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Volume 57, Number 3

June / July 2009

Whatever Happened To The 56 Signers?

Celebrate Your Father

By: Darlene Fuchs

Originally Published By: Neednuttin in 1998 Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence? Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured before they died. Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned. Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army, another had two sons captured. Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or hardships of the Revolutionary War. They signed, and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor.  What kind of men were they? Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists. Eleven were merchants, nine were farmers and large plantation owners, men of means, well-educated. But they signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the penalty would be death if they were captured. Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the British Navy. He sold his home and properties to pay his debts, and died in rags. Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British that he was forced to move his family almost constantly. He served in the Congress without pay, and his family was

kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him, and poverty was his reward. Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer, Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton. At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that the British General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General George Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed, and Nelson died bankrupt. Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed. The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months. John Hart was driven from his wife’s bedside as she was dying. Their 13 children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill were laid to waste. For more than a year he lived in forests and caves, returning home to find his wife dead and his children vanished. A few weeks later he died from exhaustion and a broken heart. Norris and Livingston suffered similar fates. Such were the stories and sacrifices of the American

See 4TH OF JULY on PAGE 5

155 41

Number of hotdogs to be consumed on July 4th

million

Number of Americans who will spend the holiday at someone else’s home

$172.5 25

million

Of Fireworks imported from China last year

million

Pounds of fireworks sold to municipalities for public celebrations last year

See FATHERS on PAGE 5

New In This Issue! Welcome our 1st German Correspondent, Corinna Bienger on Page 5

Numb3r F4ct5: 4th of July million

Historians have recorded that there was a tradition to celebrate Father’s Day 4,000 years ago in Babylon. A son called Elmesu carved a Father’s Day message on a clay card. In his message Elmesu wished his father a long and healthy life. There is no knowledge as to what happened to this father son duo, but it is believed that several countries retained the custom of celebrating Father’s Day. In Germany the Father’s Day tradition, which is also called the Lord’s Day (Herrentag),originated in the 18th century and since then has always fallen on Ascension Thursday (Christi Himmelfahrt) -- the original idea being to celebrate Jesus returning to his Father. Traditionally men would be placed in a cart or carriage and brought to the town or village square and the proud father who had sired the most children received a prize from the mayor, often a big piece of ham. By the 19th century, colorful parades featuring horse-drawn carriages and traditional walks by men and women took place commemorating the walking of the apostles. By the late 19th century, as religion lost it’s hold on

$5.2

million

252

million

Of American flags imported into the US from China last year

Pounds of fireworks sold to individuals for personal celebrations last year

Find Business & Technology on Page 12 to see how closely connected we really are to Germany! Introduce your kids to Oskar & Atticus on Page 11. Have them read the wacky adventures and they will learn some German too!

TidBits

Education

Business & Technology

Calendar

The Insider

Oskar & Atticus

Lifestyle

Obituaries

Pages 3-5 Pages 6-9

Page 10

Pages 11-12

Page 12 Page 13

Page 14 Page 15


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German-American Journal

June / July 2009

Check Us Out Online! WWW.DANK.ORG DANK Discussion Forum Presidents Blog

Liebe Mitglieder und Freunde! Dear Members and Friends, As I write this message, I am reminded about the many changes that the spring season brings with it as nature renews itself. As I arrived in Amsterdam this morning from one of my transatlantic crossings, the sun was shining and it looked like it was shaping up to be a nice spring day. After a short nap I woke up to stormy weather with wind and rain. A couple of hours later the clouds gave way to beautiful clear, blue sky allowing the flowers and trees to shine in full bloom. The weather shares some similarity with the life of our organization, which I believe is in a state of renewal similarly to nature’s spring revival. Over the years we have had several of our chapters reach a state of dormancy but over the last year, through the relentless energy exhibited by National Vice President Erik Wittmann, and with the help of many others, the Peoria, IL chapter and just recently the Indianapolis chapter have found new life. There is also interest in several areas of the country in starting new chapters. I am very encouraged by this and even see a trend of increasing membership. Our National Board remains committed to have DANK stay on a path that provides a proud voice of Germanic-Americans and increasing value through member benefits for all ages. If you did not renew your membership for 2009 yet, this will be your last issue of the DANK Journal. Whatever reason you might have for not renewing, we hope that you will check out our updated website, which has a description of our many member benefits by clicking on the “Join DANK Here” button or going to www.dank.org/membership_benefits.html. Please feel free to call our national office in Chicago, toll free at (866) 926-1109 to resolve any membership renewal problems. We truly believe that we are making a difference in providing our members a valuable connection to Germanic heritage in the United States. Our website forum has really taken off and provides a wonderful way for our members and friends to connect in all areas of interest. I have also had many positive comments on my President’s Blog, in which I share many interesting experiences that are related to our German-American heritage all over the world. We are also committed to improving this newspaper to make it more pleasant to read with more interesting content. Our DANK Visa card is also starting to get very popular due to the many benefits to our members. Card Partners, who make this VISA card possible to us, has just added additional benefits through UMB bank that are worth checking out. Not only is the beautiful Neuschwanstein castle design appealing but using the card will benefit DANK financially without a cost to you. Look for additional attractive card designs soon. As the weather continues to get warmer many of our chapters and associate member organizations will be having festivals, dances and picnics. I am looking forward to seeing many of you at these events. Also please mark your calendar for DANK’s National Convention and 50th Anniversary Celebration from November 6-8, 2009. DANK chapter Chicago-South is hosting this event and we invite everyone to join us on Saturday, November 7 at the Holiday Inn Convention center in Tinley Park, Illinois for the big Gala 50th Anniversary celebration. Look for much more information in the next Journal and on www.dank.org. Also look for a letter in the mail within the next month introducing our improved and more valuable annual DANK benefit raffle. Have a safe and enjoyable summer. Mit freundlichen Grüßen,

William Fuchs National President

Submission Deadline For The August / September Issue:

JULY 1st, 2009

Newspaper Archives And More...

Der Deutsch-Amerikaner DANK seeks to bring together Americans of German descent in the pursuit of cultivating and presenting their heritage and interests on local, regional and national levels. These were the primary reasons that the German American National Congress was founded in 1959, and they are still among the organization’s primary objectives today.

DANK National Executive Board President William Fuchs 1. Vice President Erich Wittmann 2. Vice President Donna Lippert Treasurer Maria Thompson

Say Thanks to Dad on Father’s Day Children blessed with a loving father should consider themselves fortunate and never take it for granted. For they have someone who listens and takes care of their needs and interests. Someone to guide them on the road to success and virtue. Fathers have always been there to solve our countless science and mathematics problems while explaining the same formula a hundredth time, or better still, until it is understood by us. Fathers defend us in times of need, are proud of our triumphs and successes, but when things go wrong they are helpful and strong. Fathers would never give even the smallest hint to let us know how hard they worked to take care of our needs and fulfill even the most whimsical of demands. For all their caring scolding and constructive punishments we all owe a big thanks to our Dads. The idea is to show our affection and tell Daddy how much he is loved and appreciated, not just on Father’s Day, but every single day of the year. Let us praise those fathers who have striven to balance the demands of work, marriage and children with an honest awareness of both joy and sacrifice. Let us praise those fathers who by their own account were not always there for their children, but who continue to offer those children, now grown, their love and support. Let us praise those fathers who have lost a child to death and continue to hold the child in their heart. Let us praise those men who have no children, but cherish the next generation as if they were their own. And let us praise those fathers who have died, but live on in our memory and whose love continues to nurture us. “The most important thing a father can do for his children is to love their mother.”

Secretary Beverly Pochatko

Editorial Staff Managing Editor Darlene Fuchs Darlene@GoldenFoxPro.com Editorial Staff Margita Mandel mulman3@comcast.net Chapter News Editor Beverly Pochatko erieoma@verizon.net Membership Erik Wittmann erik25@comcast.net German Correspondent Corinna Bienger corinna.bienger@live.de Layout & Design Stephen Fuchs Stephen@FoxTaleEdit.com For Advertising & Classifieds, Contact: Darlene Fuchs Darlene@GoldenFoxPro.com

Office Staff DANK National Executive Office

4740 N. Western Ave Chicago, Il 60625-2013 Call (773) 275-1100 Toll Free (866) 926-1109 Fax (773) 275-4010 Office Hours:

9 AM to 5 PM / Monday-Friday

Darlene Fuchs Managing Editor

Executive Secretary Eva Timmerhaus Office@dank.org

DIE BRUECKE ZUR ALTEN HEIMAT “Building Bridges to Germany” Listen to LIVE German radio, broadcast straight from Germany, on our website! Find ‘Radio Heimatmelodie’ along with a list of other live German radio stations that you can listen to for FREE. Visit www.DANK.org

Office Manager Amelia Cotter Amelia@dank.org

General Information - ISSN 1086-8070 - is published bi-monthly and is the Official Organ of the German American National Congress. Periodicals Postage paid at Chicago, Illinois and additional Mailing Offices.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: German-American Journal 4740 N. Western Ave Chicago, Il 60625-2013

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DANK does not warrant or assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information published herein. DANK reserves the right to change or amend submissions for any reason without prior notice. ©2009 DANK. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the prior written permission of the publisher.


June / July 2009

German-American Journal

JUN

24

Rock’n In Germany

By: Darlene Fuchs Managing Editor

Together Rock im Park and Rock am Ring are the largest music festivals in Germany and one of the largest in the world with a combined attendance of just over 150,000 people in 2007, selling out both events in advance for the first time Rock am Ring organizers have advised that over 100,000 tickets have now been sold for 2009 with over 80 bands confirmed. The line up is young and fresh with some of the top bands in the world together with lots of new bands. These two simultaneous rock music festivals are held annually in Germany. While Rock am Ring takes place at the Nürburgring racetrack in the west of Germany, Rock im Park takes place in and around the Frankenstadion in Nürnberg, in the south east of Germany. Both festivals are usually regarded as one event with a mostly

identical lineup for. All artists perform one day at Nürburgring and another day at Nürnberg during the three day event. For the fourth year in a row, Rock am Ring has already sold out all 80,000 tickets in advance. The tickets were gone more than two months before the start of the most popular German open air festival, which dates June 5th to 7th, 2009. Even the twin festival Rock im Park in Nürnberg, with the same line-up enjoys increasing popularity. Selling more than 40,000 tickets to date demonstrates the great public interest in the south. Because of the demand, it can be assumed that this open air concert will also be sold out. The festival fans expect more than 100 hours of Modern Rock at its best in three stages.

