Issuu on Google+

Georgina Davies

CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT


CONTENTS CONCEPT..............................................................................................................1 BRAND ETHOS........................................................................................................2 TRENDS FROM HEIMTEXTIL AND THE FUTURE LABORATORY....................................................3 VERDICT - UK CLOTHING MARKET 2010 - APRIL 2010..........................................................4 VERDICT - GLOBAL LUXURY RETAILING 2009....................................................................5 ‘BLING IS DEAD’ - KARL LAGERFELD..............................................................................5 MINTEL - BRITISH LIFESTYLES 2010 ..............................................................................6 KEY FINDINGS FROM THE MINTEL AND VERDICT REPORTS.....................................................6 SLOW FASHION.......................................................................................................7 DRAPERS INDICATOR.................................................................................................8 PINPOINTING THE CONSUMER......................................................................................9 CONSUMER PROFILE................................................................................................10 FARMERS’ MARKET QUESTIONNAIRES............................................................................11 TRACEABILITY......................................................................................................12

CASE STUDY - WWW.WHERESYOURSFROM.COM .......................................................................................12 HOW CAN TRACEABILITY BE PUT INTO A FASHION PRODUCT..........................................................................12

MARKET POSITIONING MAP........................................................................................13 COMPETITORS.......................................................................................................14

NICOLE FARHI................................................................................................................................15 PAUL SMITH BLACK..........................................................................................................................16 ELIZABETH AND JAMES......................................................................................................................17 LOVER........................................................................................................................................18 BY MALENE BIRGER.........................................................................................................................19

COMPETITOR COMPARISON........................................................................................20 PROPOSED PRODUCT AND PRICE ARCHITECTURE..............................................................21 COMMUNICATING WITH CONSUMERS.............................................................................22 WHAT DOES THE CONSUMER THINK ABOUT COMMUNICATION?.......................................................................22 CASE STUDY - ONLINE PRESENCE - ASOS.COM .........................................................................................22 CASE STUDY - THE CATAZINE - JOULES..................................................................................................23

MAGALOGS AND CATAZINES.......................................................................................24 BOUTIQUE ANALYSIS................................................................................................25 FINDINGS FROM MARKETING AND BOUTIQUE ANALYSIS.......................................................27 WHAT IS STILL PRODUCED IN THE UK?..........................................................................28 DENHOLME VELVETS................................................................................................29 MORTON YOUNG AND BORLAND..................................................................................30 HARRIS TWEED TEXTILES..........................................................................................31 FOX BROTHERS & CO LTD ........................................................................................32 JOHN FOSTER.......................................................................................................33 ACORN FABRICS.....................................................................................................34 JOHN ENGLAND.....................................................................................................35 HENRY BERTRAND..................................................................................................36 STEPHEN WALTERS.................................................................................................37 REID & TAYLOR......................................................................................................38 JAMES GROVE AND SONS..........................................................................................39

EASTMAN STAPLES..................................................................................................40 K STEVENS...........................................................................................................41 WOVEN LABELS......................................................................................................42

FRANKLINS..................................................................................................................................42 NATIONAL WEAVING COMPANY............................................................................................................42

HOW STABLE IS THE UK MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY?.........................................................43

VIEWPOINT OF JOHN FOSTER.............................................................................................................43

CAMPAIGN FOR WOOL AND UKFT.................................................................................44 MANUFACTURING WITHIN THE UK ..............................................................................45 CARBON FOOTPRINT...............................................................................................46 BRANDING THE PRODUCT..........................................................................................47

DECIDING ON A BRAND NAME.............................................................................................................47 WOVEN LABELS..............................................................................................................................47 DESIGN FOR ISLE’S LABEL.................................................................................................................47

SWING TICKETS.....................................................................................................48 SWING TICKET DESIGNS...........................................................................................49 INSPIRATION........................................................................................................50 MARGUERITE BAKER HARRISON..................................................................................51 FREYA STARK........................................................................................................52 ECCENTRIC TOURISTS..............................................................................................53 THE DNA OF THE ECCENTRIC TOURIST...........................................................................56 MOROCCAN DRAPING...............................................................................................57 CULTURAL MIX MATCH.............................................................................................63 COMBINATIONS OF TEXTURES.....................................................................................65 CLASHING TRIBAL WITH TRADITIONAL...........................................................................66 THE EXOTIC TEXTILES OF AFAR..................................................................................67 ENGLISH STYLE.....................................................................................................68 KEY ENGLISH PIECES................................................................................................69 ENGLISH JUXTAPOSITIONS........................................................................................70 MOOD BOARD........................................................................................................72 DESIGNS WITH DRAPING...........................................................................................73 THE COLOURS OF THE SOUKS OF MARRAKECH.................................................................75 MOSQUE OF THE KASBAH COLOURS - MARRAKECH............................................................76 THE SAADIAN TOMBS COLOURS - MARRAKECH..................................................................77 YVES SAINT LAURENT’S MARJORELLE GARDENS COLOURS - MARRAKECH..................................78 FINAL COLOUR PALETTE...........................................................................................79 PATTERNS OF THE SAADIAN TOMBS..............................................................................80 LASER ENGRAVING EXPERIMENTATION...........................................................................82 DESIGNS USING LASER ENGRAVING...............................................................................85 EXPERIMENTING WITH AGEING LACE............................................................................86


CONCEPT To create a new brand with a tailoring based collection which highlights the fabrics and materials available from British manufacturers and embraces the concept of

traceability, slow fashion and product value

The brand will sit between the high high street and designer fashion and will hopefully become part of the affordable luxury area A variety of types of fabric will be sourced from silks to shirtings and suitings to velvets. Trims such as buttons and zips will also be sourced from the UK

Traceability – understanding and having information on the whole of the products life up to the point of sale. For instance have information on fibre producers, fabric producers and where the garment was made Slow Fashion – creating a product which transcends trends and seasons in order to combat the fast fashion market and buying trends Product Value – making a consumer want to keep a product beyond its seasonal life through making them connect emotionally with the product

...1


BRAND ETHOS

... a brand to showcase British fabrics and trims ... a brand to deliver desirable forever goods ... a brand to make customers fall in love with product again ... a brand with traceability at the centre of its ethos ... a brand to bring a resurgence to slow fashion

...2


TRENDS FROM HEIMTEXTIL AND THE FUTURE LABORATORY Heimtextil has been working with The Future Laboratory to analyse the consumer trends for the Spring Summer 2011/12 season. Although Heimtextil primarily focuses on interior design and trends I believe these insights into consumer feeling would also translate to fashion. Within the interview with them they have chosen five key trends :

Sustainability Progress Handicrafts Global Long Lived They have established the links between these five categories as consumers wanting to understand and love a product again: ‘These days, there are so many products on the market and there is so much

consumers want to know precisely what their decision to buy is based on.

choice that the

Especially in difficult times like these, they need a good reason to buy. They want to know exactly why they have decided to buy a certain product rather than another.

no longer want to follow the trends of the season, buy They

Consumers want cutting down, stripping back and to know where a product was placing more value on those things with which they made and who made it. surround themselves’. (http://

...3

of their own origin.

GLOBAL

SUSTAINABILITY

The Global trend looks at what the consumer feels about globalisation and its effects. The Future Laboratory has found that due to globalisation the

Both Kate Franklin and Caroline Till from The Future Laboratory believe that sustainability is set to grow within a consumers conscious. They believe that the rise in consumer recycling and taking an interest in the environment points towards a increase in sustainability.

‘products need not necessarily be recyclable they do have to be manufactured and designed in a way which allows them, for example, to be repaired, hence making them sustainable’. (http://heimtextil. They believe that

messefrankfurt.com/frankfurt/en/besucher/trend/ newsletter/interview/nachhaltigkeit.html)

PROGRESS

new bed linen or redesign walls every year.

The Progress trend is looking at how consumers feel about progress within there lives and whether they have had enough of it.

Things have to last, i.e. be sustainable. They should have a cultural heritage, history and tradition and also tell the story

The Future Laboratory found that ‘consumers facing increasing financial pressure and the need to go green are

heimtextil.messefrankfurt.com/frankfurt/en/ besucher/trend/newsletter/interview/fortschritt. html)

They have also found that an emotional connection with a product is becoming more important to the consumer. ‘As we edit our lifestyles, we seek the

we can place more emotional value – those that products on which

offer us comfort and reassurance, hence we see a new generation of designers is renewing traditional craft techniques and a revived interest in more traditional textiles. This goes hand-in-hand with consumers’ growing

desire to know more about how things are made and about the people who make them.’ (http://

heimtextil.messefrankfurt.com/frankfurt/en/ besucher/trend/newsletter/interview/fortschritt. html)

HANDICRAFTS The Future Laboratory feel that because of the huge increase in handicrafts there is a renewed interest in the origins of a

‘manufacturer is the focus of attention and is celebrated’. http://heimtextil.

product and that the

messefrankfurt.com/frankfurt/en/besucher/trend/ newsletter/interview/handwerk.html

‘attention is reverting to all things local and people can immerse themselves in their microcosm’ (http://heimtextil. consumers

messefrankfurt.com/frankfurt/en/besucher/trend/ newsletter/interview/global.html)

Therefore consumers are buying a lot more

‘concepts like tradition and cultural heritage crop up again’ (http://heimtextil. local produce and

messefrankfurt.com/frankfurt/en/besucher/trend/ newsletter/interview/global.html)

LONG LIVED Following on from the previous four trends Long Lived looks at whether these principles are likely to stay. The Future Laboratory believes that

‘in this new landscape, value equates to quality, longevity, sustainability and meaning.’(http://heimtextil.messefrankfurt. com/frankfurt/en/besucher/trend/newsletter/ interview/langlebigkeit.html) and that this

landscape is likely to stay. They also

‘the trend is moving away from seasonal towards longevity’(http://heimtextil.messefrankfurt. believe that

com/frankfurt/en/besucher/trend/newsletter/ interview/langlebigkeit.html)

Taken from -http://heimtextil.messefrankfurt.com/frankfurt/en/besucher/trend/newsletter/interview.html


VERDICT - UK CLOTHING MARKET 2010 - APRIL 2010 THE MARKET The UK Clothing Market 2010 report by Verdict analyses the whole of the market from value to luxury. The main finding

‘premium segment becomes new focus for the market’ (2010:1) which is of this report is that the

even used on the front page of the report. Verdict feel that this change in the focus of the market has come about because of the recession.

‘the novelty of low prices has begun to wear off and consumers have become more selective in their purchasing’ that

(2010:18) and that therefore brands are having to try harder to gain customers.

THE CONSUMERS

Verdict have found that the 25-34 year olds are going to grow in the next 5 years until 2015. Although they may not grow as quickly as the more mature customer there will still be 1,110,000 more of them in 2015 (2010:39) and so they will be a possible market.

This focus on a new part of the market is interesting and could point towards a viable market for a new brand to enter into. Verdict states with this in mind that the worst place to be at the moment is the midmarket which is being squashed by the value and premium markets. There

‘offer consumers value by replicating premium ranges and experiences at lower price points’ (2010:3). This idea of giving customers more than a cheap price point is something that Verdict has really investigated in this report and they feel that a low price is not enough to get consumers. They believe

‘social trends such as women deferring childbirth are making the 2534 age group more attractive to retailers, and this age group is growing, making it a valuable target’ (2010:2). This They have found that

growing market is therefore one which is going to be investigated further as the prospective consumer for the range.

‘After a decade of the value retailers driving the clothing market in the UK, there has been a shift and the premium segment is going to become the new battleground.’ (2010:2)

advice is to

25-34 age group. Verdict believes that these age groups though are set to change.

Profile of UK Clothing Shopper 2010 (2010:17)

The report also analyses the current clothing consumers in the UK which is shown in the chart above. As can be seen there is a bias towards women with 22.3 million women who fit into the bracket of regular clothing shoppers. The chart also shows that the 35-44 age group are the most prolific shoppers followed by the 65+ group and then the

Verdict has also identified that the 5564 age group are high spenders and are spending almost as much as the 25-34 year olds. They believe that it is this age group that is the driving force towards the end of fast fashion. It is this end of fast fashion which Verdict feels is key to the coming years within the clothing market and that

‘instead more distinctive fashion and brands are gaining prominence and the demand for better service and quality is increasing’(2010:2).

...4

CHANGING THE WAY FASHION IS SOLD Within this report Verdict has also looked at how fashion is currently being sold. They believe that the days of just selling through a shop or just through a catalogue are gone and that multichannel retailing is the way forward. Multichannel retailing is the idea of selling online and instore for instance and Verdict believe that this is the way forward for retailers.

‘Consumers want the flexibility and convenience of multichannel retail; being able to order, collect , have delivered and return goods at their own convenience, not the retailer’s’(2010:4) It is this return to consumer flexibility and choice that will be incorporated into the proposed brand. Verdict have only looked at the internet as an example rather than also looking at catalogues but this could be a way of incorporating the consumer within the selling experience.


