Page 1

The JANUARY 2013

Red Hook StarªRevue SOUTH BROOKLYN’S COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

FREE

EPA PRESENTS: THE SUPERFUND PLAN by Nic Cavell

A

t a January 24 meeting in the Miccio Center, there was little of the fanfare that met the same EPA team when it placed the Gowanus Canal on its National Priorities List for toxic remediation more than three years ago. This time, the organization delivered their proposed plan for cleanup of Brooklyn’s densely polluted canal to a skeptical audience of Red Hook residents and activists. The plan calls for the dredging of over 500,000 cubic yards of contaminated sediment from the bottom of the canal, most of which would be towed away by barges for processing off-site. Using high-powered machines, EPA contractors will excavate and entirely remove the top layer of soft sediment that lies at the canal-bottom. By doing so, the EPA will remove the This photo was taken in front of Fire Department facilities on Union Street where old fire call boxes are stored (photo by George Fiala)

From Red Hook to Kilimanjaro

by Nic Cavell t is 7 am, it is freezing, and Fran- There, even ces Medina, 23, is up. She’s sit- now, Franting at the computer in her moth- ces is busy er’s apartment in the Red Hook carrying out Houses, and she’s connecting herself an immense to the pipeline of information about workload left Red Hook. She looks at the Twitter by the hurrifeeds of local activists, friends and the cane. In her kids she mentors with Red Hook Initia- o f f i c e — o r tive (RHI). Then she reaches her hand any office, out—questioning others, posting her as offices in own informational column and follow- RHI are mixed domains, and tend to ing up with donors lined up in the wake be shared—she answers calls. “Her of Hurricane Sandy. people,” or those in the community of At 10:45 am, Frances disconnects, but Red Hook, ask about how to put on a only from her online vector. She steps benefit for RHI, or how to get involved into the cold, locks the door and goes in the organization’s volunteer corps. to Baked for iced coffee—her prefer- They call about donations they want to ences don’t change with the seasons. It make, and Frances applies a dampener looks like an indulgence for someone to suggestions of items no longer needwho “likes to take her sweet time in the ed—“No, we don’t need more hats and morning,” as she says. By 11 am, she’s scarves, thanks!”—even while she culls (continued on page 13) reported to work at RHI.

The Red Hook Star-Revue 101 Union Street Brooklyn, NY 11231

I

“Despite reassurances by Tsiamos and his team, residents weren’t convinced the CDF wouldn’t pose health risks in the event of another storm like Hurricane Sandy.”

canal’s most contaminated material; and although deeper layers of sediment hold pollutants of their own, they are neither as numerous nor as mobile as those in the soft sediment. And by the EPA’s calculation, these lower layers lie at impractical-to-dredge depths. Instead dredging all layers of polluted sediment—at depths which reach more than 50 feet in some places along the canal—the EPA proposes to “cap” the freshly tilled canal basin. In the areas of most contamination, the EPA will treat and stabilize the contaminants in the deeper sediment before replacing them in the basin as the cap’s base layer. All areas, including those relatively less polluted, will employ a layer a new, clean soil as well as multiple layers of “armor,” composed of rock and gravel. Atop these layers, the canal bottom’s function as a habitat will be restored. The plan is estimated to cost the EPA half a billion dollars, and about the same for the city and state to maintain. Another core component is holding the city accountable for reducing the influx

Christos Tsiamos answers questions at Red Hook meeting (photo by Fiala)

of new pollutants and combined sewage overflows (CSOs). By cleaning the canal basin and choking off toxins leaking into the Gowanus’ waters, as well as allowing the natural flow of tides to cycle canal water into the Gowanus Bay and greater New York Harbor, the water’s own toxicity will be remediated.

A Polluted Grindstone Delivered in these broad strokes, the plan was met with little resistance. What failed to pass muster with the Red Hook audience was the EPA’s suggestion that less densely polluted material dredged from the area adjacent to Red Hook be stored and processed within the neighborhood itself. The EPA’s rationale was two-fold: by keeping the treatment process on-site, the EPA can ostensibly provide local jobs at the waste’s confined disposal facility (CDF); and by cutting out transportation to an off-site facility, the EPA can save an additional $37 million. The community’s questions came in volleys, filtered through the prism of disaster and Hurricane Sandy. Wasn’t the proposed site for the CDF in a flood zone? What kind of health risk does a facility like this pose, placed right next (continued on page 3)

Dolphin dies in canal day after meeting

Story and more photos page 7

Presorted Standard Rate US Postage PAID Brooklyn, NY Permit 84


The

Red Hook StarªRevue

JANUARY 2013

SOUTH BROOKLYN’S COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

VOLUME 4 NO. 1

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 30

Table of Contents

Rocky Sullivan’s 7:30 pm Join published and unpublished writers alike for a showcase and peer review event, the “Last Wednesday Series Reading and Open Mike.” If you would like to read, come early at 7 pm, or contact MC Lisa McLaughlin by email at rockysreadings@gmail.com. 34 Van Dyke St.

Community Calendar......... 2 Christmas................. 8,9 Happenings ...................... 2 Editorial/Letters......... 11 Fairway............................... 3 Arts Calendar............. 15 Visitation Church............... 5 School Benefit........... 16

THURSDAY, JAN 31

STAFF

El Greco Diner, Sheepshead Bay 2 pm-6 pm NYC Business Solutions will provide pro-bono legal advice from volunteer attorneys with the Neighborhood Entrepreneur Law Project along with accounting guidance from CPAs with the New York State Society of CPAs. At the Hurricane Sandy Legal and Accounting Clinic, ask experts about FEMA and SBA issues, employer responsibilities, contract issues, how to calculate business loss and more. Make sure to bring all related documents, including your lease and riders, any contracts and insurance and all riders. El Greco Diner is located at 1821 Emmons Avenue.

Kimberly G. Price.......................................Editor/Publisher George Fiala.......................................... Graphics/Publisher Nic Cavell.............................................................. Reporter Vince Musacchia..................................................Cartoons Erik Penney...................................................... Restaurants Eric Ruff............................................................... Calendar Matt Silna......................................................... Advertising

FRIDAY, FEB. 8 - SATURDAY FEB. 9

Brooklyn Arts Exchange 8 pm With “Untold,” BAX artist-in-residence Mariangela Lopez unites three New York-based choreographers who have been inspiration for her own career. Lopez, as curator, has chosen choreographers with strikingly different aesthetics--Alex Escalante, Marilyn Maywald and Michelle Torino Hower--who nevertheless share audacity, emotional complexity and powerful physical presence as performers. 421 5th Ave Brooklyn

Contributors

Mary Anne Massaro, Mary Ann Pietanza, Brian Clancy, Richard Feloni

Member @RedHookStar

Happenings

www.facebook.com/ redhookstarrevue

718.624.5568 - Editorial & Advertising 917.652.9128 News Tips 101 Union Street, Brooklyn, NY 11231 editor@redhookstar.com

ONGOING MONDAYS AND TUESDAYS IN JAN.

Carroll Gardens Association 5:30 pm-7:30 pm The CGA began hosting free computer classes for all ages this month on January 7. Classes will continue on Mondays and Tuesdays at 201 Columbia Street. Make sure to call (718) 243-9301 ahead of time to register for class.

Star-Revue Community Calendar COMMUNITY BOARD 6: ALL MEETINGS AT 6:30 PM

Wed. Feb. 13 Executive Meeting: CB6 Board meets to vote on recent committee recommendations. Long Island College Hospital, 339 Hicks

Street, Room A

Brooklyn Children’s Museum 10 am-5 pm Global Shoes combines cultural artifacts from the Brooklyn Children’s Museum’s stores with a variety of hands-on, feet-on activities. Children and their families explore global cultures by experiencing the museum’s fantasy shoe store and factory. For ages 5-12; 145 Brooklyn Avenue

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 30 THROUGH SATURDAY, FEB. 2

OTHER MEETINGS Wed, Jan. 30 76th Precinct Community Council Meeting, Monthly meeting where the Commanding Officer reports to the community. 7:30 pm. 76th Precinct, 191 Union Street Wed, Jan. 30 Carroll Gardens Association, “Homeownership Education and Counseling Program” 6 pm - 7:30 pm. 201 Columbia Street Mon, Feb. 11 Gowanus Canal Community Advisory Group, Special meeting with EPA on the Proposed Remedial Action Plan for the Gowanus Canal. 6:30 pm. PS 58, 330 Smith Street Tues, Feb. 12 Board Meeting of the Boerum Hill Association, Board meetings are open to the public. Bishop Mugavero Center, 155 Dean Street Wed, Feb. 13 Gowanus Canal Conservancy, Living in a Contaminated Estuary. This talk will focus on the lives of species found in waters such as the Gowanus Canal. Speaker: Dr. Judith S. Weis, Professor of Biological Sciences at Rutgers University, Newark. Social Hour 6:30 pm, Lecture: 7:30 - 8:30 pm, followed by Q&A. $5 requested donation. BuildItGreen!NYC’s Gowanus Warehouse 69 9th St, Brooklyn

Page 2 Red Hook Star-Revue

TUESDAYS - SUNDAYS, THROUGH MAR. 10

Brooklyn Academy of Music 7:30 pm Famous choreographer Trisha Brown leads the Trisha Brown Dance Company’s return to the Brooklyn Academy of Music in a program that mixes repertory classics and two New York premieres. The performance of “If You Catch Them They’re Yours” (2011) and “Les Yeux et l’âme” (“The Eyes and the Soul”) (2011) mark the last stop in Brown’s choreographic career. 30 Lafayette Avenue

DAILY, THROUGH FEB. 8

Medgar Evers College 9 pm Portraits of MLK, an exhibit composed of various artists’ renditions of both the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., is now on display. Call (718) 270-4920 to schedule an appointment for a tour of the gallery and the minds of the artists, some of whom knew Dr. King personally. 1650 Bedford Avenue

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January 2013


Community grapples with Tsiamis’ vision for Gowanus - sees rocky road ahead (continued from page 1)

to ball fields where Little Leaguers play; why is the facility being built within a stone’s throw of the thousands of families living within the Red Hook Houses? Wouldn’t a storm similar to Sandy present a double jeopardy of not only fresh debris, but also rampant spatches of contamination in Red Hook?

environmental violations. The violations were earned for illegal dumping of pollutants into the same Gowanus Canal and total nearly $20 million. “If you don’t want it, that’s it. I won’t push for it personally,” Tsiamis said. “I’ll be frank—everyone is going to be inconvenienced by this in some way,” he said, before reiterating that jobs for the area’s unemployed were what were at stake.

Finally, if local jobs assisting in the cleanup were the concession for this onus on the community, what specifics could the EPA offer about the work available? EPA administrator Christos Tsiamis has been tireless in his work while investigating as well as readying the cleanup of the canal. In this meeting, however, he relied on tired assertions of the EPA’s technical and engineering expertise in response to the community’s queries and challenges. “We’ve been doing this for what, 30 or 40 years?” he asked his colleagues at the front of the room, before answering his own question. “Since the 1970s. The EPA has high standards to uphold, and all work is carried out accordingly.” Tsiamis—who explained that the CDF was his own idea—labored to construct an appropriate image for the quizzical audience. Essentially, the CDF would treat and envelop the contaminated soil in a giant concrete husk or, as he put it, “a monolith.” The image was an unpopular one, and a number of community members pounced on it as they voiced their opinions and opposition. Residents of Red Hook refused the reassurances of Tsiamis and his team that the CDF would be safely contained, even in the event of another storm like Sandy. They asked what would happen to the CDF’s concrete vestiges when the EPA work was completed. After being told that the EPA’s contractors would clear their equipment and leave the site empty, they wondered aloud whether the same site could presently be used for something like a community center instead—a development that would supply permanent jobs instead of temporary work afforded by construction. The EPA’s report, its accompanying presentation and the vagaries of its responses proved similarly monolithic for community members. Their chief concern—the EPA’s proposal for an on-site CDF—is only mentioned on page 23 of the EPA report. In the entire presentation, the name of the man who owns

Reflections on Community

John McGettrick questions the idea of burying cleaned waste by the Red Hook

the Red Hook Gowanus Bay Terminal (GBX) site that will be used was not mentioned once. Neither were his previous environmental violations nor the total he stands to collect if plans for the CDF in Red Hook are approved.

Quadrozzi’s Gambit After so many audience members’ dissent from the plan, Phaedra Thomas— “yes, I am a paid representative”—of John Quadrozzi, Jr. and his company NYCEMCO took the floor. Instead of naming her client, she appealed to the audience as a Red Hook resident and property owner, saying that Red Hook, and especially its unemployed, stand to gain many employment opportunities if the proposal for the CDF is accepted by the community and New York City’s Department of Environmental Conservation. In fact, Thomas’s client stands to gain much from acceptance of the proposal. Quadrozzi’s company, which holds the GBX site, will reap Superfund money for taking contaminated material off the hands of EPA contractors. After collecting his payment, Quadrozzi will repurpose the same material. In addition to the monolith, the company will use the stabilized, concrete-enveloped soil to fill the GBX’s waterfront, which will bring into use new swathes of the GBX’s offshore property.

Win-win for GBX As the Star-Revue reported in July 2012, this would allow bulkheads to be moved into deeper water, allowing larger vessels to dock. Quadrozzi says a massive ship he owns could be turned into a stationary museum, while the rest of the new land could create local business opportunities. But Thomas’ appeal, in which she neglected to mention either the win-win for Quadrozzi or the money she herself collected for appearing, struck many audience members as disingenuous. Declan Walsh pursued a heated altercation with Thomas even outside the Miccio Center, after the meeting had ended.