(photo credit: www.Rock-am-Ring.com)

Kiel Sailing City By: Darlene Fuchs Managing Editor Whether a performance orientated regatta freak or “just” fast sailing cruising yachtsman, whether short-distance friend or long-distance fan - Kieler Woche 2009 (June 20 - 28) has something to offer to every offshore sailor and boat. Kieler Woche has been called the greatest sailing event in the world and the largest summer festival in northern Europe. A nineday program packed with over 1,700 events to entertain over three million guests from all over the globe. The roots of Kiel Week go back to a regatta in 1882. Today about 5,000 sailors from 50 countries are competing with 2,000 yachts, dinghies and surfboards with almost 40 sailing events and more than 400 planned regatta starts on ten race courses. For the World Sailing Association, Kiel Week is the ‘Mother and Father of all Regattas’ thanks to its sporting creativity. But Kiel Week is also a unique event on dry land: over ten days, Kiel puts its best foot forward with a unique mix of cultural, musical, political and social highlights. After the grand opening, the whole city center becomes one giant party zone. With lots of music, international specialities and mini cabaret, there’s something for everyone at the International Market. Besides, Kiel Week is never only about water sports: an

established part of the program every year involves competitions and encounters in more than 30 sports. There is an endless forest of yacht masts on the banks of the firth, over one hundred windjammers and traditional sailing boats moored and an array of tall ships in the windjammer parade, with more than 100 ships taking part in the festivities. Sailors in uniform have always been an integral part of the image of this international festival. Destroyers, frigates, corvettes, high-speed launches and minesweepers from all over the world will be mooring in Kiel’s Tirpitz. If not only for the fact that, on the second Saturday of the Kieler Woche, is the day that the traditional sailing ships gather in the inner-firth for the great windjammer parade. This spectacle is also always a magnet for tens of thousands of spectators, who gather along the narrow inlet to watch this grand event

3

1374 - People in the streets of Aachen, Germany, suffered from a sudden outbreak of St. John’s Dance, causing them to dance uncontrollably and see hallucinations, as if possessed by the devil, until they collapsed from exhaustion. This was one of the first major outbreaks to occur.

What generation German are you? First, Second, Third, etc. What are your German language skills? Speak It, Write It, Understand It? Let us know by visiting www.DANK.org/polls

POL

L

Will The True Dutchman Please Stand Up? By: Darlene Fuchs Managing Editor First of all, we can quickly dispose of the “Pennsylvania Dutch” misnomer. The term is more properly “Pennsylvania German” because the so-called Pennsylvania Dutch have nothing to do with Holland, the Netherlands, or the Dutch language. These people originally came from Germanspeaking areas of Europe and spoke a dialect of German they refer to as “Deitsch” (Deutsch). In the English language, during the 18th and 19th centuries, the word “Dutch” referred to anyone from a wide range of Germanic regions, places that we now distinguish as the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. It is also easy to forget that Germany (Deutschland) did not exist as a single nation state until 1871. Prior to that time, Germany was more like a patchwork of a variety of areas where various German dialects were spoken. The settlers of the Pennsylvania German region came from the Rhineland, Switzerland, Tyrol, and the eastern parts of France or wherever the German language was spoken beginning in 1689. The Amish, Hutterites and Mennonites now located in the eastern counties of Pennsylvania and elsewhere in North America did not really come from “Germany” in the modern sense of the word. They did bring their German dialects with them, and in modern English could refer to this ethnic group as Pennsylvania Germans. Calling them Pennsylvania Dutch can be somewhat misleading.

Observers, including many Europeans, frequently assume, incorrectly, that the term “Pennsylvania Dutch” is synonymous with “Amish.” In fact, of the approximately 81,000 German-speaking immigrants who came to Pennsylvania during the eighteenth century, only a few hundred were members of the small, but very visible, Anabaptist sect known today as the Old Order Amish. Most were of either Lutheran or German Reformed (“nonsectarian”) background who, unlike the Amish and other “sectarians,” did not separate themselves for spiritual reasons from the social mainstream. Some believe that the English-speaking Pennsylvanians simply confused the word “Deutsch” for “Dutch.” But then you have to ask yourself, were they really that ignorant—and wouldn’t the Pennsylvania Dutch themselves have bothered to correct people constantly calling them “Dutchmen?” Many of the Pennsylvania Dutch actually prefer that term over Pennsylvania German! They also use the term “Dutch” or “Dutchmen” to refer to themselves. But one must accept the fact that the Pennsylvania Germans are linguistically German, not Dutch. Support for this opinion can be seen in the name of the Pennsylvania German Cultural Heritage Center, at Kutztown University. This organization, dedicated to the preservation of the Pennsylvania German history, language, folkore, and traditions, uses the word “German” rather than “Dutch” in it’s name. Since “Dutch” no longer means what it did in the 1700s and is very misleading, it’s more appropriate to replace it with “German.”


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German-American Journal

June / July 2009

Stories from Camp Frederick German World War II POWs in Frederick, Maryland

(Part 3 of 5) By: Amelia Cotter Many of the primary sources in this work come directly from the archives at The Frederick County Historical Society in Frederick, Marlyand.

POWs at Camp Frederick Above is a general overview of the camp life and activities that most German POWs in Maryland experienced. Now Camp Frederick itself will be specifically discussed, with information both supporting and adding to that which was previously presented. In the fall of 1944, the September 4 issue of The Post announced in a brief article that the former Civilian Conservation Corps camp, which was built in 1933 and located just west of Frederick, would soon become home to about 350 German POWs. This was followed by another small article shortly after, which informed citizens that 30 POWs were already on site preparing tents for the camp, and it would open within two weeks under the command of Captain Eugene Messner. A large crowd reportedly gathered to watch the prisoners arrive by train and be ushered onto buses that headed to Camp Frederick, located off of old Route 40.

The men, whose average ages ranged from 17 to 45, were mostly privates and non-commissioned officers from the Afrika Corps. Many had been initially captured by the British troops, but Britain—dependent at the time upon imports—was unable to feed or support its POW population, and so many ships carrying supplies or troops from England to the U.S. delivered prisoners as well. They would be staying in large six-man tents on the four-acre plot of land that had formerly belonged to the Klein Farm and is today a residential neighborhood on the fringes of the supermarket, gas station, and restaurant filled west end of the “Golden Mile” on Route 40. The public was told in an article in The Post in 1979, entitled “What’s in the Name? Old Camp Road,” that the average stay of the men would be anywhere from two weeks to over a month, and the camp was cleverly termed a “detainment center used to hold captured soldiers until the necessary papers could be processed for their return home.” Also according to the article, the men’s daily activities consisted of being transported from the camp at 7 a.m. to a nearby farm and being picked up again around 5 p.m. A single guard might watch over five to ten prisoners while they worked. Wales explained that “when only a few prisoners were sent out for work there was usually no guard sent along with them. Larger groups were sent with a guard.” There is some evidence that suggests that the seemingly low-key publicity surrounding the coming of the POWs continued throughout its existence until well after the war was over. According to “What’s in the Name? Old Camp Road,” the camp had maintained a low profile throughout its operation and “some senior citizens [could not] recall its existence. The only Fredericktonians to come in direct contact with the camp or its detainees were a handful of civilian drivers and a dozen or so farmers.” This is exaggerated, as many of the family members and friends of farmers who hired the POWs came into contact with them on a regular basis. At any rate, in 1967, a little more than 20 years after the war ended, a sudden surge of interest in the German POWs hit Frederick after an article in The News on February 15, 1967 spoke of a “frantic search for the location of any German prisoner of war camp” in Frederick. The article, entitled “Where, Oh Where, Was That German POW Camp?” was in response to a letter the paper received in 1949 from a former POW, Peter Siegfried Muetzel (see pages 8 and 23). The letter, recovered 20 years after Muetzel’s escape from Camp Frederick and recapture in Hagerstown, expressed Muetzel’s gratitude to the people of Frederick, who he explained were “extremely kind to him.” According to the article, several historians were also questioned about the camp, and “several people said there were several camps in the area,” but oddly, they did not know or remember the location of the camp. The next day, the newspaper printed an article called “County Residents Recall Camp For POWs Here,” about

how several residents actually did remember the camp and its inhabitants, including Cyril Klein, whose father had owned the land that the camp was located on. Another article was printed the same day, called “‘Lost Prisoner Camp Was Located Near City,” and claimed that because of “nearly 100 phone calls from interested citizens,” the location of the camp could finally be identified as off old Route 40 near the Klein Farm. Clearly many citizens remembered Camp Frederick after all. The day after that, February 17, The Post ran an article with photos in response to inquiries about the “now dismantled camp,” called “POW Camp Revisited 20 Years Later.” Author Nelson Brooks actually ventured out to the location of the former camp and discovered an empty pasture with a series of “concrete floors minus any walls or shelter facilities.” He also noted inlaid brick walkways, old rusty nails lying in the grass, latrines with household items tossed into them, and old shoes. The most interesting artifact he found was a six-foot semicircle carved into the concrete with a man swinging an axe at one end, and a man with a pick on the other, both with a ball chained to their legs. He found no sign of a 600-foot deep well rumored to have been used on the property, but did locate a dam across the creek between the camp and the highway, with a large metal pipe that once carried water from the stream to a nearby pond. The next day a new article, “POW Camp Near City Part of Fort Meade,” was published, which announced that the paper had gotten in touch with Pentagon spokesman Charles Romanus, of the Reference Branch of the Military History Department at the Pentagon. Romanus confirmed the already obvious existence of Camp Frederick and asserted that 336 prisoners alone were sent there in 1946. Why, 20 years later and not sooner, was such interest in the POWs rekindled? It seems that in spite of many citizens’ lack of knowledge of the camps, there were also many people who did come in contact with the POWs and who had not forgotten about them. As stated before, many more civilians than anticipated had observed, worked with, or were host to the prisoners. To be continued...

Find It Online

If you have missed previous installments of this article, you can now find them on DANK’s website. Just Visit: www.dank.org/journal_archives.html and select the issue you want to read! (Part 1 located in the February/March 2009 Issue)

An Island Of Human Kindness In An Ocean Of Hopelessness By: James Ziler While reading the February/March 2009 issue of “German–American Journal” Stories from Camp Frederick: German World War ll POWs in Frederick, Maryland. I remembered that a German POW camp was near Cumberland Maryland, as well. This camp was located in the Green Ridge State Forest approximately 15 miles east from my hometown of Cumberland. Before being a POW camp the site was a former CCC (Civilian Conservation Corp) camp that had been converted to intern German POWs. It was located in an isolated mountainous region of Allegany County. It may have been a satellite camp to accommodate any overflow of POWs from other Maryland camps at Frederick, Camp Ritchie or Fort Meade. The enlisted POW personnel worked on local farms and orchards to harvest crops because of the shortage of local male workers serving in the United States military services. This locale of Maryland besides having agriculture and orchard industries it has

a large coal reserve. I don’t remember hearing that any POWs were put to work mining coal. How the officers spent their time as POWs I don’t know. The Geneva Convention specifies POW officers are not compelled to do manual labor. The enlisted men worked eight hours a day on local the farms or orchards and received small cash credit for their labor with which they could purchase items in a commissary within the camp. Other than working in the agriculture industry during the growing season or repairing farm /orchard machinery, life must have been boring, but not hard. Apparently some had duties such as cooks and KP’s in the mess halls and others maintained the camp’s cleanliness and repair. There was a recreational area for playing soccer and other type of exercises. The temperature in Western Maryland is temperate with hot periods in the summer and low ones in the winter. To some of the POWs, the mountains and forests in area may have been reminiscence of Bavaria. The prisoners were served the same rations served to the US Army guards. The residents of Cumberland knew of

the German POW camp but they never gave it much consideration. The prisoners were never seen in Cumberland, caused any disturbance at the camp, nor was there an escape alert from the camp. Although many of the families in the area being of German ancestry, the mountainous terrain of Western Maryland and the camp location would have made it difficult for an escapee(s) to find refuge, an escape route, or means of travel. The nearby B&O rail road yards in Cumberland had a security force as it was a marshaling yard for war material and coal transportation during the war. The clothing issued to POWs also identified them as such. One day a rumor was going around the high school which I attended, that German POWs were coming to Cumberland that evening by train. A group of my friends and I wanted see what German POWs looked like; plans were made to go to the train station. Cumberland was on the main line of the Baltimore and Ohio (B&O) railroad coming from Baltimore and Washington leading to terminals in Chicago and New

