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ANNUAL REPORT 2014 Group for the Environment, Renewable Energy and Solidarity


TABLE OF CONTENTS

2 3 4 5 6

Foreword The women and men of GERES Key numbers Highlights in 2014 Operational themes and sectors

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CROSS-CUTTING EXPERTISE

Contributing to the territoriallybased development of sustainable solutions

13

Proposing bioclimatic solutions for housing and agriculture

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Combating poverty and mitigating climate change through biomass

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EUROPE MEDITERRANEAN

Meeting the challenges of energy access for rural areas

CENTRAL ASIA

SOUTH-EAST ASIA

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WEST AFRICA

Facilitating the energy transition

29 FINANCIAL REPORT 33 34 35 35 36

GERES publications in 2014 GERES digital productions in 2014 Index of partners Financial partners Technical partners


▪ FOREWORD

2 014

, an unusual year insofar as we had to reconcile our deep commitments in France and developing countries with not only a terrific upheaval in the development aid world but also an urgent need to rebalance our books after two years in deficit? The passion that motivates both the volunteers and the staff of GERES had come face-to-face with the economic reality of our environment and restoring our finances was essential to keep the association going. The challenge has been met but we must stay ever watchful to retain and develop our capabilities for initiative and innovation. Big business, demanding a leading role in the implementation of aid programmes for countries in the South, has burst onto the development aid scene in France. GERES has a long history of including local enterprises (4101 of which were supported in 2014) in its operational strategies in the countries where we work. The challenges posed by these newcomers are, however, quite different: with our nine partners in the NGO collective, Groupe Initiatives, we have chosen the demanding option of striving for complementarity. Thierry Cabirol, 2014 also saw GERES opening a new mission in Myanmar to disseminate effiPresident cient cooking appliances; the launch within Coordination Sud of the information Alain Guinebault, platform on the interactions between climate change and development; the esExecutive Director tablishment of an expertise unit supporting the association’s projects but also acting as a service provider; and, of course, the continuation of its work to improve people’s living conditions through the implementation of 58 projects. 2015 is likely to see considerable changes for GERES with the arrival of the new executive director and the creation of the position of deputy director, but it will also be an important year with the climate conference (COP21) taking place in Paris. Significant commitments are expected but, whatever the results, we must take part along with our technical and financial partners in building solutions for a fairer world for the great majority.

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GERES • Annual Report 2014


THE WOMEN AND MEN OF GERES ▪

The Board and committee

GERES staffing At 31 December 2014, GERES had 237 direct employees (82 women and 155 men).

GERES Board of Directors is Staff representation: made up of voluntary members, elected at the Annual General “Employees in France” group: • Full members: Oriane ASSALI Meeting.

Composition of the Board of Directors as at 31 December 2014: The committee President: Thierry CABIROL Vice-president: Frédéric BOEUF Treasurer: Sophie IBOS Secretary: Éric BUCHET

39 people work in France. Staffing is as follows:

and Marie-Maud GÉRARD • Alternates: Sophie GASQUET and Auria POIRIER

“Expatriates” group: • Full member: Anne CALVEL (Mali) • Alternate: Julien JACQUOT (Cambodia)

22 employees and 1 apprentice for GERES HQ 9 employees for GERES France 7 employees for GERES Expertise

198 people work abroad. Staffing is as follows:

Other Members Jean-Paul PRUVOST — Kader BEKKAR — Jean-Claude CHASSAGNOUX Michel DEGRAND GUILLAUD — Swan FAUVEAUD — Dominique FICHBEN (Mrs) Michel HAMELIN — Vincent PRIORI — Régine TEULADE-NESS Bernadette VERRON — Noémie ZAMBEAUX

160 under local contracts 29 under expatriate contracts 4 under international solidarity volunteer contracts (VSI) 4 under internship agreements 1 under consultancy contract

Organization chart 31 December 2014 Board of Directors Thierry CABIROL President Executive Direction Alain GUINEBAULT Executive Direction

HQ Administration and Finance Unit (SAF) Emmanuelle CHOIN SAF Director

Human Ressources Unit (RH) Nathalie CROIZIER HR Director

Development Unit (DEV) David GENTREAU DEV Director (temporarily)

REGIONS West Africa

Central Asia

South-East Asia

Europe Mediterranean

Benin Raymond AZOKPOTA

Afghanistan Olivier MUNOS (temporarily)

Cambodia Mathieu RUILLET

France Cyril JARNY

Mali Grégoire GAILLY

Mongolia Camille NEGRE

Myanmar Georgi DHZARTOV

Morocco Mathieu GOUDET

Grégoire GAILLY

(vacancy)

Tajikistan Anne RANDALL

Mathieu RUILLET

Cyril JARNY

Technical Advisors Unit Julien JACQUOT

Team of Advisors Olivier MUNOS StovePlus Julien JACQUOT

GERES • Annual Report 2014

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KEY NUMBERS

4,101

10

entrepreneurs or enterprises supported or assisted

permanent offices

58

696,769

financial partners

families or project developers benefiting directly*

167

technical partners

58

237 employees

projects in 19 countries Intervention

Direct

Indirect

EUROPE MEDITERRANEAN SOUTH-EAST ASIA CENTRAL ASIA WEST AFRICA

Entrepreneurs: one-person businesses, organizations engaged in economic activity or enterprises directly receiving technical, financial or organizational support in developing their activities

*

* Direct beneficiaries: people or entities (heads of family, institutions, local authorities, project developers, etc.) directly and individually benefiting from a project implemented by GERES.

Indirect beneficiaries: family members of the direct beneficiaries where a project implemented by GERES actually affects the entire household

*

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GERES • Annual Report 2014

3,195,931 indirect beneficiaries


HIGHLIGHTS IN 2014 ▪

▪ 28 May 2014 ▪ 23 January 2014

INAUGURATION OF ALTERRE MALI The ALTERRE Mali team, in the presence of Malian Ministry of Energy representatives, inaugurated two Jatropha oil (farmer biofuels) production units in the municipalities of Yorosso and Koury, South-East Mali.

TWO PROJECTS RECEIVE ENERGY GLOBE AND ASHDEN AWARDS

▪ 15 October 2014

• Project to disseminate improved ovens in Morocco

INAUGURATION OF THE CENTRAL HIGHLANDS PROGRAMME

• The Cambodian social enterprise SGFE (Sustainable Green Fuel Enterprise), incubated by GERES.

which is to run in Bamyan province, central Afghanistan, for a period of three years.

HIGHLIGHTS IN 2014 ▪ 12 September 2014 ▪ April 2014

LAUNCH OF THE SUSTAINABLE HAMMAMS PROJECT IN MOROCCO As resources become scarcer and their price continues to rise, energy modernization of hammams and sustainable management of supply chains are an environmental and economic necessity.

LAUNCH OF GERES IN MYANMAR WITH THE SCALE PROJECT Government, project partners and private sector stakeholders meet to share experience of the fuel-efficient cooking appliance market in Myanmar; the occasion sees the project’s official launch.

▪ 7 October 2014

GERES ORGANIZES THE CLIMATE SOLIDARITY FESTIVAL, taking over the Longchamp Park in Marseille to raise local people’s awareness of sustainable agriculture and climate change through a variety of festive events and presentations.

▪ 28 October 2014

GERES OBTAINS THE IDEAS LABELS following support and advice on its governance and financial management and monitoring of its efficiency. This label confirms GERES’ high level of compliance with the requirements of the IDEAS good practice guide in respect of monitoring the impact of the donations it receives.

▪ 26 November 2014 ▪ 19 May 2014

THE FIRST ENERGY INFORMATION POINT IN THE KINGDOM OF MOROCCO OPENS ITS DOORS IN CHEFCHAOUEN

PARTICIPATION IN THE LIMA SUMMIT, an opportunity to trigger the virtuous dynamics that will ensure the success of the next and most important stage, i.e. the Climate 2015 conference in Paris.

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▪ OPERATIONAL THEMES AND SECTORS

Energy, climate, development: 38 years’ expertise in helping people To support human development at the same time as preserving the environment, GERES activities are organized around five strategic themes: energy efficiency and energy saving, clean energy production, local policy and territory, economic development and combating climate change. Beyond these major operational themes, energy in all its forms of production or supply has a considerable impact on people and the planet. The many different issues involved may be the subject of consensus or discord. For its part, GERES has always favoured simple but innovative approaches, directly linked to the capacities and needs of local communities and authorities.