The reception at Thursday’s meeting in Red Hook bore a stark contrast with that at the meeting just one evening before, held in Carroll Gardens. In Carroll Gardens, a community that is not hurting for employment and has everything to gain from the cleanup, audience members singled out the EPA for restoring their faith in good government. They heaped Tsiamis and his colleagues with praise for the studiousness with which they crafted their plan. Some audience members recalled earlier efforts to clean up the canal, which were only headed by the city with recalcitrance. Those efforts proved ineffective because the city was unwilling to spend the vast sums that dredging and capping require. That money will now derive from the pockets of the EPA, but not before it collects coinage from the city. New York City stands legally responsible as one of the chief polluters of the canal for its role in enabling industry at the cost of the surrounding communities—a fact noted by audience members in Carroll Gardens with glee.

greater transparency. They called for a fuller, simpler presentation of what the community stands to gain or to lose by consenting to the CDF at the next public meeting. Despite, as one audience member put it, Red Hook’s history of airing grievances in forums like the Miccio Center without avail on its priorities, both EPA and New York City elected officials emphasized the need for community members to make their voices heard during the public comment period, which ends March 28. A special Gowanus Canal Community Advisory Group (CAG) meeting will be held at 6:30 pm, February 11 at PS 58 to discuss the plan with the EPA. Tsia-

In Red Hook, a weary Tsiamis was interrogated by the audience, often tenaciously. He developed a personal tone in Phaedra Thomas turns to leave the meeting after receiving some heckling. Dan Wiley, representing Congresshis appeal for the plan he woman Velasquez, stands in the back (photos by Fiala) claimed for his own. But audience members, perhaps aggravated mis personally agreed to offer a clearer by the ongoing struggles to rebuild after explanation of alternatives and what’s Sandy, ultimately remained skeptical. at stake with the CDF at this meeting. The community’s demands focused on

The EPA’s proposal can be found online at www.EPA.gov/ region2/superfund/npl/gowanus and at two information repositories—the Carroll Gardens Library and the Miccio Center. The Red Hook Library, which was affected by Hurricane Sandy, does not house the document. To submit comments on the EPA’s plan, email Christos Tsiamis at GowanusCanalComments.Region2@epa.gov or mail him at:

“Why come here and misrepresent who you are? Why would you even consider placing a toxic processing plant here?” he pressed her. Tsiamis’ own remarks remained placatory, and he repeatedly declined to answer questions concerning Quadrozzi’s

Red Hook Star-Revue

John Muir, Vice Chairman of the Gowanus Canal Conservancy, animatedly discusses the proposed 1st Street CDF.

www.RedHookStar.com

Christos Tsiamis Project Manager Central New York Remediation Section U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 290 Broadway, 20th Floor, New York, NY 10007-1866

January, 2013 Page 3


NYCHA monopolizes meeting with low turnout by George Fiala

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n Wednesday, January 2, the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) held the first of a series of meetings this year with Red Hook public housing tenants. NYCHA is making a public effort to deal with tenant issues, following much bad press about their response to Sandy. Less than six tenants showed up. All the participants, including a large NYCHA contingent, were seated at one table. The meeting was led by Marguerite Mann, NYCHA’s Director for Brooklyn Property Management. Brian Honan, Director, State & City Affairs, was seated next to her. Honan has worked with tenant activists and Occupy Sandy volunteers involved in relief efforts. Mann provided an update on the situation at the Houses - from NYCHA’s point of view. She discussed electricity, lighting, garbage, heat and hot water, water quality, and rent abatement. She addressed the progress of the Bellfour Group, the subcontractor hired by NYCHA for cleaning of the basements and mold remediation. She announced that all buildings had been treated for

First phase A spokesman from Capital Projects Division explained that the temporary generators lent to NYCHA to provide electricity will be replaced with transformers by the end of February. This first phase of improvements should provide more reliable and less expensive electricity. The second phase will replace the temporary high pressure boilers with modern low pressure boilers. These will be more cost effective because they use less fuel. The contract for these boilers is currently out for bid. NYCHA’s long range plans are to place the boilers and electric systems in locations better sheltered from flooding. This will require innovative planning and placement other than in the basements. The spokesman explained that Sandy was an unprecedented event, and new ideas have to be designed by contracted engineers, which will take

“Some people’s apartments are still ‘raggedy’ dating back from before the storm. She mentioned outdated sinks that haven’t been replaced in years, the lack of hot water and equipment shortages.”

Lilly Marshall informed NYCHA about intermittent phone service.

insect and rat infestations. NYCHA is keeping a log of complaints, and she stated that 95% of all complaints had been dealt with. She was quite positive about NYCHA’s response to Sandy.

time and money. Federal relief money was mentioned several times, but at the time of this meeting, the aid package was still uncertain. After NYCHA’s extensive presenta-

Brian Honan and Marguerite Mann explain what NYCHA has been doing to restore normalcy to the Red Hook Houses (photos by Fiala/Price)

tion, the floor was opened to the residents. Lillian Marshall, president of the Red Hook West Tenant Association, brought up a problem of intermittent phone service. Others concurred, citing spotty cellular as well as internet service. NYCHA seemed unaware of this problem but promised to have a Verizon representative at the next meeting because phone and internet service is not under NYCHA’s domain. The next meeting was held on January 16th without a Verizon representative. It is another example of an unfulfilled NYCHA promise.

Raggedy apartments Sheryl Braxton spoke brought up a series of new and longstanding complaints. She said that some people’s apartments are still “raggedy” dating back from before the storm. She mentioned outdated sinks that haven’t been replaced in years, the lack of hot water and equipment shortages. Different NYCHA representatives attempted to address each issue, stressing the importance of calling in complaints. Another tenant brought up the problem of communication. NYCHA claimed to have placed notices about this meeting under everyone’s door. An informal Star-Revue survey failed to find anyone at the Houses who received a notice. It was suggested that the newsletter be put in everyone’s mailboxes. NYCHA pointed out the Post Office forbids stuffing mailboxes by anyone other than postal employees. As of press time the newsletter has not been updated in at least four weeks. The question of jobs was raised. NYCHA responded that they had received a Department of Labor grant and had hired 378 cleanup workers citywide, with 5060 more slots to be filled. However, they received a huge response and would not be accepting new applications. Part of Bellfour ‘s contract required a portion local hiring, employing 15 local residents. NYCHA claims to be monitoring payroll records to ensure continuing compliance with this requirement.

Tenant activist Sheryl Braxton had much to tell NYCHA.

ants” and “Housing residents get some answers but want more,” December 16, 2012), an ad hoc group of tenants, together with members of Occupy Sandy, formed a response group to deal with the lack of NYCHA presence. Issues such as rent abatement, electricity, heat and hot water and NYCHA’s lack of preparation were first addressed. After Thanksgiving, this group - including Wally Bazemore, Merelin Mieles, June Smith and Sheryl Braxton - went to NYCHA’s Manhattan headquarters and presented Bryan Honan with a list of questions. NYCHA produced written answers within the week. On December 4th, a meeting of the group’s leaders and tenants met at the Miccio Center. This activism may have forced NYCHA’s hand to create ongoing communication with tenants. These regularly scheduled meetings have been well attended by NYCHA representatives. The meetings are held every two weeks on Wednesday evenings at 6:30 pm. The next two scheduled meetings take place at the Miccio Center on January 30 and February 13. To voice a complaint, tenants can call (718) 707-7771.

Karen Patterson from Family Services said that attention was being paid to medical needs and partnerships had been established with Visiting Nurses, HRA and FEMA. Everyone who showed up at this meeting fit around one long table.

Page 4 Red Hook Star-Revue

As reported in the Star-Revue, (“NYCHA faces angry Red Hook ten-

www.RedHookStar.com

January, 2013


Strength in numbers confront NYCHA by Nicholas Cavell

O

n January 16, representatives from the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) conducted the next in a series of bimonthly meetings initiated to discuss Hurricane Sandy relief with tenants of the Red Hook Houses. In contrast to the January 2 meeting, this meeting was well-attended. And in this meeting, tenants did not spare NYCHA frustration formed in the face of chronic heating problems, lighting failures, safety discrepancies and sanitation issues. Communication and responsiveness remained the biggest issues, residents said. NYCHA representatives, for their part, stuck to a positive message emphasizing that both the East and West Houses were safe and operational. NYCHA’s Tasha Smith, who has been Property Manager at Red Hook Houses West for nine years, reminded residents that

both residents and NYCHA’s engineers when they were more concrete. The absent plans for permanent boilers versus the use of temporary boilers as a stopgap parallel NYCHA’s use sidewalk shedding. Scaffolds for exterior repair board up existing construction while the comprehensive work is left indefinitely for the future. During the questioning period, one resident cited that repairs to individual rooms were often assigned a 6-18 month waiting period. Despite promises at the previous meeting that representatives from Verizon Wireless, the Houses’ sole phone and internet service provider, would be available to answer residents’ questions, the representatives were nowhere to be found. On communication issues, residents complained that NYCHA had yet to restore intercom service. They also bristled at the idea that the intercom service would only be available through Verizon.

Honan, who had stated early in the session that individual complaints were to be filed with management personally and not aired in discussion, issued numerous reminders, Residents listen tentatively and was numerously denied. Residents NYCHA employees had gone door-togenerally ignored NYCHA’s request door in the hours following the storm, that they limit themselves to one queschecking in on residents to make sure tion each. they had resources like medicine. Sarah Chapman, who lives at 831 But residents like Wally Bazemore Hicks, described living conditions on weren’t buying Smith’s story, which the 6th floor of her building. The winhe and others have refuted in previous dow across from her room, she said, had NYCHA meetings. a crack in it before Sandy. Now, that “Nobody from NYCHA helped us for crack is growing bigger. three weeks,” he said. “We were strand“There’s no sidewalk shedding around ed in the cold and the dark.” it?” Brooklyn Property Management In response to Bazemore’s question Department Director Marguerite Mann about plans for new permanent boilers, asked, incredulously. NYCHA Director of State & City LegGarbage can filter? islative Affairs, Brian Honan said the new boilers would be protected on up- In one of the meeting’s most startling per floors where—as Bazemore pointed revelations, Emelyn Matos suggested out—they could displace up to 32 resi- that the hot water supply of 82 Dwight dents. Honan responded that although Street is being filtered through garbage plans had not yet been made, they cans in the basement that are contamiwould be thoroughly discussed with nated with asbestos. She also suggested that the basement foundation of 135 Richards Street, where the contractor Belfour had knocked down walls and placed red tape, was unsafe, and provided photo evidence of each. Matos’ photographs, all of which were taken since December 26 and some of which as recently as January 11, are currently being investigated by NYCHA’s engineers. The complex’s basement facilities have been padlocked since Matos took her photographs.

Wally Bazemore makes a point.

Red Hook Star-Revue

“All testing of the water towers and low-rise buildings was completed and we are happy to say they all came back with a clean bill,” Honan said. Honan believed that Belfour’s red tape was in place as a sanitation warning to other

Marguerite Mann and Brian Honan answer tenant questions (photos by George Fiala)

“Mann took to the floor to personally respond to residents’ making phone

complaints, the

calls

necessary herself

to

connect them with services. Neither she nor any other NYCHA Brian

officials, Honan,

save

answered

the Star-Revue’s questions afterward, citing NYCHA policy.”

with services. Neither she nor any other NYCHA officials, save Brian Honan, answered the Star-Revue’s questions afterward, citing NYCHA policy. In what often seemed like a battle to control media message, NYCHA continued to assert its positive record and emphasize improvements in conditions. Residents demurred, offering personal accounts of conditions in Red Hook Houses that leave much to be desired. The objects of their complaints often dated to times well before the hurricane. “NYCHA staff ought to be moved into that housing and see what it’s like drinking that water and bathing their children in that water,” Matos said after the meeting. “I want to pick the right fights, and I need to get these tenants to help. A lot of people are just happy to be in the building,” said Matos, who resides in a hotel and refuses to move back into the Houses at this time.

NYCHA employees. Mann believed that the walls knocked down were not essential to building integrity. Both admitted they are not engineers.

Lillian Marshall, Tenants Association President of Red Hook Houses West struck a different note.

After the meeting, Mann took to the floor to personally respond to residents’ complaints, making the necessary phone calls herself to connect them

“This should be the last meeting, because it’s the same story every time. Just the same people talking, but they never get anything done,” she said.

The scene at the Miccio Center in contrast to the previous meeting

www.RedHookStar.com

January, 2013 Page 5


Star-Revue ®

News Briefs

Thief Beyond Belief

At 4 am on the morning of January 3, sanitation worker Louis Pepe left his home and stepped into his car. In the morning darkness, he drove past the outdoor crèche of Sacred Hearts – St. Stephen Roman Catholic Church, stared at the plaque bearing the names of his parents, and gazed at the nativity. And then, staring at the center, he realized it was gone. Nearly two weeks after the $150 statue of the Baby Jesus vanished from outside the Red Hook church, there are still no leads to its whereabouts. The statues of Joseph and Mary, bolted down, peer into an empty manger. The NYPD Hate Crimes Task Force’s investigation into the theft is ongoing. Pepe, who dedicated the $1,700 nativity scene to his parents, remains upset. But Monsignor Guy Massie, pastor, suggested peace with the thieves. “Leave it in a back seat of the church, and there will be no questions asked,” he told The Tablet.

The Restaurant

Eat for

Red Hook SBA Recovery Center Closes; Deadlines for Funding Still Open

On Saturday, January 12 the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) Business Recovery Center at the IKEA in Red Hook closed its doors. Citing a steady decrease in activity at the center over the past several weeks, the Administration issued its decision just a day beforehand, on January 11.