York. Our group arrived at the train station about 6:00 P.M. to wait the arrival of the Germans. About 7: 00 P.M. a passenger type train pulled into the station area and was redirected to a rail siding. Men were looking out and waving from the windows of the cars. We were sure these were the POWs, because they were under guard by US Army personnel. Someone in the group said, “These guys don’t look any different then we do.” Looking back, I am not sure what we expected to see. The best I remember the camp was opened in 1943 or `44 and closed in 1945, at the end of hostilities of World War ll. With the closure of the camp, I assume the POWs were transported to an US Army processing center, processed and returned to Germany. I live in Florida now and don’t know what remains of the camp site and had to have my memory sharpened of the time by conversing with friends still living in Cumberland, The presence of the camp added an another piece of history to a historical Cumberland and Allegany County, Maryland.


June / July 2009

German-American Journal

5

4TH OF JULY: A look into the lives of the signers of the Declaration of Independence in the years that followed CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 independent America. The history books never told us a lot of what happened in the Revolutionary War. Our forefathers didn’t just fight the British. They were British subjects at that time, and they fought their own government! Some of us take these liberties so much for granted... and we shouldn’t. So, let’s take a few moments while enjoying our 4th of July holiday and silently appreciate these patriots.

Did You Know...

Only two people signed the Declaration of Independence on July 4th, John Hancock and Charles Thomson. Most of the rest signed on August 2, but the last signature wasn’t added until 5 years later.

DYK?

Revolution. These were not wildeyed, rabble-rousing ruffians. They were soft-spoken men of means and education. They had security, but they valued liberty more. Standing tall, straight, and unwavering, they pledged: “For the support of this declaration, with firm reliance on the protection of the divine providence, we mutually pledge to each other, our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.” They gave you and me a free and

FATHERS: A move from honoring dad to a ‘guy’s night out’ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

FACTS

many, particularly in urban areas, the day evolved into men going on walking trips, and bringing picnics of ham and beer in handkerchiefs tied to their walking sticks. Gradually society incorporated the honoring of earthly dads into the celebration and all went well, until sometime in the roaring 1920’s when “Herrentag” in Germany turned

into a “drinking day”. Gone were the pious intentions and religious overtones; replaced with goodnatured carousing. The participants (traditionally exclusively male young and old,) make this mostly an outing or hike to a planned destination. Some have handcarts (Bollerwagen), others carriages (Kremserwagon) and even tractors with trailers to transport drinks and food for their journey. Vatertag is less of an “honoring dad” celebration the whole family enjoys, and more of a “guys’ night out.” Hence it has been referred to as “men’s bar tour” (Männerrunde). For most, the day is just a good excuse to band together with friends and set out on foot or on bicycles to visit the local watering holes, or to get back to nature. Sometimes even women are allowed to take part. The Austrian Father’s Day observance, while closer to the American holiday, is still not exactly the same thing. The date is also in June (on the second Sunday), but

the celebration has a slightly more religious connotation, something like a feast day celebration. Even more than in the US, the Austrian “Vatertag” ranks far lower in importance than “Muttertag.” The first observance of Father’s Day in Austria was in 1956. Today it is similar to the U.S. Father’s Day in that many Austrians give cards and presents for Papi’s (Father’s) special day. Father’s Day in Switzerland seems to be almost unknown. When it is observed at all, “Vatertag” seems to be a regional affair, falling either in June or October, but there is no Swiss national holiday for Papa. The moral of this story: Much as mom’s work is often unnoticed and under-appreciated, dad’s role apparently slides by even lower on our radar screen. So here’s an idea for this Father’s Day; don’t just tell your dad that you appreciate him. Appreciate him for all he has to offer.

More collect calls are made on Father’s Day than any other day of the year. Father’s Day is the fourth-largest card-selling occasion in the United States.

Letters From Our Readers Article Response

Informative, Educational, Concise, and Accurate I want to take a moment to congratulate you on the fine recent issue of the German-American Journal (April/May 2009). I thought you did a great service in your “Tage der Arbeit” article by informing the many readers who may not understand that the labor day that started in Chicago is celebrated in most countries except the U.S.A.  As a historian I

appreciate the concise and accurate nature of your essay. Moreover, I was very taken with the informative, educational story “A Prisoner Without a Name.” It is important to point out that there were many Germans that resisted Hitler not just a handful of aristocrats who struck once they thought the war was lost. Dr. William A. Pelz

Fostering Friendship Between The United States And Germany When I was asked whether I would like to be the new German Correspondent for the DANK Journal, I felt honored and afraid at the same time. Because I am German, my command of the English language is not what I feel it should be, when writing for a paper like The Journal, but Darlene convinced me that I should give it a try. And so I will. Let me introduce myself: I am 46 years old, and I live in Hamburg, Germany (partner city of Chicago, IL), together with my 15 year old daughter. I work as an office manager, and I love to cook (and eat!). When I was 14 years old, I joined a Verein called Ring für Heimattanz e.V. Hamburg, where I learned how to dance German “Volkstänze“ (Folkdances), and how to sew my own “Tracht“ (traditional costumes). In the meantime, I have also taken to play the contra bass in the Volkstanzmusik Neugraben. So you can see that Volkstanz and Volkstanzmusik must have been – and really are – an important part of my life. Although I have not always lived in Hamburg, I always came back. I spent 5 wonderful years in Florida, some of that time – including the most important year of my life - working at Walt Disney World as a World Showcase Fellowship Student. I also spent 13 months in Port Hueneme, California. I lived in Spain for a year, and within Germany I spent 3 years in Stuttgart and 7 years in Munich. Four years ago I moved back to Hamburg, bought a house, was quickly adopted by two cats, and promised my daughter we would not move again until she is done with school, which is in 2012. I am honestly trying my best to keep that promise! From my times abroad, I still have a lot of friends that live all over the globe. I bask in their friendship and I am always willing to do anything to keep that friendship alive, even if it means extended traveling from time to time. In addition, we always try to spend some time in Florida every other year. I always enjoy learning more about the old traditions in Germany. I do a lot of research concerning the historical origin of the “Trachten” and most recently I love to compare the GermanAmerican customs to the traditions that are still alive in Germany. I will try my best to write in the Journal about how things are seen over here in Germany, and give all the interested readers of the Journal a “German“ view of politics, whether American or German, of social events, or just of topics that are “hot“ in the media. I came to admire DANK for the dedication towards the GermanAmerican community, and I am so proud to be allowed to be a small part of it. Of all the objectives of DANK, this is my favorite: Fostering friendship between the United States and Germany. I’m trying.


6

German-American Journal

June / July 2009

26

JUN

1948 - American and British airplanes began dropping food, coal and medical supplies into West Berlin, prompting the beginning of the Berlin Airlift. This brought relief to roughly 2 million Berliners blockaded by Soviet troops. 278,000 flights took place until September 30th of that year.

Life Membership In DANK Have You Considered It?

Celebrating 50 Years! Convention News

By: Terry Viebach DANK Chicago South is very pleased to be hosting the DANK 2009 National Convention and 50th Anniversary Celebration. Committee members are Terry Viebach, Christine Walthier, Anita Walthier, Paula Malloy, Linda and Frank Janca, Kathy Fandle, Bill Schmidt and Marianne Dietz. Because of the amount of business that needs to be done and to be able to offer some quality sessions, the National DANK board has requested that the convention run from Thursday, November 5th through Sunday, November 8th. We are planning a 50th Anniversary dance at our DANK Haus in Frankfort, IL for Friday night. The meetings and seminars will be held at the Holiday Inn Hotel & Tinley Park Convention Center at 18501 South Harlem Ave, Tinley Park IL., with the high point of the convention being the gala dinner dance on Saturday night. We are also planning activities for guests to include a tour of old Frankfort, a visit to a Joliet riverboat casino and a trip to downtown Chicago.

A questionnaire will be going out in the next few weeks to all the chapter presidents, regarding some of the things they would like to see included in the convention. This questionnaire will also ask about chapter interest in sponsoring a young lady to run in a National Miss DANK pageant at the convention. It would be great if every chapter had a candidate as a way to include young people in the organization. If there is enough interest, we will proceed with this. We’ll also be sending out applications for ads for the program book. We are very pleased that the Holiday Inn has agreed to offer a special room rate for attendees to the convention of only $99 per night. The regular cost is $139 per night. Please make your reservations early by calling 708-444-1100. You will need to tell them that you are attending the DANK convention to get the special rate. More details regarding the convention will be announced in the near future. We hope to see as many of you there as can possibly attend. Bring your family and friends for a great weekend.

As National Membership chair, I have had the opportunity to communicate with many of our members, especially in chapters that are struggling financially or with chapters whose membership has become inactive. In talking with these individual members, I frankly expected to hear that they have lost interest in their Germanic roots, just don’t feel like being in an organized group any longer, or are struggling financially. While our current economic condition as a country impacts our own personal feeling of well being, it is not the primary cause of chapter inactivity or diminished feeling of pride in our heritage. Overwhelmingly our membership, like many Americans of Germanic heritage, continues to have tremendous personal pride in both their heritage and culture. Frankly, what appears to be missing, is a lack of a local or national venue on how to best express that pride and how to guarantee your membership dues are spent wisely. We all want to make sure that the things we support not only have lasting value, but that we support those things of personal value. Even I, as a 24 year DANK member, including 15 years as Pittsburgh Chapter President, have questioned “ the value of a DANK membership.” Will DANK, which is the only nationally based organization promoting Germanic culture, language, heritage and pride, be around for the next century? While I certainly don’t have a crystal ball and know the answer, I do know that unless we, as individuals of Germanic ancestry, put our money where our mouth is, it may not be in existence. Like all persons of varying cultures, be they Irish, Latino, Spanish or Scandinavian, I value those qualities that my German-Austrian-Hungarian heritage taught

me. The lessons of hard work, responsible behavior, enjoyment of life including food, drink, music/arts and compassion for others, have served me well professionally and personally. I take pride not only in those values taught to me, but also in the contributions of so many German-Americans to the American fabric. Daily we are bombarded by news of the growth of the Latino community, Chinese influence in our lives and the accomplishments of others, while Germanic contributions either historically, or by way of values, are either never mentioned or played down. It was this lack of respect and recognition of Germanic contributions by our public institutional systems, which frankly motivated me to change my year to year support of DANK to that of a more permanent commitment of DANK by becoming a Life Member this year. DANK as an organization needs both the financial support and personal commitment of it’s members, not only on a day to day basis but also long term. How often do most of us say “I am committed to a cause,” but not act upon it, or sometime perhaps too late? I urge all of our members, who can financially afford to do so, to leave a legacy of support for your Germanic heritage by becoming a “Life Time Member” and support your organization when it needs resources to grow and develop programs across the country, which are reflective of the values and traditions we share. Equally, consider leaving resources in your will to DANK, stipulating how you would like to see the organization utilize those funds, be it education, support of cultural groups or just maintaining an American organization proud of it’s Germanic heritage.