VERDICT - GLOBAL LUXURY RETAILING 2009 The traditional Luxury Market is currently suffering due to the world wide recession. This could be a good opportunity to launch a lower priced ideal of luxury while the larger companies may be faltering. Verdict has assessed the current state of the Luxury market in 2009 and come up with these key points...

‘Bling is out and considerate consumption is in’(2009:3) Focus on sustainability Consumers are now looking for products to last longer than a short season As has already been found in one of Verdict’s other reports the premium market is the area which will grow. Within the Global Luxury report Verdict has found that the high prices which have governed

as product traceability, supply chain standards, product authenticity and quality’(2009:19). This idea fits in

perfectly with the ethos of the proposed new brand which will focus completely on traceability. This renewed interest in product quality and ethical issues will hopefully aim towards consumers buying products which will last longer than one season. This does not necessarily mean that the product has to be classic or boring but just that the consumer has a love for it.

‘some luxury retailers report that consumers are now looking for products to last longer than for a short season’(2009:62). This

In fact Verdict has found that

evidence hopefully begins to signal an end to the fast fashion world that has currently been happening and instead shows that consumers are beginning to care about products again. Verdict believes that

‘in the current climate further price rises cannot be passed on or this is the case and ‘craftsmanship communicated to the buying public’(2009:18). This means that within rather than bling becomes the luxury market prices need to either go paramount’(2009:62) which helps to luxury are set to fall and that

down or stay as they are.

This move away from the excessive consumption which has happened in recent times signals an approach to a more traditional way of purchasing and Verdict believes a move back to an ethical approach. This does not necessarily mean organic cotton but instead:

‘an increased interest in ethical issues such

...5

back up the idea of a really local product within the new brand which is being proposed. The key ideas within this report signal a real change within the luxury market with a end to the conspicuous consumption which has ruled the last 20 years. It is hoped that The new range will hopefully be able to capitalise on this trend.

‘BLING IS DEAD’ - KARL LAGERFELD Verdict is not the only group to decree that bling is out. Karl Lagerfeld has also said that the coming era will be an era of considered consumption. Speaking to the Telegraph in 2009 he was quoted as saying:

‘There is no creative evolution if you don’t have dramatic moments like this. Bling is over. Red carpetry covered with rhine-stones is out. I call it ‘the new modesty’’ (Adams,2009). This idea of getting back to beautiful items without all the added glitz is very refreshing and points towards a new way of loving product.

The Chanel designer believes that this will not impact on the creative design of the luxury market but

‘this whole crisis is like a big spring housecleaning - both moral and physical’ instead believes that

(Adams,2009).

interesting one. This could be taken to mean getting back to a cleaner aesthetic or it could be changing the way that we have consumed for years. Overall though the feeling is one of change and in Lagerfeld’s eyes change for the better.

This idea of cleaning up the fashion industry is an

Karl Lagerfeld Taken from http://fashion.telegraph.co.uk/newsfeatures/TMG4268330/Karl-Lagerfeld-Bling-is-dead-due-to-globaleconomic-crisis.html


MINTEL - BRITISH LIFESTYLES 2010 The Mintel British Lifestyles report has looked at the British consumer throughout a number of different sectors. The sector which has been analysed in relation to this project is Clothing and Adornment as well as some of the more general areas about consumer spending and viewpoints.

be better insulated from the effects of tax rises and spending cuts because this sector relies on a small niche group of affluent and keen buyers’(http://academic.mintel.com/sinatra/oxygen_ academic/my_reports/display/id=479871&anchor=atom/display/ id=541565).

THE CLOTHING MARKET Like Verdict Mintel has also documented that the way consumers shop has changed during the recession and have noted that the higher level has not declined. Mintel believes that this is because the higher market can offer elements which the high street and value sectors can’t.

‘Consumers have learnt that heritage, craftsmanship, quality, design and style are worth paying for when it provides fashion that can withstand the test of time: clothing becomes an investment and not a form of consumption.’(http://academic.mintel.com/sinatra/

oxygen_academic/my_reports/display/id=479871&anchor=atom/ display/id=541565) This focus on craftsmanship and quality is often only found within the premium and designer market and the fact that the consumer is searching for this bodes well for these levels in the future.

‘most adults feel designer clothing is better quality than other brands: only 30% of men and 17% of women agree that designer clothing quality isn’t any better than other brands’(http://academic.mintel.com/sinatra/ Mintel has also found that

oxygen_academic/my_reports/display/id=479871&anchor=atom/ display/id=541565). This shows that the British consumer still feels that there is a reason to trade up in their buying and that the majority still value premium and designer clothing. Mintel acknowledges this and makes the observation that it is also the top end of the income scale who have come through the recession best. This could explain why the designer market has not suffered as much as they first feared it might. This idea is backed up by Mintel’s finding that designer clothing

...6

‘may

THE END OF FAST FASHION? It has been identified that Verdict already feels that there may be an end to fast fashion and Mintel has also found evidence to suggest this. They have found that consumers will still have a small spending

‘the trend towards low-cost disposable clothing may slow in the coming years as consumers age and as more look for products with longer-term value’ power after the recession but that

KEY FINDINGS FROM THE MINTEL AND VERDICT REPORTS The premium market is a strong area of the market post-recession Consumers are beginning to care about sustainability and product traceability

(http://academic.mintel.com/sinatra/oxygen_academic/my_ reports/display/id=479871&anchor=atom/display/id=541565). They also believe that this new aim for longer term value will place a greater emphasis on the sustainability of products. This does not necessarily mean that consumers will want everything to be fair trade and organic, but that they would like to know where the products have come from and to understand who has made them.

Consumers have an increased interest in heritage and craft elements within brands

Although most consumers will have a renewed interest in quality and sustainability which will drive them towards the upper end of the market the value sector will not disappear completely. This is because there will still be a market for cheaper clothing from younger consumers within the lower economic bands.

Consumers would like a more personal shopping experience

‘will lose out as the number of upmarket AB consumers rises’(http://academic.mintel.com/sinatra/oxygen_academic/ Mintel also believes though that the value market

my_reports/display/id=479871&anchor=atom/display/ id=541565).

Overall Mintel has documented much the same findings as Verdict has and found that the clothing market is still relatively strong following the recession. They believe that the premium market is strong and that although fast fashion won’t completely disappear the consumer does appear to be thinking more about purchases.

The end of over the top consumption and the return to considered consumption Interest in products lasting longer than a season

A return to all things local both in food and fashion


SLOW FASHION

...7

DEFINITION A product which transcends trends and seasons in order to combat the fast fashion market and buying trends. The product often has a more classic styling which will not go out of fashion quickly. Fast fashion has been ruling the British fashion industry for the past 10 years with the high street going from strength to strength and the value market being led by Primark. As Primark has become more fashionable it has become the high street shop of choice for not only teenagers with little income but also the middle classes with a steady job. As the recession hit it was thought that the value market would grown and the designer market would shrink. As has been seen in both Verdict and Mintel reports the value market remained strong but the designer market didn’t crash in the way that it was thought it would. This is mainly because a lot of middle class consumers traded up their buying to designer level. Mintel and Verdict also found that the consumer is looking for a more personal and crafted product. This idea fits in perfectly with the ethos of slow fashion which has already been seen through the more classic collections of Chloe and Celine for Autumn Winter 10. Many of the collections for this season focused on classic shapes which was seen as a comment on the recession and what consumers were after. In fact the Vice President of PR for Gap,

‘the economy has led people to be more considered about the way they spend money on clothes ... so Anita Borzyszkowska, has said

that means either simple wardrobe builders or really special pieces’(Fox,

2010). This comment sums up the principles of slow fashion perfectly. Its main principles are to make consumers fall in love with products again and to encourage them to buy less. The aim is for consumers to buy less of better quality. Three researchers from the Blekinge Institute of Technology in Karlskrona in Sweden have come up with a ten Slow Fashion Values. These are:

Seeing the big picture Slowing down consumption Diversity Respecting People Acknowledging human needs Building relationships Resourcefulness Maintaining quality and beauty Profitability Practicing Consciousness

(Cataldi, 2010) These ten principles are only guidelines which have been set by the research trio and are not to be used all in conjunction with each other. Like sustainability a completely slow fashion label would not be possible but elements can

be used. One of the main values is practicing consciousness. This is the consumer being aware of what they are buying and where it has come from. The issue is not to stop consumers shopping because that would not be sustainable but to make consumers think about what they are buying. Dorothy Maxwell from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA)

‘reducing consumption is part of the issue, but it’s not the only solution. Investing in closed loop systems that enable us to reuse and recycle is important too’

believes that

(Wright, 2010). This idea of reusing and recycling items is key to a more sustainable lifestyle. This could either be sending an item to charity once the consumer is finished with Celine AW10 Taken from http://www.vogue. it or looking at ways of repairing co.uk/fashion/show.aspx/full-length-photos/ id,8867/Page,2# /imageno/19 the item. Slow fashion is ultimately making consumers fall in love with a product and them not wanting to replace it within a seasons time. This is good for the environment and will hopefully help consumers value product again. The products do not necessarily have to follow a very classic styling but have to have enough added value for the consumer to want to keep them forever.

Chloe AW10 Taken from http://www.vogue.co.uk/ fashion/show.aspx/full-length-photos/id,8881#/ imageno/2


DRAPERS INDICATOR

...8

The Drapers Indicator is good way of seeing how the current trading climate is within the independent fashion business. The proposed new brand is going to pitched at the premium level and so the most recent Indicator for this sector has been looked at.

These Top 10 best selling brands have all been looked at as possible competitors for the proposed new brand. This is because they are successful within the area which the brand is to be launched into.

This question which was asked to the 50 boutiques within the Indicator follows on from the quotation from Browns in Cambridge. Although it only shows that 32% of the consumers are interested in the country of origin this is almost a third of consumers. If the findings of Verdict and Mintel are to come true then this number will grow and they will be the captive audience for the new brand.

This quotation is really interesting and helps to back up the idea of a fully British brand. The consumers new interest in the origins of products could be down to the exposes often run in the press about bad manufacturing practice. It could also be because they are beginning to be interested more sustainable products.

This result really shows that consumers are moving towards a quality product and away from fast fashion. It is very interesting that over three quarters of the shops which were questioned believes that quality is becoming an increased priority for their customers. Womenswear Indicator Taken from Drapers October 15 2010, pg 10


PINPOINTING THE CONSUMER

...9 Food

Viewpoints on slow fashion Viewpoints on marketing opportunities

Shopping

Holidays Their particular style

Films

Analysing the Magazines they read to find ...

Using Questionnaires to find ...

Lifestyle

Viewpoints on local products

Possible Price Points

Style icons

Viewpoints on brands ethos

FINDING THE CONSUMER

Targeting women who already have an interest in local products

Which Socio Economic group of the population is growing?

Who to question and where Using reports to analyse the demographic features of the population

Farmers’ Market

Captive audience

Local boutique

Questioning local women within a fashion environment

Which age group is growing and will continue to?

What are consumers currently spending on?


CONSUMER PROFILE

AGE - 25-35+ FAMILY STATUS - In a relationship Pre Children JOB - Semi Professional atmosphere Creative industry Marketing and PR

LOCATION - Within a strong community Notting Hill Tunbridge Wells Harrogate Didsbury FOOD - Farmers’ Markets Waitrose Shops for Organic and Local produce

...10

INTERIOR SHOPPING - Heals Butlers

INTERESTS - Art Exhibitions Cinema

HOLIDAYS - Long weekends with the girls in a spa South of France Paris

READS - Salman Rushdie Paul Auster Kate Furnivall John OHara

SOCIALISES - Local Pub Cocktail Bars Book Clubs

LISTENS TO - Beth Rowley Biffy Clyro Imelda May Muse

STYLE - Mixture of designer and high street Classic with a hint of fashion FASHION ICON - Lily Donaldson Anne Hathaway Jaquetta Wheeler Natalia Vodianova Olivia Palermo

For image references please see Appendix 1


FARMERS’ MARKET QUESTIONNAIRES

...11

What do you like about Farmers’ Markets?

West Malling Farmers’ Market is situated within a thriving market town with local boutiques as well as a couple of cafes and pubs.

9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

Once a month they have a farmers market with 30 local producers. I was at this farmers market that 30 women were questioned within the peak tow hours of 10am to 12pm. The questions that were asked were:

Under 16 16-20 25-34 34-40 41-50

1. What do you like about Farmer’s Markets?

50+

Do you believe getting product from the UK is important?

This was asked in order to get their view point on

14

local events and products

2. Do you believe getting product from the UK is important? This was asked to find out if women actually feel that British product is important

3. Would you like to see the Farmers’ Market ideas of Britishness, traceability and interaction in a fashion brand? This question was the most important one of the whole questionnaire. In order to gain whether there really is a market for my brand and ideas

12

Again overwhelmingly the response to whether UK products were important to the women who were questioned was yes it is

25-34 year olds all agreed that British products were important which

important. The target market of the

shows that they are interested in the origins of the items they buy. This means that there is a good chance that a British origins fashion brand would be well received.

