am the Marketing and Development intern at the DANK National Executive Office. I am a rising junior at Northwestern University, majoring in Economics. I am interested in pursuing a career in business after graduation. I have studied two years of German in college and I am strongly interested in German and German American culture. I am very excited about working at DANK because it offers me a great opportunity to learn about German American culture while exploring marketing in a non-profit organization. During this internship, I have contributed my skills and efforts to further promote DANK, especially to the younger generations, and raise awareness of German American heritage in the community.

DANK Youth Ambassador By: Marianne L. Dietz The DANK National Convention is offering an exciting opportunity for young people to proudly represent our national organization and to promote German/ American youth, heritage and culture as the DANK National Youth Ambassador. Candidates interested in this opportunity should contact their local DANK Chapter for sponsorship at the National Convention held in November.    Candidates should be ages 14 to 19, of German/American heritage and possess basic knowledge of German/ American history.  German language skills would be a plus but are not mandatory.  Candidates will be judged based on German/American knowledge, poise and enthusiasm.  Prizes include a scholarship in the form of a savings bond.  As the DANK National Youth Ambassador, participation in various cultural events such as German Day celebrations and Von Steuben Parades, as well as local DANK events are expected during the two-year term. Interest indicator forms are due August 20th.  Please contact your local DANK Chapter for sponsorship at the National Convention to be held in November.   For more information, please contact Anita Walthier at 708-636-3074 or Terry Viebach at 708-560-3614.

DANK National Raffle 2009 Update By: Bob Miske Raffle Chair Members and friends of the German American National Congress will once again be able to win big this year by participating in the DANK 50th anniversary - “Golden Anniversary Raffle.” Tickets have been mailed to every DANK household in the past few weeks. Here is the opportunity to help your organization by supporting this worthy fund raising event. Funds from this event will be used to maintain the programs already in place to serve our membership. The Executive Board would like to wholeheartedly thank Harald Pitz, who for years served as the

raffle chairman. Bob Miske, who has served the organization as Convention Chairman, is taking over the role vacated by the retirement of Harald. Changes to the raffle this year include: the price per ticket has been reduced from $10.00 to $5.00, thereby doubling your chances at having the winning number drawn. Another change is that DANK chapters will also have the opportunity to sell raffle tickets at their various functions. The enhanced prizes for this year’s anniversary raffle are as follows: 1st prize is $1000 cash, 2nd prize is a 42” Philips 42PFL Flat Screen LCD 1080p HDTV (or comparable equivalent), 3rd prize for the raffle is $500 cash, 4th prize will be a $250 gift certificate, the 5th prize winner will receive a $100 gift certificate, and finally,

the 6th number drawn will win a $50 gift certificate. The drawing for prizes will be held during the National Convention 50th anniversary gala celebration being hosted by the Chapter Chicago South during the weekend of November 6-8, 2009. Winners will not need to be present to win. You may order additional tickets by calling the National Office at 773-2751100 (toll free at 888-USA-DANK) or by sending an e-mail to: office@dank.org. Your envelope with the raffle stubs and money must reach our National Executive Office by November 1, 2009. Please mark the envelope “Raffle.” Again, thank you for your support in previous years. This year may be your opportunity to win the big prize! We wish everyone “Good Luck” in the drawing.


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German-American Journal

August / September 2009

50th Anniversary Celebration And May Dance At Chicagoland’s DANK West

By: Annelies Pitz

Is it possible that five decades of service to the GermanAmerican community have passed? That was the question posed at the annual May Dance of our chapter - this year held at the beautiful Terrace Room of the William Tell Banquet Hall. Well, as noticed, ALL of us grew a bit older and wiser (ja!) but enjoyed the celebration nevertheless. We were happy to welcome two of our past Honorary Presidents: Alfred Schmidtke and wife Dorothy, as well as Siegfried Endlichhofer with wife Marianne. Both of our past presidents contributed greatly to the growth of our chapter over the last 50 years. It was a great  honor to greet National President Bill Fuchs and his spouse Darlene, editor of the DANK Journal. President Fuchs presented Herald Pitz, President of DANK chapter Chicago West and it’s board members a plaque in grateful acknowledgement of 50 years of outstanding service on behalf of the German-American National Congress and all German-Americans by the National Executive Board. Also in attendance were past National President Ernst Ott and wife  Alexandra; DANK National Treasurer Maria Thompson with husband Jerry; longtime National Executive Secretary Eva Timmerhaus. From various DANK chapters we welcomed Presidents: Edwin Guenther  and

wife Ursula (Milwaukee); Cobi Stein (Lake County); Dagmar Freiberger and husband Erich (DANK North); Dora Totzke with husband Erhard (Northern Suburbs). From the Elmhurst Männerchor: President Hermann Pigors and wife Dorothy and from the Schleswig-Holsteiner Sängerbund Heinrich Janssen. Honorary DANK West President Siegfried Endlichhofer was presented with a special gift from Region One President Edwin Guenther for his many years of dedicated services to the Region.

A family style dinner followed and was enjoyed by everyone. The Egerlaender Tanzgruppe performed folk dances from the old country and received  big applause. This group has dedicated itself to maintain the traditions brought to the new country by their parents and grandparents. The Perlen Band with  their always enjoyable music rounded out the evening. All of our guests enjoyed a wonderful evening amongst friends of the German Community. Wishing you an enjoyable summer and keep happy songs and thoughts in your hearts.

DANK National President, Bill Fuchs, presenting Herald Pitz with a plaque recognizing the chapters positive contributions over the past 50 years.

The Egerlaender Tanzgrup

South Bend Enjoys The From The Shore Of Lake Erie Fort Wayne Germanfest By: Beverly Pochatko

By: Christine Weiss Thirty three people boarded the bus on June 13th at 11:AM to visit the annual Germanfest in Fort Wayne. Soon after the trip began the music of “die Tiroler and die Wildecker Herzbuben” sounded through the bus and because of the generosity of some people snacks and drinks made the rounds. By the time we arrived in Fort Wayne everyone was in a cheerful mood. John, who was in charge of this trip, had made sure that a table for all of us was reserved at the Festival. A good hearty meal consisting of Bratwurst, Sauerkraut and potato salad with a cool refreshing glass of beer gave us a good start for the afternoon to come. Die Freudenmacher and die Perlen set the stage for the entertainment.

There were a lot of activities at the festival including a dachshund race and a grape stomping contest. For those of us who wanted to venture further, a foot bridge led to an island where the old Fort was still standing. A long the path leading to the Fort people had set up tents and stands selling hand made items and demonstrating the old settlers’ life style. Various items were labeled in German, such as the tree (Baum) that Inge Bradburn used as a photo prop! A ‘family reunion’ also took place when two sisters planned to meet. Ursula Reeve came from Michigan for the event and to meet her sister Elfriede Schuell there. Evening arrived way too soon and the bus was waiting to take thirty-three tired, but happy, people back to South Bend. Germanfest WUNDERBAR!

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1. Happy group of people - “Ein Prosit der Gemütlichkeit” ///// 2. Mike Smith – Enjoying the Germanfest! ///// 3. Ursula Reeve came all the way from Michigan to join her sister Elfriede Schuell to have some fun at the Germanfest.

