Issuu on Google+

THE  ETHICAL  PROBLEM  OF  THE  HOLY  WAR   1  

 

    The  Ethical  Problem  of  the  Holy  War   As  Seen  Primarily  in  the  Book  of  Joshua        

 

Geoff  Hill  


2   THE  ETHICAL  PROBLEM  OF  THE  HOLY  WAR       “No  enactment  of  man  can  be  considered  law  unless  it  conforms  to  the  law  of  God”   -­‐William  Blackstone       The  Ethical  Problem  of  the  Holy  War       What  are  the  first  things  that  enter  your  mind  when  you  hear  the  words   genocide,  decimation,  extermination,  or  annihilation?  Personally,  I  think  of  Adolf   Hitler,  Chairman  Mao,  and  Rwanda  to  name  a  few.    This  paper  will  discuss  the   ethical  problems  of  the  Holy  War  as  told  in  the  Biblical  books  of  Joshua  and   Deuteronomy,  and  attempt  to  justify,  what  some  would  consider  the  heinous  acts  of   cruelty  similar  to  those  of  Hitler,  Mao,  and  Rwanda.     How  Can  We  Reconcile  a  Good  God  to  Such  Bad  Events?       The  root  of  the  problem  at  hand  could  be  labeled  what  scholars  and   theologians  call  “The  Ban”,  or  more  specifically,  “Herem”  (‫)חרם‬,  literally,  “cursed”.     Strong’s  Exhaustive  Concordance  (2764)  defines  Herem  as  an  accursed  dedicated   thing,  appointed  to  utter  destruction,  to  be  exterminated.    A  Biblical  account  of  this   is  seen  in  Joshua  7:2,  “when  the  Lord  your  God  shall  deliver  them  before  you,  and   you  shall  defeat  them,  then  you  shall  utterly  destroy  [herem]  them”.    

The  traditional  attempts  at  justifying  God’s  command  to  Israel  to  lay  waste  

and  utterly  destroy  Canaan  can  be  broken  up  into  several  parts.    The  first  of  which  I   would  like  to  discuss  revolves  around  the  intended  purity  of  the  covenant  between   God  and  Israel.    Leviticus  18:3  makes  this  far  from  ambiguous  by  saying  “You  shall   not  do  as  they  do  in  the  land  of  Canaan,  to  which  I  am  bringing  you.    You  shall  not   walk  in  their  statutes.”  God  has  a  pure,  personal,  and  real  covenant  with  Israel  and  


THE  ETHICAL  PROBLEM  OF  THE  HOLY  WAR   3  

 

he  forbids  it  to  be  defiled  by  the  wicked,  sinful,  and  idolatrous  lifestyles  of  the   Canaanites.    Thus,  God  requires  absolute  holiness  among  the  Israelites.    This  can  be   summarized  by  the  popular  proverb  “bad  company  corrupts  good  character”1.    Not   only  had  God  commanded  Israel  to  destroy  the  people  of  Canaan,  but  also  the  objects   within  Canaan  by  saying  “Keep  yourselves  from  the  things  devoted  to  destruction.”2        

Philip  Jenson  summarizes  this  example  by  saying  “God’s  demand  for  justice  

and  righteousness  is  worked  out  in  the  political  life  and  death  of  nations.”3   Consequently,  it  may  seem  that  the  only  way  to  secure  the  purity  of  Israel  is  to   remove  any  potential  stumbling  blocks,  i.e.,  the  annihilation  of  the  wicked   Canaanites  and  their  idolatrous  objects.        

The  previous  sentence  leads  me  to  address  the  next  potential  attempt  at  

justifying  the  conquests  of  Joshua,  namely,  God’s  sole  right  and  authority  to  carry   out  justice  on  the  wicked  any  time  He  pleases  –  it  just  so  happens  to  be  in  the  time  of   Joshua  that  He  decided  to  do  so.    We  can  recall  Genesis  15:16  where  God  made  it   clear  that  He  will  wait  “four  more  generations”  to  call  Canaan  to  justice  because   their  iniquity  is  “not  yet  complete”.    What  was  the  culmination  of  their  wickedness?   Bestiality,  sodomy,  child  sacrifices  and  occult  worship  to  name  a  few.        

