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QRS Annual Report 2014-15


GHT’S VISION GHT’s vision is for all people living with HIV in the North West to live happy and healthy lives, and be free from stigma and discrimination. GHT’s vision is for all people to know their HIV status and to be HIV aware.

GHT’S MISSION STATEMENT GHT will provide good quality services to people living with HIV, which enable them to feel empowered and able to live happily and healthily with HIV. GHT will raise awareness of HIV, promote safer sex and encourage all sexually active people in the North West to know their HIV status.

GHT will ensure that HIV is prioritised by public bodies across the North West, given that it has the biggest population of people living with HIV outside of London. GHT will challenge HIV stigma and discrimination and promote a better understanding of HIV.

GHT’S VALUES Dignity - We treat everyone with dignity, show respect and value them.

Integrity - We demonstrate integrity by being honest and having strong principles.

Respect - We show respect by considering people’s feelings, wishes and rights.

Recognising Differences - Everyone is unique! We embrace and celebrate diversity and difference.

Empowerment - We believe that people need freedom to act, think, initiate and make decisions.

Passionate - Our ambition is to put as much heart, mind, body and soul into our workand it shows!


GEORGE HOUSE TRUST ANNUAL REPORT 2014-15

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Contents Chairman’s Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 04-05 Transparency And Accountability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 06-07 Two Heads Are Better Than One . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 08-09 Moving In The Same Direction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 -11 Ever Thine. Ever Mine. Ever Ours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Chantelle’s Story of Destitution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Sustainability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-15 The Food Chain Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-17 Supporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Funders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Trustees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Ambassadors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22


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GEORGE HOUSE TRUST ANNUAL REPORT 2014-15

“I will forever be an HIV activist and a friend of George House Trust.”

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GEORGE HOUSE TRUST ANNUAL REPORT 2014-15

R G

eorge House Trust changes lives and has done for the last 30 years. This may seem like a bold statement or even a boast, but I can tell you from experience that it is completely true. As we embark on a year of celebration we are also afforded the opportunity to reflect on 30 years of HIV activism, of supporting people to live happy and healthy lives, of still being here, despite everything. As I come to the end of my term as the Chair of George House Trust I find myself reflecting on my own journey as a volunteer. I moved to Manchester in 2007, a stranger in a new city. I had decided that I would like to volunteer; an opportunity to meet people and to do something worthwhile. Following the positive diagnosis of a friend I contacted a national HIV charity who pointed me in the direction of Laura Hamilton, Volunteer Manager at George House Trust. That was possibly the single most important email I have ever sent. A couple of interviews later I found myself heading nervously to a weekend-long training course, completely unprepared and expecting a room in a dingy community centre. And then I walked into the George House Trust building; bright, warm and welcoming. I met fantastic people and learned the truth about HIV. Following my second interview I began to volunteer at the Gay Men’s Space and as a Community Support Volunteer. This was some of the most rewarding work I’d ever done. George House Trust draws you in and I became more and more involved. Eventually I was approached about becoming a Trustee and my immediate response was that I wasn’t up to the job. I was quiet, nervous, completely lacking confidence. But I did it; I handed in my application and was nominated. I was so incredibly proud. And then I sat in my first meeting in silence and my second meeting and possibly even my third. Then, with the support of fantastic staff and other Trustees I gained confidence and, in many ways, changed completely.

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Chairman’s Statement I was pleased to act as Deputy Chair to Jim Vann, from whom I learned a great deal, before taking over the role of Chair in 2011. During my term as Chair, Rosie Robinson (Joint Chief Executive) and I have worked hard to develop robust governance within the organisation improving many of our systems and processes. We have reinvigorated membership at George House Trust, ensuring that Members are empowered and active in the decision-making process. We have worked with colleagues to raise the profile of the organisation in a relevant way and most importantly we have focused on the need to be a service user-centred organisation introducing the Service User Representative programme. It is great to be able to reflect on four years of achievement, but George House Trust has given me so much more than I have been able to offer. My roles within the organisation have taught me empathy, how to communicate with people from all races, religions, backgrounds and sexualities; it has increased my confidence, taught me how to lead and has developed my skills as a young professional. I have secured two new paid roles purely based on the skills and experience gained as a volunteer at George House Trust. My advice to anyone stuck in a career they hate is always ”volunteer!” And so it’s time to hand over the baton. I am incredibly pleased to be welcoming Jo Hancock to the role of Chair of George House Trust from September 2015. Jo brings a wealth of skills and experience to the role as well as a warm personality and a sense of humour, the things that really unite us all at George House Trust. I wish her every success for the future. And so back to my original statement, George House Trust changes lives. It changed mine. I will forever be an HIV activist and a friend of George House Trust.