Our Lake Erie shoreline is dominated by Presque Isle State Park, a peninsula with it’s sandy beaches, great fishing and a view of the city across a bay that is safe to swim in. Not to mention that at the entrance to the state park is another famous amusement park, the Waldameer, the 4th oldest in Penna. and the 10th oldest in the United States. The family-friendly park is admission-free with a busy midway, well appointed grounds and picnic groves. The name “Waldameer” can be literally translated as the “Woods by the Sea” in German. This 113 year old park had it’s beginning as a picnic area called Hoffman’s Grove, was leased by the Erie Electric Motor Co in 1896 and renamed “Waldameer”. The trolley car company extended it’s service to the new park, making Hoffman’s Grove picnic area a terminus on the line in the hopes of increasing passenger traffic. It underwent a major rejuvenation in 1988 when it sold it’s classic carousel at an auction for more than $1M, using the money to replace the carousel and purchase new equipment, which was added to their Water World. Just across from the Waldameer entrance is the Tom Ridge Environmental Center, considered to be the gateway to Presque Isle State Park. It is dedicated to teaching visitors about the unique 3200 acres of Presque Isle and the many different forms of life that inhabit the peninsula. It offers research, education and visitor services in one place, making TREC a unique destination for learning, wonder and fun. Open year-round with free admission to the interactive exhibits, glass-enclosed tower and an orientation movie. In May, Margaret Potocki, Bev Pochatko and Heddy Quest went to North East High School to visit the German I class of Ms. Cheri Dohmen. Ms. Dohmen made the contest a class project and we were there to announce and present the winner with a prize of $50, a Certificate, and a student membership in DANK. Victoria Bartlett, the winner, was surprised as her name was called and stunned to learn that her sister had known for almost two weeks and kept it a secret!

Caleb Baker and Katherine Gilmore received a Certificate of Merit and membership to DANK. All students participating received a Certificate of Participation. Ms. Dohmen received a subscription to German Life Magazine. The students said they are looking forward to next year’s contest. At our June meeting, we welcomed another new member, Rose Hill to our group. Rose had been joining us for dinner prior to our meetings to get to know us better and decided that she wanted to join as a member at our June meeting. Since fall, we have been without a Vice President, when Alfred Hofmann resigned his position to move to the southern states. Recently, we were able to fill his position with the appointment of Mary Jane Hartman to finish his unexpired term. Mary Jane and her husband, Richard, are fairly recent members to DANK and are active members of the Erie Männerchor Gesangverein. She has already taken on a project/ fund-raiser for next spring…“Half-way to Oktoberfest”. The Hartman’s enthusiasm adds greatly to our chapter. On July 15th, the Annual DANK Family Picnic will be held at Mt. Carmel Picnic Grove. This year, we are bringing in our German Heritage Festival volunteers (non-DANK members,) to say thank you for their contributions to our success. The evening starts with dinner at 6 pm with the chapter providing our famous ox-roast sandwiches and the attendees sharing a tureen dish. There will be live German music and door prizes. We even plan to hold a ‘gently used’ sale of Trachten from some of our members and a Chinese Auction. August will find us busy preparing for our Labor Day weekend German Heritage Festival that is returning to the beautiful wooded setting of St. Nick’s Picnic Grove. We plan to promote our DANK Visa card, as well as selling tickets for our DANK National Raffle. New this year will be a Viennese Café, that many are looking forward to. Hoping that you and your families enjoy a wonderful summer and if you are in our area, get off I-90 and see what Erie has to offer. You won’t be sorry you did!


August / September 2009

German-American Journal

9

Erie’s German History Contest Winner By: Beverly Pochatko

The German Heritage Society of Erie, DANK Chapter 71, sponsored a German History Essay Contest for high school students. Designed to ‘spark’ an interest in our young people and to acquaint them with the notable contributions of the Germanic Americans, there was a wide variety of subjects. They included contemporary topics such as German business in Pennsylvania; areas settled by early Germanic immigrants in Pennsylvania; and Prisoners of War during WWII. Historic topics included: A Business Founded by German Immigrants; Famous Pennsylvanians from Germany; Pennsylvania Settlements with a German Heritage. To acquaint them with associations founded by German immigrants, they could choose from Turn Vereine, Gesangs Vereine, Trachten Vereine, DANK; religious institutions (Evangelical Lutherans, German Catholics and Jewish Temple/Synagogue) and the Amish/Mennonites. It was interesting to note that the students chose other relevant topics! Interestingly, the winner, Victoria Bartlett, a first year German student at North East High School, wrote “The theme of my essay is WWI And German Americans, Specifically How They Were

Left - Right: Ms. Cheri Dohmen, Victoria Bartlett, Katherine Gilmore, Caleb Baker and Beverly Pochatko, Chapter President.

Treated In America. It was important in our history because it was hard emotionally (they could be relatives) and physically (discrimination). Her interest was piqued because her social studies class studied WWI, and they had only a small paragraph about it. Her favorite part of the project was tying it in with today. People do the same thing today (though not to the same degree) and I could fight against it in my essay. I

learned a lot about this time period. I never knew that John J. Pershing was GermanAmerican and it was a real surprise that they were treated so horribly and unjustly. I found conflicting information when I researched about a man who was hanged by a mob. Some say it was because of his heritage, but others say it was his radical beliefs.” Caleb Baker wrote on “German American

Musicians and how they impacted the musical Community”. He stated: This is important because music affects every single person, regardless of age, race or sex. Caleb wrote further, I love music and everything about it. Learning about the different conductors was his favorite part. I learned that many great composers were German American. Katherine Gilmore wrote on German Holiday Traditions in America. She stated “without German-Americans, America would not experience the many interesting holiday traditions as we do today. Christmas is one of my favorite holidays and I wondered how the traditions came about. She enjoyed her research in the library as she loves to read. From it she learned the origin of Oktoberfest, St. Nicholas’s appearance and the Easter bunny.” Victoria received a cash prize as a Junior Division (Grades 8-10) winner and a Certificate and a Student Membership in DANK. Caleb Baker and Katherine Gilmore received Certificates of Merit and Student Memberships in DANK also. All participating students did receive a Certificate of Participation. Their instructor, Ms. Cheri Bohman, will receive a subscription to German Life Magazine for use in the classroom.