This  is  an  indication  that  God  did  not  act  arbitrarily  or  randomly  in  

commanding  the  wars,  but  that  He  Himself  operates  in  accordance  with  the  very   same  “laws  of  justice”  that  are  part  of  His  nature.    (I  go  so  far  as  to  say,  humbly,  that   God  had  to  wait  until  it  was  lawfully  right  to  do  so.)  In  other  words,  the  Israelites                                                                                                                   1  1  Corinthians  15:33   2  Joshua  6:18  

3  Philip  Jenson,  The  Problem  of  War  in  the  Old  Testament,  Grove  Biblical  Series  25  (Cambridge:  Grove  

Books,  2002),  17  


4   THE  ETHICAL  PROBLEM  OF  THE  HOLY  WAR     weren’t  commanded  to  kill  and  slaughter  innocent  peoples,  but  that  God  used  them   as  the  divine  instrument  of  justice  against  wicked  peoples.    Gary  DeLashmutt  poses  a   summarization  of  the  existence  of  The  Ban  by  saying  “The  main  reason  for  “The   Ban”  was  not  that  God  was  ‘playing  favorites’  with  Israel…”  although  Deuteronomy   7:7-­‐8  might  disagree,  but  that  “…the  primary  reason  for  the  "ban"  was  to  execute  his   judgment  on  the  Canaanites  [for  their  wickedness].”4  Philip  Jenson  also  concludes,   “Just  as  the  Assyrians  will  be  God’s  means  of  judgment  on  sinful  Israel,  so  Israel  is   the  medium  for  God’s  punishment  of  these  nations.”5    

Furthermore,  I  believe  God  executing  judgment  on  the  Canaanites  was  the  

means  by  which  He  chose  to  bring  to  fulfillment  the  earlier  promises  to  the  people   of  Israel.    Deuteronomy  9:5  states,     “It  is  not  because  of  your  righteousness…  that  you  are  going  in  to  take   possession  of  their  land;  but  on  account  of  the  wickedness  of  these   nations…  to  accomplish  what  he  swore  to  your  fathers.”       In  this  case,  the  means  justified  the  end.    As  I  noted  previously,  God  chose  to  wait   until  the  right  time  in  which  he  could  carry  out  his  justice  for  the  purpose  of   bringing  Israel  into  the  Promised  Land.    Recall  the  covenant  God  made  with   Abraham:  

 

“I  will  give  to  you  and  to  your  offspring  after  you  the  land  of  your   sojourning’s,  all  the  land  of  Canaan,  for  an  everlasting  possession,  and  I  will   be  their  God.”  (Genesis  17:8)     This  is  another  one  of  the  methods  scholars  and  theologians  

traditionally  use  to  justify  the  conquests  of  Joshua.    Furthermore,  simply                                                                                                                   4  DeLashmutt,  Gary.  "The  Ban"  Xenos  Christian  Felloship.  2011?.     <  http://www.xenos.org/essays/ban  >.   5  Philip  Jenson,  The  Problem  of  War  in  the  Old  Testament,  Grove  Biblical  Series  25  (Cambridge:  Grove   Books,  2002),  16.  


THE  ETHICAL  PROBLEM  OF  THE  HOLY  WAR   5  

 

calling  it  an  attempted  justification  falls  short  of  its  deeper  purpose.    Our  God   is  a  faithful  God  who  does  not  break  His  promises,  even  in  the  midst  of  Israel’s   (and  our)  sin.    God  promised  that  land  to  Israel  and  He  would  not  renege  on   His  promise.       Finally,  the  previous  justifications  climax  into  what  I  believe  is  the   primary  reason  for  the  Holy  Wars;  justifiable  above  all  other  reasons  or   examples,  honoring  God,  rightfully  so,  in  His  throne,  with  dominion  over  the   earth.    In  my  opinion,  The  Holy  War  is  God  showing  his  sole  divinity,  authority   and  preeminence  over  the  false  gods  of  Canaan,  and  as  an  example  for   generations  to  come  that  “You  shall  have  no  other  gods  before  me”6.    God  has   zero  tolerance  for  that  command  being  disobeyed,  and,  as  God,  reserves  the   right  to  punish  those  who  transgress  that  law.    Jeph  Halloway  puts  it  nicely  by   saying  “That  God  acts  as  the  source  and  means  of  victory  for  Israel  is  an   expression  of  his  exclusive  kingship  over  Israel”7.    Thus,  God  receives  the  glory   and  honor  –  Israel  was  merely  the  tool.        

 

Let’s  Take  Into  Account  Some  Other  Potential  Opinions   In  the  midst  of  the  justification  for  the  conquests  of  Israel,  lies  a  seemingly   convincing  set  of  different  perspectives.    There  is  a  fairly  populous  group  of  scholars   who  believe  there  is  good  evidence  to  admit  that  these  horrific,  genocidal  conquests   never  even  happened  –  at  least  not  in  the  literal  sense.    Even  if  the  fundamental                                                                                                                   6  Exodus  20:3  

7  Jeph  Holloway,  “The  Ethical  Dilemma  of  Holy  War,”  Southwestern  Journal  of  Theology  41  (1998),  

50.  


