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Proud To Be German-American Stolz Deutsch-Amerikaner Zu Sein Visit us at www.DANK.org

Volume 62 Number 2

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Contents Of This Issue 4

From the President’s Desk by Beverly Pochatko

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How do Americans feel about Germany?

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Newly Declassified Documents

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New German Heritage Monument in Cincinnati

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Maypole in Bavaria

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Chapter Chatter

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A Little Bit of Germany in West Bend, WI

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Indignity for German-Americans

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Easter in Germany

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Kurznachrichten

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Bremen and Bremerhaven

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Aus Oma's Küche

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Calendar of Events

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Die 3 bekanntesten Osterbräuche in Deutschland

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Odds & Ends

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Donations

Editorial Staff Beverly Pochatko Eve Timmerhaus Eva Timmerhaus Correspondents Anne Marie Fuhrig Christa Garcia Francine McKenna Desktop Publishing and Design Eve Timmerhaus Advertising and Classifieds Eve Timmerhaus

General Information

German American Journal -ISSN 1086-8070 is published bimonthly and is the official publication of the German American National Congress. Periodicals postage paid at Chicago IL and additional mailing offices.

POSTMASTER” Send address changes to: German-American Journal 4740 N. Western Avenue Suite 206 Chicago IL. 60625-2013 Annual Subscription Rate $15.00 www.dank.org/news.html

DANK does not warrant or assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any information published herein. DANK preserves the right to change or amend submissions for any reason without prior notice.


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From The President’s Desk Beverly Pochatko, National President Liebe Mitglieder und Freunde, Dear members and friends of DANK, Here it is, the springtime of the year and a time of renewal. Renew…the word has a lot of meanings depending on its usage, to become new or strong again; to begin (or start over) again, or to resume with new energy; or the granting of an extension such as a lease. In the Christian community, Easter is the renewal of faith. For many people, the arrival of the first official day of spring had us searching the still frozen earth for a sign of ‘green’ renewing the promise that the ‘earth’ will soon be clothed in vibrant color, and the melodic sounds of birds. No matter what our belief is, Catholic, Protestant, or Judaism, we all celebrate a renewal, the ‘making of things new’ again within our faith. We have a new sense of spiritual vitality. At DANK, the renewal of memberships boosts our energy and reaffirms that we will be strong in declaring the belief that our heritage is important and pass on to our children, a renewed pride in our past. Our future lies in our youth and your renewal enables them to know that this is important…that we not forget the ancestral home of our Germanic roots, and how our heritage has had an effect on American lives today. With the advent of spring, there is generally a flourishing of activities within the German communities from Easter to Maitag celebrations, spring choral concerts, parades, bus trips to other areas of interest. We celebrate with open arms the warming rays of the sun, the smell of the damp earth, and the fragrance of the early blooming flowers. It renews our vitality and reminds us of the promise that the ‘winter’ has passed once more and we join in many types of celebrations. We begin another cycle of life that we nurture and enjoy until the rays of the sun seem cooler and less bright, and the colors turn to darker shades of red, gold and brown. Already sleeping in the soil, the spring flowers are building their strength to push through the frozen earth at the perfect time… Even though they say that the ‘mini’ daffodils will not survive through really cold weather, ours are the first to show their ‘heads’ after the severe ‘polar vortex’ that hovered over our city and the record 124.8 inches of snow so far this year! Which is just the proof to me that where there is a will to survive, you will! So be it with DANK… you just have to believe in the future! If you take a little time to nurture your Chapter by introducing a new member, you are providing the additional strength to your group and seeing it bloom again, perhaps with renewed vigor! My wish for you is to enjoy the renewal of this season, find strength in wisdom, and to be refreshed in the fragrance of life. Frohe Ostern!

DANK seeks to bring together Americans of German descent in the pursuit of cultivating and presenting their heritage and interests on local, regional and national levels. These were the primary reasons that the German American National Congress was founded in 1959 and they are still among the organization’s primary objectives today.

DANK National Executive Board President: Beverly Pochatko Vice President : Ronald Kabitzke Erik Wittmann Treasurer: Bob Miske Secretary: Esther Markwart Membership: Erik Wittmann DANK National Executive Office 4740 N. Western Avenue Chicago IL. 60625-2013 Phone: (773) 275-1100 Toll Free: 1-888-USA-DANK Office Hours: 9 am - 4 pm Monday, Wednesday-Friday Office Staff Eva Timmerhaus Eve Timmerhaus


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How do Americans feel about Germany?

American Impression of Germany Found Stronger than Ever Americans’ perspective of modern Germany continues to grow in a positive direction: nearly 60 percent of Americans have an excellent or good impression of Germany, especially in view of economics, education and technology, according to a survey of Americans released on Jan. 30 in a roundtable discussion at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Americans’ positive impressions of Germany have been steadily rising over the years and are now the highest they have ever been since polling began in 2002. The study, which was conducted on behalf of the German Embassy in Washington by Frank N. Magid Associates, Inc. in late 2013, took a nationally representative sample to determine how Americans perceive Germany and the Germans. The survey included a vast set of questions covering every aspect from bilateral relations to Germany’s role in Europe. The results show that Germany continues to be hailed as one of the most important partners of the United States and is being regarded as a leader in Europe. Personal ties to Germany make a positive difference and reinforce the outstanding results: 88 percent (that’s twenty-nine percent up from the national sample), of Americans who once lived in Germany for more than 6 months, have a positive impression of the country. The same applies to those with a higher level of education: 69 percent of college students see Germany in a favorable light. Overall, 60 percent of American respondents characterized Germany as a modern and forward-thinking society. Germany was also praised for its exceptional levels of scientific research, innovation and technology, and the majority of Americans commended its educational system. Politically, Germany was applauded for its importance in global politics, as well as its efforts to promote peace and democracy on an international scale. Fifty-seven percent of Americans called Germany an important player in international politics

and believe Germany holds an important role in the United Nations. In today’s multipolar world with many interests and changing alliances Germany stands out as the top non-Englishspeaking country that shares common values with the US. It steadily continues to be regarded as the third-most important international partner of the US. Germany’s presence in Europe was highlighted as being particularly successful, and only growing in importance: Americans describe Germany’s presence as stable, constructive and collaborative. Additionally, 53 percent believe Germany’s role in Europe has strengthened over the past few years and 51 percent are expecting Germany to assume a leading role. Out of all countries, Germany was also chosen as the best suited to lead Europe out of its debt crisis, followed by Great Britain and the US. A question on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) brought encouraging results: Though the negotiations between the EU and the US are still in their early phases, informed Americans overwhelmingly support a deal. Forty-two percent of respondents believe a TTIP partnership is in the best interest of the US (only 6 percent disagreed, and the remainder chose not to answer the question or picked a neutral stance). The numbers reinforce the feelings expressed by US and German political leaders over the past few years: "[Germany] is unquestionably one of our strongest most vibrant alliances in the world," Secretary of State John Kerry said in 2013. The results also point to a growing trend in which Americans are picking up interest in German life, culture, history and research: 51 percent of American survey respondents believe the U.S. media does not provide enough information about Germany, and more than half of all Americans would like to learn more about modern life in Germany, science and history. continued on page 36


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Newly Declassified Documents Show American Perspective on Cold War Berlin In 2014 Germany is marking the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. Recently in Washington, DC, the National Archives released a trove of nearly 2,400 newly declassified US documents from the State Department, the Central Intelligence Agency and numerous other agencies dating from 1961 to 1987. The documents, totaling some 11,000 pages capture the US perspective during this time and show the resilience of the human spirit demonstrated by Berliners in East and West living in the shadow of Berlin Wall. US agencies aren’t the only ones who have begun to declassify and publish their records from the Cold War. In Germany, the Bundesnachrichtendienst, federal intelligence agency, released 5,000 pages of records chronicling the years around the construction of the Berlin Wall covering the years 1952 to 1962. Officials with the National Archives, the National Declassification Center and the Central Intelligence Agency, along with US and German historians, talked about the significance of the release at a symposium at the National Archives building in Washington, DC, on January 14. In his introduction to the booklet accompanying the document release, Neil C. Carmichael Jr., director of the Indexing and Declassification Review Division within the National Declassification Center describes the historical context for this era in the Cold War. “The publication covers the period between two of the most famous speeches by the visiting American Presidents Kennedy and Reagan. With his iconic speech on June 26, 1963, President John F. Kennedy united the citizens of Berlin with the United States by his statement that ‘he too was a Berliner.’ Twenty-four years later when visiting Berlin, President Ronald Reagan declared in his speech that ‘… Yet I do not come here to lament. For I find in Berlin a message of hope, even in the shadow of this wall, a message of triumph.’ The newly published and released declassified documents reveal the struggle for life and death in the shadow of the wall, focusing on the resolve of the human spirit for freedom and equality.” Some examples of documents contained in the release • A 1962 intelligence memo reports on a tunnel and escape plan orchestrated by wholesale butchers and

students in West Berlin and a plan by CBS News to release a film on the effort. • A day before the visit of US President John F. Kennedy to Berlin in 1963, a State Department telegram reports on the plan by a construction workers union to smuggle a bouquet from East German construction workers for presentation to the American president. • A 1964 State Department telegram reports on the release of balloons in West Berlin carrying anti-communist propaganda over the wall into East Berlin. • A US military report on the fatal shooting of a member of the US Military Liaison Mission patrol by Soviet forces in East Berlin in 1985. © Germany.info


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New German Heritage Monument Coming To The Museum In Cincinnati In a very exciting development for the Greater Cincinnati German community, the German Heritage Museum is about to become the site of the new German Heritage Monument! This new monument is intended to honor all of the people that helped build Cincinnati’s German community, plus serve as a reminder to all of the deep German roots and heritage of the region. The design will be a four-sided pyramid, three feet high, cut from grey, Barre, Vermont granite, and secured to a larger platform of the same material. Both pieces will rest on a one foot high concrete pedestal. The monument will be positioned on the lawn in front of the museum, at the top of the hill where it will be visible from the road. This monument was made possible by the generous donations of two individuals. Wilhelm Gottenbusch, the founder of Servatii’s Bakery, provided all of the funds for the purchase and engraving of the monument. F. David Carpenter provided the funds for the foundation and base, in memory of his wife Dolores, who owned the Lindennoll Gift Haus in

Mainstrasse Village, Covington. The Dedication Ceremony was scheduled for Saturday, April 19th. Due to a landscape wall collapse at the park the dedication ceremy has been postponed. The program will recognize the dignitaries present, several messages from distinguished visitors, introduction of our donors, and finally unveiling of the monument. The museum is open on Sundays, mid-May through October, from 1 until 5 PM. The museum can also be opened by special appointment. There is no admission charge. The museum is staffed solely by volunteers. If you have a desire to view any particular artifacts, please make prior arrangements by calling (513) 574-1741. The museum is located in West Fork Park, at 4764 West Fork Road, Cincinnati, OH, 45247. • This article is reprinted with the permission of The German Pioneer, the official newsletter of the German Heritage Museum of Greater Cincinnati.