DANK Chapter Lake County, Illinois Helped Waukegan Celebrate T he 4th Of July By: Ursula Hoeft The city of Waukegan, Illinois traditionally holds its 4th of July parade the weekend before the actual holiday. This year the parade took place on Sunday, June 28, and members of DANK Chapter Lake County, Illinois again participated. To the delight of those marching, unlike

Fini and Karl Schmidt riding in style.

the hot and humid weather usually prevalent in the midwest at this time of year, the temperature was in the mideighties, the humidity was low, and a cool lake breeze kept everyone comfortable. It was a perfect day for a parade! Chapter members Lisa and Harry Kordas, along with son-in-law Todd Eifert, carried the DANK Chapter Lake County, Illinois banner. Other members of the Kordas family also took an active part in the parade. Kai Eifert and son Nathan were kept busy passing out packets of Jelly Belly candy to the crowd, as were Karin Shaffer, dressed in a pretty dirndl, and Ursula Hoeft. (The candy was generously donated by the Jelly Belly Candy Company.) Rex Eifert, dressed in lederhosen and carrying a German flag, wowed the crowd while his baby sister, Lucy, either slept or sat watching in her stroller. In between waving to the cheering crowd, chapter president Cobi Stein, also wearing a traditional dirndl dress, made sure no-one ran out of candy to hand to the enthusiastic crowd. Everybody seems to love Jelly Bellies! And last but not least were Fini and Karl Schmidt in their shiny black Porsche Targa,

proudly displaying a German flag on one side and an American flag on the other. For those who participated, Waukegan’s 4th of July parade was a pleasant prelude to the festivities they would enjoy the following weekend.

Lake County marchers pose for a photo after the parade.

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10

German-American Journal

August / September 2009

SEP

03

Worldwide Network Of German Language Partner Schools

A Worldwide Network of German-language Partner Schools is an initiative launched by German Federal Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier. Its goal is to build up a worldwide network of German-language partner schools through which to awaken young people’s interest in and enthusiasm for modern-day Germany and German society. The project is coordinated by the German Federal Foreign Office and implemented in cooperation with the Central Agency for Schools Abroad, the Goethe-Institut, the Educational Exchange Service of the Standing Conference of the Ministers of Education and Cultural Affairs of the Länder in the Federal Republic of Germany and the German Academic Exchange Service. The first year was already a striking success: the number of partner schools doubled to more than 1000 worldwide. In the United States, there are currently 82 PASCH partner schools. Every new partner school receives the official PASCH plaque. For more info visit www.pasch-net.de

Zwei DANK Schulen bekamen das offizielle Guetesiegel von Deutschland By: Christa Garcia Die DANK Sprachschule Nord (Chicago), gegründet 1968, und die DANK Sprachschulen Nördliche Vororte (Arlington Heights und Palatine, IL), gegründet 1973, wurden am 3. Mai 2009 offiziell von Generalkonsul von Chicago, Wolfgang Drautz, mit den begehrten PASCH Plaketten geehrt. Diese besondere Auszeichnung des deutschen Aussenministeriums erlaubt den beiden Teilzeit-Sprachschulen des Deutsch-Amerikanischen National Kongresses (DANK) sich im Kreis des weltweiten Partner-schulverbunds (PASCH) zu zählen. Somit hat DANK Chicago die offizielle Anerkennung zum

Prüfungszentrum für die Vorbereitung und Durchführung des Deutschen Sprachdiploms erreicht. Eine beachtliche Anzahl von DANK Schülerinnen haben auch in diesem Jahr wieder die DSD-A2 und die DSD-B1 bestanden. Mit Recht können die Schülerinnen, die Eltern, die Lehrerinnen, und Schuldirektorinnen stolz auf das ihnen anerkannte Gütesiegel der Bundesrepublik Deutschland sein. Im PASCH-Netz http://www.paschnet.de/ liest man über diese Initiative: PASCH verbindet über 1000 Schulen weltweit, die eines gemeinsam haben: Sie unterrichten die deutsche Sprache. PASCH unterstützt die Schülerinnen und Schüler, die Lehrkräfte und Schulen dabei.

Die Abschlussfeier, zu der auch die AATG Junior Award DANK Schülerinnen von DANK Fox Valley und DANK Columbus, Ohio, eingeladen waren, wurde im grossen Ballsaal des historischen DANK Hauses in Chicago abgehalten. Als besondere Auszeichnung erhielten die DSD-A2/B1 und die AATG Junior Award Kandidatinnen ein Zertifikat mit den Flaggen der Bundesländer Deutschlands und eine besondere Medaille. Es ist bemerkenswert, dass die Schülerinnen der DANK Schulen im Grundschulalter diesen in ganz USA gegebenen und zentral zensierten Test mit solchen hervorragenden Resultaten bestanden haben. Herzlichen Glückwunsch an Alle!

Two DANK Language Schools Receive The Official Quality Seal From Germany Translated By: Christa Garcia The DANK Language School North (Chicago) founded in 1968, and the DANK German Language School Northern Suburbs, with two locations in Arlington Heights and Palatine, IL (founded in 1973), were officially honored on May 3, 2009 with the coveted PASCH Plaque by Consul General of Chicago, Wolfgang Drautz. This special plaque allows both Language Schools of DANK to join the circle of PASCH, the worldwide Partner School organization. DANK has achieved the official recognition as a German Diploma Testing Center and is allowed to prepare students and to officiate the German Language Diploma. There have been quite a number of students again this year that took and passed the DSD Niveau level A2 and B1. Indeed the parents, students, teachers and school directors can be very proud to

have achieved and received the official Quality Seal from Germany. The website http://www.paschnet.de/ states about this initiative: PASCH connects more than 1,000 schools worldwide – they all have one thing in common: they teach the German language! PASCH supports the students and the teachers in this effort. The ceremony, to which we also invited the AATG Junior Award DANK students from DANK German Language Schools Fox Valley and DANK Columbus, OH, took place on the 5th floor of the historic DANK Haus. A special award was given to the DSD-A2/B1 and the AATG Junior Award candidates: they received a certificate with the flags of the German states and a special medal for their efforts. It is remarkable that the elementary school aged students of all of the DANK German Language Schools passed this National German

High School Test which is given throughout the United States and is centrally scored. Congratulations to all!

Consul General of Chicago, Wolfgang Drautz, presented the PASCH Plakette to Christa Garcia, Co-chair DANK National School Committee

1954 - The German U-Boat U-505, which was captured by the US Navy on June 4, 1944, began its move to a specially constructed dock at its final destinition...Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry. As of this year, the ship is kept indoors in a climate controlled environment.

The Central Agency For Schools Abroad Yearly Conference in San Francisco By: Christa Garcia It was the first weekend in June and the Central Agency for German Language Schools – Zentralstelle fuer Auslandsschulen = ZfA held their by now traditional School Management Conference – this time not in Washington DC, but at the Goethe Institut in San Francisco, CA. More than sixty-five German Language teachers, directors and superintendents of part-time and Immersion German Language Schools were invited to participate in this outstanding yearly conference. The person in charge was the German Language Consultant Frank Mueller whose responsibilities span the entire west coast and parts of Texas. His excellent organizational and professional know-how made this conference appear child’s play! Most of the PASCH Schools of the United States were represented including the Rilke Schule in Anchorage, Alaska. The PASCH Schools – Partners for the Future – are specially chosen to be the official partners of the Federal Republic of Germany. All of these schools offer various tracks of learning: targeted preparation for the Diploma of Proficiency in German as well as fun classes incorporating interesting new topics, films, music and exciting internet sites for additional study outside of the classroom. The following German publishers were also on hand to introduce their newest classroom publications: Hueber, Langenscheidt and Klett. The Conference participants could glean additional information and materials from informational booths set up by GLOW, German World and ZfA.

