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Contents NO.1 - SS14


RIGHT ON POINT EDMONTON • CALGARY • VANCOUVER • TORONTO www.gravitypope.com


Georgie NO.1 - SS14

Publisher & Creative Director NATHAN MARSHALL

Associate Publisher AARON PEDERSEN

Fashion Director MICHAEL MENEGHETTI

Advertising Manager JESSICA CL ARK

Copy Editor JUDE ZUPPIGER

Contributing Writers GLEN LEAVITT, OMAR REYES, KRIS SAMRA J, BEN SIR, ELL A WEATHERILT

Contributing Photographers TINA CHANG, NEIL MOTA, AARON PEDERSEN, MATHEW SMITH

Contributing Illustrator STAVROS DAMOS

Special Thanks MODE MODELS, WORKHALL, HENNESSY, OVERHAUL MEDIA

Contact GEORGIE MAGAZINE 222 - 9662 101a Ave Edmonton, AB, Canada T5H 0A7 info@georgiemagazine.com | www.georgiemagazine.com facebook.com/georgiemagazine | twitter.com/georgiemagazine instagram.com/georgiemagazine FOR ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES sales@georgiemagazine.com

Self published by Georgie Magazine Inc. Opinions expressed in this issue are the opinions of the authors and do not nessesarily reflect the opinions of Georgie Magainze. 2014 Š Georgie Magazine. Reproduction without permission is prohibited. Printed in Canada.


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Rock ‘n’ roll hit perfection in its infancy. Betrayers are not party-poopers. Despite the title of their recently released debut album, Let the Good Times Die, singer and guitarist Travis Sargent insists the title is tongue-in-cheek. “It’s not the gloomiest album ever, but it isn’t exactly G ‘n R, y’know?” The band simply thought it was funny, thinking one could “throw on this record and bum all your friends out,” Sargent says. Even visually the album offers a paradox – a woman laughing vivaciously, dressed in vibrant colors, the style of print and font resembling a bastard sibling to The Beach Boys’ Pet Sounds, in a world where the apple of Brian Wilson’s eye stomped on his heart instead of agreeing to a cruise in his Camaro. So what, if not gloom and doom, is the band’s M.O.? According to Sargent, “We wanted to make a party album that was a bit darker and had a bit of desperation in there.” Start the party and kill it as well – a two-birds attack with fuzzy guitars and crunchy beats replacing the stone. And the attack plan is clearly working. Accompanying Sargent in the five-member band is bassist Justin Zawada, drummer(s) Joe Stagliano and Scarlet Welling-Yiannakoulias, and the easiestspelled-last-name organist Terry Fairfield. Following the December release of the album, Betrayers garnered an impressive amount of press and hype surrounding their tunes and live shows. There’s an understanding around their hometown of Edmonton that if you want to make it into their show, you better get there early, as staple venues such as Barber-Ha and Wunderbar hit capacity quick. And their prominence is expanding beyond the borders of their home province. Previous tours have yielded admirable results, with Victoria-based label Shake! Records releasing a cassette version of Let the Good Times Die and mail-order demands for the album coming from as far away as Norway and Greece. The possibilities that will reveal themselves through

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this summer’s touring plans are unknown. On top of performing at some Alberta festivals (Hot Plains, Bermuda, Golden West), Betrayers will join fellow Edmontonians The Lad Mags and Victoria’s The Backhomes for some road time. The tour is tentatively titled The Sea to Sky Revue. “[It] will be set up like a classic touring roadshow,” explains Sargent. “I guess the common theme the bands share is a love of psych, garage and bubble gum music. It’s looking pretty great so far, and it’s been nice putting our heads together with those other bands [to plan] it all out. The rock ‘n’ roll brain trust.” So the gang has plans and ambitions, and they are anything but gloomy. “I think the goal for us is just to be able to carry on making records that people like, and to be able to go on tour and not have to worry about whether or not people are gonna show up. It would be great to tour the States or Europe on the next album. I’ve got pretty realistic expectations,” Sargent says. The humble bastard – visions of ‘hard work’ and ‘humility’ floating through his head – surely a band with a name like Betrayers has to have a grander scheme. Sargent admits he’d accept being “adored by all of Edmonton. Is a key to the city too much to ask for?” Aha, their nefarious plot thickens. But like any plot, it’s never as good without characters that compel you, and Betrayers plan on doing just that, bringing their psych-rock blitz with a tried and true consistency. “The music that holds up best over time is early rock ‘n’ roll,” proclaims Sargent. “How does that work? Usually when something is invented it gets tinkered with and improved over time but rock ‘n’ roll hit perfection in its infancy. As they say, if it ain’t broke don’t fix it, so we try to play music in that vein in the hopes it’ll still sound good fifty years from now.”

