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the Georgia

VOICE July 2013

What’s inside this issue? MESSAGES FROM

Georgia PTA President, Georgia’s State School Superintendent ARTICLES ABOUT

Bylaws, Male Involvement, Reflections Winners HELPFUL INFORMATION

such as Important Dates and 2013 Convention Leadership Training Information AND MUCH MORE!


Message from the Georgia PTA President

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ere we are at the end of the second of a two-year term! It has truly been a year of challenges, adopting and overcoming challenges, working through the many issues that take place in a volunteer association—all the while keeping the focus on the students, families and local school communities of our great state and the accomplishments made in education achievement and success. The Georgia PTA Board of Directors has worked diligently to keep the programs, events and all that we do focused on the whole child, including health and nutrition, safety, mental health, advocacy and effective engagement to build on the collaborative relationships between home and school. Our ability to strengthen that partnership—through the equitable leadership we can provide in the classroom, in the school, and in the community—benefits our children where they are and reaches into our economy.

The Georgia PTA Board

Building PTA leadership, equitable leadership, is a vital component to the success of the work we do on behalf of all children. At the 99th Annual Convention Leadership Training, we are hosting another spectacular event and are proud to announce the first combined schedule with an Emerging Minority Leaders Conference. Plan to join us Thursday for the Education Panel Session on Human Trafficking, where Georgia PTA and the Georgia Department of Education co-host an “experts in the field” dialogue. The workshops this year are dynamic—look for a couple of unique learning opportunities being offered. The theme for the Friday night Banquet Dinner and Awards is “Celebrating PTA the Great Gatsby Way” with a special performance and festive Celebration Party scheduled after. This weekend promises to be memorable!

of Directors has worked diligently to keep the programs, events and all that we do focused on the whole child, including health and nutrition, safety, mental health, advocacy and effective engagement to build on the collaborative relationships between home and school.

It has been my pleasure and honor to have served in PTA at the state level these past nine years and believe that the time spent has impacted the growth that continues today. Effective advocacy and engagement leads to student achievement and success. This is as true today as it was my first day in PTA, and it is my personal belief, that this remains true—moving forward. Together, though not always easy, but necessary and worth every moment invested, we make every child’s potential a reality. Thank you for everything we have shared in leadership this year! Donna Kosicki President, Georgia PTA 2011 - 2013

Believe, Dream, Inspire The theme for PTA’s 2013–14 Reflections Program is Believe, Dream, Inspire. This theme was submitted through the Reflections Theme Search Contest by Julie Lampert of Waverly Park PTA, located in East Rockaway, New York. “My Inspiration for the theme came from my experience in competitive sports. I hope that students across the country will strive to make their dreams become a reality,” Julie writes. Students can start working on their entries for 2013-14 now so start speading the word of the theme.

Translated Materials Available Did you know that we offer membership forms already translated into Spanish, Chinese, Korean, Portuguese and Vietnamese on our website? You can download them and use them at your Local Unit. Go to www.georgiapta.org/ leadership-membershipnews.html and look under Membership Resources.

Georgia

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Georgia PTA « THE VOICE


Message from the Georgia State School Superintendent

Georgia’s Future. Now! depends on you

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uring my conversations and meetings there is one

Recently, Education Week released the findings of their 17th

2013 Georgia PTA Emerging Minority Leadership Conference

annual Quality Counts survey, which grades all states on key

July 12-13, 2013

question that is often raised: how do we make education more meaningful for our students?

education indicators. I am pleased to share that Georgia ranked 7th in the nation for the second straight year and received a perfect score for the indicator on Transition and Alignment, which includes Early Childhood Education and College Readiness. While it is important to grow in our successes, there is no doubt that Georgia is committed to providing meaningful and quality education from early childhood through college and career preparation.

Georgia International Convention Center in conjunction with Georgia PTA Convention Leadership Training

It is an absolute thrill to see schools all over the state implement wonderful and innovative strategies and practices that engage parents and students in the learning process. As we open a new chapter with the College and Career Ready Performance Index, I am confident that we will see more evidence of how schools and teachers continue to build up our students to reach new heights. Last of all, I invite all parents to join us in making education more meaningful for our students by being involved and taking an active role in your child’s education. This is a very critical time of year as we steer our students successfully across the finish line of another school year. I look forward to sharing more good news with you about the hard work and accomplishments of all students in Georgia! Dr. John Barge is Georgia’s State School Superintendent

Sandra Perrino, District 10 Director, arranged for 35 students from one of Atlanta’s schools to attend PTA Day at Capitol and meet one of the Representatives. Pictured in photo amidst the throngs of students is Sandra Perrino, Donna Kosicki (GA PTA President) and Rita Erves (GA PTA President-Elect).

July 2013

Thank you to all who attended PTA Day at the Capitol Those in attendance at PTA Day at the Capitol on February 27, 2013 were able to hear speakers talk about the current educational and legislative climate. They were then given time to navigate the State Capitol to find and speak to the elected representatives from their area. Following time at the Capitol, PTA leaders enjoyed lunch at the Freight Depot.

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Georgia

Bring your PTA team to Convention Leadership Training! While you are there, begin

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ng Leader di

planning for the school year and build camaraderie within your PTA team. This is the place to get all the information you need to kickstart your year!

On-Site Registration is still available! Convention Leadership Training 2013

2013 CLT Schedule at a Glance

Thursday, July 11 3:00 pm - 7:00 pm

Registration in the Exhibit Hall

4:00 pm - 5:15 pm

Education Panel Session on Human Trafficking with the GA Department of Education – in Salon 2 – Join experts in the field to discuss this critical issue in Georgia to build greater awareness, define advocacy strategies and identify programs for children affected. Georgia PTA will be joined by: · Moderated by Aaronde Creighton, Member, Street Grace Board of Directors & FACE Atlanta Advisory Council – www.streetgrace.org and Janett Abrams with Georgia Department of Education – www.doe.k12.ga.us · Dave McCleary, Rotary District 6900 Director End Human Trafficking Now – http://www.endhtnow.com/ · Amy Walters, Programs Director, Street Grace – www.streetgrace.org

5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

CLT 2013 Kick-Off Reception in the Exhibitors Hall Emcee Debbie Rabjohn will host the Awards Reception for The Model PTA winners. Visit with the Exhibitors, enjoy delicious hors d’oeuvres, network with other leaders, and join us for a festive event!

Friday, July 12 8:00 am - 8:00 pm

Registration, Exhibits open – in the Exhibit Hall

11:00 am - 6:00 pm

Membership Card Pick Up – in the Exhibit Hall

8:45 am - 9:15 am

First Timer’s Orientation (in Salon 2) and Bylaws & Resolutions Q&A (in Salon 1)

9:30 am - 11:00 am

Workshop Session 1

11:15 am - 1:45 pm

Opening General Session I (Nominations, Elections, Candidates Forum). Lunch buffet in Salons 4 & 5.

2:00 pm - 8:15 pm

Voting – in the Exhibit Hall

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Workshop Session 2

3:45 pm - 5:15 pm

Workshop Session 3

6:00 pm

Banquet Doors open, Student performance in Salons 4 & 5.

6:30 pm - 9:00 pm

General Session II – Banquet Dinner & Awards (President’s Speech) – in Salons 4 & 5, Celebrating PTA the Great Gatsby Way (semi-formal attire preferred)

9:00 pm - 11:00 pm

Celebration Party– Special Invited Guest! DJ and dancing. (Not a ticketed event, all are welcome.)

Saturday, July 13

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8:00 am - 10:00 am

Registration – in the Exhibit Hall

7:45 am - 8:30 am

Coffee and Light Continental Breakfast compliments of Georgia PTA and Association Insurance Management (AIM)

8:00 am - 11:00 am

Voting (if necessary) – in the Exhibit Hall

8:00 am - 2:15 pm

Exhibitors, PTA Mart and Membership Card Pick Up – in the Exhibit Hall

8:30 am - 9:30 am

District Meetings and Birney Butler PTA Annual Meeting (see page 25 for locations)

9:45 am - 11:00 am

Workshop Session 4

11:15 am - 12:30 pm

Workshop Session 5

12:45 pm - 2:15 pm

Lunch in the Exhibit Hall – Concessions, network with local and state PTA leaders

2:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Closing General Session III – Installation of newly elected Officers and District Directors, Incoming President’s speech, Membership Awards – in Salons 4 & 5

Georgia PTA « THE VOICE


Coffee Break with the President-Elect Georgia PTA Hero: Community Collaboration Extraordinaire – Aaron Turpeau