David Teasdale-Hughes, Chairman


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GEORGE HOUSE TRUST ANNUAL REPORT 2014-15

THE POTENTIAL SAVING TO THE NHS IF THE 468 NEW HIV CASES IN GREATER MANCHESTER IN 2013 WERE REFERRED TO GEORGE HOUSE TRUST

Each new HIV diagnosis costs the NHS on average £320,000 in lifetime treatment. These costs exclude hospital admissions.

SEXUAL PARTNERS

SAVING TO NHS

When a person newly diagnosed with HIV is supported by GHT, knowledge about HIV and confidence in managing the risks within sexual relationships is significantly increased. This means the risk of passing on HIV is greatly reduced.

GHT’S WORK MEANS THE RISK OF ONWARD TRANSMISSION OF THE HIV VIRUS IS GREATLY REDUCED.

GHT’S WORK WITH PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV IS GREATER MANCHESTER’S BEST CHANCE OF REDUCING NEW INFECTIONS.

£960,000 £1,280,000 £1,600,000

GHT’S WORK SAVES SIGNIFICANT AMOUNTS OF MONEY FOR LOCAL AUTHORITIES AND CLINICAL COMMISSIONING GROUPS ACROSS GREATER MANCHESTER AND, NATIONALLY, FOR NHS ENGLAND.

Sources: National AIDS Trust, Commissioning HIV Testing Services in England (October 2014) Liverpool John Moores University, HIV & AIDS in the North West of England 2013

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£640,000

ght.org.uk


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Transparency and Accountability As a charity in receipt of money from local government, charitable trusts and foundations, the public purse and individual donations, we are mindful to maintain transparency and accountability to our stakeholders. Our Marketing & Fundraising sub-committee scrutinises how we raise money from individuals, events, commercial participators and grants, trusts and foundations; our Finance & Risk sub-committee examines both statutory and charitable income and interrogates how we spend and save. This information is regularly escalated to the Board of Trustees through a formal reporting structure so there are no surprises, particularly when internal or external challenges arise.

We are honest and truthful, and comply with the law. We respect the reasonable requests of donors and other stakeholders, and operate in order to give donors, beneficiaries and other stakeholders a better understanding of how George House Trust works. We joined the Fundraising Standards Board in 2014 to show we care about our supporters and are accountable. Our Fundraising Manager is a member of the Institute of Fundraising and is bound by the Code of Fundraising Practice.


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GEORGE HOUSE TRUST ANNUAL REPORT 2014-15

George House Trust has responded effectively to the changing HIV landscape and the changing needs of people living with HIV.

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GEORGE HOUSE TRUST ANNUAL REPORT 2014-15

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Two heads are better than One

I

joined the organisation in 2013 on a 6-month fixed term contract, but then had the opportunity to pilot a job-share role with Rosie Robinson as Joint Chief Executive Officers. Whilst not unique, it is not the norm for the Chief Executive Officer role to be a job share, but then George House Trust is not your usual charity. We embrace opportunities to try new things and stretch our boundaries and we are certainly undaunted by change. The pilot job-share has been successful and Rosie and I were able to demonstrate and prove the theory of synergy (when combined, the total effect is greater than the sum of the individual elements) meaning that George House Trust benefits from two leadership perspectives rather than just the one. We bring our different professional areas of expertise and experience to everything, creating a more honest, respectful and robust decisionmaking platform for the organisation. In our 30th year, as we reflect and celebrate the work of George House Trust, its origins and its future – my overarching observation is the way in which George House Trust has adapted to meet the changing needs of people living with HIV. From our grass roots as an HIV activist organisation which mainly supported people who were facing the end of life, we have seen significant changes in the mid-90s with the introduction of antiretroviral drugs, which gave people a future not previously expected. Today, it is possible to effectively manage HIV with minimal intervention and support, provided diagnosis is early. Throughout the years, George House Trust has responded effectively to the changing HIV landscape and the changing needs of people living with HIV. That ability to adapt and respond has been enabled by a team of people: Our staff team,