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H a ve yo u eve r t r i e d t o e x p l a i n a d re a m t o s o m e o n e a n d f e l t l i k e yo u f a i l e d i n g ra s p i n g t h e e m o t i o n s o r a d j e c t i ve s t h a t we re s o p a l p a b l e o n ly a f e w h o u rs a g o ?

It’s as if this hidden world exists on a different realm with its own rules. Yet, we are so eager to share this “reality” with others because we believe they’d understand us. Perhaps that’s what Jack Kerouac was getting at when he penned the now ubiquitous statement taken from his 1960 novel, Book of Dreams: “All human beings are also dream beings. Dreaming ties all mankind together.” The idea that an alternate reality binds us together is fascinating. If there was a soundtrack to help unravel this notion, Washed Out’s sophomore LP, Paracosm, just might be what we need. As a continuing narrative to their previous work, this new album continues in the vein of blurring genres and creating otherworldly atmospheric melodies and textures. During our interview, I asked Ernest Greene (singer-songwriter, producer and main entity of Washed Out) about the evolving aesthetic of this new album. “First off, musically, I try not to think too much about how I’m putting the record together. I follow whatever my inspiration is at the time.” He continues: “So, for this new record, Paracosm, I was most concerned with writing an album that could be performed well. That meant using a lot more live performances and instrumentation on the album. A lot of the earlier records were

sequenced on the computer and there was very little playing happening.” When artists release their creation into the wild, it is our tendency to want to categorize what we hear. I asked Greene how he felt about this tendency. “Out of the gate I was called ‘chillwave’,” he confesses. “I definitely didn’t go out to create a genre or anything. I’ve always had that which is both good and bad. It’s great that I’m set apart from a lot of other bands. On the flipside, I don’t want to make the same record every time.” Although there is a less obvious electronic influence on this album, there is still enough to satisfy longtime fans while keeping things warmly inventive through a myriad of instruments and a surprising rock nuance. If you’re familiar with Greene’s story, you’ll remember that everything started in the bedroom studio he created while living with his parents in Georgia. Like a dream beyond any of his craziest expectations, he garnered the attention of internet taste-makers and from there catapulted towards touring and eventually signed in 2011 with legendary Seattle-based label Sub Pop. His debut album had him performing live shows behind keys and synthesizers. So how has Greene

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adapted to being more prominent on stage? With his friendly Georgian drawl he admits, “I’ll never say it’s super natural really for me to do that. It’s just been a progression that’s happened along the course of four or five years of doing this and playing in front of crowds. I’m actually a pretty shy person. But I guess I’ve developed. I can deal with it now.” With a laugh, he adds, “I have to will it to happen. It [also] helps having a great band [because] they’re doing most of the work!” Greene does not exude any sense of entitlement or the “let’s get on with the interview” attitude that you’d expect from someone who had just gotten up from a tiring tour to answer questions from a stranger. Instead, he was focused, deliberate and friendly during our talk. I was curious to know, despite his meteoric rise, what fame has taught him. “I guess the one thing that jumps out is just to be humble. Every single day to remind myself that it’s like a crazy dream to be doing what I’m doing, ‘cause you know, it’s easy. We’ll be on the road having shitty days where I’m not getting sleep and it’d be easy to bitch about it. But when it’s all

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said and done, not only am I getting to travel all over the world and see these amazing places [but] I’m getting to make money playing music. It’s pretty insane!” This attitude is not surprising considering how hard Greene works at creating a live show that engages his audience and allows him to meet with fans after almost every concert. Yet, the stuff of dreams doesn’t always come easy. Greene reveals that after the initial wave of success from his first album,Within and Without,it took time to adjust to the recognition he was receiving and the pressure of meeting those expectations. “After the attention it was really hard to just even start working because immediately everything felt like it wasn’t good enough.” Yet, his outlook changed when he decided to adjust his attitude and not overthink it. Which, in my opinion, is part of what’s compelling about the landscapes Washed Out creates with every album. We are invited to escape our current reality for a few moments and enter our own little paracosm – that is, our imaginary places of whim and freedom.