L-R: Maria, Alexandra, Christa, Hannelore, and Sharon

Each participant had to choose four of nine very interesting workshops ranging in topics from: 1. Berlin is worth a trip 2. From Gummibears to Santa Claus 3. Shorts-Shortfilms for German classes 4. Twenty years after the fall of the Berlin Wall 5. Simulations: Learning about Germanic tribes in the classroom 6. Description of German Youth by looking at posters 7. Description of Germany by piecing together German history with the aid of given pictures 8. Publishers’ Workshops: Introduction to new classroom materials 9. And a universal lecture on PQM= Pedagogical Quality Management But the conference was not all work and no fun! Frank Mueller had us board a German School bus and gave us a comprehensive ‘Stadt-Rundfahrt’, a trip through San Francisco with stops at scenic spots for pictures. This was followed with a dinner at Schroeder’s…The following teachers were invited to participate: Alexandra PradellaOtt, Hannelore Zydel, Sharon Terry from DANK Chicago and Maria Thompson from DANK Fox Valley.


August / September 2009

German-American Journal

11

Oskar & Atticus Meet by Amelia Cotter “Oskar And Atticus Meet For The First Time!”

„Oskar und Atticus treffen sich zum ersten Mal!“

It was a beautiful summer day. Oskar (with the big ears) was going on a nice walk with his best human friend, Dani. They walked together deep into the dark woods, to discover everything that the forest has to offer. Oskar walked all around, making loud happy noises. This disturbed a long snake that was sleeping on a thick branch in a big tree above. This snake was our old friend, Atticus. He opened a sleepy eye and looked down. “What kind of strange animal is that?” he asked himself. “Looks like a kangaroo with those funny ears.” He put on his golden glasses and moved his smooth body slowly and quietly, until half of his body was hanging from a thin branch. “Good—oh no!” Atticus started to greet Oskar, but fell suddenly from his branch instead. He landed hard on the ground in front of Oskar. Oskar thought, “Hurray! Something interesting to sniff!” He jumped quickly over to Atticus. “Help!” Atticus cried. He lay on his back and could only see a big wet dog nose in his face. “Help me! I’m going to die!” “Hello, Mrs. Snake,” said Oskar, very friendly. “I’m Oskar. I’m two years old and I like green tennis balls. I come from the big city near here. Where do you come from?” Atticus was very angry and shook his head. He tried to speak with such a deep male voice. “Mrs. Snake—I am—hello! I am Mr. Atticus von Snake and I come from the tree that I just fell out of!” Oskar set his wiggly bottom on the ground. “How interesting.” “No, that it is not. But I have always found big cities interesting. Maybe you have an old bus ticket somewhere in that marsupial pouch of yours that I can use to see the city?” Oskar looked down at his round belly. “No, unfortunately I don’t have a pouch with me today.” Suddenly Oskar and Atticus heard the loud sound of human feet. It was Dani! “Quick, Mrs. Snake, Dani’s coming! I’ll just take you with me back to the city!” Before Atticus could protest, Oskar bent down and lifted Atticus up into his ear. Atticus rolled himself into a tight ball inside Oskar’s big ear. “Oh boy, what have I done now?” Atticus asked himself. But then he thought, “Well, it is pretty comfortable in here! This soft kangaroo fur—top quality!” “Well, there you are Oskar!” said Dani kindly. “Come on, we’re going home now.” The three rode back to the city in a brand new bus. The bus was very clean inside and Atticus was quite impressed. He had never been in a bus before. Dani, Oskar, and the hidden Atticus got out of the bus and walked toward Dani’s house. “Wow!” said Atticus from inside Oskar’s ear. “This is the big city! How lovely! Look, the buildings are higher than the trees!” Oskar began suddenly to breathe funny. Atticus sensed this and asked, “Everything okay, boy?” “I have to…” Oskar tried to speak, “I have to…ahhhh….ACHOO!” He sneezed violently. Atticus flew from Oskar’s ear and into the street. “Bless you,” said Dani, and then she saw a snake flying though the air in one direction, and teeny tiny glasses in the other! Atticus landed in the middle of the street traffic. “Mrs. Snake!” Oskar followed him. “I’m not a woman, you dumb kangaroo!” Atticus called out breathlessly. Cars were still driving by quickly. “And I’m not a kangaroo,” said Oskar, and reached the little snake. Then they heard Dani’s strong voice. “Stop! Stop!” A car stopped right in front of Oskar and Atticus. “Oskar! Oh, you’re safe now. You shouldn’t just walk into the street like that.” She held Oskar in her arms and looked on the ground where Atticus was lying there like a poor little shoelace. First she picked up his little glasses and then carefully picked him up, examining his weak body. “Okay, little friend. We’re all going home together now.” Atticus put his crooked glasses on and crawled slowly back into Oskar’s ear. “You tried to save me, Oskar. Thank you.” Oskar was very happy and turned a little red. “No problem. We can, by the way, hopefully address each other informally now [by saying “du” and not “Sie”]. I have a lot to tell you about me and I hope you can tell me about yourself and your life in the forest and things like that, too.” Atticus was already getting a strong headache. “Yes. Okay. But first I have a question. If you’re not a kangaroo, then what kind of unique animal are you?” But before Oskar could answer, Dani said, “Oh, you adorable dog, Oskar, and you special little snake, we are finally home. That was an exciting adventure, huh?”