who have changed over the last 30 years but have remained totally committed to George House Trust’s values of dignity, respect, empowerment, integrity, recognising differences and being passionate about the work they do. Our huge team of committed and diversely skilled and experienced volunteers, which numbers over 120. Our volunteers support our project work, offer counselling, advice, drive people to appointments, fundraise for us, and use their networks to promote our work and highlight HIV issues plus so very much more. Finally, our service users, who are at the centre of our work and who we continually engage with through our Service User Involvement Framework to make sure we are providing the right services. By listening to the voices of people who access our services, and those who don’t, we try our best to make sure that we are getting things right. And when we don’t quite get things right, we know about it and then look to how we can improve. Over the last 18 months I have heard George House Trust referred to by service users as family, when there is no one to turn to or when advice is needed. However, I see the relationship as much more of a co-production with all of us working together to achieve the best possible long term outcomes. George House Trust has already proved itself as an organisation of quality, but now, as never before, we need to remain alert and ready to respond to the next round of challenges: whether that is further cuts to funding, emerging health trends of a population ageing with HIV, or the ongoing stigma and discrimination which impacts on many people living with the virus. Whatever the challenge, we are ready to meet it.

Stephanie Mallas, Joint Chief Executive


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GEORGE HOUSE TRUST ANNUAL REPORT 2014-15

Moving in the same direction

W

ithout a collaborative approach to service delivery there is always the risk of mission drift – or rather going off and doing whatever you fancy. The risk here of course being that what you fancy doing may not be what is actually needed by, or required of, your stakeholders.

Staff Service users Volunteers

The partnership between our staff, volunteers and service users means that we stay on track and deliver relevant and appropriate services to people living with HIV. Service users are at the very heart of our work and we derive our direction of travel directly as a result of consultation around identified needs. Through a formal Service User Involvement Framework we are committed to proactively and regularly asking for feedback on how we are doing, what works well and what could be improved. An example of this was our review of events and activities. Staff had identified that whilst many service users regularly attended the events and courses we facilitated, there were many for whom they were not relevant. So, we asked service users what would be better. This has led us to offer more short courses, information events, social drop-ins, focused workshops and personal coaching resulting in a more diverse group of people accessing George House Trust for support, advice and information. Our volunteers play an invaluable role by giving their time to support the practical delivery of projects across the wide range of services we offer - such as peer mentoring which is crucial when a person is newly diagnosed. Volunteer counsellors are an integral part of the process which helps in dealing with the emotional challenges of living with HIV.

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Our meet and greet volunteers provide a warm and reassuring welcome to people who may be coming to us for the first time. We have an incredibly committed staff team who are able to use the experiences from their day to day role to improve services, the building and environment, contribute new fundraising suggestions, identify needs which are not being met or trends which are emerging, develop new partnerships with other organisations and so much more. The overlap of the parts means that the partnership is interactive and constantly evolving – never staying still and always remains relevant. It really is the collaboration of all three partners: staff, volunteers and service users, which makes George House Trust the progressive and responsive organisation it is today.


GEORGE HOUSE TRUST ANNUAL REPORT 2014-15

We provided 1,176 hours of volunteer advice support

GHT volunteers gave 9,704 hours of their time

980 hours were spent in volunteer training

Distributed 1,257 food parcels

Volunteer drivers spent 531 hours getting people to appointments and services

We delivered 463 counselling appointments

Managed ÂŁ119,037 worth of debt

Our volunteers carried out 2,194 hours of reception duties

We provided 142 hours of specialist volunteering

Partnerships help us increase our reach and heighten the impact of our work:

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GEORGE HOUSE TRUST ANNUAL REPORT 2014-15

Ever thine. Ever mine. Ever ours.

