Issuu on Google+

georgia pogas b.s. portfolio | 2013- 2017 ball state university college of architecture and planning


10_ 11_ 12_

FOR RENT !

GOES IN A FRAME

A PHOTOGRAPH

UNINTENTIONAL

HOTTEST HIGH-RISE FOR THE

VANCOUVER'S

DECK [FOR KITBASHING]

ALL HANDS ON

THE PERFORMING ARTS

04_

CAMPING STRUCTURE AVAIL.

COOL BEACH

STUDY

07_

SORRY, NO CHICKEN THE

WAFFLES, BUT

TOO

FORT WAYNE CENTER FOR

OOZES + GOOZES

03_

A HOMELESS TINY HOUSE

PLASTER PILLOWS:

06_

GARDEN GROWS BENCH,

CAMPUS COMMUNITY

SPECTACLE IS SPECTACULAR

A SPECTACULAR

02_

TAKE A MILK BATH

09_

SPLISH/SPLASH,

A STUDY IN RUINATION

GLITCH, PLZ:

05_

IN A PROJECTED IMG

LOST FACES

01_

08_


SPECTACLE IS SPECTACULAR

A SPECTACULAR

01_

Resilience is defined as a way to accommodate risk. In terms of a skate park, resiliency tends to be lacking, as it is rendered useless until touched by a skater. As soon as a skater touches an object in the site, it immediately becomes essential to the skater’s functionality. Without the skater, the park is reduced to a field of follies. To the bystander or the spectator, a skate park is difficult to navigate, therefore, it is deemed weak in nature. To accommodate for the spectator, there must be a balance of follies. What is a folly to a spectator is not for a skater, and vice versa. Incorporating the skater with the spectator, and the spectator into the spectacle, becomes critical to the site and the skate culture. When studied from above, it becomes apparent the current state of Major Taylor Skate Park maintains a similar language to that of more mainstream sports. However, the nature of mainstream sports such as football, soccer, basketball, etcetera, vary compared to the nature of skating. Other fields simply create boundaries for relatively predictable behavior and trajectory, while skating more so is less predictable. While typical fields are intended for team interaction with one goal, skate parks are intended for multiple individuals with varying goals. A skate park requires a design that allows for maximum constrained improvisation. To design for constrained improvisation, the generator of form needs to be acknowledged. By studying the profiles and design processes of typical skate elements, it becomes apparent that the generator of form is the quarter pipe. By taking the quarter pipe and applying simple operations, numerous elements can be formed. However, if the goal of a skate park is to generate maximum improvisation, how come there are not more elements introduced to the park? How quickly do skaters get bored with the typical elements? By continuing to use these simple operations and producing deviations of these existing elements, the breadth of improvisation is expanded.--

Fig. 1.1 - Skate feature versus skate folly: which will you use?


S

T

A

N

D

A

R

D

D

E

V

Side 1

I

A

T

E

D

Side 2

Quarter Pipe

Half Pipe

Bowl

Extension

Vert Wall

Bank

Curved Bank

Hip

Fig. 1.2 - Skate feature inventory reveals the quarter pipe to be the generator of form.

ARCH 401 - PROFESSOR ENRIQUE RAMIREZ - FALL 2016_

Spine


A SPECTACULAR SPECTACLE IS SPECTACULAR_

Fig. 1.3 + 1.4 - Observation towers process diagrams; the origin of the 9 square grid being carved away by the circle forming the ground level and roof of each tower.


Tippy Top of the Highest Tower 80'-0"

Tippy Top of Medium Towers

Tippy Top of Small Towers 30'-0"

Fig. 1.5 - 1.8 - Nine observation towers of varying heights allow visitors to not only spectate the spectacular spectacle of skating, but to also become a part of the spectacle. Gnarly, right?

ARCH 401 - PROFESSOR ENRIQUE RAMIREZ - FALL 2016_

40'-0"


A SPECTACULAR SPECTACLE IS SPECTACULAR_

Fig. 1.9 - Programmatic diagram; an iteration of a potential site plan, designed with “stickers” of varying program, a method that allows for layering and diversity in its outcome.


ARCH 401 - PROFESSOR ENRIQUE RAMIREZ - FALL 2016_ Fig. 1.10 - 1.15 - Programmatic process diagrams for potential further iteration; no need to stick to one plan.