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African Artist Blends Media in Brooklyn Museum

On February 8, the curtain will fall to reveal African artist El Anatsui’s Gravity and Grace exhibition in the Brooklyn Museum. The exhibit, which features over 30 artworks—many of them crafted on a titanic scale—combines wood and metal, Ghana and Nigeria in the same universe of abstraction. With scraps like printing plates, condensed milk tins and aluminum liquor bottle caps, Anatsui has the strength of his materials’ particular histories, but also the freedom to improvise. Within the exhibition, twelve recent sculptures using disparate elements stand at the zenith of his career, while a series of drawings and wooden wall reliefs reference his earlier work and the development of his process. The exhibit will run from February 8 through August of this year, and will be located in the Morris A. and Meyer Schapiro Wing and Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Gallery on the Brooklyn Museum’s 5th Floor.

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Several business recovery centers throughout Brooklyn have offered businesses one-on-one assistance completing their SBA applications and

answered questions about the recovery process.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announces the opening of a comment period on the Proposed Plan and preferred cleanup alternative to address contamination at the Gowanus Canal Superfund site in Brooklyn, Kings County, New York. EPA will accept public comments on this proposed plan until March 28, 2013. As part of the public comment period, EPA will hold two public meetings on the Proposed Plan for the Gowanus Canal Superfund site. The first meeting will be held on Wednesday, January 23 at 7:00 PM at the Carroll School (P.S. 58) located at 330 Smith Street, Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn. The second meeting will be held on Thursday, January 24, 2013 at the Joseph Miccio Community Center, 110 West 9th Street, Red Hook, Brooklyn. To learn more about the meetings you can contact Natalie Loney, EPA=s Community Involvement Coordinator, at 212-637-3639 or 1-800-346-5009 or visit our website at www.epa.gov/region2/superfund/npl/gowanus. EPA recently concluded a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the site to assess the nature and extent of contamination and to evaluate cleanup alternatives for the site. Based upon the results of this RI/FS, EPA has prepared a Proposed Plan which describes the findings of the remedial investigation and also provides the rationale for recommending the preferred cleanup alternative. The preferred cleanup alternatives to address contamination at the Gowanus Canal Superfund site consist of:  Dredging approximately 300,000 cubic yards of contaminated sediment from the upper and middle portions of the Canal and stabilizing the remaining contaminated native sediments with concrete or similar materials  Placing a three layer cap on the stabilized areas in the upper and middle portion of the Canal  Dredging approximately 280,000 cubic yards of contaminated sediment from the lower portion of the Canal and placing two layer cap over the dredged areas.  Removing contaminated fill from the 1st Street Turning Basin  Transporting the contaminated sediment to an off-site permitted facility  Source controls for contaminated upland properties and Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs) The Proposed Plan and other site-related documents are available for public review at the following locations: Joseph Miccio Community Center: 110 West 9th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11231; 718-243-1528; Hours: 9AM – 9PM Carroll Gardens Library: 396 Clinton Street, Brooklyn, NY 11231; 718-596-6972; Hours: M, Th, F:10AM - 6 PM; T:1PM - 8PM; W:10AM- 8PM; Sa:10AM - 5PM USEPA Region 2: Superfund Records Center, 290 Broadway, 18th Floor, New York, NY 10007, 212- 637-4308 Hours: Mon. - Fri., 9am - 5pm

IKEA Brooklyn

Or you can access them at:

1 Beard Street Brooklyn, NY 11231 Open daily 10am-9pm

EPA relies on public input to ensure that the selected remedy for each Superfund site meets the needs and concerns of the local community. It is important to note that although EPA has identified a preferred cleanup alternative for the site, no final decision will be made until EPA has considered all public comments received during the public comment period. EPA will summarize these comments along with EPA=s responses in a Responsiveness Summary, which will be included in the Administrative Record file as part of the Record of Decision. Written comments and questions regarding the Gowanus Canal Superfund site, postmarked no later than March 28, 2013 may be sent to:

Restaurant Hours: 9:30am-8:30pm

www.IKEA-USA.com/brooklyn (718) 246-4532

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www.epa.gov/region02/superfund/npl/gowanus/

© Inter IKEA Systems B.V. 2012

www.RedHookStar.com

Christos Tsiamis, Remedial Project Manager U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 290 Broadway, 20th Floor New York, New York 10007-1866 FAX: (212) 637-4257 E-mail: GowanusCanalComments.Region2@epa.gov

January, 2013


Gates of Gowanus swallows porpoise by Nic Cavell

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n Friday morning’s early darkness, a dolphin made the fateful strokes into the headwaters of the 1.8-milelong Gowanus Canal. At 9:30 am, the Riverhead Foundation responded to a call reporting that the animal had been spotted at the canal’s mouth. After the drive from Long Island, the organization’s rescue truck parked in an empty lot along the canal and the staff decamped into the cold to file notes and tend the media, along with the New York Police Department and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

police officer reportedly tried to take matters into his own hands by searching for a rowboat, before giving up. Later, as the dolphin treaded water on the bank near DeGraw Street, a bystander reached over the rusted and deformed corrugated steel barriers to grasp the animal’s fin. The episode prompted Chris Hayes, who owns land and Eastern Effects Inc. on the adjacent bank to shout, “Get those stupid people to stop touching the animal!” But the animal was too weary to respond to their bravado. As it drifted in half-circles and surfaced to breathe at irregular intervals, Wocial conceded that, per her own observations, the animal’s vital signs were not those of a healthy mammal.

A parade of spectators—first interested, then hopeful, then frustrated and concerned—gathered at the Union Street Bridge to watch the dolphin wend its way through trash and other obstacles. When asked, she said was neither aware One onlooker reported that its dorsal fin of the Gowanus’ toxicity nor that the was trailing blood. EPA has designated the canal one of At 2:30 pm, members from the marine the nation’s most densely polluted arrescue group, including supervisor Julika eas—a Superfund site for toxic remeWocial, continued to explain that a res- diation. She was not familiar with the cue would not be attempted until at least fact that, less than 12 hours before the 7 pm, at high tide. She said it was more dolphin mired itself in Gowanus’ pollutlikely that an intervention would be de- ants, the EPA had presented its plan for layed through several more tide cycles’ the canal’s cleanup. worth of observation. Not much chance in the canal

the dolphin, which continued to bob in waters whose surface was blearily streaked with, as one EPA administrator put it in a same meeting one evening previous, “blobs that make a good rainbow sheen.” At 5 pm, snow began melting onto the canal’s surface. At 6 pm, the dolphin met the dark current, tried to pushup—and died. It was unclear whether the animal’s previous injuries, the canal’s toxicity or some combination thereof subdued it.

Spokesperson Julika Wocial of the Riverhead Foundation explains that a rescue operation would not start until the next day. Natural forces took over before they had a chance (photos by Fiala).

“Any type of intervention carries risks— In the late afternoon, ducks pedaled by risk to the crew and a risk to animal itself. In many cases, an intervention is found to be unbeneficial to the animal,” said Wocial, adding that because dolphins are a protected species, any rescue attempt would have to be approved by the National Marine Fisheries Service. Wild dolphins, which are often erroneously portrayed in media as friendly, have been known to bite and lunge at humans. Not everyone heeded the message. One

GrowNYC wants your apples!

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ood scraps account for about 17% of NYC’s waste. The thrown-out leftovers also cost the city money to dispose and create damaging greenhouse emissions. But one local group has found a viable solution for uneaten edibles. On Sunday, January, 6 GrowNYC announced their 1 million pounds milestone of compost collection at the Carroll Gardens Greenmarket. Emily Rubenstein, Assistant Commissioner of Sanitation, Recycling and Sustainability with DSNY; Marcel Van Ooyen, Executive Director of GrowNYC; and Amanda Gentile, Development and Communications Director gave a short presentation about the program.

by Kimberly Gail Price City Councilman Brad Lander also showed his support, eagerly participating in the presentation. GrowNYC hosted their first composting site at the Union Square Greenmarket in 1994. Council Speaker Christine Quinn and the New York City Council funded the program in March 2011. The pilot program began with seven collection sites around Manhattan and has since expanded to 21 different greenmarkets in Manhattan, Staten Island and Brooklyn. “We’re thrilled that Speaker Quinn and the New York City Council helped launch the compost program last year and that DSNY stepped in this year to bring the successful pilot

to the next level,” Ooyen said. Vegetable and fruit scraps, along with coffee grounds at area wide green markets, where GrowNYC staffs Sustainability Centers into collection tubs. The Department of Sanitation (DSNY) and GrowNYC transport the food waste to several sites in the five boroughs. The soil is transformed into fertile material that adds nutrients and improves the quality of soil. “This forward thinking initiative has

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successfully improved how we handle food post-consumption. Everything from apple cores to those leftovers sitting in the fridge has to go somewhere – and it doesn’t have to be trash,” Quinn said. Scraps can be dropped off every Saturday at the Carroll Gardens Greenmarket on the corner of Smith and President Streets. For more information or volunteer opportunities, visit www.grownyc.org

January, 2013 Page 7


Van Brunt company closed by bus strike by George Fiala

B61 GAINS RED HOOK PARTNER

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ufaro Transit Company, 225 Van Brunt Street, was the scene of picketing, as a citywide school bus strike impacted local workers. The protesting was peaceful as two officers from Kensington’s 70th precinct kept watch. Tufaro was closed due to the strike.

$2,600. Another cost-raising factor is busing kids to charter, private and parochial schools. According to the Independent Budget Office, 20% of charter school students use these buses, as opposed to 9% of regular public school children.

According to workers and other news media, the strike is not about wages. Job security is the main complaint. The city, represented by Mayor Bloomberg, feels that busing 150,000 under the current contract is too costly. NYC pays over $1 billion annually for private bus companies to deliver the kids to school. The union claims that over 75% of that cost involves busing children with special needs. Many of these transports are to private schools far outside the city, as reported in the NY Daily News.

The city is trying to eliminate job protection in the new union contract. According to the strikers, one effect would be to replace the current staff of drivers, matrons, and mechanics - all highly trained - with new workers at lesser pay with less training. Currently, the matrons, who watch the children during their bus ride, earn $15 per hour.

According to a Daily News article (“Blame Mike, not workers,” Jan. 8), the inefficient routing of the special needs students results in an annual cost of $12,000 per child. The cost of busing the general education students averages

The city is attempting to find alternatives to the school buses, including paying for taxi service for the special needs kids, while the bus companies filed a complaint with the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). A decision is expected the last week in January. If the strike is ruled illegal, the bus companies will go to court to seek an injunction, forcing the workers back to their jobs.

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n Sunday, January 6th, the Star-Revue rode with City Councilman Brad Lander on an inaugural ride of the B57 extension as part of its new Red Hook route. This new option for Red Hookers should relieve some of the overcrowding of the beleagured B61. MTA made the decision based on a report prepared in the fall of 2011 by Lander, Sara Gonzalez and Nydia Velazquez called “Improving the B61 Bus.” The expanded route takes passengers from Smith and Court Streets down past the Smith and 9th Street area, over to IKEA, and then back again. It then continues on its usual way through Bushwick, Bed Stuy, Williamsburg and ending in Maspeth, Queens. At 1:30 pm, Lander and his District Director, Catherine Zinnel - who is a Carroll Gardens resident - met up with the B57 on the corner of Court and President Streets. A staff member from Sara Gonzalez’s office and Red Hooker, Robert Berrios - who makes it a point to follow the MTA - joined them. Lander was his cheery Sunday self, tweeting his ride and engaging with us in wide ranging discussions. Subjects included the trillion dollar platinum coin, participatory budgeting and shopping at IKEA. His tweets included photos of our friendly bus driver - Nuanna, the restoration work at Red Hook Community Farm and a picture of the B61 and the B57, the old and the new standing side by side during a 5 minute layover at IKEA. Lander has been in the forefront of Red Hook transportation improvements. None on the bus were more excited than he about the new route. One might have thought Lander was visiting Disneyland for the first time.

Bus placard announcing service expansion (photos by Price/Fiala)

National Grid Offers Sandy Relief Grants

National Grid is offering grant funds up to $250,000 for new constructions and renovations as part of its Hurricane Sandy Relief Program. Grants may finance the existing energy infrastructure, new energy-related construction and outfitting businesses with the machinery and equipment. Each application is evaluated on a variety of factors including financial need and potential impact on the community. For more information (855)-496-9359.

A Cow is Born in Prospect Park Zoo

On Christmas Eve, the Wildlife Conservation Society witnessed the birth of its very first calf within Prospect Park Zoo. The male calf, which weighed in at a hefty 84 pounds at birth, is the son of Tetley, the Zoo’s Shornhorn milking cow, and a Randall Lineback bull. When mature, the calf could easily grow to 1,000 pounds.

Authors Besides Jack London Discuss “Call of the Wild”

On Wednesday, February 6, 4:30 pm, authors Janyce Stefan-Cole, Lisa Sita and Anne Whitehouse will present

Page 8 Red Hook Star-Revue

readings of their contributions to the collection “Being Human: Call of the Wild” in Founders Hall at St. Francis College. The readings will approach the collection’s theme of an evolving world and our evolving relationship with the natural world. A reception and book signing will follow. Free admission.

SBA Loans Exceed $560 Million, Still Available

The U.S. Small Business Administration has approved 8,234 disaster loans totaling $560 million. The deadline to return applications for physical property damage is February 27, 2013, and that for economic injury applications is July 31, 2013. For more information, visit www.sba.gov.

Squadron Fights for Ferry

On January 16, State Senator Daniel Squadron launched a petition for yearround East River Ferry service to and from Atlantic Avenue/Pier 6. The petition, which has won the support of numerous elected officials, Brooklyn Community Boards 2 and 6 and other organizations, is expected by its supporters to be a boon for commuters, visitors and local businesses alike.