HOUSING AND THE ISOLATION OF VULNERABLE COMMUNITIES In France, 4 million households, around 8 million people, spend more than 10% of their income on energy within their homes. According to the French Energy Poverty Observatory (ONPE), one person in five is living in energy poverty. This Observatory calls attention to the difficulties experienced by 11.5 million people, or 20% of the French population, in heating and lighting their homes. Progressive rises in energy prices and the impoverishment of households only serve to consolidate this social fracture and the isolation of vulnerable communities. This situation, dramatic in France and more widely in Europe, is even worse in other regions of the world such as Central Asia. In Afghanistan, 48% of families say they have trouble getting what they need to keep warm or cook. 20% of their annual expenditure goes on energy. This is why GERES sees promoting home insulation and energy-efficient appliances as key to combating this scourge. The association advises, trains and supports households, artisans and local authorities in respect of efficient insulation techniques and eco-friendly action. Always in partnership with local stakeholders, GERES has been able to develop local supply chains producing more efficient heating and cooking appliances. It disseminates technologies that have proven their worth and, for example, has enabled more than 2,900 households in Kabul to improve their energy efficiency (building a solar conservatory and insulating their homes). These activities result in up to 50% energy savings when the home is fully insulated.

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GERES • Annual Report 2014

In Europe, apart from helping artisans and individuals with more efficient insulation techniques, GERES works with local operators to assist households with advices on energy consumption habits and the small-scale insulation work that can improve day-to-day life. ▪

GERES has made 400 home visits to help households experiencing energy poverty.


OPERATIONAL THEMES AND SECTORS ▪

In Mongolia, children learn about vegetable production.

SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE AND BIOMASS GERES activities in the field of agricultural energy are in line with some of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). It is estimated that 842 million people in the world are suffering from malnutrition and more than 99 million children under five are malnourished and underweight*. GERES is playing its part in combating this dramatic situation through the development of a passive solar greenhouse that enables people to grow vegetables on the high plateaux of Central Asia. Despite a harsh climate, the significant levels of sunshine in this region of the world mean that vegetables can be grown even in winter. As a result of diversifying vegetable production from 5 to 15 varieties, the community becomes more aware of nutrition and food security is enhanced. In Africa, for some 10 years now, GERES has been supporting the development of farmer biofuels, a whole value chain based on Jatropha grown alongside food crops: from producing the seed through to marketing of derivative products such as soap made by, and helping to eman-

cipate, women. In addition, the production of Jatropha oil helps to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through its use as a substitute for fossil fuels to power agricultural machinery. GERES is keen to promote greener, more environmentally friendly agriculture that also conserves natural resources. The association is endeavouring to promote better biomass management in the countries where it works in Asia and ­Africa. Across the world, 2.5 billion people use biomass as their main fuel (for farming, cooking and heating), resulting in heavy pressure on resources. GERES involvement in developing a sustainable charcoal supply chain in Cambodia has helped seven forest communities in four provinces to develop smart forest management practices and improve charcoal kiln maintenance operations. Its more efficient carbonization process means that 40% wood savings can be achieved through using this sustainable charcoal. ▪ *Source: United Nations website on the Millennium Development Goals

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▪ OPERATIONAL THEMES AND SECTORS

In Mali, GERES helps Jatropha producers to set up micro-businesses.

ENTREPRENEURSHIP: LEARNING, SUPPORTING AND PASSING ON According to the International Energy Agency, 2.7 billion people in developing countries are still using traditional cooking appliances which are very harmful to users due to emissions of carbon monoxide and particulates and which consume large quantities of wood. Entrepreneurship in the renewable energy field is vital to provide sustainable economic opportunities for local people. As a result, GERES has been working in Cambodia for around 15 years to develop a wood-energy supply chain, encouraging the creation of micro-businesses to produce sustainable charcoal and manufacture improved stoves. The ICoProDAC association was set up and now offers its members training in entrepreneurial skills and organizational development, together with an economic model including a series of recommendations put forward by GERES. Drawing on its field experience, GERES has been able to co-operate with local communities, providing support and passing on improved technologies conducive to economic development. In Central Asia, solar conservatories have generated 118,000 euros in income for the 59 micro-businesses trained in Kabul. In addition, more and more people in Africa are moving away from the countryside towards towns and cities, partly due to

the low level of rural electrification. Only 25% of the continent’s 1 billion inhabitants have access to electricity. As demand for electricity grows massively in West Africa, energy is key to development and renewable energy offers an opportunity to meet local needs. GERES and its partners are therefore designing, testing and implementing solutions to improve access to productive energy in rural areas. Private sector involvement is based on the assumption that entrepreneurs are best able to put the solutions into effect, particularly on a large scale. In the Electrified Enterprise Zone project in Konséguéla (Southern Mali), GERES is trialling innovative hybrid solutions aimed at local artisans, offering access to electricity for 10-15 very small enterprises. Strengthening local supply chains is therefore a key challenge for GERES, for example in the food processing sector. Oil from a particular variety of groundnuts grown in central Benin is prized for its unique aroma. The association is working with three local women’s co-operatives, providing technical support to improve clarification processes and commercial support in the form of activities to promote and market the product. In this way, GERES is enabling thousands of entrepreneurs and artisans to set up an economic activity and create local jobs. ▪

GERES AT COP21 In December 2015, France is hosting the 21st United Nations Climate Change Conference, COP21. This historic event needs to take up a twofold challenge: reducing the greenhouse gas emissions of every country on the planet and support-

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GERES • Annual Report 2014

ing low-carbon development in the emerging and least developed countries. Since 2008, GERES has been advocating the principle of climate solidarity, which means that any action in favour of the energy transition in the North should have

its equivalent in the South via support for low-carbon solidarity projects. Throughout 2015 and until the major gathering in Paris, GERES will be mobilizing to defend this vision of solidarity at several levels: civil society, media and institutions. ▪


CROSS-CUTTING EXPERTISE Contributing to the territoriallybased development of sustainable solutions CAPE VERDE SENEGAL MALI GHANA IVORY COAST SIERRA LEONE

MYANMAR

LAOS PHILIPPINES

CAMBODIA KENYA INDONESIA

Direct intervention Indirect intervention

G

ERES expertise (GEX) unit comprises GERES technical advisers who have several years’ experience in developing countries and are involved in strengthening and improving different stages of the project cycle depending on their specialisms. The team’s skills cover many energy-related themes, such as rural electrification, cooking energy, energy efficiency in mountainous or continental areas, rural development, territorial approaches to climate and development issues, etc. Drawing on GERES long experience in the field, whether in Africa, Asia or Europe, GEX was set up to provide services in line with the needs identified in projects at local level. Far more than mere consultants, the technical advisers have a detailed, overall view of projects enabling them to come up with realistic context-specific solutions.

GERES • Annual Report 2014

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WORLD

GERES takes part in the COP20 round tables in Lima in November 2014.

Taking action against climate change SUD in 2013. Their role is to monitor international negotiations and raise the awareness of decision-makers who have a part to play in policies relating to climate change throughout the world. To this end, GERES took part in COP20 in 2014 and will take part in COP21 in 2015. ▪

I

n 2014, 12 projects, in Mali, Niger, Cambodia, Tajikistan, Senegal, France and Afghanistan, benefited from our climate initiatives: via studies to identify vulnerabilities in regions such as the Ferlo in Senegal and examine their capacity to adapt to climate change; audits to calculate, analyse and raise awareness and advise various decision-makers in respect of the impact of projects or technologies, such as passive solar houses in Afghanistan, measuring their energy efficiency and potential to mitigate climate change, with very conclusive results. Similarly, 15 French NGOs, including GERES as lead agency, came together in the «Climate and Development Committee» (CCD) of Coordination

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GERES • Annual Report 2014

NDICATORS AND MPACTS • 520 people made aware through events organized by the CCD • 13 events organized by the CCD • 6 international events attended •1  passive solar house avoids the emission of 0.54 tonnes CO2eq/year (Afghanistan)

“The activities and studies carried out by GERES in partnership with rural entrepreneurs, communities and political decision-makers aim to build the capacity of the countries where GERES operates to develop efficient, sustainable climate projects and policies.” Yann François, Climate and development technical adviser, GERES


WORLD

Improved stove producer in Cambodia.