This question was used to assess what kind of style the women questioned had In addition to these questions the women were asked what age group they fitted into and whether they would be interested in taking part in a follow up questionnaire

10 8

Yes Prefer It

6

No

4 2 0 Under 16

Would you like to see the Farmers’ Market ideas of Britishness, traceability and interaction in a fashion brand? 9 8

4. What is your favourite item of clothing and why?

Overwhelmingly the majority of the women questioned said that what they like about Farmers’ markets is the idea of local produce. The brands target market of 25-34 year olds said this was the most important thing to them.

7

16-20

25-34

34-40

41-50

50+

This question divided opinions a bit more than the others but the majority response was still yes they would like to see the Farmers’

67% of the women in the target age group of 25-34 said they would like to see Britishness, traceability and interaction in a fashion brand.

market ideas within a fashion brand. In fact

6 5

Yes

4

Yes -price dependent

3

Possibly

2

No

1 0 Under 16

16-20

25-34

34-40

41-50

Couple with the responses from Question 2 this is really strong evidence to suggest that the target market would be interested in the ethos of the proposed brand.

50+ Full questionnaire results can be found in Appendix 2


TRACEABILITY Traceability is the current buzz word within the world of food and lets consumers know exactly where their food has come from. With the renewed interest in the origins of fashion products, as a backlash against fast fashion,

...12 this idea of traceability could be used. For instance Verdict evidences within it’s Global Luxury Retailing 2009 report that consumers are looking for a more ethical product.

Within the results of the Farmers’ Market questionnaires carried out for this project 73% of the 30 women questioned said that they would like to see the farmers market ideas of Britishness, traceability and interaction in

CASE STUDY - WWW.WHERESYOURSFROM.COM www.wheresyoursfrom.com is an initiative which has been set up be Chippendale foods and it is primarily a way of tracing exactly where the egg has come from. By using the code printed on the egg the consumer can

a fashion brand. This overwhelming interest means that traceability is really important to the prospective consumer and will therefore be used with the final brand.

HOW CAN TRACEABILITY BE PUT INTO A FASHION PRODUCT?

direct relationship with the producer.

recipe ideas.

The website also has a slideshow which shows the life of the egg from laying through packing to eating. This engagement with its full life means

The most important idea behind this website though is the idea of a consumer engaging with the products they buy again. This would easily

Due to the nature of the new brand which is being proposed traceability would be quite easy to add in. All the fabrics and trims will come from the UK so the origin could be made into a selling point for the product. For instance each piece could come with the story of the product so far with origins of the cloth and trims being listed within the swing ticket.

This would give the consumers a way of identifying with the product and would make them understand where it has come from. The origins of the product is incredibly important in this brand because of the British element. The idea of focusing traceability will therefore be a really good way of showcasing the origins of the brand and its products.

The diagram below shows some of the items within a jacket which would be traceable within the new brand.

Main Cloth

Shoulder Pads

Lining

trace exactly which chicken the egg came from.

that the consumers will value the product more.

This way of tracing products means that even when food is purchased in a supermarket the consumer has a

The website is also used to give more in depth information with about the egg and its nutrition as well as giving

translate over into a fashion line where the consumer is incredibly keen on knowing where there product is coming from. Buttons


MARKET POSITIONING MAP Following the market research which has been carried out by analysing reports from Mintel, Verdict and Drapers the market which the brand will be launched into has been plotted. This has been plotted due to price and style of the brand.

...13 The circle shows the gap which the proposed brand will fit into. This would be within the premium brand level which is predicted by Mintel and Verdict to grow and will fit equally between the current and classic aesthetic.

The four competitors which have been identified from this map are Nicole Farhi, Elizabeth and James, Paul Smith Black, Lover and By Malene Birger. All of these brands have a similar aesthetic, although ranging from classic to current.

+ÂŁ

Key Position = of proposed brand

BLACK

Staid

Classic

-ÂŁ

Current


COMPETITORS Following the Market Positioning map five competitors have been identified. Some initial

...14 comparisons are within the table below. The four elements which have been initially been

analysed are aesthetic, product range, price points and there London stockists. This has

given a quick look at the competitors before further analysis is carried out.

BLACK

Aesthetic

Product Range

Price Points London Stockists

Classic with a strong tailoring feel Some more directional pieces but these come with a price increase Coats Jackets Tops Knitwear Trousers Skirts Dresses £2250 for Show Collection coat to £130 basic tank top

Quirky takes on classic styles with colour being key Balanced range with a slight bias towards tailoring and dresses

Own Stores: New Bond St W1 Fulham Road SW5 Hampstead High Street NW3 Floral Street WC2 Concessions: Harvey Nichols Harrods Online: www.nicolefarhi.com www.harveynichols.com www.harrods.com

A tailoring based collection with fun and young elements Although fun the collection also has more classic pieces suitable for everyday wear Coats Jackets Tops Knitwear Trousers Skirts Dresses £665 for a fur trimmed jacket to £75 for a cotton t-shirt

Young brand based on reworking classic shapes in unusual fabrics with a smart/casual feel

Own Stores: Brook St W1 Floral St WC2 Park St SE1 Sloane Avenue SW3 Westbourne House W11

No own stores

No own stores

Concessions: Harvey Nichols Matches Donna Ida

Concessions: Amelie Boutique SW8

Concessions: Harrods Harvey Nichols Selfridges Liberty

Online: www.harveynichols.com www.matchesfashion.com www.shopbop.com www.net-a-porter.com www.donnaida.com www.mytheresa.com

Coats Jackets Tops Knitwear Trousers Skirts Dresses £445 for a tweed Coat to £115 for a cotton shirt

Online: www.liberty.co.uk www.harveynichols.com www.harrods.com www.selfridges.com

Tailoring based collection with modern details added to classic shapes

Coats Jackets Tops Knitwear Trousers Dresses

Coats Jackets Tops Knitwear Trousers Skirts Dresses £772 for a lace dress to £67 for a £2857 for Fur waistcoat to £49 cotton t-shirt for a Tencel t-shirt

Online: www.net-a-porter.com

Own Stores: Marylebone High Street W1 Concessions: Harvey Nichols Selfridges Online: www.net-a-porter.com www.my-wardrobe.com www.mytheresa.com


NICOLE FARHI

...15

KEY PIECES

£1,020

Nicole Farhi has a mixture of classic and quite directional pieces with in the current selling collection. Three of the more directional pieces are the Salt and Pepper Tweed Jacket, Show Collection Camel Skirt and Show Collection Wool Chiffon Dress. These pieces each have classic elements but have a more directional twist to them. For instance the Camel Skirt is a classic pencil skirt shape but this has been made fun by adding the drawstring waist detail.

£600.00 SALT & PEPPER TWEED JACKET

£390.00 SHOW COLLECTION CAMEL SKIRT

70% Virgin Wool 30% Cashmere

100% Wool

The wool chiffon dress has taken the classic column shape and had one sleeve added and draped detail added to the other shoulder.

£700.00 SHOW COLLECTION WOOL CHIFFON DRESS

£624

£543

The tweed jacket also uses draping to update the double breasted blazer. This means the classic silhouette is unaffected while having a new element.

100% Wool

PRICE ARCHITECTURE The price architecture of the Nicole Farhi range is quite traditional in its level.

Knitwear 16%

Coats 15%

Tops 12%

Jackets 11%

Skirts Trousers 9% 8%

BRAND ARCHITECTURE Dresses 29%

£365

Coats are the most expensive part of the range with tops coming at the bottom. This is quite usual in price architecture because tops tend to be the opening level of a brand and are usually cheaper to produce than other categories.

£345

£281

This chart shows the brand architecture of the Nicole Farhi brand.

There is quite a high presence of coats with tops being a surprisingly small part of the brand.

Dresses are the clear focus of the brand with trousers being the smallest part of the brand.

The reliance on dresses is interesting because the brands most prolific consumers are

probably working women and so one would assume that separates would be higher up in the architecture.

£225 Product Image references can be found in Appendix 3


PAUL SMITH BLACK

...16

KEY PIECES

£369

The Paul Smith Black line is made up of key British heritage pieces such as the blazer with fun modern shapes in bright colours added. The tweed jacket to the left is a classic British blazer which has been given a Paul Smith edge by using a printed lining.

£325 PURPLE COAT 80% Wool, 20% Polyamide. Body and sleeve lining 100% Acetate

£325 PURPLE DRESS 100% Silk. Lining 100% Silk

£285 TWEED JACKET 80% Wool, 20% Polyamide. Body and sleeve lining 100% Acetate

PRICE ARCHITECTURE Paul Smith Black has a very traditional price architecture with the outerwear and jackets at the top. This is mainly because they are more labour intensive to make and they tend to be only bought once a season.

The purple coat shows the Paul Smith Black lines use of colour on a classic 1950’s shape. The sequins and bow detail also had the signature fun element.

Tops are at the bottom of the price architecture which is the normal place for them to be.

The Purple Dress again shows the signature use of colour and print on quite a classic style of dress.

All of these architecture prices have been calculated by calculating the average price by category from the current selling collection.

Trousers 3%

Jackets 13% Tops 18% Dresses 24%

Coats 18%

Knitwear 13%

£345

£278

£204

£188

Skirts 11%

£150

BRAND ARCHITECTURE The brand architecture of the Paul Smith Black line is heavily weighted towards dresses with trousers being the smallest part of the range.

Trousers are a very small part of the range which is interesting. This gives the range a very womanly feel.

Coats are also a large part of the range which is unusual because they are normally a small high cost area.

£141

Product Image references can be found in Appendix 3


ELIZABETH AND JAMES

...17

KEY PIECES

£374

The Elizabeth and James brand is an irreverent take on fashion classics with a high leaning towards comfort. The Laurent Shirt Dress is a key example of this and showcases the laid back yet sexy attitude of the brand.

£500 JAMES JERSEY FEATHER BLAZER 56% Rayon, 38% Nylon, 6% Polyurethane. Lining 100% Polyester. Trim 100% Ostrich

£215 SILK CHARMEUSE BLOUSE

£290 LAURENT SHIRT DRESS

100% Silk

55% Linen, 45% Cotton

PRICE ARCHITECTURE

The Charmeuse Blouse also shows this being luxe take on a classic mens shirt, therefore injecting some luxury into everyday pieces.

Dresses are the highest priced area of the Elizabeth and James brand. This is probably because they range from everyday dresses to going out dresses within the range. Coats and Jackets are also highly priced like most other brands.

One of the key pieces of very range is the James Blazer. This season it has been updated with Ostrich feather tails - a classic Elizabeth and James edge.

The rest of the brand is quite usual with its price architecture. Tops are at the bottom because they are normally the easiest way to buy into the brand through t-shirts.

£350

£324

£291

Knitwear 8% Trousers 10%

£267

Skirts 8%

Coats 9%

£263

BRAND ARCHITECTURE Tops 25%

Jackets 17% Dresses 23%

Tops and dresses make up almost have of the Elizabeth and James selling collection. The tops and dresses vary from easy going shirts and dresses to more

upmarket going out dresses and blouses. The smallest proportion of the brand is joint between knitwear and skirts. Trousers are quite

a large part of the brand with coats and jackets making up the rest of the collection.

£225

Product Image references can be found in Appendix 3


LOVER

...18

£443

KEY PIECES Lover is quite a simple brand with the focus being on shape and detail. The Portrait Dress is a key example of this. It has the classic bib front which is then upon a less traditional shape.

£360 GALLERY CREPE BLAZER

£240 MODERNIST SILK BLOUSE

£326 PORTRAIT DRESS

57% Acetate, 43% Rayon. Lining 100% Cupramonium

100% Silk

100% Silk

The Modernist Silk Blouse is a traditional blouse shape which has had a very small collar added to it. The seam which runs across the chest is also an interesting element. The Gallery Crepe Blazer is a classic tuxedo shape with jetted pockets and a shawl collar.

PRICE ARCHITECTURE Lover’s most expensive product category is coats followed closely by dresses and jackets.

£378

Knitwear is the cheapest product category with the other entry price product being tops. This price architecture is quite a classic model although coats and jackets would normally come ahead of dresses. This shows the value that the Lover brand puts upon dresses.

£324

Knitwear 3% Jackets 10%

£219

Coats 8%

BRAND ARCHITECTURE

Dresses 31%

Tops 28%

Trousers 21%

Dresses make up nearly a third of the Lover brand with tops and trousers also being a large part. The success of dresses is interesting because

there are no skirts within the current selling range. Knitwear is also a very small part of the range. Coats and jackets are also

a small percentage compared to some of the other competitor brands.

£215

£200

Product Image references can be found in Appendix 3


BY MALENE BIRGER

...19

KEY PIECES £298

Draping is a key look for the current selling collection of By Malene Birger with draped elements being added to classic pieces. The Helen Heavy Coat is an example of this because it is a double breasted coat with a draped egg shape.