Es war ein wunderschöner Sommertag. Oskar (mit den großen Ohren) ging mit seiner besten Menschenfreundin Dani auf einen schönen Spaziergang. Sie liefen zusammen tief in den dunklen Wald, um Alles was der Wald anbietet, zu entdecken. Oskar lief hin und her und machte vor Freude laute Geräusche. Damit störte er eine lange Schlange, die oben auf einem großen Baum auf einem dicken Zweig schlief. Diese Schlange war unser alter Freund, Atticus. Er öffnete ein schläfriges Auge und guckte herunter. „Was ist das für ein merkwürdiges Tier?“, fragte er sich. „Sieht aus wie ein Känguru mit diesen komischen Ohren.“ Er setzte seine goldene Brille auf und bewegte seinen glatten Körper langsam und leise, bis die Hälfte seines Körpers von einem dünnen Zweig hing. „Guten—ach nein!“, Atticus fing an, Oskar zu begrüßen, aber fiel plötzlich von seinem Zweig. Er landete hart auf der Erde vor Oskar. Oskar dachte, „Hurra! Etwas Interessantes zum schnüffeln!“ Er sprang schnell herüber zu Atticus. „Hilfe!“ schrie Atticus. Er lag auf seinem Rücken und sah nur eine große feuchte Hundenase in seinem Gesicht. „Hilfe, ich sterbe!“ „Hallo, Frau Schlange“, sagte Oskar ganz freundlich. „Ich bin Oskar. Ich bin zwei Jahre alt und mag grüne Tennisbällchen. Ich komme aus der Großstadt in der Nähe von hier. Wo kommen Sie her?“ Atticus war sehr böse und schüttelte den Kopf. Er versuchte mit einer tiefen Männerstimme zu sprechen! „Frau Schlange—ich bin—ja, hallo! Ich bin Herr Atticus von Schlange und ich komme von dem Baum, von dem ich gerade gefallen bin!“ Oskar setzte seinen wackelnden Po auf den Grund. „Wie interessant.“ „Nein, das ist es nicht. Aber ich habe immer Großstädte interessant gefunden. Vielleicht haben Sie irgendwo in Ihrem Beuteltierbeutel eine alte Buskarte, die ich benutzen kann, um die Stadt anzusehen?“ Oskar guckte auf seinen runden Bauch. „Nein, ich habe heute leider keinen Beutel dabei.“ Oskar und Atticus hörte plötzlich das laute Geräusch von Menschenfüßen. Das war Dani! „Schnell, Frau Schlange, Dani kommt! Ich nehme Sie einfach mit in die Stadt!“ Bevor Atticus protestieren konnte, schaufelte Oskar Atticus mit seinem großen Ohr von der Erde auf. Atticus rollte sich in dem großen Ohr Oskars in einen engen Ball zusammen. „Oje, was habe ich jetzt gemacht?“, fragte sich Atticus. Dann dachte er, „Na, das ist ja ziemlich bequem hier drin! Dieses weiche Kängurufell—Spitzenqualität!“ „Na, da bist du ja, Oskar!“ sagte Dani glücklich. „Komm, wir gehen jetzt nach Hause.“ Die drei fuhren wieder in einem nagelneuen Bus in die Stadt. Der Bus war innen sehr sauber und Atticus war ziemlich beeindruckt. Er war noch nie in einem Bus gewesen. Dani, Oskar, und der versteckte Atticus stiegen aus dem Bus und liefen bis zu Danis Haus. „Wow!“, sagte Atticus aus Oskars Ohr. „Das ist die Großstadt! Wie schön! Guck mal, die Gebäude sind höher als die Bäume!“ Oskar fing plötzlich an, komisch zu atmen. Atticus spürte das und fragte, „Alles klar, Junge?“ „Ich muss…“ versuchte Oskar, „ich muss…haaaaa…HATSCHI!“ Er nieste heftig. Atticus flog aus Oskars Ohr und auf die Strasse. „Gesundheit“, sagte Dani und sah eine Schlange in eine Richtung und eine winzig kleine Brille in die andere Richtung durch die Luft fliegen! Atticus landete in der Mitte des Straßenverkehrs. „Frau Schlange!” Oskar lief ihm hinterher. „Ich bin keine Frau, du dummes Känguru!”, rief Atticus atemlos. Autos fuhren weiter schnell an ihn vorbei. „Und ich bin kein Känguru“, sagte Oskar und erreichte die kleine Schlange. Dann hörte man Danis kräftige Stimme. „Halt! Halt!“ Ein Auto hielt gerade vor Oskar und Atticus an. „Oskar! Du bist in Sicherheit. Du sollst nicht einfach auf die Strasse laufen.“ Dani nahm Oskar in ihre Armen und guckte auf den Boden, wo Atticus wie ein armes kleines Schnürband lag. Sie hob erst seine kleine Brille und dann ihn selbst sehr vorsichtig auf und überprüfte seinen schwachen Körper. „Okay, kleiner Freund. Wir gehen jetzt alle zusammen nach Hause.“ Atticus setzte seine schiefe Brille wieder auf und kroch wieder langsam in Oskars Ohr. “Sie haben versucht, mich zu retten, Oskar. Danke.“ Oskar war sehr glücklich und wurde ein wenig rot. “Kein Problem. Wir können, übrigens, jetzt hoffentlich du sagen. Ich hab dir Vieles zu erzählen über mich und ich hoffe du kannst mir auch was über dich und dein Leben im Wald und solche Sachen erzählen.“ Atticus hatte auf einmal starke Kopfschmerzen. “Ja. Okay. Aber ich habe erstmal eine Frage. Wenn du kein Känguru bist, was bist du denn dann für ein einzigartiges Tier?“ Aber bevor Oskar antworten konnte, sagte Dani, „Ach, du niedlicher Hund, und du besondere kleine Schlange, wir sind endlich zu Hause. Das war ein aufregendes Abenteuer, nicht wahr?“

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German-American Journal

August / September 2009

This story features many describing words, also known as adjectives and adverbs. Generally, an adjective is a word that tells you about a noun or pronoun. Example: von einem dünnen Zweig/from a thin branch. Generally, an adverb is a word that describes other words in the sentence, but never nouns—that’s the adjective’s job. Adverbs answer questions like how, when, why, and where? Example: langsam und leise/slowly and quietly. You might notice from reading the story that in German, adjectives and adverbs often share the same form. That is why we are learning about both at the same time. There are even more adjectives and adverbs in the story than just the ones in bold! For now, just focus on learning some basic describing words. Another important thing that happens in the story is that Oskar and Atticus start out by calling each other Sie. In German, there are two types of ways to address someone, formally (Sie) and informally (du). When speaking to a stranger, adults in a non-social setting, or when a young person is speaking to an adult, it is proper to say Sie. Between family and friends, and after getting to know someone, it’s okay to say du. Oskar was nice enough to mention it to Atticus before he said du. Atticus thought that was just fine and responded by saying du as well.

Oops! Mistakes from the June/July Edition Das Mensch (person/human being) is actually der Mensch. Der Identitätskrise (identity crisis) is actually die Identitätskrise—Krise has a feminine gender. Also, Frau can mean woman and Mrs. or Ms. But on the other hand, Mann always means man, and Herr means Mr. or refers to a gentleman.

In the next installment: Oskar and Atticus Find a Penny!

Become a Fan of “The Adventures of Oskar and Atticus” on Facebook! And don’t forget to send them your adventure ideas and thoughts at: Oskar@dank.org or Atticus@dank.org. They will write you back! /////

In der nächsten Folge: Oskar und Atticus finden einen Pfennig!

17

AUG

1982 - Germany became the first country to produce and receive the Compact Disc (CD). The CD that was produced was “The Visitors” by ABBA. 2 years earlier, testing was done in Havover, Germany on a recording of Richard Strauss’s “Eine Alpensinfonie.”

Taken: July 14

United States 1. I Gotta Feeling Black Eyed Peas 2. He Could Be the One Hannah Montana 3. Fire Burning Sean Kingston 4. Boom Boom Pow Black Eyed Peas 5. You Belong With Me Taylor Swift 6. Obsessed Mariah Carey 7. Love Drunk Boys Like Girls 8. Best I Ever Had Drake 9. LoveGame Lady GaGa 10. Good Girls Go Bad Cobra Starship

Germany 1. Jungle Drum Emiliana Torrini 2. I Gotta Feeling Black Eyed Peas 3. Stadt Cassandra Steen & Adel Tawil 4. When Love Takes Over David Guetta 5. Heavy Cross Gossip 6. Evacuate the Dancefloor Cascada 7. I Know You Want Me Pitbull 8. LoveGame Lady GaGa 9. They Don’t Care About Us Michael Jackson 10. New Divide Linkin Park

A Look Inside Germany’s Tax System By: Stephen Fuchs Understanding the ins and outs of the German tax system can be a confusing subject for many, including German citizens themselves. What is known is that Germans can expect to spend roughly 50% of their income on taxes every year. From January 1 - July 14 of this year, just about all the income that Germans earned went to pay the taxes for this year. In the U.S. that date was April 13. In order to get a general understanding of where all the money is going, this article will break down the most common taxes paid by German citizens. Einkommensteuer (Income Tax) Probably one of the most complex taxes to breakdown is the regular income tax. A single person making €7,834 or married couples making €15,668 do not pay income tax. However, once that income bracket is exceeded, the rates range from 14%-45% of their income. As a comparison, U.S. citizens can expect to pay anywhere from 10%-35% in income taxes. Solidaritaetszuschlag (Solidarity Tax) Introduced to help rebuild East Germany after reunification, the solidarity tax is still being paid by Germans. This tax was originally meant to be temporary, but the extra tax money became quite handy to the government. Today, 5.5% of the total income goes to pay this tax.