Stoveplus: finding innovative solutions for cleaner, more efficient cooking A

t present, 2.5 billion people in the world cook and heat their homes with biomass-based fuels (wood, charcoal, agricultural residues, manure, etc.). Biomass is used for two main reasons: it is cheap or even free and access to cleaner energy (such as electricity) is often difficult. StovePlus is designed to strengthen and enhance projects focusing on cooking solutions. By providing technical support to improved stove project developers throughout the project cycle, StovePlus helps to reduce not only the risks to users’ health but also greenhouse gas emissions and forest degradation in certain regions of the world. In partnership with governmental, institutional and local bodies, our team is working at several levels to take the domestic cooker sector forward in countries such as Indonesia, Myanmar, Laos, Mali and Ivory Coast. ▪

NDICATORS AND MPACTS • 24 services provided in 6 countries in Africa and Asia • 36 partners, including 25 national partners • 12 workshops and training seminars organized on the trials and projects • 10 reports and studies published on improved stoves

“Thanks to the SCALE project, we shall be able to develop and disseminate certified, standardized improved stoves in Myanmar, which is one of the primary needs in this sector.” Zaw Zaw Han, Director Ever Green Group, partner of GERES in Myanmar

GERES • Annual Report 2014

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WORLD

CO2Solidaire: 10 years at the service of solidarity-based, citizen-led offsetting I

n October 2004, GERES launched the first francophone carbon offsetting project. The idea was to defend an ethical view of this innovative way of co-funding solidarity projects. Since then, many French operators have moved into a market disrupted by both the economic crisis and justified criticism concerning the obscure aspects of offsetting. Over the years, CO2Solidaire has become a key player on the French scene, positioning itself as an expert on the entire carbon finance production chain. The programme has sought to prioritize

the reduction of its partners’ greenhouse gas emissions. It has always taken the time to explain the complex mechanisms of offsetting and work in complete transparency with carefully selected companies. As a result of these precautions, it is now seen as the ethical benchmark for offsetting in France. Apart from being climate friendly, this kind of offsetting should lead to the climate solidarity that has never been more vital. ▪

NDICATORS AND MPACTS • Number of tonnes offset in 10 years: 86 276 tCO2eq (= €1,754,781) • Amount of individual donations over 10 years: €404,369 • More than 10,000 connections to the calculation tool in 10 years. GERES at the side of François Hollande chairing the Summit in November 2014.

The Elysée Summit for Peace and Security in Africa has supported the CEnAO project in Mali by offsetting the travel of the 53 delegations from African countries which generated the emission of 1 038 tCO2eq. The event was held in Paris on 6 and 7 December 2013. The work of this Summit focused on security, economic partnership, development and climate change on the African continent. It was the culmination of the various phases of organization of the Summit which followed a strictly eco-responsible policy.

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• More than 200 partners supporting us since 2004.

To offset your residual CO2 emissions by supporting an ethical, solidarity-based development project, go to: www.CO2solidaire.org


CENTRAL ASIA Proposing bioclimatic solutions for housing and agriculture MONGOLIA

TAJIKISTAN AFGHANISTAN In the mountainous regions and high plateaux of central Asia, climatic conditions are particularly harsh and ecosystems vulnerable. The energy model is still mainly biomass-based, with particularly high demand for heating in winter. In urban areas of Afghanistan, energy costs account for 25% of the household budget. This energy poverty makes families vulnerable and has many negative effects on individual health. As regards agriculture, the production season is limited to just four months in Mongolia and heavily dependent on access to natural resources: water, arable land and grazing. The sparse vegetation is impacted by deforestation. The region does, however, enjoy significant levels of sunshine: up to 300 days per year. GERES is taking advantage of this abundant, free, natural energy source to improve living conditions for local people by developing passive solar houses and passive solar greenhouses for vegetable production.

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CENTRAL ASIA

Producer helped by GERES, met in connection with the “On n’a pas fait le tour” programme shown on the French TV station France 4 on 3 February 2015.

Making vegetable production accessible, sustainable and locally oriented S

ince 2011, GERES has been assisting and training 196 small producers in Mongolia and Tajikistan to increase and market their agricultural produce using innovative tools: passive solar greenhouses and bioclimatic cellars. In 2014, GERES focused particularly on helping producers to make optimum use of the new farming tools: cropping calendars, techniques to increase yields and extension of the production season. Producers also received support in selling their vegetables locally: in Mongolia, 72% of the harvest is sold or bartered to regular customers and the vegetables are much appreciated. In the mountainous regions of Tajikistan, 60% of production still goes towards feeding the family or is offered as gifts. In addition, GERES has organized cooking courses to raise awareness of new, formerly unknown vegetables and raise awareness of nutrition. ▪

NDICATORS AND MPACTS • Diversification of vegetable production: from 5 to 15 vegetable varieties available • 17% increase in the income of the Mongolian farmers assisted by GERES • 17,600 people benefitting from access to fresh, locally produced vegetables. • 850 children made aware of nutrition • 120 people benefitting from cooking classes

“By starting production of fresh vegetables in the passive solar greenhouse, we have discovered vegetables such as spinach, pumpkin and cauliflower and have learned how to cook them. Now I have new recipes for my little restaurant and that makes all the difference: customers adore my lettuce wraps with vegetables.” Nara, restaurant owner, Tariat district, Mongolia

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CENTRAL ASIA

Bioclimatic solutions can raise indoor temperatures by 5 to 10 C°.

Bioclimatic houses in Central Asia G

ERES is working on energy efficiency to make sustainable improvements in private homes both in the rural areas of the regions of Sughd in Tajikistan and Bamyan in Afghanistan and in urban areas, mainly Kabul. The bioclimatic solutions disseminated combine various solar architecture techniques (passive solar conservatories, direct gain, etc.), insulation techniques and improved heating/cooking stoves. In order to ensure the dissemination and adoption of these solutions on a wider scale, GERES is supporting the organization of local production and supply chains helping to stimulate demand. Since 2012, more than 142 individual artisans and small/ medium-sized enterprises have received instruction in these techniques in Afghanistan and Tajikistan. Support also includes certification and systematic quality control of constructions to ensure customer satisfaction and continuity of supply. ▪

NDICATORS AND MPACTS • In 2 years in Kabul, 2,917 passive solar conservatories and insulation techniques disseminated • 118,000 euros income generated for the 59 micro-businesses trained in Kabul • Up to 50% energy-saving with full insulation of the home • 235,919 people informed about energyefficient solutions for homes • Creation of an association of 31 artisans supporting the organization of the production chain and dissemination of energy-efficient techniques

“With my new stove, I’ve reduced my wood consumption by up to 50%. It also helps me to cook twice as quickly and without any smoke, so that day-to-day living is much more comfortable. I’ve encouraged all my neighbours and my family to build an improved heating and cooking appliance.” Khudoiberdieva Latofat, beneficiary living in Asht in Tajikistan GERES • Annual Report 2014

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CENTRAL ASIA

Woman farmer helped by GERES to take on board good practice in respect of energy efficiency.

Taking action in the face of climate change G

ERES is taking part in natural resource conservation and efforts to combat climate change by promoting good practice in the field of domestic energy efficiency and the management of soil and water resources in agriculture. A study of climate change vulnerability and resilience was conducted in the Iskanderkul Valley in Tajikistan, assessing the climate change adaptability of the population of a watershed. The main conclusion is that climate change has a direct impact on the safety net offered by gardening and small-scale livestock farming that helped cushion the impact of migration to Russia. Information workshops on climate change and potential local ac-

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tion were organized for 45 local organizations, along with a national seminar for local and government authorities. In Afghanistan, GERES engaged in training and awareness-raising for institutional and civil society stakeholders on the themes of energy efficiency and its consequences for air pollution, the environment and climate change, with a view to getting the energy dimension taken on board to a greater extent in national programmes. ▪

NDICATORS AND MPACTS • 45 local entities (local authorities, NGOs and Mahalla committees) informed about climate change in Tajikistan • 1 good practice handbook on water and soil management published and distributed in Tajikistan, based on the results of field trials • 5,906 rural households instructed in composting techniques • 400 farmers adopting composting in Tajikistan • Reduction of 1,800 tonnes of CO2 emissions in Kabul during 2014 as a result of greater domestic energy efficiency.