£314 HELENI HEAVY COAT

£105 STAPHANE SHEER SHIRT

70% Wool, 30% Polyester Lining 100% Acetate Sleeve lining 53% Viscose, 47% Polyester

100% Silk

£152 FILIXIA PLEATED PANTS 68% Wool, 14% Viscose, 14% Polyester, 4% Elastane

The Staphane Sheer Shirt also shows draped elements being added although at the neck this time. This piece shows the versatility of the By Malene Birger brand because it could be either dressed up or down.

PRICE ARCHITECTURE The By Malene Birger price architecture is an example of the most traditional price architecture. Coats and jackets, as complex make and considered buy pieces, are at the top with entry price point items such as tops at the bottom.

The largest part of the By Malene Birger brand, dresses, are placed in the middle of the architecture. The Filixia Pleated Pants also show the This makes them both affordable and aspirational versatility of the brand because they could be pieces to the consumer. quite a casual trouser or be dressed up to be smart.

£230

£200

£156

Skirts 9%

Jackets 6%

Coats 7% BRAND ARCHITECTURE

Knitwear 21% Dresses 24%

Tops 18%

Trousers 15%

Dresses are very important within the By Malene Birger brand with them taking up almost a quarter of the brand. Jackets are the smallest part of the brand with coats

£156

only being slightly higher. Knitwear is also a big part of the brand with tops and trousers holding the middle ground. The reliance on dresses may reflect

the consumers want for something smart but easy to wear either everyday or to the office.

£136

£129

Product Image references can be found in Appendix 3


COMPETITOR COMPARISON Competitor comparison is a key element of research when setting up a new brand because the market the brand is entering needs to be understood completely. By analysing the brand

BRAND ARCHITECTURE The brand architecture of every competitor has already been analysed on the brands own page but it is useful to compare them all together. The chart below shows the brand architecture of all the brands together. As can be seen dresses are a large part of all the competitors

...20

architecture and price architecture of the brands possible competitors a gap can hopefully be found for the new brand. In the instance of this new brand that is

being researched five competitors have been researched in order to find the gap. The analysis has focused on premium brands because this is the area which the new brand

PRICE ARCHITECTURE

within all the brands. Coats and jackets are a relatively small part of most of the competitors brands with only Nicole Farhi and Paul Smith having both at over 10%. It is hoped that the proposed brand will follow this example and have both coats and jackets at over 10%. These two categories are normally

35%

Price is also a very important element when looking at the competitors for a new brand. The price architecture of each competitor has been broken down by product category and can be seen in the chart below. Nicole Farhi easily has the highest priced

will be launched into. All the competitors also have a similar smart/casual aesthetic. These similarities mean that a fair comparison can be made.

they are not as widely bought items. For instance consumers tend to buy one coat a year in comparison to tops and trousers which are bought more often. Other than Lover the lowest price category is tops which is because these are an easy entry point into a brand.

£1,200

30%

£1,000

25%

Coats

Coats

£800

Jackets

Jackets

20%

Tops 15%

Knitwear Trousers

10%

Skirts Dresses

5%

Tops

£600

Knitwear

£400

Trousers Skirts

£200

Dresses

£0

0% Nicole Farhi

Paul Smith Black

Elizabeth and James

brands, being the top category for Nicole Farhi, Paul Smith Black, Lover and By Malene Birger. All of these brands are successful and the fact that dresses are such a large part of the brand means that they sell well. Therefore it is proposed that the new brand will have a large proportion of dresses. It has already been decided that the proposed brand will be tailoring based so it is interesting to look at the proportion of Jackets and Coats

Lover

By Malene Birger

more expensive as well so it is not viable for them to be a very large part of the brand. Interestingly trousers are quite a small part of all of the competitors offerings, with only By Malene Birger and Lover having categories which are smaller. This maybe reflects the smarter feeling of all of these brands and the reliance on dresses and skirts. The new brand will address this and hopefully have a more equal balance between trousers and skirts.

Nicole Farhi Paul Smith Elizabeth Black and James

product with elements reaching over the £1000 barrier. The is a lot more expensive than the proposed brand will be but Nicole Farhi has been looked at because of its aesthetic. For all brands apart from Elizabeth and James coats are the most highly priced element. This is quite usual and will also be reflected within the proposed brand. The reason for coats being more expensive tends to be because of the work which goes into making them and because

Lover

By Malene Birger

Dresses were found to be a really key part of all the competitor brands and so it is interesting to look at the average prices for this category. Within all the brands dresses are within the top three most categories. This means that dresses fit solidly within the brand and have high and low priced alternatives. Therefore dresses can either be more expensive showcase pieces within the range or lower priced entry point level.


PROPOSED PRODUCT AND PRICE ARCHITECTURE

...21

PRICE ARCHITECTURE Following the competitor analysis and relating to the brands ethos a proposed brand and price architecture has been decided for the new brand. The price architecture is designed to fall in the middle of the level set by the competitors. It has therefore been decided to set the prices above By Malene Birger and below Elizabeth and James. The most expensive elements will be coats and jackets with tops and skirts being the entry level products.

£180

£300

£110

£250 £210

£360

It has been decided that unlike the brands competitors knitwear will not be included within the brands initial range. This is because of its more structured ethos and so jackets and tops will be focused on instead. Also trousers have been included above skirts because of the dominance of dresses. It is felt that a dominance of skirts would not work with the dresses and that having more trousers would give versatility to the range.

BRAND ARCHITECTURE

Skirts 10% Tops 15% Trousers 15% Coats 15% Dresses 20% Jackets 25%

The brand is going to be a tailoring based brand so jackets are the largest part of the brand. Following competitor analysis it can be seen that dresses are key part of the consumers wardrobe. These are a versatile element of a woman’s wardrobe and can either be dressed up or down. This fits in with the smart casual look of the new brand. Following on from the tailoring basis coats are also a large part of the brand with trousers tops and skirts forming the rest.


COMMUNICATING WITH CONSUMERS Communicating is the most important thing that a brand can do. Not only can it be useful to gain information on products but customers also like to feel valued by a brand and this will then encourage them to shop.

...22

Communicating with consumers can be done in various different ways, whether it be instore, online in a blog, email, phone or by post. Each of these methods have their merits and can get different results. One of the key things when communicating with consumers though is to not bombard

them with information especially if it is direct marketing which is being sent to their email or house. When communication is done well though it is invaluable and some examples of good practice follow.

WHAT DOES THE CONSUMER THINK ABOUT COMMUNICATION? Following the Farmers’ market questionnaires seven women who fitted into the prospective age group were questioned to get some more in depth answers. One of the questions which was asked was how the women like to communicate with brands. They were given the choice of either Post, Email or Phone to choose from and only 2 out the 7 women chose email with all the

others opting for post. A reason for this enjoyment of receiving something in the post could be the fact that it is tactile and in a world which is technological there is something quite comforting about it. The ladies were also asked there thoughts about the catazine (a mixture of catalogue and magazine) and were asked to rate the idea on a scale of 1(good)-5 (bad). None of the women

rated the catazine as a bad idea all of them rating 3 or above and three rating it as a good idea. This therefore shows that women like to have communication with there brands and that they still feel in this technological age post is an appropriate way of doing it. They are also welcoming less traditional formats such as the catazine instead formats such as a catalogue or newsletter.

CASE STUDY - ONLINE PRESENCE - ASOS.COM Asos.com is one of the largest e-commerce sites in the world which gives it a large online presence within the shopping market. They have utilised their large footfall to setup Asos Life. This is not only a way for Asos to communicate with its consumers but also for the consumers to communicate with each other. Asos has its own blog within the Asos life model which it uses to update about topics which are inspiring them or are interesting. They also have links to blogs which they find interesting. A key part of the Asos Life area is the Forum section. This is run completely by Asos’s consumers and features interaction between themselves and Asos. As well as a forum to get help from customer services there are forums for ideas for Asos, Fashion talk, Star Style, Beauty and General Chat. Asos Life also works like social networking where you can create a profile about yourself and make friends. This interaction with the consumer brings the consumer to the site even if they are not planning on buying something and increases a brand loyalty.

Asos Blog Taken from http://community.asos.com/category-blog/?category id=4617281254125038910

Asos’s online presence extends beyond its own website with it also involved with Facebook and Twitter. This is used to advertise new items and free shipping offers as well as updating on stock and updates on blog entries. When consumers either like Asos on Facebook or follow them on Twitter the updates are automatically added to their news feed meaning that the information is

seen by them every time they log in. They are only short updates so this does not bombard the consumer with too much information. Asos has embraced all the online elements of consumer interaction that it could. This means that they have almost as much interaction with customers as a shop would. The only problem with an online presence is if a consumer needs to talk to someone they cant. Other than that though their online presence covers all angles from customer support to social networking. This makes Asos a destination store online in the same way as a shop could be a destination store on the high street. The numerous ways that customers can interact with Asos also means that there is way for everyone to interact. For instance if the consumer doesn’t want to be involved on Twitter and Facebook they can still get updates on the blog and forums and also the other way round. This versatility means there should be an appropriate way for all consumers to be able to interact. Overall Asos’s online presence is a key part of its business because it directs customers toward buying even if the didn’t visit the website primarily for this purpose. It also instils a sense of community which would be similar to the community surrounding an actual shop on the high street with the community sharing ideas and viewpoints.


...23

CASE STUDY - THE CATAZINE - JOULES Joules communicates with their consumers in a number of ways including a blog, Facebook and Twitter but one of their most innovative ways is through their catazine. The catazine is a mix between a catalogue and a magazine and examples of the Joules one can be seen to the right. This catazine includes shots of product in quite a catalogue way as well as more photoshoot styled images. It also has articles on issues which the Joules consumer may find interesting. The Joules ethos is living the good life so their articles tend to be based on the countryside and growing your own fruit and vegetables. This mixture of hard selling product pages and magazine articles makes the catazine feel less like Joules are fishing for sales. This means that consumers are more likely to read the catazine than just put it straight in the recycling when it comes in the post.

The idea that the catazine may be something the consumer looks forward to receiving is also an important part of the catazines appeal. It is used alongside Joules more technological offerings and a copy of the catazine can be downloaded on the website. The fact that it does come in hard copy shows that consumers still like receiving items through the post. This is also backed up by the women who were questioned following the Farmers’ Market. They feel that it is still nice to have a something to look at which isn’t on a screen. The main appeal of the Joules catazine though is its soft sell of product. Within the current environment when every store is fighting for sales the catazine puts the consumer back in control. It is not an email with a direct link to the website or a phone call asking why the consumer hasn’t ordered. The catazine is something to enjoy reading which may translate into sales for Joules.

Catazine Pages Taken from Joules Catazine August/September 2010 (2010) p1, p20-21, p32-33


MAGALOGS AND CATAZINES

...24

As seen within the example of the Joules catazine it can be a very effective way advertising a brands product. A magalogue is the same as a catazine and it is the combination of a magazine and a catalogue. Klassen describes a magalogue within a fashion context below: ‘A magalog communicates image and brand by telling the story behind the product using magazine-like techniques. A catalog tells you what the fabric is made of. A magalog explains how it makes you look and feel. The result is a more emotional connection to the products being sold. Since we understand that people like to do business with people they know, we have to find ways for our audience to get to know us when we can’t meet them face-to-face. A magalog gives you the space to tell your story and the story of your product or service.’ (Klassen, 2010)

HOW SUCCESSFUL ARE CATAZINES? Catazines are an innovative way of getting consumers to notice a brands offering. While the world of marketing and sales has become so technological is there a market for a post orientated marketing scheme? Plutsky believes that there is due to the amount of emails which the average person receives

‘on average, consumers receive 14-15 emails per day from companies or brands’ (Plutsky, daily. Plutsky has found that

2010) it is not surprising therefore that marketing emails do not get read or followed through to sale. Due to the amount of emails that a prospective consumer is getting then a catazine could be a more successful way of gaining business. Within Harte’s 2009 article entitled Do You Magalog? Harte has found that 68% of consumers say a magalogue helps them make better purchasing decisions. Harte also found that consumers are more open to

‘78% don’t mind sponsors selling their products and services through custom publications’ a custom publication and that

(2009). Harte also feels like Plutsky that email marketing is maybe not as successful as brands thought it would be when it was first used. Within her article it is documented that:

‘59% read print custom publications, whereas only 36 percent look through electronic custom publications’ (Harte, 2009).

Net-a-Porter is one example of a brand which has a successful online catazine. This may be because it has a complete relationship with the website and items can be bought directly from the pages of the catazine. It is this interaction which can be very useful while using an online catazine but a hard copy catazine can also have interaction built into it. Many catazines have interaction through discount codes and offers which are only available to catazine readers. This is seen within the catazine for online retailer A-Wear where an exclusive 10% off is offered to the reader. Catazines are also successful in getting across the brands ethos whether it be irreverent fun in the example of White stuff or getting celebrity looks for less in the case of A-Wear. Clark states within her 2009 article ‘The Fashion Magalogue’ that the magalogue is the perfect way of getting across ‘brand related ideas and stories that they want to share with their customers’ (Clark, 2009). This therefore strengthens the consumers understanding of the brands ethos and in time strengthens their brand loyalty.