PERFORMING ARTS

FORT WAYNE CENTER FOR THE

OOZES + GOOZES

02_

Oozes and Goozes Fort Wayne Center for the Performing Arts celebrates the movement of the body by engaging varying scales of performing arts through proximity. Through studying Object Oriented Ontology (OOO) and the process of kitbashing and subtle manipulation of primitive objects, including spheres, cubes, and cones, a formal language emerges through the development of a new object. Objects ooze out from one another, and the glazing oozes down off the structure. To ooze is to imply fluidity and movement, which inspires the form and the program within. The size of the openings in the building reflect the activity occurring within: a larger opening indicates a larger space and activity, while serving as a natural spotlight for the performer. The shapes created allow for natural activity: where there is a dip in the form, an auditorium is located. Where there is intersection, a change in program is introduced. A scalar relationship is developed among three different auditoriums, each of which allow for different scale performances, thus challenging the degrees of public versus private spaces through proximity. For instance, a guest practicing yoga, a more intimate art located in a smaller studio, can be found near an auditorium where a large scaled performance is occurring. This proximity in program allows the individual to gain inspiration from other arts, progressing the fluidity of art from space to space.--

Fig. 2.1 - Form finding lineage.


ARCH 301 - PROFESSOR JAMES KERESTES - FALL 2015_ Fig. 2.2 - Outside of the Performing Arts Center, the snow falls, and the people of Fort Wayne have a ball.


OOZES AND GOOZE'S FORT WAYNE CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS_

Fig. 2.3 - Form massing as a result of kitbashing primitive objects. Fig. 2.4 - Exploded structural diagram.


Fig. 2.5 - Radical section cut.

ARCH 301 - PROFESSOR JAMES KERESTES - FALL 2015_


ON DECK [FOR KITBASHING]

ALL HANDS

03_

Often in architecture the parts get lost in idea of the whole. With kitbashing, a method of model making by taking recognizable parts to construct another object, the part-to-whole relationship is put into question. Rather than viewing architecture or an object as parts that realize a whole, kitbashing allows a viewer to observe the object to object relationship, thus erasing any hierarchy among objects, a theory developed by Graham Harman known as Object Oriented Ontology (OOO). Rather than producing an occupiable space, this study led to the production of a new object, one that has no proper orientation, and is constructed of familiar objects of varying scales. The radial pattern formed by the elongated elements begin to eliminate the idea of sides. Protruding from the center are sharp, shard-like objects that pierce the center of the object, further distorting its orientation. As more curvilinear forms are introduced, the scale of objects begins to shift. Smaller rounded objects begin to ooze from the crevices, wrapping themselves onto other objects.--

Fig. 3.1 - An object made of other objects.


ARCH 301 - PROFESSOR JAMES KERESTES - FALL 2015_ Fig. 3.2-3.9 - Detailed views of an object, or a game of “I Spy.”


HIGH-RISE FOR THE UNINTENTIONAL

VANCOUVER'S HOTTEST

04_

In collaboration with Michael Gasper

Community is commonly associated with proximity, making that the connection between multiple individuals, although that is not always the case. Communities do not necessarily require proximity to thrive, rather passions and interests generate connections with individuals regardless of location, deeming location an unjustifiable qualification for a community. A community is a metaphysical collection of individuals whose interactions complement each other and form multiples facets of underlying passions and interests. Communities that are deliberately formed are much less likely to be successful, than those that arise on their own will. To do something with intent means to do something purposefully with a predetermined, calculated plan. Connections however, cannot be predetermined. Communities by nature cannot be intentional, but rather unintentional. Communities are not homogeneous, therefore it is difficult to precisely plan the evolution of a community and how it will grow in the future. The spaces designed should freely produce experimental interactions between passionate individuals and groups, allowing for the emergence, evolution, and growth of new communities, rather than forcing preexisting communities into a fixed location. High-rises became a solution to the rising density problem in cities. Density in architecture references not only the physical buildings and its occupants, but also the amount and type of program within. Through design, we will be investigating densities of structure, space, and program by the process of aggregation. Individuals essentially aggregate to form a community, both physically and metaphysically. Through aggregation, we can begin to solve the problem of density in two ways: through the spatial conditions aggregation forms, and the way individuals collect based on interests. Aggregation is an additive process that continues over time, allowing the program and size of the building to continue to grow based on the needs of future inhabitants.--

Fig. 4.1 - The aggregation process through simple operations and deviations of the classic toy jack.


