Page 1

George X. Lin 440 Massachusetts Ave Apt #3 Cambridge, MA 02139 geolin@Mit.edu 510-710-0739

B.A. U.C. Berkeley, 2007 M.arch Candidate, MIT, 2013

Academic

2 18 32 42

Continuity, Duality, Transparency

Urban Archive D. O. F Compound Perspectives Limited Porosity

Disturbance, Reaction, 48 Filtration

Competitions

Personal

Evolo: 54 Transpositional

Metroscapes

Proliferations 58

PS1: Weathers Permitting

70

77

Resume

64

Fallen Heroes Table Of Contents

1


2000

Rise of Light Manufacturing Industry (Boston)

1820

Diversified

Planning

Historic Preservation

Contamination

Abandonment

DESIGN INCUBATOR

Ecological Preservation

Light indust ry monetary value

1810

2050

2010

Abandoned

Abandonment

Rise of Ice Industry (Boston)

Ice House

1980

Crack epidemic Contamination

2040

1940

Massive migration

2010

1913

1880

1868

1861

Industrial town

1920

1900

1830 1829

1805

1825

Population

P rojection 1830

1850

1850

1860

1870

1880

1890

1900

1910

1920

1930

2010

2020

Ice indust ry monet ary value

Demand in NY, Baltimore, Philadelphia and Washington grew

First export to Calcutta Frederic Tudor found the natural ice industry. First export to Carribean

Patent for horse-drawn ice cutting technique

Civil War - Cutting off ice export

First above ground ice house

I nc ubator Invention of electric refrigerator

First ice manufacturing plant was opened by the Louisiana Ice Manufacturing Company

Electric refrigerator became affordable for household use

Fresh Pond

London

Boston

Havana Mumbai

Martinique Hammond Pond

Calcutta

Roxbury

New York Philadelphia Baltimore Washington

Jamaica Pond

Charleston Savannah

Jakarta

Rio de Janeiro

New Orleans

2

Hong Kong

Madras

Boston

Boston Ice Industry’s Influence on the World Old Zoning Strategy

2030


Continuity, Duality, Transparency

Roxbury, South Boston

Fall 2010 M.Arch Year 2 Studio Instructors: Cristina Parreño Sheila Kennedy Building Type: Renovation & addition to Existing Concrete Tower Program: Design Incubator (Design Library, arch. dsn, graphics dsn, industrial dsn, fab lab, theater)

Roxbury is a vibrant community with rough

recent history. During the civil riots of the 70’s, stores on Blue Hill Avenue were looted and eventually burned down, leaving a desolate and abandoned landscape. This landscape of burnt down buildings and trash filled lots discouraged commerce and business development. With the crack epidemic of the 1980’s, Roxbury became one of the most dangerous, least occupied counties in Boston. Historically however, this particular site was occupied by the Ice industry, which had a powerful influence on the economy of Boston and the commerce of the world. When the invention of the refrigerator made the ice industry obsolete, other industries moved in. Groundwater contamination from the occupation of these other industries resulted in a drop in estate and increase in infectious disease. The purpose of this project is to clean the site through Phytoremedation, the use of plant roots to extract contaminants, and to incorporate public galleries into the icehouse/incubator which reveal the interior and act as a panoptic. Public engagement would encourage future designers to not develop inventions that contaminate the area. The reuse and reactivation of this building unlocks the social and historic potential of an Icehouse.

Population

T

Rise of Light Manufacturing Industry (Boston)

Contamination

1820

T

Diversified T

T

Historic Preservation

Abandonment

DESIGN INCUBATOR

Ecological Preservation

Light industry monetary value

1810

2050

2010

Planning

2040

2000

Abandoned

Abandonment

Rise of Ice Industry (Boston)

Ice House

1980

Crack epidemic Contamination

2010

1913

1880

1861

1868

1940

Massive migration

1920

1830 1829

1805

1825

T

1900

Industrial town

Projection 1830

1850

1850

1860

1870

1880

1890

1900

1910

1920

1930

2010

2020

2030

I ce indust ry monet ary v alue

Demand in NY, Baltimore, Philadelphia and Washington grew

First export to Calcutta Frederic Tudor found the natural ice industry. First export to Carribean

Patent for horse-drawn ice cutting technique

Civil War - Cutting off ice export

First above ground ice house

Incubat or Invention of electric refrigerator

First ice manufacturing plant was opened by the Louisiana Ice Manufacturing Company

Electric refrigerator became affordable for household use

TimeLine of Ice Industry

Continuity, Duality, Transparency

Fresh Pond

London

Boston

3


Remediation Strategy

Hard edge to soft edge

Depreciating Real estate prices 4


Continuity, Duality, Transparency

5


Circulation Diagrams

Continuous arrangement of PUBLIC/ Temporal programs Theatre Cafe Library Ver tical circulation

Graphics Showroom

Industrial Dsn

Showrooms

Storefront

Arch/ Light Manufacturing

Storefront Bike Shop

Exit

Exit

Public programs spiraling downwards

Fab Lab

Entrance

Exit

PUBLIC programs accessible from ground floor

Pub

Entrance

PUBLIC programs accessible from ground floor

Thea

Visual Interaction between PUBLIC / PRIVATE programs

Program spaces

lic

te r

C a fe L ib ra

Controlled Light

Access to Light

Street Side Access

Private

Graphic Design

Fab Lab (Accessible to Street Lift) Incubator Store Front (Visual ok)

Arch./ Light Manfacturing Arch Gallery

Arch./ Light Manfacturing Theater

Industrial Design

Design Materials Library Fab Lab Cafe

Size

Public

Industrial Design

Geometry

Arch/ Light Manufacturing 2200 sf Industrial Design/ Light Manufacturing 4000 sf

+

Ind. Dsn Gallery

Fab Lab

Bike Gallery

Graphic Design

Graphics Design Gallery

Incubator Admin

Design Material Library

Incubator Store Front

Cafe

Incubator Admin

Incubator Store Front

P ro d

+ +

Graphic Design/ Branding 2000 sf

ry

u c ti

on

Gallery In c A

Gallery

G ra p

Indoor / Outdoor Gallery

d m in

h ic D

e si g

n

Incubator Admin 1,300 sf

Theater Lobby

+

Fabrication Facility / Bike Shop 5,000 sf

In d u A rc h

Theater 5,000 sf In cu

Cafe and Public Lobby 2000 sf Reading

Design and Material Library 3400 sf

Programed Surface

Virtual and Actual Incubator Storefront 2500 sf

+ +

Light Sensitive

r ga

ll e ri

st ri a

l De

it e ct

si g n

u re

es

P ro d Fab

Max Visibility

Max Visual Contact

b a to

u c ti

on

Lab

ZONE 1 Exterior / Outdoor

Pub

ie. Circulation, Break Area, Outdoor Workspace

lic

ZONE 2 Interior Work Space

O u td

ZONE 3

oor

S p a ce

Exterior / Enclosed i.e. Galleries ZONE 4 Interior/ Enclosed i.e. Circulation, Darkrooms

Environmental diagrams

LESS SOUND LEVEL

LIGHT

DYNAMIC TEMP WELL LITE NOISY GOOD VIEW

THERMAL

VIEW

MORE MORE

MORE TE FL MP UX

nd

nd

ou Gr

ou Gr

0dB 25dB 50dB 75dB 100dB 140dB

LESS

nd

ou Gr

MOST ACCESS MODERATE LIGHT MOST NOISY

LESS L RMA THE S MAS

Wind diagrams

MOST PEACEFUL THERMAL MASS DARK

GEOTHERMAL SYS ?

Wind Statistic N

22

N

N

N

14

8 E

E W

W

E

E W

W

14

S

S

October Wind Distribution

Janurary Wind Distribution

S July Wind Distribution

S April Wind Distribution

Circulation Maneuvers

Circulation T

Helix

6

Front/Rear Walls Removed

Side Wall Removed

Circulation on Sides

Circulation on All 4 Sides


Circulation Test

Circulation Circulation TrialsTrials

CutsCuts / Openings / Openings

test Models Continuity, Duality, Transparency

7


Unrolled Plan CAFE

PUBLIC Entrance Lobby +0.00 0

2

4

8

IND DSN GALLERY +71.50

IND DSN GALLERY +74.25 CAFE +17.00

FAB LAB DISPLAY GALLERY

16

IND DSN +59.00

ARCH GALLERY +45.00

VIR. INC (HUNG FROM ABOVE)

PRIVATE

GRAPHIC DSN +30.00

GRAPHIC DSN +22.00

FAB LAB

INC ADMIN +58.00

IND DSN +66.00

INC ADMIN +48.60

ARCH DSN +43.50

ARCH ARCH DSN +43.50

Industrial Dsn. Interior Gallery

Industrial Dsn Work Area

Industrial Dsn Work Area

Industrial Dsn Outdoor Work Area

Industrial Dsn. Interior Gallery

Industrial Dsn. Outdoor Gallery 0 2 4

8

8

16

0 2 4

8

16


Industrial Dsn Gallery (Outdoor)

THEATER +120.66

THEATER +108.66

OPTION GALLERIES LIBRARY +100.50

LIBRARY +97.66

THEATER +92.66

THEATER +97.66 Arch. Office

Arch. Office Arch. Workspace

Arch. Gallery

Arch. Workspace

Arch. Gallery Industrial Dsn.