SOUTH-EAST ASIA Combating poverty and mitigating climate change through biomass

S

outh-East Asia has MYANMAR 600 million inhabitants, more than half CAMBODIA of whom live in rural areas and depend on farming and forestry for their subsistence. As it develops and experiences rapid population growth, the region’s energy demand has risen significantly: the share of renewable energy in the primary mix amounts to 24% (almost twice the global average), reflecting the heavy dependency on traditional biomass used for cooking by almost half the region’s population. Home to 15% of the world’s tropical forests, South-East Asia has also experienced one of the highest rates of deforestation in the tropics, with a net annual loss of 1 million hectares of forest area between 2005 and 2010, seriously impacting global biodiversity, carbon balance and the living conditions of the people who depend on the region’s forests. To help these communities make sustainable use of their biomass resources so that they can contribute to their socio-economic development and the fight against the effects of climate change, GERES is continuing to promote sustainable production and consumption of wood fuels with the active involvement of the private sector.

GERES • Annual Report 2014

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SOUTH-EAST ASIA

Sustainable charcoal from a production centre where the more efficient carbonization process means a 40% reduction in wood use.

Sustainable practices for the wood-energy sector B

y working with traditional producers of cooking equipment and forest communities in Cambodia, GERES has helped to develop new income sources for the inhabitants of 20 rural villages wishing to get involved in the activities of the domestic cooking sector (sustainable wood gathering, sustainable charcoal production, improved stove production). Encouraged by the socio-economic dynamics, the sustainable forest management project completed in 2014 piloted a natural resource management model and an economic model aimed at rural communities. In Myanmar, GERES launched the SCALE (Strengthening improved Cookstove Access towards a better quality of Life and Environment) project designed to replicate and apply the lessons learned from GERES decade-long experience in Cambodia in promoting sustainable firewood production and consumption practices. The project aims over five years to establish mechanisms that will facilitate sustainable access to cleaner, more economical cookers for the population of Myanmar. ▪

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NDICATORS AND MPACTS • Dissemination of more than 3.6 million improved stoves by end December 2014 • 7 forest communities in 4 provinces of Cambodia trained in good forest management and improved maintenance of charcoal kilns • 17 centres producing improved charcoal kilns and 8 plots of forest established • 65 tonnes of sustainable charcoal produced and sold over 11 years

“We simply used to go into the forest to cut wood and make charcoal in our gardens. A lot of wood was wasted during processing. Now we harvest appropriately and all of us benefit!” Horng Saroeun, aged 51, Woodcutter in Prey Tralach- Battambang Forest community, Cambodia


SOUTH-EAST ASIA

Involving and building the capacity of the private sector Seeking to promote sales of the “Khmer rocket stove” (KhRoS: a top of the range cooker developed by GERES in 2013) on the Cambodian urban market, GERES put together a marketing plan which includes a production and distribution plan as well as financial projections aimed at entrepreneurs wishing to market the product.

Meeting of the executive committee of the ICoProDAC association which has 316 members producing and distributing improved domestic cookers.

I

n December 2014, GERES celebrated the 10th anniversary of ICoProDAC (Improved Cookstove Producers and Distributors Association of Cambodia) which has 316 members. Together they have carried out a series of activities aimed at building the capacity of ICoProDAC to become an independent, sound, relevant industrial association able to protect its members’ interests. The association must also ensure compliance with the quality standards for the New Lao Stove and Neang Kongrey Stove and co-operate with public and private institutions for the benefit of its members and the improved stove sector as a whole. To this end, more than 100 micro-entrepreneurs have received training in entrepreneurial skills and organizational development and adopted an economic model including a series of recommendations put forward by GERES. ▪

In 2014, the first batch of KhRoS cookstoves was produced.

NDICATORS AND MPACTS

ASHDEN AWARD: THE SUCCESS OF BUSINESS INCUBATION The Cambodian social enterprise SGFE (Sustainable Green Fuel Enterprise) incubated by GERES, which produces charcoal briquettes using recycled waste, won the prestigious Ashden Award in recognition of this innovative project launched in 2008 by the French NGOs GERES and PSE (Pour un Sourire d’Enfant). Meeting of the executive committee of the ICoProDAC SGFE is now the leading producer and distriassociation which has 316 members producing and butor of sustainable fuel in Cambodia. With distributing improved domestic cookstoves. average monthly production of 40 tonnes of briquettes, it supplies a network of more than 100 shops and restaurants. Production capacity should double between now and May 2015 and the company’s manager is planning to open a second factory.

• Increase in income of up to $30 per month for wood gatherers and sustainable charcoal producers and up to $80 per month for cookstove producers • 45 potters producing traditional cooking appliances trained to improve cookstove production and informed about economic development and operational aspects

GERES • Annual Report 2014

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SOUTH-EAST ASIA

Farmers in Samaki Meanchey district are using more eco-friendly farming techniques which help reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Consolidation of biomass expertise T

Round table for stakeholders in Phnom Penh to talk about climate finance.

GERES SHARES ITS EXPERIENCE IN ACCESS TO CARBON FINANCE In November 2014, more than 50 development stakeholders (Alliance against Climate Change in Cambodia, the Cambodian Development Resources Institute, Nexus-Carbon for Development and GERES) met in Phnom Penh with a view to reaching agreement on the methods needed to optimize global support for Cambodia in the face of climate change. Over a period of 10 years, the dissemination of more than 2.9 million New Lao Stoves led to a reduction of 2 million tCO2eq in emissions into the atmosphere. 1.4 million tCO2eq were sold successfully on the voluntary carbon market to various organizations in Asia, Europe and Oceania wishing to support projects related to climate change mitigation whilst offsetting their carbon emissions. The resulting sales to the value of more than 11.8 million dollars enabled GERES and its partners to extend the improved stove project as part of an integrated national biomass energy strategy.

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GERES • Annual Report 2014

hrough the integrated platform for rural energy development project (February 2011 — January 2015), various solutions were tested, such as fuel-efficient technologies and agro-ecological techniques. These will enable Cambodian farmers (51 of whom have been trained) to enhance their capacity to adapt and mitigate the effects of climate change. In order to get a better grasp of the biomass sector, which is the major source of energy in Cambodia, GERES ran FLOWOOD, a national survey on the largest users of wood-energy in the country: domestic cooking, brick production, rubber processing, fish smoking, salt refining, ice cream production and tobacco drying. Solid biomass (charcoal and wood) accounts for 72% of annual national energy demand, while total demand for wood amounts to 4 million tonnes. The study was conducted to help decision-makers and members of the private sector design strategies to tackle the fundamental issues in the biomass energy value chain, so as to preserve sustainable use of forest resources. With support from Global Forest Watch, GERES carried out a study on the impact of charcoal on the Cardamomes forest in Cambodia. The participatory impact evaluation highlighted the complexities of the situation of charcoal production in Cambodia. It also helped to develop a methodology to be replicated at local level regarding the impact of charcoal on forests. ▪

NDICATORS AND MPACTS • With more than 3.6 million New Lao Stoves sold between 2003 and 2014, GERES helped to reduce carbon emissions into the atmosphere by 2.9 million tonnes CO2 equivalent (tCO2eq) • 64,570 km2 of forest now have a management plan to ensure their regeneration • 1,954,000 tonnes of wood saved.


WEST AFRICA Meeting the challenges of energy access for rural areas

In West Africa, the SENEGAL challenge of ensuring universal access MALI to energy and modern BENIN services is still huge. Its impacts on people’s living conditions (time spent gathering wood, exposure to cooking fumes, arduous, time-consuming manual labour, etc.), energy poverty is a notorious constraint on the economic development of rural areas. If people are to make the best use of their local resources, move towards less arduous, higher paying jobs or develop new local services, decentralized solutions need to be found, drawing on the potential of each area. By effectively combining several, especially renewable, energy sources, profitable, accessible services can be provided. GERES and its partners are therefore designing, testing and implementing solutions to improve access to productive energy in rural areas, the energy efficiency of the technologies used and community resilience in the face of climate change. Private sector involvement is based on the assumption that entrepreneurs are best able to put the solutions into effect, particularly on a large scale.

GERES • Annual Report 2014

21


WEST AFRICA

Women from Nampena village make soap from Jatropha residues.

Energy for production in rural areas A INAUGURATION OF THE PRODUCTION UNITS IN MALI As part of the ALTERRE project in Mali launched in response to the energy crisis facing rural areas, GERES and its partners inaugurated two Jatropha pure vegetable oil production units in Yorosso and Koury (Koutiala region) on 23 January 2014. The principal private secretary to the Minister of Energy has noted that only 12% of the rural population has access to electricity. Consequently, the establishment of a local biofuel supply chain will help to “create income and employment opportunities, particularly for women who are the most fragile sector of society”.