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s you all know, I love to write about my favorite things and my favorite PTA people in the Voice newsletter. For this edition, I felt moved to write about a community involvement extraordinaire. This is an individual that reached out to PTA in a most unique and special way. His name is Aaron Turpeau, and he has been well connected in the City of Atlanta for many years. He had prominent roles in the mayoral administrations of both Maynard Jackson and Shirley Franklin. He left city government and now has a very successful private business career. Allow me to share a most compelling story with you. Atlanta Public Schools has been confronted with challenges that pertain to educating its most precious commodity — the children. When situations of this nature arise, the reality is that quite often, human inclination causes some to dwell on what is perceived as “bad.” To the contrary, Mr. Turpeau recognized the need for people not to forget all of the “good” that has been associated with educational opportunities for our Atlanta Public School students. By means of the strong level of support he received from the Community Foundation of Greater Atlanta, he organized a wonderful rally properly named, “Support the Good.” However, this brilliant visionary did not stop there. He truly believed that he could make the most positive impact on the City’s schools/children by reaching out to the PTAs in this particular area. The Foundation again aided him in developing the Atlanta Council PTA Leadership & Advocacy Grant. The “good” thing about this grant is that it was created for the purpose of building this Council’s leadership capacity, advocacy capabilities, and to raise overall parental involvement in Atlanta schools. Georgia PTA recognizes that providing leadership training is vital to the success and progressive movement of our Association. That is why we spend so much time and resources on affording our seasoned and emerging leaders a vast array of training opportunities. Had it not been for the generosity of this grant, many of these individuals would not have been able to sponsor and/or attend the following events: 1) PTA Day at the Capitol & Student Advocacy Day 2) Atlanta Council Leadership Training 3) National PTA Federal Legislative Conference 4) National PTA Emerging Minority Leadership Conference 5) CLT 2012 6) National PTA convention 2012 (San Jose, CA) We know that collaboration must exist between parents, schools and communities, and that it is undoubtedly the driving force behind student achievement and success. It is not commonplace for a Council to receive a generous training grant of this magnitude. We also understand that he did not have to select our Association. Please join me in celebrating the efforts and initiatives of one of Georgia PTA’s true heroes, Mr. Aaron Turpeau. Rita Erves, GA PTA President-Elect, rerves@georgiapta.org

In February 2013, a few PTA leaders had an opportunity to fellowship with Aaron Turpeau. Pictured from left to right are: National President Elect, Otha Thornton, Aaron Turpeau, Dr. Howard Grant (Atlanta Public School District), Georgia PTA President Elect Rita Erves, Sandra Perrino, District 10 Director and Dr. Norman Thomas, Past President of Georgia PTA

Stay Connected to Georgia PTA We make it easy to be in the know! Bookmark our website: www.georgiapta.org

Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/GeorgiaPTA

Like us on Facebook: Georgia PTA July 2013

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The DeKalb Council of PTAs Sponsors Mad Violinist Workshop For Metro-Atlanta Orchestra Students Music YouTube Video Recording of Ashanti Floyd’s “Battle Field for the Orchestra”

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n March 23, 2013, The DeKalb Council of PTA’s Youth Empowerment Committee, in partnership with Still Waters Youth Sinfo-Nia of Metropolitan Orchestra (Sinfo-Nia) hosted a YouTube Video Recording with 5-time Grammy nominee, Ashanti Floyd “The Mad Violinist” of his original composition “Battlefield”. Ashanti is a recording artist and music producer, who has performed with the most trending artists of this century including T-Pain, David Banner, Nicki Minaj, Sean Kingston, Lil Wayne Rick Ross, 50 Cent, Lupe Fiasco, Young Buck, Young Jeezy, Fantasia and B.B. King to name a few. He is known for his electrifying style of playing in the soul of Jimi Hendrix where he bends notes. He is known as a “melodic, rhythmic genius.” This classically trained virtuoso, a graduate of the Berkeley College, understands the significant correlation between string pedagogy and academic mastery. (Statistics continue to prove that students who study string instruments perform better in the classroom and on standardized tests.) In Ashanti’s efforts to promote orchestral education, he teamed up with Sinfo-Nia and the PTA to form a metro-wide orchestra of advanced-level musicians for this video production. Sinfo-Nia, Atlanta’s premiere urban youth orchestra, was founded by director, David E. Robinson III who is a 30-year veteran music educator in the Dekalb County School System in Georgia where he teaches at four elementary schools: Meadowview, Ronald E. McNair Discovery Learning Academy, Flat Shoals, and Kelley Lake. He composed the alma maters for the Ronald E. McNair DLA, Middle and High Schools. For nearly

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24 years, Sinfo-Nia has performed throughout the United States and has completed two tours in West Africa. After receiving venue approval to use the Arabia Mountain High School Auditorium from Principal Rodney Swanson, The Mad Violinist along with Matt Barrett of Symphony Crack Orchestra, facilitated a music workshop and YouTube recording of a 40-piece string orchestra of metro Atlanta’s finest students from the following schools: Atlanta Girls, N Springs Charter High, MLK High, DeKalb School Of The Arts, Mount Zion Magnet High, Lakeside High, Riverwood High, Clarkston, Hebrew Israelite Academy, Woodland Middle, Sandtown Middle, Lost Mountain Middle, Agnes Scott College and Morehouse College. Ashanti’s mother, Patrice Floyd, a violinist extraordinaire, participated with some of her students from Javacya Arts Conservatory in Tallahassee FL. Sound was sponsored by PMI Audio, who donated Three Studio Project C4 omni-directional microphones. A second piece that was recorded was “Joshua Fit the Battle” arranged by David Robinson. The video, “Battle Field” was released Monday, April 1, 2013 on YouTube. As of Sunday, April 21, 2013 it has received almost 9,000 Views with some great comments. “Joshua Fit the Battle” has not been released as of yet. This is the link to the video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NH3NZdxkEsM Ashanti was a great inspiration providing a start for such a venture. This experience is opening doors as Sinfo-Nia has already received a few interesting calls. For more information on the Still Waters Youth Sinfo-Nia, please call (404) 328-0840. Please visit the website at www.sinfo-nia.com.

Georgia PTA « THE VOICE


Reflections

Winners Honored at State Reflections Ceremony

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ational PTA has been honoring students’ artistic achievements through the Reflections Program since 1969. Students are challenged to create artwork inspired by a specific theme. Themes are selected from hundreds of ideas submitted by students. The 2013-2014 Reflections theme will be “Believe, Dream, Inspire.” The PTA Reflections Program is designed to enhance quality arts education for students in pre-school through 12 grade, encouraging them to create works of art in the areas of dance choreography, film production, literature, musical composition, photog-raphy, and visual arts. Thousands of students in Georgia participate through their local PTAs each year. Each state is allowed to submit 4 entries in each of the arts area to the national level of judging—one entry for each grade division. That is a total of only 24 entries from Georgia. All national entries are judged on artistic merit/creativity, mastery of the medium, and interpretation of the theme. Only 6 Outstanding Interpretation Awards will be awarded from National, one for each category. These winners are notified directly and are also invited to attend the National PTA Convention. Within each arts area, 3 Awards of Excellence and 5 Awards of Merit are also selected. All winning visual art and photography pieces that receive national awards are used in exhibits and in online galleries to help promote the Reflections program for a period of 2-3 years. Visit the National website, www.ptareflections.org in mid to late May for a press release of national award recipients. Special thanks to the following businesses and individuals for their donations of goods and/or services: High Museum of Arts, Woodruff Arts Center, Lifetouch, Georgia PTA Staff, Georgia PTA Board of Directors, Kahnie Cowan, Debbie Rabjohn, Cydne Tweddle and Local & Council Reflections Chairs.

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Reflections 2012-2013 Winners THEME SEARCH AWARDS “If Only….” Eric Weese Mountain Park ES, Gwinnett Area 1, 12 “Everyone has a Story…!” Marcelo Guerra Lake Windward ES, North Fulton, 10 “Through My Eyes...” Makaila Brown Golden Isles ES, Glynn, 3 “Once In a Lifetime” Jewel Wells Puckett’s Mill ES, Gwinnett Area 3, 12 “It Takes my breath away” Kaleb Kenady RM Moore ES, Cherokee, 13

POSTER AWARD Andra Tudor 6th Grade, SKA Academy, 12

GEORGIA SPECIAL ARTISTS PHOTOGRAPHY First Place and Entry to National PTA – Jordan McCrea North Gwinnett HS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 First Place – Andrew Meredith Freedom MS, Cherokee, 13 First Place – Daniel Xing SKA Academy, 12 First Place – Brantley K. Jones St Simons ES, Glynn, 3 First Place – Alexander Kramer Manning Oaks ES, North Fulton, 10 First Place – Katie Norris Dickerson MS, East Cobb, 9 First Place – Joey Milstein Dodgen MS, East Cobb, 9 First Place – Jeremy Bolt McClure MS, Tom Mathis, 9 Second Place – Logan Rearic Vanderlyn ES, DeKalb, 11 Second Place – Christopher Yancy Little River ES, Cherokee, 13 Second Place – Yu Qian Yip SKA Academy, 12 Second Place – Bradley Kincannon North Paulding HS, Paulding, 9 Second Place – Tate Ragsdale Poole ES, Paulding, 9 Second Place – Warren Rogers Dickerson MS, East Cobb, 9 Second Place – Devin Michael Dickerson MS, East Cobb, 9 Second Place – Lexie Luckcuck Dodgen MS, East Cobb, 9

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Second Place – Thomas Nyce Marshpoint ES, Savannah-Chatham, 6 Third Place – Caitlin Conlon North Paulding HS, Paulding, 9 Third Place – Hanif Ali Smoke Rise ES, DeKalb, 11

Second Place – Brian Salinas Big Shanty Intermediate, Tom Mathis, 9 Third Place – Ana Becerril Mason ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12

Third Place – Haley Stansell Gordon Central HS, Gordon, 13 Third Place – Jonathan Razzano Bascomb ES, Cherokee, 13 Third Place – Ivy Pendley Shiloh Point ES, Forsyth, 13

Third Place – Yu Qian Yip SKA Academy, 12

Third Place – Reyna Lopez-Quintinilla Mason ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12

Third Place – Curtis Taylor North Paulding HS, Paulding, 9

Third Place – Nakosi Lott Mason ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12