Shared Galleries

Server Space CAFE CAFE

PUBLIC 2

4

8

Printing Cluster

CAFE +17.00

FAB LAB DISPLAY GALLERY

Entrance Lobby +0.00 0

PUBLIC

IND DSN GALLERY +74.25

IND DSN GALLERY +71.50

IND DSN GALLERY +74.25

THEATER +120.66

THEATER +108.66

OPTION GALLERIES

OPTION GALLERIES LIBRARY +100.50

LIBRARY +97.66

Graphic Gallery

LIBRARY +100.50

THEATER +92.66

Graphic Gallery

LIBRARY +97.66

THEATER +97.66

THEATER +92.66

Ind. Dsn

THEATER +120.66

THEATER +108.66

THEATER +97.66

16 0

2

4

8

16

Shared Galleries

PRIVATE

IND DSN +59.00

ARCH GALLERY VIR. +45.00 INC (HUNG FROM ABOVE)

VIR. INC (HUNG FROM ABOVE)

Shared Galleries

PRIVATE

Industrial Dsn Gallery / Outdoor Assembly Work Space

GRAPHIC DSN +30.00

GRAPHIC DSN +22.00

FAB LAB

IND DSN +59.00

ARCH GALLERY +45.00

GRAPHIC DSN +30.00

FAB LAB

INC ADMIN +58.00

ARCH DSN +43.50

IND DSN INC ADMIN +59.00 +58.00

IND DSN +66.00 INC ADMIN +48.60

INC ADMIN +48.60

ARCH

LIBRARY +88.50

IND DSN +74.00

GRAPHIC DSN +22.00

ARCH DSN +43.50

Industrial Dsn Gallery / Outdoor Assembly Work Space

LIBRARY +88.50

IND DSN +74.00

IND DSN +59.00

IND DSN +66.00

Ind. Dsn

Industrial Dsn Gallery

Industrial Dsn Gallery

ARCH

ARCH DSN +43.50

IND DSN +74.00

Industrial Dsn.

04 Ind. Dsn

IND DSN GALLERY +71.50

Printing Cluster

CAFE +17.00

FAB LAB DISPLAY GALLERY

Entrance Lobby +0.00

04

Industrial Dsn.

Server Space

ARCH DSN +43.50

LIBRARY +88.50 Inc Admin Meeting Rm

Industrial Dsn Gallery (Int)

Inc Admin Meeting Rm

Inc Admin Work Area

IND DSN +59.00

Winter Interior Access Ramp

Industrial Dsn Gallery (Int) Winter Interior Access Ramp

Inc Admin Work Area

Industrial Dsn Gallery (Outdoor)

Shared Galleries

Bike Shop

Printing Cluster

Shared Galleries Cafe

Industrial Dsn Gallery (Outdoor)

Printing Cluster

Cafe

Bike Shop CAFE

PUBLIC 4

8

IND DSN GALLERY +74.25

16

IND DSN +59.00

ARCH GALLERY +45.00

VIR. INC (HUNG FROM ABOVE)

Shared Galleries Shared Galleries

Shared Galleries

Lobby

Bike Gallery Fab Lab

2

CAFE +17.00

FAB LAB DISPLAY GALLERY

Entrance Lobby +0.00 0

Shared Galleries Lobby

PRIVATE

Bike Gallery

GRAPHIC DSN +30.00

GRAPHIC DSN +22.00

FAB LAB

Fab Lab

INC AD +48.60

ARCH DSN +43.50

ARCH ARCH DSN +43.50

Bike Gallery

Arch. Office

Bike Gallery

Arch. Office Arch. Workspace

Arch. Workspace

Arch. Gallery

Arch. Gallery Industrial Dsn.

Server Space

Industrial Dsn.

Industrial Dsn.

04 Ind. Dsn

CAFE

Printing Cluster

PUBLIC Entrance Lobby +0.00 0

2

4

8

Printing Cluster

IND DSN GALLERY +71.50

IND DSN GALLERY +74.25

OPTION GALLERIES LIBRARY +100.50

CAFE +17.00

FAB LAB DISPLAY GALLERY

Industrial Dsn. Bike Shop

Server Space

Graphic Gallery

LIBRARY +97.66

Ind. Dsn

THEATER +120.66

THEATER +108.66

Graphic Gallery

THEATER +92.66

THEATER +97.66

16

IND DSN +59.00

ARCH GALLERY +45.00

VIR. INC (HUNG FROM ABOVE)

PRIVATE

Industrial Dsn Gallery / Outdoor Assembly Work Space

GRAPHIC DSN +30.00

GRAPHIC DSN +22.00

FAB LAB

INC ADMIN +58.00 INC ADMIN +48.60

Industrial Design Gallery

ARCH DSN +43.50

Industrial Dsn Gallery / Outdoor Assembly Work Space

Lobby Ind. Dsn

Bike Gallery Fab Lab Industrial Dsn Gallery

IND DSN +59.00

IND DSN +66.00

Ind. Dsn

LIBRARY +88.50

IND DSN +74.00

Industrial Dsn Gallery

ARCH ARCH DSN +43.50

Inc Admin Meeting Rm

Inc Admin Work Area

Industrial Dsn Gallery (Int)

Inc Admin Meeting Rm

Industrial Dsn Gallery (Int)

Winter Interior Access Ramp

Winter Interior Access Ramp

Inc Admin Work Area

Industrial Dsn Gallery (Outdoor)

Industrial Dsn Gallery (Outdoor)

Architecture Gallery Arch. Office Arch. Workspace Shared Galleries

Shared Galleries

Arch. Gallery

I

Printing Cluster

Cafe Server Space

Bike Shop

CAFE

CAFE

PUBLIC Shared Galleries

Shared Galleries Shared Galleries

Shared Galleries

Entrance Lobby +0.00 0

2

4

8

Printing Cluster

PUBLIC

FAB LAB DISPLAY GALLERY 0

2

4

8

IND DSN GALLERY +74.25

CAFE +17.00 FAB LAB DISPLAY GALLERY

Entrance Lobby +0.00

16

OPTION GALLERIES

THEATER +108.66

OPTION GALLERIES LIBRARY +100.50

CAFE +17.00

PRIVATE

PRIVATE FAB LAB

IND DSN +59.00

ARCH GALLERY +45.00VIR. INC (HUNG FROM ABOVE)

VIR. INC (HUNG FROM ABOVE)

Fab Lab

Graphic Gallery

IND DSN GALLERY +71.50

LIBRARY +100.50

LIBRARY +97.66

THEATER +92.66

THEATER +120.66

LIBRARY +97.66

THEATER +97.66

GRAPHIC DSN +30.00

GRAPHIC DSN +22.00

INC ADMIN +58.00 INC ADMIN +48.60

ARCH

LIBRARY +88.50

IND DSN +74.00

GRAPHIC DSN +22.00

ARCH DSN +43.50

ARCH DSN +43.50

IND DSN +59.00

IND DSN +66.00 INC ADMIN +48.60

INC ADMIN +58.00

IND DSN +74.00

LIBRARY +88.50

IND DSN +59.00

IND DSN +66.00

ARCH

ARCH DSN +43.50

ARCH DSN +43.50

Inc Admin Meeting Rm

Wint Acce

Inc Admin Work Area

Arch. Office Arch. Workspace

Arch. Gallery Shared Galleries Industrial Dsn.

Industrial Dsn.

Printing Cluster Cafe

Server Space Ind. Dsn

Bike Shop

Printing Cluster

Cafe

Bike Shop

Printing Cluster Graphic Gallery Shared Galleries Industrial Dsn Gallery / Outdoor Assembly Work Space

Ind. Dsn

Lobby

Fab Lab

Shared Galleries

Lobby

Bike Gallery Industrial Dsn Gallery

Bike Gallery

Fab Lab

Bike Gallery

Inc Admin Meeting Rm

THEATER +97.66

IND DSN +59.00

ARCH GALLERY +45.00

GRAPHIC DSN +30.00

FAB LAB

Bike Gallery

Architecture Gallery

THEATER +92.66

16

Lobby

Bike Gallery

IND DSN GALLERY +71.50 IND DSN GALLERY +74.25

Bike Gallery

Industrial Dsn Gallery (Int) Winter Interior Access Ramp

Inc Admin Work Area

Industrial Dsn Gallery (Outdoor)

Continuity, Duality, Transparency

9


Industrial Dsn. Outdoor Gallery 0 2 4

8

16

Elevations

Concrete Box Interior Air Barrier and Wood Interior Column Anchor and Plate Stiffeners 0 8 16

32

64

0 8 16

32

64

0 8 16

32

64

Diagrid Structure Hss 4x14” @ Corners Hss 2x12” Elsewhere

Insulation Framing

Sections

0 8 16

32

64

3. Theater

Library/ Cafe

Library Dark Room Graphics Design Worksp

ace

Graphics Gallery 2 Outdo or Ind. Dsn Gallery 1 Po

plar

Fore s

t

4. Graphics Gallery

Industri

al Dsn W orkspac e

Arch. L igh Manufa t ctu

re Gall

Industrial Dsn Gallery

ery 5 Fab

Lab

Bike

10

Galle

ries


0 2 4

8

16

Theater

Library

Graphics Design

Industrial Design Gallery

Architecture / Light Manugacturing Gallery

Architecture / Light Manufacturing

Continuity, Duality, Transparency

11


Structural / envelope analysis FORCES

DETAILS FOCUS

Secondary Stiffener

Primary Members, typ.