6   THE  ETHICAL  PROBLEM  OF  THE  HOLY  WAR     majority  dismisses  this  group,  there  could  be  a  lot  of  validity,  and,  to  be  honest,   concrete  grounds  for  such  views.       For  example,  look  at  two  specific  passages:  the  first  where  God  commands,  and   the  second  where  Israel  apparently  obeys.    In  Deuteronomy  20:16  Israel  was  told,   “in  the  cities  of  these  peoples  that  the  LORD  is  giving  you  as  an  inheritance,  you  shall   not  leave  anything  alive  that  breathes”,  and  in  Joshua  11:11,  “They  struck  every   person  who  was  in  it  with  the  sword,  utterly  destroying  them;  there  was  no  one  left   who  breathed.”     K.  Lawson  Younger,  Jr.  makes  the  point  that  if  we  viewed  these  passages   literally,  then  we  would  also,  in  some  sense,  be  obligated  to  view  the  words  literally   when  we  read  about  the  “conquest”  of  France  during  World  War  II,  or  say  that   ‘Germany  conquered  France’8.  He  says,  “The  meaning  is  something  like  ‘the  German   army  defeated  the  French  army  in  battle  and  occupied  France’,  but  it  did  not   subjugate…”9  nor  did  it  completely  exterminate  everyone.  This  could  lead  us  to   understand  that  the  conquests  may  not  have  happened  literally,  but  may  have  been   a  literary  hyperbole.  The  terms  everyone,  no  one,  and  every  are  absolutes  that  many   historical  (and  literal  pieces)  use  as  exaggerations  to  emphasize  the  statement.      

In  addition  to  the  hyperbolic  nature  of  Joshua  and  Deuteronomy,  it  can  be  

said  that  many  people  “naturally  read  [Joshua  and  Deuteronomy]  against  the   background  of  conquests  made  by  European  settlers  and  colonial  invaders  in  the  

                                                                                                               

8  K.  Lawson  Younger,  Jr.,  Ancient  Conquest  Accounts:  A  Study  in  Ancient  Near    

Eastern  and  Biblical  History  Writing,  JSOTSup  98  (Sheffield:  JSOT,  1990),  242-­‐244.   9  Ibid,  244.  


THE  ETHICAL  PROBLEM  OF  THE  HOLY  WAR   7  

 

Americas,  Africa,  and  Asia.”10  In  other  words,  we  could  admit  that  our  own  social   and  political  framework  is  at  fault  for  our  misinterpretation  of  Scripture.  Perhaps  it   was  never  meant  to  be  taken  literally  –  who  are  we  to  assume  it  is?     Richard  D.  Nelson  says  that  Joshua  is  “describing  an  idealistic  and  theoretical”   explanation  of  Israel’s  living  in  Canaan,  “not  factual  history”11.  To  put  this  example   to  practice,  Nelson  might  say  that  Israel’s  dramatic  telling  blazing  wars,  glorious   battles,  fallen  kings,  and  conquered  lands  are  nothing  more  than  an  attempt  at   scaring  off  would-­‐be  invaders,  and  to  give  Israel  a  self  proclaimed  fame  on  the  field   of  battle.12   In  conclusion,  if  we  combine  archaeological  evidence  with  hyperbole  and   literary  exaggerations,  it  could  be  somewhat  safe  to  say  that  Israel  never  completely   annihilated  Canaan  at  all,  but  emerged  from  within  the  land,  rather  than  the   outside.13     Evaluation,  Assessment,  and  the  Answer  to  the  Problem  At  Hand    

Evaluation  of  the  previous  attempts  at  justifying  (or  dissecting)  the  Holy  

Wars  of  Joshua  and  the  Israelites  can  go  a  long  way  in  discovering  more  than  just   whether  they  actually  took  place,  or  trying  to  prove  God’s  inculpability.  I  admit,   whether  they  did,  or  didn’t  happen  the  way  The  Bible  tells  us,  or  whether  our   interpretation  of  the  texts  leads  us  to  two  different  conclusions,  there  are  some  clear   lessons  from  the  passages.                                                                                                                   10  Richard  D.  Nelson,  The  Historical  Books  (Nashville:  Abingdon,  1998),  81.   11  ibid.  

12  ibid.,  82 13  ibid.  