DANK Haus in Chicago presents “Let’s Talk About Germany: The Rise and Fall of the Berlin Wall” Historian Anette Isaacs enlightens and educates with this lecture Join German historian Anette Isaacs, as she presents a historical and political overview of the rise and fall of the Berlin Wall. It has been almost 25 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall – an insurmountable icon of the Cold War. With its rise on August 13th 1961, the course of German history, and especially Berlin history, took an inconceivable turn. It would take over 28 years later on November 9th, 1989 to tear down this cruel and inhuman symbol of Germany’s division, thus giving birth to yet another period in this European nation’s

evolution. Executive Director Nicholle Dombrowski says, “Ms. Isaacs’ brings a unique perspective and experience to the discussion of the rise and fall of the Berlin Wall. After you hear her speak of the historical people and places of Berlin, you will want to book a trip to see Berlin as it is today.” The event will be held Thursday, May 1st, 2014 at 6:30pm at the DANK Haus German American Cultural Center in Chicago. The event is free and open to the public. For more information: 773-561-9181•


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Untranslatable ­German Words

A list of some of the most popular—and funniest—untranslatable German words Waldeinsamkeit A melancholy feeling of being completely alone in the forest. Literally: forest loneliness. Kummerspeck English may have a phrase for the food you eat to comfort yourself when feeling low (comfort food), but German has Kummerspeck, a word for the inevitable weight gain that follows. Sandkastenfreund A friend you’ve known since childhood. Literally: sand box friend. Drachenfutter The present you get for your significant other when you know you’ve done something wrong and want to “appease the dragon” you know he or she is going to turn into when he/she finds out. Literally: dragon food. Fremdschämen Seeing someone else do something so embarrassing that you feel embarrassed for them yourself. Literally: foreign shame. Rabenmutter A bad mother, usually used to describe a mother who is thought to spend too little time with her children. Literally: raven mother.

Treppenwitz The come back to the snide comment that you don’t think of until ten minutes later, when you’re already out the door and going down the stairs. Also used to refer to a stupid joke, ridiculous behavior, or the irony of fate. Literally: stair joke. Backpfeifengesicht A face that looks like it needs a fist. Literally: cheek whistle face. Torschlusspanik The fear, as you age, that opportunities are vanishing from your life. Literally: gate close panic. Fernweh English has “home sickness,” but it doesn’t cover the opposite emotion which this word embodies. Fernweh is the feeling of missing being away. Literally: Distance pain. Ohrwurm A personal favorite, Ohrwurm is the phrase you use to describe a song that is stuck in your head. Handschuhschneeballwerfer One of the strangest phrases on the list, this word refers to someone who is a coward. Literally: glove snow ball thrower. © www.deutschland.de


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Maypole Day in Bavaria May 1st is maypole day in Bavaria and a day for the local folklore group dressed in their finest costumes to gather all the villagers together to celebrate this important annual occasion. Each and every maypole is uniquely decorated with ribbons, wreaths or signs denoting local craftsmen’s guilds. Soon it is time for the brass band to tune up and accompany the dancers well into the night. A traditional dark “Maibock” beer is brewed especially for the occasion. The hoisting of a maypole is an important part of all spring festivities. Most Bavarian villages have a club known as the “Burschenverein” that is akin to Young Farmer’s associations. Long before the 1st May the young men of the Burschenverein go out to the woods to choose a tall straight pine tree that is then felled and hidden away for safe keeping. The earliest reports of Maypoles, as a symbol of all things that grow and bear fruit, date back to the 13th century. Today the Maypole reflects the wealth of the particular community. Part of this whole tradition is that one village tries to steal the maypole from the neighbors. If they succeed the safe return of the maypole is up for negotiation with ransoms involving copious quantities of beer and food. Some "Burschenvereine" have specialized in stealing the maypoles that are most closely watched

by the strongest security. Maypole stealing is governed by a pretty strict code of conduct: sawing or damaging the maypole in any way is absolutely frowned upon as is a non-payment of the ransom. The most spectacular theft occurred back in 2004 when cunning thieves stole the maypole from the top of the Zugspitze using a helicopter. Once the 20 m long maypole had been safely flown to an Alpine hut negotiations began to determine how much ransom would be paid for its return. Rumor has it that there were ample quantities of food and the beer flowed freely all night. Hoisting the maypole is a really tough job that makes most men break out in a sweat. It is raised using smaller trees that have been stripped of the bark and slung together at the top by thick rope together with a whole lot of muscle power. Centimeter by centimeter the maypole is slowly hoisted into a preprepared hole. Once firmly anchored in place it is decorated with signs indicating local craftsmen’s guilds and topped with a wreath from which sausages, bacon, wine and schnapps bottles are hung. Fixing the wreath in place is the job of the "Maibaumkraxler" who has to scale the maypole, attach the wreath and make it safely back down to the ground again. When all the work is done its time to celebrate with Bavarian brass band music and dancing long into the night. • © bavaria.by


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Chapter Chatter DANK Chicago South Frankfort, IL

Fasching... Karneval… Mardi Gras was held on February 22, 2014 in our festive clubhouse in Frankfort, Illinois. We couldn’t ask for better weather to celebrate this crazy time of year. There was only clowning around when you entered the door for the evening dance. President, Gary Dietz welcomed special guests including Rheinischer Verein Prinzenpaar 2013 Prinz Stefan and Prinzessin Elfriede, St. Hubertus Club members Mr. & Mrs. Bernie Uhlein, DANK Chicago West members along with their President Fred, Andrea and Baby Emilie Leinweber, the Jolly Burgenländers, several students from Carl Sandburg High School German club and a visiting German exchange student from Baden Baden, GermanyMegan Neusatz. Also, member Katie Messing celebrated her birthday with family and friends. Herzliche Glückwünsche zum Geburtstag Katie. Many danced to the music of Die Perlen along with “schunkeling” to multiple Karneval songs. The highlight of the evening was of course the costume parade. We were excited to have quite a few

children (little Dalmatian, Bumble Bee, Cleopatra, and a Werewolf ), since they each were so cute- all of them won prizes for the best costume. Best group costume was given to the Sandburg HS German students-Little Red Riding Hood, 3rd Prize awarded to Karl Zollner (Lederhosen Karneval Jester), 2nd Prize Claudio Ehinger (Gladiator) and 1st Prize Anita Walthier (clown). We appreciated all the people that were in the spirit of Fasching dressed in costume. Of course, we can’t forget the dedicated volunteers to help run the event. The hall was decorated cheerfully with streamers and masks in Karneval colors thanks to a dedicated group of individuals that are a part of the decorating committee to transform the hall into a spectacular display. A special thanks to head chef Marianne Dietz and her entire kitchen team for cooking and serving delightful dinner choices of Leberkäse or traditional bratwurst. The Fasching Krapfen for dessert was enjoyed by all. The winners of the raffle walked away with fabulous prizes. We hope that you all had a “Gemütlich” wonderful time at the German American Heritage Center and hope that you can join us at DANK Chicago South’s next big event in

Frankfort our Mai Tanz, on Saturday May 10. Helau, Anita Walthier, Narrenexpert


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Chapter Chatter Introducing DANK Chicago's new President... At January's election Michael Ianni was selected as Board president. Mr. Ianni established three top priorities during his term 1. Establish a Long Term Fundraising Plan 2. Foster Community Engagement 3. Increase the Volunteer Base. Michael Ianni’s interest in German culture goes back well over a decade, first inspired by a college semester abroad in Salzburg, Austria in 2000. In 2003, Michael joined the Austrian American Educational Commission’s U. S. Teaching Assistant Program offered in partnership with the U.S. Fulbright Commission. He spent two years working in Linz, Austria, for two private schools teaching English as a Second Language. Michael returned to the U.S. and joined Nuveen Investments in 2005, where he is still employed and has held multiple positions. He currently holds the title of Vice President, Inside Sales & Service Manager, in their Global Private Client Group. Additionally, Michael has been an Adjunct Professor at DePaul University for over 3 years working in the Marketing Department’s Center for Sales Leadership teaching Effective Business Communication. Michael also achieved the Prüfung Wirtschaftsdeutsch in 2007 through the Goethe Institut – Chicago. Michael sees the opportunity to serve on the board as a way to help others enjoy German culture, assist in DANK’s overall objectives as an organization, and continue the efforts to ensure the

legacy of the organization continues. After being a volunteer for many years, Michael sees this as a way to give back to a community that has provided a resilient link to German culture in the great city of Chicago. •

Kulturkueche – Rahmschnitzel, No Relation Rahmschnitzel has been on the Chicago menu long before the local news ever uttered the name on a daily basis. The German American Cultural Center illustrates this vocabulary lesson in the most delicious way possible. Join Chef Carol Himmel from Himmel’s as she spoons the shallot mushroom cream sauce over exquisitely pounded pork tenderloin medallions seared and sautéed in butter served with spätzle. We have heard tales of folks stationed in Germany who would walk two miles into town every week for this dish! Class attendees will be whisked up an elevator and gather in the kitchen with Chef Carol’s bubbly personality and a healthy amount of heavy cream.