Primary Stiffener

Secondary Members, typ.

Secondary Stiffener

Secondary Stiffener

Primary Beam

Primary Beam

Tertiary Members, typ.

Fire Escape Core

Stiffener

(e) Columns, typ.

(n) Columns, typ. Elevator Core

Cantilever Member

2"

24'-

208.2 sf

Cont. Cantilever Member

10"

35'-

208.2 sf

VS.

35'-10" 5'-1"

7'-3"

F

R_b = 109.7K R_a = 58.6K

180 psf

F

W=1.5 K/Ft R1=WL = 37.5 Kips

+ M_a = + (4'-5" R_b) - (9'-6" * 51.1K) = 0 WL= 284 sf * 180 PSF = 51.1 K

WL= 208.2 sf x 180 psf = 37.5 Kips

180 psf

F_x =0 , F_y = 0, R_a + R_b = 51.1K

19'-1"

4'-5"

24'-2"

W = WL / L = 51.1K / 35'-10" = 1.43 K/ft

R_a = 58.6K

R_a = 109.7K 35'-10" 5'-1"

7'-3"

24'-2" WL = 37.5 Kips

19'-1"

4'-5" - 79.7K + 109.7K =30 K

V

V

0

0

NTS -7.25' * W = -14.8K

Shear Force WL=31.2K NTS

-73.4K + -4.42' * W = 79.7K

-14.8K + -57.6K = -73.4K

24'-2"

M

M

0

35'-10" 5'-1"

7'-3"

19'-1"

4'-5"

NTS

!

0

Max Moment = WL² /2 = 37.5K * 24.16' /2 = 452.7 K-ft 7.25' * 14.8 K /2 = 53.7K

σ =My / I = M / S

Max Moment = Aread under Crv = 7.25' * 14.8 K /2 + 4.42' * 73.4 K + 4.42' * 6.3K / 2

(E) Column Crush / Buckle Calc

Tributary Area = 666.1 SF Crush . . . Axial Stress: F = P / A P_cr= σ_cr * A = 1.5k/in² * 5.75 ft * 4ft* (12in /ft)(12in /ft) P_cr = 4968 K 180PSF * 666.1 SF = 119.9K 119.9K < 4968K

666.1 sf

= 392.1 K - ft

σ _steel = 15 k/in ² 15 k/in ² = 452.7 K-ft (12in / ft) / S

4'-0"

σ =My / I = M / S

! Choose

σ _steel = 15 k/in ²

y

5'-9"

S = 362.2 in³ / min

M_max= 392.1 K - ft 15 k/in ² = 392.1 K - ft (12in / ft) / S

Will NOT Crush Buckle . . . P_cr = pi² E I / L² E_conc= 3000 Ksi I_yy=hb³ /12 = 69in * (48in)³ /12=635904 in^4

y

S = 313.7 in³ / min

4968K = (pi²) (3000 K / in²)(635904 in^4) / L² L² = (pi²) (3000 K / in²)(635904 in^4) / 4968K L² =3789928.1 in² L= 1946.8 in = 162.2' Exisiting building at only 101 ft. New Addition only extend til height of 140'.

Beam Deformation w = 1.43 (k-ft) or 1430 lb/ft L = 35.83 ft E = 29000 ksi or 4176000000 psf I= 3450 in^4 or 0.166377 ft^4

W 18x192

HSS 24x22x5/8

W18x175

W21x147

S = 448 in³ I= 3870 in^4 Weight/Ft = 192 lb

S = 390 in³ I = 4680 in^4 Weight/Ft= 183 lb

S = 344 in³ I= 3450 in^4 Weight/Ft = 175 lb

S = 329 in³ I = 3630 Weight/Ft= 147 lb

HEAVY !

LARGE

Max allowable Deformation= L/ 360 = 0.067 ft ∆ = 5 wL ^4 / ( 384 E I ) = 0.044ft

No continuous member longer than 30' .

Will NOT Buckle

0.044ft < 0.067 ft Will Meet Requirements

BETTER !

Primary = W18x175 Secondary = W18 x 97 Tertiary = W18 x 48

Carbon Offset.

70ft 65ft 30ft

Ratio: .43 Ratio: .39 Ratio: .18

+/- 5700 sf / Per Loop 7 Planes/ Loops in building

Envelope

=39900 sq total

Int

Ext

Unroll Structure Total Length =47041 ft of Steel

Material

Int

Ext

-

Concrete = 22800 sf 2" Thick Steel Total = 47041 Linear Ft W18x175 Ratio: .43 W18x97 Ratio: .39 W18x48 Ratio: .18

-

Weight

Carbon Offset

= 3800 cf

570000 lbs

2.8 lbs / sf

20227 ft 18346 ft 8467 ft Total

3539725 lb 1779562 lb 406434 lb 5725723 lb

258.3 lbs / sf

261.1 lb/sq ft

12


Envelope composite

Structural / envelope models

Continuity, Duality, Transparency

13


Details GEORGE X LIN 4.463 BTII ASSIGNMENT 2

1/4" GALVANIZED STEEL C-SECTION CAP 1/4" GALVANIZED STEEL ANGLES HORIZONTALLY 1/4" GALVANIZED STEEL TEE-SECTION 8" DEEP VERTICALLY 1.5" UNTREATED POPLAR BOARDING 2 TO 8" WIDE POLYTHENE SHEETING / BLACK PROPYLENE MATTING 2" HAT CHANNEL MOUNT BALLAST AGGREGATE METAL DECKING W/ 4" CONC. ROOF SLAB. ROOFING EPDM MEMBRANE METAL ROOF JOIST FLASHING, SEALANT 1/4" STEEL PLATE FACADE MOUNT, BOTH SIDES. BOLTED IN FACADE VERTICLE TEE SECTION, TYP.

 MEGA TRUSS TOP MEMBER 5/8" PLYWOOD WITH WEATHER BARRIOR

STEEL I-BEAM 10" DEEP 6" R-30 MINERAL FIBER INSULATION, TYP 1/8" SHEET-STEEL FIN FIXED W/ANGLES TO FACADE, TYP.

2" ALUM PROILE 1.5" UNTREATED POPLAR BOARDING 2 TO 8" WIDE

1/8" GALVINIZED SHEET STEEL BENT TO SHAPE, FIXED TO FIN W/ STEEL FLATS, TYP.

1.5" POPLAR BOARDING TO 6" WIDE

6" R-19 MINERAL FIBER INSULATION, TYP

SEALANT

LOW-E DOUBLE GLAZING

B

C

TYPICAL ROOF DETAIL

0 2" 6"

1'

2'

1 - 1/2" = 1' - 0"

1.5" POPLAR BOARDING TO 6" WIDE

SEALANT

METAL DECKING W/ 4" CONC. FLOOR SLAB.

D A

14

PARTIAL SHORT SEC. THR BLDING 1 / 4" = 1' - 0"

0

1' 2'

5'

10'

C

TYPICAL CANTILEVER FLOOR DETAIL 1 - 1/2" = 1' - 0"

0 2" 6"

1'

2'


METAL DECKING W/ 4" CONC. FLOOR SLAB.

D A

PARTIAL SHORT SEC. THR BLDING

0

1' 2'

5'

10'

TYPICAL CANTILEVER FLOOR DETAIL

0 2" 6"

1'

2'

1 - 1/2" = 1' - 0"

C

1 / 4" = 1' - 0"

CONCRETE FOUNDATION

GRAVEL

SOIL

D

1' 2 DIAMETER FOOTING DRAIN

E

E E

ENLARGED DETAIL SECTION

0

6" 1'

2'

TYPICALFOOTING DETAIL

0 2" 6"

1'

2'

1 - 1/2" = 1' - 0"

5'

1 / 2" = 1' - 0"

Continuity, Duality, Transparency

15


Theater Space

Exterior Circulation

Interior Circulations

16


Interior Core

Continuity, Duality, Transparency

17


Future Predictions

Current Situation

Per Capita Visits

12% Increase in Visits

1800 1750 1700 1650 1600 1550 1500 1450 1400 1350 1300 97

Current Situation

98

99

00

01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08 09 Year

4.5% Decrease in Circulations

100%

18 90% 80% 70% 60% 50%

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

Very Few Collection Circulations 73.6%

18

19

20

Circulations Per 1000 Visits All (Library Media)

Per Capita Visits

1800 1750 1700 1650 1600 1550 1500 1450 1400 1350 1300 97

et Users of US

Social Center

5.6 5.4 5.2 5.0 4.8 4.6 4.4 4.2 4.0 3.8 3.6

% Internet Users of US

Future Predictions

12% Increase in Visits

Social Center

5.6 5.4 5.2 5.0 4.8 4.6 4.4 4.2 4.0 3.8 3.6 98

99

00

01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08 09 Year

4.5% Decrease in Circulations

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

18

19

20

Very Few Collection Circulations

100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

73.6%

97

98

99

00

01

02

03

73.6 % of American have access to the Internet as of 2007

04

05

06

07

08 09 Year

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

99% Of Americans Will have access to Internet by 2010


Urban Archive Leechmere, Boston Fall 2010 M.Arch Year 2 Studio Instructors: Ana Miljacki MeeJin Yoon Building Type: Library / Metro Stop