Join DANK Online

Joining DANK is now even easier than before. Complete the entire membership process online. DANK currently accepts all major credit cards when you use our web site to apply for your membership. Just Visit:

www.dank.org/membership.html

Today!


June / July 2009

German-American Journal

7

DANK Chapter Also In Michigan Late Saturday afternoon the 14th of March 1964 a group from DANK National went to Benton Harbor, Michigan to bring a new chapter to life. The DANK delegation reached their destination and were greeted by Joseph Baumann, President of the St. Joe Fussball club. Later they attended a St, Joe Soccer club meeting where members would have an opportunity to hear about DANK following their business meeting. Mr. Kollacks was given time to speak about the goals and ambitions of the German-American National Congress. After a short discussion the members of the Fussball club were asked whether or not they would like to join DANK.The decision was to join DANK as the first chapter in Michigan. These young German-Americans, from Benton Harbor and the surrounding area, understood the importance of joining together all German-Americans as they officially became members of DANK. Since three to four people showed interest in filling each positions of the new board an official vote needed to take place. Joseph Baumann, President of the St. Joe Fussball Clubs, was also voted in as Benton Harbors first DANK Benton Harbor President. A new milestone was laid with the founding of DANK Chapter Benton Harbor. Congratulations were extended to this young group of members as they look forward to continued growing membership.

National Office Buzzing With Excitement By: Amelia and Eva Eva and I have been very busy bees here in the National Office lately, getting a lot of exciting projects underway for our joyous 50th year milestone. DANK will be hosting two interns this summer in our first-ever National Internship Program, in the areas of Graphic Design and Marketing and Development. The resumes have been flowing in from both students and professionals in these fields, and some candidates have even expressed interest in pursuing internship opportunities with us in the fall and beyond. In the meantime, our inventory database is up and running, printing frilly invoices as well as helping us keep track of all sales, supplies, and purchases. We are hoping to launch a new DANK product line by the end of this year with fun products like t-shirts and mugs, featuring our logo and other Germanic-related themes that members and future members will hopefully get a kick out of!

Eva has taken on a huge project over the past couple of months, organizing and archiving all of our old (and new) German American Journals. This has been both an exciting and touching look back into the annals of DANK history, with lots of familiar handsome faces popping up and more front page articles about Miss DANK than the mind can possibly comprehend. Just as a reminder, our chapters can request just about anything from us. We are here to work and want to hear from you. We will send documents, such as membership and dues reports, via email, fax, or regular mail. We are also happy to assist members, non-members and our Germanic friends abroad with their questions, ideas, and concerns. Both Eva and I take pride in our research and management capabilities, as well as our fluency in small talk, chit-chat, and shooting the breeze. As always, we are humbly accepting donations to help us keep up our good work here at DANK so we can be there for the people, which is what we’re all about.

Apply for and use the new absolutely FREE DANK PlatinumÂŽ Visa Rewards Card, the bank will donate $50 to DANK. The more who participate, the bigger the impact we make. Apply now and earn points at select merchants. Redeem your points for travel, merchandise and more.

No annual fee and no additional cost to you 0% APR on purchases for six months then low APR Zero liability protection for unauthorized purchases Emergency cash and card replacement 24-hour roadside assistance Lost luggage replacement Using the DANK Visa credit card is an easy way to support your Germanic heritage while promoting good will among all Germanic organizations across the United States. Visit DANK.org or Call 866-926-1109 To Sign Up Today


8

German-American Journal

June / July 2009

Revitalizing The Indianapolis Dank Chapter By: Ruth M. Reichmann, Ph.D.

In our days, “Vereins-fatigue” is not uncommon. DANK chapters are not immune against it either. The Indianapolis Chapter, e.g. just concluded a two-year period of zero activity. Encouraged by some of its local members and the National Office, Dr. Ruth Reichmann took the initiative and called a meeting for January ‘09. Ten members met at the Deutsche Haus-Athenaeum to discuss the Chapter’s future. Everyone was in favor of reactivation. It was decided to have an Annual Meeting at the German-American Klub and elect an executive committee, discuss program and matters pertaining to the functioning of the chapter. Program ideas were discussed and Reichmann suggested that we sponsor programs that would involve children and students and thus get the attention of teachers and parents. She reminded everyone of the DANK mission by reading from the German-American Journal: “D.A.N.K. a non-profit organization, supports German cultural landmarks and events, sponsors German-American student exchanges and the study of the German language and culture. It promotes harmony and goodwill among German-American clubs and societies across the United States.” Ruth Reichmann and husband Eberhard had been involved with the National DANK programs, such as the national observation of German-American Day, and the Germans in America TV/DVD series. She suggested that, since DANK has been in the forefront of working for October 6 as German-American Day and then celebrating it every year that we participate in German-American Day, October 6 and sponsor a teacher workshop on the teaching materials developed in conjunction with the film series. It was also suggested that we should do things jointly and include a meal to give members a chance to speak German. Re-

ichmann believes that we could gain new members with renewed and meaningful activity. On Sunday, April 26, the Indianapolis DANK Chapter Annual Meeting was held at the German-American Klub, located on S. Meridian Street in the German Park. It began with a buffet luncheon in the Edelweiss Restaurant and ended with pastries prepared by the DANK ladies. Twentyfour members and guests were present. Special guests for the occasion were Erich Wittmann and Donna Lippert, both National Vice-Presidents, who brought greetings from the national Organization and answered questions. By the end of the meeting several of the guests had paid dues directly to Erich Wittmann, National Membership Chair. Erich Wittmann conducted the election in a humorous and accomplished manner. Elected to the Executive Committee for a two-year term were Ulrich C. Harte, President, Ruth Reichmann, 1st Vice President, Anna Stultz, 2nd Vice President, Wiga Kowalski, Secretary and Dwayne Cawley, Treasurer.

“Legacy” Was The Theme Of The Spring Social Event

After the election, President Harte asked Ruth Reichmann to share some of her program ideas. Reichmann explained that DANK has been in the forefront of working for October 6 as German-American Day and then celebrating it every year. She had worked with the then National President Elsbeth Seewald on this exciting venture. In the Indianapolis area the Indiana GermanHeritage Society has taken it upon itself to carry on with German-American Day. It is very important that we get involved. Another important focus of DANK are Schools/Educational programs. Reichmann explained that it was thru the good work of former DANK President Ernst Ott that the Goethe Institut Washington had brought together German-American historians from across the Nation to discuss production of a TV series on the Germans in America, among them Professors Eberhard and Ruth Reichmann of the Max Kade German-American Center, Indiana University/Purdue University, Indianapolis. The TV/DVD’s were to be both in German and in English and would be accompanied by teaching materials for the Social Stud-

ies and the German Classroom. Under the leadership of Dr. William Gilcher of Goethe Institute Washington, the four-part series Deutsche in Amerika was produced in 2004 by Axel Engstfeld and a German TV production crew and shown by ARTE-TV on European TV channels. More and more films are being produced by the Europeans, dealing with such topics. www.goethe.de/ usa Subsequently the four-part Germans in America series was translated into English and adapted for showing on PBS. with an excellent film on the Germans in Hollywood. Unfortunately it was not shown in Indianapolis. She introduced her colleague Dr. Claudia Grossmann, Director of the Max Kade German-American Center, who gave a brief report. She explained that the teaching materials for the TV/DVD’s were developed by the TOP program of Goethe/Washington, Stefan Brunner and Wood Powell. They were asked by Ruth Reichmann to conduct a workshop during German Week for teams of Social Studies and German teachers and will do so on October 3 during German Week. The DANK-sponsored workshop will be cosponsored by the Max Kade German-American Center and the State of Indiana Dept. of Public Instruction - an example for partnering. The materials are perfectly suited for a team teaching approach. Links to the learning materials (and other items) can be found on the main project page: www.GermansInAmerica.org. Direct link to the download page for the learning materials for social studies teachers: www. goethe.de/TheGermansLessons On the Gemütlichkeit, comfort food and talk German side of the program, we can visit German-American places supporting Germanic businesses in the area. Many great programs are offered in the Indianapolis area by other groups. We can participate, support, and we can work toward closer cooperation and joint programs of German-American Societies.

Super Bowl Bet

By: Ursula Hoeft

ability to tolerate stress - there’s always plenty of that - and for his charisma. She DANK Chapter Lake County, Illinois described him as “one wonderful human held it’s Spring social event, a Legacy being.” luncheon, at the Country Squire Restaurant Chapter members celebrating DANK in Grayslake, on Sunday, April 19. The anniversaries this year were also luncheon brought people together not just to recognized. Vice President Karl Schmidt enjoy a delicious meal, warm camaraderie and Membership Chair Judy Kanka and a chance to presented pins to learn more about Hildegard Kordas each other, it also and Werner Stein for was an occasion to 45 years; Kathleen recognize members Behrend and Juliet for their years of Stein-Davies for DANK membership 25 years; James and commitment to Davies, Brigitte and the chapter. Rev. Richard Käske A highlight of for 5 years. Other the event was the Chapter members awarding to Victor eligible for pins this Kordas, President L-R: Victor Korda, Cobi Stein, Karl Schmidt year but not at the of DANK Chapter luncheon include Lake County, Illinois from 1988 through Robert Schmidt for 35; Bridget Stein, 2006, the prestigious title of Honorary Kristine and Charles Thorsen for 25 years Chapter President. With family members, each, Fritz Sauter for 15 years; Margrit and wife Anni, son Harry and daughter-in-law Dietrich Piegsa for 5 years each.. Lisa Kordas looking on, Karl Schmidt, Three generations of the Behrend family Chapter Vice President, presented a plaque attended the luncheon: Kathleen Behrend to Mr. Kordas in recognition of this honor. - wearing her deceased husband’s 35 year The chapter’s appreciation for his years DANK pin - her son and daughter-inof service was also expressed via a gift law Dave and Andrea Burr and grandson certificate presented to Mr. Kordas by Anthony Burr. Commitment to the German Board Members Brigitte Käske and Rev. culture is a legacy that is obviously being Richard Käske. passed from one generation to the next in Chapter President Cobi Stein commended the Behrend family. Mr. Kordas for his integrity, competence,

Region 2 President Donna Lippert, from Benton Harbor, pays her debt for betting against Pittsburgh in the Super Bowl.