Black Arts Movement Collection Moves to Brooklyn

The Brooklyn Museum recently acquired important artworks created as part of the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s to mid-1970s. The museum purchased the collection directly from former art dealers David Lusenhop and Melissa Azzi, who assembled the pieces to preserve the work of the movement’s leading visual artists.

Rally to save LICH

On January 25, elected officials including Nydia Velazquez, Daniel Squadron and Joan Millman joined the 1199 SEIU, New York Nurses Association, other unions and community members gathered to support SUNY Downstate Medical Center, which faces closure. The elected officials argued that closing the campus was off the table and that a long-term stabilization plan for Brooklyn’s hospitals is needed instead. SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Long Island College Hospital and other affiliated hospitals are “vital to Brooklyn’s already-underserved residents,” a press release from Senator Squadron’s office maintained.

www.RedHookStar.com

Brad Lander, Robert Berrios, Kimberly G. Price and Catherine Zinnel

Season Premiere of “Down Here” at Cora Dance

From February 28 to March 2, and from March 6 to 9, the Cora Studio-Theater will present Shannon Hummel and Cora Dance’s 2013 New York City Season Premiere of “Down Here,” a performance foregrounding the relationships of lovers, sisters, gods, heads of state and prisoners—and the very human pursuit of control. For more information and to buy tickets, visit www.coradance.org.

BCF Community Grant Rebuilding Program

Brooklyn Recovery Grant Applications are due February 4, 2013. This second round of the Brooklyn Recovery Fund’s grant program is to support physical improvements to homes and buildings damaged in the hurricane. Funding will support mold removal and remediation; electrical, heating and systems repairs and replacement; and structural repairs to 1-4 family homes, nonprofit facilities, or buildings used by small businesses. For information on how to apply contact Toya Williford at 718.722.5352 or twilliford@bcfny.org.

January, 2013


Fashionable Nydia inaugurated with love by George Fiala

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ydia Velazquez wore a stylish bright red outfit at her January 13th swearing in at the downtown Brooklyn Federal Courthouse. This did not go unnoticed by Assemblywoman Joan Millman who called her “always the best dressed” at every gathering she attends. Millman was one of many friends and associates called on to express their love and well wishes at Velazquez’s 11th Congressional inauguration. Judge Deborah A. Batts of the Southern District of NY performed the ceremony. The two and a half hour event was hosted by Lincoln Restler, former Brooklyn District Leader. The dais and audience was packed with numerous local politicians covering her district from Red Hook to Williamsburg. However Park Slope City Councilman Steve Levin’s absence was notable. Current political gossip has Restler eyeing Levin’s seat in November.

Schumer shines US Senator and Brooklynite, Chuck Schumer spoke warmly and enthusiastically. His speech was a preview of his duties the following Monday as Master of Ceremonies for Barack Obama’s inauguration. As he did in Washington, Schumer spoke of the significance of Washington’s Capital Dome. The one now standing is actually the second one. It was under construction when the Civil War began. Abraham Lincoln was under pressure to suspend construction during the war, but he refused. He viewed the rising dome as a symbol of America’s continuing future. Schumer called Nydia’s presence in the Congress another such symbol. He also spoke about Nydia’s father, a worker in Puerto Rico’s sugar fields. He became a labor activist and later a business owner, giving Velazquez inspiration and education. Schumer recalled the interim period after Obama was first elected president, but not yet inaugurated. A passionate Nydia called the President-Elect. She announced to Obama that she had a “big idea” - something

ILA NEGOTIATE FINAL PHASE OF CONTRACT

by George Fiala ack in September, the Star-Revue reported that the entire shipping industry on the east coast might shut down at the end of the month. The International Longshoremen’s Association (ILA) represent workers on containerports from Nova Scotia to New Orleans, including the Red Hook Container Terminal (RHCT). The latest contract was due to expire. Neither side desired a walkout prior to the holiday season. A crippled shipping industry could bring economic distress. So on September 15th, a three month moratorium was declared, making the new strike date the last day of the year. By the end of the year, an agreement was reached on some terms, but not all. An additional extension was granted -

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Red Hook Star-Revue

Nydia often has, according to Senator Schumer. She excitedly told Obama about her friend, Judge Sonia Sotomayor, and why she would make a great Justice of the Supreme Court. When the time came, Obama nominated her. Sotomayor became the third woman and first Hispanic Supreme Court Justice. Hispanic, women’s and gay rights were topics in many of the afternoon’s speeches. While emcee Restler kept urging the many speakers to limit their talks, no one did. Councilwoman Diana Reyna, State Assemblywoman Joan Millman, Judge Carol Bagley Amon, Felix Ortiz, William Thompson, John Liu and Christine Quinn were among those who spoke. A chorus of PS 250 fourth grade students comprised the musical entertainment. They enchanted the gathering with their renditions of “America the Beautiful,” and later “Wind Beneath My Wing.” A college freshman and Ghanaian immigrant, Alpha Barry spoke nervously but forcefully about the life changing experience he had while volunteering for the Brooklyn Greenway Initiative, a project that Velazquez has been instrumental in funding.

Nydia beams as she listens to Senator Chuck Schumer, who just eight days later served as Master of Ceremonies at President Barack Obama’s Washington inauguration (all photos by George Fiala)

After the official swearing in by Federal Judge Deborah Batts, Nydia took the platform. She still spoke in campaign mode, pledging to pass immigration reform and gun control this next session of congress. She talked about her father, noting that while he was good with his hands he was better with his words. She

She added the only two amendments that successfully passed with the bill. The first provided $25 million for the Community Development Fund. The second increased funding for the National Cemetary Administration by $25 million.

Christine Quinn

recalled the speeches he made on behalf of his fellow workers and was grateful that he always brought his young daughter along. Immediately following the event, Nydia flew down to Washington where she busily worked with the rest of Congress on the Sandy relief bill which passed the next evening.

Based on her words, one can expect a

Joan Millman

one that is due to expire on February 6. According to participants, the biggest stumbling block was container royalties. In addition to base pay, workers receive extra pay per container unloaded. The shippers did not want to continue paying these fees. The issue was settled but others remain. On January 9th, negotiations were halted again when the ILA became frustrated with management’s intransigence. There is pressure for management to settle this strike by the February 6 because of the week-long Chinese New Year holiday. China shuts down for this celebration, and factories work overtime beforehand, anticipating a week of no production. Container ships coming to the US are fully stocked and the shipping companies need them unloaded - it is their most profitable time. A strike would impair the US economy;

Nydia working tirelessly for immigration reform, more sensible regulation for small business, and gun control during this next two year term.

Nydia with Ghanain mmigrant Alpha Barry.

The acclaimed chorus of PS 250, a magnet school in Williamsburg, sang flawlessly.

Nydia embraces Judge Deborah Batts following her swearing in.

some estimate a strike in New York will cost $ 1 billion a day in lost activity. Additional pressure to settle comes from the National Retailers Federation. The Federation represents both small shops and box stores. In January they wrote a letter to the negotiators urging agreement. Locally, the Red Hook Two cranes visible from Union Street (photo by Fiala) Containerport is represented by Local 1814, with headquar- among the shippers and the unions ters on 20th Street. They are said to since then. It is expected that a new sixrepresent over 600 full and part-time year contract will be ready by Februworkers. RHCT is Brooklyn’s only ship- ary. According the the ILA’s Facebook ping facility. page, negotiations reconvened the third The last strike was in 1977, lasting two week in January. New York work rules months. There has been cooperation are part of the negotiations.

www.RedHookStar.com

January, 2013 Page 9


The

Blue Pencil Lunar Revue A spoof publication of the Red Hook Star-Revue, no information below is meant to be true or offensive.

LOOK, TWEEDLEDEE. IT’S AN ACTUAL EVENT!

S

hazbot! It was a hit, a very palpable hit. As was the next one, as onlookers watched acting legend Robin Williams drive golf balls out of Coffey Park this past Wednesday. He was clad entirely in his Scottish getup, while his also famous caddy, Pam Dawber caddy trotted behind him carrying his beloved bagpipes. According to one resident, Williams would shout, “I SOUND MY BARBARIC YAWP OVER THE ROOFTOPS OF THE WORLD!” before launching the balls into nearby windows. Apparently Williams was trying to skyrocket the golf balls over the East River into Manhattan. In an exclusive interview with the Blue-Pencil, Williams confessed that “this would not be an easy mission; monkeys slow the expedition.” But he also encouraged the crowd to stick around noting that “What some folks call impossible is just stuff they haven’t seen before.”

said, “I just hope one day to be half as smart and funny as this amazing trophy. I ain’t never had a friend like this.” Bob Munro told the Blue-Pencil, he will remember who busted his window “every time that cold February wind blows through my apartment.” He clutched his ball so tightly his knuckles turned white. “I don’t care if my landlord ever fixes that,” he chortled.

After three glee-filled hours of knocking the Nanu-Nanu out of the golf balls, Williams decided to retrieve his balls, most of which had plunged deep into the filthy Gowanus Canal. Undeterred, Williams said he chose Red Hook be- he took off like a knight on a special quest as though he was riding a psychotic horse toward a burning stable. Upon approaching the canal, clearly unaware of his locale, Williams muttered, “I found you in Hell; don’t you think I could find you in Jersey!” before submerging himself in the canal. Gowanus, residents and business owners who had gathered to survey the ruckus, just simply released one horrified and synchronized gasp. A good Samaritan named Rainbow Randolph quickly retrieved his rhinestone snorkel mask to lend to the actor. “Sucking the marrow out of life doesn’t mean choking on the bones,” he said. At this point Williams began surface diving to the bottom of the canal. Between bobbings, he would clear his mask and snorkel and repeat the mantra, “this is a battle, a war and the casualties could be my heart and soul.” Williams cruising for golf balls in Gowanus The actor was successful in retriev-

cause of a phone call from God. “If it had been collect, that would have been daring.” The actor also mentioned that he has been very warmly received by the community and thinks Red Hook is “real homey, in an opium kind of way.”

ing several of his golf balls, along with other random findings. Being the king of ad lib comedy, he entertained the crowds with his witty lines like, “f@$% the shrimp!” “So this is Hell. And there’s a crucifix in it,” and “PHENOMINAL COSMIC POWERS; itty-bitty living space.”

Nearby residents seemed baffled, yet unconcerned that golf balls shattered After two hours of swimming, Wilexterior windows and came bound- liams had covered more than a mile stretch of the Gowanus Canal. He fiing into their normal routine. nally emerged near Union and Nev“One day, my baby girl will treasure ins Streets shrieking, “This stuff is this ball with all her heart. Her black burning the hair off my feet!” eye and broken arm will heal, but this is something she can keep for- Hundreds of Smartphones had ever,” beamed Euphegina Doubtfire. caught thousands of photographs of “I hope she grows up to be just like the event. Executive director of the nearby medical clinic, Patch Adams Princess Jasmine!” found the encounter brave and inAnother local, Garp – who wished spiring. “Sometimes I stand upon my only to give his first name in fear he desk to remind myself that we must might be hunted for his prize ball – constantly look at things in a differ-

Page 10 Red Hook Star-Revue

ent way. I think that’s what Robin Williams taught us today.” Another witness disagreed, saying that this was probably just a publicity stunt by the actor voted “Least Likely to Succeed” by his high school graduating class. Thinking that maybe Williams still had something to prove, Armand Goldman announced, “What if Peter Pan grew up? He’d remember Hook being a lot bigger. To a ten year old, he’s huge.” Maxwell “Wizard” Wallace was on the fence about what motives drove this occurrence. “Even when you’re squeaky clean, you can fall in the mud. But no matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.” Media representatives for Williams, Jack Powell and Jack Monkier, seemed fairly unphased by the event. Monkier was hesitant to answer the Blue-Pencil’s questions claiming that “I used to think people were out to

get me. Now I know they are.” Powell simply replied to all of our inquiries with nonsensical rhymes warning of future threats to the area. “Every month at the quarter moon, there’ll be a monsoon in your lagoon.” Immediately after scouring himself in scalding hot bath water, Williams called a press conference. “There are three things you need in this world: respect for all kinds of life; a nice bowel movement on a regular basis; and a navy blazer,” he began. After offering condolences for the havoc he cause and the minor injuries, he thanked Brooklyn for their support and promised to return soon. “This has been the vacation I’ll never forget – no matter how hard I try.” He concluded his comedic appearance by noting that, “if there is a poop fairy, I can make lots of money.” Spokesperson, Sean Maguire declined to comment or return phone calls as of press time.

Blue Pencil Classifed Ads To place your own ad in our next issue, please go see a shrink because you are obviously out of your mind.

FOR SALE

All construction trucks on Van Brunt Street. 50 cents each. First come, first serve. OBO. Douchebag sign call Barry at Bait n’ Tackle. Used car. Needs minor repairs, three tires, extra steering wheel, no windshield. Comes with crowbar and owner’s manual. Formerly used to distribute RHSR. 748,000 miles. Must pay repo fees plus $49.95 shipping and handling. Dead tulips for sale. Must bring own pot. Contact bulbage@redhookstar.com Hope and ambition for sale. Must take as a set. Price: 2 cents OBO. Email realist@redhookstar.com Sisters for sale: Emily $5.00; Denna $3.00, Emily is costs

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more because she is bigger. Offer expires 4/27/2073. Email: middlechildsyndrome@ redhookstar.com 6 pairs of dirty gym sock. Makes lovely dining room table center piece. Excessively fragrant. Comes as set. $546. Contact: buymycrap@ redhookstar.com Three handed pencil sharpener for sale. Requires assistance to sharpen pencils.