A

t one point in history, books became faster than architecture at spreading culture and knowledge, but in the late 20th century, the internet undermined the book in its turn. Today the speed of the book seems glacial when compared to the speed of the internet, which grants its users instant access to vast amounts of information. In America, access to the internet has increased from 44% to 72% within the last 10 years. Books are digitalized and read online without necessitating any physical trip to the library. As the value of the book is lost, the architecture that houses it becomes vague. In the last 10 years, we have also seen a steady, 4.5% decrease in the circulation of library books per year; however, the number of library visits has increased by 12%. In the most traditional sense, the space of the library was dedicated to a collection of books; it was an interface between that organized authoritative collection of knowledge and the readers who sought it out, first private and then public. But in the modern scenario, the library collection has expanded to include many additional programs such as digital media, maps, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s collections, tax aid, and job training. In recent years libraries, some of which even include cafes, are becoming social centers one visits for specific services and information rather than for books. Considering the possibility that books will become even more obsolete than they are today, and that books may even reach the status of relics, my project relegates the book to the archive. The purpose of this maneuver is both to acknowledge the reality of the contemporary library (other public deliveries of knowledge and spaces of interaction are, in fact, relevant today) and to elevate the book anew as an object. Through their symbolic presence in the archive, books are simultaneously presented as a towering mass and as fragile objects to be handled with special care. Urban Archive

19


Variant Heights

3'-6" 3

'-0

"

" '-0 5'-0" 3

2 ’-6 ”

Intersection w/ Programs

3'-6" 3

'-0

"

"

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’-6

’-6

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Variant Heights

2

2

2

Most libraries today...

Typical

6'-10" 3

7'-6" 3

'-0

"

'-0

"

Typical

Intersection w/ Programs

Typ. Seating

History of Library Collection eBOOK

WWW DATABASE PHOTOCOPY AUDIO CASSETTE

MAGAZINES

CINEMA NEWSPAPER COMIC BOOKS PHOTOGRAPHY

BOOKS MAPS

YELLOWPAGES DOCUMENTARY PAPER BACK VIDEO

MICROCHIP FLOOPY CD- ROM COMPACT DISC

1100

20

1200

1300

1400

1500

1600

1700

1800

1900

2000

2020

Typ. Seating


Most libraries tomorrow...

White Glove Reading Area User

+

+

User Book Request

Book Sort Librarian

+

Library Transformation

Urban Archive

21


Top of R +8

Top of R +4

3rd L +3

2nd L +2

Entr

22


Roof 80'-0"

Hide and Seek

Circulation

Kids Area

T - User

Media Pods

Student

Reading Carrels Reading Carrels

T Cafe

Kiosk

0 5 10

25

Media Market

50

Media Market

Media Pods

100

Rare Book Readers

Roof 46'-0"

Level 34''-0"

Level 22'-0"

T

rance 0'-0"

0 5 10

25

50

100 Top of Roof +80'-0"

4th Level +46'-0" 3rd Level +34-0" 2nd Level +22'-0" Bottom of Overhang +17'-6" Ground Level 0'-0"

Urban Archive

23


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100

Urban Archive

25


Roof / Skylites

3rd Level Study Spaces

Mesh Facade Glazing Outer Truss Media Market

White Glove Reading Rooms Art Collection

Admin / Support Spaces

Small Media Pod Cluster

Portuguese Rare Book Collection

Inner Truss

Small Media Pod Cluster

Oversize Art books

Inner Truss

Newsprints Admin / Support Spaces

Children's Library Rare Book Archive

White Glove Reading Rooms

Large Media Pod Cluster

Lobby Entrance Stairs

Glazing Mesh Facade

Conference Area

26

Outer Truss


rchy

H Furniture Basic Foam Furniture Component

Media Pod

Kiosk

Basic Soft Seating

Hi Tech Public

Spacial Hierarchy

Spacial Adjacency

Spacial Adjacency Furniture Aud.

Aud.

Basic Foam Furniture Component

Additional Possible Uses Public

Public

On Side

Media Pod Reading Area/ Study

Kiosk

Reading Area/ Study

Benches Media Market Basic Soft Seating

Cafe

Cafe

ET

Media Kiosk Additional Possible Uses

Media Room Conf Rm Pres Rm

On Side

Media Room Conf Rm Pres Rm

Media Market

+

Media Market

Benches

Sound Wall Collective / Public Spaces

+

Gla Collective / Public Spaces

Media Pods

Mes Ext Ski Hide and Seek

ETC

The The Robot Robot Circulation

Ciru. (Help Desk) Ciru. (Help Desk)

Average Wait Time.... Average Time.... 3 3 Min Min 1/7 of of required Space 1/7 Space

60' 60'Max Max

Kids Area

T - User

Media Pods

Student

Read Car

Sound Wall

Reading Carrels

Glazing

Private Private

Mesh Exterior Skin

White Glove White Glove Reading Area Reading Area

T

Hide and Seek

Book Scan Book ScanCirculation

Cafe

Kiosk

Kids Area

T - User

Media Pods

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Reading Carrels

M M

Media Pods

Media Market

Reading Carrels

Book Book Restoration Restoration

Rare Book Readers T Admin Office Admin Office

Cafe

Book Load / Sort Kiosk Book Load

/ Sort

Book + Media Storage (THE ARCHIVE) Book + Media 1) Rare Books Storage (THERare ARCHIVE) 2) Spanish Book 1) 3) Rare Books Maps/ Art / 2)Oversize Spanish Art Rare Book books 3) Maps/ Art / Oversize Art books

Media Market

Media Market

Media Pods

T Rare Book Readers

Individual / Private Spaces

Individual / Private Spaces

Archive Skin

Archive Skin

Glass Block Windows

Glass Block Windows

T

Urban Archive

27


Book Storage

28


Media Market

WhiteGlove Reading Room

Urban Archive

29


30


Concept Model

Urban Archive

31


32


D. O. F

Fort Points, Boston, MA

Fall 2009: Academic Instructors: Nick Gelpi William O’Brien Jr. Building Type:

Theater

Fort Points has been known as the empty streets

of South Boston, where night life is frequent but hidden from the public. The Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) has decided to purchase and locate their theater here to increase the transparency of theatrical performances as well as the social aspects of theater. In doing so, the ICA is attempting to create new gathering and public spaces that provide a contrast to other, generally hidden public spaces in Fort Points. DEPTH of FIELD (DoF) is a project that conceptualizes the theatrical experience as one that varies as much as the visibility of city. In 1930’s Lewis Mumford explains “The city creates the theater and is the theater.... The streets are the set and the people are the actors.” The backdrop of city itself creates dynamics within the story of the theater. There are four (4) theaters within the complex, ranging from a “Blackbox” (theater with only artificial lights) to a “Whitebox” (Theater with all natural lights). The “Blackbox” is located underground where the theater has complete control of the view of the city. The “Whitebox” is a public space located at the top level of the complex, where the visitors 3a Material Systems Study have complete freedom over their view of the city. Further, the “Whitebox” allows for a view back to 3a Material Systems Study ICA. The mixed use theaters in between have limited visibility to the city, and use this limited visibility selectively for framing. The circulation provides glimpses into the theater space where the viewers can be observed by the public, enabling the public to acknowledge the theater is in operation and fulfilling their role as actors within the city.

Private

Public

Different DOF for different scenes in a Theater Private

Spacial diagrams

Public

Different DOF for different scenes in a Theater

Spacial diagrams

Summer Street Entrance

Standard layout Blackbox located based on deunder ground sired PriGradation of theStandard vacy study. Reallocated ater for layout volumes cityscape backBlackbox located based on deground under ground sired PriGradation of thevacy study. Reallocated ater for volumes cityscape background

Split level division use of space Split level division use of space

Split dof relationship with ICA and surrounding site

Split dof relationship with ICA and surrounding site

D. O. F

public/privat relationship

public/private relationships

33


Skin Development

Precedent + Module / System Organization

The System

The Module

George X. Lin Nick Gelpi Studio

Variability of Component / System

Variability of Organization

Single Deep Layer System Advantages: Allow in more light Provides more shade

Section / Plan

Double Layer Thin System Advantages: Provides more shelter Provides access

Component Openings

Component Scaling

Variations based upon program program. Provides openings for Views, Air, Light and Accessibility.

Variations based upon user accessibility.