Third Place – Kensley Stacy Roberts ES, Paulding, 9

Third Place – Hanif Ali Smoke Rise ES, DeKalb, 11

Third Place – Taneka Jackson Sammy McClure MS, Paulding, 9

Third Place – Ameena Jackson Dickerson MS, East Cobb, 9

Third Place – Jonathan Davis Birmingham Falls, North Fulton, 10

Third Place – Iliana Lucero Virginia L Heard ES, Savannah-Chatham, 6

Third Place – Noah Parker Annistown ES, Gwinnett Area 1, 12

Third Place – Christopher O’Neill Cheatham Hill ES, Tom Mathis, 9

GEORGIA SPECIAL ARTISTS DANCE CHOREOGRAPHY

Third Place – Carolyn Prunkl Dodgen MS, East Cobb, 9

GEORGIA SPECIAL ARTISTS VISUAL ARTS

First Place and Entry to National – McKenzie Carey Floyd Shelton ES, Paulding, 9

GEORGIA SPECIAL ARTISTS LITERATURE

First Place and Entry to National PTA – Jessica Bussert

First Place and Entry to National PTA – Madison Coleman Needwood MS, Glynn, 3 First Place – Trenton Gross Fairmount ES, Gordon, 13 First Place – Faith Moon Couch MS, Gwinnett Area 3, 12 First Place – Alexis McKee Sugar Hill ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 First Place – Elian Botello Sugar Hill ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 First Place – Gary Hamburg Woodstock HS, Cherokee, 13 First Place – Nyzair Johnson Brumby ES, East Cobb, 9 First Place – Alonis Jones Big Shanty Intermediate, Tom Mathis, 9 Second Place – Darrien Salter Mason ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Second Place – Elijah Cook Sugar Hill ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Second Place – Scott Gutierrez Mason ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Second Place – Kendra Vongsavath Big Shanty Intermediate, Tom Mathis, 9 Second Place – Fernando Juanez Big Shanty Intermediate, Tom Mathis, 9 Second Place – Zack Bennington Big Shanty Intermediate, Tom Mathis, 9 Second Place – Aleks Perez Big Shanty Intermediate, Tom Mathis, 9

Gordon Central HS, Gordon, 13 First Place – Joshua Cook RN Fickett ES, Atlanta, 10 First Place – Savannah Hunter equoyah HS, Cherokee, 13 First Place – Annika Ferreras Shiloh Point ES, Forsyth, 13 First Place – Amy Yu SKA Academy, 12 First Place – Jon-Michael Huisman WC Abney ES, Paulding, 9 First Place – Kelsey Jackson East Paulding MS, Paulding, 9 First Place – Christian Barrett Juliette Low ES, SavannahChatham, 6 Second Place – Kaynan Burns Sonoraville ES, Gordon, 13 Second Place – Mikaila Dixon New Georgia ES, Paulding, 9 Second Place – Zoe Lismore Goodyear ES, Glynn, 3 Second Place – Ashley McCormick North Gwinnett HS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Second Place – Cassidy Moncrief Trickum MS, Gwinnett Area 1, 12 Second Place – Humberto Smart Gadsden ES, Savannah-Chatham, 6 Second Place – Evelyn Lucero Virginia L Heard ES, SavannahChatham, 6 Second Place – Ariel Carthan RN Fickett ES, Atlanta, 10 Third Place – Jack Winwood Level Creek ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12

Third Place – Thoren Barber New Georgia ES, Paulding, 9

GEORGIA SPECIAL ARTISTS FILM PRODUCTION First Place and Entry to National PTA – Kristen Wright Sonoraville HS, Gordon, 13 Second Place – Chasity Young Sonoraville HS, Gordon, 13

MUSIC COMPOSITION Twelth Grade First Place – William Fulkerson Walton HS, East Cobb, 9 Second Place – Joseph Nam Norcross HS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Third Place – Brandon Kothe Walton HS, East Cobb, 9 Eleventh Grade First Place – Chloe Gilligan Roswell HS, North Fulton, 10 Second Place – Ji Seop “Edward” Lim North Gwinnett HS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Third Place – Andrea Clements Parkview HS, Gwinnett Area 1, 12 Tenth Grade First Place and Senior Division Entry to National PTA Jacob Rogers Lakeside HS, DeKalb, 11 Second Place – Simi Shah Peachtree Ridge HS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Third Place – Kyle Willoughby South Paulding HS, Paulding, 9 Ninth Grade First Place – Justin Thongsouk Mill Creek HS, Gwinnett Area 3, 12

Georgia PTA « THE VOICE


“The Magic of a Moment” Second Place – Rebecca Topper Norcross HS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Third Place – Sri Bhat Lakeside HS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Eighth Grade First Place – Danielle Nam Pickneyville MS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Second Place – Alexander Thannisch Creekland MS, Cherokee, 13 Third Place – Tony Zeng Crews MS, Gwinnett Area 1, 12 Seventh Grade First Place – Katie Crabtree Riverwatch MS, Forsyth, 13 Second Place – Chloe Pak Pickneyville MS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Third Place – Rebecca James EF Garrison MS, SavannahChatham, 6 Sixth Grade First Place and Middle Division Entry to National PTA – Jamie Le Crews MS, Gwinnett Area 1, 12 Second Place – Navkaran Gill River Trail MS, North Fulton, 10 Third Place – Jackie Wang Dickerson MS, East Cobb, 9 Fifth Grade First Place and Intermediate Division Entry to National PTA – Makayla Ford Union ES, Paulding, 9 Second Place – Claire Zhou Sope Creek ES, East Cobb, 9 Third Place – Briana Gabe East Side ES, East Cobb, 9 Hon Mention – Katie Maxson Simpson ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Fourth Grade First Place – Ava Gilbert Berkeley Lakes ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Second Place – Brian Shon Lake Windward ES, North Fulton, 10 Third Place – Ally Smith Puckett’s Mill ES, Gwinnett Area 3, 12 Hon Mention – Rebecca Wettlaufer RM Moore ES, Cherokee, 13 Third Grade First Place – Alexandria Burkingstock Puckett’s Mill ES, Gwinnett Area 3, 12 Second Place – Chandler Pridemore Macedonia ES, Cherokee, 13 Third Place – Thulsy Krishnan Rocky Mount ES, East Cobb, 9 Hon Mention – Isabella Smith Simpson ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12

July 2013

Second Grade First Place – Srirag Tatavarti Shiloh Point ES, Forsyth, 13 Second Place – William Skidmore, III Duncan Creek ES, Gwinnett Area 3, 12 Third Place – Evan Le State Bridge Crossing ES, North Fulton, 10 Hon Mention – Kristen Lester Allgood ES, Paulding, 9 First Grade First Place and Primary Division Entry to National PTA – Emilie Vu Sugar Hill ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Second Place – Kirti Subramanian Kincaid ES, East Cobb, 9 Third Place – Ryan Deaver Due West ES, Tom Mathis, 9 Hon Mention – Weston Skidmore Duncan Creek ES, Gwinnett Area 3, 12 Kindergarten First Place – Audrey Hager Duncan Creek ES, Gwinnett Area 3, 12 Second Place – Haleigh Clay EL Bouie ES, DeKalb, 11 Third Place – Jayden Nguyen Woodward Mill ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Hon Mention – Michael Martinez Cheatham Hill ES, Tom Mathis, 9

DANCE CHOREOGRAPHY Twelfth Grade First Place and Senior Division Entry to National PTA – Rachel Barker Cambridge HS, North Fulton, 10 Second Place – Virginia Spinks DeKalb School of the Arts, DeKalb, 11

Third Place – Hau Dang Brunswick HS, Glynn, 3

Third Place – Lillie Cate Ergle Clayton ES, Cherokee, 13

Ninth Grade First Place – Alyssa Beasley Glynn Academy HS, Glynn, 3 Second Place – Miranda Harmon Norcross HS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12

Second Grade First Place and Primary Division Entry to National PTA – Eileen Chen Oak Grove ES, DeKalb, 11

Third Place – Renee Chang Johns Creek HS, North Fulton, 10

Second Place – Adriana Rafanelli Dacula ES, Gwinnett Area 3, 12

Eighth Grade First Place – Christy Chu McClure MS, Tom Mathis, 9 Second Place – Ra’nae Pinkney Glynn MS, Glynn, 3 Third Place – Veena Jaipradeep Elkins Point MS, North Fulton, 10 Seventh Grade First Place and Middle Division Entry to National PTA – Kevin Park Richard Hull MS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Second Place – Amayha Mathis Fort MS, Muscogee, 4, Third Place – Imani Spann DeKalb School of the Arts, DeKalb, 11 Sixth Grade First Place – Mackenzie Lyons Holcomb Bridge MS, North Fulton, 10 Second Place – Emma Fender North Gwinnett MS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Third Place – Anna Turpen Richard Hull MS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Fifth Grade First Place and Intermediate Division Entry to National PTA – Brooke Childs Sonoraville ES, Gordon, 13 Second Place – Hunter Hadid Alcova ES, Gwinnett Area 3, 12

Third Place – Jose Pizaro Columbus HS, Muscogee, 4

Third Place – Jordan Sosnovsky Mountain Road ES, Cherokee, 13

Eleventh Grade First Place – Danielle Dawes Johns Creek HS, North Fulton, 10 Second Place – Cassidy Farwell Berkmar HS, Gwinnett Area 3, 12