Walking optional. There are plenty of hands on opportunities for students as well as tasting opportunities. Nominal class fee of $16 includes demonstration, recipes, one drink and tasting. We know your Oma made it better - that was the love. This class is available Thursday May 15 2014 at 7:30 pm. For information: 773-561-9181. To reserve your spot in this class: www.brownpapertickets. com/e/601567 DANK Haus is located ½ block from the Western Brown Line stop in Lincoln Square, Chicago’s historically German neighborhood. Free parking courtesy of MB Financial Bank •


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Chapter Chatter DANK Chapter Milwaukee Turns the Clock Back to the 50’s and 60’s By DANK Chapter Milwaukee Vice President William Bessa and member Jane Nacker Find your bobby socks and get ready to twist! DANK Chapter Milwaukee is having a Mai Tanz and Chor concert, with a 50’s and 60’s theme, on Saturday May 10, 2014. The DANK Chor will perform, followed by Schlager dance music performed by Pieptones of Chicago. Just like the sock hops of the past, dance contests and a Hula Hoop contest will be held. In addition, the Milwaukee Donauschwaben Youth Dance Group will perform. Food and beverages for the dancers and onlookers, and raffle chances for lucky winners, will be available for purchase. The fun will be held at the Schwabenhof in Menomonee Falls, WI. Doors open at 5:00 PM, Chor

Nordamerikas einzige deutsch-singende retro Schlagergruppe fing als Goethe-Institut Chicago Student Teilnehmerexperiment an, um Deutsch besser mit Musik zu lernen. Dabei verliebten sie sich in den lustigen und wahnsinnigen deutschen Schlager der 50er und 60er Jahre und den exotischen deutschen

concert at 6:00 PM, dancing at 7:00 PM. Admission is $12; under 12 free. Event proceeds will be used to support German education programs. Last year DANK awarded funds to two teachers that requested support from our chapter. Both teachers suggested that they would use their funds for four scholarships for their students studying German. They will decide how best to award them. For information and ticket reservations, please contact Ursula Günther at 414-4221385 or Ron Kabitzke at 262-675-5336 by May 3, 2014. DANK Chapter Milwaukee is on Facebook! “Like” us at www.facebook.com/dankmilwaukee •

und internationalen Stars, die diese Musik spielten. Nun ist es ihre Leidenschaft, diese alten musikalischen Goldstücke einem neuen Publikum vorzustellen. Obwohl nur eine Handvoll Pieptone!-Fans zu Hause im Chicago und Mittleren Westen versteh -en Deutsch, trotzdem erkennen und genießen sie die Klänge der Ära. Wie Pieptone! so gerne sagt, Die Sprache der Popmusik ist universell! • www.pieptone.com/


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Chapter Chatter

Spring on the Pennsylvania Lake Shore O winter, go away! I have had enough! Here it is mid-March and even though the official arrival of spring is days away, we can just hold on to the fact that by the end of July on, we will be wishing for the cold breeze that come off the lake in the opening days leading to summer! This has been one of the coldest, snowiest winters in Erie. With actual temps that dipped to minus 14 (forget the wind chill); and snows that left 128 inches on the ground, many of us hibernated indoors! While December wasn’t too bad, January was fierce and I cancelled our DANK meeting to keep our members safe and our Kaffee Klatsch took a breather until March! With the severe weather concerns, we did not celebrate Fasching this year as we have in the past. Thankfully, our members were spared the flu virus…probably because we didn’t venture out too much. There were members who came for the February meeting, due to a break in the weather. Thanks to Luise Dudkiewicz who provided a Lemon Tart to go with our coffee. We began discussing activities for the coming year, among them our annual family picnic. Always held mid week, we found that it really was inconvenient for those who work or have to travel to join us. This year it will be held on a Saturday afternoon. This is one thing

that we have learned that many of our older members prefer ‘day time’ activities as they are not keen about driving at dusk. So, we are trying to remedy the situation to be able to bring more members together for some activities. We found moving our DANK Christmas party to a Saturday afternoon has worked well. In a chapter survey, I learned that our members like programs on genealogy, history, travel videos, and traditions. This gives our board a wide range of activities in which to plan for the coming year. I must say, that we have truly dedicated members who come to our meetings. It makes me happy to know that while we may not always agree on everything, we work things out with their help. They are the ones who keep DANK going. Working together as a team! Spring is my favorite time of the year, and at the first warm days and the sidewalks are clear of snow/ ice, you will find me putting on my ‘sneakers’ and going to my favorite walking space – the cemetery! I enjoy being alive, and can enjoy nature coming alive and the chattering of birds that breaks the silence. The sun is shining and I’m ready to go. Remember to take time and enjoy this wonderful world around you. Happy Easter! Margaret Potocki, Chapter President

DANK Chapter Listing ARIZONA Phoenix IOWA Quad Cities ILLINOIS Chicago Chicago South Chicago West Fox Valley Lake County Northern Suburbs Peoria Springfield INDIANA Indianapolis LaFayette South Bend MICHIGAN Benton Harbor Great Lakes Bay Region OHIO Cleveland PENNSYLVANIA Erie Philadelphia Pittsburgh Uniontown WASHINGTON DC Washington DC WISCONSIN Milwaukee www.dank.org


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Great Lake Bay Region Celebrates with Fasching Party Although Lent has already begun a few days earlier and the north winds were still howling outside, a near capacity crowd of revelers celebrated Fasching on March 8, 2014 at the Atrium Restaurant and Stein Haus in downtown Bay City, MI. Following a sumptuous buffet, including many “hausmade” specialty items prepared by “Inhaberin” Elaine Fournier and her dedicated kitchen staff, the party-goers were treated to an evening of authentic German music provided by the 14-piece band ‘The German Connection’. The servers were kept busy filling glasses during the festivities, and as the evening wore on the happy celebrants often supplemented the music with rousing choral accompaniments. A 50/50 drawing was held midway through the eve-

ning, and not only did a guest leave very satisfied and wealthier, but DANK chapter#78 was able to add appreciably to its bank account. As the final “Prosits” were sung at the end of the evening and last calls were made by the beertenders, many conversations turned to the hopes of an early Spring with its balmy weather and the anticipation of getting together soon for Ostern and Maifest events. “Das Leben ist Gut – The Life is Good” for members, families and friends of the Great Lakes Bay Region DANK Chapter 78. •

Easter Fountains at German American Heritage Center Davenport, IA Spring into the Season by learning about German Easter traditions! Kathi Hofmann will be presenting on Easter Fountains, or Osterbrunnen, and other German traditions at the German American Heritage Center on Sunday, April 13th at 2 p.m. Join us for this fun sea-

sonal treat! Admission to GAHC is $5 Adults, $4 Seniors, $3 Kids 5-17 and free for members! GAHC is located at 712 W 2nd St. Davenport, IA. For more information call 563322-8844 or email kelly.lao@gahc.org. •


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Willkommen

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A Little Bit of Germany in West Bend, WI

Man born behind the Iron Curtain meets American foreign exchange student; home and happiness ensue By David Frank Daily News In a community that boasts of its German heritage, few homes in West Bend, WI can claim the Germanic influence the four-bedroom ranch house of Terri and Jörg Kramer, 912 Hillcrest St. Jörg (pronounced York) was born in West Berlin surrounded by East Germany in the decades of the Iron Curtain. He met his wife, Bender Terri, when she was a high school exchange student in Berlin when she attended a ballroom dance class in 1971. They married in 1978 and spent five years in West Berlin when Terri Kramer decided she wanted to raise ABOVE: The beginning verses from Martin Luther’s hymn “A Mighty Fortress her family in her home town. is our Lord” is written in German across the garage of Jörg and Terri Kramer Living in a big city was fine, she said, in West Bend, WI. but “I wanted to have a yard like I had in West Bend and let the kids out to play. It was a trial move and here we are.” Jörg grew up in Berlin which is in Prussia, northern “It was a two-year contract, so to speak,” Jörg Kramer Germany. said as he laughed. “It must have been extended every The four-bedroom home was built by Jim and Muriel year. I’m still waiting for the meeting to decide.” Wondergem, she said. “Our living room was the start Their 1,716-square-foot home was built in 1968. of the local Hope (Community) Reformed Church. Jim While it has quintessential American ranch-style ap- and Muriel Wondergem are charter members of the pearance, there is no doubt the Kramers brought a congregation. They used our living room for about a touch of Germany styling back with them. year before they had a church.” The front of the house sports a German crest and the Hope Community is now at 500 Lenora Drive, West phrase, “Ein' feste Burg ist unser Gott, Ein gute Wehr Bend WI. und Waffen” (“A mighty fortress is our God, a good We moved here in 1981 Terri Kramer said after living shield and weapon”) the first lines from Martin Luther’s in two different West Bend homes. most famous hymn. The Kramers extended the backyard deck and added “People come up all the time and say, “I have to ask a bay window in the family room, Terri Kramer said. you what it means,’” Jörg Kramer said. “We have an apple tree, a pear tree and a nice garden The home has a Bavarian chalet vibe, which is a big or – out under the snow.” misnomer, his wife said. Continued on page 36


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DANK Executive Office Update by Eve Timmerhaus

This year is a big year for commemorating historical events in Europe. It has been 100 years since the start of World War I, 75 years since the outbreak of World War II and 25 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall. Here at DANK we also have some milestones to recognize. This year DANK turns 55! DANK Chapter Benton Harbor reaches an impressive 50th anniversary. Details on celebrations for their Golden Anniversary will come in a future edition of the Journal.

Dues reminders have been mailed to all unpaid members. If you haven’t already done so, please pay today to keep your dues current. It’s raffle time once again and we hope you will help to make it a success! The raffle is a great fundraiser for DANK National. Raffle tickets are $5 each, or $20 for five. To all our members we would like to wish you a Happy Easter and a Happy Mother’s Day.