 


8   THE  ETHICAL  PROBLEM  OF  THE  HOLY  WAR      

In  my  evaluation,  I  have  separated  the  justifications  into  two  primary  

categories  of  intended  purposes,  namely,  theological  and  practical  (not  to  say   theology  isn’t  practical,  or  vise  versa).    In  the  first  category,  theological,  I  have   included  God’s  command  to  Israel  to  subjugate  and  conquer  Canaan  for  the  goal  of   acquiring  the  Promised  Land.  Although  this  may  seem  like  it  exists  for  practical   purposes,  we  have  seen  above  that  God  did  not  bring  them  into  the  Promised  Land   because  of  their  own  righteousness,  but  because  God  made  a  promise  to  their   forefathers.  In  upholding  the  promise  to  the  patriarchs,  God  is  making  Himself   known  as  a  faithful  God  that  does  not  waver  regardless  of  circumstances.  He  also   makes  clear  that  He  is  sovereign,  and  His  ultimate  plan  is  not  bound  to  the  decisions   or  sins  of  man.  If  God  were  a  god  that  broke  promises,  the  future  promises  of   Salvation  and  eternal  glory  in  Christ  would  be  void  and  untrustworthy.    

I  also  would  venture  to  include  God’s  display  of  His  own  power  in  the  lives  of  

the  Israelites  and  Canaanites  to  be  a  measure  by  which  he  will  act  to  the  entire   world  for  generations  to  come.  Israel  is  a  representation  of  those  who,  today,  are  the   spiritual  Israel,  and  Canaan  could  be  seen  as  a  representation  of  the  reprobate.  Just   like  in  Joshua,  God  will  one  day  bring  His  people  into  the  “Promised  Land”  of  heaven,   whereby  committing  the  lost  to  judgment  –  all  for  His  glory.     On  the  other  hand,  in  the  practical  category,  God  requires  of  Christians  to  be   holy,  righteous  and  blameless  before  Him.  He  tells  us  there  is  no  communion   between  the  light  and  the  dark,  and  to  not  be  a  part  of  wickedness  in  any  sense  of   the  term.  This  is  a  wonderful  parallel,  albeit  more  “spiritual”,  to  that  which  He   commanded  the  Israelites  to  Ban  any  Canaanite  or  their  objects.  Finally,  the  


THE  ETHICAL  PROBLEM  OF  THE  HOLY  WAR   9  

 

judgment  of  the  Canaanites  is  a  “gentle  reminder”  that  those  who  put  a  god  before   Him  will  be  judged  accordingly,  and  likewise  to  that  of  the  land  of  Canaan.     Finally,  my  solution  to  the  claims  of  the  Ethical  Problem  of  the  Holy  War,  and   the  question  “Why  would  a  good  God  command  war  and  genocide  as  seen  in  the  Old   Testament”  would  be  fairly  simple.  Whether  literal  or  literary,  God  requires  that  we   abstain  from  impurity  and  unrighteous  acts.  In  the  same  way  Christ  will  come  again   to  judge  the  wicked  and  call  the  righteous  to  salvation,  so  God  did  to  the  Canaanites   and  the  Israelites.  He  is  a  faithful  and  just  God  who  does  not  waver  in  His   righteousness  or  His  glory.  I  conclude  with  a  quote  from  Philip  Jenson.   “War  may  be  unavoidable…  it  is  an  aspect  of  a  fallen  world  that   God  purposes  to  redeem…  God’s  desire  to  save  the  world  through  the   descendants  of  Abraham  makes  the  wars  required  to  establish  that   nation  a  necessary  evil”.14       Word  Count:  2162        

 

                                                                                                                          14  Philip  Jenson,  The  Problem  of  War  in  the  Old  Testament,  Grove  Biblical  Series  25  (Cambridge:   Grove  Books,  2002),  16.  


1 THE  ETHICAL  PROBLEM  OF  THE  HOLY  WAR    0     Bibliography     Jenson,  Philip.  The  Problem  of  War  in  the  Old  Testament,  Grove  Biblical  Series  25.   Cambridge:  Grove  Books,  2002.     Halloway,  Jeph.  The  Ethical  Dilemma  of  Holy  War.     Southwestern  Journal  of  Theology  41.  1998.     Nelson,  Richard  D.  The  Historical  Books.  Nashville:  Abingdon,  1998     Younger,  Jr.,  Lawson  K.  Ancient  Conquest  Accounts:  A  Study  in  Ancient  Near     Eastern  and  Biblical  History  Writing.  Sheffield:  JSOT,  1990.     DeLashmutt,  Gary.  The  Ban.  Xenos  Christian  Fellowship:  xenos.org,  2011            

   


The Ethical Problem of the Holy War