Fourth Grade First Place – Olivia Yang Wilson Creek ES, North Fulton, 10

Third Place – Keyana Francis Berkmar HS, Gwinnett Area 3, 12

Third Place – Akhil Turaga Camp Creek ES, Gwinnet Area 1, 12

Tenth Grade First Place – Stephanie Niu Walton HS, East Cobb, 9

Third Grade First Place – Rachel Claxton Russom ES, Paulding, 9

Second Place – Madeline Kelso Savannah Arts Academy, Savannah-Chatham, 6

Second Place – Charles Barefoot Dacula ES, Gwinnett Area 3, 12

Second Place – Gillian Stolz East Side ES, East Cobb, 9

Third Place – Morgan Vasseur Puckett’s Mill ES, Gwinnett Area 3, 12 First Grade First Place – Margaret Hyser River Eves ES, North Fulton, 10 Second Place – Samia Ainsley-Childress BB Harris ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Third Place – Shruti Nainwal Vanderlyn ES, DeKalb, 11 Kindergarten First Place – Marlie White EL Bouie ES, DeKalb, 11 Second Place – Lorelei Jackson Sycamore ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Third Place – Mariah Snare Simpson ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Pre-Kindergarten First Place – Lucca Rodriguez Fernbank ES, DeKalb, 11

PHOTOGRAPHY Twelfth Grade First Place – Paula Santa Cruz Hillgrove HS, South Cobb, 9 Second Place – Ashlyn Cathey Grayson HS, Gwinnett Area 3, 12 Third Place – Nico Masters Sequoyah HS, Cherokee, 13 Hon Mention – Nick Sheridan Centennial HS, North Fulton, 10 Hon Mention – Emily Francis Lassiter HS, East Cobb, 9 Eleventh Grade First Place – Lauren Bullock Mill Creek HS, Gwinnett Area 3, 12 Second Place – Sarah Loftus Parkview HS, Gwinnett Area 1, 12 Third Place – Kayla Moudry Paulding HS, Paulding, 9 Hon Mention – Mary Petzer Ridgeview Charter HS, North Fulton, 10 Tenth Grade First Place – Ariez Martinez Walton HS, East Cobb, 9 Second Place – Amari Parham Parkview HS, Gwinnett Area 1, 12

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Reflections 2012-2013 Winners Third Place – Luke Rucker Brookwood HS, Gwinnett Area 1, 12 Hon Mention – Devika Menon Alpharetta HS, North Fulton, 10 Ninth Grade First Place and Senior Division Entry to National PTA – Morgan Harrison Cherokee HS, Cherokee, 13 Second Place – Yasmin Goreja Mill Creek HS, Gwinnett Area 3, 12 Third Place – Samantha Becker Northview HS, North Fulton, 10 Hon Mention – Martin Middleton Walton HS, East Cobb, 9 Eighth Grade First Place – Nicolas Mirchandani Hopewell MS, North Fulton, 10 Second Place – Camryn Gostel North Gwinnett MS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Third Place – Sammy Tomasello Ashworth MS, Gordon, 13 Seventh Grade First Place – Jax Denmon Holcomb Bridge MS, North Fulton, 10 Second Place – Douglas Stanfield Glynn MS, Glynn, 3 Third Place – Khushali Patel Marietta MS, Marietta City, 9 Hon Mention – Elisa Higgins Richards MS, Muscogee, 4 Sixth Grade First Place and Middle Division Entry to National PTA – Amelia Bishop Trickum MS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Second Place – Quynn Gianetta Couch MS, Gwinnett Area 1, 12 Third Place – Alyssa Chester RM Moore ES, Cherokee, 13 Fifth Grade First Place – Ginna Kibler Sara Ragsdale ES, Paulding, 9 Second Place – Sarah Winters Simpson ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Third Place – Valerie Novak Rock Springs ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Fourth Grade First Place – Cody Nelson Oak Grove ES, DeKalb, 11 Second Place – Olivia Cornwell Red Bud ES, Gordon, 13 Third Place – Amara Rangwala Chattahoochee ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12

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Third Grade First Place and Intermediate Division Entry to National PTA – William Landa Kemp ES, Tom Mathis, 9 Second Place – Hudson Collier Roswell North ES, North Fulton, 10

Eleventh Grade First Place and Senior Division Entry to National PTA – Kalie Chebib Lakeside HS, DeKalb, 11

Third Place – Grace Sanders CB Greer ES, Glynn, 3

Third Place – Caleigh Derreberry Brookwood HS, Gwinnett Area 1, 12

Second Grade First Place – Reagan Williams Simpson ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12

Tenth Grade First Place – Sasha Kershteyn Lassiter HS, East Cobb, 9

Second Place – Brayden Curry West Chatham ES, SavannahChatham, 6

Second Place – Ali KilkennySmith Lassiter HS, East Cobb, 9

Third Place – Ansley Haislip Camp Creek ES, Gwinnett Area 1, 12

Third Place – Katherine Sudakova DeKalb School of the Arts, DeKalb, 11

Hon Mention – Isabella Boston Kincaid ES, East Cobb, 9 First Grade First Place – Nathan Jovanovic Fernbank ES, DeKalb, 11 Second Place – Joyita Ahmed Mountain Park ES, Gwinnett Area 1, 12 Third Place – Dane Mills Still ES, Tom Mathis, 9 Hon Mention – Laurel Anderson Esther Jackson ES, North Fulton, 10

Second Place – Duane Stanford, III Parkview HS, Gwinnett Area 1, 12

Ninth Grade First Place – Caitlin Nebel Norcross HS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Second Place – Jason Born Cambridge HS, North Fulton, 10 Third Place – Zack Chalmers Chamblee HS, DeKalb, 11 Eighth Grade First Place and Middle Division Entry to National PTA – Will Wright Chamblee MS, DeKalb, 11

Kindergarten First Place and Primary Division Entry to National PTA – Sheridan Cathey Hayes ES, Tom Mathis, 9

Second Place – Katelyn Dossey Holcomb Bridge MS, North Fulton, 10

Second Place – Natalie Rhines Indian Knoll ES, Cherokee, 13

Hon Mention – Helena Brante McClure MS, Tom Mathis, 9

Third Place – Porter Eckes Cooper ES, Gwinnett Area 3, 12 Pre-Kindergarten First Place – Rebecca Miller Woodland ES, North Fulton, 10 Second Place – Hannah Lambert Tolbert ES, Gordon, 13 Third Place – Ethan Harris Jacob Smith ES, SavannahChatham, 6

FILM PRODUCTION Twelfth Grade First Place – Kevin Urbina North Paulding HS, Paulding, 9 Second Place – Diane Nguyen Duluth HS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Third Place – Genna Matarazzo Centennial HS, North Fulton, 10

Third Place – Fransisco Tomei Osborne MS, Gwinnett Area 3, 12

Seventh Grade First Place – Sierra Little Riverwatch MS, Forsyth, 13 Second Place – Julia Kiklica Marietta MS, Marietta City, 9 Third Place – Jeremiah Adeola Crews MS, Gwinnett Area 1, 12 Sixth Grade First Place – Alexis Seith Duluth MS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Second Place – Remington Youngblood Riverwatch MS, Forsyth, 13

Second Place – Lilly Steiner Avery ES, Cherokee, 13 Third Place – Braden Thorne Montgomery ES, DeKalb, 11 Fourth Grade First Place – Thomas Henderson Ball Ground ES, Cherokee, 13 Second Place – Spencer Toomey Level Creek ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Third Place – Alexandra Lynch Cooper ES, Gwinnett Area 3, 12 Third Grade First Place – Molly Malloy Oak Grove ES, DeKalb, 11 Second Place – Hayden Cole Nebo ES, Paulding, 9 Third Place – Kaitlyn Griffin Level Creek ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Second Grade First Place and Primary Division Entry to National PTA – Bryce Graham Hiram ES, Paulding, 9 Second Place – Harrison Bullard Vaughan ES, Tom Mathis, 9 Third Place – Sebastian Manuel Roberts ES, Paulding, 9 First Grade First Place – Elijah Dodge-Brooks May Howard ES, SavannahChatham, 6 Second Place – Livia Stetson Pitner ES, Tom Mathis, 9 Third Place – Dahlberg Yancey Sharon ES, Forsyth, 13 Kindergarten First Place – Mehek Saha Harbins ES, Gwinnett Area 3, 12 Second Place – Emily Sapough Simpson ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Third Place – Krish Chinta Shakerag ES, North Fulton, 10

VISUAL ARTS Twelfth Grade First Place – Markie Adamcyzk North Gwinnett HS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Second Place – Janice Lee Parkview HS, Gwinnett Area 1, 12

Third Place – Alyssa Pilcher Awtrey MS, Tom Mathis, 9

Third Place – George Quintrez Mount Zion HS, Clayton, 7

Fifth Grade First Place and Intermediate Division Entry to National PTA – Shelby Holihan East Side ES, East Cobb, 9

Hon Mention – Daniel Hao SKA Academy, 12 Hon Mention – Saul Palos Rodriguez Tri-Cities HS, South Fulton, 10

Georgia PTA « THE VOICE


“The Magic of a Moment” Eleventh Grade First Place – Monica Machado Walton HS, East Cobb, 9