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DI lyrics and hooks with the effect of creating an emotional experience for the participant. You could consider clubs the temples of a 21st century secular society – with DJs standing in for ministers. The effect of going to church or a club is the same. You enter a place with a group of people and have a shared experience. The audience, in this case led by the DJ, is directed towards the same emotional experiences. You leave feeling uplifted and connected to your other fellow participants. However, the analogy to gospel music was probably unintentional. Guy and Howard originally wanted to get a rapper, but couldn’t get one and thought a hip-hop preacher would be the next best thing.

Settle leads off with “When a Fire starts to Burn”. The song samples the voice of a self-proclaimed “hip-hop preacher” and the accompanying music video is a provocative montage of the preacher (and the music) working up the crowd to a frenzy. House music and gospel music do have things in common so the use of a preacher as vocalist says something beyond just looking cool. Both gospel and house use repetitive

There are so many layers to understanding pop culture nowadays – musical mash-ups and sampling, the subtle and not-so-subtle cultural

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EDM is more popular than ever. Last year the electronic dance music duo Disclosure released their debut full-length album. In the UK, their home country, Disclosure’s Settle sold more albums than Lady Gaga, Miley Cyrus or Kayne West. The brothers behind Disclosure, Guy and Howard Lawrence, will tell you that electronic dance music has always been here, but it is here now in a way it hasn’t been before. Why is that?

Kris Samraj

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Sonically we were taking an approach from the past, but we wanted to update it and give it a modern twist using vocalists. references. It can be bewildering for people who aren’t neck deep in the zeitgeist. Critics have unpacked Disclosure’s music and said that parts are derivative of earlier house music sounds or that it’s not particularly innovative. But those criticisms completely miss the point and don’t help explain the extraordinary success of these two brothers. Somewhat bewildered by their success Guy explains, “The size of the shows we have been playing has gone off to a huge extent. We were playing to people in 200-300 capacity venues and now we are doing 50,000 people at festivals.” Why is that? Because the way to appreciate and understand Disclosure’s music is emotionally, not intellectually. Settle is extremely polished; never mind the young age of Guy and Howard. The craftsmanship and expert production has made the album popular, but it’s their use of vocalists that has set them apart. “Sonically we were taking an approach from the past, but we wanted to update it and give it a modern twist using vocalists,” says Guy. The lyrics make the music accessible, providing a touchstone for people unfamiliar with house music. The goal for Guy and Howard was to create a pop-house album and they have succeeded.

“There was an idea that we just wanted to make a combination of instrumental club music, house music and garage. A mixture of that same sound, but with vocalists in a more pop structure,” explains Guy. What’s refreshing about Guy and Howard is their willingness to work with anybody, whether it’s a fresh face or an experienced star. Before providing the vocals for Disclosure’s breakthrough single “Latch”, English singer-songwriter Sam Smith was not a household name in the UK. Then “Latch” blew up and launched Sam Smith into fame. Howard tells us that the first time they heard Sam sing was on a phone recording. “It was just ridiculously good,” says Howard. Guy chimes in: “He is fucking awesome. Heard his voice and we loved it.” On the very next track, “F For You”, Guy and Howard seamlessly switched gears and collaborated with Mary J. Blige. For vocalists, Guy and Howard are easy to work with. “I do more of the production and mixing and Howard does more of the lyric writing, top line writing. But we both contribute to almost everything. It’s pretty shared,” says Guy. They create the sonic framework for the song, but give vocalists latitude in writing the lyrics. Exactly what lyrics

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The focus is on the playing of instruments ‘cause there are a lot of acts out there, especially in dance music, where it’s just a guy with a laptop.