Happy Easter Welcome our newest Life Members Erwin Lickmann Elizabeth Obert Christina Schuschel Kris Jarantoski Exchange Rates

1 USD = 0.72 EURO 1 EURO = 1.38 USD

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Indignity for German-Americans By Thomas E Reimer

The December 2013-January 2014 issue of the Ger- May 8, 1889, at Bedford Michigan. He was born at German-American Journal included a fascinating article many in 1865, and now resides with me. on the film, Children of Internment. My German famAt the end of the application, Minnie was required to ily endured indignities, albeit less harsh, during the sign the following oath of allegiance. Second World War even after being in America for deI hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and encades or born in the United States. tirely renounce and abjure all allegiances and fidelity My grandmother, Johanna Christiane Maria Albrecht, to any foreign prince, potentate, state or sovereignty was born in Woltow, Germany, in 1870. At the age of of whom which I have heretofore been a subject or twelve, Anna emigrated to America with her parents citizen; that I will support and defend the Constituand six siblings. Anna was the youngest. The family tion and laws of the United States of America against settled in Michigan, just north of Battle Creek. all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true August Albrecht was Anna’s only brother. Seven years faith and allegiance to the same and that I take this after arriving in the United States obligation freely without any August married Wilhelmine Stmental reservation or purpose of I hereby declare, on oath, evasion; SO HELP ME GOD. In acrevens. Minnie, as she was known, was born in Michigan. Soon after that I absolutely and entirely knowledgement whereof I have their marriage the couple purhereunto affixed my signature. renounce and abjure all alchased a farm. They acquired adAugust and Minnie celebrated legiances and fidelity to any their fiftieth wedding anniversaditional acreage as their family grew. They had nine children. All ry on May 8, 1939. Minnie passed foreign prince, potentate, prospered. Their sons, Harry and state or sovereignty of whom away on April 6, 1942, seven Orville, served in the military durmonths after she signed her apwhich I have heretofore ing the Second World War. plication and took the oath of alAs war raged in Europe, Amerilegiance. been a subject or citizen... cans became suspicious of immiAugust’s youngest sister, Anna grants. On June 28, 1940 the U.S. Albrecht Reimer (my grandmothCongressed passed the Alien Registration Act. Like all er), married American born William Carl Reimer (my foreign born, August Albrecht was required to register grandfather). As far as I know, Anna was not required at the post office and be finger printed. He was issued to register or take an oath. They moved to Chicago two an Alien Registration Card which he was required to days after their wedding in Michigan on May 29, 1890. carry with him at all times. The purchased property included a two flat apartment August endured the indignity even though he had building in the predominantly German neighborhood been in America fifty-right years and had nine chil- of North Center As a child I lived with their son (my dren, all born in America. Minnie, August’s wife was father() and mother on the first floor. My grandparents born in the United States. Even as a natural citizen, lived upstairs. I was eight when the war ended. Minnie was required to submit an “Application to Take My grandmother spoke German but switched to Oath of Allegiance to the United Stated Under the Act English in my presence. I am unaware of any difficulof June 25, 1936, as Amended.” ties they had because my grandmother was a German Minnie submitted the following statement: immigrant. My full, true and correct name is Minnie Albrecht. My August Albrecht passed away on September 30, occupation is housewife. I am 72 years old. I was born 1952, at the age of 87. August was seventeen when he on May 16, 1869, in Bedford, Michigan, U.S. My person- arrived in American. He lived in the United States for al description is female, white, fair complexion, blue seventy years. • eyes, brown hair, height, 5 feet 5 inches, 170 pounds. I am married to August Albrecht. We were married on


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Easter in Germany Customs and Traditions by Francine McKenna, Staff Columnist

Colored eggs and rabbits play a large part in an Ostern in Deutschland, Easter in Germany, but together with many other religious, secular and folk traditions and customs, while Good Friday and Easter Monday, originally 'free days' for workers so they could attend church services, are public holidays throughout the country. Palm Sunday, Palmsonntag, the Sunday before Easter, is a time for many young people to take their first communion, and combined with this it is often a scene of church parades in towns and villages, symbolizing the journey made by Jesus riding a donkey along palm branch covered roads to Jerusalem. A poignant sight. Processions led by priests and choirs, young and old, fit pushing the infirm in wheelchairs, families, children in baby carriages and pushchairs, and babes in arms, singing and carrying Palmbuschen, decorated pussy-willow bouquets in lieu of the difficult to find palms, to be blessed during the morning church service. The blessing was believed to give Palm Bouquets protective qualities and, as well as being a sign of protection for the home and family until Ash Wednesday of the following year, they are used to begin the Easter decorations in the home. The following Thursday is Maundy Thursday, Gruendonnerstag Green Thursday, celebrated since the 13th century and originally with no connection to green but stemming from an old German word, greinen

to groan, mourn or weep, as it commemorated the Last Supper and the betrayal by Judas. However over time this association was lost, and replaced by 'green' as the color of hope and a symbol for the awaking of nature after the winter. Homes are cleaned and decorated with green branches or ornaments, while green food, green vegetables: spinach, beans, leeks with chives and other herbs, make up the meals of the day. Popular ones are Gruene Bohnensuppe, Green Bean Soup, and Sieben Kraeuter Suppe, Seven Herb Soup, because of a custom based on an old superstition that green foods eaten on Gruendonnerstag give protection for the rest of the year. Good Friday, Karfreitag from kara meaning 'care' so 'Caring Friday'. The week after Palm Sunday used to be known as 'Karwoche', Caring Week, with Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday dedicated to an account from the bible, but now only the Friday is marked by a special liturgy, as a day of remembrance for the crucifixion, with church services and religious processions. Including the Kreuzwegandacht, a walk in prayer along the 15 Stations of the Cross, which is usually held at 3 p.m. when it is said Jesus died on the cross. No church bells are rung

and children are told they have flown to Rome to be blessed, while in France and Belgium this story goes further so young children believe it is the church bells, Easter bells, that drop their Easter goodies wherever while they are flying back from Rome. Usually fish is eaten on 'Good Friday', anything from herring salad or fish soup to an extravagant fish terrine, and in many areas the bakers mark the crust of the day's bread with a cross. Although its four sections could also have represented the quarters of the moon honoring the preChristian 'Eostre', the goddess of spring, which later become 'Easter'


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and a religious festival controlled by the lunar calendar. Easter Bonfires, 'Osterfeuer', a custom which takes place on Saturday, or in some regions on Easter Sunday or Monday, are based on a Christian belief that fire is a sign of the resurrection of Christ. However the tradition dates back to at least the 16th century, again probably to pre-Christian days, and the families, friends and neighbors who gather around bonfires, which are made mainly from old Christmas trees, are not all Christians but there to have 'fun', the tradition and the light and warmth of fire symbolizing the end of winter and arrival of spring. Huge flaming wood and straw wheels, 'Osterraeder', are an alternative way of marking Easter and winter's end in parts of North Rhine Westphalian, just as they were used to represent the sun 2,000 years ago. It is a spectacular sight as they roll down hills leaving behind hundreds of meters of burning tracks, and if the wheel makes it to the bottom of the hill that is a sign the next harvest will be successful.

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Ostersonntag, Easter Sunday, is a day of celebration for the triumph of life over death, when the Easter rabbit or hare brings colored and chocolate eggs, hiding them or leaving them in nests already prepared by children. This odd combination of rabbit, eggs and a Christian Festival began in the Middle Ages, when rents due from tenant farmers must be paid on the Thursday before Easter and, as they had not been eaten during Lent, Medieval landlords were paid in eggs which had been cooked to preserve them, as well as with hares caught on their property. Nevertheless it was not until the mid 20th century that the rabbit as 'egg bringer' finally won out over the foxes, storks and cranes that up until then had shared the tradition. And with all those cooked eggs around Frankfurter Gruene Sosse mit Eiern, Eggs with Frankfurter Green Sauce, using herbs left from Green Thursday, is often added to the Easter Sunday end of Lent meal. Ostermontag, Easter Monday in Germany, is the final day of the Easter celebrations and a public holiday. A family day when often the entire extended family meets

for lunch, which once was lamb but this tradition is no longer as strong as it was, followed by egg rolling competitions or visits to the countryside and sports events or festivals. Many towns hold special festivals and processions and one of these is Traunstein in Bavaria, where Joseph Ratzinger, the former Pope Benedikt XVI, lived when young. There the famous St. George Parade, a horse mounted pilgrimage in traditional dress, accompanied by brass bands, with the riders in armor and maidens in medieval costumes, takes place. The climax of the parade is a blessing made upon a gathering of almost 500 horses from the neighborhood, of various shapes, sizes, ages and types, none of whom are outshone by St. George's pure white steed. It is the last day of Easter celebrations, but not the end of Eastertide which is Whitsun, Pfingsten, and in Germany many of the trees, branches, wells and fountains decorated with colored eggs, together with greenery remaining from Palm Sunday, stay in place for fifty days until the end of the celebrations for Pfingsten and Pfingstenmontag. • Frohe Ostern! - Happy Easter


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Meine Mutter Von allen Müttern auf der Welt ist keine, die mir so gefällt wie meine Mutter, wenn sie lacht, und wenn sie mir die Tür' aufmacht. Auch wenn sie aus dem Fenster winkt und mit mir rodelt, mit mir singt wenn sie auf meinem Bettrand sitzt, solang' es donnert oder blitzt, und wenn sie sich mit mir versöhnt, und wenn ich krank bin mich verwöhnt ja, was sie überhaupt auch tut, ich mag sie immer, bin ihr gut. Und hin und wieder wundert's mich, dass wir uns fanden - sie und ich. Rosemarie Neie

Photo credit: Elizabeth Gibson


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Der Mai ist gekommen Der Mai ist gekommen, die Bäume schlagen aus. Da bleibe, wer Lust hat, mit Sorgen zu Haus. Wie die Wolken wandern am himmlischen Zelt, So steht auch mir der Sinn in die weite, weite Welt. Herr Vater, Frau Mutter, daß Gott euch behüt'! Wer weiß, wo in der Ferne mein Glück mir noch blüht. Es gibt so manche Straße, da nimmer ich marschiert; Es gibt so manchen Wein, den ich nimmer noch probiert. Frisch auf drum, frisch auf im hellen Sonnenstrahl, Wohl über die Berge, wohl durch das tiefe Tal! Die Quellen erklingen, die Bäume rauschen all Mein Herz ist wie'ne Lerche und stimmet ein mit Schall. Und abends im Städtchen, da kehr ich durstig ein: Herr Wirt, mein Herr Wirt, eine Kanne blanken Wein! Ergreife die Fiedel, du lustiger Spielmann du, von meinem Schatz das Liedel das sing ich dazu. Und find ich keine Herberg', so lieg' ich zur Nacht wohl unter blauem Himmel, die Sterne halten Wacht. Im Winde die Linde, die rauscht mich ein gemach, es küsset in der Früh' das Morgenrot mich wach. O Wandern, o Wandern, Du freie Burschenlust! Da wehet Gottes Odem so frisch in die Brust; Da singet und jauchzet das Herz zum Himmelszelt: Wie bist du doch so schön, o du weite, weite Welt! Text: Emanuel Geibel 1841 - (1815–1884) Photo credit: Elizabeth Gibson