Snow White Stuff Taken from Once Upon a White Stuff (2010) p4-5

Urban Warrior taken from AWear.com Christmas 2010 (2010) p11


BOUTIQUE ANALYSIS The premium level market is usually stocked within independent boutiques. The boutique is currently having a resurgence in popularity due to the decline in fast fashion. Boutiques tend to be popular because they are more hands on with consumers and stock than multiples. In order to analyse

...25 the relationship that boutiques have in their area the boutiques of Tunbridge Wells were visited. Tunbridge Wells has been identified as one of the areas which the perspective consumer may live in so it was good place to analyse the boutiques.

The independent boutiques of Tunbridge Wells are situated away from the high street stores within the Georgian area of The Pantiles and the Victorian High Street. Many of the stores have kept the traditional hoardings which adds to the classic feel of the area.

LITTLE LONDON

BOD & TED

BLUE LAWN

BRANDS STOCKED - Alice By Temperley, Ash, Bernshaw, Butter by Nadia, By Malene Birger, Halston Heritage, House of Harlow, Kyen, Lucas Jack, Metalicus, Milly, Miquello, Missoni, Oryany, Paige Premium Denim, Sam Edelman, Sara Berman, See By Chloe, Tibi

BRANDS STOCKED - Almost Famous, Betty Jackson 2, By Malene Birger, Marmalade Cashmere, NYDJ Jeans, Velvet by Graham and Spencer, Designers Remix, Marimekko, Pyrus, Darling, Mina, Bombki, Alice Hannah, Madeleine Thompson, Junk Food, Clare Jordan, American Vintage

BRANDS STOCKED - Odd Molly, Vivienne Westwood, Vanessa Bruno, Paul Smith, Handwritten, Rick Owens, Twin-Set, Antik Batik, Gary Graham, Belstaff

NUMBER OF STORES - 4

NUMBER OF STORES - 2

COMMUNICATING WITH CONSUMERS Blog Facebook E-Newsletter

COMMUNICATING WITH CONSUMERS E-Newsletter

COMMUNICATING WITH CONSUMERS E-Newsletter Twitter Phone

Little London find that Facebook is the best way to keep in touch with consumers because they can easily update them with small bits of information. It is also an noninvasive way of getting information across.

Bod & Ted currently only communicate with their consumers directly by and E-Newsletter. They feel that engaging with social networking does not offer any advantage to the brand. Bod & Ted do however take part in local fashion events when they happen which they feel boosts their profile within the local community.

NUMBER OF STORES - 3

Blue Lawn pride themselves on having a very personal relationship with their customers. They have a database which logs what particular consumers are interested in and a phone call is made when items come into store. They also use Twitter as an effective way to let consumers know about stock updates. Blue Lawn also feel that running events within the store is a good idea for launching new products.


...26 LOVE IS ... BOUTIQUE BRANDS STOCKED - A mixture of vintage and pre loved items ranging from high street to high designer, accessories to clothing NUMBER OF STORES - 1 COMMUNICATING WITH CUSTOMERS Facebook Twitter Blog E-Newsletter Phone Love is Boutique has embraced social networking and viral marketing as an effective way of communicating with consumers. They believe that this is so successful because it gives people short snippets of information which they can access quickly. The social networking element via Twitter and Facebook also connects quite personally with the consumer because it fits into their new feed amongst updates from their friends. Love is Boutique also have a free membership scheme where they take a note of what particular consumers are interested in and then either email them or phone them when an item of interest comes into store. They currently have 362 members which have been gathered within the first year of the business and hope to have 500 by 2011. This relationship with the consumer is really important to Love is Boutique and they find that this is making them a destination within Tunbridge Wells. Running events is also a key part of Love is Boutiques relationship with its consumer. They not only run fashion shows and vintage fairs for new stock but the store can also be hired out for free within the evening. This means that they have hosted hen parties, fund raising events and Avon parties. Again this makes the boutique central within the community and makes it a destination for local people. Social networking has been embraced by three of the boutiques which were visited and all of these feel that it has made areal difference to the way customers interact with them. The biggest plus point is begin able to make quick stock announcements in order to get customers into store. Little London and Love is Boutique also run a blog which they find not only brings in new customers but is also a fun way to update people with what is going on within the store and other fashion related news.

All of the boutiques have an E-Newsletter which although they deem valuable they are all cautious as to how often they send one out because they do not want to bombard their consumers. Love is Boutique is the most active within the local community and have found that this is really valuable. They find the most valuable thing though is running events with local people. They feel that this makes consumers view the boutique as their own and they therefore have the confidence to shop that they might not have within the high street.


FINDINGS FROM MARKETING AND BOUTIQUE ANALYSIS ... have an online presence as well as perfecting ways of directly communicating with the consumer ... engage in social networking it is one of the easiest ways of updating consumers with stock and offer information ... run competitions in connection with the social networking. For instance the person who gets the most new friends or followers for the business gets 10% of their next purchase. This not only makes the consumer feel valued but also gets a larger marketing base for the brand with little effort. ... use a catazine or magalogue to interact with consumers in an informal way. They are perfect for introducing the brand ethos and engaging a consumer within its values ... catazines can also be used to give consumers special offers and information on issues that relate to the brand ... consumers like to feel special and valued - get involved in their lives by running events and treating them like friends ... run a membership scheme to the brand so that members get updates, early sales shopping and other benefits. This again makes them feel valued and increases brand loyalty ... offer a personal relationship with the consumer which they will not be able to get from large brand. Find out what they do and don’t like, offer personal styling advice. Remember that the customer is key! ... become active within the local community - take part in local events such as fund raising evenings to raise the profile of the business in the local area ... use the current interest in local food and products to find customers. For instance tie-ins with local Farmers’ Markets could be used to get in touch with the prospective consumer

...27


WHAT IS STILL PRODUCED IN THE UK?

...28

Acorn Superfine English Shirtings

Abraham Moon and Sons

Morton Young and Borland

Thomas Mason and Sons LACE

Mitchell Interflex

Magee Weaving Ltd SHIRTINGS

Baird McNutt

Vanners LINEN

INTERLININGS

Marling and Evans

Dechamps

Denholme Velvets

Emblem Weavers Ltd

John England Textiles

Hield Brothers

JH Clissold and Sons

VELVETS

John Foster Magee Weaving Ltd SUITINGS

J&J Stern

BRITISH FABRICS AND TRIMS

Fox Brothers and Co

K Stevens

Stephen Walters

Bulmer and Lumb

BUTTONS

TRIMMINGS

James Grove and Sons

Marling and Evans

Stand Even

Henry Bertrand

John Foster

Moxon Huddersfield

SILKS

WOVEN LABELS

SHOULDER PADS

Taylor and Lodge

Franklins Eastman Staples

Reid and Taylor

Aranlish Tweeds

Neill Johnstone

TWEED

JERSEY

Whitchurch Silk Mill

Vanners

Magee Weaving Ltd Josery Textiles

Harris Tweed Hebrides Harris Tweed Textiles Manufacturing Ltd

ZIPS

National Weaving Company

Zipex


DENHOLME VELVETS

...29

BRAND OVERVIEW Denholme Velvets is a relatively young British fabric company having only been founded in 1938.

They started off producing velvets for displays in jewellery shop windows and then moved into fashion fabrics.

They are based within the heart of Yorkshire in the Bradford area which historically is the centre of the British fabric production industry.

PRODUCTS AVAILABLE Denholme Velvets focuses on products with a raised pile surface. These include: -

Silk Velvets Rayon Velvets Cotton Velvets Devore Velvet Faux Fur


MORTON YOUNG AND BORLAND BRAND OVERVIEW Morton Young and Borland have been make lace in Scotland since 1900. They were initially a theatre and interior fabric company but within the last couple of years they have launched a fashion fabric line.

The brand is therefore now structured into four elements; Scottish Lace, MYB Couture, MYB Screen and Tex Tec.

Tex Tec is their research and development part of the brand. This concentrates on new fabrics being used within a number of industries using new finishing treatments.

PRODUCTS AVAILABLE Morton Young and Borland are a lace manufacturer which has only recently branched out into fashion fabrics. Lace for interiors such as curtains and also lace printed wall paper. Fabrics for theatre productions are also made. The fashion fabrics with in the MYB Couture collection range from heavy macramĂŠ style lace to delicate lace suitable for dresses and ball gowns.

...30


HARRIS TWEED TEXTILES

...31

BRAND OVERVIEW Harris Tweed is one of the most famous British fabrics which is synonymous with British style. Harris Tweed Textiles is one of four Harris Tweed companies

still trading. All four companies are based on the Isle of Lewis and very piece of tweed has to be woven within the weavers home on the Isle of Lewis.

The colours of Harris Tweed are one of its most famous features with most tweeds incorporating at least 20 colours.

PRODUCTS AVAILABLE Harris Tweed Textiles specialise in tweeds handwoven on the Isle of Lewis. The tweeds are available in numerous colours and patterns. The tweed is available in various different weights: Standard Weight - 310-340 g/mt Light Weight - 250-280 g/mt Feather Weight - 216-240 g/mt Ultra Light - 160-180 g/mt


FOX BROTHERS & CO LTD

...32

BRAND OVERVIEW Fox Brothers & Co Ltd have been making fabric in Somerset since 1772. They claim to be the first manufacturers of flannel fabric and have also laid claim to serge fabric which was used for Army

greatcoats now known as khaki. The mill began to suffer during the 20th Century and was bought in 2009 by Deborah Meaden from Dragons Den who is very

keen to support the British fabric industry. The product has changed in 250 years from heavy woollens in the beginning to fine wool and cashmere suitings in the modern range.

PRODUCTS AVAILABLE Fox Brothers specialise in wool and worsted cloth. They were one of the first companies to produce flannel and this still forms the backbone of their range. They also produce: Super Lightweight Flannel Classic Flannel Jacketing Luxury Wool Jacketing Medium Weight Flannels Over Coating Fabrics


JOHN FOSTER

...33

BRAND OVERVIEW John Foster was established in 1819 in Bradford in an area which is well known for Britain’s fabric manufacturing industry. It was initially a worsted manufacturer which then branched out into woollen

fabrics. John Foster was also one of the first to experiment in Britain with Alpaca and Mohair in 1837. The mill is still housed within the Black Dyke building which

was built for John Foster in 1819. This history is very important to the John Foster brand which is producing fine woollens and worsteds within Britain today.

PRODUCTS AVAILABLE John Foster’s product range is based around woollen and cashmere suitings. These are available in various different patterns ranging from herringbones to houndstooth. The fibres used are: Cashmere Wool Mohair Merino Wool


ACORN FABRICS

...34

BRAND OVERVIEW

Acorn fabrics started producing cotton shirting for mens shirts in 1900 within their mill in Lancashire. Acorn fabrics was unusual at this time because most of the local cotton mills

were producing heavier cottons. Acorn fabrics started as a bespoke cotton manufacturer just producing from clients orders but within the 1940’s they foresaw the need for a stock

supported company. This is still the way the company is run today with no minimum orders on the stock fabrics. All of their styles of fabric come in a range of classic colours.

PRODUCTS AVAILABLE Acorn fabrics supply shirtings in cotton which are available in two widths. The widths that are available are 90cm and 150cm. Among these two widths some patterns cross over but the majority are different. Some of the patterns which Acorn fabrics produce are: Stripes Checks Herringbones. Some of these are very traditional patterns and others are modern takes on the traditional patterns.


JOHN ENGLAND

...35

BRAND OVERVIEW John England is a linen company which is based near Dublin. The company has been trading for just over 40 years and hopes

to be at the front of the linen production industry. The companies main focus is

bringing Irish linen to anew market through mixing it with more modern finishes and techniques.

PRODUCTS AVAILABLE John England Textiles are a traditional linen weaver who is rejuvenating their range with modern finishes and techniques. Some of these techniques are metallic prints and polyurethane coatings. Their offer is split evenly between fashion fabrics and interior fabrics.


HENRY BERTRAND BRAND OVERVIEW Henry Bertrand is a fabric wholesaler based within London who primarily sells silk. They have a small British made silk section

and also act as the agents for other brands. The Henry Bertrand name was initially used for a silk

...36

manufacturing business based in Lyon, France and it was only when this company went into decline in the 1980’s that the wholesale business was born.

PRODUCTS AVAILABLE Henry Bertrand specialises in silk and within their Made in Britain range silks are heavily represented. This is within the brocade and damask category. They also have stock of some British wool Crepe and are the agents of Scottish mill Reid and Taylor.