22

GERES • Annual Report 2014

mongst the range of energy solutions available in sub-Saharan Africa, GERES wanted to use the ALTERRE — Agrocarburants Locaux et Territoires Ruraux — farmer biofuels programme to find out whether Jatropha could, under certain conditions, contribute to the energy mix in isolated rural areas. Grown on family farms without disrupting food crops, this seed has found a place in the local economy of Yorosso and Koutiala, whether processed into oil for engines, cake for soil enrichment or residues for traditional soap-making. As a replacement for diesel, it contributes to economic and climate resilience, particularly for women who use the grinding service. This local-scale trial is part of a wider exercise studying the correlation between electrification and economic development. While the potential of renewable sources can no longer be denied, the economic repercussions of energy access are not systematic. Apart from technical constraints, organiza-

tional constraints affect the development of decentralized solutions. In the Electrified Enterprise Zone project in Konséguéla (Southern Mali), GERES is trialling innovative hybrid solutions aimed at local artisans. Together with the local authorities, it is helping these economic operators to develop. ▪

NDICATORS AND MPACTS • 1,146 family farms involved in Jatropha production • 15,000 litres of oil produced in 2014 • 23 village millers operating entirely on Jatropha • Access to electricity for 10 - 15 Very Small Enterprises and maintenance of a local biofuel supply for millions around the activity zone


WEST AFRICA

Strengthening local supply chains

…IN THE ENERGY SECTOR.

S

ince 2011, GERES has been supporting the development of the local supply chain for WASSA brand improved cooking appliances. The potters and tinsmiths from Bamako municipality who make the appliances strive to meet the quantity and quality requirements of households in the capital. To support the scaling up of the sector, GERES and its partners have turned to carbon finance schemes via the establishment of a programme of activities which has both CDM* and Gold Standard certification. CDM: Clean Development Mechanism

*

…IN THE FOOD PROCESSING SECTOR. Oil from a particular variety of groundnuts grown in Agonli, central Benin, is prized for its unique aroma. GERES is working with three local women’s co-operatives, providing technical support to improve clarification processes and commercial support in the form of activities to promote and market the product. ▪

NDICATORS AND MPACTS •O  fficial recognition of the Association of Stove Retailers in Bamako (ARFB), which has 56 members, since early 2014 •3  training sessions organized for women in 2014: flow management and production planning, business management and financial monitoring, negotiation and sales techniques

Sales outlet for Agonli oil in the mini-markets of the capital.

“Now I’m surprised to find myself educating my customers, particularly the supermarkets.” President of the Covè group

GERES • Annual Report 2014

23


WEST AFRICA

Resilience in the face of climate change BUILDING LOCAL CAPACITY

A

Consulting local stakeholders in Benin.

t a time when climate change has become a reality for many parts of sub-Saharan Africa, local policymakers are getting organized to understand the constraints affecting their own areas and to adapt their policies on the basis of methodologies including the climate change variable. In Collines department in central Benin, the Inter-Community Group of Collines (GIC) has, with support from the local NGO IDID* and GERES, begun an ac-

FERLO ENERGY ASSESSMENT Having worked in the Ferlo sylvo-pastoral zone (northern Senegal) since 2012, particularly on building local stakeholders’ capacity in respect of climate analysis methodologies and tools (cartographical atlas, vulnerability analysis), GERES is continuing its efforts in the field, carrying out an energy assessment of the Ferlo area. This assessment is designed to give a comprehensive picture of the area, shedding light on the position of energy consumers, the value chain in which they are involved and the barriers they face along the road to clean, sustainable solutions. It seeks to widen the scope of GERES and its partners’ knowledge of the study area and will make recommendations for possible future intervention. It is supported by the French energy management agency (ADEME) and the Rhône-Alpes region. ▪

24

GERES • Annual Report 2014

tion-research exercise involving a) an energy assessment of two economically dynamic border towns which are key to the department’s development and b) capitalization of the agro-ecological practices adopted in the area. Launched in September 2014, these two lines of work will help over the coming 16 months to build local capacity and identify potential low-carbon, climate-change-resilient solutions. ▪ *IDID: Initiatives for Sustainable Integrated Development

ANNUAL QUANTITY OF ENERGY CONSUMED PER PERSON IN THE COMPOUNDS Figures according to the energy mix used Ferlo Zone Wood = 120 kg/year/person Charcoal = 64 kg/year/person Gas = 8 kg/year/person

Wood = 125 kg/year/person Charcoal = 60 kg/year/person

Wood = 168 kg/year/person


EUROPE MEDITERRANEAN Facilitating the energy transition

FRANCE

MAROCCO

S

ocietal transitions are ongoing in Europe’s neighbouring countries, to both South and East, but numerous crises continue to occur. The very heavy energy dependency of these countries contributes to their vulnerability. During this time, political Europe is still reluctant to commit fully to the energy transition, while local areas look for territorially-based solutions. GERES is therefore fully committed to supporting them, with both their strategic planning and the concrete implementation of field activities, whilst fostering greater co-operation between Europe and its neighbours. In 2014, GERES continued its work of helping households to manage their consumption better in connection with European projects or local initiatives with local authorities or social landlords. 2014 also saw the passing on of the tools and skills developed in respect of small-scale hydro-electricity to local stakeholders to ensure continuity. In Morocco, the Sustainable Hammam project continued its efforts to establish a genuine professional value chain.

GERES • Annual Report 2014

25


EUROPE MEDITERRANEAN

Assistance in housing energy retrofit.

Energy, housing and fuel poverty: towards better management of energy consumption T

his has been the core of GERES work for many years and we aim to provide assistance at all levels to smooth households’ path towards better management of their energy consumption: whether it’s raising awareness and offering advice through the Energy Information Centres, facilitating work through the establishment of an energy retrofit platform, action-research to establish a scheme specifically for jointly owned properties, the “Vivons Solaire en région PACA” platform to stimulate the solar water heater market, or our research work on households’ own efforts to retrofit their property themselves. When it comes to combating energy poverty, we provide strategic support to local authorities or social landlords, along with concrete assistance to households in difficulty. We also design tools for sharing and operational methodologies and we train social workers. ▪

NDICATORS AND MPACTS • 400 home visits to households experiencing energy poverty between 2012 and 2014 • 4,300 households advised by the Energy Information Centre in the last 10 years • Work carried out by 92 individuals at a cost of more than €585,000, or more than 1,200,000 kWh saved, the equivalent of six jobs/year •4  social landlords helped to mobilize their tenants around energy issues in Baou de Sormiou, Marseille

“I systematically advise my clients to get in touch with the Energy Information Centre. There they can get advice on the subsidies available and the work needed to improve their homes’ energy profile. The advisers also run workshops where they give me the benefit of their knowledge and skills concerning the relevant regulations. That interaction means that I can be constantly upto-date in my line of work.” Ange Marchetti, energy retrofitter, domestic thermal insulation

26

GERES • Annual Report 2014


EUROPE MEDITERRANEAN

Farm biogas production centres.

Improving territorial energy performance and autonomy G

ERES is involved in eco-friendly waste management at various levels, including territorial strategies, prevention via the Garden Composting network and specific local composting initiatives, as well as working with particular professional sectors (school catering, campsites, etc.) Commissioned by the Provence-AlpesCôte d’Azur region, GERES is launching the climate/agriculture assessment and energy/climate plan of action approach

at regional level, with the Chamber of Agriculture of ­Bouches-du-Rhône and Bio de Provence. As well as passing on the tools and knowledge deriving from the PHéE (small-scale hydro-electricity and environment) initiative, GERES carried out a forward study and continued its support for local and citizen-led renewable energy production projects in connection with the Green ­Partnerships programme. ▪

NDICATORS AND MPACTS • 84 MW additional hydroelectric potential available in PACA region • 1,978 people made aware of organic waste prevention practices • 49 people recycling 3.7 tonnes of organic waste per year in Meyrargues

In December 2012, the Region approved the Regional Climate/ Energy Plan, committing itself to facilitate the energy transition. Seeking to assist stakeholders, it wanted to carry out a regional climate/agriculture assessment to get an overview of energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions and carbon storage in the agricultural and forestry sectors. At the initiative of GERES and its partners (Chamber of Agriculture 13 and Bio de Provence), a participatory approach was suggested with a view to working together with farmers and foresters in Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur to come up with a regional plan of action. GERES is therefore supporting the Region by carrying out the climate/agriculture assessment which will help in 2015 to consolidate the sustainable agricultural activities ongoing in the area.