Mason-Dixson Learning German Instructor Ernst Jung of our German Class, the Mason-Dixon Sub Chapter would like to report that we have an on-going class for about a year now. And with the help of other classmates who speak German, we are learning to understand and speak ‘ein bisschen Deutsch‘ We meet at the St. Peter Lutheran Church in Uniontown, Pa each Tuesday and not only enjoy the learning process, but also the “Gemütlichkeit” with our classmates. On April 21, 2009 these folks and the rest of the club  are planning a Spring dinner at a local restaurant with a selection of veal or pork, red cabbage, spaetzele, coffee,rolls & butter and Black Forrest cake. You all are invited too.


June / July 2009

German-American Journal

9

Herzlichen Glückwunsch Gertrude Wolf Zu Deinem 100 sten Geburstag By: Christine Weiss

Gertrude Wolf was born in Frankfurt am Main on April 5th, 1909. She married Willie Robert Wolf in 1936. They became proud parents of two children, Karl Ludwig and Ursula. When Ursula and Karl Ludwig were teenagers, Mr. Wolf accepted a position in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He was a skilled specialist in airplanes and an expert in gyroscopes. As time passed, the family settled in South Bend and Mr. Wolf was employed by Notre Dame in the radiation department. Trudy had a natural ability to paint pictures making it her life time hobby. After the death of her husband, her son came to live with her and while watching her paint he suggested that she should try to paint with acrylic. She adapted a new expression of painting. She described how the time spend with her son was her most joyous time of her life. She and her son loved to travel together and they treasured their companionship. He was 62 years old when he died of a heart attack, leaving her overwhelmed with pain and sadness.

When she turned 80 years old, a friend became aware of her talent and supplied her brochures of modern paintings. The next 2 years she devoted her time to study and expand her painting skills. Her paintings are exhibited through out her house and show off her remarkable talent. She donated one of her paintings to our chapter with the request to display it at every Christmas party. The painting shows a red burning candle. On her 100th birthday party, Trudy dressed in a black leather skirt, white blouse, and stylish red high heeled open toe shoes, demonstrating the stylish woman she has been all her life. Asking her what the secret of her longevity is, she only smiles and says, “wearing high heels.” Well ladies, get out those pumps, throw away those ugly sneakers which only make your feet flat and elegantly walk through the rest of your life. Then for sure you will also turn 100. Trudy, we all wish you the best and may you continue to paint, wear high heels and next year we will be back again. Gertrude Wolf has been a DANK member for 24 years.

So Much To Do, So Little Time By: Nicholle Dombrowski

Outstanding Dedication

At the March National Executive Board meeting, Eva Timmerhaus our executive secretary for many years and Amelia Cotter, office manager, who recently joined our staff, were honored with a cake during the meeting’s lunch break. The National Board, recognizing Eva’s long-standing involvement in DANK, have known that she would like to retire in the future and her wealth of knowledge on the everyday working of the office, contacts throughout the German community and more needed to be passed on. This is not just information that could be simply written down as so many things were on automatic response by Eva. Enter Amelia Cotter, hired in January to start a rigorous training to be Eva’s successor when she decides to retire. Amelia came with great qualifications and fresh ideas to DANK and has proven to be a good match. The cake was to simply thank Eva for her continuing loyalty to DANK and its officers, and to say welcome to Amelia and her willingness to serve our Germanic community.

DANK Chicago is enjoying the silver lining of the cloud of this economy. People may not have a lot of gold, but they have plenty of time. Time to run a 5k with SportsClub DANK in our t-shirts answering “So, what is DANK?”; time to compile a book for publishing as a companion to our museum exhibit; time to come in weekly and sift through the Arthur Koegel Bibliothek. Soon enough the library will be fully catalogued in the computer and ready for the university system as an invaluable resource for German studies. Sweating is not limited to the library. Sports Club DANK organized a team for the local Ravenswood Run, an evening of Fussball, bags and table tennis - all in the first two months of formation. SC DANK is pivotal to our impetus to dispel the “beer and brats” stereotype. Not that we won’t capitalize on beer and brats come Maifest. Educating the public on the merits of Thüringer and Leberkäse at our largest fundraiser, 300 volunteers will now be found on the opposite side of the fest. Be sure to contact us for your shift or just stop by! This year’s “Maikönigin” comes from DANK: Miss Katie Luecht will wear the tiara at the 10th Maifest Chicago. Before you think it is all fun and games, we are working around the clock for the star of our 2009 calendar – Friday October 2. That evening we need four floors to celebrate our 50th anniversary, open “Lost German Chicago”, debut “Legacy Project”, view the 2016 Olympic announcement and throw in a little jazz. We expect 500-700 guests that evening and have doubled the space devoted to “Lost German Chicago.” Keep those donations rolling in! The contract is signed for the companion book to be distributed in Borders nationwide.

From The Shore Of Lake Erie By: Beverly Pochatko

Well, spring has certainly sprung here with some warm weather typical of early summer. However, in Erie there is a saying: give us a few hours and you can experience most of the seasons in one day… waking up to warm, balmy breezes in the morning, rain by noon, much cooler temperatures by dinnertime and winter coats to go out in the evening. Yes, we had a drop from 73 degrees to 33 in less than 24 hours! The tulips, used to this, are blooming profusely and the lilacs are just ready to burst open and the flowering trees make up for the otherwise drab day today. Some of our members are recovering from illness and/or surgeries and hopefully this new season will lift their spirits.

They are: Paul Gerbracht, Marianne Gruenwald, Fred Huttel, Sr., Joe Pochatko, Jim Schmittle and Sharon Wallin. Our Chapter celebrated it’s 19th Anniversary with a dinner at the Erie Männerchor Club, followed with a social hour in the Gold Room. It was a time to reminisce on our first gathering in the Nash Library at Gannon University and the years that followed. Listening to some of the members recounting what it was like settling in the US, having left their families and home in Germany, always gives those born here a lot of insight. Like all chapters, we experienced a high membership and then a low. Now we are gaining once more. This past month, we welcomed Carol Snippert as our newest member and Richard Hartman the month before.

Eleven university students have been accepted to assist preparation for “Lost German Chicago” and “Legacy Project,’ including Catherine Tasch’s grandson. Their passion for German culture is infectious. Touring them past the Kaiser Wilhelm portrait, the Sängerbund corner and past the Schellenbaumträger reminds us that our collection is fascinating. Vielen Dank to everyone who has had the foresight to make these acquisitions and donations. You may soon be approached by the Fine Arts Committee to be a subject of “Legacy Project.” Each year, 15 senior members will be interviewed, photographed and interviewed on film to capture the human history of DANK “Legacy Project” will fill the Scharpenberg Gallery with our favorite German Americans. It is also our second year of Adult Summer Classes. The demand is high and we will experiment with a more conversational German culture class in addition to traditional language and grammar. We accomplish all these things with strong Archive, Fine Arts and Building Committees, a supportive Board, our ever growing volunteer base, eleven interns and our old friend time.

DANK Chicago - Sports Club

Our focus continues to be that of preserving our German heritage, traditions, music and culture. But, that isn’t enough anymore. We need to insert new life into our chapter and the DANK organization as a whole, and that means we need to reevaluate and find a way to preserve the old and embrace the new. On our DANK National Webpage Forum, I read this contribution and decided this is where we need to regroup and adopt:

“To foster a cultured, well-rounded perspective that enables our community to grow as a whole while preserving and respecting the past alongside our modern German relatives and friends, requires connecting the thread with modern Germans today to our ancestors to ourselves.” Forum Topic: Putting Out Msgs & Understand’g Return’g Words

This will be our challenge for the coming years, and will require a change of thought and perspective on our part. On May 20th, we look forward to announcing the winner(s) of our GermanAmerican Essay contest at a reception for the students and their families. Plans are already in the works for our annual summer picnic in July at which time all the volunteers for the German Heritage Festival and our members will gather. It’s always a good time, with lots of food, music and even games! Memorial Day weekend is fast approaching and if you are travelling please take care. We want to see you at the National Convention as we celebrate DANK’s 50th year anniversary. Reserve the dates now, November 5th - November 8th, and plan on attending all the festivities.


10

German-American Journal

June / July 2009

JUL

02

1900 - The first Zeppelin flight took place over the Bodensee near Friedrichshafen, Germany. Due to a breaking winding mechanism for the balancing weight, the flight only lasted 18 minutes before being forced to land on the lake. It wasn’t until October 17 that a second flight took place.

AATG Student Awards Ceremony

By: Christa Garcia

On Sunday, May 3rd, 2009, the AATG (American Association of Teachers of German) held its annual Student Awards Ceremony at the DANK Haus. For the past several years the German American Education Fund - die Deutsche Kulturstiftung (founded in 1970) – has been able to fulfill it’s mission to preserve the German language and culture, by officially recognizing German language students. Over the years the German American Education Fund has worked hard to support not only students, but also DANK German language teachers and DANK German weekend schools. Over the years the German American Education Fund has donated several Concordia Summer Language Camp scholarships to deserving recipients. This year it is joining the AATG again by presenting the AATG Junior Award to 22 highly motivated DANK German Language students. Even though our DANK students are still below high school age, they have achieved excellent scores on the National AATG High School Test. The German American Education Fund is very proud to be able to present the 2009 certificates and medallions to these highly motivated young German students. In addition, this year we are also able to honor the DSD-A2 2008 students who

received the official German Language Diploma from the German Central Agency for Schools Abroad (ZfA). This certificate states that the students have achieved the competencies of reading, listening, writing and speaking German on the level A2, as measured on the Common European Framework of Reference of Languages. The DANK National Education and School Fund, represented by its Chairman, Ernst Ott, presented AATG with a partial Summer language Camp scholarship for one of the four AATG award recipients, who will spend two weeks in Bemidji, MN. This year a special guest participated in the AATG Student Awards Ceremony – the Consul General of Chicago - Wolfgang Drautz. He was representing the German Ambassador, Klaus Scharioth, to honor two of our DANK Schools, DANK Chicago and DANK Northern Suburbs. He presented the

DANK Schools with the coveted PASCH Plaque. “PASCH is an initiative launched by German Federal Foreign Minister FrankWalter Steinmeier. It’s goal is to build up a worldwide network of German-language partner schools through which to awaken young people’s interest in and enthusiasm for modern-day Germany and German society. The project is coordinated by the German Federal Foreign Office and implemented in cooperation with the Central Agency for Schools Abroad, the GoetheInstitute, the Educational Exchange Service of the Standing Conference of the Ministers of Education and Cultural Affairs of the Länder in the Federal Republic of Germany and the Academic Exchange Service. The first year was already a striking success: the number of partner schools doubled to more than 1000 worldwide. In the United States,

there are currently 82 PASCH partner schools. Every new partner school receives the official PASCH plaque.” DANK Superintendent Christa Garcia then thanked her two National Education Committee Co-Chairs, Anne Marie Fuhrig and Alexandra Pradella-Ott, for their engaged participation during the last two Saturdays, when the DSD-A2-2009 tests were given. 32 students from three DANK Schools and one public school are now anxiously awaiting the mail this summer, hoping to have received the official Zertifikat – German Language Diploma. We all wish every student the very best in all of their future studies of the German language and culture. More Info: www.pasch-net.de