≤ €7,834

Single Person

€7,835 - €52,151

€52,152 - €249,999 ≥ €250,000

tax free 14% 42% 45%

Married Person

≤ €15,668

tax free

€104,304 - €499,999

42%

€15,669 - €104,303 ≥ €500,000

14% 45%

Mehrwertsteuer (Value-Added Tax) Similar to the U.S. Sales Tax, Germans are required to pay a Value-Added Tax (VAT) for goods and services. The general tax rate is 19%, but there is a reduced rate of 7% which is mainly for food and books. Unlike the U.S., this tax is consistent throughout the country and is included in the posted prices at stores.

DOW

3 Month Closing Range 8,029.62 - 8,359.49

3 Month Volume Range

3 month (Apr 15, 2009 - July 14, 2009)

DAX

6,241,100,000 - 4,149,030,000

3 Month Closing Range 4,549.79 - 4,781.69

3 Month Volume Range 3 month (Apr 15, 2009 - July 14, 2009)

as marriage, baptism, or even burials. Rundfunkgebuehren (TV Tax) The church tax isn’t the only odd tax paid by Germans... if there is a TV, radio, or computer present in home, a TV tax needs to be paid to cover licensing fees from the broadcasting companies. This tax is paid every 3 months to the amount of €53.94 (€17.98/month). Other Taxes By no means are these the only taxes paid. Germans are also responsible for paying automobile tax, inheritance and gift tax, property tax, trade tax, and more. On top of all the other taxes, individuals must pay social security contributions which cover a range of state benefits including statutory pension funds, unemployment insurance, health insurance, and old age Medicare insurance.

Kirchensteuer (Church Tax) One of the stranger taxes paid by Germans is the church tax. Residents affiliated with one of Germany’s established churches are required to pay a tax ranging from 8%9% of their yearly income. Germans that decide to remain unaffiliated in order to avoid paying this tax may run into problems when trying to use a church for such things

Comparing Markets

# - Song Found On Both Lists source: www.apple.com

2009 Income Tax Breakdown

23,441,300 - 24,792,000

Germany is ranked as the largest exporter in the world. Many believe that China is number one, but the take the number two spot. Following in third place is the United States.

Did You Know...

iTunes Top 10 Songs

1. Germany $ 1,530,000,000,000 2. China $ 1,465,000,000,000 3. United States $ 1,377,000,000,000 Data based on The World Factbook - 2008


August / September 2009

German-American Journal

13

26

AUG

1978 - Sigmund Jähn, a German pilot once part of the East German Air Force, became the first German to fly in space as part of the Soviet Union’s Intercosmos program. He flew on board Soyuz 31 to the Soviet space station, and spent 7 days, 20 hours, and 49 minutes in space.

The Famous Munich Hofbräuhaus And Its Beers The Hofbräuhaus in Munich is an institution, one that has gained a degree of worldwide fame that no other catering establishment can equal. So said “Superbrands”, a British publication that each year selects from the entire world’s 100 brands it considers super brands. Those include Starbucks, Chevrolet, IBM, etc. and now Hofbräu. Founded 400 years ago as the brewery of Bavarian dukes and kings, the Hofbräuhaus is today a tourist attraction of international renown. It serves 1.5 million liters of beer to some 1.8 million visitors each year, and on busy days provides 8000 people with meals. The origins of the Hofbräuhaus as a catering establishment go back to the reign of Ludwig I, who in 1828 decreed that it could now serve its beer (and food) to the public in general. Indeed the HB logo became so famous that it was registered in the 19th century first in Munich and later in Berlin to prevent people from copying it. The Hofbräuhaus has also been a cornerstone of history. Founded in 1589 by Duke William V, a Wittelsbach sovereign, the brewery and tavern have always been closely linked to the history of the duchy and kingdom of Bavaria, and thus the Wittelsbach dynasty. It was also Duke William IV, the grandfather of William V, who proclaimed the Bavarian Purity Law on April 23, 1516, making it the oldest regulation of its kind in the world. Famous Americans who have visited the Hofbräuhaus include Ulysses Grant, John Kennedy, Bill Clinton as well as other renowned world

leaders. However, there is more to the Hofbräuhaus than a restaurant. The crowned HB in the Hofbräuhaus logo is known all over the world. The brand is the property of the Staatliches Hofbräuhaus in München still owned by the Bavarian State. It sells its beers under the shorter name of Hofbräu München worldwide. From the days when HB only made brown ale, wheat beer and bock beer, the brewery has gone on to produce a varied range of beers based on traditional recipes sold

Come Travel With Us May we reintroduce ourselves to you our valued members of DANK - as your official travel agency service since 1995. We are EURO LLOYD TRAVEL GROUP – an international travel service that ranks among the top 30 corporate agencies in the USA, with six branch offices and many corporate on-site locations. Established in 1954 as Hapag-Lloyd Travel, the company evolved into Euro Lloyd Travel in the early nineties. Today, ELT provides travel solutions to over 450 companies with air travel expenditures that range from a low of $40,000 to $5 million plus. Valuing a diverse client base, ELT is also present in leisure, group and e-commerce markets. In 1983, Euro Lloyd Tours was established to promote European vacation travel to the USA market. Lufthansa City Center (LCC) Founded in 1991, Lufthansa City Center is a global travel network designed to provide like-minded partner agencies with a powerful competitive edge. A select group by design, the network is comprised of co-branded agencies in 530 major cities in 40 countries. As the group continues to expand, LCC’s presence can be found in Europe, South America, China, India and the United States. We were officially appointed as LCC’s USA partner in early 2005. To ELT clients the LCC brand is a promise of superior cost-savings, quality standards, enhanced internet and technology support, strong vendor relations resulting in better pricing and better global assistance. Wherever your travels take you, you are assured of the highest standards of service and reliability of your destination hosts. Leisure Travel Since 1983, thousands of travelers setting out to explore Europe have come to rely on the ELT tour product, our financial stability, our knowledge and our passion