STEPHEN WALTERS BRAND OVERVIEW

Stephen Walters has a long history of silk fabric production in Britain starting in 1720 when Joseph Walters moved to Spitalfields from France. By the 19th Century the business had grown sufficiently to move the company out of London

and set up a mill instead of the workshops which had been used before. Sudbury was chosen as a good location and that is where Stephen Walters settled and still is today. During the 20th Century many large commissions were taken on by

...37

the mill including Queen Elizabeth II coronation robes and the fabric for Princess Diana’s wedding dress. The business is still family run and comprises of Stephen Walters and two sister mills, David Walters Fabrics Ltd and Glemsford Silk Mills.

PRODUCTS AVAILABLE Stephen Walters specialise in silk production which is produced on site using their specialist jacquard looms. The majority of their silk is jacquard woven with patterns although they do produce some fabrics which are just with stripes. They produce weights which are suitable both for interiors and fashion.


REID & TAYLOR

...38

BRAND OVERVIEW Reid and Taylor are based in Scotland and have been producing fabrics there since 1830. The beginnings of the brand started with producing a cheviot cloth using the wool

which was available in the local area. The heyday of Reid and Taylor was in the 1930’s when they had a very large worldwide

distribution. They kept a really close relationship with their buyers which is still the backbone of the company now.

PRODUCTS AVAILABLE The Reid and Taylor brand focuses on fine suitings for the tailoring business in a variety of different patterns. They use a large amount of different fibres including: Cashmere Silk Wool Cotton Lambswool


JAMES GROVE AND SONS

...39

BRAND OVERVIEW James Grove and Sons were established in 1857 and are still a family owned business. They supplied buttons to both sides of the American Civil War and from the early 1900’s the buttons were beginning to be sold across Europe. They are the largest supplier of

buttons within the UK and one of the only ones which still produces buttons here. They are also the one of the worlds largest suppliers of horn buttons and because of this size in 2006 they moved into a new purpose built factory. This new facility means that they can continue to compete on a world wide scale.

PRODUCTS AVAILABLE James Grove’s offer includes many different types of button from small delicate sizes to real horn toggles. They are produced in various different materials, including: Real Horn Polyester Nylon Shell All of their buttons are also able to be engraved to create a personal button to meet the clients needs.


EASTMAN STAPLES

...40

BRAND OVERVIEW Eastman Staples is a sundries supplier for the fashion industry, supplying sewing sundries and pattern cutting equipment.

The majority of this produced overseas and just sold on by Eastman Staples.

Eastman Staples was established in 1921 and has been at the forefront of fashion supplies since.

PRODUCTS AVAILABLE Eastman Staples supplies many different products to the fashion business including fusibles, shoulder pads and linings. Although many of these are produced overseas some of Eastman Staples Shoulder pads are produced in the UK. These are: 103050 - Shape D1 (A = 235mm, B = 125, C = 10) 103436 - Shape D1 (A = 165mm, B = 75, C = 6) 103527 - Shape D1 (A = 165mm, B = 75, C = 12) 103433 - Shape D1 (A = 195mm, B = 95, C = 6) 103085 - Shape D1 (A = 235mm, B = 125, C = 12) 103191 - Shape D1 (A = 235mm, B = 125, C = 15) 103016 - Shape D4 (A = 265mm, B = 142, C = 12) 100395 - Shape D4 (A = 280mm, B = 130, C = 20) 6367 - Shape D1 (A = 245mm, B = 135, C = 15)


K STEVENS

...41

BRAND OVERVIEW K Stevens is a UK manufacturer of trimmings based in Leicester. They are a family run business which has

been running for 30 years. Some of their clients are Argos, BHS, B&Q, Laura Ashley

and Marks and Spencer. These companies use K Stevens because of their quick turn around and range of products.

PRODUCTS AVAILABLE K Stevens provide a full range of British made trimmings. These include: Bias Binding available in stock colours Custom cut Bias Binding Insertion piping Rouleau Shell edge binding Frilling Waist banding Piping Cord Covered Buckles Covered Buttons Belts Leather Piping Leather Binding Leather and PU Strapping Pleated Ribbons

Covered Buttons Taken from http://www. biasbinding.com/products.php?c=13


WOVEN LABELS Woven labels are a key part of branding a fashion garment and with the main ethos of this new brand being Made in Britain the

FRANKLINS Franklins is one of the leading suppliers of woven and embroidered labels and badges within the UK.

The company was established in 1835 as a silk weaver in Coventry. During the 20th Century the company moved from producing silk fabric into silk ribbons and labels

...42 labels should be as well. Two woven label companies have been found who still make

for masonic and military organisations. These as well as childrens organisations are still Franklins main consumers.

some of their labels in the UK. Both produce a range of qualities of labels of which some are UK produced.

NATIONAL WEAVING COMPANY National Weaving Company specialises in weaving labels and name tapes. These can either be completely bespoke designs or clients can customise

a ready made design. They are based in Pembrokshire and because of their UK location are able to offer short runs for small clients .

Minimum orders start at 20 for some customisable labels up to 500 for the bespoke design ones.

PRODUCTS AVAILABLE

PRODUCTS AVAILABLE

Franklins produce many different woven and embroidered items including labels and banners. Their woven labels are available in the following qualities: Damask Satin Taffeta The only British made quality though is Taffeta.

National Weaving Company has many products which all relate to personalised woven labels. Some of these products are: Woven Name Tapes Wide Woven Labels Designer Woven Labels Woven Washcare Labels Woven Luggage Straps


HOW STABLE IS THE UK MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY? The British fabric industry is in decline and has been declining rapidly for the past 100 years. There are still a handful of businesses left in Britain producing fabrics and it is these that need supporting and showcasing. In fact the UK Fabric Industry currently employs 19,000 people where as in 1904 it employed 1.2million, a 98.5% fall in employment (Leunig, 2010). The main issue for the British fabric industry is competition from countries which can produce goods of a similar quality. Italy itself produces many similar textiles to Britain, primarily wool based suitings, so that brings up the question

why does Italy have a more successful textile market than Britain? of

Economic Differences between the Italian and British fabric Industries The Italian textile industry is a much more successful industry in recent years than the British textile industry and this seems to be primarily down to unit costs. The Italian mills are able to produce similar quality fabrics for a cheaper price in a country with similar working conditions protection. A report by the Department for Trade and Industries looked into this exact issue in 2003 (Owen, N) where it tries to pinpoint the exact difference between the Italian and British fabric industries. The Italian textile industry itself is a much larger industry than the British industry by over 3%. This immediately means that there is a greater choice of mills and Italian produced fabrics over the smaller British operation. Owen feels that the British mills could produce their fabrics at the same price as the Italian mills if only they had the same volumes. The volumes are to be

better marketing and design of the British fabrics. In other words the preconceived view

gained in Owen’s viewpoint through the

of a lumpy, brown British tweed needs to be changed otherwise no one is going to buy into the British market. The Italian market is more inventive than the British one which means that they are producing new and exciting ideas while the British mills are only seen as producing the more traditional wools.

It is important that these traditional British textiles are not lost but the British industry also needs to move forward in order to gain customers. They need to embrace new ways of weaving, new technology and ultimately move into the idea of producing fabric collections with seasonal colours. As Owen puts it:

‘English fabrics are traditionally noted for their, construction, durability and other functional attributes. The Italian tradition is orientated more towards effects, the look and the feel’ (2003). In order

for the British industry to gain custom this needs to change. The new brand which is proposed will hopefully help to raise the profile of the British fabric industry by showcasing the fabrics which are available. This would then hopefully begin to change the viewpoint on British fabrics making them more interesting to the consumer and other companies.

VIEWPOINT OF JOHN FOSTER Matthew Simpson is one of the employees of John Foster fabric mill. He has been contacted for his viewpoint on the stability of the British fabric market. One of the questions which was asked was how stable did he think the British fabric market was. Although Matthew can’t ‘quantify whether the British fabric industry is shrinking’ he does feel that it is ‘not a growing industry’. The industry in its current state is stable he feels because of the recent move from bulk products into niche. One of the other issues though is an ageing work force and in order to combat this the Centre of Textile Excellence has been set up in Huddersfield to provide training. In order for the British market to grow Matthew thinks that there should be an industry wide marketing initiative. This idea has begun to gather pace with the Campaign for Wool which was promoted by the Prince of Wales. Matthew believes that there are two ways for British brands to market themselves being either a heritage brand or as an up to date brand. John Foster used to market themselves as a heritage brand but are currently rebranding as an up to date brand. Matthew feels that the industry ‘can’t completely dismiss the heritage, however we do need to push an up to date image’. John Foster agree with the consensus of the rest of the industry that Italy is their biggest competitor. Although there are also the low cost economies John Foster are producing a better product than them and the only way they are competing is within the raw fibre industry. The Italian market is much larger than the British market and Matthew feels that they are able ‘to undercut UK mills on price’. Therefore Matthew identifies that the British mills ‘cannot sell on price alone, it has to be based on quality, service and the customer appreciating the benefits of UK fabrics’. Italian mills also get more support from their government than the British industry which Matthew believes is because it is a bigger industry. He also thinks that with the British industry at it’s current size the government is unable to give much support. They already have export led sales initiatives in place and their is not much more the government can do. Matthew Simpson believes that one of the main ways to support the British textile industry though is for the luxury ready to wear brands to use their fabrics more. He feels that ‘the UK wool textile producers are ideally suited to working with luxury brands as we can make small quantities and we have the skills and facilities to develop specific fabrics’ and that it is for these reasons that they should be used. Overall the viewpoint of John Foster is that ‘luxury brands are an important market for UK weavers’ and that it is only through being used within the fashion market that the mills and businesses will survive.

Matthew Simpson’s full answers can be found in Appendix 4

...43


CAMPAIGN FOR WOOL AND UKFT CAMPAIGN FOR WOOL The campaign for wool is an initiative set up Prince Charles to raise awareness of wool. Although the campaign is not limited to just British wool it is this element which is getting a lot of press. One of the main events which has taken place is the grazing of sheep on Savile Row which is pictured below and took place within Wool Week. Wool Week was a week long campaign during October 2010 to highlight the issues. This campaign is mainly about highlighting the use of wool instead of a man made fibre and protecting the rare British sheep breeds which are used for their fibre. Therefore the campaign is highlighting the three main uses of wool; interiors, fashion and insulation. Although this is primarily a campaign for the wool fibre some of the press has also been directed towards British wool fabric manufacturers. For instance one article, within the magazine Selvedge, has put together a series of case studies ranging from fabric

...44

weavers to duvet manufacturers. One of the British mills which is referred to within this article are Fox Brothers who launched a special West of England Tweed to coincide with Wool Week. The managing director Douglas Cordeaux believes that

‘a collective responsibility to champion this versatile, sustainable and natural fibre’ there is

(Farrelly, 2010).

The Wool Campaign is gathering pace and is beginning to shine upon the British manufacturing industry as well as just being about wool. The amount of press which Wool Week gains shows how interested the consumer is becoming in sustainable issues so it has become a good platform to launch other campaigns from.

UKFT - LET’S MAKE IT HERE CAMPAIGN The UK Fashion and Textile Association (UKFT) has recently launched a database of UK manufacturers for the fashion industry. This includes fabric manufacturers, trim manufacturers and factories for the producing of garments. Eric Musgrave is the director general designate of the UKFT and believes that UK manufacturing is the way forward for the fashion industry. Within an article written by him for Drapers he

‘for British manufacturing the slogan must be: Use It or Lose It’ (Musgrave,2010). says that

It is hoped that the database will let the fashion industry know what is still available in the UK. Musgrave has found that many of the leading names in the British fashion industry do not actually know there is still a UK manufacturing industry. For instance within another article

written for Drapers Musgrave documents that

‘a powerful retail boss asked me recently: “Do we still make any textiles in the UK?’ (Musgrave, 2010).

It is the unknowing that Musgrave is hoping to combat with UKFT’s database and through their B2B (British supplier to British customer) events which will be running. Musgrave also believes that there needs to be more understanding of the British fashion industry within the government and that the government could help more with funding and marketing. The main reason for the Let’s Make it Here database though is to increase business for the businesses listed within it. It is a free database to sign up to and access and it is hoped that it will give marketing to the struggling areas of the industry. It is also hoped that it will help promote a market which is not nearly as small as most people think.

Let’s make it here logo Taken from http://ukft.org/letsmakeithere/index.php

Sheep in Savile Row Taken from http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/standard/article-23886660-savile-row-wool-is-best-baanone.do


MANUFACTURING WITHIN THE UK The main aim of the brand is to showcase British fabrics and a wide range has been found to use within the range. If this range was then manufactured outside of the UK then this

would be going against the ethos of the brand. British clothing manufacturers have therefore been researched in order to find factories which would be able to produce the range. Each

...45 product category has been looked at and a suitable factory has been found. These factories are profiled below.

LS MANUFACTURING

ELLA LONDON

EDEN STUDIO

LOCATION: Wolverhampton, West Midlands

LOCATION: Bethnal Green, London

LOCATION: Wimbledon, London

PROFILE: LS Manufacturing is based in Wolverhampton as well as having an overseas manufacturing base within Portugal and the far east. They specialise primarily in outerwear and are one of the manufacturers which make Barbour’s wax jackets. The company was founded in the 1950’s and currently employs over 100 staff.