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Kurznachrichten

Ältere Wähler beeinflussen immer stärker den Wahlausgang

Wahlberechtigte ab 60 Jahren stellten bei der Bundestagswahl 2013 bereits gut ein Drittel aller potentiellen Wähler. Gleichzeitig war die Wahlbeteiligung dieser Altersgruppe vergleichsweise überdurchschnittlich. Angesichts der demografischen Entwicklung „beeinflussen damit ältere Wähler immer stärker den Wahlausgang“, unterstrich Bundeswahlleiter Roderich Egeler heute auf einer Pressekonferenz in Berlin zu den Ergebnissen der repräsentativen Wahlstatistik zur Wahl des 18. Deutschen Bundestages am

22. September 2013. Bei der Bundestagswahl 2013 waren insgesamt 61,9 Millionen Bürgerinnen und Bürger wahlberechtigt, davon war knapp die Hälfte im Alter von 30 bis 59 Jahren. Die Generation ab 60 Jahren stellte mit 21,3 Millionen mehr als doppelt so viele wie die jüngere Generation unter 30 Jahren, die mit 9,8 Millionen knapp ein Sechstel aller Wahlberechtigten ausmachte. Mit 71,5 % war die amtliche Wahlbeteiligung um 0,7 Prozentpunkte höher als bei der Wahl 2009. Wie schon bei früheren Bundestagswahlen hatten die jüngeren Altersgruppen auch 2013 wieder eine unterdurchschnittliche Wahlbeteiligung. Am geringsten war sie mit 60,3 % bei den 21- bis 24-Jährigen. Mit steigendem Alter nahm die Wahlbeteiligung bis zu den 60- bis 69-Jährigen kontinuierlich zu: diese Altersgruppe beteiligte sich mit 79,8 % am aktivsten an der Bundestagswahl 2013. Bei den über 70-Jährigen, die sich früher unterdurchschnittlich beteiligt hatte, war erstmals bei der Bundestagswahl 2009 eine überdurchschnittliche Wahlbeteiligung registriert worden. Dieser Trend setzte sich auch 2013 fort. •

Giraffenjunges im Leipziger Zoo heißt Jamal Der am 18. Januar geborene kleine Giraffenbulle aus dem Leipziger Zoo heißt Jamal. Der Name sei afrikanisch und bedeute „Der Schöne“, teilte der Zoo am Freitag mit. Vor allem in den Regionen, in denen Suaheli gesprochen wird, sei Jamal ein weit verbreiteter männlicher Vorname. Eine Jury hatte den Namen für den Nachwuchs von Mutter Gusti und Vater Max aus rund 1000 Vorschlägen ausgewählt. Jamal entwickle sich prächtig und erkunde täglich seine Umgebung, sagte Zoo-Prokurist Rasem Baban. •

Augen, Ohren, Mund. Aug’ und Ohren sind die Fenster, und der Mund die Tür’ ins Haus! Werden diese wohl verwahret, geht nichts Böses ein und aus. - Friedrich von Logau


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Kurznachrichten

Angehörige aus 190 Staaten leben in Deutschland

Laut Ausländerzentralregister (AZR) lebten zum 31.12.2012 Personen aus 190 verschiedenen Staaten in Deutschland. Wie das Statistische Bundesamt (Destatis) weiterhin mitteilte, gab es mit Timor-Leste, Palau, Mikronesien und den Marshallinseln nur vier diplomatisch anerkannte Staaten, aus denen keine Staatsangehörigen im AZRregistriert waren. Von den 7,2 Millionen im AZR registrierten Ausländern hatten mit 1,6 Millionen die meisten einen türkischen Pass, gefolgt von polnischen (532 000) und italienischen (529 000) Staatsangehörigen. Dahingegen war nur eine Person mit nauruischer Staatsangehörigkeit im AZR registriert, aus Vatikanstadt und von den Salomonen hielten sich 2012 immerhin zwei Personen in Deutschland auf. •

Trauer um Maximilian Schell

Der Schauspieler Maximilian Schell ist im Alter von 83 Jahren gestorben. Nach Angaben seiner Agentin starb er in der Nacht zu 3. Februar 2014 in einem Krankenhaus in Innsbruck. Schell spielte an zahlreichen renommierten Theatern in der ganzen Welt. In Deutschland hatte der österreichisch-schweizerische Darsteller Engagements in Essen, Bonn, München und Berlin. Unter Gustaf Gründgens trat er am Deutschen Schauspielhaus in Hamburg auf. Für seine Rolle in „Das Urteil von Nürnberg“ bekam er 1962 den Oscar und war damit der erste deutschsprachige Gewinner nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg. •

EU will Raucher mit Fotos auf Zigarettenschachteln schocken Verfaulte Zähne, Krebsgeschwüre und Raucherlunge - an den Anblick solcher Schockfotos müssen sich Raucher in der EU schon bald gewöhnen. Mit Horrorbildern auf Zigarettenschachteln will die EU die Europäer vom Rauchen abhalten. Das EU-Parlament stimmte mit großer Mehrheit für strengere Vorschriften, die ab 2016 gelten sollen. Die Warnhinweise auf den Verpackungen werden deutlich größer und müssen künftig 65 Prozent der Vorder- und Rückseiten der Schachteln bedecken - das ist fast doppelt so viel wie bisher. •

Erneut mehr als 2600 Gewalttaten in Zügen Die Bundespolizei hat im vergangenen Jahr erneut fast als 2700 Gewalttaten in Zügen erfasst. Registriert wurden etwa 2500 Körperverletzungen und knapp 180 Raubdelikte, wie das Bundesinnenministerium auf eine Kleine Anfrage der Linksfraktion antwortete. Mit insgesamt 2683 Delikten lag die Gesamtzahl damit auf dem Niveau des Jahres 2012, als 2641 Fälle gezählt wurden. Genauer aufgeschlüsselt wurden diese Straftaten nicht. Im Jahr 2012 lag die Aufklärungsquote demnach bei 75 Prozent. •


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Bremen and Bremerhaven: the city, the countryside and the sea Bremen: a regional capital and trading city with a long-standing maritime heritage. Bremerhaven: 1,000 years Bremen's junior but still steeped in history and with many tales to tell. These two cities together form Germany's smallest federal state – a world of experiences that is cosmopolitan, welcoming and full of pleasures, open to the new and respectful of the old. Bremen's history goes back more than 1,200 years and is perfectly encapsulated by the baroque and Renaissance ensemble on the market square, home to the UNESCO World Heritage Town Hall and Roland statue, patrician town houses and the Schütting, Bremen's historical guildhall. Sightseers won't even need a map to find their way around. Two thousand nails made of brass and steel guide visitors from the courtyard of the Church of our Lady via the market square to Böttcherstrasse. Once a tradesmen's alley, this narrow lane is now a centre for art and culture, and a jewel in the crown of European cultural history. The people here appreciate the finer things in life – internationally renowned coffee, chocolate of the highest quality, rare spices, tasty fish specialities and, of course, worldclass beers. These can all be found in the city's charming shops, where time seems to have stood still, or in more than 1,000 cafés, restaurants, bistros and bars. Just

60 kilometres downstream lies B re m e r h ave n , first established in 1827. From its port, millions of emigrants stole their last glance at Europe before going in search of a better life in America. Many found it, others failed. The German Emigration Centre® recounts their fates in fascinating multimedia exhibits that bring their great adventures back to life. By contrast, the Harbour Worlds complex is rooted firmly in the present day. Here you will find ATLANTIC Hotel SAIL City with its bold curved design, Klimahaus® Bremerhaven 8° Ost and the German Maritime Museum – three absolute must-sees. Not far from the Maritime Museum is a fountain featuring a small gnome-like character known as the Klabautermann (water sprite). According to folklore this barely two-foot tall imp is the spirit of someone who died and whose soul took up residence in a tree. Should this tree become a mast of a ship, the spirit will transform into a Klabautermann, a welcome figure – in spite of all his bad moods and terrible jokes – because he watches over the ship and its crew. A charming legend – and a classic example of Bremerhaven's maritime heritage. You can find out about life at sea, and about the past, present and future of the entire region at the cen-


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trally located History Museum, whose bold, visionary architecture is a standout feature of one of the prettiest and most tranquil parts of this port city. Back in Bremen, another unusual exhibition building is the Weserburg, Bremen's museum of modern art. It is housed in four converted warehouses in the middle of the river and enjoys international acclaim as one of Germany's biggest contemporary art galleries and Europe's first collectors' museum. Staying by the water, the very modern Schlachte is Bremen's newly regenerated promenade alongside the Weser. There's always

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a great buzz here in the delightful beer gardens and outdoor eating areas – and all with beautiful riverside views, of course. If you find yourself heading back towards the nearby market square from here, don't forget to pay your respects to the Bremen Town Musicians, the world-famous characters from the Brothers Grimm fairytale. Touching the donkey's legs is said to bring good luck, but remember to use both hands. As far as the locals are concerned, using only one hand is simply a case of two donkeys shaking hands. And no visitor to Bremen deserves that! •


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Aus Oma's Küche Osterkranz (Easter Wreath) Recipe This sweet bread adorned with decorated eggs is a popular Easter treat across much of Germany. Maybe this braided yeast dough treat will become a tradition in your home. Ingredients: 4 cups flour 2 packets of active dry yeast 1/2 cup of butter 1/2 cup of sugar plus 1 tsp. 1/2 tsp. salt 1 cup buttermilk 2 egg yolks 2 beaten egg whites additional dyed eggs for decoration, if desired sanding sugar or sliced almonds for decoration, if desired Preparation: In a large bowl, mix 1 cup of the flour with the sugar, and sprinkle the salt along the edge of the bowl. Make an indention in the middle and add the yeast, a teaspoon of sugar and ¼ cup of lukewarm buttermilk; mix well and let sit until yeast is active. Combine the remaining ¾ cup of buttermilk and butter in a small saucepan and heat gently until the milk is lukewarm and the butter is softened but not melted. Mix the yeast mixture into the flour. Gradually add the milk and butter mixture to the flour mixture, stir-

Asparagus

ring constantly. Add the egg yolks and ½ cup of the flour and beat well. Continue adding the flour ½ cup at a time, mixing well after each addition. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic, approximately 8 minutes. (These steps may also be done with a mixer fitted with a dough hook.) If the dough seems too thin to braid, knead a bit more flour into it. Cover the dough with a kitchen towel and let it rise in a warm place until doubled in volume. Punch the dough to deflate it and turn it out onto a lightly floured surface and knead once again. Divide the dough into 3 parts and roll into long ropes (about 20 inches long). Lay the dough ropes on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and braid the ropes together. The braid may be left as is or formed into a wreath shape. Press the ends to help them stick together. For an extra special wreath, a smaller wreath may be made and placed on top of the larger wreath. Alternatively, smaller wreaths, called bird’s nests, can also be formed. Cover loosely with a damp towel and let the dough rise until doubled in volume. Brush the braid or wreath with the egg whites and sprinkle with sanding sugar or sliced almonds for decoration, if desired. Bake in a preheated 350° oven until golden brown. Cool on a wire rack and wrap well in aluminum foil until ready to be eaten. Dyed eggs may be placed in the middle of the wreath. Frohe Ostern! Happy Easter!