for excellence. While best known for our specialty in the central European countries of Germany, Austria and Switzerland, our division also offers diverse options throughout Europe. Combine our best airfares with hotel, car and rail, customized or deluxe land arrangement options, fully escorted or hosted tours, ski holidays, and tailor-made group programs and more. But, don’t stop there. Our agents have the expertise to send you anywhere in the world that your interests will lead, whether as an individual traveler or a member of your own group. Your imagination and our skills are at the pallet of your heart’s fulfillment. Hapag-Lloyd Cruises Euro Lloyd is also the official preferred USA sales agent for Hapag-Lloyd Cruises, offering world-wide luxury and adventure cruises on the MS Europa, MS Hanseatic, Ms Bremen and MS Columbus. Internet Services EUROLLOYD.COM is a portal for all our services and products – download our sample tour brochure or company profile. Corporate Travel As one of the top corporate agencies in the USA, ELT provides clients with business solutions that deliver results. From our lowest fare negotiated rates (that includes our exclusive special rate offers to DANK members) and global hotel program, to our online technology processes and 24/7 travel helpline, we offer convenience and cost savings. Our technology, product and staffing maintain the right travel service at the right price. We offer customized and comprehensive corporate services, including a dedicated staff, management reports, consultation services and more. While there are several ELT branch offices in the USA, we have dedicated our Chicago, Illinois office to assist DANK members

under the umbrella brand of Hofbräu München. Bottom fermented lagers such as Hofbräu Original and Hofbräu Dunkel as well as seasonal specialties Hofbräu Oktoberfest and Hofbräu Maibock are the brewery’s main strength. The product range is rounded off by the top fermented specialty Hofbräu Hefe Weizen. Since 1997 Hofbräu beers have been available in the US imported by Hofbräuhaus of America LLC. HBA is a joint venture with the majority owned by Staatliches Hofbräuhaus in München. It imports Hofbräu beer in 27 states. In addition, it has the franchise rights for Hofbräuhauses and Hofbräu Beer Halls. Currently there are three Hofbräuhauses: Las Vegas, Newport, KY and since early 2009 Pittsburgh, PA. Smaller Hofbräu Beer Halls and Hofbräu Beer Gardens are currently in Miami Beach and Panama City Beach, FL. The Überstein in Chicago as well as the Old German Beer Hall in Milwaukee belong to the beer hall category. More are being planned. Because of its many friends around the world, the Hofbräuhaus taverns and beer halls, as well as its fine beers keep prospering and winning new friends. It is a tradition born in the Middle Ages that has survived royalty, wars, depressions as well as modern times. The Hofbräuhaus tradition brings joy to millions today and hopefully for another few centuries to come. Learn more on its website: www.hofbrauhaus.us

in all of your domestic and international travel, from simple airline tickets, car and hotel reservations, to individual or group travel tour and cruise arrangements. You will be rewarded with professional service, the lowest rates, and a dedicated person for DANK members, while at the same time supporting your valued organization. Your Dedicated DANK Travel Agent Now – may I introduce myself to you. Born to German immigrant parents who were both very active in the Chicago German Society community, I am Audrey L. Hess-Eberle, branch manager of Chicago’s Euro Lloyd Travel Group and your designated DANK travel agent. My travel industry/travel agent experience spans a solid 40 years, with extensive personal travel throughout the world. I started my career working for a German Travel agency that specialized in group charter flights, including individual and group tours,

and corporate travel arrangements. I also worked for the very high-ended deluxe tour company, Abercrombie and Kent, to custom design speciality travel arrangements to African nations, India, the Himalayas and Asian countries. From gorilla trekking, bush tent camping, hot air ballooning, Mt Kilimanjaro climbs, to a private afternoon lunch with anthropologist Richard Leaky – trips were designed to fulfill any dream. My personal interests extend from selling my photography in art fairs, working in my dark room (I worked as the photographer for a 3rd world medical facility in the northern hill-tribe jungles of Thailand,) to writing, exploring new cultures and so much more in between. The world teaches us much, if we only listen. I believe that your travel journey begins with the very first step from where you are standing, that step from which all adventures begin. We at Euro Lloyd Travel are here to help you find your way through that passage. So, come travel with us.

EURO LLOYD TRAVEL

Announcing AIR FARE SPECIALS for members of DANK If you have not traveled to Germany lately, or just thought you might skip the trip to Europe this year, you can not afford to pass up the low discounted travel airfares being offered by all airlines. Please identify yourselves as DANK members when calling our office. Call our office early for air fare quotes for the National Convention to Chicago in November!

Special summer roundtrip airfares for travel to and from Germany, including taxes, start from: Chicago Indianapolis Milwaukee Madison Cleveland Detroit

$644 $726 $648 $786 $668 $650

Audrey L. Hess-Eberle or Tiffany Nedwed EURO LLOYD TRAVEL GROUP Partner of Lufthansa City Center The Monadnock Building 53 W. Jackson Blvd. - Suite 863 Chicago, Illinois 60604

*Call for special airfares to other European cities and beyond. *Low discounted Domestic and international airfares. *European Rail passes and single tickets. *Car rentals with special low dollar rates in most European countries. *Cruises world-wide - Caribbean, Alaska, Mediteranean on all major cruise lines. *Worldwide tours – independent, hosted and fully escorted.

Call now for information: 1-800-572-3149 or 1-312-362-0218 email: chi@eurolloyd.com Visit us at: www.eurolloyd.com

Rates are subject to availability for your date of travel, with various airline non stop or connection options. Friday, Saturday, Sunday Weekend surcharges apply for each direction.


14

German-American Journal

August / September 2009

*** Calendar Of Events ***

This area is designated for DANK chapters and Associate Members to inform their members and the public of events they are having. We rely on the submissions of each chapter or organization, therefor all events may not be included. Please contact our National Office at 773-275-1100 or visit www.DANK.org for the most recent listing of events or for information on how to make sure your event is listed in the next issue. (Associate Member Events Listed In Italics)

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Benton Harbor: Fish Fry 6-8pm. Doors open 5:30pm, band plays 7-10pm. 2561 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI 49022. Call 269-926-6652 for more information.

South Bend: End of Summer Party at Sonja Wilson’s, 1:00 pm. Potluck. 11361 Brundydge Dr., Osceloa, IN. Call Christine 272-8163 or Trudy at 271-6922 for more information.

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Lake County: “Die Fidelen Kirchheimer,” on tour from Germany, will perform at Cressey Center for the Performing Arts Theatre at the Lake Forest Academy, 1500 W. Kennedy Rd., Lake Forest, IL. All are welcome. Contact Cobi Stein 847-234-3920 or Ludwina Homer 847-249-0073 for more information.

Chicago South: Picnic at German American Heritage Center, 25249 S. Center Rd., Frankfort, IL. Call (815) 838-1619 for more information. South Bend: Annual Picnic, 1:00pm. Potluck. Kison’s Farm, 63620 Maple Rd., South Bend, IN. Call Christine 272-8163 or Trudy at 2716922 for more information. Pittsburgh: Hofbräuhaus Pittsburgh social event for members, 1-3pm. Call Chris Sabatini at 412431-1522 for more information. American/Schleswig-Holstein Heritage Society: Quarterly meeting at American Legion in Walcott, Iowa at 1:30pm with “Hugo Eckener and His Zeppelins” Program. Refreshments to follow. Call 563-284-4184 for more information.

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Benton Harbor: Dance with Squeezebox Band, 7-11 pm. 2561 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI 49022. Call 269-926-6652 for more information.