WANTED

Star Revue seeks talented Janitor with long longevity. 92+ years experience; must own a plunger. Pay starting at 43 cents/hour DOE EOE email: worstjobintheworld@ redhookstar.com call (718) 624 -5568, ask for George. Seeking translator to transcribe complete Shakespearean works into Gibberish pays $1.30/wd contact jkljprmg@

rrolerz.crud for more info. One trained monkey equipped with cymbals to carry out ridiculous tasks. Must not be able to talk back. Interviews to be held at Star Theater Monday April 1st, 1-5 p.m. Introducing Happy Hour at Chase Bank. M-F 2:29 p.m. to 2:36 p.m. Free all you can drink stale cold decaf coffee all month long. Now hiring bartender with a bad attitude, funny smell and intolerable personality to work without compensation. Apply in person 24/7 at 101 Union Street. Garlic Wearing Vampire with own cross and memorabilia to sober up Star Revue staff. Desperately seeking for immediate hire. Lady Peter, South Brooklyn’s original psychic grants wishes, gives answers and spouts bullshit while looking at your hand.

January, 2013


New colorful maps step up NYC foot traffic by Nic Cavell

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he elevator pinged open. Director of Policy Jon Orcutt, slim and spectacled in rumpled office-wear, led a team of Department of Transportation (DOT) staff jostling and joking through the fifth story labyrinth of Prospect Park Residence. After stumbling blindly into the Community Board 6 meeting down the hall—now some four minutes late—the group didn’t wait long to steal the show with a presentation of the DOT’s new Pedestrian Wayfinding Initiative, which features an innovative mapping system whose first phase will be rolled out in four neighborhoods citywide in May. Orcutt tended his audience at a rapid clip with both facts and bon mots. He contrasted the city’s ubiquitous road signage for cars with a lack of guidance for pedestrians, which account for 31% of all trips made in New York. What does exist, he said, is a “cacophony of pedestrian information,” which shepherds commuters into unnecessary subway trips and sometimes away from business districts.

According to Orcutt, the new signage keeps thing simple. High-contrast white-on-black signs like those seen in the subway will designate kiosks on street corners in the selected districts. The full-color maps locations are identified on the grid, along with nearby subway stops, the range of street addresses for each block, and easy landmarks like the Brooklyn Bridge or the Empire State Building. The new system has been approved for use in Long Island City, Chinatown, parts of Midtown and, most locally, Prospect Heights and Crown Heights as part of the museum alliance, Heart of Brooklyn. In those destinations, as well as all future locations, maps will not include individual businesses and, following the recommendation of over 80% of those surveyed, are oriented “heads-up,” not “north-up”—the direction the kiosk is facing replaces north on traditional maps. Walking distances are given in minutes, in an effort to calibrate pedes-

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Add local media to your marketing plan. we will show you how advertising in The Red Hook Star-Revue can lead to increased profits. Call her today

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The creativity of this approach highlights the cobbled way in which the wayfinding initiative came together, including the way in which Orcutt and other DOT officials finagled finances for it. A mix of sources was used—elected It will be some time before Red Hook sees one of these council money, federal new outdoor maps. matching funds, and even However the initiative came together, the cash long bottled up by organiza- its popularity is undeniable. The 34th tions like the Heart of Brooklyn. The Street Partnership had fully implementlatter had hired consultants and was ed a signage system of its own, but easily deep in the pipeline developing its own agreed to take it off streets in exchange signage system before agreeing to terms for the DOT’s system. with the DOT. (continued on page 12)

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January, 2013 Page 11


A respectful goodbye for Celia by George Fiala

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elia Cacace, longtime neighborhood activist still insists in referring to her Carroll Gardens community as Red Hook. She was honored at Mama Maria’s restaurant on Sunday, January 13th. Cacace had been living in an apartment on 1st Place owned by her niece. Her niece is selling the building, forcing Celia to move. When she was unable to find affordable housing she decided to move to Wisconsin to live with her son. At the event she was all smiles and seemed excited to start a new life. She pledged to return for visits but multiple speakers insisted they would not accept her leaving. Leroy Branch of CB6 called her his second mother. Judge Alex Calabrese spoke movingly of her help in setting up the Justice Center back in the 1990’s. Daniel Squadron presented her with a proclamation from the City Council. Celia forced Squadron to erase the words “Carroll Gardens” and insert “Red Hook” instead. The crowd laughed at a representative from the borough president’s office because it was Marty Markowitz who refused to reappoint Celia as well as Jerry Armer - who was also at the party - to CB6. She accepted the proclamation anyway. Portside’s Carolina Salguero played a large part in planning the celebration. Salguero is a prize-winning photographer who documented 9/11. This day, she was seen flitting around the room documenting Celia’s party. Former Park’s Department head, Julius Spiegel got one of the big laughs when he appointed her “Bocce Queen of Brooklyn.” He then explained that back in the early 1980’s, Celia helped

DOT presents new signage system (continued from page 11)

In the days since the design for phase one was released in mid-January, the development has been a favorite with the press and business districts salivating at the thought of increased pedestrian traffic, said Orcutt, allowing himself an indulgent smile. He specified Coney Island and Jackson Heights as two neighborhoods jockeying to be included in phases two and three, which will be rolled out in late summer and fall, respectively. A mobile app for the mapping system is in development, one of what Orcutt said is a myriad of its possible permutations. Hotels and other businesses could use the app’s source code to tailor maps to shopping and attractions within their own districts. If the system proves successful, Orcutt hopes to see the MTA use it in their subway mezzanines.

Celia honored by (from left then clockwise) Marilyn Gelber, Leroy Branch, Brad lander, Craig Hammerman and Judge Alex Calabrese. Daniel Squadron can be seen standing behind Calabrese. get the bocce courts of Carroll Park refurbished, even though back then the Italian players refused to allow women to participate. Another good laugh came from Marilyn Gelber, who encountered Celia during her tenures with Borough President Howard Golden, NYC Department of City Planning and at her current position with the Brooklyn Community Foundation. Pointing out their equality in height, she recalled thinking of starting a society with Celia called the Short veiled at the same time as smart phone booths are appearing in increasing numbers around the city. The phone booths, which are equipped with wifi and other functions that can be used for orienting pedestrians, offer a counterpoint to the DOT project, and beg the question of whether or not the wayfinding system will be obsolete before it is fully implemented. After the meeting, a vibrant Orcutt said that while no one from Red Hook had

Female Activist Coalition. But the biggest laugh came when it was announced that Vincent Mazzone of the hardware store had made a nice donation in her honor. He said that it would have been ten times greater had she left years ago. Celia was famous for being outspoken, long winded with no problems at getting right to the point. Some might have disagreed with her positions, but CB6 Chairperson Daniel Kummer pointed

While many progressives were speaking of the good that a battered woman’s shelter would do anywhere but there, Celia spoke in favor of it. When asked why, she said that when it comes to choosing between good and the devil, you choose the good.

contacted the DOT about being included in a later phase of the initiative, it was still possible for business districts like those by the Columbia Waterfront and near Court Street to discuss with the DOT. He said interested business owners should contact him directly at (212) 839-6427. “It’s possible that Red Hook could be in phase two or three, yes. There and elsewhere, there are areas where at first glance, it may look daunting, it may

The DOT’s new Pedestrian Wayfinding Initiative is only in phase 1. Highcontrast white-on-black signs like those seen in the subway will designate kiosks on street corners in the selected districts. The full-color maps locations are identified on the grid, along with nearby subway stops, street addresses, and easy landmarks like the Brooklyn Bridge or the Empire State Building. System has been approved in Long Island City, Chinatown, parts of Midtown, and Prospect Heights and Crown Heights • Walking distances are given in minutes • Maps will be placed on biking docks’ kiosks making them bike-friendly • A mobile app is being developed for the system For more info visit www.dot.nyc.gov Interested business owners should contact Orcutt directly at (212) 839-6427 about being included in the rollout of later phases

The DOT’s new system is being un-

Page 12 Red Hook Star-Revue

out that Celia was often unpredictable. He had a recent encounter with Celia at a recent CB6 meeting dealing with the proposed West 9th Street homeless shelter. After pointing out that Celia was the only questioner permitted to go over three minutes, he recalled a similar battle back in 2003. At that time, a shelter for battered women was proposed for a Carroll Gardens brownstone.

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DOT’s Christopher Hrones watches the Wayfinder presentation at recent CB6 meeting. (photo by Cavell)

look like a hell-hole. But just a block away is a thriving commercial community,” Orcutt said, citing the example of Chinatown, which is largely unknown to be just three or four minutes from the Brooklyn Bridge. “Connecting communities—that’s what this is for,” he said.

January, 2013


On Kilimanjaro, one of Red Hook’s own (continued from page 1)

the items that are needed by firing the stove online—“Where’s my food? Can we get some mac n’ cheese?” When activists, reporters or representatives from other organizations knock on RHI’s door to ask how they “did it”—how the Initiative stemmed the inundating tide of Hurricane Sandy’s damage to the Houses, replacing it with the balm of food, medicine and other supplies, to national acclaim—Frances answers their questions. She regales them with stories while keeping an eye on “her kids,” or the more than 200 young people between middle school and their early twenties that RHI mentors and provides programming for on a daily basis. “I am the ‘Sandy Relief Person’,” Frances tells them. What she doesn’t often tell people is that her story has an arc of its own.

Geographically Inclined Above RHI’s lobby hangs the kind of thoughtful combination of caulking and insulation that precisely resembles a creampuff or a meringue. After briefly checking in with me on the concrete ground floor, Frances attends to point A and point B—two people between her and the metal-grated stairwell—before ascending the stairwell to finish point C—perhaps a phone call. When she returns, we buzz along another vector to the sole unoccupied office, following RHI’s ambiguous arrangement, which is down the back hallway. When Frances sits down, she begins. Frances grew up in Red Hook, and she grew up within limits. Red Hook; red tape. Finances, energy and strict lack of awareness of what lay in the rest of New York City severed entire boroughs from her during childhood. She spoke Spanish with her mother, whose ancestry is Puerto Rican, and conceived of life in Red Hook as merely normal. But as she grew into her teens, she started to understand more and more the reasons why people in the projects might, as she puts it, “victimize our situation” by choosing apathy over action. But a keen interest in emotional health and the influence of her own younger sister led her to reject that victimization. Following her sister, she became involved with the Red Hook Initiative the same year it began—2002—and looked not only into its services, but into the work she could do for others. RHI founder and co-president Jill Eisenhard immediately took an interest in the energetic 13-year-old. It was Jill who became, as Frances puts it, “not just a mentor, but a second mother.”

In high school, the hummingbird spread her wings to become more beautiful even as circumstances grew more terrible. Her father passed away, and her mother was diagnosed with cancer in quick succession. She continued to be a peer health counselor RHI and helped other students prepare their studies. She headed the yearbook staff at her high school and worked at New York University’s Elmer Holmes Bobst Library. She was still keenly interested in emotional health. But as she entered the phase of high school where the road gets blurry and then spits out eight forks ahead, Frances despaired. Perhaps she wasn’t meant for college after all—perhaps she should drop the books, drop the illusions and file straightaway for a minimum-wage job instead. In a time of personal crisis, Frances’ second mother stepped in the void. College, she said, was not one option, but “the only option.” She cited Frances’ “plan,” which all RHI youths use to

“Frances eyes’ dilated with a new cultural perception of her surroundings in New Orleans. In bars and on the streets, jazz players sussed out the blues, brass bands swayed and even tap dancers clacked against African beats. The experiences each year were unforgettable, and gave her a taste of what new cultures could be like.” organize life goals with their mentors. Frances’ plan was one imbued with Jill’s trademark: boldness. And for Frances, the RHI founder extended herself even further to realize that plan. She searched for colleges with Frances, pushed her to complete applications and write essays and finally to enroll at the University of Michigan (UM), an institution Frances hadn’t dreamed of attending. If Jill and RHI, as Frances says, birthed this opportunity for her, they also birthed in her the spirit of community action. At the University of Michigan, she executed her responsibilities like a student inspired—inspired not to let down Jill, RHI and the creampuff clouds of caulking and insulation of RHI’s ceiling—atop which she bounced into Ann Arbor. She played hopscotch between her academics and various student organizations. She was part of UM’s prestigious Order of Angell, maintained an average GPA

Red Hook Star-Revue

above 3.0 and managed to flit between entirely different geographic plateaus. In 2008, she forfeited her spring break and ventured south to New Orleans instead. While her classmates partied in exotic locales, Frances sorted debris left stagnant in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. She was a college freshman, and she loved it—rebuilding wood, plaster and the root materials of “community”—so much that she returned the following summer. Outside of New York and the pressure to perform in Ann Arbor, Frances eyes’ dilated with a new cultural perception of her surroundings in New Orleans. In bars and on the streets, jazz players sussed out the blues, brass bands swayed and even tap dancers clacked against African beats. The experiences each year were unforgettable, and gave her a taste of what new cultures could be like. So she played hop-scotch with grantwriting, applying to source after source of funding within the University of Michigan for a new dream she envisioned: two months abroad in Italy during summer holiday, where she could study Italian and nurse a passion she’d long bottled up: drawing, and “living the arts.” She wrote essays about eating pizza in Italy; she won $16,000 dollars in funding. She walked Italian piazzas and art events—only the free ones, because Italy is expensive—and visited other cities with her program. Then, she got stranded.

pushed Frances to apply for a spot with the Kilimanjaro Initiative, which offers four young people with outstanding leadership records a fully funded opportunity to climb Mt. Kilimanjaro and see KI’s work in Kenyan village communities. Seated at the helm of RHI’s communications center during RHI’s Sandy Relief efforts, Frances forgot about her application. But KI didn’t; they accepted her. Now, along with just three other New Yorkers, she’s bought climbing gear and a plane ticket. “I’m literally climbing a mountain— climbing another milestone. I have no idea what to expect. But I am so happy this opportunity is falling into my lap,” she says, smiling at more than serendipity.

