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PRESENT TENSE:

The present tense is a grammatical tense whose principal function is to locate a situation or event in present time. The term "present tense" is usually used in descriptions of specific languages to refer to a particular grammatical form or set of forms; these may have a variety of uses, not all of which will necessarily refer to present time. Some examples are here: We study English at the University. She likes to play soccer.


NEGATIVE AND INTERROGATIVE FORM: Present tense negative form; When we use the present in negative form we just need to use; Subject + auxiliar y DO/ DOES+ not+verb+ complement. Some examples here: I Don´t like to play soccerShe does not write a letter. Present tense interorgative form: When weuse present tense in interrogative form we just need to use; Auxiliary Do/does+ subject+ verb+complement Some examles here: Do I need to study today?


PRESENT CONTINUOUS OR PROGRESSIVE: The present progressive or present continuous form combines present tense with progressive aspect. It thus refers to an action or event conceived of as having limited duration, taking place at the present time. some examples are here: She is singing right now. we are studying and working. They are cooking our dinner now. I’m taking a call form one of my friends.


NEGATIVE AND INTERROGATIVE FORM: Present continuos negative form: When we wanna use present progressive in a negative form this is the estructure: Subject+be (negative)+verb(ING)+complement. Some examples are here: We are not dacing. He is not studying right now. Present progressive interrogative form: When we need to ask something using this tense we need to use this: Be+subject+verb(ING)+complement. Some examples are here: Are you calling her right now? I


PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS OR PROGRESSIVE: The present perfect progressive (or present perfect continuous)is a construction combines some of this perfect progressive aspect with present tense. It is formed with the present tense with (have or has), the past participle of be (been), and the present participle of the main verb We have to follow this structure: subject+HVE7HAS+be(PASTPARTICIPLE)+ verb( ING)Complement. Some examples are here: I Have Been listening music for an hour. She has been Studying and Working at the same time for 3 years


NEGATIVE AND INTERROGATIVE FORM: Present perfect in negative form: When we use present perfect tense in a ningative form we have to use this estructure: Subject+HAVE/ HAS+Been(NOT)+VERB(ING)+complement.

Some examples are here: I have Been not eating yet. She has Been not doing that yet. Present perfect in interrogative form: We need to follow this estructure: HAVE OR HAS+subject+been+Verb(ING)+complement. Some examples are here: Have you been trying to do that before? Has she been spending money there before?


PRESENT PERFECT: The present perfect (traditionally called simply the perfect) combines present tense with perfect aspect, denoting the present state of an action's being completed, that is, that the action took place before the present time. (It is thus often close in meaning to the simple past tense, although the two are not usually interchangeable.) It is formed with the present tense of the auxiliary have (namely have or has) and the past participle of the main verb. We just need to follow this: Sub+HAVE/HAS+ Participle+complement

Here are some examples: I have written a letter this morning.

They have never traveled abroad.


NEGATIVE AND INTERROGATIVE FORM: Present perfect in negative form: When we use present perfect tense in a ningative form we have to use this estructure: Subject+HAVE/HAS (NOT)+Past participle+complement. Some examples are here: I have not eaten yet. She hasn´t done that yet. Present perfect in interrogative form: We need to follow this estructure: HAVE OR HAS+subject+past perticiple+complement. Some examples are here: Have you tried to do that before? Has she been there before?


PAST TENSE: The past tense is a grammatical tense whose principal function is to place an action or situation in past time. In languages which have a past tense, it thus provides a grammatical means of indicating that the event being referred to took place in the past. Examples of verbs in the past tense include the English verbs sang, went and was. Some examples are here: I played videos games with some friends yesterday.

We went to mall and we got this video game. They studied a lot for that test.


NEGATIVE AND INTERROGATIVE FORM: Past tense neagative form: When we use past tense in negative we need to follow this: Subject+Auxiliary DID+not+verb+ complement. Some examples are here: We didn´t want to be there yesterday. He did not work last weeked. Past tense interrogative form: When we want to ask something in the past we just need to follow this estructure: Auxiliary DID+Subject+verb+complement. Some exampales are here: Did you study for this exam? Where did they work last year?


PAST PERFECT TENSE: The pluperfect is a type of verb form, traditionally treated as one of the tenses of certain languages, used in referring to something that occurred earlier than the time being considered, when the time being considered is already in the past. The meaning of the pluperfect is equivalent to that of English verb forms such as "(we) had arrived" or "(they) had written". you just need to follow this structure: Subject+HAD+Participle+cmplement. Here are some examples: I had played soccer. She had finished the homework.


NEGATIVE AND INTERROGATIVE FORM: Past perfect tense neagative form: When we use past tense in negative we need to follow this: Subject+HAD (NOT)+PAST PARTICIPLE+ complement. Some examples are here:

I had not broken my glasses. He had not worked there. Past perfect tense interrogative form: When we want to ask something in the past we just need to follow this estructure: HAD+Subject+Past perticiple+complement. Some examples are here: Had you studied for this exam? Where Had they wored ?