Axon

34


Elevation Porosity

Shadow Density

D. O. F

35


Rooftop Whitebox Theater 1/4” = 1’ 0

2

8

4

16

op x ft bo ' oo te 0 R hi .0 W 69 + on op ti ft rva oo e ' R bs k 0 O ec .0 D 83 +

Section A Section 1/4” = A 1/4” = 1’ 1’ 0

2

4

8

0

2 16 4

Observation Deck Observation Deck +83.00' +83.00'

Graybox Theater 1/4” = 1’ 0

2

4

8

Roof Top White Box Roof Top White Box +69.00' +69.00'

16

r x oo o ) d yB te In ra iva 0' G r .0 (P 28 +

15

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up

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up

'

0

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1

4

+

up er m m su t 0 s .5 -0

Interior grayboxInterior graybox +28.00' +28.00'

8

on

4

16

ti

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S

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Support Space Support Space +18.00' +18.00'

B

Summer Street Entrance 1/ 4” =1’

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S

up

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36

A st. level black box -21.50'

A st. level black box -21.50'

8

16


Site map 1/32” = 1’

ICA

To Boston

To Downtown Boston

Site Section

D.O.F Depth of field. 4.123 | Core Studio | Project 3b | Nick Gelpi Studio

Section Section B B 0

2 0 4 2

4 8

8

16

16

Observation Observation Deck Deck +83.00' +83.00'

Roof Roof Top Top White White BoxBox +69.00' +69.00'

Support Support Spaces Spaces 2 2 +51.50' +51.50'

Top Top of GrayBox of GrayBox +41.50' +41.50'

Interior Interior graybox graybox +28.00' +28.00'

Outdoor Outdoor Balcony Balcony Support Support Space Space +18.00' +18.00'

Top Top of GrayBox of GrayBox +8.00' +8.00' Summer Summer st Level st Level Outdoor Outdoor graybox graybox +0.00' +0.00'

projection projection room room A st. A level st. level black black box box -21.50' -21.50' ticket ticket ticket ticket Booth Booth Booth Booth

D. O. F

37


RoofTop WhiteBox

Indoor GrayBox

outdoor Graybox (Public) Black Box

A St Entrance

38


WhiteBox Theater

Gray Box Theater

Street Level Gray Box Theater

Underground Blackbox Theater

D. O. F

39


Entrance Atrium

40


D. O. F

41


42


Compound Perspectives Limited Porosity Fall 2009 M.Arch Year 1 Studio Instructors: Nick Gelpi William Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien Jr. TA: Skylar Tibbets Building Type: Bridge

This

project centers on the development of a component that allows itself to be aggregated in forming a structure that bridges the gap between two platforms. The structure serves a secondary purpose as a shading device during the day, while also providing lighting for users at night and framed views of the city.

43


44


45


46


47


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Museum/Lobby Caretaker Home Observation Deck Boat Storage Shop Bay/Repairs Wet Training Dry Training Lockers/Showers Storage Space Break Room Parking HVAC Storage

3

1 Interior view of history museum/lobby

48


Disturbance, Reaction, Filtration

Aquatic Park, Berkeley, CA

Spring 2006: Academic Instructors: Lisa Iwamoto Robert Shepherd Building Type: Boathouse

T

3

he Boathouse can be seen as a mediator between land and water. The program literally demands that the boat launch connect directly to the Boathouse and extend into the water. Situated and confined by the Interstate 80 (running from CA to NJ) and nearby infrastructure, Aquatic Park in Berkeley, CA is home to wildlife habitats and recreational water sports. This project aims to minimize impacts to the site while informing and filtering visitors from the surrounding human related disturbances. An architectural system is developed for this scheme from studying the construction of the rowboat and its minimization of resistance when traveling on water.

3 4

4

Boat storage. Stairs leads to observation deck

Exterior view from rowerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s point of view

Disturbance, Reaction, Filtration

49


Mutation of the building shape 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Museum/Lobby Caretaker Home Observation Deck Boat Storage Shop Bay/Repairs Wet Training Dry Training Lockers/Showers Storage Space Break Room Parking HVAC Storage

6

3

2

4 5

7

8

1

1

9

Site Map

Mutation of the skin and ceiling 6

3 4 5

2

7

8

1

1

9

6 3

59 2

4

7

8

1

3 6 5

3

7

9

2 4

8

1 1

3 6 5 2 4

3

7

9

8

1

1 Conceptual Idea The earliest form of scull boats come from hollowed logs. The logs are shaped for the least drag on water and hollowed for fitting. Like the scull, this building starts as a box of programs and is stretched and shaped as a response to program needs and disturbances from the site.

50

Like the clash between two ripples, the shape of the skin (RED) is created from the reaction at the midpoint of the programs within the building. The ceiling (BLUE) is shown as a secondary reaction at the midpoints resulting from the reactions of the skin.


Exploded perspective Axon

3

12

10

8

7 8

2

3

5/9

11

4 1

Disturbance, Reaction, Filtration

51


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Museum/Lobby Caretaker Home Observation Deck Boat Storage Shop Bay/Repairs Wet Training Dry Training Lockers/Showers Storage Space Break Room Parking HVAC Storage

Section

3 12

2

1

11

12

4

Elevations

west

52

south


Plans 3

6 10 7

2

8 8

3

5 9 11

4 1

east

north Disturbance, Reaction, Filtration

53


1. 2. 3. 4.

Commercial tower Residential tower Mix used Green space Support Spaces: Civic space Institutions healthcare Recreational 5. Mall/entertainment 6. Regenerative components 7. Infrastructure

1

4

4

2

5

7 6

3

Mutation of office tower w/ residential, office, & greenspace

54


Transpositional Proliferations Spring 2008 Competition Entry Building Type: Mixed-Use Skyscraper Collaboration with Bill and Adelina.

I

ncreasing density in the city is inevitable, resulting in degradation of the quality of life. In the 20th century, this disturbance along with the development of motorized vehicles fueled the development of suburbs, moving man further from his work. What if suburban qualities of personalization and individualism are brought to a tower next to work and coexist with collaboration and proximity? What if we look at residential space as an expansion of a solid in a voided space, commercial space as is an expansion of a void in a solid space and support spaces as a result of mutation between the two towers? This project strives to accentuate what is most lacking in the current condition by implementing a new system for providing personalizable and pleasurable space within the pre-estimated perimeter.

+ SubUrban Homes

Skyscapers

+ Aerial view of tower centers

Residual voids between residential & commercial towers are public accessible area that weaves through and connect the solid masses. Voids offer opportunities to maximize freedom of spatial configuration, duplicability, variations, expandability from macro to micro scales. The requirements/characteristics/economics/density of the inhabitants parametrically drives the shape of the towers, which then shapes the mutation of the green space.

Expanding Solids

Expanding Voids

Transpositional Proliferations

55


Suburban residential unit mutations Commercial tower Residential tower Mix used Green space Support Spaces: Civic space Institutions healthcare Recreational 5. Mall/entertainment 6. Regenerative components 7. Infrastructure

Germination of suburban greenspace

1. 2. 3. 4.

2

4

4

Exploded Diagram

The residential tower adopts a system of modular exposed framework as a means to provide maximum openness and exposure to sun and air to the occupants. Each individual house in a flexible habitat is free to combine or detach with neighbors and free to translate within their given area to personalize their spaces that reflect their needs.

56


Street View: The interior gardens and supporting commercial spaces act as an extension of the building occupying space above the transportation infrastructure.

Commercial tower mutations

1

3

The office tower allows its owners to take measures to satisfy the occupant needs. Owners can prefer the maximize square footage to be used for housing the most staff to increase productivity or if they feel the need to increase in light and exposure, they can choose to hollow out from the usable office space. Voids offer opportunities to maximize freedom of spatial configuration, duplicability, variations, expandability from macro to micro scales.

Transpositional Proliferations

57


Weathers Permitting By William Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;brien Jr. Winter 2010, PS1 Competition Entry Finalist

Fig. 8.5

Edge Seat Plate Detail

Collaboration with William Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;brien Jr., Cecilia Ho, Sunnie Lau, Alex Marshall, Travis Williams Visualization: Neoscape, Inc. Shallow (45Ë&#x161;)

Weathers Permitting -- a proposal for the 2010 MoMA/ P.S.1 Young Architects -- aspires Und Fig. 8.6 Program Typological to broaden affiliations between natural processes and cultural practices. It seeks to sponsor a renewed curiosity in spatial, temporal, and conditional patterns of environmental transition to which we may have grown accustomed. The installation is conceptualized as a terrain, a continuous and varied landscape, which resists rigid typological classification. Rather, through formal and compositional metamorphosis, the terrain enfolds a spectrum of diverse, yet correlated landscape characteristics. It is designed as an elevated boardwalk with unconventional properties including malleability and water retention. Conceived as a flexible construct, the design makes use of the common-directionality and inherent materialflexibility of parallel planks of wood in order to guide the locations of folds in its surface. Transitions between two-dimensional surface and three-dimensional volume offer multiple littoral zones which mimic the variety of aquatic conditions typically associated with coastlines. Participating in the repetitive cycles of time and the indeterminate patterns of weather, depressions in the terrain collect and evaporate water intermittently, registering the oscillation of environmental conditions.

Ps1: Weathers Permitting

59


16

17

26

ORGANIZATIONS

45

30.00°

0° .0 90 .00° 75 .00° 60

15.00°

.00 °

Cu. 16

17

26

ORGANIZATIONS le Angle Study at 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90 Top Alignment

Bw.

30.00°

0° .0 90 .00° 75 .00° 0° 60 .0 45

15.00°

Cup (Cu.) Cu. Tq. 48.00 41.57

Bow (Bw.)

12.42

le Angle Study at 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90 Top Alignment

Bw.

24.00

33.94

.0

.00

75

90

°

°

.00°

60

Cup (Cu.)

45.00

30.00° 15.00°

Cr.

Tq.

Tourque (Tq.)

48.00 41.57 12.42

Bow (Bw.)

24.00

33.94

les Study (length in inches) 0°

.0

°

° .00 .00°

60

75

45.00

90

Cr.

30.00°

15.00°

Crook (Cr.)

Cr. Bw.

Cu.

Tourque (Tq.)

92.73 83.14 67.88 48.00 41.57

les Study (length in inches) 12.42

24.00

12.00

16.97

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24.00

.0

Bw.