AATG Junior Award Recipients Level 2

Marie Bachhausen Charlie Bauer Elisabeth Crotser Margaret Crotser Bastian Winings Melissa Herzog Daniel Davidson Elke Granata Jonathan Crank Cami Kohler

Level 3

Andrew d’Angelo Renata Wetterman William d’Angelo Emily Winter Hannah Baur Mika Chislett Maja Ding

Level 4

Krista Ruddick Rachel Ruddick Andrew Fischer Eric Fischer Nina Chislett

German Children’s Classic Now In English By: Roland Freischlad The best-selling German children’s classic “Rabbit School” (“Die Häschenschule”) was first published in 1924. It is still printed today. Sales have long passed the one million mark and the book keeps on thrilling young and old, even though (and perhaps because) it is so nostalgic. The verses were written by a school teacher, Albert Sixtus, who had come home to his wife and 3-year-old son toward the end of WWI, having almost lost his life. It took him many month to recover from the life-threatening wounds he sustained. Sixtus said that during those days he “relived his own childhood” with his little boy, Wolfgang. He played with his child all day long, read stories to him and told him all the rabbit and elf stories he remembered. When he ran out of material, he wrote his own. “Die Häschenschule” is one of the results, and it became his greatest success. One of Germany’s most renown illustrators, Fritz Koch-

Gotha had been commissioned by the publisher to create the illustrations for the verses. The result was pictures of unmatched quality and appeal. Roland Freischlad, born and raised in Germany, came to Southern California in 1974. He had grown up with the book and loved it so much, that he read it time and again. When his only son, Eric, embarked upon “Kindergarten” in 1996, Roland wanted him to have a small glimpse of the kind of school life Eric’s Oma had known in Germany and of which Roland still had gotten a last whiff during First Grade, such as writing on a slate with a stylus, wiping it clean with a wet sponge, respecting teachers, etc. Roland, loving poetry, translated the verses of the “Häschenschule” into English. Seeing the result, he contacted the Publisher in Germany and asked if his text could be published in English. Even though Germany took its time, Roland persisted in keeping after the project year after year. Finally, in the summer of 2008, he was informed that an agreement had been reached with David R. Godine, Publisher, in Boston. In the Spring of 2009, the book was introduced to the vast English-speaking market world-wide.  Eric remarked: “Look, Papa, you translated it for me when I started school, and now that I’m about to graduate from  High School, it finally gets published!” There is a touching parallel between the book’s origin and its translation: both, the author and the translator did what they did out of love for an only son. Love begets beauty, doesn’t it!

2009 Erick Kurz Award By: Ilse Hoffmann The Steuben Society of America is pleased to announce that Emilie Eggemeyer is the 2009 recipient of the Erick Kurz Memorial Award for GermanAmerican Studies. Emily, a graduate student at the College of Architecture and Planning at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana will receive a M.S. in Historic Preservation (Spring 2009) with a thesis on “From Germany to America: A Comparative Study of German Vernacular Architecture in Small Midwestern Towns.” According to Prof. Sigrid Koehler of Ball State, “Emilie’s master thesis is an extensive documentation of two mid-western towns, Mayestown, Illinois, and Hermann, Missouri. She documents and discusses the many existing historical buildings as well as the background of the families who settled there. Detailed description is given to the architectural traditions and building styles of homes, churches, public, and commercial buildings. Emilie also points out where German tradition and customs have merged with the New World and thus creating a distinctive GermanAmerican architectural style.” We are delighted to have had the opportunity to select such a deserving candidate and congratulate Ms. Eggemeyer on her achievements in this documentation of German contributions to America.


June / July 2009

German-American Journal

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Introducing Oskar & Atticus by Amelia Cotter “Oskar With The Big Ears”

„Oskar mit den großen Ohren“

Oskar was a little dog. He was brown and white, and had gigantic ears. His ears were like two big brown satellites that were always moving around while he listened. Everywhere—on the street, in the dog park, and even on the beach—all of the other dogs and people stared at his huge ears. This was a little embarrassing for Oskar. “I don’t want to have these stupid ears anymore,” Oskar thought, and tried to make himself smaller than he was. Then a nice woman came along and said to Oskar, “Good day, little man. You have really big ears! I think you look like a little deer.” And Oskar thought, “Oh, deer are beautiful animals.” Then a nice man came along and said to him, “Oskar, how are you? You know what? You look like a fox with your huge ears.” And Oskar thought, “Oh, foxes are rather intelligent animals.” Then a nice Dachshund came along (he was even small than Oskar) and said to him, “Little Oskar! I was thinking and I can’t decide if you look like either a kangaroo or like a bat. Oh well, they’re both especially interesting animals.” And Oskar thought, “Wow, not only interesting, but especially interesting! Am I also that way because so many like my ears?” Then Oskar went to his best human friend, Dani. He sat on her lap and she petted him. “My Oskar, you are beautiful, intelligent, and especially interesting. You’re the sweetest dog in the world!” Then she gave him a gigantic kiss. That made Oskar very happy.

Oskar war ein kleiner Hund. Er war braun und weiß, und hatte riesengroße Ohren. Seine Ohren waren wie zwei große braune Satelliten, die sich immer hin und her bewegten wenn er anderen zuhörte. Überall auf der Straße, im Hundepark, und sogar am Strand, starrten alle anderen Hunde und Menschen seine riesengroßen Ohren an. Das war Oskar ein bisschen peinlich. „Ich will diese blöden Ohren nicht mehr haben“, dachte Oskar, und versuchte sich kleiner zu machen, als er war. Dann kam eine nette Frau und sagte zu Oskar, „Guten Tag, kleiner Mann. Du hast aber große Ohren! Ich finde, du siehst aus wie ein kleines Reh“. Und Oskar dachte, „Oh, Rehe sind aber schöne Tiere“. Dann kam ein netter Mann und sagte ihm, „Oskar, wie geht es dir? Weißt du was? Du sieht aus wie ein Fuchs mit deinen riesengroßen Ohren“. Und Oskar dachte, „Oh, Füchse sind aber intelligente Tiere“. Dann kam ein netter Dackel (er war noch kleiner als Oskar) und sagte zu ihm, „Oskarchen! Ich habe mal überlegt und ich kann mich nicht entscheiden, ob du entweder wie ein Känguru oder wie eine Fledermaus aussiehst. Naja, beide sind besonders interessante Tiere“. Und Oskar dachte, „Wow, nicht nur interessant, sondern besonders interessant! Bin ich auch so, weil so viele meine Ohren mögen“? Dann ging Oskar zu seiner besten Menschenfreundin Dani. Er saß auf ihrem Schoß, und sie streichelte ihn. „Mein Oskar, du bist schön, intelligent, und besonders interessant. Du bist der süßeste Hund der Welt“! Dann gab sie ihm einen riesengroßen Kuss. Das machte Oskar sehr glücklich.

This story is about different animals and nouns (words for a person, place, or thing). Look at the words below and find them again in the text. Look at the words that come right before them in the story. In German, the endings of adjectives (describing words) or words like the and an change depending on where the noun is in the sentence. Sometimes the endings of nouns also change depending on whether they are the subject, direct object, or indirect object in the sentence. You may notice some patterns. For now, just try learning some new words. das Ohr, die Ohren der Hund, die Hunde das Mensch, die Menschen die Frau der Mann das Reh, die Rehe

the ear, the ears the dog, the dogs the human, the humans (or person and people) the woman the man the deer, the deer (plural)

das Tier, die Tiere der Fuchs, die Füchse der Dackel das Känguru die Fledermaus die Menschenfreundin

the animal, the animals the fox, the foxes the Dachshund the kangaroo the bat the human friend (who’s a girl)

“Atticus Has an Identity Crisis” „Atticus hat einen Identitätskrise“ Atticus was a snake. He lived deep in the forest in a tree. He had his own branch where he could stretch out his long body. Every day he looked forward to lying on his branch and observing the world. But at some point he noticed something. Something bothered him. What was it? “I’m going for a little walk,” he thought. On the way, Atticus met a mouse. “Good day, Mrs. Mouse,” he said in a friendly way. “Good day, Mrs. Snake,” said the mouse. “What?” asked Atticus. He was suddenly very annoyed. “Excuse me please, but I am not a woman! I am Mr. Atticus von Snake!” “Sorry,” said Mrs. Mouse, smiling. “But don’t you call yourself ‘die’ Schlange, as in, feminine?” she asked curiously. Atticus was really mad now. “Yeah, of course, but there are male and female snakes, just like with mice and all other animals in the world!” “Aha,” answered Mrs. Mouse calmly and nodded her head. “That must be rather frustrating then. Imagine if you were ‘das’ Schlange—neuter, an ‘it’!” “Oh, life is difficult!” Atticus cried out, and suddenly everything was clear to him. “It’s true, it is frustrating!” And he started to cry. “Don’t cry, Mr. Snake,” said Mrs. Mouse and gave him a nice hug. “Everything is okay, it’s alright.” He continued to cry. “Ohhh! What an identity crisis!” “Don’t be sad. My husband is also ‘eine’ Maus, but his name is Mr. Mouse.” He balled some more. After a while, Atticus finally stopped crying. He coughed and held his head up high. “Ah, now I feel much better. You’re right. Everything’s okay.” “I’m glad,” said Mrs. Mouse honestly. Atticus looked at her. “But unfortunately, Mrs. Mouse, normally I would have to eat you now.” “Yeah, I can understand that,” Mrs. Mouse answered unaffected. “But I’m not going to do that,” said Atticus, also unmoved. “Thanks for your help!” “I was happy to, Mr. Snake!” And both of them disappeared quickly back into the forest.

Atticus war eine Schlange. Er wohnte tief im Wald, auf einem Baum. Er hatte seinen eigenen Zweig, auf dem er seinen langen Körper ausbreiten konnte. Jeden Tag freute Atticus sich, auf dem Zweig zu liegen und die Welt zu beobachten. Aber auf einmal merkte Atticus was. Etwas störte ihm. Was war es? „Ich mache einen kleinen Spaziergang“, dachte er. Auf dem Weg traf Atticus eine Maus. „Guten Tag, Frau Maus“, sagte Atticus freundlich. „Guten Tag, Frau Schlange“, sagte die Maus. „Was“? fragte Atticus. Er war plötzlich sehr genervt. „Entschuldigen Sie bitte, aber ich bin keine Frau! Ich bin Herr Atticus von Schlange“! „Das tut mir Leid“, sagte Frau Maus lächelnd. „Aber nennen Sie sich nicht die Schlange“? fragte Sie neugierig. Atticus war jetzt sehr böse. „Ja natürlich, aber es gibt doch männliche und weibliche Schlangen, genau so wie bei Mäusen und allen Tieren auf der Welt!“ „Ach so“, antwortete Frau Maus ruhig und nickte den Kopf. „Das muss aber sehr frustrierend sein. Stellen Sie sich mal vor, wenn sie das Schlange wäre“! „Oh weh, das Leben ist schwierig“! rief Atticus, und vieles wurde ihm plötzlich klar. „Doch, es ist frustrierend“! Und er fing an zu weinen. „Nicht weinen, Herr Schlange“, sagte Frau Maus und gab ihm eine nette Umarmung. „Alles klar, ist schon gut“. Er heulte weiter. „Oh weh! Was für einen Identitätskrise“! „Nicht traurig sein. Mein Mann ist auch eine Maus, aber heißt Herr Maus.“ Er heulte weiter. Nach einer Weile hörte Atticus endlich auf zu weinen. Er hustete und hielte den Kopf hoch. „Ah, jetzt geht’s mir viel besser. Sie haben Recht. Alles ist klar“. „Ich freue mich“, sagte Frau Maus ehrlich. Atticus guckte sie an. „Aber leider, Frau Maus, würde ich Sie jetzt normalerweise auffressen“. “Ja, das kann ich nachvollziehen“, antwortete Frau Maus unberührt. „Aber das mache ich nicht“, sagte Atticus wiederum unberührt. „Danke für Ihre Hilfe“! „Gern geschehen, Herr Schlange“! Und die Beiden verschwanden wieder schnell im Wald.