T

uesday date night. We’d met on a volunteer training course; I thought he was a twink, all about his looks (or just out of my league). We met for the second time at the George House Trust World AIDS Day Vigil and it turned out that he was also funny, intelligent and kind and I hated that! (He was definitely out of my league). We chatted and I tried to set him up with my good looking, funny, intelligent friend (I hate him as well). It turned out that he was trying to chat me up (Finally, a flaw, he was nervous as hell!) So, the obligatory first date in ‘Velvet’. I was done with the ‘let’s get hammered and dance all night’ dates of my early twenties and turned up with a secret... I want kids, and a dog, a wedding and a picket fence. My friends told me not to mention any of that on a first date. About an hour in I realised that this one was special. He was all the things that I had expected; funny, kind, intelligent, but also all the things that I hadn’t expected; shy, caring, thoughtful and passionate about his family. I lasted a couple of hours and confessed; “I want four kids and a sausage dog”... a silent pause... and then he laughed and kissed me. And I was hooked, completely. It turned out that he also had something on his mind. He told me that he was HIV+. It’s hard to explain how clearly I see that moment in my mind. I was frightened; not for my health or for him but for the dream of a family and a home that I had created and thought I might lose. And then I stood up and hugged him and said that ‘that was ok’. The single most embarrassing moment of my life. As though I thought at the time that hugging him proved that I was okay with it or that I accepted him; my Princess Di moment. I knew all about HIV, had HIV+ friends but none of that had directly impacted

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on my life. So we talked and it was fine, but it was there, in my mind. The following morning I talked to my best friend. She was close to slapping me. She pointed out a few things; firstly how incredibly brave it was of him to tell me. Secondly, that I am a HIV activist and that I would be the first person to tell anyone that a positive person is just that, a person. And thirdly that I hadn’t shut up about him all morning so it was probably worth investing in a second date. She also pointed out that I come with my own issues, and baggage and history, a lot of it. So we had our second date, and our third and our fourth... It wasn’t always easy. He had some things to deal with. It made my HIV tests a little more real. He had some issues with his viral load. And then it becomes normal. It becomes a part of life and who he is and who we are. Magnetic. We’re married. We have our sausage dog. We’ve bought a house, our home. We have each other. We’re hoping to start a family. He is my world. Sometimes HIV activism is about battling your internal stigma, not shouting from a float. I fought it and I won.

“I knew all about HIV, had HIV+ friends but none of that had directly impacted on my life.”


GEORGE HOUSE TRUST ANNUAL REPORT 2014-15

“GHT is the pillar that I lean on that gives me strength.”

A

fter my asylum claim was refused, I was given 28 days to leave the house. I had no-where to go. All of my friends were asylum seekers and I couldn’t stay with them. Being destitute means not having food or accommodation, as well as not being entitled to any public funds. At first I was staying with a friend for a day and then moving on to another friend. When I was desperate I used the 24 hour library. I worked through the night as I was doing an apprenticeship at Salford University. I sometimes nodded off in the library. In the afternoon I would visit a friend to take a bath and sleep a little. I could also visit the Cornerstone where I could get a bath, two hot meals and wash my clothes. I was homeless for about one month. GHT sign-posted me to The Boaz Trust, where they help people in my position to find somewhere to live. At first I was placed in lodgings with a lovely couple in Didsbury. They were so kind and generous. I stayed for three weeks, before I moved into a Boaz shared house with six other women.

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Chantelle’s Story of Destitution

I used to collect food parcels from the Red Cross before GHT set up its own destitution project. GHT gave me weekly food parcels. I liked these because there was variety and choice, and I also really enjoyed the African maize that they included in the parcels. GHT also gave me £30 per month to live on. This felt really strange after going so long without any cash in my hand (asylum seekers are given vouchers rather than cash). It helped me to forget my situation. Without GHT’s help, I don’t think I would have survived. I had depression and GHT helped me through it. I went through counselling at GHT, and was eventually referred to a psychologist. If I meet someone on a bus who is positive I would say don’t worry, there are always friends and family at GHT. My first family is in Ardwick Green, and I would take them to meet the staff. GHT is the pillar that I lean on that gives me strength. GHT has been really empowering. And now after 7 years, the Home Office have finally given me leave to remain in the UK. A whole new chapter of my life is opening up. I will be free to work, to live independently and to be happy.