Cu.

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30.00°

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les Study (length and height in inches) 48.00

41.57

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12.00

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75.00° ° .00 60 45.00°

90

30.00°

Tq.

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20.78

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23.18

Fig. 1.8 Plank Distribution

15.00°

Fig. 1.7 Lumber Behavior

Bw. Cr.

Cu. Tq.

Fig. 1.7 Lumber Behavior

les Study (length and height in inches)

Fig. 1.8 Plank Distribution

25

CHAPTER 3

STRUCTURES

CHAPTER 3

STRUCTURES

42

STRUCTURES

25

42

STRUCTURES

Wood plank deck

Wood plank deck

Wood Plank Deck Substructure Self Healing Rubber Membrane

Self -healing rubber membrane

Gravel Ground Fill

Substructure

Tertiary structure

Wood Plank Deck Substructure Self Healing Rubber Membrane

Self -healing rubber membrane

Tertiary Structure Footing

Gravel Ground Fill

Footing Substructure

Figure 3.1 Tertiary structure

C omponent C omposite

Figure 3.2

Composite Structure

Fig. 6.2 Tertiary Structure Footing

60

Footing

Small Size Pool Use


19

27

CHAPTER 2

STRUCTURES

Fig. 8.5

Edge Seat Plate Detail

°

41.41

°

Shallow (45˚)

15.00°

18.00

° 45.00 ° 30.00

COMPOSITES

Visor rotation

2’0

°

75.00

.00

60

COMPOSITES

19

STRUCTURES le Angle Study: 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90 Bottom Alignment

°

41.41

°

75.00

°

.00

° 45.00 ° 30.00

COMPOSITES

COMPOSITES

Hinge Point, Canopy rotation Visor rotation

2’0 Varies per canopy angle

Fig. 8.6

y

Typological Und

15.00°

18.00

60

CHAPTER 2

5’0 Typ.

z

27

°

75.00

Hinge Point, Canopy rotation

le Angle Study: 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90 Bottom Alignment

° 60.00 ° 45.00 00° 30.

Varies per canopy angle

16’0

30’0

y z

18.00

15.00°

20’0

z

5’0 Typ. °

41.41

14’0 Node, R=2’0 Typ.

20’0 16’0 2’0 p. Ty

°

41.41

° 60.00 ° 45.00 00° 30.

les Study (length in inches)

8’0

y

Wood plank deck

Fig. 2.1

Component Dimensions

30’0

z

18.00

15.00°

14’0 Hinge point, Typ.

Node, R=2’0 Typ. x

les Study (length in inches) 41.41° 75.00°

Component Dimensions

15.00°

41.41° 75.00°

90 + x/2

Hinge point, Typ. y

180 - x y , varies*

C omponent R otation A nalysis

C omponent A ngle A nalysis z

les

*Depth of deck x varies based on pleat les (see chapter les) Fig. 2.2 x/2 z , varies*

6.21

les Study (length and height in inches)

15.00°

6.21

18.00

° .00° 45.00 60 30.00°

8’0

2’0 p. Ty

y

Wood plank deck x/2

Fig. 2.1

18.00

° .00° 45.00 60 30.00°

z , varies*

180 - x

z

°

75.00

les Study (length and height in inches) les

*Depth of deck varies based on pleat les (see chapter les) Fig. 2.2

90 + x/2 y y , varies*

C omponent R otation A nalysis

C omponent A ngle A nalysis

50

43

51

INHABITATION

HYDROLOGY

50

43

51

INHABITATION

HYDROLOGY Steep (60˚)

Fig. 8.4

Edge Seat Detail Plan Steep (60˚)

Fig. 8.4

Edge Seat Detail Plan

Middle (52.5˚)

Middle (52.5˚)

Fig. 8.5

Edge Seat Plate Detail Shallow (45˚)

Fig. 6.3

Fig. 8.6

Large Size Pool Use Fig. 8.5

Edge Seat Plate Detail

Typological Under Visor Zones

Ps1: Weathers Permitting Shallow (45˚)

61


Ps1: Weathers Permitting

63


64


THE GE

Fallen Heroes Memorial By William O’brien Jr. Summer 2011 Competition Collaboration with William O’brien Jr., Cecilia Ho, Travis Williams, Li huang

Memorial G 30A + 9B

R5'-5"

R6'-6"

R8'-5"

oef 900' +150%

oef +103% 9A

oef 900' +115%

Fallen

R4'-8" R4'-10"

13.00°

40.00°

11.00°

R7'-6"

R7'-6"

35.00°

7.00°

30.00°

R6'-0"

R4'-6"

R5'-0"

R4'-6" 15.00°

20.00°

25.00°

R6'-4"

" '-8 75

0"

R6'-0"

" '-0 50

R5'-0"

"

R3'-0" R3'-0"

R6'-6"

OEF LENGTH: 918'-6" GRWOTH: +71.8%

OIF LENGTH: 3150'-10" GROWTH: +25%

R5'-0"

5.00°

R5'-3"

R6'-0"

R6'-6"

-1

Heroes Memorial attempts to systematically guide visitors to their loved and lost ones. It seeks to reveal the tensions of two ongoing wars: Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), while simultaneously sponsoring a dynamically growing memorial. The memorial is conceptualized as two ribbons that wrap and insert themselves into the landscape, continuous yet varied in magnitude to respond to various programs within the memorial. The fingers of the memorial are used as entrances, observation decks and future expansions. The outer ring represents the OIF casualties while the inter ring represents the OEF casualties. The flags along the perimeter group the states the soldiers are from into regions of the United States. The entrance paths which ramp downward into the mall of the memorial create the boundaries of the region in which visitors can find their lost ones, with those casualties closest to the mall being the most recent. As the war continues, the memorial will grow, allowing for the expansion of a few fingers in creating a more canyon-like and claustrophobic space. '-2

oef 891' +80% 5A

oef 900' +85%

9.00°

R6'-6" 5'-0"

5'-0"

5'-0"

R8'-6"

R8'-6"

oef +65% 9B

5'-0"

15.00°

oef 920' +97% 11A

151'-4"

5'-0"

oef 900' + 78% 13A

5'-0"

oef 900' + 62%

6' 18

61

16'-6"

R3'-0"

25A + 11A

R3'-3"

18

9'

64

427'-11"

R6'-8"

75

1" -1

50

'-0

'-8

"

R5'-0"

R6'-6"

"

9' -9

R5'-0"

" '-3

R3'-0"

"

OEF LENGTH: 911'-8" GRWOTH: +92.1%

OIF LENGTH: 3343'-10" GROWTH: +18%

R3'-0"

R8'-6"

OIF 3274' 25B 384'-0"

374'-10"

OIF 3287' 20A

30A

3245'

R12'-6"

R6'-8"

20A + 11A

18

61

368'-7"

422'-0"

OIF 3096' 25A

OIF 3663' 20B

'-9

"

7'

" -5

" '-8 75

OEF LENGTH: 862'-8" GRWOTH: +103.8%

R5'-0"

" '-0 50

7' -6

R6'-6" R5'-0"

"

OIF LENGTH: 3287' GROWTH: +21.8%

R11'-0"

Memorial Geometry Studies

Zero Surface Ribbon

Niche Ribbon

Splay Ribbon

DATA & ORGANIZAING STRATEGY

OPERATION IRAQI FREEDOM

OPERATION ENDURING FREEDOM

anticipated casualties 4393 casualties

anticipated casualties 1201casualties

150’

375’

300’ 500’

1000’ 1140’

Fallen heroes

65

Memorial G

Landsca


DATA & ORGANIZAING STRATEGY

AK

DATA & ORGANIZAING STRATEGY

Documented Casualties (By August 15th)