In 2013, asparagus was again the vegetable accounting for the most cultivated acreage in Germany. The most popular vegetable in Germany also accounted for the most cultivated acreage in 2013, namely around 24,100 hectares, 1% up on the prior year. As the German Federal Statistical Office stated, this accounts for more than 20 per cent of the total outdoor farmed acreage for vegetables. The volume of asparagus harvested in 2013 exceeded 103,000 tons. Following asparagus, carrots place second in the German cultivated acreage rankings, requiring a total of 10,200 hectares, with onions next at 9,700 hectares, cabbage at around 5,800 hectares and cauliflower, which accounts for more than 4,200 hectares. • Source: destatis.de


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Calendar of Events April 2 Milwaukee, WI. Board meeting at 5:30 pm. Singing at 7:30 pm. 4 Benton Harbor, MI. All you can eat Montly Fish Fry. Doors open at 5:30pm. Food served at 6:00 pm. $9 per adult, $4 per child. (ages 2-12). 2651 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI. 5 Benton Harbor, MI. Spring Dance. Doors will be open from 6 - 11 PM. Music by Eddie Korusa & The Boys. 2651 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI.

16 Milwaukee, WI. Singing 7:00 pm. 16 Chicago, IL. Kulturkueche – Linsensuppe. Chef Mike from Borderline will instruct in the traditional Eintopf, one-dish meal, accompanied by warm sourdough bread. There are plenty of hands-on and tasting opportunities for students. Tickets: $16 - includes demonstration, recipes, one drink and tasting. www. brownpapertickets.com/event/600860 23 Milwaukee, WI. Dancing 6:00 pm. Singing 7:00 pm. 30 Milwaukee, WI. Singing 7:00 pm.

5 Chicago, IL. Kino Kaffee und Kuchen, 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave., Chicago, IL.

May

5 Chicago, IL. Visit the "Lost German Chicago exhibit. Museum open Saturdays 11:00 am to 3:00 pm or by appointment. Free and open to the public. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave, Chicago IL (773-561-9181)

2 Benton Harbor, MI. All you can eat Montly Fish Fry. Doors open at 5:30om. Food served at 6:00 pm. $9 per adult, $4 per child. (ages 2-12). 2651 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI.

9 Milwaukee, WI. Dancing 6:00 pm. Singing 7:00.

3 Chicago, IL Kino Kaffee und Kuchen, 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave., Chicago, IL.

9 Erie, PA. Chapter Anniversary. 7:00 pm at the Erie Männerchor, 1607 State St., Eire, PA. 12 Chicago, IL Quarterly Membership Meeting. 11:00 am. 4740 N Western Ave., Chicago IL. Learn about German American cultural initiatives and programming. Engage in discussions with the board regarding the current state of affairs and contribute your ideas to improve how everyone experiences the DANK Haus. 4740 N Western Ave. Chicago IL. 773-561-9181 12 Chicago, IL. Kino Kaffee und Kuchen, 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave., Chicago, IL. 12 Chicago, IL. Visit the "Lost German Chicago" exhibit. Museum open Saturdays 11:00 am to 3:00 pm or by appointment. Free and open to the public. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave, Chicago IL (773-561-9181)

3 Chicago, IL. Visit the "Lost German Chicago" exhibit. Museum open Saturdays 11:00 am to 3:00 pm or by appointment. Free and open to the public. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave, Chicago IL (773-561-9181) 7 Milwaukee, WI. Singing 7:00 pm. 10 Menomonee Falls, WI. Maitanz at Schwabenhof. Music by Pieptone! For tickets contact Ron Kabitzke: 262-675-6336. 10 Frankfort, IL. May Dance. Music by The Phenix. German style beer tasting by local brewer: Horse Thief Hollow Brewing Company. Contact Anita at 708-6363074 for more information and tickets. DANK Chicago South, 25249 S Center Rd., Frankfort, IL Continued on page 34


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Letters From Our Readers

15 medals for Germany

Greetings, I just received the recent issue of the German-American Journal and was please to see my article on the Germanic Museum. The journal itself looks very good and I like the new format.

The XI Winter Paralympic Games in Sochi are over. With 13 athletes in the squad, the German team was very successful. It returned home with 15 medals, nine of them Gold. To conclude the Paralympics, Anna Schaffelhuber and Andrea Eskau once again improved the German team’s gold tally. In the giant slalom, mono-skier Schaffelhuber won her fifth Gold in her fifth race. Eskau took her second victory in the five kilometre cross-country race in the sitting category. Andrea Rothfuss was delighted with Silver in the giant slalom in the standing class. 13 athletes were competing for Germany in Sochi. With nine Gold, five Silver and one Bronze medals, the German team came second in the Medal Table behind Russia. Source: bundesregierung.de

Sincerely, Don Heinrich Tolzmann Please note that I/we find the DANK / German – American Journal very informative and pleasant to read. The format is in English with some articles in German. That is a good balance for both English and German reading audiences. Additionally, the various topics covered and articles presented are quite informative and of interest to read. Thus, it is certainly fair to say that the DANK Journal, in its current format, is a good publication. A thank you to all that work and contribute to its publication. Fritz Petzold / Chicago

On the cover: Schloß Mespelbrunn began as a simple house built on the water by an early 15th century knight. Located within the Spessart forest between Frankfurt and Würzburg, this is a medieval moated castle may lack the gingerbread look of other German castles, but its simple beauty makes it one of the most visited water castles in Germany.

Neuschwanstein very popular 1.52 million people visited Neuschwanstein Castle in 2013 – 100,000 guests more than the prior year. In other words, for the first time visitor figures topped the 1.5 million mark. Above all tourists from China and Russia are almost magically attracted to Neuschwanstein, as was disclosed at a press conference on the plans of Bavaria’s Castle Administration Dept. The castle’s appeal was evaluated on the basis of the number of guided tours in the respective languages; Neuschwanstein Castle can only be visited by guided tour. The proportion of tourists who were Chinese speakers thus came to 13.5 per cent, while 8.3 per cent attended guided tours in Russian. The number of English-speaking visitors amounted to 27.2 percent, which is more than that of German speakers (23.7 per cent). All in all, the various castles in Bavaria last year attracted around 4.9 million visitors. Source: schloesser.bayern.de

Indeed, it has been described as one of the loveliest castles in Europe. This northern Bavaria castle is privately owned, but the family opens its doors to tourists throughout the year. Taking a walk on the paths throughout the castle grounds is highly recommended by past visitors. – For more information: www.schloss-mespelbrunn.de


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Die 3 bekanntesten Osterbräuche in Deutschland

Heidnische und christliche Riten zeigen sich noch heute in Osterbräuchen In deutschen Osterbräuchen verfestigen sich Gedenk -tage an Fruchtbarkeitsgötter der alten Germanen. Nach Christi Geburt war Ostern Sinnbild für das Leben schlechthin. Viele heidnische oder aus den Anfängen des Christentums stammende Osterbräuche haben sich bis heute erhalten.

Ostereier Schon in der frühen Kulturgeschichte war das Ei Symbol für die Entstehung des Universums, Sinnbild des Lebens und der Auferstehung. In vielen Kulturen was auch üblich, den Toten ein Ei als Grabbeigabe mitzugeben. Verschiedene mystische Deutungen sind möglich. Einmal hält das Ei etwas verschlossen wie ein Grab, zum anderen kommt aus einer scheinbar toten Hülle etwas Lebendiges hervor. Auch die Form des Eis ohne Anfang und Ende kann in Hinblick auf die Ewigkeit gedeutet werden. Im Mittelalter hatte das Ei große Bedeutung als Maßeinheit für Pacht und Zinszahlungen. In der Fastenzeit schließlich durfte bis zum Osterfest kein Ei verzehrt werden. Seit über 1000 Jahren werden in Ägypten Eier farbig bemalt. Bei uns ist diese Tradition seit dem 13. Jahrhundert bekannt. Die am häufigsten verwendete Farbe ist Rot, als Sinnbild des Blutes Christi und als Sieg des Lebens über den Tod.

Das Osterfeuer Diese Tradition geht weit in die vorchristliche Zeit zurück. In heidnischen Zeiten wurde die Sonne mit Frühlingsfeuern begrüßt, denn sie war der Mittelpunkt allen Lebens. Im achten Jahrhundert übertrug man die heidnische Bedeutung des Frühlingsfeuers auf das Christentum. Fortan wurden Osterfeuer als Symbol für das Ende des Winters, die Auferstehung von Jesus und als Licht in der Finsternis verehrt. Noch heute ist das Anzünden des Osterfeuers vielen Christen enorm wichtig und mit dem Entzünden einer Osterkerze eng verbunden. Der Osterhase Der Osterhasenbrauch entstand erst vor 300 Jahren uns ist damit die jüngste Ostertradition. Damals erwähnte ein Heidelberger Arzt erstmals diesen Brauch, der offenbar aus dem Elsass und der Pfalz stammte. Über die genaue Herkunft kursieren die unterschiedlichsten Gerüchte. Sehr wahrscheinlich ist die Version, in der in protestantisch geprägten Städten ab dem 18. Jahrhundert Kindern erzählt wurde, der Osterhase würde Eier färben und verstecken. In katholischen Gemeinden war es üblich, gefärbte Ostereier zu weihen. Die einstige religiöse Bedeutung machte einem romantisch verklärten, bürgerlichen Festtagsbrauch Platz, in dem der Osterhase eine wichtige Rolle übernahm. •


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Odds & Ends Prost! Beer town turns 900 The small town of Aufseβ in Bavaria is celebrating its 900th birthday this year, marking the occasion with a parade, exhibitions and tours of the region. The town, located in the Franconian Schweiz region, is home to only 1,400 residents, but holds the world record for the greatest brewery density and may also have the oldest brewery in Franconia. The brewery Klosterbrauerei Weissenohe was built with the establishment of the Benedictine monastery in 1050 AD, and is often described as the oldest brewery in the world. In 2001, the Guiness Book of World Records listed Aufseß, which has a brewery for every 350 people, as the town with the greatest brewery density. The town proudly acknowledges its world record, offering hiking tours along a 13 km trail that brings visitors to each of its four breweries to do some sampling.