PROFILE: Ella London is based within Bethnal Green and is a traditional CMT manufacturer. It employs 12 people and focuses on trying to give customers quality product for a low price. Some of Ella London’s clients are Mulberry, La Petite Salope and John Marks.

PROFILE: Eden Studio is a relatively new small CMT factory in Wimbledon. The factory is being run with sustainable principles by its owner Catherine Eden. They believe in paying their workers a living London wage and try to use organic sewing thread and other products for production that they supply. They also reuse and recycle all off cuts.

PRODUCT SPECIALITY: Washed garments Jackets Fleece jackets Structured outerwear Jeans and trousers

PRODUCT SPECIALITY: Ella London has a very experienced staff and could tackle any product but their speciality is soft garments such as: Dresses Blouses Skirts They are very good at working in fine fabrics such as silk chiffons and crepes.

PRODUCT SPECIALITY: Eden Studio are open to producing any garment within a small production run and have a variety expertise among their workers. For instance some of their machinists have also worked in house for Alexander McQueen and Ben De Lisi. They are therefore able to produce garments with tailoring, lingerie and evening wear elements.

NEW PLANET FASHION

AVICSTAR LONDON

RAYNER AND STURGES

LOCATION: Leyton, London

LOCATION: Tottenham, London

LOCATION: Gillingham, Kent

PROFILE: New Planet Fashion are a CMT factory based in Leyton. They can produce samples and production right from pattern cutting stage through to manufacture. They run production from sampling up to large production. They pride him themselves on producing high quality product quickly. They currently produce garments for Victoria Beckham, Preen, Jonathan Saunders and Osman Yousefzada.

PROFILE: Avicstar London is based in Tottenham with other production units based around the UK. They can produce garments from sample and pattern cutting stage and also in both large and small production quantities.

PROFILE: Rayner and Sturges were established in 1913 as a shirt manufacturer for the gentlemans outfitters of Piccadily. Today they still produce best quality shirts for the London tailors as well as for the export market. Their production is split into two elements either fully factored or CMT. Rayner and Sturges can also grade patterns for their clients.

The fabrics LS Manufacturing tend to work in are waxed cottons, wool coatings and faux leather.

PRODUCT SPECIALITY: New Planet Fashion specialise in tailored and semi-tailored garments. These include: Ladies and Gentleman’s Coats Trousers Jackets Dresses

PRODUCT SPECIALITY: Avicstar London can produce any garment from sampling through to production. Their manufacturing capacity is 300 garments a month. They have 20 experienced staff who have varying expertise in different product categories and fabrics. Avicstar London therefore claim they can produce a good quality product out of any fabric.

PRODUCT SPECIALITY: Rayner and Sturges produce shirts and blouses for the bespoke and ready to wear market. This is their only speciality and is the niche which they fit into.


CARBON FOOTPRINT

...46

Although the new brand is not striving to be a completely sustainable brand it is interesting to compare the carbon footprints of a general designer against a brand which is

completely British. The general designer brand is based within Europe and uses a

European factory and fabric manufacturer. The British brand is made completely within the UK and will be stored and sold in the UK as well.

EUROPEAN PRODUCTION

Fabric flown from mill in Florence to Factory in Porto

Approval sample sent from Porto Full Production delivery flown 0.18 tonnes to office in London 0.13 tonnes from Porto to London

Stock driven from 0.13 tonnes airport to Aylesbury warehouse

Stock driven from 0.02 tonnes warehouse to store in Manchester

0.06 tonnes

TOTAL 0.34 tonnes

BRITISH PRODUCTION

Fabric driven from mill in Bradford to factory in Wolverhampton

0.04 tonnes

Approval sample driven from Wolverhampton to office in London

Full production delivery driven 0.05 tonnes from Wolverhampton to Aylesbury warehouse

Stock driven from warehouse to 0.05 tonnes store in Manchester

0.06 tonnes

TOTAL 0.2 tonnes

This analysis shows that British Production has a lower carbon footprint than European production. This is mainly because everything is based within the UK and therefore less travelling is needed.

Although the proposed brand is to going to be sold as an ecofriendly brand the less miles which it travels before it gets in to store is good for the environment. This element of eco friendly could also help the brand appeal to a more eco conscious

consumer. The European productions carbon footprint isn’t too large but once this is multiplied across a whole brand it would be significantly more carbon than a fully British based brand.


BRANDING THE PRODUCT The branding of the proposed range is incredibly important. Although the range is going to be made in Britain and this needs to be shown through the branding it also needs to be appealing

DECIDING ON A BRAND NAME The brand name is the most important part of the branding. It needs to reflect the brands ethos as well as appealing to the premium consumer. The brand name will therefore have a British element but without being overly patriotic. The idea behind the brand is that it is completely made out of British products but that it is also desirable purely for its aesthetics. It has therefore been decided that the brand name will be Isle. This reflects the idea of keeping products local and has a reference to the British Isles without being obvious. Isle is also a short memorable name which should stick within the consumers conscious. The group of women which were contacted following the farmers’ market questionnaires have been contacted again for their viewpoint on the brand name. These women are prospective consumers and so have a valuable opinion on the brand name. Overall 80% of the women questioned thought that Isle was a successful brand name and that it focused on the brand ethos well.

...47 as premium range. The branding also needs to be used in order to convey the traceability of the products and give the consumer the story of each garment. Two of the most important ways of

branding products are with the brand label for the inside of the garment and the swing tag. It is these two items which will be analysed and the design of which will be decided for the brand.

WOVEN LABELS Woven labels are the key way of branding a product for it’s product life. The label needs to be easy to remember and to reflect the brands ethos. Some examples of brand labels can be seen below. These all come from brands which are within the premium brand level. All of these labels are based on the brand name with some of them using a line to promote the website or the brand ethos.

DESIGN FOR ISLE’S LABEL The label for Crumpet is the simplest and reflects the simple aesthetics of the brand. Liberty Freedom’s label reflects the punk aesthetics of their brand without being too confrontational. The Sartoris label is the only one which uses a logo as well as the brand name. This logo is quite simple because it is only a take on the capital S. The use of logo’s within the premium fashion market are not used very often and so if an element is added to the label it is often very simple. This will be reflected within the design for Isle’s label.

The label which has been designed for Isle is a clean and clear hyper resolution label which relies on the brand name as its logo. There is also a stitching line which reflects the handmade ethos of the brand. The other key element of the design is the wording British to the Core. This easily sums up the ethos of Isle and without being overly patriotic. The same group of women which were asked about Isle’s brand name were also asked for their viewpoint on the brand label. All of the women thought that the label was easy to read and liked the combination of navy, grey and off white.


SWING TICKETS Swing tickets communicate a lot about a brand. They are often the first piece of branding which the consumer comes across when looking at a garment. They need to be able to communicate the brands name and aesthetic as well as informing the consumer of the price of the garment. The swing ticket for Isle also needs to do more than this. This is because traceability is at the heart of the brand. The swing ticket will therefore communicate the product life of the garment so far. This means that the origin of all the elements within a garment will be told within the swing ticket. Many brands are currently using the swing ticket as a way of explaining the product and range to the consumer and some examples of which can be seen to the right. The Christian Lacroix for La Redoute swing ticket is folded with the information incorporated within whereas the Christopher Kane for Topshop swing ticket has the information printed on the back. Both of these swing tickets make use of the space to explain the collaborations between themselves and the high street. The Todd Lynn swing ticket has been looked at because of its clean simplistic design. This is really effective and reflects the clean lines of the garments. The swing ticket is folded and has a button bag inside. This idea of having something inside the swing ticket is an interesting one and could be used to include information. All of the swing tickets looked at are printed on different weights of card so there are no standard weights. For instance the Todd Lynn swing ticket is on a light weight card which has metallic finish, the Christian Lacroix one is on a medium weight card with a gloss finish and the Christopher Kane one is on incredibly thick card with a texture. All of these suit the product and it is a key part of the swing ticket. The printing and medium needs to be correct to reflect the ethos of the brand. The swing tickets for Isle do not need to include a lot of complex information because this could be accessed by the consumer online after purchase but it does need to include basic traceability information. The quality of the swing ticket needs to e incredibly good because it is being attached to a premium product. It is also important because Isle needs to have a slick look in order to combat the misconception of a completely British brand being old fashioned and unfashionable.

THE ELEMENTS OF A SUCCESSFUL SWING TICKET ... clear design ... colour to be used appropriately for brand’s aesthetic ... brand name shown clearly ... inclusion of logo if it adds to brand name and not if it distracts ... weight of medium to reflect brand and purpose of swing tag ... layout to be chosen carefully to include just the right amount of information for the consumer

...48


SWING TICKET DESIGNS

...49

This swing ticket uses a different logo which was shown to the focus group at the same time as the isle - British to the Core one. Although they all thought that this was a clever logo which encapsulated the British element they thought it was a bit gimmicky for a premium brand. The swing ticket would have had and embossed print on it and been printed on a 200gsm card.

14cm

isle

3.7cm

BRITISH TO THE CORE

Where have I come from?

Fabric ... Yorkshire ... Woven by John Foster Ltd Body Lining ... Lancashire ... Woven by Acorn Fabrics Sleeve Lining ... Suffolk ... Woven by Stephen Walters Buttons ... West Midlands ... Made by James Grove Ltd

isle

BRITISH TO THE CORE www.isleclothing.co.uk

Front Piece

Sahara Coat Size 12 ÂŁ300 Double sided insert

Unique traceability no - 6493 Find your products history ... Enter it into www.isleclothing.co.uk to discover more

This swing ticket uses the isle - British to the Core logo and the dashed line which has an element of the craft within the brand. The focus group felt that this was an effective swing ticket but that the size and shape was a little ordinary for a premium brand. They thought that including the website on the swing ticket was a good idea though.

Back Piece www.isleclothing.co.uk

isle

BRITISH TO THE CORE

This swing ticket again uses the isle - British to the Core logo and the dashed line. All the focus group thought that the colours were really successful but they thought the landscape swing ticket to the right was more successful. They thought that this one although clear and easy to read was quite ordinary compared to the long landscape one which was chosen.

CHOSEN SWING TICKET DESIGN Following a discussion with the focus group this design has been chosen as the one which they like the most. The focus group believe that it is a clear layout and that it would not detract from the product which it was attached to. The swing ticket is in three pieces. The front and back pieces are made out of a 480gsm card which would have a slightly textured surface. The inside of the pieces of card would be the same blue as

the lettering and the hole which has been punched through would be edged using a blue metal eyelet. The insert in the middle of the swing ticket is the only bit which would change for each item. This insert is printed on 160gsm card and is double sided. It included the traceability information which is key to the brand and encourages the consumer to find out more on the brands website.


INSPIRATION

...50

isle is all about juxtaposition

... ... ... ... ...

the the the the the

juxtaposition juxtaposition juxtaposition juxtaposition juxtaposition

of of of of of

craft and slick design traditional and modern textiles country and city life new and old media local products and international design

the inspiration for the first isle range is the juxtaposition of travel ... the want for something familiar and new at the same time ... taking elements of new lands home with you ... exploring and discovering new ways of living and dressing ... the juxtaposition epitomised by the female explorers and eccentric tourists of the early 20th century ... the juxtaposition of textures ... the juxtaposition of draping and tight silhouettes ... the juxtaposition of British sensibilities and the desert lands of North Africa ... the juxtaposition of sombre British colours and bright North African hues ... the juxtaposition of patterns and plains


MARGUERITE BAKER HARRISON

...51

Marguerite Baker Harrison was an explorer who travelled the world through the first half of the 20th Century. She travelled primarily through North Africa, the Levant and into the Himalayas. Throughout her travels she fully engaged with the local culture. Adopting bits of their clothing and taking part in local customs.

Marguerite Baker Harrison shares a meal of wild goat en route from Istanbul to Persia (1924) Taken from Steffof, R (1992)

Travel ‘offered for women, the chance to wear clothes that were loose, comfortable, flamboyant and with a faint air of fantasy’ (Russel, 1986)

Merian C. Cooper, Marguerite Harrison and Ernest B. Schoedsack on the pipe on location (1924) Taken from http://home.comcast.net/~flickhead/Cooper.html

The Ship of the Desert Taken from Steffof, R (1992)


FREYA STARK

...52

Freya Stark Taken from http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00m6c3y

Freya Stark travelled extensively within the Muslim areas of Persia and Arabia. She was one of the first female travellers to travel without an entourage which was deemed unsuitable;e. One of her main ways of protecting herself though was learning Arabic and dressing like a local man.