Second Place – Grace Warmkessel Marshpoint ES, SavannahChatham, 6

Third Place – William Maher Ellis Montessori, SavannahChatham, 6

Second Place – Zoe Mims Savannah Arts Academy, Savannah-Chatham, 6

Third Place – Catherine Shih SKA Academy, 12

LITERATURE

Hon Mention – Kali Alves St Simons ES, Glynn, 3

Twelfth Grade First Place – Sarthak Mohapatra Roswell HS, North Fulton, 10

Third Place – Michelle Lung SKA Academy, 12 Tenth Grade First Place and Senior Division Entry to National PTA – Ansley Petherick Sequoyah HS, Cherokee, 13 Second Place – Augustina Horlava Sequoyah HS, Cherokee, 13 Third Place – Kaylee Bahk Northview HS, North Fulton, 10 Ninth Grade First Place – Rachel Chae Johns Creek HS, North Fulton, 10 Second Place – Ashley Prosser Brunswick HS, Glynn, 3 Third Place – Shuo Yang Duluth HS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12

Fourth Grade First Place – Austin Rubinger Sarah Smith ES, Atlanta, 10 Second Place – Tiffany Lee Johns Creek ES, Forsyth, 13 Third Place – Hannah Schulze New Georgia ES, Paulding, 9 Third Grade First Place – Emily Lam SKA Academy, 12 Second Place – Amy Huang Rocky Mount ES, East Cobb, 9 Third Place – Siya Saha Harbins ES, Gwinnett Area 3, 12 Hon Mention – Madelyn Van Bramer Ford ES, Tom Mathis, 9

Eighth Grade First Place – Serena Ho Holcomb Bridge MS, North Fulton, 10

Second Grade First Place and Primary Division Entry to National PTA – Abbey Johnson Mableton ES, South Cobb, 9

Second Place – Lillian Liu Duluth MS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12

Second Place – Olivia Lambert Bascomb ES, Cherokee, 13

Third Place – Stephanie Tian Riverwatch MS, Forsyth, 13

Third Place – Apollinaria Brunot Dowell ES, South Cobb, 9

Hon Mention – Mallori McKeegan Moses MS, Paulding, 9 Seventh Grade First Place and Middle Division Entry to National PTA – Audrey Nguyen SKA Academy, 12 Second Place – Sara Du SKA Academy, 12 Third Place – Kimberly Scott Woodstock MS, Cherokee, 13 Sixth Grade First Place – Max “Hyun” Choi Creekland MS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Second Place – Jeffrey Yang Webb Bridge MS, North Fulton, 10 Third Place – Christopher Park Riverwatch MS, Forsyth, 13 Fifth Grade First Place and Intermediate Division Entry to National PTA – Rachel Lee Johns Creek ES, Forsyth, 13

July 2013

First Grade First Place – Caley Anderson Dowell ES, South Cobb, 9 Second Place – William West WL Swain ES, Gordon, 13 Third Place – Joyita Ahmed Mountain Park ES, Gwinnett Area 1, 12 Kindergarten First Place – Ellie McGill Garrison Mill ES, East Cobb, 9 Second Place – Carson Mosley Marshpoint ES, SavannahChatham, 6 Third Place – Allison Whyte Joseph Knox ES, Cherokee, 13 Pre-Kindergarten First Place – Silas Gjekaj EF Garrison ES, SavannahChatham, 6 Second Place – Vyshakh Menon Medlock Bridge ES, North Fulton, 10

Second Place – Victoria Jordan Tri-Cities HS, South Fulton, 10 Third Place – Sara Dada Wheeler HS, East Cobb, 9 Eleventh Grade First Place and Senior Division Entry to National PTA – Lydia Turnage Wheeler HS, East Cobb, 9 Second Place – Morgan Stokes Dacula HS, Gwinnett Area 3, 12 Third Place – Emma Heneine Lakeside HS, DeKalb, 11 Tenth Grade First Place – Taylor Harris South Gwinnett HS, Gwinnett Area 1, 12 Second Place – Marianne Danneman Wheeler HS, East Cobb, 9 Third Place – Savannah Peat Mill Creek HS, Gwinnett Area 3, 12 Ninth Grade First Place – Daniel Lang South Paulding HS, Paulding, 9 Second Place – Savannah Higgins Lanier HS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Third Place – Ashley Eggart Lassiter HS, East Cobb, 9 Eighth Grade First Place and Middle Division Entry to National PTA – Jenny Pham Creekland MS, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Second Place – Sydney Norman Dacula MS, Gwinnett Area 3, 12 Third Place – Charlotte Densmore Hopewell MS, North Fulton, 10 Seventh Grade First Place – Anna Lester East Paulding MS, Paulding, 9 Second Place – Shae Johnston Jane Macon MS, Glynn, 3 Third Place – Zion Martell Marietta MS, Marietta City, 9 Sixth Grade First Place – Marissa Ross Richards MS, Muscogee, 4

Third Place – Hope Kutsche McClure MS, Tom Mathis, 9 Hon Mention – Nicole Bourland Memorial MS, Rockdale, 11 Fifth Grade First Place – Ritu Reddy Kittredge Magnet ES, DeKalb, 11 Second Place – Savannah Godowns Double Churches ES, Muscogee, 4 Third Place – Grace Galyean Floyd Shelton ES, Paulding, 9 Fourth Grade First Place – Madison Koch Hasty ES, Cherokee, 13 Second Place – Maddie Hays Dacula ES, Gwinnett Area 3, 12 Third Place – Jordan Piper Varner ES, South Cobb, 9 Third Grade First Place and Intermediate Division Entry to National PTA – Kaylee Lankford Hasty ES, Cherokee, 13 Second Place – Emily McNeice Sope Creek ES, East Cobb, 9 Third Place – James “Jay” Black Vickery Creek ES, Forsyth, 13 Second Grade First Place and Primary Division Entry to National PTA – Jafar Hashim Barnwell ES, North Fulton, 10 Second Place – Maci Hodo West Manor ES, Atlanta, 10 Third Place – Charley Podlesney Olgethorpe Point ES, Glynn, 3 First Grade First Place – Colin Loeffler Russom ES, Paulding, 9 Second Place – Prielle Zafft White Oak ES, Gwinnett Area 2, 12 Third Place – Haile Goodings EL Bouie ES, DeKalb, 11 Kindergarten First Place – Emory Curry Puckett’s Mill ES, Gwinnett Area 3, 12 Second Place – Marcellus Owens EL Bouie ES, DeKalb, 11 Third Place – Krish Chinta Shakerag ES, North Fulton, 10 Hon Mention – Jaide Venzen Hickory Hills ES, Marietta City, 9 Pre-Kindergarten First Place – Shreya Sehgal Smoke Rise ES, DeKalb, 11

Second Place – Nimra Ahmad Freedom MS, Cherokee, 13

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Celebrating Our Children

Photos courtesy of Lifetouch Photography

Scenes from the State Reflections Ceremony

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Georgia PTA ÂŤ THE VOICE


From the Education Chairperson

Special Tips for Standardized Tests

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tandardized test measure the performance of one group of students against the performance of other groups of students They help schools see how well their programs are succeeding. Here are some ways to help your child do his or her best. • Get your child used to multiple-choice questions by making up a few at home. • Explain that some questions may be unfamiliar. This normal and is no cause for worry. • Standardized test are usually timed. Tell your child to see how many questions are on each section and how much time is allowed. This way, he can pace himself.

Reducing Test Taking Anxiety

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est anxiety is when a student excessively worries about doing well on a test. This can become a major hindrance on test performance and cause extreme nervousness and memory lapses among other symptoms. The following are tips on reducing test taking anxiety. • Being well prepared for the test is the best way to reduce test taking anxiety. • Space out studying over a few days or weeks, and continually review class material, don’t wait until the night before and try to learn everything the night before. • Get a good night’s sleep before the test. • Show up to class early so you won’t have to worry about being late. • Stay relaxed, if you begin to get nervous take a few deep breaths slowly to relax yourself and then get back to work. • Read the directions slowly and carefully. • If you don’t understand the directions on the test, ask the teacher to explain it to you.. • Write down important formulas, facts definitions and keywords in the margins first so you won’t worry about forgetting them. • Do the simple questions first to help build up your confidence for the harder questions.

Develop a Test Taking Strategy

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o build your child’s confidence, suggest that he or she have a clear test taking strategy. For example, many teachers recommend the following: Look over the entire test before starting: answer the easiest question first; don’t spend too much time on one question; and if there’s time , check your work and go back to the ones you skipped. Preparing Your Child For Writing Test • Encourage your child to write stories, letters, diaries, different endings to stories or television shows. • Discuss your child’s writing with him or her including answers to discussion questions included in his or her homework.

• Don’t worry about how fast other people finish their test; just concentrate on your question. • If you don’t know a question, skip it for time being and remember that you don’t have to always get every question right to do well on the test. • Focus on the question at hand; don’t let your mind wander on other things. • If your child is still experiencing extreme test anxiety after following these tips, seek help from your school counselor. Visit TestTakingTips.com for more test taking help.