PAST CONTINUOS OR PROGRESSIVE: The past progressive or past continuous is construction and combines a progressive aspect with past tense, and is formed using the past tense of be (was or were) with the present participle of the main verb. It indicate an action that was ongoing at the past time being considered. When we used this tense we have to follow this: Subject+be(past)+verb(ING)+complement. Here are some examples: At three o'clock yesterday, I was working in the garden last month , They were working and studying.


NEGATIVE AND INTERROGATIVE FORM: Past progressive in negative form: When we use the past progressive we have to use this; Subject+be(PAST)+NOT+verb8ING)+Complement. Here are some examples: They were not working yesterday. At two o’ clock yesterday she was doing some exercises. Past progressive interrogative form: When we want to ask something,You just need to follow this: Be(PAST)+Subject+verb(ING)+complement. Here are some examples: Were you eating last night? Was she stuying today in the morning?


PAST PERFECT PROGRESSIVE The past perfect progressive or past perfect continuous (also known as the pluperfect progressive or pluperfect continuous) combines perfect progressive aspect with past tense. It is formed by combining had (the past tense of auxiliary have), been (the past participle of be), and the present participle of the main verb. when we use this we just need to follow this: Subject+HAD+been+verb(ING)+compelement.

Here are some examples:

I had been working on my novel when she entered the room to talk to me. They had been usng their cellphones all night.


NEGATIVE AND INTERROGATIVE FORM: Past perfect continuos neagative form: When we use past tense in negative we need to follow this: Subject+HAD (NOT)+been+verb(ING)+compelemnt Some examples are here: I had not been broking my glasses. He had not been working these days. Past perfect continuos interrogative form: When we want to ask something in the past we just need to follow this estructure: HAD+Subject+Past perticiple+complement.

Some examples are here: Had you been studying for this exam? Where Had they been working ?


SIMPLE FUTURE TENSE WITH WILL: The term simple future or future simple, as applied to English, generally refers to the combination of the modal auxiliary verb will with the bare infinitive of the main verb. Sometimes (particularly in more formal or old-fashioned English) shall is preferred to will when the subject is first person (I or we); see shall and will for details. The auxiliary is often contracted to 'll; see in English auxiliaries and contractions. We just need to follow this structure: subject+Will+verb+complement Here are some examples:

It will rain later this week She will work in that company. We will sleep together this weekend.


NEGATIVE AND INTERROGATIVE FORM: Fututure in negative form When we have to express something negative using this tense you must follow this estructure: Subject+will(NOT)+verb+compelement. some examples are here: I Won’t be able to do that we will not be there because we have to do something else. future in interrogative form: we just need to follow this estructure: will+subject+verb+complemet. Will you be able to do that? Will we stop tomorrow?


SIMPLE FUTURE WITH GOING TO: The going-to future is a grammatical construction used in English to refer to various types of future occurrences. It is made using appropriate forms of the expression to be going to.[1] It is an alternative to other ways of referring to the future in English, such as the future construction formed with will. So basically we just need to use this format: Subject+be+GOING TO+verb+complement. here some examples; She is going to be there tomorrow We are going to dance all night. I am going to teach you how you have to speak English.


NEGATIVE AND INTERROGATIVE FORM: Fututure in interrogative form When we have to express something negative using this tense you must follow this estructure: be+subject+GOING TO+verb+compelement. some examples are here: are you going to work today? is she going to be our teacher? future in interrogative form: we just need to follow this estructure: subjectl+be (NOT)+GOING TO+verb+complemet. you are not going to need that. She is not going be our teacher.


FUTURE PERFECT: The future perfect combines perfect aspect with future time reference. It consists of the auxiliary will (or sometimes shall in the first person, as above), the bare infinitive have, and the past participle of the main verb. It indicates an action that is to completed sometime prior to a future time of perspective, or an ongoing action continuing up to a future time of perspective (compare uses of the present perfect above). here are some examples:

I shall have finished my essay by Thursday. When I finally search him he will have disposed of the evidence. By next year we will have lived in this house for half a century


FUTURE PROGRESSIVE: The future progressive or future continuous combines progressive aspect with future time reference; it is formed with the auxiliary will (or shall in the first person; see shall and will), the bare infinitive be, and the present participle of the main verb. It is used mainly to indicate that an event will be in progress at a particular point in the future. here are some examples: At this time tomorrow I will be taking my driving test.

I imagine we will already be eating when you arrive.


MODAL VERBS: A modal verb (also modal, modal auxiliary verb, modal auxiliary) is a type of auxiliary verb that is used to indicate modality that is, likelihood, ability, permission, and obligation. Examples include the English verbs can/could, may/might, must, will/would, and shall/should. A modal auxiliary verb gives much information about the function of the main verb that it governs. Modals have a wide variety of communicative functions, but these functions can generally be related to a scale ranging from possibility ("may") to necessity ("must"), in terms of one of the following types of modality:


MOST COMMON MODAL VERBS ARE: CAN:Can I get your name please? COULD:Could you tell me where the bank is ? MAY:May I Know the reasons why you are leaving? DO:Do you need some help with that? WOULD:Would you like to come with us? SHOULD:Should I need to be here? There many other modal verbs that are important to understand but these are the most important for you to understand English.


Modal verbs and all the tenses that we have in english  

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