Freya Stark in Arab Dress Taken from http:// weekly.ahram.org.eg/2003/634/bsc10.htm

‘To travel properly you have to ignore external inconvenience and surrender yourself entirely to the experience. You must blend into your surroundings and accept what comes. In this way, you become part of the land, and that is where the reward comes.’ Freya Stark quoted within (Lawton, 1993) Freya Stark wearing Arab Dress Taken from Steffof, R (1992), p 126


ECCENTRIC TOURISTS

...53

Following the rise of female explorers and a renewed interest in the history of North Africa the early 20th Century saw an increase in tourists to these areas. Many of these people who were travelling were the English upper classes and they took their classic eccentricity with them on their travels. This was shown in the way they travelled and their dress for travelling.

Tourists on top of Great Pyramid Taken from http://www.corbisimages.com/Search#p=1&q=tourists+on+top+of+great+pyramid


...54

Tourists Standing on Top of Great Pyramid Taken from http://www.corbisimages.com/Search#p=1&q=tourists+on+top+of+great+pyramid

Glamour and rough function collide ... North Africa and the upper classes combine ... lace and rock ... draping and corsets ... THE JUXTAPOSITION OF TRAVEL

Tourists climbing the Great Pyramid of Giza Taken from http://www.imageenvision.com/ historic/6502-tourists-climbing-the-great-pyramid-of-giza-by-jvpd


...55

BRITISH SENSIBILITIES IN THE DESERT WILDERNESS

Tourists Ride Camels in the Sahara Taken from http://media3.corbisimages.com/CorbisImage/ hover/11/33/441/11330441/BE070144.jpg

Tourists sitting atop Camels with Egyptian guides Taken from http://media2.corbisimages.com/ CorbisImage/170/11/57/9944/11579944/VV9092.jpg


THE DNA OF THE ECCENTRIC TOURIST

...56

References can be found in Appendix 5


MOROCCAN DRAPING

...57

Rif Dweller, circa 1909 - 1915 Taken from Ben Jelloun,T (1999), p53

Draping is key to the tribes of Morocco and North Africa. The wrapping and draping is a way of shielding the wearer from sand. The hoods and drapes are very simplistic but incredibly effective.

Rif Dweller, circa 1909 - 1915 Taken from Ben Jelloun,T (1999), p50

Fez Region, Man in Djellaba, 1934 Taken from Ben Jelloun,T (1999), p95


...58

Province of Fez: Folds on Shoulders, circa 1915 - 1918 Taken from Ben Jelloun,T (1999), p59

DRAPING ... WRAPPING ... FOLDING ... LAYERING ... TWISTING ... PLEATING ... VOLUME ... TUCKING


...59

DRAPING AND SHROUDING

Tangier: Countrywoman, 1891 Taken from Ben Jelloun,T (1999), p35

Tangier: Watercarrier, 1891 Taken from Ben Jelloun,T (1999), p32


...60

PLEATING AND TUCKING Arab Moslem Women of the cities still go closely veiled Taken from Seabrook,WB (1928) p76


...61

BEDOIN DRAPING AND TWISTING

Bedouin Men Taken from http://www.thisfabtrek.com/journey/africa/mauritania/20051225-nema/ bedouin2-4.jpg


...62

ENVELOPING AND SWATHING

Moroccan Figures, circa 1880 Taken from Ben Jelloun,T (1999), p26


CULTURAL MIX MATCH

...63 One of the key elements of the traveller look is the mix match of cultures. This is including elements of the travelled in country with the usual clothing of the wearer. This creates an eccentric look which is personal to the wearer. Ultimately the traveller look is about mixing well loved elements with new exciting pieces which reflect the life of the wearer.

The Road to Marrakech Taken from British Vogue Whole No 2478 Vol 171 Jan 2005, p83

The Road to Marrakech Taken from British Vogue Whole No 2478 Vol 171 Jan 2005, p93


...64

CLASHING COLOURS AND PATTERNS

The Road to Marrakech Taken from British Vogue Whole No 2478 Vol 171 Jan 2005, p95

The Road to Marrakech Taken from British Vogue Whole No 2478 Vol 171 Jan 2005, p86


COMBINATIONS OF TEXTURES

...65

... tassels and tartan ... ikat and sequins

Trail Blazers Taken from British Vogue Whole No 2516 Vol 174 March 2008, p311

To the ends of the Earth Taken from British Vogue Whole No 2509 Vol 173 Aug 2007, p130


CLASHING TRIBAL WITH TRADITIONAL

...66

... tartan and hot pink ... mud cloth and linen ... harems and trench coats ... blazers and robes ... beads and sashes ... prints and plains

The Road to Marrakech Taken from British Vogue Whole No 2478 Vol 171 Jan 2005, p90

Portraits of Spring Taken from British Vogue Whole No 2479 Vol 171 Feb 2005, p112


THE EXOTIC TEXTILES OF AFAR

...67

... lame ... lace ... patterns ... textures ... mirrors ... cinched waists ... slim skirts ... cropped jackets

The Road to Damascus Taken from British Vogue Whole No 2530 Vol 175 May 2009, pg 184

The Road to Damascus Taken from British Vogue Whole No 2530 Vol 175 May 2009, pg 191


ENGLISH STYLE

...68

HISTORY TRENCH COAT

LAYERING PRINTED TEES

BARBOUR

TWEED Image references can be found in Appendix 6

‘English style is a never ending labour of love which will result in a huge reward (individualism)’ (Bartley, 2010: 3) ‘Mix of uptight traditions and unabandoned teenage rebellion that combines to form English style’ (Bartley, 2010: 4) ‘English style at its best is totally natural, fiercely individual and girlishly contrary’ (Bartley, 2010:4)


KEY ENGLISH PIECES

...69

The English wardrobe is made up of a few key pieces which epitomise it’s style. These are then incorporated into the wearer’s wardrobe and made their own using layering and accessorising. These key pieces stay in wearer’s wardrobe forever and get better with age, dirt and fraying. These garments will all be used to inspire pieces for the new range.

THE GREAT COAT ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

THE MINI SKIRT

double breasted metal buttons belted heavy wool below the knee epaulettes military styling

... ... ... ... ... ...

short but sweet slightly beaten not too perfect rock styling zips buttons

Hacking Jacket Taken from http:// katherinehooker.com/current-range/jackets/ hacking-jacket More Dash than Cash Taken from British Vogue September 2009, p200

THE TRENCH COAT ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

THE HACKING JACKET

Blazer Taken from http://www.splendora.com/ international_street_style_2009/paris_0

... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

THE BLAZER

double breasted belted buckles and eyelets knee length storm flap pockets collar with revers

Asos Belted Midi Military Coat Taken from http://intheircloset.com/category/designer/ burberry-prorsum/?submit=view

... rever collar ... jetted pockets with flap ... single breasted ... shoulder pads ... neatly tailored ... two buttons

Lily Donaldson Mini Skirt Taken from http:// golestaneh-streetstyle.blogspot.com/2009/09/lilydonaldson-styles.html

tweed single breasted jetted pockets with flap curved edges collar with revers leather elbow patches three buttons buttoned cuffs


ENGLISH JUXTAPOSITIONS

...70

... tweed and chiffon ... fur and tartan ... diamonds and checks ... smooth and rough ... satin and wool ... metal and leather

Adn de la Mode Taken from Vogue Paris No 899 Aout 2009, p139

Brilliantly British Taken from British Vogue Whole Number 2535 Vol 175 October 2009, p263


...71

Out of the Woods Taken from British Vogue Whole No 2475 Vol 170 Oct 2004, p345

Out of the Woods Taken from British Vogue Whole No 2475 Vol 170 Oct 2004, p347

... sequins and tweed ... volume and sleek ... sheer and opaque ... reveal and conceal


MOOD BOARD

...72

NORTH AFRICAN DRESS

DRAPING

TEXTURE CLASHES

LAYERING

ENGLISH ECCENTRIC STYLING Picture references available in Appendix 7


DESIGNS WITH DRAPING

...73 These designs have both taken the idea of adding a scarf piece to a classic English garment. The two garments which have been added to are a classic grey wool great coat and a white blouse. Lace has been added to the blouse and Marrakech silk has been added to the coat.


...74

Both of these designs are using a headscarf. The design to the left is a cotton corduroy swing coat which has had a lace heads scarf added to it. This would create a translucent veil over the wearer and it also forms and collar for the coat. The design to the right is a drop waisted dress which has the draped headscarf piece. The skirt is a lace pleated skirt with an under skirt of linen bamboo mix. The main fabric is an off-white linen bamboo mix.


THE COLOURS OF THE SOUKS OF MARRAKECH

PANTONE 173 C

PANTONE 284 U

...75

PANTONE DS 193-3 C

PANTONE 576 M

PANTONE 2765 M

PANTONE 7407 C

The colours of Marrakech are incredibly inspiring with the souks being one of the most sensuous places. They are a riot of colour, from the produce on sale right through to the stall holders themselves. Colour can be found on tajines and babouches slippers, tea glasses and kaftans.


MOSQUE OF THE KASBAH COLOURS - MARRAKECH

...76

PANTONE 8021 C

PANTONE DS 318-6 C

PANTONE 5535 M

PANTONE 7531 C

PANTONE BLACK 7 PC The Mosque of the Kasbah is full of colour mainly due to its turquoise tiles. The combination of the pink terracotta brick against the turquoise creates a nice colour palette with greys mixed in as well.


THE SAADIAN TOMBS COLOURS - MARRAKECH

...77

PANTONE COOL GRAY 1 UP

PANTONE 4635 C

PANTONE 5635 C

PANTONE 438 C

The tiles of the Saadian tombs have a wonderful combination of colours with the turquoise, ochre and sky blue creating a really nice colour combination. The cream colour also helps to tone the hues.


YVES SAINT LAURENT’S MARJORELLE GARDENS COLOURS - MARRAKECH

PANTONE 2726 C

PANTONE 7407 C

PANTONE 4535 C

PANTONE 7483 C

PANTONE 723 C

Yves Saint Laurent found much inspiration within Marrakech and the Marjorelle gardens have many inspirational colours. Again the combination of ochres and blues are the most successful.

...78


FINAL COLOUR PALETTE

BURNT IVORY

PANTONE 7500 U

SOUK TIN

PANTONE 401 EC

ATLAS STONE

...79

SHARK SKIN

TURMERIC

PANTONE 8004 C PANTONE COOL GRAY 11 EC PANTONE DS 54-2 C

DUTCH GOLD

PANTONE DS 50-1 C

MEDINA CERAMIC

PANTONE 485 C

LAPIS LAZULI

PANTONE 275 C

SAADIAN AQUA

PANTONE 557 C

Picture references available in Appendix 7


PATTERNS OF THE SAADIAN TOMBS

...80 The Saadian Tombs in Marrakech have many patterns incorporated within their decoration. Many of these come from the wall engravings. Some of these have been drawn in order to be used for motifs. These motifs are then going to be used for laser engraving.


...81

These two designs have also come from the Saddian tombs, with one coming from the tiles and the other wall engravings.


LASER ENGRAVING EXPERIMENTATION Laser engraving is a method of embellishing a pile fabiric. A pattern is created and a laser cutter is used to burn away the pile in order to incorporate the pattern into the fabrics. All the laser engraving samples have been carried out by Hobart’s Lasers and have been done within the UK This has been experimented with using three diffferent patterns from the Saddian Tombs and some cotton velvet from Denholme Velvets. This pattern has been taken from the engravings of one of the buildings.

...82


...83

This pattern is a repeat of a line drawing which is inspired by the tiles within the Saadian Tomb’s in Marrakech. This creates a really simple but intresting repeat which woul look good across a whole piece of fabric and within a garment.


...84

This pattern uses some of the arabic script patterns which are engraved on the walls of the Saadian tombs in Marrakech. This has been put into repeat to form a square repeat tile which could then be repeated again. This pattern is a more abstract one than the others and works really well.


DESIGNS USING LASER ENGRAVING

Both of these designs show how the laser engraving could be used within garments. The design to the left shows a traditional woollen blazer teamed with some engraved cotton velvet harem trousers. This is a really interesting way of using the engraving which really encapsulates the look which is wanting to be achieved for isle. A more subtle use of the engraving can be seen to the right. This is a trench coat which has been made in Harris Tweed with the laser engraving used as accents. This is used on the storm flap, pockets, belt and welt. This would create an interesting clash of textures as well as colours.

...85


EXPERIMENTING WITH AGEING LACE The inspiration for isle’s first collection is gathering pieces from around the world and mixing them together to get an eclectic look. Part of this look is having pieces which are new but look a bit battered and old. This means that some of the fabric needs to be aged. Morton Young and Borland are a lace manufacturer based in Scotland. Some of their lace was requested to done experimentation with. The lace in its finished state is quite crisp and new looking whereas the look which is wanted for isle is a more lived in heirloom look. Therefore some experimentation was carried out in order to age the lace. The first element which was carried out was washing the lace on a 40 degree wash. This softened the lace considerably and gave it a better drape. The lace was then tie dyed with a powder beige colour and moss green. This has created quite a random pattern within the lace which can be seen to the right.

The aged lace

The original lace

...86


Concept Development