Indra’s Net At University of Michigan, Frances’ first major was sociology, the first class of which she took on a hunch. “Sociology 101 – The Study of Sexuality” marked the first time she’d ever encountered the idea of five different sexes. She took more sociology classes, which introduced her to the roving positions and roles taken by the members that in turn make up a community. She learned the frameworks and the vectors along which effective community action might take. She learned better writing, which would go far in her later grant applications, and she learned more about her own interest: “There was a definite trend that I was interested in community,” she says.

When Frances missed her plane back from Italy, she didn’t have the cash to buy another ticket. Michigan had reduced her grant award by $4,000 at the last moment, eviscerating the careful architecture Frances had put in place for her trip. She had no relative to bail her out with hundreds via Western Union.

It’s this skill for community organization—this mathematically precise intuition about how it can be most effective—that Frances recognizes as her vector to interaction with the other young people accepted into the threeweek program. And she believes she’ll fit in well.

RHI, which even since high school had been Frances’ “place to get grounded,” brought the hummingbird back along a red vector to the Hook. Getting lost in Italy wasn’t part of Frances’ “plan;” but a free ride wasn’t either. Within months, and on principle, Frances repaid Jill every dime she borrowed for the ticket. Now, Jill has sent Frances off to explore another vector leading to Africa. Sometime last fall—before the maelstrom of need left by Hurricane Sandy—she

“The dynamic of the group going is amazing—we have an artist who’s 18, who does murals in New York and also music, beats and raps. It’s his first trip abroad. We have a current university student who’s just starting to branch out. We have a grad student who brings expertise and has done research before. Really—I can’t wait to watch everything collide and intersect,” Frances

www.RedHookStar.com

(continued on page 15)

January, 2013 Page 13


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

(send yours to editor@redhookstar.com)

Give Red Hook some juice!

It is a shame that the subway station at Smith and Ninth street is going to be delayed for at least another year and our local politicians are doing nothing - council, senators, chamber of commerce, community boards. Incompetent contractors were sighted as the cause. A lame excuse, let me tell you when the escalator at Lexington and East 53rd street has to be done over, the contractors were given an incentive to complete it on or if not ahead of time and it was done. Why? Because it’s the f---ing Eastside of New York , not Red Hook or Gowanus, both Smith/Ninth street and Fourth Ave F /G stations are just a disgrace. I ask that you put some of the power of the press on the powers that be in getting this done in a somewhat more timely fashion. Gowanus and Red Hook are the new Williamburgs, don’t you know! TOM J. FAGAN GOWANUS NY.

I thought maybe he was a member of the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, since he obviously had excellent knowledge of pier construction. But I really was unable to conclude just why the writer carried these intense feelings about what a stretch of roadway should or should not be called. He did admit however that while your paper is referring to the location incorrectly, He really is not sure what it should be called. I will offer for his benefit and for the enlightenment of others, that as a youngster playing stickball in the early 1940’s we kids called the area in question simply The Long Dock. It was always the long dock no matter what type of support was used to construct it, we never cared what was under so long as we could reach home plate safely after we hit the ball. JJ Burkard, redhookhistory@aol.com

GOLFERS HELP RED HOOK BUSINESSES

Brooklyn Crab, 24 Reed Street, hosted a fundraiser on Saturday, January 5th. From noon to four a miniature golf tournament was held on their backyard course. Co-sponsored by a beer company, $10 got one a large mug of craft beer and a round of golf. The $10 was donated to ReStore Red Hook, the organization set up for the benefit of Red Hook businesses that suffered losses from the hurricane. The goal is to maintain the growing business community of Red Hook without major changed. Saturday turned out to be a bright sunny day which helped keep scores down and spirits up!

If it looks like a dock

Dear Editor - On a letter in last Dec 16 issue of the Red Hook Star, a reader went through a great deal of trouble to educate us into the correct terminology of what to call a shipping pier...I’m not exactly sure why, but he seemed to take issue with this paper referring to a southern section of Columbia Street being identified as a pier in an article. He outlined many different types of construction which would effectively cause a pier structure to be called a pier.

We are across from Coffey Park (718) 923-9880

Page 14 Red Hook Star-Revue

www.RedHookStar.com

January, 2013


Frances Medina (continued from page 13)

says, adding that six Kenyans, similarly aged, will join the group along with the instructors. When she walks through Kenyan villages, when she interacts with both countries’ young leaders, Frances promises she’ll be “processing, as a sociologist, all my interactions.” In a country so different—so rich with culture, yet so poor, monetarily—she wonders if she’ll have an epiphany of the same sort that brought her knocking at RHI.

after a strong iced coffee from Baked; it is orchestrated. “I love the kids, but transitioning into RHI’s development aspect is a priority for me. I could work in anything here, say in college retention. But I would work ten times as hard to get this organization running at its best and to get it the money it needs to go on,” she says. “If you have the skill set to keep the organization running, you have to use that skill set!” And so, when Frances returns from Kilimanjaro, her superchiasmatic monitoring of the Red Hook’s circadian rhythms

will be nested with a job title at RHI, perhaps “Development Consultant.” Before then, she has just three weeks to get used to this idea amid the tumult of a new setting.

sents the “best gift,” as she called it on her Twitter feed. On the same feed, less than two months previous, she posted a quote by Anaïs Nin, an author whose heritage was also twined with Puerto Rico:

“I’m just ready to breathe and enjoy other people,” she laughs, a hummingbird whose nectar is community.

“And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom.”

She has three weeks, and a final gift from Jill. As Frances packed to leave RHI on the Thursday before her trip, Jill handed her a set of notes wrapped in brown paper. For each day, she will unwrap one note from the sheaf. For Frances, Jill’s continued advice repre-

“I have no climbing experience whatsoever,” Frances says back in the office, her eyes looking a red vector at the sandy brown boots the Kilimanjaro Initiative bought for her. She’s laced them with purple strings. This isn’t her office. She leans back in the chair and grins.

“In the projects, we’re prone to victimize our situation. But Kenya won’t be like the projects. Those people have a lot less, and I don’t know what to expect.” A few things are certain. When Frances returns, she’ll put on a photo exhibit of her trip with a New York arts organization, FOKUS (Fighting Obstacles Knowing Ultimate Success), with which she’s worked in the past. And along with the other New Yorkers going to Kenya, she’ll make a documentary of her experience there. From there, things become more tangential. She wants to start an arts experiment at RHI, working with her kids to channel their artistic energies into projects like their own documentaries. She wants to write about her time in Kenya. As a sociologist, she wants to calibrate her understanding of Red Hook with what she finds in Kenyan communities—to optimize her algorithm for the different vectors in play at home.

“We need you” Last year, after graduating from Michigan, Frances tested her limits by working for a number of organizations simultaneously—the Sadie Nash Leadership Project, Los Pleneros de la 21 and, of course RHI. With the hurricane approaching, however, she knew it was time to consolidate her energy. Even before Sandy struck, she dropped these other obligations and began working full-time in the RHI hub directing donations, communications and human resources. Along with Jill and the other RHI staff, she gave extra energy to make sure all of RHI’s normal programming for kids remained available. Her position, just as before, was listed as part-time. When she comes back from Kenya, Frances wants to keep working with the kids, namely through the arts project she envisions as an offshoot of her photo and documentary exhibitions. But after so much prodding from Jill to apply to college, go to college; apply to Kenya, go to Kenya—and after so much pinball through the sociology offerings of Michigan and RHI’s own organizational structure—Frances has a plan of her own. And after seeing, repeatedly, Frances’ organizational alacrity and poise in the wake of Sandy, Jill was ready to accept that plan. “We need you,” was all she said when she gave Frances a full-time job offer. For the bystander or visitor in RHI’s community center, Frances’ activity must seem frenetic. But her energy transcends the flurry that descends on her

Red Hook Star-Revue

www.RedHookStar.com

January, 2013 Page 15


Star-Revue

Guide to area restaurants

Carroll Gardens/ Red Hook BAKED 359 Van Brunt St., (718)222-0345. THE BROOKLYN ICE HOUSE 318 Van Cobble Hill Brunt St., (718) 222-1865. BOTANICA 220 Conover St (at Coffey St), (347) 225-0147. DEFONTE’S SANDWICH SHOP 379 Columbia St., (718) 855-6982. DIEGO’S RESTAURANT 116 Sullivan St., (718) 625-1616. F&M BAGELS 383 Van Brunt St., (718) 855-2623. FORT DEFIANCE 365 Van Brunt St., (347) 453-6672. THE GOOD FORK 391 Van Brunt St., (718) 643-6636. HOME/MADE 293 Van Brunt St., (347) 223-4135. HOPE & ANCHOR 347 Van Brunt St., (718) 237-0276. IKEA One Beard St., (718) 246-4532. JOHN & FRANKS, 367 Columbia Street, (718) 797-4467 KEVIN’S 277 Van Brunt St., (718) 5968335. MARK’S PIZZA 326 Van Brunt St., (718) 624-0690. NEW LIN’S GARDEN RESTAURANT 590 Clinton Street, (718) 399-1166 RED HOOK LOBSTER POUND 284 Van Brunt St., (646) 326-7650. ROCKY SULLIVAN’S 34 Van Dyke St., (718) 246-8050. STEVE’S AUTHENTIC KEY LIME PIE, 204 Van Dyke St, (718) 852-6018 SUNNY’S BAR IN RED HOOK, 253 Conover Street, (718) 625-8211

Columbia Waterfront District

ALMA 187 Columbia St., (718) 643-5400. BAGEL BOY CAFE 75 Hamilton Avenext to Chase, (718) 855-0500. CALEXICO CARNE ASADA 122 Union St., (718) 488-8226. CASA DI CAMPAGNA 117 Columbia Street (718) 237-4300. CASELNOVA 214 Columbia St., (718) 522-7500. FERNANDO’S FOCACCERIA RESTAURANT 151 Union St., (718)855-1545. HOUSE OF PIZZA & CALZONES 132 Union St., (718) 624-9107. JAKE’S BAR-B-QUE RESTAURANT 189 Columbia St., (718) 522-4531. KOTOBUKI BISTRO 192 Columbia St., (718) 246-7980. LILLA CAFE 126 Union St., (718) 8555700. MAZZAT 208 Columbia St., (718) 8521652. PETITE CREVETTE 144 Union St., (718) 855-2632. TEEDA THAI CUISINE 218 Columbia St., (718) 643-2737.

ABILENE, 442 Court Street, 718-5226900, ANGRY WADES, 222 Smith Street, (718) 488-7253 BACCHUS, 409 Atlantic, (718) 852-1572 BAR BRUNO, 520 Henry St., 347-7630850, BAGELS BY THE PARK, 323 Smith Street, (718) 246-1321 BAR GREAT HARRY, 280 Smith Street (718) 222-1103 BOMBAY DREAM, 257 Smith Street (718) 237-6490 BOURGEOIS PIG, 387 Court Street, (718) 858-5483 BROOKLYN BREAD CAFE, 436 Court Street (718) 403-0234 BUDDY’S BURRITO & TACO BAR, 260 Court Street, 718-488-8695, BUTTERMILK CHANNEL, 524 Court Street (718) 852-8490 CASA ROSA, 384 Court Street, 718-7971907 CHESTNUT, 271 Smith St., (718) 2430049 COBBLE GRILL, 212 Degraw Street, (718) 422-0099 COBBLE HILL COFFEE SHOP, 314 Court Street, (718) 852-1162 CODY’S ALE HOUSE GRILL, 154 Court Street, 718-852,6115 COURT STREET GROCERS, 485 Court Street, (718) 722-7229 CRAVE, 570 Henry Street, (718) 643-0361 CUBANA CAFE, 272 Smith Street (718) 718-858-3980 DOWNTOWN BAR & GRILL, 160 Court street, 718-625-2835 DUBUQUE, 548 Court Street, (718) 5963248 EM THAI KITCHEN, 278 Smith Street, (718) 834-0511 ENOTICA ON COURT, 347 Court Street, (718) 243-1000 F LINE BAGELS, 476 Smith Street (718) 422-0001 FIVE GUYS, 266 Court St., 347-799-2902 FRAGOLE, 394 Court Street, (718) 6227133 FRANCESCO’S RESTAURANT, 531 Henry Street, (718) 834-0863 FRANK’S LUNCHEONETTE, 365 Smith Street, (718) 875-5449 GHANG, 229 Court Street, 718-875-1369 GOWANUS YACHT CLUB, 323 Smith Street, (718) 246-132,Closed til spring HANA CAFE, 235 Smith Street, (718) 643-1963 LE PETITE CAFE, 502 Court street, 718596-7060 LING LING YOUNG, 508 Henry Street, (718) 260-9095 MARCO POLO RISTORANTE, 345 Court Street, 718 852-5015 MAMA MARIA’S RESTAURANT, 307 Court Street, (718) 246-2601

MEZCALS Restaurant, 522 Court Street, 718-783-3276 NATURES GRILL, 138 Court street, 718852,5100, NINE-D, 462 Court Street, 718-488-8998, OAXACA TACOS, 251 Smith Street (718) 222-1122 OSACA RESTAURANT, 272 Court Street (718) 643-0055 P J HANLEYS, 449 Court St, 718- 843-8223 PALO CORTADO, 520 Court St, 718407-0047 PRIME MEATS, 465 Court Street, 718254-0327 or 0345, PALMYRA, 316 Court street, 718-7971110 RED ROSE RESTAURANT, 315 Smith Street, (718) 625-0963 SALS PIZZA, 305 Court Street, (718) 852-6890 SAM’S RESTAURANT, 238 Court Street, 718-596-3458 SOUL SPOT 302 Atlantic Ave 718 5969933 SAVOIA, 277 Smith Street, 718-797-2727 SEERSUCKER RESTAURANT, 329 Smith Street, (718) 422-0444

SMITH & VINE, 268 Smith Street (718) 243-2864 SOUTH BROOKLYN PIZZA, 451 Court Street, 718 852-6018 STINKY BROOKLYN, 261 Smith Street, 718 522-7425 SWEET MELISSA, 276 Court Street, (718) 855-3410 TRIPOLI, 156 Atlantic Ave, 718 596-5800 VINNY’S OF CARROLL GARDENS, 295 Smith Street, 718 875-5600 VINNY’S PIZZERIA, 455 Court Street, 718 596-9342 VINO Y TAPAS, 520 Court Street, 718407-0047 VINZEE’S, 412 Court Street, 718 855 1401 ZAYTOONS, 283 Smith Street, 718 875-1880

Gowanus

MICHAEL AND PINGS, 437 Third Avenue, (718) 788-0017 COTTA BENE PIZZA, 291 3rd Ave, 718 722-7200 LITTLENECKS, 288 3rd Ave., (718) 522-1921 CANAL BAR, 270 3rd Ave, (718) 246-0011

Hours: Noon to 10:30 pm Tues. to Thurs. Noon to 11pm Friday. 4pm to 11pm Saturday & 4pm to 10:30pm Sunday.