• Help your child organize his or her thoughts and revise original drafts. Neatie Green, Education Chair, ne2green@hotmail.com

July 2013

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Improve Student Nutrition: What Your PTA Can Do

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esearch has shown that students who eat a healthy diet perform better at school. PTAs can have a significant, positive impact on student learning by advocating for healthier food options during the school day and taking good nutrition into account when planning PTA fund raisers and events. One of the best ways that schools support student nutrition is by participating in the Federal School Meals programs. Find out whether your school is part of these programs; if not, work with your school and district administration to encourage their participation: http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/ The following are other ways your PTA can help improve nutrition at your school: Promote the new food guidelines in effect thanks to the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010. These guidelines will help schools provide better nutrition and reduce obesity. • Find out what school meals are like by volunteering during meal times, eating lunch with your children, or reviewing school menus. • If you see something that doesn’t fit with the new guidelines, share the USDA’s information with school leaders. • Point your school’s food service staff toward technical assistance and training opportunities (e.g., USDA’s Best Practices Sharing Center or National Food Services Management Institute ).

are for sale in your school store? (Consider replacing junk foods with healthier choices such as bottled water, 100% juice, yogurt and fruit.) • Meet with food service staff to learn about their daily challenges in preparing healthy meals for students. Ask for their suggestions for improvements. • Find out how nutrition is covered in the school’s health curriculum. What messages are students receiving? Are they getting the latest guidance , or does it need to be updated? • Check out the cafeteria: Is it a nice place to eat? Do visuals promote healthy eating? If not, ask the principal’s permission to paint a colorful mural or post student artwork featuring healthy foods. • Be sure to get ideas from the students, too! Find out how they feel about what time they eat lunch, how much time they have to eat, how the food tastes, and what they would like to see changed. • Once you have gathered all of your information, request a meeting with the principal to discuss possible improvements to your school’s “nutrition environment.” Give your fund raisers and other PTA events a healthy makeover: • Sell fruit (citrus or other in-season fruit), gift wrap, or other items rather than candy or baked goods for school fund raisers.

• Consider joining your school district’s Local Wellness Committee to be a part of the team that implements these changes.

• Invite chefs from local restaurants to donate healthy hors d’oeuvres and desserts for a “Taste of [Your Town]” event. Charge for admission.

• Offer to organize a taste test for new, healthier recipes and foods. Talk to kids about why it is important to eat these new foods: “They will make you BIG, STRONG, and SMART!”

• For class “spirit” and other competitions, provide healthy rewards (extra recess) or nonfood items instead of candy, doughnuts, and pizza parties.

• Publicly support your school if they have adopted established nutritional standards for their National School Lunch and Breakfast programs. Thank school leaders and food service personnel for helping your child and every child to be healthier and stronger.

• Sell bottled water and healthy treats (rice cakes, popcorn, fruit) instead of candy and soda at PTA events.

Encourage your school to participate in other national efforts to improve school nutrition, including:

• Consider making Healthy Lifestyles Month [link] an annual PTA event.

• The HealthierUS Schools Challenge • Let’s Move! Salad Bars to Schools • Team Nutrition Go on a “fact-finding mission” around your school: • What other foods compete with the nutritious foods available through the school meals program? How many vending machines are there, and what do they contain? What foods

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Make the “healthy lifestyles” message part of everything your PTA does:

• Make healthy lifestyles a regular feature during your PTA meetings, or devote one meeting to exploring what your PTA can do. • Point parents to the Healthy Homes [link] section of the National PTA website. Feature content from this section regularly in your newsletter or on your website. This article can be found on the National PTA website at http://www.pta.org/programs/content. cfm?itemnumber=3389

Georgia PTA « THE VOICE


Financial Red Flags

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ne of the most important things we do as PTA Board Members is fundraise so that we can provide educational support to our schools. With that comes the handling of money — often large sums of money. It is important to always stay aware of what is going on with your PTA funds and to catch any financial red flag. To protect your PTA, be aware of the following things:

• No treasurer’s reports at executive board or association meetings.

• Inquiry calls by concerned parents, teachers, or principal.

• Reports are given orally with written information to be provided “later.”

• Calls on the same matter from two different sources.

• Treasurer’s reports list only general categories without sufficient detail.

• Failure to provide a year-end audit on request.

• Treasurer misses meetings.

• Providing skimpy or misleading information.

• Audits not performed as scheduled.

• Subsidizing memberships for anyone (students, etc.)

• No one from unit attends any council/district meetings or workshops. • Board members not turning in correct amount of money; accounting irregularities in their own fundraisers/activities. • Inability of treasurer or chairman to say how much money the fundraiser made. • A PTA mom offers to “do” the fundraiser with her own business. • No monthly financial reports; no audits. • Board unfamiliar with unit bylaws. • Banks that do not return processed checks (or copies of such.) • Unapproved meeting minutes. • Unapproved budgets or yearly calendars. • President (or other officer) not reviewing bank statements. • School staff member as treasurer. • School staff the greater percentage of the board. • Demands from staff/principal for “gifts” to school. • A treasurer who is disorganized and can’t get reports ready for meetings.

• Lack of or incomplete minutes, particularly in matters involving use of funds. • PTA paying for aides or specialists one year and expecting/obligating next year’s board to do the same. • Getting involved in supporting petitions for more teacher hours, etc. Boards are not obligated to take either side of a dispute. • Anxious principal who wants projects funded without going through the process set up by the PTA. • Overbearing principal who wants the PTA to do what he/she wants regardless of the proper procedure. • Fundraising project that will benefit a board member financially. • Unit board not following financial procedure because they “never did before”; board that claims it “didn’t know.” • Only one person counting money. • Only one person signing checks; only one person on bank signature card.

First Steps for Suspected Fraud or Theft • Do not make accusations. • Determine what other access the suspect has, what other types of fraud schemes the suspect could have perpetrated, the likelihood of collusion, the possible duration of the schemes discovered. • Document all allegations. • Gather facts, documents, and interviews. • Identify all bank accounts involved and consider closing or freezing the accounts. Follow steps in the policy developed to cover such matters. • Contact your Council and District leadership if you suspect fraud or theft so they can offer support and assistance. • Contact the authorities. • Contact insurance company. • If it is determined that fraud did occur, National PTA recommends that the PTA should file an official report with the police department

Need help or guidance? Contact your Council and District leadership.

• Signing of blank checks. • Receipts not attached to Requests for Reimbursements.

• A president who writes the checks because the treasurer has no experience.

July 2013

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Spring Into Action

Parent to Parent

locks have been moved forward one hour, the days are longer, flowers blooming, and pollen is falling turning everything yellowish-green. All signs that spring is either here or on the way.

arent to Parent of Georgia is a statewide organization that provides support, information and training for families of children with disabilities and special healthcare needs. We have a toll free number (1-800-229-2038) and offices, staff and volunteers across the state.

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If I may, where are you in regards to male engagement in the life of your child(ren) or the life of any child in our great state. Are you there or are you on the way? Last month National PTA sprung into action giving men from across the country an opportunity to gather in Kansas City for tips and resources. Topics included: Making Father Engagement Relevant to Child Outcomes, Bullying Preventon, Increasing Male Involvement and Engaging Dads and Engaging Ethic Men in Education, to name a few. I must give pause and menton some of the notable speakers and presenters who sprung into action while in Kansas: Eric Snow, Executive Director of WATCH D.O.G.S., Carey Casey, CEO of the National Center for Fathering; Carey has written a wonderful book titled “Championship Fathering…How to Win at Being a Dad”. Others were Eugene Schneeberg, Director of Center for Faith-Based Neighborhood Partnerships, U.S. Department of Justice, Eddie Kennison, Former Kansas City Chiefs NFL Football Player, representatives from AllPro Dad, StrongFathers/ StrongFamilies and the U.S. Department of Education to name a few. All persons involved sprung forth with their focus on raising male engagement. They provided tips, best practices and resources to engage fathers, grandfathers and other important male figures in education, reduce bullying, and bring male mentors into schools nationwide. So I ask, will you spring into Actions today and help make a difference in the life of a child(ren). Now is the appointed Time to do the work. As Georgia PTA Male Engagement Chair, I look forward to assisting you with your efforts to spring forth with new ideas, to incorporate into your existing plans to get more males engaged in your local unit PTA district, and councils. Reginald Forrest, Male Engagement Chair, rforrest007@gmail.com

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We believe that parents are the best support for other parents. We value diversity and respect people of all backgrounds and circumstances. We help families learn how to work with schools, medical professionals, government officials and community leaders to meet the unique needs of their children.