GERES • Annual Report 2014

27


EUROPE MEDITERRANEAN

Owner of a Moroccoan hammam advised by GERES on energy savings.

In the Mediterranean, stakeholders are getting organized NDICATORS AND MPACTS • In 3 years, 400 households in energy poverty receiving assistance through home visits in and around Marseille

SUSTAINABLE HAMMAMS IN MOROCCO Launched in 2013, the hammam improvement programme in Morocco is moving into its second year. Strongly rooted in Moroccan culture, hammam usage is highly prized by most people, but still relies on obsolete, inefficient facilities with extremely high energy consumption. After a difficult start due to the lack of involvement of hammam owners, activities were redirected to focus more on demonstrations to show the possible savings. With support from the French Global Environment Facility, GERES is working alongside its main Moroccan partner EnSEn (Energy, Solidarity, Environment).

• 50 artisans trained in insulation techniques in Georgia and Ukraine • More than 22,500 citizens informed and supported (stands, activities for schools, associations, local authorities and so on) with regard to the practice of composting waste in 6 years • In 2014, 2 websites end 1 web documentary created as mobilization tools

MOBILIZING STAKEHOLDERS

GERES uses its scale model to demonstrate the many possible insulation techniques available to individuals.

28

GERES • Annual Report 2014

The energy transition needs to involve the largest possible number of people and create new synergies between the local authorities and economic operators in our areas. How this mobilization will be organized obviously depends on its specific objective, its sponsor and targets and the context in which it is undertaken, but also on the stage the subject has reached (do people know about the subject? Do they think it’s a matter for them? Are they ready to change? Are they already changing?) Setting up a network for exchange, organizing events to raise a­ wareness and share experience, providing the wherewithal to take action, offering training, running communications campaigns … just some of the methods GERES adopts in its mobilization projects.


FINANCIAL REPORT ▪

FINANCIAL REPORT THE 2014 BUDGET TOTALLED €10.7 MILLION, 14% MORE THAN IN 2013. THIS INCREASE REFLECTS THE HIGHER VOLUME OF ACTIVITY IN CENTRAL ASIA.

10%

OPERATING AND FUNDRAISING COSTS ACCOUNTED FOR 10% OF THE TOTAL BUDGET, LESS THAN IN 2013.

Headquarters

9%

35%

Central Asia

Europe Mediterranean

GERES RECORDED A SURPLUS FOR THE 2014 FINANCIAL YEAR. THE FINANCIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL STRATEGY PUT TOGETHER DURING 2013 HAS REAPED ITS REWARD, WITH A €127,000 DEFICIT IN 2013 TURNED INTO A €28,000 SURPLUS IN 2014.

11%

West Africa

22%

South-East Asia

12%

Expertise

Annual use of funds statement USE OF FUNDS IN 2014

FUNDS IN 2014 France & Europe

9% 0,3% 8%

1%

West Africa

11%

12%

Central Asia South-East Asia Expertise

22%

35%

Foundraising costs

Public grants

6% 1%

Morocco

1%

Private grants

13%

Sales of carbon credits

1% 8% 2% 9%

60%

Sales of services Individual donations Recovery of provisions and carry forward of unused funds Inventory

Operating costs

Other operating income

Surplus of the year

CHANGES IN USES OF FUNDS FROM 2010 TO 2014

100% 90%

1%

1%

11%

9%

0% 9%

0% 12%

CHANGES IN PUBLIC GRANTS BETWEEN 2009 AND 2014

0,3%

4,434,227

4,500,000 EUROPEAN UNION

10%

80%

AFD, FFEM, MAEE

70%

Surplus

60% 50%

88%

90%

91%

88%

89%

40%

3,000,000

OTHER PUBLIC FUNDS

HQ costs + Fundraising costs Association’s purpose

30%

1,500,000 979,912

20%

676,105 617,549

10% 0%

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2009

1,509,586

1,343,846

1,149,897

1,635,713

1,458,294 669,601

2010

2011

1,654,717 1,355,315

1,403,302 1,238,853

785,686

2012

795,032

2013

1,070,241 965,761

2014

GERES • Annual Report 2014

29


▪ FINANCIAL REPORT

Annual use of funds statement ► Use of funds USE OF FUNDS ASSOCIATION’S PURPOSE

2014 9,580,911

2013 89%

8,272,854

88%

Variation 2014-2013

Allocation of funds collected from individual donors in 2014

16%

44,222

France & Europe

846,788

983,284

-14%

8,919

Morocco

158,154

184,173

-14%

1,056

West Africa

1,127,239

1,701,605

-34%

22,614

Central Asia

3,759,620

1,780,199

111%

9,116

South East Asia

2,394,829

2,953,137

-19%

2,518

Expertise

1,294,281

670,456

93%

FUNDRAISING COSTS

-6%

49,479

Public fundraising expenses

11,797

13,304

-11%

11,797

Other private funds fundraising costs

88,877

94,018

-5%

37,681

-3%

-

OPERATING COSTS

SURPLUS OF THE FINANCIAL YEAR TOTAL USE OF FUNDS IN €

100,674

1%

107,322

1%

1,009,658

9%

1,041,278

11%

28,237

0,3%

-

0,0%

10,719,480

100%

9,421,454

100%

14%

Total use of funds collected from individual donors TOTAL ACTUAL USE OF FUNDS € (Excluding surplus, provision, stock and outstanding commitment)

The budget rose sharply between 2013 and 2014, with a 29% increase in actual uses of funds. The actual operating budget was therefore €9.9 million, representing 92% of the total budget. It corresponds to expenditure actually incurred, disregarding provisions, dedicated funds, stock variations and operating surplus. This overall increase does, however, conceal large disparities between regions: ► Activities in France, Morocco, West Africa and South-East Asia decreased considerably, with several programmes coming to an end, including the SETUP project in Benin and New Lao Stove project in ­Cambodia. ► At the same time, the activities of the Central Asia region and Expertise unit experienced strong growth, with rises of 111% and 93% respectively in relation to 2013. ► In Afghanistan, the Central Highlands rural development programme, run in partnership with two other NGOs, received

30

GERES • Annual Report 2014

93,701 9,899,862

92%

7,686,309

82%

funding from the French Development Agency. Begun during 2013, it really took off in 2014. With a budget of €10 million over three years, it accounted for 75% of uses of funds in the Central Asia region in 2014. ► Within the Expertise unit, the budget increase is due on the one hand to the rollout of the StovePlus programme, which has seen its budget rise from €400,000 in 2013 to €800,000 in 2014, and on the other to the start of the Climate and Development Committee advocacy project, which will reach its high point during the COP21 conference in Paris in 2015. Operating costs amounted to €1 million in 2014, accounting for only 9% of the total budget as opposed to 11% in 2013. This decrease is partly due to successful efforts to contain overheads and partly to the stabilization of staff numbers and nonreplacement in several cases of maternity

29%

leave, while the volume of the association’s activities has grown. Fundraising costs also fell slightly in value but remained stable in terms of volume, standing at 1% of the total budget.


FINANCIAL REPORT ▪

► Funds FUNDS

2014

FUNDS COLLECTED FROM INDIVIDUAL DONORS

93,701

Unrestricted donations

49,479

Related donations

7,486,912

Public

6,470,230

Private

1,016,682

PRODUCTION SOLD

1,030,681

Services OTHER INCOME Carry forward of unused funds from previous year

1%

2%

168,695 69%

5,650,342

60%

3,805,064

1,298,366

1,130,171

2,161,563

-49%

93,701

221%

49,479

-74%

44,222

33%

-21% -72%

635,201 20%

Follow up of funds collected from individual donors in 2014

-45% 14%

663,165

843,372

Variation 2014-2013

70%

1,845,278 10%

187,309

2,108,186

184,102 15,407

44,222

GRANTS ALLOCATED

Carbon credits

2013

33% 23%

-2%

553,627

104%

Inventory of finished goods

621,168

886,015

-30%

Recovery of provisions

228,339

343,609

-34%

Other activity income

128,507

378,312

-66%

-

127,081

1%

-100%

9,421,454

100%

14%

LOSS FOR THE FINANCIAL YEAR TOTAL FUNDS IN €

10,719,480

100%

Total funds collected from individual donors TOTAL ACTUAL FUNDS € (Excluding deficit, recovery of provisions, stock entries and unused funds carried forward from earlier years)

Actual operating funds amounted to €8.7 million in 2014, accounting for 82% of total funds. As these were not sufficient to cover all actual uses, recoveries of provisions and dedicated funds took up the slack. Public and private grants totalled €7.5 million in 2014, accounting for 60% and 9% respectively of total funds. The 70% rise in public grants in 2014 reflects the increased budget in Central Asia and the operation of the Central Highlands project in Afghanistan. AFD is GERES leading donor, providing almost €4.5 million in grants, although €2.1 million was paid out to our partners in the Central Highlands ­programme. Private grants fell to €1 million, 45% below the 2013 figure. This drop reflects the way public and private grants are allocated in accounting terms to multi-year projects and does not imply any reduction in GERES ability to raise private co-funding.