Operation Enduring Freedom

S TATE S

ALA(By MBAugust AMA 15th) Documented Casualties ALAS KA AME R ICFreedom AN S AMO AOperation Iraqi Freedom Operation Enduring S TATE S AR IZO NA ALAMBAMA 19 73 AR KANS AS ALAS KA 5 17 C ALIF O R NIA 1 AME R IC AN S AMO A 9 C O LO R ADO 2 8 AR IZO NA 98 AR KANS AS 62 C O NNE C TIC U1T1 C ALIF O R NIA 1 1 4 4 7 0 DE LAWAR E C O LO R ADO 1 8O LUMBIA 63 DIS TR IC T O F C C O NNE C TIC UT 8 28 F LO R IDA DE LAWAR E 2 15 G E O R IG IA DIS TR IC T O F C O LUMBIA 3 5 G UAM F LO R IDA 76 187 HAWAII G E O R IG IA 38 140 IDAHO G UAM 8 6 ILLINO IS HAWAII 4 26 INDIANA IDAHO 3 31 IO WA ILLINO IS 57 158 INDIANA 27 96 KANS AS IO WA 9 51 KE NTUC KY KANS AS 45 LO UIS IANA 1 1 KE NTUC KY 25 68 MAINE LO UIS IANA 18 86 MAR YLAND MAINE 15 25 MAS S AC HUS E TTS MAR YLAND 24 72 MIC HIG AN MAS S AC HUS E TTS 30 76 MINNE S O TA 3 2 MIC HIG AN 157 MIS S IS S IP P I 1 4 MINNE S O TA 67 MIS S O UR I MIS S IS S IP P I 10 56 MO NTANA MIS S O UR I 29 88 MO NTANA 8 29 NE BR AS KA NE BR AS KA 8 45 NE VADA NE VADA 37 NE W HAMP S H1I4R E NE W HAMP S HIR E 24 NE W J E R S E Y 1 0 77 NE W J E R S E Y NE W ME XIC O 2 0 NE W ME XIC O 7 42 NE W YO R K NE W YO R K 62 187 NO R TH C AR O3L7INA NO R TH C AR O LINA 106 NO R TH DAKO T5A NO R TH DAKO TA 14 NO THE R N MAR1IANA IS LANDS NO THE R N MAR IANA IS LANDS 5 O HIO O HIO 34 184 O KLAHO MA 2 2 O KLAHO MA 73 OREGON 18 73 OREGON P E NNS YLVANIA 4 196 P E NNS YLVAN5IA P UE R TO R IC O 35 P UE R TO R IC O 9 R HO DE IS LAND 10 R HO DE IS LAND2 S O UTH C AR O LINA 55 S O UTH C AR O1L9INA S O UTH DAKO TA 3 19 S O UTH DAKO TA TE NNE S S E E 28 94 TE NNE S S E E 9 0 TE XAS 412 TE XAS UTAH 12 24 UTAH VE R MO NT 1 22 VE R MO NT VIR G IN IS LANDS 1 6 VIR G IN IS LAN3D1S VIR G INIA 132 WAS HING TO N 35 89 VIR G INIA WE S T VIR G INIA 23 WAS HING TO N1 3 WIS C O NS IN 91 WE S T VIR G IN1IA4 WYO MING 14 WIS C O NS IN 4 WYO MING TO TAL

1201

4393

TO TAL

TOTAL

1201

100%

73 17 9 98 62 470 63 28 15 5 187 140 6 26 31 158 96 51 45 68 86 25 72 76 157 67 56 88 29 45 37 24 77 42 187 106 14 5 184 73 73 196 35 10 55 19 94 412 24 22 6 132 89 23 91 14

1201

4393

Angle No. of Rays Arc Length (FT) Casualties % Occ Angle No. of Rays Arc Length 60.55 1.9 151.5 645 15% 52.86 3.4 483.75 109.11 3.3 273 1155 26% 94.65 6.0 866.25 67.74 2.1 169.5 970 727.5 Casualties % Occ. 22% Angle 79.49No. of Rays5.1Arc Length (FT) .7T 6H EAST 1.6 132 579.75 N5O2R 202 77317% 18% 60.563.35 5 1.4.0 9 151.5 .8T 4HEAST 2.1 174.75 637.5 S6O9U 364 85030% 19% 109.169.66 1 3.4.5 3 273 900.75

TOTAL

WA

MT

CENTRAL

ND

ME

WA

MN

CENTRAL

ND

ID

WY NY

IL

OH

IN

CO

IA

KS

NORTHEAST

NC TN

OK

NMNC

AR

SC

OK

NM

AR

SC MS

TX

AMERICAN SAMOA NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS

NJ

MD DE DC

KY

KY

AZ TN

HI

RI

VA

MO

VA

MO

MA

WV

NORTHEAST

WV KS

AZ

PA OH

IN

NJ

MD DE DC

NH

CT

RI NE

IL

PA

CO

UT

NH

CT

UT

NY MI

MA

MI

NV IA CA

NE

CA

VT

WI

SD WY

WI

SD

MN

NV

VT

ME

ID

OR

WEST

OR

WEST

MT

HI

LA

SOUTHWEST

AL

GA

MS

TX

AL

GA

SOUTHEAST

LA

SOUTHEAST

SOUTHWEST

PL PL

AMERICAN SAMOA NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS

GUAM

VIRGIN ISLANDS PUERTO RICO

VIRGIN ISLANDS PUERTO RICO

GUAM

United States Regional Map

United States Regional Map

Operation Iraqi Freedom

Operation Enduring Freedom

CENTRAL 360.00 11.00 SOUTHWEST WEST

AK

Operation Iraqi Freedom

Operation Enduring Freedom Casualties % Occ. 202 17% 364 30% 226 19% 176 15% 233 19%

NORTH EAST SOUTHEAST CENTRAL SOUTHWEST WEST

Operation Iraqi Freedom

19 5 1 28 11 114 18 8 2 3 76 38 8 4 3 57 27 9 11 25 18 15 24 30 32 14 10 29 8 8 14 10 20 7 62 37 5 1 34 22 18 54 9 2 19 3 28 90 12 1 1 31 35 13 14 4

226 19% 67.74 4393 100% 360.00 176 15% 52.76 233 19% 69.84

1201

100%

360.00

2.1 1.6 2.1

23.00

11.00

169.5 132 174.75

3294.75

900.75

Casualties % Occ 645 15% 1155 26% 970 22% 773 18% 850 19% 4393

100%

Angle No. of Rays 52.86 3.4 94.65 6.0 79.49 5.1 63.35 4.0 69.66 4.5 360.00

23.00

Arc Length 483.75 866.25 727.5 579.75 637.5 3294.75

Regional Chart for OIF and OEF

Regional Chart for OIF and OEF

66


THE GE

Memorial G 30A + 9B

R5'-5"

R6'-6"

R8'-5"

oef 900' +150%

oef +103% 9A

oef 900' +115%

6' 18

R4'-8"

61

R4'-10"

13.00°

40.00°

11.00°

R7'-6"

R7'-6"

35.00°

7.00°

30.00°

R6'-0"

R6'-0" R5'-0"

R3'-0" R3'-0"

R6'-6"

OEF LENGTH: 918'-6" GRWOTH: +71.8% OIF LENGTH: 3150'-10" GROWTH: +25%

R5'-0" R4'-6"

R5'-0"

R4'-6" 15.00°

20.00°

25.00°

" '-8 75

0"

" '-0 50

5.00°

R5'-3"

R6'-0"

R6'-6"

-1

"

oef 891' +80% 5A

oef 900' +85%

9.00°

R6'-6" 5'-0"

5'-0"

5'-0"

R8'-6"

R8'-6"

oef +65% 9B

5'-0"

15.00°

oef 920' +97% 11A

151'-4"

5'-0"

oef 900' + 78% 13A

5'-0"

oef 900' + 62%

'-2

16'-6"

R3'-0"

R6'-4"

25A + 11A R3'-3"

18

9'

64

427'-11"

75

1" -1 50

'-0

'-8

"

R5'-0" R6'-6"

"

9' -9

R5'-0"

" '-3

R3'-0"

"

OEF LENGTH: 911'-8" GRWOTH: +92.1% OIF LENGTH: 3343'-10" GROWTH: +18%

R3'-0"

R6'-8"

R8'-6"

OIF 3274' 25B 384'-0"

20A + 11A

374'-10"

OIF 3287' 20A

30A

3245'

R12'-6"

R6'-8"

18

61

'-9

"

7'

" -5

" '-8 75

OEF LENGTH: 862'-8" GRWOTH: +103.8%

R5'-0"

" '-0 50

7' -6

R6'-6" R5'-0"

"

OIF LENGTH: 3287' GROWTH: +21.8%

368'-7"

422'-0"

OIF 3096' 25A

OIF 3663' 20B

R11'-0"

Memorial Geometry Studies

Zero Surface Ribbon

Niche Ribbon

Memorial G

Splay Ribbon

Fallen heroes

Landsca

67


68


69


METROSCAPES

Refections of the American Landscape

2007-Current www.wix.com/georgexlin/photos

Native to California, George X. Lin received

his Bachelor’s degree from UC Berkeley and is currently completing his Master’s of Architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Exploring and experiencing new environments has always been his fascination. While growing up in California, he was blessed to be in close proximity to nature. However, at the time he did not realize how fortunate he was to be surrounded by nature and all its beauties, partly because many people in his life fantasized instead about exotic countries abroad. Simply finding the time to experience everything one’s hometown and the nature nearby have to offer is challenging, let alone other cities and countries. While George was fascinated by his travels abroad, these travels led him to realize that the same diversity exists here in his backyard. The only requirement to discovering this diversity was occasionally venturing off the beaten path and exploring. Getting lost often times helps us to find ourselves. George hopes that this book can be an inspiration for others to find time in their lives for a journey, whether it be in new cities or out in nature away from familiar environments. Metroscapes: Reflections of the American Landscape is a book that explores the contrasts and sometimes the influences between the rural and urban and vice-versa. This is his journey of and reflection on America, a metropolis of urban and rural landscapes.