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Lake County: Road Trip to 132nd Cannstatter Volksfest at Schwaben Center in Buffalo Grove, IL. Contact Cobi Stein 847-234-3920 or Ludwina Homer 847-249-0073 for more information.

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American/Schleswig-Holstein Heritage Society: 1:00pm 80th Anniversary of the “Graf Zeppelin” Airship Visit to Davenport. Quad City Brass Quintet will perform. Schuetzenpark Historical Site, 700 Waverly Rd., Davenport, IA. Call 563322-5489 for more information.

SEPTEMBER 2009 2German American Heritage Center of Daven10/14 port, IA: Advanced Genealogy Classes, 6:30pm at GAHC. $60 non-members, $50 members. 712 West Second St., Davenport, IA 52802. Call 563322-8844 for more information. 4

The German Society of Maryland: Ecumenical Service. For more information, visit www.germansociety-md.com.

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Milwaukee: Board Meeting 3:30pm.

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Benton Harbor: Fish Fry 6-8pm. Doors open 5:30pm, band plays 7-10pm. 2561 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI 49022. Call 269-926-6652 for more information.

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Benton Harbor: Membership Meeting, 4:00pm. 2561 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI 49022. Call 269-926-6652 for more information.

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Chicago West: Board Meeting, 1:30pm

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German American Heritage Center of Davenport, IA: Book Discussion, 7:00pm. Free and open to public. 712 West Second St., Davenport, IA 52802. Call 563-322-8844 for more information.

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Lake County: Depart for three night motor coach trip to the Oktoberfest in Cincinnati, Ohio. Contact Cobi Stein 847-234-3920 or Ludwina Homer 847-249-0073 for more information.

18-20 Pittsburgh: Pennsylvania Bavarian Oktoberfest in Canonsburg, PA. Call Chris Sabatini at 412431-1522 for more information. 19

Chicago South: Oktoberfest at German American Heritage Center, 25249 S. Center Rd., Frankfort, IL. Call (815) 838-1619 for more information.

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German American Heritage Center of Davenport, IA: Program on the Wends and Immigration to Central Iowa, 2:00pm. $5 non-members, free for members. 712 West Second St., Davenport, IA 52802. Call 563-322-8844 for more information.

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Milwaukee: Membership Meeting.

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Pascack Valley: Regular Meeting; Planning Meeting.

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Phoenix: Membership Meeting.

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Lake County: Road Trip to Kenosha, WI for Oktoberfest. Contact Cobi Stein 847-234-3920 or Ludwina Homer 847-249-0073 for more information.

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American/Schleswig-Holstein Heritage Society Oktoberfest will be held at Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds in Davenport, IA. Call Mary Burchett at 563-355-6274 for more information.

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German American Heritage Center of Davenport, IA: Oktoberfest at Starlite Ballroom. Call 563322-8844 for more information.

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German American Heritage Center of Davenport, IA: Volksmarsch, 8am-4pm at Schuetzenpark. Call 563-322-8844 for more information.

WELCOME NEW MEMBERS 4/29/09 to 6/30/09

Bachan, Piotr Baker, Caleb M. Bartlett, Victoria Sue Beatty, Kimberly A. Beloiu, Alexandru S. Beloiu, Melissa Helen Beloiu, Silvana Bessa, William Brown, Alexis Brown, Caleb Brown, David John Brown, Evan Vaughn Brown, Gacie Mae Brown, Kiyana

Brown, Sandra Burns, Helmut Careno, Monica Carreno Adam Carreno, Ramon Cline, Ursula Deatherage, Gloria Deatherage, James Dick, Virginia N. Doellman, John Flack, Gene Franklin, Caroline Franklin, Catherine Franklin, Elizabeth

Franklin, Justin Franklin, Marguerite W. Franklin, Richard Gilmore, Katie L. Grossman, Claudia Hannemann, Erika Hartman, Mary Jane Heideman, John Erick Heusman, Evelyn Heusman, Willard H. Hickey, Jessica Hill, Rose M. Kennedy, Robert J. Lemke, Alan

Lemke, Mark Loos, Jeremy Lovreck, Ursula Marshall, Elise Stefan Martin, Anna E. Master, Sue Maynard, James Maynard, Lynne Michel, Asta Neff, Greg Neilson, Lisa Rottman, John L. Schultz, Rudolf A. Schumacher, Alberta

Schumacher, Ferdinand Schwartz, Michael Sichtermann, Jeanette Sproul, Jeannette Thunhurst, Linda Underwood, James B. Winkler, Peter Juergen Zimmerman, Corabell C. Zimmerman, James L. Associate Member Indiana German Heritage Society

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August / September 2009 German-American Journal

German-American Journal

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Inge G. and Robert D. Machnik celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary recently in Janesville, Wisconsin. Robert and Inge were married on June 11, 1959 in West Berlin, Germany. The Machniks are long time DANK members. Robert was chapter president of the Beloit-Janesville chapter in Wisconsin for many years. Both are retired.

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OBITUARIES Lee Beckermann would like us to remember her father Burkard Muller who passed away recently. Her mother Inka Muller passed away a little over a year ago. They were members of the Phoenix Arizona chapter and will be missed by many.

Kraenzler, Robert Age 89 years. May 27, 2009. Beloved husband of Adeline Kraenzler for 60 years. Loving father of Werner (Laura) and Erik (Karen) Kraenzler. Loving Opa to Kari Ann and Kurt Robert Kraenzler. Further survived by other family and friends in Germany . Robert was a honorary member of DANK Milwaukee Chapter.

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CLASSIFIED Two Piece Bar with Four Chairs, Straight-Curved, $175.00. Like New. 847-895-6893. If no answer leave name and number.

Joyce M. Wrenger, 68, passed away Monday morning, June 22, 2009. She was born January 9, 1941, in Ridgely, Tennessee, the daughter of Robert L. and Mildred I. (nee: Turner) Tidwell. She married Alfred K. Wrenger on December 21, 1990, in Racine. Joyce was employed with Kemper Insurance for over 20 years and was a member of DANK chapter Beloit/Janesvill. Survivors include her husband, Alfred; three daughters, Petra (Norm) Walker of Racine, Debbie Bischoff of DeForest, and Patrice Wrenger of Franksville; six grandchildren along with other relatives and friends. She was preceded in death by her parents and two brothers.

It is with deep sorrow that we report the death of one of our DANK Chicago South members Paul Moser. For 40 years, Paul was very involved with the Chapter especially with the responsibility as General Contractor in making the “DANK-Haus” Chicago South building a possibility. He spent many hours away; it was like his second home for many months.  He was very proud of the building.  Our sympathy goes out to his wife, Nancy, former corresponding secretary at DANK Chicago South, his daughter, Rosemarie, and her family. He will be missed.


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German-American Journal

Please Support the Businesses That Advertise in the German-American Journal

August / September 2009

DANK Visa Platinum® Rewards Card

COMING SOON: SPECIAL EDITION HOFBRÄU CARD DESIGN! See Card Details on Page 9 Along With Two More Great Designs! ®

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German-American Journal | August/September 2009  

Volume 57, Issue 4