Parent to Parent provides 7 core services to families: 1. P2P Special Needs Database has over 5,000 provider resources specific to children and young adults with disabilities and special healthcare needs. You can search it online at www.p2pga.org or call our office and receive assistance. 2. P2P Roadmap to Success is an easy to navigate online guide to the major points in the life of a child with a disability. By visiting roadmap.p2pga.org you can find information on everything from diagnosis to transition to adulthood including personal stories from parents who have already traveled this path. 3. P2P Supporting Parents are volunteers who can be matched with parents according to the child’s age, disability, or specific issue. Sometimes parents just want to talk to someone who knows exactly what they are going through. 4. P2P One-On-One Assistance is the assistance we provide to families who call our offices. We help with education, health and related issues to any parent who calls us. We have bilingual staff and resources and are able to assist in whatever language is required. 5. P2P Navigator Project has volunteers all over the state who are working to build collaborative community leaders. 6. P2P Trainings are available on a variety of topics for free to parents across the state. Check out our training calendar to find one near you or call us to host one in your area. 7. There are many ways to connect with P2P Online. Join us on Facebook, Twitter or Pinterest or sign up for our email list to receive regular announcements about disability related topics. Give us a call at 1-800-2038 to find out more about any of our services or visit us a www.p2pga.org

Georgia PTA « THE VOICE


Georgia PTA 2013 Legislative Recap

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he 2013 legislative session was relatively quiet with no high profile education bills and few major bills affecting children and youth. The most significant bill affecting children was HB 242, the Juvenile Justice bill which rewrote the juvenile code and addressed how youth would be handled once they entered the juvenile system. The goal is to keep the nonserious offenders out of jail and in local jurisdiction treatment programs so that minor offenders don’t become major, repeat offenders. Below is a recap of some of the more significant legislation passed that impacts children and youth:

Legislation that Passed: HB 70: Under certain case by case instances, the State Board of Ed (SBOE) could waive the requirement that a ‘medically fragile’ student must be enrolled in a public school for one year and have an IEP before being allowed to qualify for a Special Needs Scholarship. The Local BOE/school could be required to expedite the development of the IEP. Stipulates that students already enrolled in private school are eligible. HB 115: Revises provisions related to the suspension and removal of school board members in cases where the system is placed on probation by an accrediting agency. Proposed changes include: notice of probation must be submitted to the SBOE by the LBOE in writing, the state board hearing on charges must be held within 90 days, deliberations of the state board may be held in executive session and suspension or removal shall not apply to board members who were not on the board when the accrediting agency placed the system or school on probation. If school or district has been accredited by a second accreditation organization within the last two years then students would still qualify for HOPE. Also added that LBOE members can’t use local taxpayer dollars to defend themselves against being removed from office due to accreditation issues. HB 131: Would have dual enrollment courses treated the same as AP and IB courses in calculating HOPE. HB 244: Puts into law the teacher and leader evaluation system currently being piloted (by RTTT systems and others). Codifies how student achievement is factored into a teacher evaluation (50% of evaluation) along with trained and certified administrative observation, school climate and student surveys. Student achievement would be based on scores from EOCTs for those classes that have EOCTs and would be based on locally developed pre and post tests based on Student Learning Objectives (SLO) for those classes with no established end of course tests. Effective 2014-15 HB 283: Major clean up of Title 20, as recommended by the Education Finance Commission. Updates QBE program weights; limits the charter system annual grant to those systems whose charters were approved prior to 1-1-12. Those approved after that date will get a one-time implementation grant subject

July 2013

to appropriations (translation: excludes Fulton County with 93,000 students would have receive a $9 million extra grant per year); counselor-student ratio changed to 1 to 450 for every grade and in 2015 will include FTE counts for English Language Learners and Students With Disabilities, and in 2016 will include gifted and remedial; includes technology with texts for ‘instructional materials’; extends maximum class size to 2014-2015 with SBOE eligibility to waive; allows 20 additional day grant to be used for additional services to students during the school day and removes the limit that can be spent on transportation; school psychologists to be funded at l to 2420, formerly 1 to 2475; school psychologists, special ed leadership and social workers to be indirect costs separately identified; removes ‘needs improvement’ designation from the code, and calls it ‘unacceptable’; charter schools no longer have to have a professional learning program; establishes a grant program to incentivize adopting of a digital learning program using high speed internet; middle school grades no longer need a shared planning period in law; home school students will send attendance reports directly to the state DOE, not the local school system; home school students with a suspected disability must notify the local school superintendent; specifies that charter petitions are three –way and that the local school system cannot be a petitioner; Charter Advisory Committee shall review petitions for charter systems only; LBOE to have 90 days to approve or disapprove a charter school petition which is now 60 days; removes the term AYP from the law; requires school foundations to be 501.c.3 corporations. Changes definitions in the School Scholarship Organization (SSO) regulations: · Eligible student must be enrolled in the public school for at least 6 weeks; · Currently 25% of revenue may be held in reserves. · SSO must designate revenue to specific students; · Students with financial needs must have preference; · Must maintain separation between scholarship funds and operating funds; · Must report federal AGI for families of all scholarship recipients and number of dependents in such families; · Donors cannot designate a specific student to be recipient of the donated funds. · Increases annual total to $58 million and eliminates the inflationary rider. HB 284: Return to Play Act. Would require LBOE to adopt a policy governing when an athlete (ages 7-18) can resume participation in a sport after sustaining a head injury. Covers public, charter and private schools but not church leagues. Schools will not be liable for a student’s injury unless it is caused by willful or wanton action. Public recreation facilities where

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registration is required and fee is charged shall provide written information on risks of concussion and head injuries to parents and are encouraged to adopt a return to play policy. HB 337: Would allow public and private schools to stockpile auto-injectable epinephrine (epi-pens). Doctors would be able to write a prescription for the schools. An employee will be trained to recognize anaphylactic shock and how to administer the epi-pen and will not be liable unless gross negligence is found. Recently, a pharmaceutical company said it would provide four per school if the school had a prescription for them. HB 372: Lowers the requirement to receive a HOPE grant from 3.0 to 2.0. Does not affect HOPE Scholarships. HB 382: Schools that enter into a recreation joint use agreement will not be liable for injuries that happen on their grounds while they are being used by the renter of the facilities. The other entity will be required to carry insurance to cover any liabilities. Modified to only pertain to agreements between public/private not public/public due to liability. HR 502: Establishes a study committee on mental health and school violence. HR 552: Urges implementation of comprehensive school counseling programs and encourages districts to allow counselors five full-time segments to advise students (and parents). SB 212: Requires an American Heart Assoc video on how to perform CPR and use AED devices to be shown in high school Health and PE. HB 142: Ethics Bill: Caps expenditures at $75 per occurrence. Forbids lobbyists from paying for sporting events, hunting trips, etc. as well as foreign travel. Can still pay for caucus, delegation, committee or whole general assembly events with certain limitations. Can pay for trips if legislator is performing ‘official duties’. HB 156: Makes ‘sexting’ between teenagers a misdemeanor instead of a felony. HB 242: Rewrite of the Juvenile Justice Code. Revises how a youth is processed when he or she is in the juvenile system. Eliminates conflicts in the code. HB 350: Requires a national criminal records check for anyone who works in a child care facility. Each person must be rechecked every five years. SR 623: Creates the Senate Select Study Committee which seeks to make age- appropriate education about child sexual abuse part of the school’s curriculum. The committee will seek to reduce child sexual abuse by recommending policy and legislation.

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Legislation that Did Not Pass:

(but remains active for the next session) HB 123: Parent Teacher Empowerment Act: The “Parent and Teacher Empowerment Act”, also known as the Parent Trigger Bill allows a petition to be submitted to convert any local school to a charter school. The petition may be submitted by a majority of parents of students enrolled in the school or cluster (one vote per household including all siblings). Whoever submits the petition must verify the signatures and verify that no for-profit entity helped with the process. For low performing schools, parents or teachers may petition or vote by secret ballot to impose a particular turnaround model (including such things as removing school personnel, including the principal, provide a management team, restructure the schools governance plan, etc.). The local board has 30 days to determine that the people who signed have students enrolled. If the petition is submitted by 60 percent of parents or faculty, denial takes a 2/3 vote of the board. HB 327: Flexibility and Accountability Act: Allows system flexibility based on school district and individual schools performance as calculated using the CCRPI (College and Career Readiness Performance Index). Category III systems would be charter systems that have a specific contract with the SBOE regarding Title 20. Category II, those with an 80 or above, along with 90% of the schools in their system having an 80 or above or showing significant growth, would be high performing systems and granted significant flexibility on Title 20 without having to apply for waivers for such areas as class size, expenditure controls, salary schedules, and certification requirements as long as they remain high performing. Category I would be those with a score of less than 80. They would still be able to apply for waivers but would have to show how those waivers align with their adopted strategic plan. Effective 2015-16 SB 68: Celebrate Freedom Week. Establishes the week in September that includes Sept. 17 where three hours of instruction be dedicated to the Constitution and other important founding documents. Students in grades 3-12 would recite from specified historic passages. SB 101: Would allow a school district to decide if they want to have a designated individual carry a weapon in school (in addition to or in lieu of an School Resource Officer). The individual would need to have a permit and to have completed any training the LBOE required. The local system can decided if they want to have this and will be responsible for the cost of the training. The system retains sovereign immunity. An employee cannot be hired or fired based on their willingness or reluctance to participate in this. Also allows guns on public college campuses anywhere except student dorms, fraternity/sorority houses and in sporting facilities. Would allow guns in churches (if the church votes to allow this) and other public buildings (except courthouses) in areas that do not require screening to enter. Would allow some individuals treated for mental health issues to be able to get gun permit. A special thank you to the Georgia PTA Legislative team who actively supported all the PTA advocates throughout the year and a very special thank you to Diane Jacobi and Sally FitzGerald who helped monitor legislation throughout the session. For those who want more information about legislation from the 2013 legislative session there will be a workshop on it at CLT in July. Karen Hallacy, GA PTA Legislative Chair

Georgia PTA « THE VOICE


Zoo Atlanta Updates

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ou may be familiar with the numerous hands-on education programs Zoo Atlanta offers students, teachers and families from all over the Southeast. We invite you to consider utilizing the Zoo’s unique resources to supplement your summer programming needs. Educational groups of 10 or more can enjoy Self-Guided Field Trips at the discounted rate of only $9.00 per person. Can’t come to us? The ZooMobile outreach program travels up to a 65 mile radius of Zoo Atlanta. Visit zooatlanta.org for details or call 404.624. WILD to learn more. Don’t forget, as a benefit of the partnership with Zoo Atlanta all active Georgia PTA members receive a $10 discount towards any Zoo Atlanta Membership or Rare Care animal sponsorship through July 1, 2013. Redeem the $10 discount, by calling 404.624.5662 and referencing member code GAPTA. The discount is not available online.