MetroScapes

71


72


73


74


75


George X. Lin 440 Massachusetts Ave Apt #3 Cambridge, MA 02139 geolin@Mit.edu 510-710-0739 510 710-0739 geolin@Mit.edu 510 710-0739 geolin@Mit.edu 440 ave. Apt. 3 510 Massachusetts 710-0739 geolin@Mit.edu 440 Massachusetts ave. Apt. 3 Cambridge, MA 02139ave. Apt. 3 440 Massachusetts Cambridge, MA 02139 Cambridge, MA 02139

George X. Lin George George X. X. Lin Lin

Education Education Institute of Technology- M.Arch Candidate, Jan 2013 Education Mass. Mass. Institute of Technology- M.Arch Candidate, Jan 2013

University of California: BerkeleyB.A.Candidate, Architecture, 2007 Mass. Institute of TechnologyM.Arch Jan May 2013 University of California: BerkeleyB.A. Architecture, May 2007 UniversityAbroad: of California: BerkeleyB.A. Architecture, May Design 2007 (Summer 2006) Education Royal Danish Academy, Scandinavian Education Abroad: Royal Danish Academy, Scandinavian Design (Summer 2006) Chinese University of Hong Kong (FallDesign 2006)(Summer 2006) Education Abroad: Royal Danish Academy, Scandinavian Chinese University of Hong Kong (Fall 2006) Chinese University of HongScience, Kong (Fall 2006) Additional Related Courses: Energy and Building Environmental Science & Policy Additional Related Courses: Energy and Building Science, Environmental Science & Policy Management, Painting, Affordable Housing, Film & Studies Additional Related Courses: EnergyLandscape and Building Science, Environmental Science Policy Management, Landscape Painting, Affordable Housing, Film Studies Management, Landscape Painting, Affordable Housing, Film Studies

Work Experience Work Experience Work Experience William O’Brien Jr., Cambridge, Dec 2009-Sept 2010: Designer

William O’Brien Jr., Cambridge, Dec 2009-Sept 2010: Designer

O’Brien Jr., Cambridge, Dec 2009-Sept 2010: Designer •William 2010 MoMA/P.S.1 Young Architects Program / Fallen heros Memorial competition • 2010 MoMA/P.S.1 Young Architects Program / Fallen heros Memorial competition •• Investigated methods of Architects construction of ruled surfaces. 2010 MoMA/P.S.1 Young Program / Fallen heros Memorial competition • Investigated methods of construction of ruled surfaces. •• Created 3d models andofphysical modelsofofruled project scheme. Investigated methods construction surfaces. • Created 3d models and physical models of project scheme. •• Project Created Photographer 3d models and physical models of project scheme. • Project Photographer • Project PhotographerOakland, July 2007-July 2009: Designer TranSystems Corporation, TranSystems Corporation, Oakland, July 2007-July 2009: Designer

Corporation, Oakland, July 2007-July 2009: •TranSystems Interfaced and collaborated with designers and engineers of Designer different disciplines to • Interfaced and collaborated with designers and engineers of different disciplines to provided drawings and reports design review boards.of different disciplines to • Interfaced and collaborated withfor designers and engineers provided drawings and reports for design review boards. • Facilitated in site investigations anddesign designreview reviewboards. meetings with clients and engineers. provided drawings and reports for • Facilitated in site investigations and design review meetings with clients and engineers. •• Coordinated Ensured that construction and contracts were Facilitated into site investigations and designdocuments review meetings with clients anddrawn, engineers. • Coordinated to Ensured that construction documents and contracts were drawn, writtened andtodelivered. • Coordinated Ensured that construction documents and contracts were drawn, writtened and delivered. • Coordinated documentation writtened and delivered. process for LEED certification. • Coordinated documentation process for LEED certification. • Coordinated process for LEEDJan-May, certification. Leddy Maytum Stacydocumentation Architects, San Francisco, 2007: Intern Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects, San Francisco, Jan-May, 2007: Intern

Stacyaddition Architects, San Francisco, Jan-May, 2007: Intern •Leddy Maytum Recommended to software package and trained employees on Sketchup. • Recommended addition to software package and trained employees on Sketchup. •• Constructed models to aid consultants and city planning department meetings. Recommendedstudy addition to software package and trained employees on Sketchup. • Constructed study models to aid consultants and city planning department meetings. • Constructed studyMay-June, models to aid consultants Grey Studios, Berkeley, 2006: Intern and city planning department meetings. Grey Studios, Berkeley, May-June, 2006: Intern

Skills Skills Skills

May-June, 2006:materials Intern to clients. •Grey Studios, AnalyzedBerkeley, and delivered presentation • Analyzed and delivered presentation materials to clients. •• Constructed and conceptual modelstoofclients. current projects. Analyzed andstructural delivered presentation materials • Constructed structural and conceptual models of current projects. • Constructed structural and conceptual models of current projects. Adobe: Photoshop CS5, Illustrator CS5, Indesign CS5 Adobe: Photoshop CS5, Illustrator CS5, Indesign CS5 AutoDesk: 3D Studio Max, AutoCAD 2011 Adobe: Photoshop CS5, Illustrator CS5, Indesign CS5 AutoDesk: 3D Studio Max, AutoCAD 2011 MCneel: Rhino 4, Maxwell V-ray, AutoDesk: 3D Studio Max,Render, AutoCAD 2011Grasshopper , Rhinoscript MCneel: Rhino 4, Maxwell Render, V-ray, Grasshopper , Rhinoscript Google and various plug-ins forGrasshopper rendering , Rhinoscript MCneel:Sketchup, Rhino 4, Maxwell Render, V-ray, Google Sketchup, and various plug-ins for rendering Microsoft Office: Word, Excel, plug-ins PowerPoint Google Sketchup, and various for rendering Microsoft Office: Word, Excel, PowerPoint Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint Careful andOffice: detailed hand drafting skills Careful and detailed hand drafting skills Rendering abilities withhand pencil, colorskills pencil, pen, watercolor Careful and detailed drafting Rendering abilities with pencil, color pencil, pen, watercolor Meticulous model building skillscolor pencil, pen, watercolor Rendering abilities with pencil, Meticulous model building skills Shop experience (Wood, Metal, Plastic) Meticulous model building skills Shop experience (Wood, Metal, Plastic) Experience with Universal/Epilog Laser Cutter and Z. corp 3d Printer Shop experience (Wood, Metal, Plastic) Experience with Universal/Epilog Laser Cutter and Z. corp 3d Printer Fluent in English and Conversational Experience with Universal/Epilog LaserChinese Cutter(Mandarin, and Z. corpCantonese) 3d Printer Fluent in English and Conversational Chinese (Mandarin, Cantonese) Fluent in English and Conversational Chinese (Mandarin, Cantonese) Interest

Personal Personal Interest Personal Interest Violin Making:

Crafted Italian instruments using traditional tools. Completed three Violin Making: Crafted Italian instruments using traditional tools. Completed three playable violins (2000, 2002, 2004). Member of VSA:traditional Violinmakertools. society of America. Violin Making: Crafted Italian instruments using Completed three playable violins (2000, 2002, 2004). Member of VSA: Violinmaker society of America. Competed in Biannual international Violin Making Competition in 2000 (youngest competitor) playable violins (2000, 2002, 2004). Member of VSA: Violinmaker society of America. Competed in Biannual international Violin Making Competition in 2000 (youngest competitor) and 2002. Competed and 2002.in Biannual international Violin Making Competition in 2000 (youngest competitor) and 2002. Ifshin Violins, Berkeley, 2003-2004: Restorer

Ifshin Violins, Berkeley, 2003-2004: Restorer

2003-2004: •Ifshin Violins, RestoredBerkeley, the interiors to current Restorer engineered measurements & regraduated the base • Restored the interiors to current engineered measurements & regraduated the base bars of violins to achieve full potential of volume and depth. Worked with • Restored the interiors to the current & regraduated the base bars of violins to achieve the full engineered potential ofmeasurements volume and depth. Worked with professionals mostpotential efficient thickness topdepth. and bottom bars of violinsto toengineer achieve the volume in and Workedboards. with professionals to engineer the full most efficient of thickness in top and bottom boards. techniques. • Delivered finished productsthe using and skilled carving professionals to engineer mostwoodshop efficient tools thickness top and bottom boards. techniques. • Delivered finished products using woodshop tools andinskilled carving •• Educated on violinusing maintenance. Deliveredcustomers finished products woodshop tools and skilled carving techniques. • Educated customers on violin maintenance. Digital 2007-Current: •Digital Photography, Educated customers on violin maintenance. Photography, 2007-Current: MetroScapes:2007-Current: http://www.blurb.com/books/1949445 Digital Photography, MetroScapes: http://www.blurb.com/books/1949445 Portfolio: http://www.wix.com/georgexlin/photos MetroScapes: http://www.blurb.com/books/1949445 Portfolio: http://www.wix.com/georgexlin/photos Landscape/Architecture: geolio.deviantart.com Portfolio: http://www.wix.com/georgexlin/photos Landscape/Architecture: geolio.deviantart.com References are Available upon Request Landscape/Architecture: geolio.deviantart.com References are Available upon Request References are Available upon Request


References

Name

Office/Relationship

Contact Information

Kit Wong / David K Lee

Transystems Employers

505 14th St Oakland CA 94612 KMWong@TranSystems.com DkLee@TranSystems.com (510) 835-2761

Robert Shepherd

Grey Studio Undergradutate Studio Professor/ Mentor

101 South Park San Francisco Ca. 94107 reshep@grey-studio.com 415-706-0195

Mary Comerio

Professor/ Former Arch. Department Chair, College of Environmental Design, Berkeley

232 Wurster Hall Berkeley, CA 94720 mcomerio@berkeley.edu

LMS architects Mentor/Supervisor Marsha Maytum

Special Thanks to: Adelina Chan, Alex Marshall, Bill Hung, Cecilia Ho, Li Huang, Sunnie Lau, Travis Williams

677 Harrison St. San Francisco, CA 94107 MMaytum@lmsarch.com 415-495-1700

2011 Portfolio  

Architectual Design Portfolio UCBerkeley + MIT

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