the vocalists come up with isn’t predetermined by Guy and Howard – underscoring the primacy of the emotional message of the melody over the intellectual meaning of the lyrics. Like most successful people, the seeds of their success can be seen in the previous generation – Guy and Howard’s parents were musicians themselves. Surrounded by music from an early age, Guy and Howard have built on the modest successes of their parents. Guy learned to play drums at three. Howard picked up the bass guitar at eight or nine. Unlike many other electronic dance acts, they play instruments on stage. “The focus is on the playing of instruments ‘cause there are a lot of acts out there, especially in dance music, where it’s just a guy with a laptop,” says Guy. It’s another way for Guy and Howard to connect with their audience and another thing that separates them from other DJs. Guy continues: “[A DJ] could be doing nothing; he could be doing loads of things. But at the end of the day it’s just on a screen and no one can see the screen. So we bring keyboards, bass guitars, drums and a big light show with a bit of visuals to try and make it exciting. Create a club

atmosphere – you feel like you are at a club but you are watching a show.” Each track on Settle has great texture. “You and Me” is a good example. Sounds ebb and flow creating a dissonant but not unpleasant soundscape. Guy and Howard experiment with bringing in many samples. “On this album there are lots of ambient noise recordings – sounds from train stations and shopping malls. It’s in the background of most tracks,” says Guy. The varied vocalist styles taken together with the eclectic background sounds and melodies create a rich, interesting album. Disclosure’s Settle was nominated for the Grammy for best dance/electronica album before ultimately losing to Daft Punk. Nothing to be ashamed of considering the heights that Daft Punk has soared to in the last decade. Guy is 22. Howard is 19. As a debut album it’s hardly unreasonable to have high expectations for their musical careers. If you’ve already heard them you know all this. If you haven’t, check them out – they’ll make a convert out of you.

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Jen Mann is creatively restless. “I don’t think anyone plans out how they will develop or change but things sort of happen and mature out of experiments and fun. At least that’s what has happened for me. I think that my work and ideas developed out of my own life and what is happening for me at the time that I am making them.”

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The Toronto-based artist studied printmaking at the Ontario College of Art and Design, but her current work focuses on large-scale oil portraits of friends and family. These paintings begin life as digital photos which Mann shoots herself. Despite the double layer of artistic mediation between the viewer and the subject,

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The Tumblr age of unlimited scroll images has definitely affected the way images are disseminated to the mass public.

Mann’s paintings are remarkably intimate. You feel as if you know the subjects, and care about them. The intimacy in Mann’s work can be partly explained by the fact that she works with friends and family members instead of strangers or professional models, as well as her low-key approach to the initial photo sessions. “I think my process of shooting is sort of intimate and casual. There is a process of removing shirts, where the subject sort of reveals himself or herself. We then talk about life and catch up a bit while I shoot photos sort of randomly, not really posing a shot in any way. There is certainly rawness even in the process, and it is definitely deliberate. It is also natural to my personality and relationships with friends and family.” Another important aspect in Mann’s work is her deliberate cultivation of imperfections. This begins with the photo sessions. While most people would choose to work from the most flattering shots taken, Mann prefers the off-shots, the pictures where the subject is blinking, or making a funny face, or looking away from the camera. “I think that there is something special about images that capture awkward or perhaps non-beautiful or posed moments. There is something beautiful in

the honest moment.” Mann then heavily Photoshops her images to give them a washed-out look, and to insert various digital “glitches” that most of us would consider undesirable when uploading photos to Facebook or Tumblr. Mann chooses to replicate visual cues from the digital world in her painting because she sees that world as a part of the reality that we now inhabit, and through which we experience our most important relationships. “The color edits and pixilations reference digital media, because the content of the work references modern relationships and understanding of people today, through avatars, profiles, and manicured facades of personality.” Since our interactions with the people we care about increasingly take place through digital media, it makes sense to reference that aspect of our lives in a painted portrait. While many commentators fret about the increasing volume of digital information available at our fingertips and what it may mean for our brains, our lives, and our relationships, Jen Mann is more upbeat. At least from the perspective of art appreciation, she sees the current glut of digital information as an opportunity, not a threat. “I think the Tumblr age of unlimited scroll images has definitely affected the way images are