Image credit - Joel Goodman

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GEORGE HOUSE TRUST ANNUAL REPORT 2014-15

The George House Trust Candlelit Vigil is a poignant reminder of the lives which have been lost, but also of the fact that people are able to live well with HIV.

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GEORGE HOUSE TRUST ANNUAL REPORT 2014-15

OUR PLAN FOR SURVIVAL Doing good work Staying alert to changes and interests at every level Diversifying income generation Deepening existing professional relationships Seeking new partnerships that will allow us to innovate and strengthen our offer to people living with HIV

Sustainability

World AIDS Day Partnership

Queer Contact Partnership

George House Trust is part of the partnership that delivers Manchester’s annual World AIDS Day Vigil. Working alongside the BHA, Brook Manchester, the LGBT Foundation, Manchester City Council, Manchester Mental Health & Social Care Trust and the Office of the Police & Crime Commissioner for Greater Manchester. The Partnership works to raise awareness of HIV throughout Manchester, challenge HIV stigma, prejudice and promote HIV testing and prevention. Together we create a moment in time when we connect Manchester with the rest of the world in remembering people lost to HIV/ AIDS and supporting those living with HIV.

Queer Contact is a two-week festival of queer performance produced by Contact Theatre, Manchester. We curated our second exhibition for the festival, focused on HIV activism.

Pride Charity Partnership We have been involved in Pride since 2003, steadily nurturing the relationship as both organisations sought to meet the needs of the communities they serve. We provide volunteers who help with on the ground delivery of the event, participate in the expo, and are part of the Pride Parade which in 2014 took home the Best Pride Parade Entry accolade. The George House Trust Candlelit Vigil closes the Pride weekend, and is always a poignant reminder of the lives which have been lost, but also of the fact that people are able to live well with HIV.

Sainsbury’s Charity of the Year In 2014 we secured charity partnership status with a local branch of Sainsbury’s. Throughout the year the store raised £2,900 for George House Trust.

BNY Mellon Partnership Volunteers from BNY Mellon’s Manchester office worked with us on a very special project over six months to help preserve a vital part of British social history – by working on the content of a digital archive linked to the conservation of the UK AIDS Memorial Quilt. 2015 marks George House Trust’s 30th anniversary and BNY Mellon’s 10th year in Manchester. The project was a great way for both organisations to celebrate this special anniversary year.

UK AIDS Memorial Quilt Conservation Partnership The UK AIDS Memorial Quilt is an irreplaceable piece of social history. It tells the stories of 300 people who were lost to the early HIV AIDS epidemic of the 80’s and 90’s. George House Trust brought together the following national HIV providers from across the UK to form the UK AIDS Memorial Quilt Partnership: • • • • •

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Positively UK The Food Chain Sahir House Terrence Higgins Trust Positive East

Over the next five years this group will be working together to secure a permanent home for the quilt to ensure its preservation.


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GEORGE HOUSE TRUST ANNUAL REPORT 2014-15

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GEORGE HOUSE TRUST ANNUAL REPORT 2014-15

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The Food Chain Partnership Funded by Manchester City Council we collaborated with The Food Chain, to improve the cooking skills and nutritional knowledge of people in Manchester who are living with HIV; through high quality hands-on cookery courses. The Food for Life project is based on the very successful Food Chain model. As well as increasing culinary skills, participants learn about the importance of nutrition, particularly when living with HIV, shopping and eating well on a budget, how certain foods can help with the management of symptoms and side effects of medication, heart health and reducing the risk of diabetes. Within each 5-class course participants directly put into practice what they learn by cooking the demonstrated recipes and eating together afterwards.

”The Food Chain is delighted to be working in partnership with George House Trust in support of people living with HIV in Manchester. Both our charities have a strong track record of providing excellent services over many years. We all need a nutritionally well balanced diet to live a healthy life, and this is especially important for people living with HIV to ensure their medication is effective and their immune system is as strong as it can be. The Food for Life project will make a long lasting difference for people at a time of real need.” Siobhan Lanigan, Chief Executive of The Food Chain

Food for Life focuses on giving people living with HIV in Manchester the skills and knowledge about how to source and cook low cost, nutritious meals. Often for people living with HIV, accessing the food they need to stay well is a challenge, which is why we are so pleased to be delivering these short courses; as they not only increase people’s knowledge around the nutrition they need to live well, but also provide them with new or improved skills which will equip them for the long term. The first course ran in May 2015.