Although the town's history dates back to the year 1007, Castle Aufseß was erected exactly 900 years ago in 1114. The name (formerly Ufsaze) comes from "sitting on the rock" and describes the location of the castle. For more information, please visit: www.aufsess.de

The Cold War Isn’t Over The barbed wire, electric fences, watchtowers, and heavily-armed guards that once lined the Iron Curtain were dismantled a quarter-century ago the but red deer will not cross the border. Behavior learned at the height of the Cold War continues in the herds that roam land that used to straddle the former Czechoslovakia and West Germany. The former guarded borders separating East from West today serve as popular summertime migratory destinations for the deer. Germany's Bavarian Forest National Park and the Czech Republic's Sumava National Park established a trans boundary wilderness area where animals like the red deer could find refuge. But as it turns out, the deer populations on either side of the former Iron Curtain roam along the border and remain reluctant to cross. Using GPS satellite collars, Czech zoologists, in cooperation with their German colleagues, monitored the migration patterns of red deer on either side of the border between 2005 and 2011. Researchers have found that the migratory patterns of the approximately 1,800 deer that live in Sumava have varied little from those followed by the herds de-

cades ago. "It's going to absolutely the same place in the following years," Pavel Sustr, head of the Czech research team, says. "And because of this traditional behavior, they are still somehow respecting the former Iron [Curtain]." "More animals in the last year are crossing [the border], but the trend, or the change, is quite slow because of the traditional behavior of the deer," Sustr says. "The young deer [during its] first year follows its mother [and] the mother is teaching [it] the area. So, more or less, the behavior of the mother [determines] the area which is used by the deer in later years." •


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Odds & Ends The Official 2014 Oktoberfest Poster has been revealed Since 1952, the selection of the official Oktoberfest poster is made by a jury, which chooses among invited candidates. The 11 participants usually come from art and design schools or have won some prize or award before to qualify for a starting place in the Oktoberfest poster competition. The jury chooses their favorite, without knowing who designed which poster. Christa Bichlmeier created this year's official poster design and not only gets 2500€ but also the honor of getting to see her design on approximately 10.000 posters and about 100.000 brochures, published in German, English and Italian language. •

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Pay gap between men and women

Compared with the previous years, the pay gap between women and men remained unchanged in 2013. As the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) reports women continued to be 22% lower than those of men. Women in Germany make an average of 15.56 euros ($21.67) per hour compared to 19.84 euros ($27.63) for men. •

Beer sales in 2013 down 2.0%

The beer producing and storing establishments in Germany sold 94.6 million hectoliters of beer in 2013. That was a decrease of 1.9 million hectoliters (–2.0%) from the previous year. •

Bavarian pretzel given EU protected origin status The Bavarian pretzel has joined champagne, Parma ham and Cornish pasties on the EU's protected origins list, which means only pretzels produced in the southern German state can be sold as Bayerische breze, or Bavarian pretzel. In a statement the EU commission said these are "characterized by a doughy taste, combined with a short, crisp crack and a soft, fluffy texture". It said the protected geographical indication status applied to the "typical Bavarian lye pastry whose shape symbolizes arms folded in prayer", be it "topped with coarse salt, cheese or poppy, sesame, pumpkin or sunflower seeds".

Products made and sold outside the EU, such as Bavarian pretzels in the US, are not affected by the decision. •


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Odds and Ends

Vienna Crowned City with Best Quality of Living

According to the Mercer 2014 Quality of Living Worldwide City rankings Vienna has the best quality of living globally. In Europe, it is followed by Zurich (2), Munich

(4), Düsseldorf (6), and Frankfurt (7). “European cities enjoy a high overall quality of living compared to those in other regions. Healthcare, infrastructure, and recreational facilities are generally of a very high standard. Political stability and relatively low crime levels enable expatriates to feel safe and secure in most locations. The region has seen few changes in living standards over the last year,” said Slagin Parakatil, Senior Researcher at Mercer. Mercer conducts its Quality of Living survey annually to help multinational companies and other employers compensate employees fairly when placing them on international assignments. Two common incentives include a quality-of-living allowance and a mobility premium. Mercer’s Quality of Living reports provide valuable information and hardship premium recommendations for over 460 cities throughout the world, the ranking covers 223 of these cities. •

Last of the Sound of Music Von Trapp Family Dies The last member of the singing and dancing von Trapp family that inspired the Sound of Music has died aged 99 at home in Vermont, America. The family fled their home of Salzburg in Austria when the Nazis arrived and ended up performing around America where this story eventually inspired the 1965 Rodgers and Hammerstein musical hit. Maria Franziska, who was the last of the seven brothers and sisters from the von Trapp family who was still alive, died in her sleep aged 99. Family friend Marianne Dorfer who runs the von Trapp Villa Hotel in Salzburg said: "It was a surprise that she was the one in the family to live the longest because

ever since she was a child she suffered from a weak heart. It was the fact that she suffered from this that her father decided to hire Maria von Trapp to teach her and her brothers and sisters. That of course then led to one of the most remarkable musical partnerships of the last century." Maria Franziska was born in 1914 in Zell am See which is in the province of Salzburg and in 1938 fled with her family. The Sound of Music which told the story of the musical family every year attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors to Salzburg even now, almost 50 years after it was made. •


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Odds and Ends Has Richard Wagner’s mythical Nibelung treasure been found? An amateur archaeologist equipped with a metal detector discovered a trove of gold and silver in a German forest dating back to late Roman times, fuelling speculation that it could be the legendary Nibelung treasure which inspired composer Richard Wagner’s operatic "Das Rheingold”, the first of four operas that constitute his epic work ”Der Ring des Nibelungen.” The haul from the Germany’s western state of Rhineland Palatinate, includes silver bowls, brooches and other jewelry, and could be worth as much as $1.36 million, archaeologists say. “In terms of timing and geography, the find fits in with the era of the Nibelung legend,” Axel von Berg, the state's chief archaeologist, said. “But we cannot say whether it actually belongs to the Nibelung treasure,” he said. The opulence of the artifacts suggested that they were owned by someone of wealth and standing, possibly a prince.

Archeology New Network stated according to Nieblung legend, the warrior Hagen killed the dragonslayer Siegfried and sank his treasure in the Rhine River. The Rhine has shifted its course many times over the centuries, so the treasurer may no longer be under water. The haul, which was found near Ruelzheim in the southern part of the state, is now at the state cultural department in Mainz, but officials suspect they may not have all of it. The unnamed treasure hunter who found the haul was promptly caught after trying to sell the rare items on the black market. Rather than carefully excavating the site, he had “completely destroyed” it, officials said. Rhineland Palatinate boasts the most famous stretch of the Rhine, dotted with castles and steeped in legend that has inspired German poets, painters and musicians. •

Baseball in Germany It may seem surprising since baseball is thought of as a prime sport played in North America, Latin America and Asia, but organized baseball in Germany goes back to 1936. Baseball is not a major sport in Germany but a small but loyal group of baseball players and fans exists in Germany. Baseball made its debut in Germany at the 1936 Berlin Olympics as a demonstration sport. No medals were awarded, but 90,000 German fans went to Olympic Stadium to watched the game being played. After the end of World War II, Germany was divided into occupied regions. In the American region, baseball was officially taught to the young people as part of the German Youth Activities program. The Baseball Bundesliga was formed in 1951 and led to the first German baseball championship. The first league champions were the Baseball Club Stuttgart Phillies, who outlasted the Berlin Babe Ruth Flyers. Since then the names of the leagues and teams have changed but baseball continues to be played in Germany. The Paderborn Untouchables have won six titles since 1999. German-born players have gone on to the major

leagues in North America. Mike Blowers had an 11-year career in the major leagues, playing primarily for the New York Yankees and Seattle Mariners. Blowers had a .257 career batting average and was a solid-fielding third baseman. Pitcher Craig Lefferts was a dependable left-handed relief pitcher for 12 years. He pitched primarily for the San Diego Padres and San Francisco Giants and was known for his ability to get left-handed batters out. Ron Gardenhire had a five-year career as a reserve infielder for the New York Mets; he has since established himself as one of the top managers in the games with the Minnesota Twins. Gardenhire was named manager of the Twins in 2002 and he remained in that position through the end of the 2010 season. Gardenhire has led the Twins to six first-place finishes in the American League Central Division during his nine years at the helm of the franchise. • www.baseballgermany.com


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10 Chicago, IL. Kino Kaffee und Kuchen, 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave., Chicago, IL. 14 Milwaukee, WI. Dancing 6:00 pm. Singing 7:00 pm.