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disseminated to the mass public. Which is great for artists. People who may never have been able to see your work or who may never visit a gallery can now easily view art from their bed on their laptops. Everyone is able to see and share images. Everyone is connected. And everyone is influenced at least in some way by the unlimited amount of images which flood the internet and sneak into our lives in so many ways.” It’s striking that given the ubiquity and ready availability of digital photography and digital imagery anyone would still want to see an old-fashioned oil painting, or make one. Film photography was supposed to kill painting, and yet the art form thrived in the twentieth century. Digital photography made it cheap and easy for anyone to take an almost unlimited number of photos and yet it is still satisfying to see a real painting, even, in Jenn Mann’s case, a painting which deliberately mimics the appearance of a digital photo. Mann believes the effort required to produce a painting is exactly what makes it so appealing. “I don’t think that painting will really ever die. There is something about the artist’s hand involved in the actual creation of the work which is alluring and almost mystical. I think that the labour involved in creating a piece also gives it this authority and deliberateness that a photo may not have.” This may

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the contrast between the source material, which is digital in nature, and the end product, which is painstakingly created by hand. Because of the digital source material inspiring Mann’s art we are reminded, even more than usual with a painting, of the deliberate care that goes into its production and the intense subjectivity of the artist behind it. While her current approach to painting is working extraordinarily well for her, it has changed in the past and Mann believes it will change again. “I haven’t always worked from photos. I have worked with live subjects; I have also worked in many mediums. I think this process works for me at the moment. I won’t say that my work will always be like this because I don’t think I could ever stick to one style or technique.” Already Mann is preparing to debut some new work, which she says will be a departure from the past. “My new work is visually related but also much different than my last series. I have taken a new turn. I am very excited about this work, and I feel like to summarize the work right now wouldn’t really do it justice.” Her new work will appear this fall at the Neubacher Shor Contemporary gallery in Toronto.

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I n J a n u a r y, N e i l Yo u n g m a d e h e a d l i n e s a c ro s s C a n a d a ove r h i s mu l t i - c i t y H o n o u r t h e Tre a t i e s c o n c e r t t o u r. What grabbed the media’s attention was the purpose behind the tour. Primarily, it aimed to raise funds for the legal battle the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation (ACFN) was waging against Shell Canada’s Jackpine mine expansion. Despite estimates by Shell that this enlarged development would bring in $17 billion in royalties and taxes to the Alberta and federal governments, indigenous and environmental groups feared that the destruction to land, water and wildlife would overshadow any financial gains. Allan Adam, Chief of the ACFN, explains: “The government just approved a giant Shell company project on our land in Alberta, even though it admits it will likely wreak havoc on the land and water my people depend on – and infringe on our treaty rights. But with Neil getting people talking, the government and Big Oil are worried Canadians will start to question the unchecked expansion of the Tar Sands that line their pockets.” With stops in Toronto, Winnipeg, Regina and Calgary, Young performed concerts and held press conferences in each respective city. Leaving Calgary, the heartbeat of the Oil Sands industry, for last, he hosted a panel discussion moderated by environmentalist David Suzuki and a variety of panelists including First Nations representatives and environmental scientist Dr. David Schindler. Neil Young is no stranger to using his platform to raise awareness about issues close to his heart. In 1985 he co-founded the now famous American benefit concert series Farm Aid along with Willie Nelson and John Mellencamp. The intent behind this initiative was to raise money for farmers in the US who faced potential bankruptcy due to surmounting mortgage debts. The following

year, something much closer to his heart was at stake. With a son who was diagnosed with cerebral palsy, he and his wife founded the Bridge School, a school for children with severe speech and physical impairments. Given his aptitude for raising awareness and funding social projects, it is little wonder that today Neil Young has invited the rest of Canada to move towards reconciliation with indigenous nations, which is what Anishinaabe journalist and educator Wab Kinew declares “the biggest social justice issue awaiting confrontation.” It is also no surprise that a celebrity like Young would garner so much scrutiny and criticism from a variety of sources. Perhaps what stood out as most surprising was how some media outlets misconstrued and cherry-picked his words to create a message that failed to resemble the truth of what he had said. This begs the question: what other misinformation does the media spew that continues to shape the consciousness of Canadians? Knowing the media slant, it seemed like Young missed an opportunity to communicate with greater clarity what treaties were being violated. It also didn’t help those sitting on the fence about these issues when Young refused to sit with Canada’s oil and gas lobby groups to have what they hoped would be “a balanced discussion”. Nevertheless, the tour was a success on many other levels. For starters, they exceeded their goal of raising $75, 000 for legal fees. “We have succeeded beyond our wildest dreams in raising money for legal defence of the First Nations. Global environmental forces are joining us now with financial resources and it’s now because of the Canadian people’s awesome response to our call for justice,” announced Young at the final