ARCH 302 - PROFESSOR ANA DE BREA - SPRING 2016_ Fig. 4.2 - An agglomerate of jacks and their interstitial spaces form a high-rise, waiting for new communities to be born.


Fig. 4.3 - A building and its Canadian context.

VANCOUVER'S HOTTEST HIGH-RISE FOR THE UNINTENTIONAL_


Fig. 4.4 - Wild section cut.

ARCH 302 - PROFESSOR ANA DE BREA - SPRING 2016_


A STUDY IN RUINATION

GLITCH, PLZ:

05_

To glitch is to suffer a sudden, unexpected malfunction, a quality not desired by most. It can last for unknown lengths of time, and may never correct itself. Instead of treating a glitch as a defect, this study embraces the uncertainty produced by ruination. Through deliberate alteration of digital information, one can begin to understand and become able to slightly predict the unpredictable. The ruination of a primitive geometry allows for clear observation of the glitched results. Through simple manipulations of the source code, such as subtraction, addition, replication, and rearrangement, the pyramid is reduced from a familiar object to that of an unfamiliar one. This technique can be pushed further as means of introducing a new design process that breaks conventional tools beyond its standard use, reevaluating current methods of architectural design.--

Fig. 5.1 - A progression of ruination.


ARCH 498 - PROFESSOR JAMES KERESTES - SPRING 2016_ Fig. 5.2 - A glitched result, multiplied and reflected along the X and Y axes.


GARDEN GROWS NEW BENCH, TOO

CAMPUS COMMUNITY

06_

Located behind the Student Center, Ball State University’s newly established campus garden, GROW, is striving to create a social and thriving garden, in order to help grow a healthier community on campus. To assist with the garden’s start up, our team was asked to fabricate a place of rest to invite visitors to stay awhile and to assist in the facilitation of meetings. Following the function of a garden, the bench was designed to appear as though it is growing from the ground. The curves formed by the slices follow the curves of the body, while the spaces created by the slices allow for grass and flowers to grow, despite the bench’s occupation. The wooden slices were designed digitally then fabricated with the CNC mill, which were thereafter sanded and sealed. Spacers were then drilled to each piece and all pieces were strung together by two 2x4s. The bench was then lowered into the hole and refilled with dirt, to create the grown-fresh-from-the-garden look.--

In collaboration with Jenna Hoch + Hannah Liechty + Iuri Trombini + Cassio Yutani

Fig. 6.1 - Exploded diagram reveals construction beneath the ground surface.


ARCH 498 - PROFESSOR KEVIN KLINGER - FALL 2015_ Fig. 6.2 + 6.3 - The bench installed and enjoyed by members of the community garden.


WAFFLES, BUT SORRY, NO CHICKEN

07_

“Waffles, But Sorry, No Chicken,” a study exploring the nature of curves, surface structure and tectonics, began with a 12” x 12” surface. Five different curves were distributed along the surface and connected to form one 12” x 12” curvilinear surface. That surface was then extruded vertically to form a volume. The model was then contoured in both the x and y direction, forming a set of curved ribs in both directions. The ribs were then notched to allow each rib to interlock to form a waffled surface, and allowing for ease of physical construction.--

Fig. 7.1 - Exploded diagram revealing the ribs that form a curved surface.


Fig. 7.2 - One waffle, different sides.

ARCH 263- PROFESSOR ANDREW WIT - FALL 2014_


WAFFLES< BUT SORRY< NO CHICKEN_

Fig. 7.3 - Inventory of ribs in the U direction.


ARCH 263- PROFESSOR ANDREW WIT - FALL 2014_ Fig. 7.4 - Inventory of ribs in the V direction.


A PHOTOGRAPH GOES IN A FRAME

08_

What better way to capture memories of travels than to put them in a frame? Even better, a frame informed by the contents it holds. Each photograph was taken during a month long architectural field study in Europe. Each frame reflects what is within, and modified as to not distract from the subject, but rather to emphasize the focus of each image. Although the image is black and white like an old photograph, the frame remains faithful to its color, as to inform viewers of the scene, yet not revealing too much, as that is between the photographer and the city. Below are the Swiss Mountains as seen from the lake. Following are the reflections and shadows of the Barcelona Pavilion. To the right, is a lone sink as seen in Le Corbusierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Villa Savoye.--

Fig. 8.1 - Located in Lucerne, Switzerland Fig. 8.2 - Located in Barcelona, Spain


Fig. 8.3 - Located in Poissy, France.