15 Chicago, IL. Kulturkueche – Rahmschnitzel. Join Chef Carol Himmel from Himmel's Restaurant. Tickets: $16 - includes demonstration, recipes, one drink and tasting. http://www.brownpapertickets.com/ event/601567 17 Chicago, IL. Kino Kaffee und Kuchen, 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave., Chicago. 18 South Bend, IN. Meet at Fernwood. 12:00 pm Picnic. 13988 Range Line Rd., Niles, MI. For more information:

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271-6922. 21 Milwaukee, WI. Singing 7:00 pm. 23-24 Benton Harbor, MI. Rumage Sale. Doors will be open from 8 AM - 6 PM. 2651 Pipestone Rd., Benton Harbor, MI. 24 Chicago, IL. Kino Kaffee und Kuchen, 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm. DANK Haus, 4740 N Western Ave., Chicago, IL. 28 Milwaukee, WI. Dancing 6:00 pm. Singing 7:00 pm. May 29-June 1 Chicago, IL. Maifest in Lincoln Square. Live German music, German food and drinks. •


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Thank you! We would like to thank the many generous members and friends listed below who have supported the works of the German American National Congress through their donations. German American Day Lakia Lightner Ingeborg Smith Hedwig Beer Wolfgang Schmidt Karl Meyer Gertrude Missun Ronald Kabitzke Ingrud Wagschal William Perry Oscar Koenig Jack Wagner Keith Will Monte Oswald Daniel Paul Technology Fund James Mulderink Ingeborg Smith Adalbert Bielski Adrianne Dost Ronald Kabitzke William Perry Oscar Koebig Jack Wagner Keith Will Robert Mitchell Education Fund Erika Laven Lanny Kearney Ingeborg Smith Dieter Markwart Helmut Sawall Prof. Peter Horwarth Sharon Wallin Vigil Kuppelwieser Donatas Uogintas Birgit Sweeney Hagen Dost Inge Dominis Adalbert Bielski Eva Robertson Renate Koetke

Adrianne Dost Horst Adomat Karl O Mayer Esther Markwart Raimond Cerbins Ronald Kabitzke Klaus Voss Gerlinde Kubitz Maria Abelkis Ingrud Wagschal William Perry Oscar Koebig Doris Simon Matthew Putz Gaye Fischer Jack Wagner Erna Jochum Keith Will Robert Mitchell Walter Hagen Pamela Dixon Katie Viebach Klaus Ruetschlin Gunter Kison German American Journal Erika Laven Ingeborg Smith Dieter Markwart Helmut Sawall Lanny Kearney Prof Peter Horowath Sharon Wallin Ronald Schiebe James Muldernik David Dohm Karin Dethlefs Johann Joneikis Anita Prolic Adalbert Bielski Joseph Fields Johann Huprich Anneliese Strupat Melitta Kraus Filettie

Elizabeth Obert Erwin Lickmann Karyn Mehringer Horst Adomat Wolfgang Schmidt Karl Mayer Marcel Pitz Karl Kordas Egon Polnau Hildehard Pieger Esther Markwart Horst Fiedler Christel Saaber Brigita Bedelis-Roth James Schmidt Felizitas Cerbins Gerda Prill James Mayr Ronald Kabitzke Alexander Hinz Klaus Voss Margaret Greif Ingrun Wagschal William Perry Oscar Koenig Guy Wendler Kenneth Schlick Ernest Zeller Matthew Putz Christa Bigham Jared Meyer Leonie Graham Carol Maurer Keith Will Robert Mitchell Monte Oswald Sabine Baker Albert Pizzato Alfred Chlubek George Rykowski Andrew Scherer David Ungerman


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GERMAN AMERICAN JOURNAL

Helen Nora Hartung

Helen Nora Hartung (nee Brashinger) age 88, passed away on February 17, 2014. Beloved wife of Walter G. Hartung. Loving mother of Susan (Frank) Penunuri of Oaxaca, Mexico and Walter "Wally" (Judy) Hartung of Lockport. Cherished grandmother of Anthony, Nicholas and Katarina Hartung, Eric Wedding and Carol Farrimond. Proud great grandmother of 5. Fond sister of Adeline Bredlau of East Ha-

Wilkommen continued from page 15

When they had to trim away a portion of the backyard apple tree, her husband said, the incorporated cut rounds of the limbs into a decorate plaster half wall in their dining room. They also remodeled the kitchen, bathrooms and basement. The décor boasts souvenirs from the family’s many travels around the world. Jörg Kramer works for a travel company in Mequon. The basement bathroom has an African décor theme, with a pair of wall-mounted spears. Another area has a Japanese theme. And, of course, there are German mementos displayed everywhere. Two German-made cuckoo clocks are mounted side by side on a living room wall. “One is American time, and the other German time,” Jörg Kramer said. There is a seven-hour difference. Terri Kramer is a music teacher at Fair Park Elementary School and they raised two sons in the home. “Prior owners’ self-installed two solar lights one in the kitchen, the other in the upstairs full bath,” Terri Kramer said. “So much sunlight projects through.”

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zel Crest and the late Julia, Mary, Ann, Theresa, Matt and George. Helen retired in 1980 as the owner of the Flossmoor Bakery. She was active at Gloria Dei Lutheran Church in Tinley Park and formerly at St. Paul Lutheran Church in Chicago Heights. Helen was also a member of D.A.N.K Chapter Chicago South. •

The Kramers also installed bricks imported from Germany next to the driveway to provide additional parking space. “The brick has openings so grass can continue to grow through, Terri Kramer said. “It is very common in Germany.” One of their prized possessions is uniquely American, the Kramers said, pointing to their restored couch in the living room. It came from a lakeside home near Eagle River in northern Wisconsin, said to have been a retreat used by Al Capone. “We would like to believe Al Capone was sitting on it,” Jörg Kramer said. “It’s huge,” Jörg Kramer said of his West Bend home. “I grew up in a two-bedroom apartment in Berlin with my parents, sister and brother. I think it’s a wonderful layout.” • This article originally appeared in the 3-1-2014 issue of the Washington County Daily News and has been reprinted with their permission.

American Impression of Germany Continued from page 5 Overall, the study reinforced the fact that most Americans view Germany in a positive light, and US interest in Germany – whether in tourism or history – remains particularly high. Survey Highlights • 59 percent of Americans have an excellent or good impression of Germany (only 6 percent have a negative impression). • 60 percent of Americans believe Germany is a modern and forward-thinking society (5 percent disagree). • 57 percent consider Germany a major economic power (5 percent disagree). • 54 percent believe Germany has an excellent edu-

cational system (3 percent disagree). • 26 percent of Americans have visited Germany. • 52 percent of Americans believe Germany has a thriving culture and performing arts scene. • 60 percent consider Germany a high-tech country. • Americans are most interested in modern life in Germany (52 percent), scientific research in Germany (51 percent) and German history (50 percent). • 57 percent say Germany plays an important role in international politics. Germany is viewed as the best-suited country to lead Europe out of its debt crisis. © Germany.info


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Clarence “Bud” Abbott, Jr.

Clarence “Bud” Abbott, age 88, passed away peacefully in the early hour on February 7, 2014 at Friendship Village in Schaumburg, Illinois. Bud was born in New Hampshire on July 16, 1925 and enlisted in the US Army at the end of World War II. He served as part of the US Occupational Forces in Post WWII, where he met and married his wife, Dorothea (Thea) in 1948. After his discharge from the Army they moved back to the US, settled for a few years in the St. Louis, MO area before settling down in St. Charles, Illinois in the 1950’s. There both Bud and his wife Thea worked at the St. Charles “Boy School” State Juvenile Correction Facility until their Retirement in 1986. In St. Charles Bud and his wife were active members of St. Patrick Catholic Church and later St. John Neumann Catholic Church where Bud served many years

Helga Laibacher

Helga Laibacher, 68, of Youngsville, passed away September 24, 2013 at the Cleveland Clinic due to complications from heart surgery. Helga was born in Bruchkobel, Germany in 1945, the daughter of the late Anna and Hans Laibacher. Helga came to the USA in April of 1963 and took on her US citizenship in November 1973. In her heart though, she was truly a German, who loved her German heritage. She took many, many trips to her homeland over the years, visiting family and friends, and had many visitors/family visiting here. Helga loved her flowers, and photography. She made her own birthday cards, and loved the outdoors. In

Reverend Traugott Vogel

The Reverend Traugott Vogel, 83, passed away on January 16, 2014. He was born in Heidelberg, Germany, on January 20, 1930. He was a retired pastor, evangelical speaker, and missionary. He graduated from Bible College in England and from Baptist Theological Seminary in Hamburg, Germany. Afterwards, he became a missionary with the Eastern European Mission, serving as missionary in Belgium. He served as pastor of churches in Germany, including the First Southern Baptist Church in Bitburg. In 1974, Rev. Vogel, his wife, and family immigrated to the United States, where he served as pastor of First Baptist Church of Sterling City, Texas. He later served as pastor to churches in Phoe-

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as an usher. Bud also actively served as a Knight of Columbus with the Marquette 188th Assembly in Aurora, Illinois. Bud for many years was, along with his wife, very active on the board of directors of the Fox Valley chapter of the German American National Congress (DANK). He was a founding member of the chapter and could be seen at many parades and festivals where he could not be missed in his favorite Lederhosen attire displaying his friendship with the German‐American Community. Unfortunately he lost his wife to illness in 2002. Bud was known to most as a kind and loving Gentleman with a love of life, dancing and positive outlook with an injection of humor. Oktoberfest time was his favorite time of the year and many will always remember him in his Lederhosen. •

past years, she enjoyed downhill skiing, biking, knitting and crocheting. Helga was a member of DANK since 2006,. She was actively involved in the ROY (Revitalization of Youngsville) organization, where she volunteered countless hours to help make Youngsville a better place. She was also involved with Youngsville's Corn Fest. She loved to dance, swim, and loved to visit friends at the Rouse Home and with those she had met over the years that truly didn't have anyone to chat with A memorial gift from DANK Chapter Erie, PA was sent to ROY - the Revitalization of Youngsville, P.O. Box 330, Youngsville, Pa. 16371 in Helga’s name. •

nix, AZ; Vancouver, BC; and Los Angeles, CA. He was involved with Youth for Christ, The Navigators, and for the last 16 years he led an Annual German Language Christmas Service at Hillside Baptist Church in Phoenix, where he was a member since 1996. Since accepting Christ as his personal savior, he shared his testimony often and devoted much of his ministry to the theme of reconciliation with others and with the Lord. He is survived by his wife of 57 years, Holdine Vogel. His will be a tremendous loss to the German community in general and specifically to DANK Phoenix, AZ. The family of Pastor Vogel has requested that gifts in his memory be given to the Billy Graham Association. •


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Happy Mother's Day from the National Board

Der beliebten

Ilse Scharpenberg herzliche Glückwünsche zum 95. Geburtstag Wer die Arbeit erfunden hat, der muß nichts zu tun gehabt haben. Whoever invented work must not have had anything to do.


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The National Executive Board

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Come support us at

Maifest Chicago May 29 - June 1

Lincoln and Leland Ave

April/May 2014  

Volume 62 Issue 2 German American Journal

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