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We have succeeded beyond our wildest dreams in raising money for legal defence of the First Nations.

concert in Calgary. Recently, Young gave an update about another legal battle the ACFN was involved in on his Facebook page indicating that Shell had “shelved the Pierre River expansion plan.” This is a small victory that shows the promise of ACFN’s work and partnership with Honour the Treaties. Another success of the tour was the significant coverage Young attracted to issues concerning health and environmental impacts related to oil sands development, treaty relationships between First Nations and Canada, and the importance of seeking alternative forms of energy. “So it’s a win for us, because we’re all talking about it. No matter how you feel, there’s a discussion going on at the breakfast table. That’s big. That’s real. That’s Canada,” reflects Young on what the tour has provoked. Not only are Canadians talking about these issues, but we are also slowly learning that the answer to this complex situation isn’t to reduce it to just one facet.

Young admitted that it’s not an “anti-tar sands crusade.” That message would be too simple and misinformed. Instead, what Young has demonstrated is that in order to move forward, we, the citizens of Canada, need to walk together towards our preferred future. Louie Dih ttheda, Dene Elder of the Black Lake First Nation, reminds us: “It is said, that when God made this world he made many different things. That is why the newcomers and First Nations people must help each other and work together.” Taking into account that Canada is ranked dead last of OECD countries when it comes to environmental protection and that Alberta only enforces one percent of its tar sands environmental violations, it is that much more imperative that we stand united in protecting our land for future generations. Don’t be fooled – the collective voice of concerned citizens and Indigenous peoples is louder and carries a larger scope of influence than Neil Young could ever muster. Which is precisely the result Young is hoping for.

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Ella Weatherilt

COAST Spawned out of a mix of Beach Boys guitars and ‘60s girl band lyrics, Best Coast is a classic California band. Their three albums since forming in 2009 have been met with both critical acclaim and commercial success, proving that their nostalgic sound is what the people want to hear. The band consists of front woman and chill indie songstress, Bethany Cosentino, and Bobb Bruno – a musical Galileo.

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As we begin our interview, I can tell right off the bat that Bobb Bruno is pretty soft spoken. I fantasize that he is the kind of guy who doesn’t really care about being famous, who just thrives on music and music alone. But I don’t really know one way or the other. Unequivocally, he is not a front man. He is a behind-the-scenes thinker who lets his music do the talking for him.

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Bobb informs me that Bethany is sleeping and won’t be joining us. I can’t really blame her; I’d probably be napping too after a two day bus trip from Salt Lake City to Vancouver – where the duo will play their fourth show on tour with legends The Pixies. I ask Bobb how the tour is going so far, and attempt to imagine what it might be like to tour with The Pixies – the band that every kid with any sense that they might be “different” obsessed over for some period in their lives. If Bobb feels similarly astonished he isn’t showing it. “It’s been really great, … crowds have been receptive. It’s just nice to be back on tour.”

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tour we’re back in the studio.” As for plans for the album, “We’ll do the usual … We had a long break before this tour, so [Beth’s] been writing at home.” As Bobb and I continue to talk it becomes clear that Best Coast is showing few signs of stopping. From the way he discusses their process it seems like Beth and Bobb have come up with an infallible formula for creating their trademark sun-drenched songs. Despite being a two-person project, they seem to spend a healthy amount of time apart – making it nearly impossible for either of the musicians to lack lustre.

What we play now is drawing inspiration from a lot of ‘70s Los Angeles stuff, like the Eagles and Fleetwood Mac...

When asked what it’s like to tour with such an influential band, he remarks that “it’s hard to believe.” Despite enormous success, Best Coast has only been playing together since 2009. But in that time they have managed to churn out three well-received albums and have opened on two major tours, now for The Pixies and previously for Green Day in 2012.