93,701

8,739,801

82%

7,511,122

80%

Sales of carbon credits fell by 72% in 2014 and accounted for only 2% of total funds. This is due to strong competition on the carbon market, the volatility of credit prices and the much lower rate of replenishment of GERES stocks. Service provision generated €843,000 in 2014, 8% of total funds. This was the result of responding to calls for tender issued in France and abroad by ministries and local authorities in particular, together with international consultancies (Myanmar, Laos, RDC, Afghanistan, etc.) undertaken by the Expertise unit. Individual donations generously given by the public amounted to €94,000. Their value fell between 2013 and 2014 and they represent a small proportion overall. The 30% fall in carbon credit stock entries is due to the end of the accreditation period of the New Lao Stove project in Cambodia,

16%

with no new credits being generated. Carry-forward of unused funds from previous years (or recovery of dedicated funds) amounted to €1.1 million in 2014, primarily corresponding to funds previously derived from carbon finance; uses totalled €867,000. Recovery of provisions totalled €228,000: €161,000 recovered against provision for unsold carbon credits, €56,000 against project risk provision and €14,000 against doubtful debt provision. Other operating income amounted to €129,000. It comprises extraordinary income (€22,000) financial income (€4,000), reimbursement of costs (€33,000) and reallocation of expenses (€20,000), together with contributions from beneficiaries and other ancillary operating income (€50,000).

GERES • Annual Report 2014

31


▪ FINANCIAL REPORT

Balance sheet ASSETS

2014

Variation 2014-2013

2013

NET FIXED ASSETS IN €

39,009

67,765

-42%

Stock of services

10,674

54,602

-80%

1,921,435

1,439,130

34%

Stock of goods Receivables

14,500,155

15,287,012

-5%

Accrued income

477,172

348,537

37%

Prepaid expenses

42,233

31,642

33%

Cash

588

890,054

-100%

NET CURRENT ASSETS IN €

16,952,257

18,050,977

-6%

TOTAL NET ASSETS IN €

16,991,266

18,118,742

-6%

LIABILITIES Social funds Operating result ASSOCIATION FUNDS IN € Provision for end-of-service allowance

2014

Variation 2014-2013

2013

277,653

404,734

-31%

28,237

-127,081

-122%

305,890

277,653

10%

80,293

70,501

14%

Other provisions

2,053,269

1,655,910

24%

Dedicated funds

509,832

1,640,003

-69%

2,643,394

3,366,414

-21%

Loans and debt from credit institutions

462,806

-

Due to suppliers

284,022

143,978

97%

PROVISIONS IN €

438,630

503,749

-13%

Deferred income

Tax and social security

12,856,524

13,826,948

-7%

CURRENT LIABILITIES IN €

14,041,982

14,474,675

-3%

TOTAL NET LIABILITIES IN €

16,991,266

18,118,742

-6%

The association’s reserves increased slightly (+10% in relation to 2013) but were still inadequate with regard to total budget volume, offering cover for less than one month’s activity at end 2014. In 2014, the working capital requirement, i.e. the cash advances needed to run activities, rose steeply. At the end of 2014, the cash flow position was critical, with available funds close to zero and a short-term liability of €463,000 towards the bank (assignment of receivables and overdraft facility). This alarming state of affairs at 31/12/2014 nevertheless needs to be seen in perspective, as significant cash flow variations occurred throughout the year.

32

GERES • Annual Report 2014

Two factors came together to produce this situation:

donors (-7% in 2014 as against -5% in 2013), while accrued income increased by 37%.

► Firstly, there was a sharp drop in the level of dedicated funds deriving from the proceeds of earlier carbon credit sales that had cushioned GERES cash flow (-69% in relation to 2013).

The increases in stock levels and provisions between 2013 and 2014 are correlated because each new carbon credit stock entry, valued at its cost price, is matched by a provision for unsold stock in the same amount. This provision is then reversed as actual sales are made during the year and outward stock movements are recorded. Thanks to this system, it is only income from sales over the year, rather than stock variations on the credit or debit side, that affects the operating result.

► Secondly, 2014 coincided with the end of several major projects in Central Asia and West Africa, meaning that GERES was obliged to incur expenditure despite not being able to obtain cash advances from its public or private donors. The balance of the amounts due against the funding agreements concerned will in fact be paid during 2015, following delivery of the final reports. Also in 2014, deferred income decreased faster than receivables from


GERES PUBLICATIONS IN 2014 ▪

STUDIES AND REPORTS

Outcomes Magazine: Looking back at 10 years of carbon finance

Development projects accessing carbon finance (F3E study)

Produced in connection with the projects run in Cambodia, this magazine reports on our experience with carbon finance as a vehicle for scaling up the dissemination of improved cooking appliances.

The study is based on a literature review and in-depth case studies (five selected projects, including three with a field presence: in Mali, Peru and Cambodia) targeting two priority sectors: domestic energy and tree planting/reforestation.

www.geres.eu/en/resources/publications

www.geres.eu/en/resources/publications

Newsletters from the Climate and Development Committee (CCD) of Coordination SUD Integrating the climate constraint in development projects. The newsletter of the Climate and Development Committee (CCD) of Coordination SUD, on which GERES is lead agency until 2015, analyses how the climate constraint can be accommodated within development projects. These “Notes” will be sent out three times per year and report the latest news from the CCD.

MANUALS AND GUIDES

Technical guides on energy and agricultural solutions in Tajikistan In 2011, ASDP Nau and GERES launched a project to help small farmers increase their income in Sughd province, Tajikistan. To back up the assistance provided to these farmers, GERES has developed a series of five guides on farming themes.

Training manual on agro-forestry, renewable energy and adaptation in Cambodia This manual has been developed to help Cambodian farmers adopt smart farming practices that mitigate the effects of climate change. It reviews topics such as sustainable forest management, composting, use of eco-pesticides and farm waste management. www.geres.eu/en/resources/publications

www.geres.eu/en/resources/publications

GERES • Annual Report 2014

33


▪ GERES DIGITAL PRODUCTIONS IN 2014

South-East ASIA Blog Creation of a blog for the South-East Asia region: an opportunity to find out about the team, project news and GERES expertise in the area. gsea.regions.geres.eu

StovePlus Setting up a website dedicated to the cross-cutting Stoveplus project helps to stimulate stakeholders’ involvement and share efficient clean cooking solutions across the world. www.stoveplus.org

The compost box Dedicated to promoting an educational tool on composting, the “Compost box” website is the gateway to discovering and obtaining a package containing various teaching materials to be used in activities with children. www.boiteacompost.fr

Energy poverty: action to help low-income households Vivonsolairenpaca Vivonsolairenpaca.fr is the portal for individual solar water heaters in Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur. It helps people in the region with the purchasing process, from receiving information and advice through to using the individual solar water heater. www.vivonsolairenpaca.fr

34

GERES • Annual Report 2014

Produced in connection with the ACHIEVE project in Marseille, this web documentary showcases the results of a coherent, co-ordinated local assistance scheme to combat energy poverty in the area. The tool aims to inform and educate local authorities and other stakeholders wishing to take action. www.geres.eu/fr/ressources/webdocs/item/352-precarite-energetique-­ agir-chez-les-menages-modestes


INDEX OF PARTNERS ▪

FINANCIAL PARTNERS Noting the tight funding climate faced by solidarity organizations and projects, GERES warmly welcomes the growing commitment of the foundations, endowment funds and companies, both loyal partners and newcomers, who stand alongside us. We thank them for their trust and support – so vital to the quality of GERES work.