Page 16 Red Hook Star-Revue

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January, 2013


Jalopy’s stage fills with Bushwick Gospel Singers by Eric Ruff

W

ith Jalopy’s proscenium colorfully lit and the congregation of the faithful seated in their pews, the Bushwick Gospel Singers mill about the stage, tuning instruments and engaging in cheerful banter. The lights dim, everyone’s in their place and six voices rise up in pure acapella harmonies that can make the sun rise and quell storms at sea. And gently, for the moment, we’re off on the spiritual journey of the Church of Ultimate Knowing.

The moment doesn’t last. And then the Reverend says “Put your Hands together!” From there on in it is a wonderful sleigh ride through the lighter side of the darkness in the American psyche. With “Hallelujahs” and “Praise The Lords,” the Reverend Pastor Phallasy (Phill Allison) exhorts, cajoles and wheedles us to throw off the shackles of American corporate domination, eschew the trappings of standard religion, and embrace the post apocalyptic doctrine of caring, sharing, forbearance and our (now) digital realities. “Eat the Body! Drink the Blood! Sign up! And Log in!” And while so much of it is a poke at modern day Christianity, it is really a call to get back to the basics of human fellowship.

“The music is a rambled, shambling, cobbled together mixture of bluegrass, country and gospel all held together by a powerful narrative, great instrumental background, and beautiful singing” a powerful narrative, great instrumental background, and beautiful singing that is both innovative and culturally satisfying. They evoke a time when people sweated in tents to praise their Lord. With Zoe Stampfel on djembe, the beat is primal and compelling. Top photo of Bushwick Gospel Singers taken at Jalopy; on the bottom as they appeared Michael Leuis on guitar supplies the searing quality of unbridled rock ‘n at the Star-Revue theater on New Year’s Eve (photos by Ruff). roll, while Brandon Wisecarver, the masked bassman, thumps out foot stomping fundament. Alex Kramer weilds the banjo accompaniment. Erin Pellnat, Thompson B. Crozier Phill Allison, John Kessel, Molly Dechenne and Zoe Stampfel raise their voices together and can sound as heavenly as the Mormon Tabernacle choir. When all is said and done, you walk out of the gathering with melodies on your mind, a spring in your step and warmth in your heart. It’s a good time for the modern day psychologically downtrodden. The Bushwick Gospel Singers next appear Jan. 30th, 10 pm at The Comedy Bar,134 W. 29th Street in NYC. They maintain both a website and Facebook page

The music is a rambled, shambling, cobbled together mixture of bluegrass, country and gospel all held together by

UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY INVITES PUBLIC COMMENT ON THE PROPOSED PLAN FOR THE GOWANUS CANAL SUPERFUND SITE BROOKLYN, NEW YORK

The

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announces the opening of a comment period on the Proposed Plan and preferred cleanup alternative to address contamination at the Gowanus Canal Superfund site in Brooklyn, Kings County, New York. EPA will accept public comments on this proposed plan until March 28, 2013. As part of the public comment period, EPA will hold two public meetings on the Proposed Plan for the Gowanus Canal Superfund site. The first meeting will be held on Wednesday, January 23 at 7:00 PM at the Carroll School (P.S. 58) located at 330 Smith Street, Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn. The second meeting will be held on Thursday, January 24, 2013 at the Joseph Miccio Community Center, 110 West 9th Street, Red Hook, Brooklyn. To learn more about the meetings you can contact Natalie Loney, EPA=s Community Involvement Coordinator, at 212-637-3639 or 1-800-346-5009 or visit our website at www.epa.gov/region2/superfund/npl/gowanus.

Red Hook StarªRevue SOUTH BROOKLYN’S COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

EPA recently concluded a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the site to assess the nature and extent of contamination and to evaluate cleanup alternatives for the site. Based upon the results of this RI/FS, EPA has prepared a Proposed Plan which describes the findings of the remedial investigation and also provides the rationale for recommending the preferred cleanup alternative. The preferred cleanup alternatives to address contamination at the Gowanus Canal Superfund site consist of:  Dredging approximately 300,000 cubic yards of contaminated sediment from the upper and middle portions of the Canal and stabilizing the remaining contaminated native sediments with concrete or similar materials  Placing a three layer cap on the stabilized areas in the upper and middle portion of the Canal  Dredging approximately 280,000 cubic yards of contaminated sediment from the lower portion of the Canal and placing two layer cap over the dredged areas.  Removing contaminated fill from the 1st Street Turning Basin  Transporting the contaminated sediment to an off-site permitted facility  Source controls for contaminated upland properties and Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs) The Proposed Plan and other site-related documents are available for public review at the following locations: Joseph Miccio Community Center: 110 West 9th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11231; 718-243-1528; Hours: 9AM – 9PM Carroll Gardens Library: 396 Clinton Street, Brooklyn, NY 11231; 718-596-6972; Hours: M, Th, F:10AM - 6 PM; T:1PM - 8PM; W:10AM- 8PM; Sa:10AM - 5PM USEPA Region 2: Superfund Records Center, 290 Broadway, 18th Floor, New York, NY 10007, 212- 637-4308 Hours: Mon. - Fri., 9am - 5pm Or you can access them at:

member

www.epa.gov/region02/superfund/npl/gowanus/

EPA relies on public input to ensure that the selected remedy for each Superfund site meets the needs and concerns of the local community. It is important to note that although EPA has identified a preferred cleanup alternative for the site, no final decision will be made until EPA has considered all public comments received during the public comment period. EPA will summarize these comments along with EPA=s responses in a Responsiveness Summary, which will be included in the Administrative Record file as part of the Record of Decision. Written comments and questions regarding the Gowanus Canal Superfund site, postmarked no later than March 28, 2013 may be sent to: Christos Tsiamis, Remedial Project Manager U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 290 Broadway, 20th Floor New York, New York 10007-1866 FAX: (212) 637-4257 E-mail: GowanusCanalComments.Region2@epa.gov

Red Hook Star-Revue

@RedHookStar

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January, 2013 Page 17


Art & Community Calendar If you have an event you would like listed in the Red Hook Star-Revue calendar, please email redhookstarcalendar@ gmail.com.

bia St. (Union/Sackett) (718) 596-6231 brooklyncollective.com Gallery hrs. Thur. - Sun 1pm-8pm through 8/31 New Collections of Local Artists FREE.

CHILDREN

Brooklyn Waterfront Artists Coalition 499 Van Brunt St. (718) 596-2506 bwac. org Open every Sat. & Sun 1-6pm WHAT IS COLOR: A Juried Art Show:

Bethel Baptist Day Care Center 242 Hoyt St. (718) 834-9292 ACD funded Early Childhood Education Programs, Family Services, and Day Care Services for the Gowanus Community. Call for more info. Kentler International Drawing Space—353 Van Brunt St. (718) 8752098, kentlergallery.org FREE Weekend Art Workshops for Families. Ages 4 & up. Every 1st & 3rd Sat. Noon-1:30pm register in advance: sallie@kentlergallery.org Who’s On First? 46 1st Place, Clinton/ Henry (718) 243-1432 whosonfirstkids. com A nuturing and supportive environment focusing on self esteem, problem solving, socialization, conflict resolution and free expression through art, music and creative movement. For children “from birth to 7 yrs. Fall schedule begins 9/17.

CHURCH/ SYNAGOGUE

Kane St. Synagogue 236 Kane St. (718) 875-1530 kanestreet.org Torah Study every 2nd Shabbat of the Month 11amNoon. Every Fri. &/or Tues. St. Stephen’s R.C. 108 Carroll St. (718) 596-7750 delvecchiorc.com & brooklyncatholic.blogspot.com Every Wed. 6:30pm Choir rehearsal, if interested contact jlake@delvechiorc.com or evelyntroester@gmx.net Visitation of Our Blessed Virgin Mary R.C. 98 Richards @Verona (718) 6241572 Every Thurs. 6pm Choir Practice w/ Emiliana In-Home Blessings and Masses, by appointment. Languages available: English, Spanish, Italian, German. Contact: Lori Burkhard at (917) 9715522. Fri, 1/18-Sun. 1/20 Marriage Encounter Weekend @Jesus of Nazareth Retreat Center, 475 E 57 St. Brooklyn. $200 per couple. Contact Deacon Leroy & Norma Branch @ (917) 496-4221.

CLASSES/ WORKSHOPS

Brooklyn Collective Gallery 212 Columbia St. (Union/Sackett) (718) 596-6231 brooklyncollective.com. Gallery Hours: Thur.- Sun. 11am-8pm, Over 40 Artists on Exhibit through January. Sat. 1/12 & 1/19 1-4pm Pattern Making for Soft Sculpture $135, inclusive. Brooklyn General—128 Union St. (718) 237-7753 brooklyngeneral.com Classes and Workshops for all things Sewing. Call or contact their website for more info. Carroll Gardens Association 201 Columbia St. Sackett/Degraw (718) 243-9301 carrollgardensassociation.com FREE Computer Training Program Mon. 1/7Tues 2/26 5:30-7:30pm Every Mon. & Tues. Fax (718) 243-9304 or info@carrollgardensassociation.com for registration. Cora Dance 201 Richards St. (Coffey St./Van Dyke St.) #15 (718) 858-2520 coradance.org Tue. Zumba 6-7pm, Thurs. 7:15-8:15pm Yoga. Sat 9:3010:30pm Zumba. Jalopy Theatre and School of Music 315 Columbia St. (718) 395-3214, jalopy. biz Sat 1/12 2pm The Modern Banjo Workshop w/Jayme Stone $50. Sun 1/20 Noon. Vocal Harmony Basics $20. 2pm Vocal Harmony Duos & Trios $25. Both $40. Sat. 1/26 3pm Balkan Singing Workshop w/Carol Freeman $25. Sun 1/27 1pm Country Harmony I w/Val Mindel $25. 3pm Country Harmony II w/Val Mindel $25. Yoga Classes 201 Richards St. #15 www.tessamwright.com /yoga. Join Tessa with morning yoga for everyone! Hatha style style for all levels. Mondays @10am. Suggested donation - $10.

Galleries

440 Gallery 440 6th Ave. (Park Slope) (718) 499-3844, 440gallery.com Gallery hrs. - Thurs., Fri. 4-7pm, Sat., Sun. 11am - 7pm, or by appointment. Thu.01/10 2/17 The Work of Gail Flanery. Sun.1/20 4:40pm Young Artists @ 440: Make New Art From Old. Sun 1/27 4:40pm Visual Thinking Strategies: Amy Chase Gulden. Brooklyn Collective Gallery 212 Colum-

Page 18 Red Hook Star-Revue

Falconworks Kidd Studio 135 Richards St. (718) 395-3218 falconworks.com redhooktheater.org Fri. 1/25 7pm, Sat. 1/26 3pm Off The Hook: Original Plays by Red Hook Kids @ P.S. 15 71 Sullivan St,. FREE. For more info: (718) 3953218. Look North Inuit Art Gallery—275 Conover St. Suite 4E, (347) 721-3995, looknorthny.com Polar Light: Greenland. The Greenland photography of Rena Bass Forman and the Greenland drawings of Zaria Forman. A climate change awareness exhibition held in conjunction with Al Gore’s “The Climate Project”. Sweet Lorraine Gallery 183 Lorraine St. (Clinton & Court St) (347) 409-8957 screwballspaces.com, fernbar@yahoo. com Through 1/27 SPORAD: New Lifeforms by Keithy McMenamy. Sat. 12 5-8pm Opening Party for SPORAD. Sunny’s Bar Backroom 253 Conover St. (Beard/Reed St.) (718) 625-8211 sunnysredhook.com & Sunny’s Bar on facebook. Open Wed, Fri, and Sat 8pm-4am.