“We’ve been finding inspiration from the music that we like. And also, on tour we all just get along and enjoy each other’s company. [Beth and I] don’t really see each other much, even though we live like five minutes from each other. It’s good – that way no one’s burnt out from being around each other all the time. Everything’s really good, it’s always fun and everybody’s always really excited to see each other when we start touring.”

The Pixies will wrap up touring North America in March and will continued down to South America. Best Coast won’t be joining them, and instead, has plans to return to the studio. “We’re going to start our new record in March,” Bobb tells me. “Pretty much two days after the

Best Coast has managed to maintain their signature sound while still presenting growth from album to album. Their first release, Crazy for You, was a lo-fi masterpiece. Its instrumentals maintained a garage rock-like attitude while still playing true to the ‘60s girl bands that inspired

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When we did Fade Away we were open to anything, and that’s how this new record is going to be.

the group. Their latest album, Fade Away, has presented itself as a more grown up version of the band’s distinctive sound. Bethany’s vocals shine and Bobb’s guitar is sharp and effective. Bobb offered some insight as to how their sound will continue to change with future albums: “What we play now is drawing inspiration from a lot of ‘70s Los Angeles stuff, like the Eagles and Fleetwood Mac, and still the Beach Boys. When

we did Fade Away we were open to anything, and that’s how this new record is going to be. There’s a lot of other influences we haven’t really incorporated into our music, but I feel like on this new record we’re going to get to do that.” If their fourth album is anything like the first three, Best Coast will have no problem maintaining their steady rise to fame. Either way, a little surf rock guitar will always go a long way.

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SEEKER

overcoat - Neil Barrett (Simons) hybrid jacket - Corneliani (The Helm) hydro compact jacket - Zegna Sport (Simons)

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BY

Pedersen

Michael Meneghetti

M O DE L Lowell Tautchin (Mode Models) S tyl i n g

BY

Sam Moukhaiber

H a i r Mark Raymond Hayes (Barber Ha) —39—


GEORGIE

fashion

shirt jacket - Jil Sander (Simons) shirt - Paul Smith (Simons) shorts - 3.1 Phillip Lim (Simons) shoes - Magnanni (The Helm)

—40—


GEORGIE

fashion

sweater - Maison Martin Margiela (Simons) trousers - Wooyoungmi (Simons) boots - Swims (The Helm)

—41—


GEORGIE

fashion

trenchcoat - Maison Martin Margiela (Simons) shirt - Paul Smith (Simons)

—42—


GEORGIE

fashion

silky undershirt - Acne Studios (Simons) sport shirt - Camoshita (The Helm) cargo pant - Ovadia & Sons (The Helm) belt - Magnanni (The Helm)

—43—


GEORGIE

fashion

blazer - Jil Sander (Simons) trousers - Philippe Dubuc (Simons) shoes - Ami (The Helm) backpack - Kris Van Assche (Simons)

—44—


GEORGIE

fashion

ECHO

PHOTOGRAPHY ART DIRECTION

BY

BY

Pedersen

Michael Meneghetti

M O D E L Courtney Visscher (Mode Models) STYLING

BY

HAIR + MAKE UP

Cassy Meier BY

MAKEUP ASSISTING

—45—

Katie Matson BY

Sean Picard


dress - MALORIE URBANOVITCH (Gravity Pope) 2nd dress - CAMPRE (Workhall) sweater - ACNE (Gravity Pope) shoes - CAMPER (Gravity Pope)


dress - MALORIE URBANOVITCH (Gravity Pope) blazer- FILLIPA K (Simons) rings - CAMPRE (Workhall)


GEORGIE

fashion

crop top - MCQ (Simons) skirt - CREATURES OF COMFORT (Gravity Pope) pants - DRYKORN FOR BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE (Simons) body chain - HUNT AMOR (Workhall + Bamboo Ballroom) shoes - FLUEVOG (Gravity Pope)

—48—


GEORGIE

fashion

pants - TRISHA PASNAK top- ACNE (Gravity Pope) cuff - KIKO (Bamboo Ballroom) shoes - FLUEVOG (Gravity Pope)

—49—


top - MINK PINK (Bamboo Ballroom) ring - HUNT AMOR (Workhall + Bamboo Ballroom) necklace - C. PAK & CO. (Bamboo Ballroom)


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GEORGIE magazine Issue 1 SS14 (DIGITAL EDITION)