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German-American Journal

This story is about articles. There are definite and indefinite articles. Definite articles are words that mean the, such as der, die or das. Indefinite articles are words that mean a or an, such as ein or eine. All German nouns have a gender that will stay the same all the time—masculine, feminine, or neuter. You can tell the gender by looking at the article. For example, der is masculine, die is feminine, and das is neuter. Die can also mean something is plural (more than one). All of this can be confusing because the article gender of a person or animal may not match its actual gender (take Atticus, for example). Look at the new words below and find them again in the text. Look for these patterns.

In the next installment: Oskar and Atticus will meet for the first time! In der nächsten Folge: treffen sich Oskar und Atticus zum ersten Mal!

Also, look at the words Frau and Mann in this story and the previous story. Notice that sometimes Frau means woman and sometimes it means Mrs. The same is true with Mann. Sometimes Mann means man, and sometimes it means Mr. die Maus, die Mäuse Frau Maus die Schlange, die Schlangen Frau Schlange Herr Schlange das Schlange Herr Maus

June / July 2009

Email Oskar & Atticus!

the mouse, the mice Mrs. Mouse the snake, the snakes Mrs. Snake Mr. Snake doesn’t exist—snakes are always feminine Mr. Maus

Oskar@DANK.org & Atticus@DANK.org

JUL

12

iTunes Top 10 Songs Taken: May 13

United States 1. Boom Boom Pow Black Eyed Peas 2. Beautiful Eminem 3. Paranoid Jonas Brothers 4. I Know You Want Me Pitbull 5. Poker Face Lady GaGa 6. No Surprise Daughtry 7. Don’t Trust Me 3OH!3 8. Sugar (feat. Wynter) Flo Rida 9. Day ‘n’ Night Kid Cudi 10. Halo Beyoncé

Germany 1. Ayo Technology Milow 2. Poker Face Lady GaGa 3. Boom Boom Pow Black Eyed Peas 4. Wire To Wire Razorlight 5. Halo Beyoncé 6. Right Round (feat. Ke$ha) Flo Rida 7. We Made You Eminem 8. Gives You Hell The All-American Rejects 9. Shake It Metro Station 10. Love Sex Magic Ciara # - Song Found On Both Lists source: www.apple.com

1994 - Germany’s Constitutional Court ended the ban which prevented German troops from fight outside the country. The ban had been in effect since the end of WWII. This ruling allowed German troops to participate in helping United Nations and NATO peace keeping missions.

Porsche & Volkswagen Plan To Merge? By: Stephen Fuchs A secret meeting was held between board members of the two German auto giants, Porsche and Volkswagen (VW), to talk about merging the two companies. Porsche has been trying for several years to fully acquire the Volkswagen brand, which include the luxury vehicles such as Audi and Bentley. Three years ago, Porsche boldly attempted a takeover bid on Volkswagen, and had hoped to take a 75 percent shareholder stake in the company. In the end, Porsche was not able to complete the bid due to lack of capital. While not being able to take a 75 percent share of the company, they were able to still walk away with a majority stake (51%) in the company. The purchase caused VW stock to surge, however it put Do you think it is a smart decision for Volkswagen to merge with Porsche? Let us know by visiting www.DANK.org/polls

POL

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Germany To Help Its Troubled Banks By: Stephen Fuchs The United States is not the only country facing banking troubles in this economy. Germany’s banking sector has been seeing trouble of it’s own recently, and politicians are torn as to whether or not the government should step in to clean up the balance sheets. Many fear what a bailout bill will do to their political career, as Germany is only five months away from a general election. All fears aside, the German government has drawn up a draft plan detailing how they may resolve the toxic assets that the banks hold which is estimated to be around $1.2 trillion. This plan would make it possible for banks to hand over their bad holdings and in return receive a government-backed bond. Participating banks would still be held responsible for their bad assets, as well as taking care of the cost for transferring and holding them until the banks recover.

Porsche 9 billion euros further into debt. Wendelin Wiedeking, Porsche CEO, released a statement after meeting with VW executives, which acknowledged the merger talks and stated that it will indeed take place in the near future. What may be holding the two companies back is the fact that Porsche may need to first get itself out of debt by looking for outside investor capital. Wiedeking said that outside help isn’t necessary, but did not rule out having

investor help at a later time. If Porsche did not have the high amount of debt, they very well could have considered a full buyout of Volkswagen instead of a merger of the two companies. Due to the economic downturn, consumers have been putting off their decisions to purchase new cars. As a result, Porsche has seen a significant drop in sales since the third quarter of 2008. Before both companies met, VW had mentioned that it was looking into the possibility of buying the Porsche brand, which would also mean buying out their debt of more than five billion euros. Volkswagen is the larger of the two companies with sales roughly 15 times higher than Porsche. Both VW and Porsche have recently said that they will publish the details of their merger deal over the next several weeks.

Listing Of Top German Sites Receives Update At DANK.org By: Stephen Fuchs DANK’s National web site has continued to see improvements since it’s rebranding back in February. One of the latest improvements has taken place on the listing of Related Sites. In the past, this section of the website consisted of one page with a simple text listing of a few web sites. If you visit that part of the site today, you will be presented with a whole new look... visitors are presented with a list of 8 categories, and when selected are brought to a visually pleasing and detailed listing of sites. Each

link is represented with a constantly updated thumbnail image of the corresponding site, a description of the site, as well as a notification as to what language(s) the site is in. Over time, this section will hopefully become a starting point for people looking to find anything German. Why browse through the millions of Google results when DANK does it for you? While DANK works to find the best sites out there, feel free to send in your favorite Germanic sites to be included in the list. Visit www.DANK.org/links.html

Steering Wheel With OLED Display By: Stephen Fuchs German OLED research association CARO (Car OLED) recently showed off an innovative steering wheel that integrates a OLED display in the center. In nearly every vehicle, this section of the steering wheel is used for the car manufacturer’s emblem. Having a display in this area opens up an

endless amount of possibilities for auto manufacturers. CARO researchers proposed the possibility of having the carmaker’s emblem light up upon ignition, used to show warning instructions, or even further the functionality of today’s instrumentation. It is expected that this steering wheel will be fully showed off during the Plastic Electronics show in Taiwan, June 8-10.


June / July 2009

German-American Journal

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26

JUN

1284 - It is believed that the story of the legend of the Pied Piper actually occurred on this day in the town of Hamelin, Germany. 130 children were led out of town by the Piper to possibly help populate parts of Moravia (which is now located within the Czech Republic).

Schnitzel Platz: So Few Germanic Restaurants In The Chicago Suburbs! Review By: Darlene Fuchs

fried potatoes). There is a vast drink list of German beers, wines and The interior of the Schnitzel Platz has a very homey feel cordials. I quenched my thirst with a .5 liter stein filled to it. Authentic cuckoo clocks, beer-steins and wood booths with Spaten, a Bavarian beer with just the right amount of surrounded us as we were seated by a very warm and hops. In addition to the customary Schnitzel there are over friendly hostess. Soon after being seated, we were served wonderful bread with pretzel rolls being my favorite, I had a dozen varieties including Zigeuner Schnitzel (Gypsy Schnitzel with peppers and onions), to remember to share with my dinner Schnitzel Cordon Bleu (filled with partner. ham and swiss cheese) and Schnitzel For dinner, I ordered with the Art des Hauses, a favorite with white Leberknödelsuppe (liver dumpling asparagus spears and hollandaise. soup) and then my Jäger Schnitzel The traditional Germanic menu also (hunters schnitzel covered in a dark includes Schweine Haxe (pork shank), mushroom wine sauce) entree. To get Sauerbraten, Lachsfilet (Salmon in a things started we shared a generous lemon butter), Bratwurst and a large side of crisp Kartoffelpfannkuchen variety of lighter fare. For children (homemade potato pancakes), with there are meals to please the less applesauce and sour cream. The adventurous. Leberknödelsuppe, consisting of an It wouldn’t be a complete dinner authentic liver dumpling in a light without such desserts as apple strudel, clear broth was served nice and hot. cheese cake or a great mocha torte. The Jäger Schnitzel was amazing. I was so full I took a slice home and The meat, tender and moist, was enjoyed it later. presented with traditional red cabbage Chef Wolfgang and Elfriede and delicious Bratkartoffeln (German Chef Wolfgang and Elfriede

are gracious hosts, full of good humor and willing to accommodate your group adapting the menu to suit your needs. Formally trained in Germany, Chef Wolfgang spent the earlier part of his career in Europe preparing meals in some of the finest resorts and hotels. Once in the United States, Wolfgang began cooking at the celebrated Plentywood Farms and helped open Indian Lakes Resort. Today, twenty years of being in business for himself, he still loves to combine his culinary skills with his passion for German cuisine by preparing authentic German dishes from the comfort of his own kitchen. On the weekends the two-man oom-pa band, the Bob Beilfuss Tyrolean Duo with Bob on accordion and Hank Mitchell on bass and trumpet, will have your entire family singing and yodeling. Overall, we say “wunderbar” to Schnitzel Platz’s cuisine. Its beer garden atmosphere is pleasantly comfortable and entertaining, with entrées priced from $8 to $23. Schnitzel Platz also offers one of the best selections of unique German gifts including cuckoo clocks, beer steins and smokers. Located at 729 E. North Avenue in Glendale Heights. They’re closed on Tuesday and have live music Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights. Call 630-942-9900 for reservations and Visit: schnitzelplatz.com