Partner companies AG2R La Mondiale Air France KLM with the Flying Blue nc programme ECODIS EDF Engie

Associations and foundations

EEP — Energy and Environment Partnership - Mekong GEF — Global Environment Facility FFEM — French Global Environment Facility Daey Owens Dutch fund NDF — Nordic Development Funds OFID — OPEC Fund for International Development UNDP — United Nations Development Programme

French public and professional organization

Crowdfunders

Our thanks to the many participatory funders who contributed

APFED — Asia-Pacific Forum For Environment and Development (Think Tank) CFSI — French International Solidarity Committee Abbé Pierre Foundation Linda Norgrove Foundation Lord Michelham of Hellingly Foundation Prince Albert II de Monaco Foundation Un monde par tous Foundation NEXUS TEI — Thai Environmental Institute (Think Tank) WRI — World Resources Institute (Think Tank)

ADEME — Environment and Energy Management Agency ADEME International — Environment and Energy Management Agency ADEME PACA — Environment and Energy Management Agency, Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur Anah — National Housing Agency ESIA Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur MEDDE — Ministry of Ecology, Sustainable Development and Energy Rhône Mediterranean Corsica Water Authority

to the fundraising

Corporate foundations

French local authorities

and Mongolia

FEDF HELP Foundation Legallais Foundation Louis-Dreyfus Foundation Nexans Foundation Raja — Danièle Marcovici Foundation

Bouches-du-Rhône Department MPM — Marseille Provence Métropole Pays d’Aix District Authority Pays d’Aubagne et de l’Étoile Urban District Authority Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur Regional Council Provence-Luberon-Durance

in autumn 2014.

Endowment funds Itancia endowment fund Solidarity Accor endowment fund

Bi- and multi-lateral co-operation agencies AFD — French Development Agency ASTAE — Asia Sustainable and Alternative Energy Programme - World Bank CEREEC — ECOWAS Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency DCI Principality of Monaco — Official Development Aid and International Co-Operation Agency DfID — Department for International Development (United Kingdom)

campaign for the bioclimatic greenhouse project in France

Institutions and public authorities in co-operation countries ACIAR — Australian Centre For International Research in Agriculture AusAid — Australian international development agency British Embassy in Tajikistan Embassy of New Zealand in Moscow EU — European Union Finnish Ministry of Foreign Affairs GIZ — German international co-operation agency German Embassy in Tajikistan KFW — German development bank

GERES • Annual Report 2014

35


▪ INDEX OF PARTNERS

TECHNICAL PARTNERS More than 165 partners including: 13 Habitat 4D ACBAR — Agency Coordinating Body of Afghan Relief and Development Accueil et Rencontres ACF — Action Contre la Faim [Action against Hunger] Acting for Life ADEME (Provence-Alpes Côte d’Azur Regional Office) ADIL — Departmental Housing Information Agency ADL-Chefchaouen — Chefchaouen Local Development Association AERMC — Rhône Mediterranean Corsica Water Authority ALEC — Local Energy and Climate Agency AMADER — - Domestic Energy and Rural Electrification Agency (Mali) AMEDD — Association for Promoting Awareness of Sustainable Development (Mali) ANADEB — National Agency for Biofuel Development in Mali APEAS — Agence Provençale pour une Économie Alternative et Solidaire (Provencal agency for an alternative, solidarity-based economy) Arbonaut ARCBDT — Casablanca Regional Traditional Bath and Shower Association Arkhangai Herders’ Federation ASDP Nau — Agency for the support of development processes Asian Development Bank Association of producers and distributors of improved stoves ATD Fourth World AVN — Association La Voûte Nubienne AVSF — Agronomes et Vétérinaires Sans Frontières BDM — Mediterranean Sustainable Buildings Bio de Provence Bolivia Inti — Sud Soleil Cambodian Forestry Administration Cambodian Institute of Technology CAPEB 13 — Bouches-du-Rhône Confederation of Building Sector Artisans and Small Enterprises CARE France CARI CAVM — Centre d’Animation du Vieux Moulin CCFD — Terre Solidaire Chamber of Agriculture, Bouches-du-Rhône CLER — Renewable energy liaison committee CNESOLER — National Solar Energy and Renewable Energy Centre (Mali) CPIE Rhône Pays d’Arles — Environmental Initiatives Centre Croq’Jardin CRPF — Regional Forest Ownership Centre CRPM — Conference of Peripheral Maritime Regions CSTB — Construction Industry Science and Technology Centre (France) DNE Mali — National Energy Department 36

GERES • Annual Report 2014

DREAL PACA — Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur Regional Environment, Planning and Housing Department Écopolenergie Électriciens Sans Frontières Énergies pour le Monde Foundation Enerplan EnSEn — Energy, Solidarity and Environment Association Envirobat Méditerranée Épluchures ETC Foundation Europ Continents European Union Ever Green social enterprise, Myanmar FBTP 13 — Bouches-du-Rhône Building and Public Works Federation Forest Research Institute, Myanmar Forestry administration of Pursat, Battambang, Kampong speu and Kampong Chhnang provinces, Cambodia FRB PACA — Regional Building Federation French Red Cross GACC — Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves GESPER — Gestion de l’environnement en Région (Environmental Association) Gevalor GIZ — German international co-operation society GoodPlanet Foundation Government of Arkhangai GRAINE PACA GRDR — Groupe de recherche et de réalisations pour le développement rural (Rural development research group) Gret — Solidarity-based development professionals Groupe URD ICS — Cambodian Standards Institute IDEMU — Urban Ecology Institute (France) In Vivo — Denis Savanne Initiative Développement Institut de la Méditerranée IRAM — Institute for Applied Research in Development Methodology IZUBA énergies Jardilien Languedoc-Roussillon Regional Council Les Jardins de l’Espérance LIRE — Lao Institute for Renewable Energy MADERA Médecins du monde Médiance 13 Mekong Think Tank Mercy Corps MIME — Cambodian Ministry of Industry, Mines and Energy Ministry of Environmental Conservation and Forests, Myanmar Mlup Baitong Cambodian Association MOE — Cambodian Ministry of Environment

Moroccan National Federation of Owners/Operators of Traditional Baths MRE — Regional Water Authority (France) Municipality of Frattamaggiore Municipality of Genoa Municipality of Kabul Municipality of Lakatamia Municipality of Malaga Municipality of Meyrargues Municipality of Simiane National network of energy information centres Naturoscope Network of energy information centres in PACA region ONEMA — National Water and Aquatic Environment Office Orgaterre Oxfam France PADES — Self-Production and Social Development Programme Peppermint Peuples Solidaires — ActionAid France PIN — People In Need Association Planète Urgence Provincial offices responsible for energy and mines in Pursat, Battambang, Kampong Speu and Kampong Chhnang Qualibat Qualit’EnR RAC-France — Climate action network REFOCTC — Regional Training Centre for Forest Communities (Cambodia) Regional agricultural centres for rural development (Benin) Robins des Villes SAB — Solidarité Afghanistan Belgique Secours Catholique SEMA SNV Laos & Vietnam — Dutch Volunteer Foundation Solidarités Internationales TEC — Tourisme Transport Territoires Environnement Conseil (consultancy) UFC Que Choisir UNIS — UNIon of property management agencies Vitri — University of Helsinki Viviane Hamon Conseil WACCA — West African Clean Cooking Alliance World Bank WWF — World Wide Fund for Nature Zangnanado, Cové and Zakpota municipal councils (Zou Department, Benin)


Credits: Collective compilation GERES Co-ordination: Audrey Onillon Proofreading: Alain Liban Translation: Jean Lubbock Graphic design and production: [LBLB] Loïc Beillet le Béhérec – contact@loicbeillet.com Copyright: © GERES/Nicolas FRÜH; © GERES/Alexander CROOK; © GERES/Benjamin ROGEZ; © GERES/Sophie NEGRIER; © GERES/Qudratullah; © GERES/France 4; © GERES/Amine GAROUJ; © GERES/Pierre THIRIET Published in September 2015 Printing: Magenta Numérique, certified PEFC paper This report has been eco-designed in accordance with GERES environmental charter in order to minimize its impact on the environment.


Major challenges Ongoing transitions Support GERES

Group for the Environment, Renewable Energy and Solidarity 2 cours Foch – 13400 Aubagne – France Tel. : +33 4 42 18 55 88 Fax : +33 4 42 03 01 56 contact@geres.eu

www.geres.eu

Annual Report RA 2014  
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