”The course was very good for me as it got me out, meeting and talking to people. It was a lot of fun and it has been very useful to me as I live on my own and didn’t cook and eat healthily. I had a weight loss problem before the course and have started to put on weight since I have done it, so thanks very much, I really enjoyed it.”


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GEORGE HOUSE TRUST ANNUAL REPORT 2014-15

PEER SUPPORT SERVICE

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GEORGE HOUSE TRUST ANNUAL REPORT 2014-15

Supporters AXM Baa Bar Bar Pop Belinda’s Show Bar Churchill’s Company Bar Cruz 101 Eagle Bar Eden Erasure Five Saints ATC GHAP Badminton and friends Give it the V Holier Than Thou Iconic Kiki Bar Manchester Frontrunners Manchester Quakers New York, New York Oscars Pendleton College Rainbow Trikes

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Sackville Lounge Salford Ladies United Temperance Society Side by Side Productions Stockport Gracie Jiu Jitsu Taurus Bar The Goose The Molly House The New Union The Rem The Rob Shop The Sister’s of Perpetual Indulgence Thompson’s Arms Tribeca Velvet Via View

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Funders


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GEORGE HOUSE TRUST ANNUAL REPORT 2014-15

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GEORGE HOUSE TRUST ANNUAL REPORT 2014-15

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Our Staff April 2014-March 2015 Colin Armstead

Services & Development Manager

Susie Baines

Damian McHugh*

Local Co-ordinator, Health Wealth & Happiness

Marketing & Community Fundraising Co-ordinator

Debora Mgijima

Sandra Berlyne*

Mike Mpofu*

Peter Boyle

Siham Noureldin*

Samuel Clark

Naome Phiri

Jill Cooke

David Raybould

Health & Wellbeing Adviser

Lead Services Adviser

Office & Facilities Administrator

Services Adviser

Maria Gumbo

Volunteer Co-ordinator

Laura Hamilton

Volunteer & Development Manager

Lee Hardman

Money & Debt Adviser

Yvonne Hepburn-Foster Fundraising Manager

Services Adviser

Services Adviser

Services Adviser

Services Adviser

Local Co-ordinator, Health Wealth & Happiness

Rosie Robinson Joint Chief Executive

Neal Sharpe

Finance Manager

Jayne Swain*

Finance Administrator

Ben Whalley Services Adviser

Stephanie Mallas

Joint Chief Executive

*Left George House Trust during the year


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GEORGE HOUSE TRUST ANNUAL REPORT 2014-15

Our Trustees April 2014-March 2015 David Teasdale-Hughes, Chair Adebayo Adeniran Kate Alcock, Vice Chair Paul Graham Anita Harris Ruth Mbera Clifford McManus Helen Middleton Corinne Ogden Andrew Saunders, Treasurer Joe Tetley Jeff Ukiri

Thomas Anderson Michael Atkins Lee Baxter Ady Blake Phil Collinson Richard Copson Jackie Crozier

Nick Curtis Christian D’arcy Mark Geary Chris Hague John Hamilton Aoibhinn MacManus Steve Myers Stuart Patterson Rebecca Perry Les Pratt Rebecca Rae Kevin Sargent Jamie Scahill Iaian Scott Andrew Stokes Malcolm Struthers Ash Sukthankar Daniel Wallace Darren Williams Adam Zane

Our Ambassadors April 2014-March 2015 QRS


Registered office: 75-77 Ardwick Green North Manchester M12 6FX T: 0161 274 4499 www.ght.org.uk /GeorgeHouseTrust @GeorgeHouseTrst George House Trust is a registered charity in England and Wales (No. 1143138) and a registered company limited by guarantee in England and Wales (No. 07575379) AUDITED ACCOUNTS for 2014-15 are available from our website

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