Nine Days of Pennsylvania Dutch Fun For The Whole Family Nine days of wholesome family fun with a distinctive Pennsylvania Dutch flavor awaits visitors at the Kutztown PA German Folk Festival June 27 – July 5, 2009 at the Kutztown Fairgrounds. Now in its 60th year, the Kutztown Folk Festival is the oldest, continuing folklife festival in America. It is one of the largest too, and in 2008 drew well over 135,000 visitors. In addition, it is one of the most celebrated festivals in the nation. Among many honors, the festival has been twice selected as one of America’s Top 100 events by the American Bus Association, and was named by the Washington Post as one of three “must see” festivals in the region. “There is so much to do at the 2009 Festival. There is literally something for everyone, including our famous folklore programs, the huge quilt show, folk art and crafts, music, dancing and entertainment running continuously on six stages, an expanded program of children’s activities and, of course, the best Pennsylvania Dutch food anywhere,” according to Festival Executive Director Dave Fooks. Again this year, live music ranging from folk singing and country fiddling to the sounds of brass bands will be heard from one end of the festival grounds to the other. The Heidelberg Band and the Sauerkraut Band will return to provide lively oom-pah sounds for appreciative audiences

throughout the fairgrounds. Familiar folk music will come from the Blue Mountain Gospel Express, Echoing Heart, and the Mountain Folk Music Duo. Keith and Karlene Brintzenhof will invite their audiences to join with them in singing songs in the Pennsylvania Dutch dialect. The Pennsylvania Germans are famous for their culinary creations and some of the best are served at the festival. There seems to be no end to the ham and chicken dinners, home-made soups, chicken pot pie, corn fritters, funnel cakes, shoo-fly pie, strawberry shortcake, and apple

dumplings. The famous Pennsylvania Dutch ox roast has been a festival tradition for decades. Thousands of hungry visitors sit down for a leisurely meal at the dining hall sponsored by one of the local churches. The all-you-can-eat fare features some of the best basic Pennsylvania Dutch cooking, all served family-style. For additional information on the 2009 Festival, please visit our website at www.kutztownfestival.com. The festival office telephone number is 610-683-1597.

*** German Recipe ***

EURO LLOYD TRAVEL

German Spring Soup

Announcing a special service for members of the German American National Congress

INGREDIENTS 1 qt. Beef (or Chicken) Stock 1 L 1 cauliflower (broken in pieces) 1 C fresh peas 250 ml 2 carrots (sliced) 1 C green beans (sliced) 250 ml 4 asparagus spears (cut up) 1 t parsley (chopped) 5 ml Salt & pepper to taste DIRECTIONS Pour beef stock into soup kettle. Bring to boil; reduce heat. Add remaining ingredients. Cover and simmer gently over low heat for 30 minutes or until vegetables are tender.

Call now to take advantage of outstanding airfare sales lower than the current DANK rate specials.

**Low discounted airfares from major cities in the USA to major cities in Europe and beyone on scheduled airlines. Also, domestic airfares. **European Railpasses (Eurail, German Rail and many others) plus single rail tickets and reservations. **Car rentals with special low dollar rates in most European contries. **Cruise in the Caribbean, Alaska, Orient, Mediterranean and North Cape on all major cruise lines. Worldwide tours - independent, hosted and fully escorted. When calling, you MUST identify yourself as a DANK Member. Rates are subject to availability and change. Several more rate categories are available at higher prices should these not be available. Sale prices offered when available. Call now for information: 1-800 572-3149 or SPECIAL FARES TO GERMANY from Chicago. 1-312-362-0218 Chicago prices starting from, PLUS TAX: Visit us at: www.eurolloyd.com Jun 01 - Aug 30, 2009 $1195 Aug 31 - Oct 25, 2009 $792 Oct 26 - Dec 10, 2009 $484 Audrey L. Hess-Eberle Dec 11 - Dec 24, 2009 $792 EURO LLOYD TRAVEL GROUP Dec 25, 2009 - Mar 25, 2010 $484 53 W. Jackson Blvd. - Suite 863 Mar 26 - Mar 31, 2010 $792 Chicago, Illinois 60604 To above rates, add Taxes and $25 for Weekend Surcharge for travel Friday, Saturday, or Sunday each way. Unpublished sale specials may also be available on different airlines at time of request. Other US departure rates as well as multiple airlines are available. Rates are subject to change at any time.


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German-American Journal

June / July 2009

*** Calendar Of Events ***

This area is designated for DANK chapters and Associate Members to inform their members and the public of events they are having. We rely on the submissions of each chapter or organization, therefor all events may not be included. Please contact our National Office at 773-275-1100 or visit www.DANK.org for the most recent listing of events or for information on how to make sure your event is listed in the next issue. (Associate Member Events Listed In Italics)

JUNE 2009 5

Benton Harbor: Fish Fry, 2651 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, Michigan 49022, $8.00 per person doors open 5:30pm, dinner 6-8pm, band plays 7-10pm For more info call (269) 926-6652

6

Milwaukee: Board Meeting (414) 659-1385

6

German American Heritage Center: Quad City Heritage League Spring Social, Oak Dale Cemetery, open to public, 2pm

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7

German American Heritage Center: Program on Hegeler Carus Mansion, LaSalle, Illinois, $5 non-members, members free, 2pm

21

Pascack Valley: Regular Meeting, Father’s Day celebration

12

Chicago-West: Annual Picnick, Kiwanis Park, Brookfield, Illinois (708) 562-7038

21

American/Schleswig-Holstein Heritage Society: Fathers Day Concert, Schuetzen Park Historic Site, 700 Waverly Road, Davenport, Iowa, 1pm

12

Lake County: Annual Picnic at Van Patten Woods in Wadsworth, Illinois, Shelter A (847) 234-3920

26

American/Schleswig-Holstein Heritage Society: The Barley House Band, “Irish Roots, American Branches”

12

Chicago-South: Picnic, German-American Heritage Center, 25249 Center Rd., Frankfort, Illinois 708-672-4998

27-28 Benton Harbor: Concertina Weekend, 2651 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, Michigan 49022, 12-8pm Saturday and Sunday For more info call (269) 926-6652

18

South Bend: Splash Party at Szulczyk’s, Potluck 1:00pm (Rain date 7/19), 16509 Bennington Ct., Granger, Indiana

18

German American Heritage Center: Volksmarch, 8-4pm

19

Benton Harbor: Picnic, 2651 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, Michigan 49022, 1pm For more info call (269) 926-6652

28

German American Heritage Center: GAHC Zither Ensemble Summer Concert, $5 nonmembers, members free, 2pm

Lake County: Participation in Waukegan’s Independence Day parade (847) 234-3920

JULY 2009

13

South Bend: Germanfest, Fort Wayne, Indiana

4

Pascack Valley: Picnic

14

Chicago-West: Board Meeting, 1:30pm

10

13

Milwaukee: Picnic at Scared Heart Church, 126pm (414) 659-1385

Benton Harbor: Fish Fry, 2651 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, Michigan 49022, $8.00 per person doors open 5:30pm, dinner 6-8pm, band plays 7-10pm For more info call (269) 926-6652

20

Lake County: Lunch and Dairy Tour at Fair Oaks Farm in Fair Oaks, Indiana, $15.00 deposit needed (847) 234-3920

11

Benton Harbor: Dance featuring Phil Mann, 2651 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, Michigan 49022, 6-11pm For more info call (269) 926-6652

German American Heritage Society: Trip to Hegeler Carus Mansion and I&M Canal, Buffet Lunch at Lock 16 Visitor Center, $60 nonmembers, $50 members, depart 8:30am

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20

German American Heritage Society: Scherenschnitte Class (ages 16+), $10 nonmembers, $5 members (supplies not included in price), 2pm

24-26 Milwaukee German Fest: Henry W. Maier Festival Park, Milwaukee Lakefront, Friday and Saturday, 12 noon to midnight and Sunday, 12 noon to 10:30pm (Volunteers needed from Lake County chapter) 25

Chicago-South: Milwaukee Fest Bus Trip, to reserve seat call Mellanie at 708-672-4998

25-26 German Society of Maryland: German Festival, Timonium Fairgrounds, Timonium, Maryland (410) 685-0450 26

Benton Harbor: Membership Meeting, 2651 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, Michigan 49022, 4pm For more info call (269) 926-6652

WELCOME NEW MEMBERS 2/24/09 to 4/28/09

Antonovits, Michael Baltrunas, Mui Becker, Susan Butler, Athena Butler, Eric Butler, Ethan Butler, Evan Butler, John D. Carney, Gudrun Ulrike Carpini, Gredel Ceconi, Anna K. Ferguson Greene, Scott Freese, Elizabeth W. Freese, Heinz O. Frick, Dolores E. Friedl, Erna Gill, Patricia Gottschalk, Jay Randall

Graber, Abigail Graber, Erin Graber, Lisa Graber, Peter Guntermann, Wilfried J. Haller, Michael Joseph Haller, Rebecca Johnson, Brent Johnson, David Johnson, Michelle Kennemuth, Delores A. Koppanyi, Charlotta Kos, Chester J. Kozak, Bea Losch, Edward Lotspeich, Rosemarie Mason, Mario F. Mason, Ruth

McDermott, Barry G. McDermott, Sandra Milner, Patricia Murray, Michael Murray, Sandra Noonan, Jon Noone, Marjorie A. Ostovic, Mary Ann Piper, Dixie Piper, Gary Randall, Hunter Randall, Lori Randall, Michael Rehbock, Timo Rimes, Andrew Rimes, Anneta Rimes, Dave Rudi Rimes, Matt

Rimes, Shaun Rodewald, Linda Romig, Eugene F. Scheibe, Roland Schramm, Edward Schramm, Emily Schramm, Katheryne Schramm, Tyler Schweihofer, Frederick Scroggin, Eileen M. Sparks, Clifford H. Sparks, Hedwig Stessl, Janet Stessl, Louis Sutor, Kate Louise Torrito, Jennifer Torrito, Justin Michael Torrito, Kelan

Valle, Mathew J. Valle, Olivia R. Weidner, Diane Weidner, Douglas Weiss, Jennifer Whitright, Ron Wurzer, Hanna Associate Member German American Police Association of Greater Milwaukee Life Members Vincent, Heidi Wittmann, R. Erik

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June / July 2009

German-American Journal German-American Journal

We must always remember when enjoying our Dank-South Building that Paul was the builder! For over a year, he donated his time to be the General Contractor, and for a few years before, he helped plan our dream of having our Wife, Nancy, Correspondence Secretary and a major contributor to the Boards of Dank South, will continue with her support and her role as an advisor to Dank.

Sudoku 9x9 - Solution 1 of 5 - Medium

Elli Smaka

Paul Moser was laid to rest on April 14, 2009. The Moser’s are Dank members since 1969. Wife, Nancy, and daughter, Rosemarie Lubinski, mourn his passing after a short illness.

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Elli Smaka, passed away on March 7, 2009. She and her husband, Walter, were long time members of the DANK.  Walter was involved in much work at the Benton Harbor chapter of DANK.  Walter died in November, 2006.

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Paul was a loving husband, always near Nancy’s side, and a caring father. He will be remembered by his many good friends, and we will miss his gentle manner and his deep compassion for others in their moments of sadness.

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Did you know? That how long a minute feels depends on what side of the toilet door you find yourself. German-American Journal

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German-American Journal

June / July 2009

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German-American Journal | June/July 2009  

Volume 57, Issue 3