CAPITALIA - PROFESSORS TIM GRAY + KEVIN KLINGER - SUMMER 2015_


LOST FACES IN A PROJECTED IMG

09_

Society projects thoughts, ideas, feelings onto others without any regard for truth. In turn, individuals feel the need to betray who they are in order to please others. This distorts oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s identity, blurring who they really are. These images seek to capture this need to distort oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s identity, by using projected black and white images and motion to distort the subjects features. The high contrast makes the project black and white image easy to distinguish, unlike the identity of the subject, similar to how it can be difficult to accurately identify who a person really is. You may catch glimpses or parts, but it becomes a challenge to see the whole.--

Fig. 9.1 - A subject and a skull. Fig. 9.2 - A subject and a skull times two.


TGRA 286 - PROFESSOR ALAN LEDUC - SPRING 2016_ Fig. 9.3 - The lips may be seen, but I’ve been told it’s the eyes that are the window to the soul.


SPLISH/SPLASH, TAKE A MILK BATH

10_

A girl takes a bath. A common ritual to cleanse the body, mind, and soul. Upon entering the bath, she is a girl in the purest form, retaining all humanistic qualities. However, as the subject lowers herself into the bath, a transformation begins. Her being evolves, appearing like that of an island, slowly being submerged and engulfed by the water. Her features are lost the further into the water she goes. The language presented by the partially submerged body conveys that of an island: the shore and the water meet, water rises up onto the land. Her body is reduced to topographic state, until she resurfaces and the tide goes down, and she is back to being a girl in a bath.--

Fig. 10.1 - A girl in a bath.


Fig. 10.2 - An island in milky water.

TGRA 286 - PROFESSOR ALAN LEDUC - SPRING 2016_


A HOMELESS TINY HOUSE STUDY

PLASTER PILLOWS:

11_

We pride ourselves in knowing what the less fortunate need. They need food, they need shelter, they need water. Something we often forget is the need for comfort, the need for love. Why resort to giving people the bare minimum when they are the ones who need the most? This study uses physical model making to produce an object whose language conveys softness and comfort. The pillow, is an object that despite its commonality, is unique and personal to its owner. It is an object utilized every day to provide a soft, comforting resting place for one of the most important parts of the human body. Some use one, some use many, but despite its many uses, sizes, and materials, they all have one quality in common- comfort, and unfortunately, not all can afford such a luxury. Each plaster pillow was made through one of three types of binding material: floss, rubber band, or ribbon. These bindings were used to reproduce the varying shape of a pillow after use. These pillows begin to inform a potential structure for a tiny house for the homeless, questioning the typology of a home. Rather than designing a standard, sterile box that feels more uncomfortable than stepping on a LEGO, how can we provide a home that expresses its comfort from the outside?--

Fig. 11.1 - A plaster pillow plastered with typical house parts.


ARCH 401 - PROFESSOR ENRIQUE RAMIREZ - FALL 2016_ Fig. 11.2 - Top: Rubber band plaster pillows; Middle: Ribbon plaster pillows. Bottom: Flossy plaster pillows.


STRUCTURE AVAIL. FOR RENT !

COOL BEACH CAMPING

12_

FOR RENT! $200 per night Accommodates: 2-4 Bathrooms: 1 Bedrooms: 2 Amenities: the beach, nature Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t decide if you want to go camping or relax on the beach? Then this is the place for you! Located up high in the trees along the Atlantic beach of an ambiguous island, this cool beach camping structure is not a house! Get that camping experience you dreamed of with the perk of falling asleep to the sound of crashing waves because there are no walls - only screens. When you wake up, take a short walk down our boardwalk that spills directly to the beach. Not feeling like being surrounded by shoobies? No problemenjoy a private day in the sun on top of one of three rooftop decks. Come be one with nature with us!--

Fig. 12.1 - Mid-day aerial view; beach goers enjoy the hot weather, and even hotter architecture.


ARCH 202 - PROFESSOR DAN WOODFIN - SPRING 2015_ Fig. 12.2 - Iconic sunset views for all who like to beach party even when the sun goes down.


georgia pogas georgia.pogas@gmail.com 317 - 968 - 0739 505 Super Star Court Carmel, IN 46032


georgia pogas


Georgia Pogas | Architecture Portfolio