REGULAR ACTIVITIES

NEW! Lemur Wild Encounters 2:30 p.m. daily, starting April 12 Go behind-the-scenes to meet and feed the endangered primates that make the forests of Madagascar one of the most dynamic places on Earth. Visit zooatlanta.org for reservations and details.

National Standards for Family-School Partnerships The benefits of family-school-community partnerships are many: higher teacher morale, more parent involvement, and greater student success are only a few. How is your school implementing these standards into their PTA initiatives?

Standard 1 - Welcoming All Families Actions for making families feel welcomed, valued and connected to each other and the school.

Standard 2 - Communicating Effectively The building blocks to effective communication between parents, schools and parent groups

NEW! Aldabra tortoise Wild Encounters Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays at 1 p.m., starting April 15

Standard 3 - Supporting Student Success

Meet and feed one of the famous giant reptiles of Aldabra Atoll in an all-new Wild Encounter. Visit zooatlanta.org for reservations and details.

Standard 4 - Speaking Up for Every Child

African elephant Wild Encounters Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays and Mondays, 1:30 p.m. Go behind-the-scenes to meet and feed one of the giants of the African savanna during an exclusive up-close-and-personal encounter. Visit zooatlanta.org for reservations and details.

Encouraging parent involvement to heighten student achievement

Methods for becoming an effective advocate for children and their education

Standard 5 - Sharing Power Ways to share power between families, students, teachers, school staff and the community

Giant Panda Wild Encounters

Standard 6 - Collaborating With Community

Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays and Mondays, 11 a.m.

Resources for connecting the school with the community

Meet and feed one of the Zoo’s world-famous black-and-white bears during an exclusive behind-the-scenes opportunity. Visit zooatlanta.org for reservations and details.

Komodo dragon Wild Encounters Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, 12:45 p.m. It’s lunchtime for the world’s largest lizard species – and you get to help! Go behind-the-scenes to meet and feed a Komodo dragon. Visit zooatlanta.org for reservations and details.

July 2013

19


Officer Elections: What To Do If…

I

n many cases, the Nominating Committee (NC) and Officer Election process at our schools runs exactly as it should – the NC is elected at least one month before the election meeting, viable candidates are identified for every position and the election meeting goes smoothly with a quorum present. Sometimes, though, things don’t go quite that smoothly. Here are some common “what if” scenarios…

What If… your Nominating Committee cannot find a viable candidate for an officer position? The slate must be posted 10 days before the election meeting in order to give proper notification to your membership. If a position has no viable candidate, the NC will post the slate with a “blank” for that position. This is preferred over simply filling in a name just for the appearance of a full slate which can create issues in the future. The NC continues to search for a candidate during this time. At the election meeting, nominations from the floor are called for and the candidate will then run from the floor.

What If…your slate has been posted and a candidate then decides to withdraw his/her name? Your NC reconvenes; its job is not over until balloting begins at the election meeting. Ideally, the NC will select another candidate who can run from the floor at the election meeting. The slate is not changed once it is posted.

What if… an officer resigns after the election? Even if they have not yet assumed office, this creates a vacancy in the office. The vacancy is then filled according to your bylaws, which essentially states that the current Board of Directors continues to look to fill the position. The Nominating Committee’s work is complete after elections. As a courtesy, the current Board would consult with the newly elected officers, since the search is for someone who will be a part of the next team. If the current Board cannot identify and vote on a candidate before the end of the school year, then the newly appointed Board of Directors would conduct the search.

What if…we do not have a quorum at our election meeting? No official business can take place if a quorum is not present. Only current academic school year members of the local unit PTA are permitted to vote. It is important to maintain a membership list in order to verify membership. A crowd of people does not constitute a quorum! If attempts to establish a quorum are not successful, a special-called meeting will probably need to be arranged. Consult your bylaws for notice requirements.

What if…one position is contested, but the others are non-contested? This is a situation when both a voice vote and ballot vote is used. The presiding officer asks permission of the body to handle the uncontested positions first and follows the script. Then, the contested position is handled by a separate vote, with ballots. Resources for other “what if” scenarios are listed below and are available on the GA PTA website, including a script for contested elections and guidelines for tellers. Your Council and District PTA teams are available to lend assistance as well. Good luck and happy election season! Look here to find these resources: http://www.georgiapta.org/leadership-bylaws.html PTA Nominating Committee and Elections Guide Quick Tips about Conducting Elections of PTA Officers Quick Tips about Filling a PTA Officer Vacancy And more… http://www.georgiapta.org/leadership-resources.html Article submitted by Irene M. Barton, GA PTA Bylaws Chair, irenebarto@gmail.com

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Membership Congratulations to North Gwinnett High School PTSA for winning our High Five Membership Contest! They increased their membership by 802 members over last years numbers, and they are our March incentive contest winner for the middle or high school with the largest increase for that same time period one year prior. Their local unit will receive $500.00 and recognition at Convention Leadership Training. The current incentive contest is for the newly chartered local unit with the highest number of members by June 30. Lisa-Marie Haygood, GA Membership Chair, jlmh2004@aol.com

Local Unit Leader Resources Sharing Ideas The PTA Great Idea Bank is a social network which enables parents to interact and learn from each other. The best advice comes from peers, so use the discussion forum to share money-saving tips, ideas on how to be a more involved parent, fun activities to share with your kids, ways to communicate with your child’s school and more. The advice and discussion on these pages is directed by users. If you are also a PTA leader or active in your local unit, this idea bank is filled with ways to run PTAs more effectively.

Leadership Resource Guide Want to know the specific duties of officers? Have a question about policy or procedure? Need report forms? Your Leadership Resource Guide is a great place to find those answers. You can access it online at http://www.georgiapta.org/ leadership-resources.html

Georgia PTA « THE VOICE


Mark Your Calendar Join Parents and Educators Together at the

2014 Georgia Family Engagement Conference ngagem li y E

il Bu

di ng

ti o ns

t en

Fam

Sharing Responsibility to Impact Student Achievement and Success

Co n n e

c

Parents | Educators | Students | Communities

January 9 – 11, 2014 The Classic Center Athens, Georgia Registration Opens in August. Register early for best rates!

Budget and Plan Now! Early Registration $175.00 Early Group Registration (4 or more people registering together)

$150.00 per person

Early Group with Parent(s) Registration (4 or more people registering together with at least one being a parent who is not employed by a school system)

$125.00 per person Registration Rate Limited to the First 75 Groups!

Late Registration $250.00 On-Site Registration $300.00

A Partnership of: Georgia Department of Education Title I, Part A

Georgia

Georgia PTA United Way

July 2013

21


Georgia PTA Board of Directors Officers Donna Kosicki, President Rita Erves, President Elect Sonia Scott, 1st Vice President Debbie Rabjohn, 2nd Vice President Cheryl White, Secretary Richard Jones, Treasurer Valerie Martin, Parliamentarian

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Important Dates to Remember Important Dates to Remember September Atlanta Braves Baseball Family Day September

14:

14: Atlanta Braves Baseball Family Day October Legislative Advocacy Day October

1:

District Directors Tom Graves, Jr., District 44 Georgette Backman, District 66 Cyd Cox, District 77 William “Bill” Good, District 88 Kiddada Grey, District 99 Sandra Perrino, District 10 10 Deirdre Pierce, District 11 11 Dee-Dee Jackson, District 12 12 Susan Hayes, District 13 13

1: Legislative Advocacy Day December

Standing Committee Chairpersons Sasha M. McCrear, Asian Outreach Outreach Irene Barton, Bylaws Dawn Small, Diversity Neatie Green, Education Angel Little, Family Engagement Adrian Watlington-Cox, Health & Wellness Isabel Sance, Latino/Hispanic Outreach Karen Hallacy, Legislative - State Reginald Forrest, Male Involvement Lisa-Marie Haygood, Membership Pam Lamar, Reflections Dewanna King, Resource Development Lisa Richardson, Technology Cathy Wendholt-McDade, Youth Services

18:

Falcons Family Day (Washington Redskins) December

15:

15: Falcons Family Day (Washington Redskins) January

January

9-11: Family Engagement Conference, Athens, GA 9-11: Family Engagement Conference, Athens, GA February Student Advocacy Day February

18: Student Advocacy Day March PTA Day at the Capitol March

4: 4:

PTA Day at the Capitol

The Voice Official publication of the Georgia PTA A Branch of the National Congress of Parents and Teachers

National PTA Officers/Board of Directors Leslie Cushman, NPTA Board of Directors

Georgia PTA

Specialists/Consultants Eve Neumeister, Environmental Education Education Diane Jacobi, Legislation - Federal Federal Michelle Sandrock, Sandrock, GA GA DOE Liaison Sally FitzGerald, Education Policy Consultant Sally Markham, Survey Design Sam Shehane, Hospitality Hospitality Tyler Barr, Education Tyler Barr, Education Policy Policy Specialist Specialist

Atlanta, GA 30308

114 Baker Street, NE 404-659-0214 or 1-800-PTA-TODAY

Georgia

Fax: 404-525-0210 www.georgiapta.org President: Donna Kosicki Editor: Susan Hayes Information from this newsletter may be excerpted for other PTA publications at the local, council and district levels as long as credit is given to Georgia PTA and any byline that may appear with the item must be included.

Georgia PTA « THE VOICE

Georgia PTA's The Voice _ July 2013  
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