MUSEUMS

The Invisible Dog 51 Bergen St. (347) 561-3641 theinvisibledog.org Through 2/7 Camden: Photo Exhibit by JeanChristian Bourcart FREE. 1/10, 11,14 7:30pm, 1/13 5pm Sacre: Dance by David Wampach. US Debut. FREE. Sun 1/13 3pm Ready to Kiss: Dance by Olivier Dubois Free. Thu. 1/24-26 7:30pm The Daedalus Effect & Other Dilemmas: Dance by Arturo Vidich Micro Museum—123 Smith Street, (718) 797-3116 micromuseum.com . Above and Beyond, a three-year retrospective of the art of William and Kathleen Laziza, every Saturday from 12-7pm, refreshments from 5-7pm, Evenings 5-10pm Through 3/3 Inside Out FREE.Sats. through 3/2 Lucky 8s, 7s, 6s Admission by donation, suggested donation $2. Say you like “Red-Hook Star Revue” and get a free gift bag. The Waterfront Museum Lehigh Valley Barge No.79, 290 Conover Street. (718) 624-4719 ext. 11 www.waterfrontmuseum.org. Free boat tours & open hours all through the year. Thursdays 4 - 8 pm and Saturdays 1 - 5 pm. Juggling For Fun Wkshp. Call (718) 624-4719 x.11 David Sharps. Hurricane Sandy: a Photo Exhibit.

MUSIC

Bait & Tackle 320 Van Brunt Street (718) 451-4665 redhookbaitandtackle.com No Cover, All shows start @ 9pm, unless otherwise noted. Fri. 1/11 Jan Bell $ The Maybelles. Sat 1/12 AVO. Fri. 1/18 41 Players. Sat. 1/19 Mike Cobb and The Crevulators. Fri. 1/25 Willy Gantrim and The Suitcase Junket. Sat 1/26 Ramblin’ Andy and Marcus Ricci. Grace & Spiritus Chorale of Brooklyn 354 Hicks St. (718) 707-1411 graceandspiritus.org Performing Coronation Mass, Mozart; Missa Brevis, Helen Watson Henderson; The Congolese Missa Luba w/Dancers & Drums. Fri. 1/25 7pm @ All Saints Church 286-88 7th Ave.@ 7th St., Sat. 1/26 7pm Lafayette Presbyterian Church @ 85 S Oxford St., Sun. 1/27 4pm St. Ann’s Church @ 157 Montague St., Clinton/HenrySt. Hope & Anchor 347 Van Brunt St.(718) 237-0276. Every Wed. 7pm, Jazz Jam w/The H & A House Band! Every Thurs. through Sat. from 9pm-1am Karaoke. Issue Project Room @110 Livingston St. (718) 330-0 313 issueprojectroom. org Tue. 1/15 8pm Keith Rowe: Duos w/Michael Pisaro & Graham Lambkin @ TEMP 57 Walker St. NYC. Donation. Wed. 1/16 8pm Keith Rowe & Christian Wolff @ TEMP 57 Walker St. NYC Jalopy Theatre and School of Music 315 Columbia St., (718) 395-3214 jalopy.biz. Every Wed. 9pm Roots & Ruckus w/Feral Foster FREE. Thu. 1/10 9pm Ververitse Brass Band w/ QUE VLO-VE $10. Fri. 1/11 8pm The Carter Family Project FREE. Sat. 1/12 9pm Jayme Stone World of Wonders $10. Sun. 1/13 8pm Julie Holland $15. Thu. 1/17 9 & 11pm Sheesham & Lotus & Son : Twosets for $10. Fri. 1/18 8pm The Bushwick Gos-

pel Choir, Peter Stampfel & The Ether Frolic Mob $10. Sat. 1/19 3pm Harry Bolick Old Time Open Jam, FREE. 9pm NYC Barn Dance $13 adv. $15 dos. Sun. 1/20 8pm Jolie Holland $15. Thu. 1/24 8pm Apoalypse Five & Dime, Cirkestra, Sweet Soubrette $10. Fri. 1/25 8pm The 6th Annual John Hartford Tribute feat. Danny Weiss, Tony Trishka, The Whistlin’ Wolves & many others $15. Sat. 1/26 8pm Triboro, Millers Crossing $10. Sun. 1/27 Jolie Holland $15. Tue. 1/29 8:30pm The Intergenerational Songs of the Earth Guitar Trio $10. Thu. 1/31 8pm The Johnson Girls, Geoff Kaufman, Jordan Shapiro: An Evening of Sea Music $10. Montero’s Bar 73 Atlantic Ave. (718) 534-6399 monteros-bar@facebook.com Karaoke w/Amethyst and the beautiful Andy at the bar. every Fri. & Sat. 10pm. Every Wed. after. 8pm - Midnight. The raucous musical concoctions of The Red Hook Irregulars. All Acoustic. Guest Players invited. FREE. Rocky Sullivan’s—34 Van Dyke St., (718) 246-8050. No Cover Every Mon, Tues, Wed 8pm Live Irish Music Every Last Wed 8pm Readings By Authors.Every. Thurs. 9pm Rocky’s World Famous Pub Quiz. The Star Theater Acoustic Jam & Hootenanny 101 Union St. ( Columbia / Van Brunt) (718) 624-5568 Every Monday Night 8pm. C&W to Jazz (with a healthy dose of Blues in the middle). Bring your Axe & Your Favorite Beverage!

PUBLIC MEETINGS

Brooklyn Greenway Initiative 153 Columbia St.(Kane/Degraw) (718) 5220913 brooklyngreenway.org The Ceramic Arts of Kathryn Robinson-Miller. 30% of the proceeds will go to support BGI’s work. Sat. 1/12 10am - Noon Columbia St. Greenway Clean-up: tools & gloves provided. Brooklyn Public Library - Carroll Gardens 396 Clinton St. @ Union St. (718) 5966972 brooklynpubliclibrary.org/locations/ carroll-gardens Tue. 1/8 3-5am English Conversation Class,1/8-10 15,16 22-25, 29-31 10am Senior Wellness Program.

TASTINGS

Botanica—220 Conover St (@ Coffey St) 347-225-0147. New cocktails, specialty liquors & Exotic Chocolates featuring Cacao Prieto Chocolate. Sat-Sun: Afternoon cocktails. Now Open!! Dry Dock Wine & Spirits 424 Van Brunt St. (718) 852-3625 drydockny.com ALL TASTINGS ARE FREE! Fri. 1/11 5:308:30pm Red, White & Rose. Sat 1/12 4-7pm Whiskey: Locally produced spirits. Fri 1/18 5:30-8:30pm Whites: Italian

& Austrian. Sat 1/26 4-7pm Canadian & Oregon Wines. MicNik Lounge 200 Columbia St. (917) 770-1984 ‘Rebel! Rebel!’ (Gay Night) every First & Third Thurs. 9pm - 2am Cheap Beer, $6 well drinks, friendly crowd.

WALKING TOURS

A Tour grows in Brooklyn 1212 64th St.(212) 209-3370 brooklynwalkingtour. com A historical walking tour of Brownstone Brooklyn featuring the childhood home of Al Capone, the history of the Williamsburg Bank, and the Revolutionary War battle site The Old Stone House. Real Brooklyn Pizza Lunch included. Daily 10am-1pm, $40 Urban Oyster (347) 618-TOUR (8687) urbanoyster.com Every Sat.Noon-3:30, Brewed in Brooklyn Tour (Williamsburg) $60 Adv. sales only. Every Sat. Brewing, Bottling, & bootlegging in historic Williamsburg. Samples, pizza and fresh lager lunch included. $65, adv. sales only. Every Sat. & Sun Navy Yard Full Tour 2:30-4:30pm.$30, adv sales only.

Great local music at the Bell House!

The Star Theater Electric Jam 101 Union St., (Columbia / Van Brunt )Every Thur. Night 8pm Hard rock, Jazz, Blues. Full Back Line. Refreshments provided. Donations accepted. Sunny’s Bar 253 Conover St. (Beard/ Reed St.) (718) 625-8211 sunnysredhook.com & Sunny’s Bar on Facebook. Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays, live local roots music.. Every Sat. 10pm Bluegrass/Folk Country Jam. Union Hall 702 Union Street @5th Ave (718) 638-4400 unionhallny.com Every Sun. 7:30pm Pretty Good Friends. Comedy host by Eugene Mirman $7. Every Fri. Midnight Karaoke Killed The Cat FREE. Every Sat. 11pm CRAZY $INCE DA 90$ FREE.

The Bell House

Doll Parts

PENDULUM SWINGS / HEELS ON FIRE / THE DEBUTANTE HOUR Thursday, Feb 21, 2013 8:00 PM (7:30 PM Doors) The Bell House, Brooklyn, NY This is a Red Hook Star-Revue approved show!

Reader Valentines In the spirit of love and companionship, the Star-Revue will once again be publishing reader valentines. This public service is performed absolutely free of charge, and presented in our usual tasteful manner. Valentines must be received by 5 pm Tuesday, February 5th for inclusion in our Valentine’s Day issue. Here is how you can get them to us: Email to Love@RedHookStar.com Send a message to either of our Facebook pages (just search for Red Hook Star and you’ll find them). Mail them to us at Red Hook Star-Revue 101 Union Street, Brooklyn, NY 11231 Drop them off at our office, address above. Be nice and tell your loved or hopefully loved one how much you care in your own hometown newspaper! ANONYMOUS IS FINE!

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January, 2013


Star-Revue Classifieds HELP WANTED Freelance Writers: The Red Hook Star-Revue is looking for freelance writers for both the arts and news sections.We want to buttress our news as well as local theater and arts coverage.Email Kimberly @ redhookstar.com Outside Salesperson: The Red Hook Star-Revue seeks an ambitious person who likes to walk, talk and make friends in the neighborhood to sell display advertising.Commission to start - work around your

No job too big or too small

Toilets, Boilers, Heating, Faucets, Hot Water Heaters, Pool Heaters.

B & D HEATING 507 Court Street 718 625-1396

hours, no pressure.Call 718 624-5568 and speak to Kimberly or George.

Movers

COOL HAND MOVERS Friendly local guys that can relocate your life, or just shlep your new couch from Ikea.We’ll show up on time, in a truck or van if necessary, and basically kick ass -- you might even have a good time! Call for a free estimate at (917) 584-0334 or email at coolhandmovers@gmail.com Customer reviews on YELP.COM

Licensed Electrical Contractors Commercial • Residential • Industrial Free Estimates

Violations Removed All Types of Wiring Emergency Service EMERGENCY SERVICE 137 King Street Brooklyn, NY 11231 Fax: (718) 935-0887

Vito Liotine (718) 625-1995 (718) 625-0867 aliotine@aol.com

Space Available

Warehousing and office space available in Brooklyn, Sunset park area, anywhere from 1,000 to 7,000 sq.ft @ $8.00 per sq.foot.Please call Frank Monday through Friday 9:00am to 5:00pm at 718260-9440 or 718-797-4000.

The Red Hook Star-Revue publishes twice a month - classified advertising is one of the best and least expensive ways to get your message across.Special yearly contracts available for service businesses such as plumbers, electricians for as little as $500 annually.Email Sara@redhookstar.com or call (718) 624-5568

JABUS BUILDING CORP.

Serving Red Hook for over 25 years

Specializing in Construction and Historic Preservation • New construction • Renovations, additions and extensions • Masonry specialist • Concrete floors/radiant heated • Concrete/bluestone sidewalk repair • Flue linings, chimneys and fireplaces • Demolition and waste removal • Violation removals • Landmark Preservation contractor

Jim & Debbie Buscarello PHONE: (718) 852-5364 Fax: (347) 935-1263 www.jabusbuildingcorp.com jabusbuildingcorp@gmail.com HIC License #0883902 Trade Waste License #1135

Here’s My Card Introducing Business Card Classifieds in the Star-Revue. Your card categorized as below. The Star-Revue is read by over 10,000 individuals in zip code 11231 every two weeks, as it is the leading source of community news. We offer highly affordable rates - contact 718.624.5568 or George@redhookstar.com to get your card in our next issue.

Your Cost: 2 months $400; 4 months $750; 6 months $1000; one year $1750. Take an extra 5% off if paid all in advance. We take all charge cards.

MOVERS

FOR SALE “Large oil painting A contemporary work of approximately 6 by 8 feet.It is painted in a loose expressionistic style.The image is of a seahorse” with other images of sea life around it. The artist used complementary colors of blue and red.The painting is livey, colorful and joyful. $1,000.00 or best offer. Vall Sr. Rosanna at Visitation Church 718 624-1572

CAR SERVICE

LEASING

718 624-5568 CALL RIGHT NOW Don’t Miss Out!!!!!!!!!

FRAMING

101 Union Street, Brooklyn, NY 11231 advertising@redhookstar.com

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January, 2013 Page 19


The

Red Hook StarªRevue SOUTH BROOKLYN’S COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

GET THE STAR-REVUE BY MAIL! Due to popular request, the Red Hook Star-Revue is now available by mail. Annual subscriptions are only $24. Each issue will be sent directly to your mailbox by the US Postal Service. In less than three years, the Star-Revue has won praise from local and civic leaders for hard hitting coverage of local government, institutions and businesses. From our coverage of the waterfront to local schools and community groups, the Star-Revue casts a beacon on events that make Red Hook the unique Brooklyn community it is. Special Offer! For a limited time, new subscribers will receive both issues from November 2012 that chronicle Hurricane Sandy. These issues have already achieved national recognition and are incredible keepsakes of the tragedy and rebuilding of the Red Hook community. These prized editions will be mailed upon receipt of your $24 subscription payment.

FREE WITH YOUR ORDER: 1 copy each of our first two post Sandy editions. Destined to become collector items.

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I enclose $________ for my subscription order. Please make checks to the Red Hook Star-Revue. You may also pay by credit card, please write credit card number/type/exp. date and secret code on the back. Credit card orders may also be called in to 718 624-5568, or emailed to subs@RedHookStar.com. Send all mailed-in orders to The Red Hook Star-Revue, 101 Union Street, Brooklyn, NY 11231. Page 20 Red Hook Star-Revue

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January, 2013

January 2013 Red Hook Star-Revue  

Red Hook Brooklyn's Hometown Newspaper

January 2013 Red Hook Star-Revue  

Red Hook Brooklyn's Hometown Newspaper