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2016 MEDIA KIT


“The timing is absolutely perfect for a consumer magazine on personalized medicine and genomics. The public is hearing about the breakthroughs regularly, and they are eager to be empowered with this type of information.�

Dr. Geoffrey Ginsburg Executive Director, Center for Personalized and Precision Medicine, Duke University, and Editor-at-Large, Genome magazine


Targeted treatment is the future of healthcare. Genome is a quarterly magazine that covers the personalized medicine stories of today and the breakthroughs of tomorrow, so that patients have the information they need to get the targeted treatments they deserve. When patients fully understand how personalized medicine can transform the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of chronic and life-altering diseases, they will be able to have informed, meaningful conversations with their healthcare professionals.

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p. 30 Researchers are rethinking clinical trials, and that’s a good thing

p. 48 Wearable tech: Are you ready for this new era of medicine?

SUB SCR IB E FOR FR EE GENOME MAG.COM

03

WINTER 2014

S U M M E R & FA L L 2 0 1 4

YO U R H E A LT H I S P E R S O N A L S U M M E R & FA L L 2 0 1 4

GENOME

GENOME

p. 26 A blood test that can detect cancer could change the way we treat the disease

p. 22 Social networks are empowering patients and advancing science at the same time

p. 26 Dentistry gets personalized with a new genetic test for gum disease

p. 56 How precision medicine is changing the way we look at lung cancer

YO U R H E A LT H I S P E R S O N A L W I N T E R 2 0 1 4

FOOD AS MEDICINE KNOWI NG HOW GE NES AND NUTRIENTS I NT ERACT COUL D B E TH E PRESCRI PT I O N FOR B ETTER H EALTH

YO U R H E A LT H I S P E R S O N A L

YO U R H E A LT H I S P E R S O N A L

T H E FA M I LY C O N D I T I O N H OW T H E G E N E S YO U I N H E R I T A F F E C T YO U R R I S K FO R D I S E AS E

Genome magazine acts as an information bridge, bringing relevant insight and knowledge to patients, families, and caregivers about evidence-based solutions available today, as well as the promising treatments that tomorrow could bring. From this landscape, Genome magazine derived its mission: to explore the world of personalized medicine and the genomic revolution that makes it possible, empowering readers to make informed health decisions that will help them live better and longer.

ROCKING THE AGES PHOTOGRAPHS BY SALLY PETERSON

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15spring_feat_Longevity_IS_3_ss.indd 36

Genome is pleased to announce that it took top honors at the Folio Awards — the largest awards competition in magazine publishing, honoring gorgeous design and uncompromising journalism.

2/27/15 11:06 AM

Zilpha 101 years old Los Angeles, California “I don’t feel like I am 100 years old. I still live on my own, in the house I designed and help build with my husband. I still drive. I do the gardening, and I still fix the plumbing around here.”

Milton 101 years old Torrance, California “I was my parents’ only son,” says the former art director and employee of the Walt Disney Studios, who continues to draw and paint. “So I was spoiled, and I expected to be waited on by my seven sisters.”

15spring_feat_Longevity_IS_3_ss.indd 37

A combination of genetic luck, environment, and attitude may be the key to living longer. BY KENDALL K. MORGAN

2/27/15 11:06 AM

1st Place Best Single Article

1st Place Overall Design

1st Place Best Full Issue Best Feature Story

Rocking the Ages, Spring 2015, Healthcare/nursing/medical category 2015 Folio Awards

Winter 2014 issue, Consumer, Above 250,000 circulation 2015 Folio Awards

Spring 2014 issue, Change Your Microbiome, Change Yourself Healthcare/nursing/medical category 2014 Folio Awards


Audience GENDER

45.1%

AG E

M A R I TA L S TAT U S

42.7%

54.9%

Male

21–24: 5.8%

Married

Female

24–34: 12.2%

Single

57.3%

35–44: 17.1% 45–54: 27.1% 55–64: 24% 14%

48 51 70 %

Income over $100k

%

Are charitable donors

%

Completed college

2015 Subscriber Survey, Subscription Genius

65+:


E D U CAT I O N

29.3%

INCOME

H O M E OW N E R S TAT U S

19.2% 33.2% 80.8%

36.7%

Completed Graduate School:

33.2%

0–35k:

8.1%

Own

Completed College:

36.7%

35–50k:

24.6%

Rent

Attended College:

0.8%

50–75k:

10%

Completed High School:

29.3%

75–100k:

9.3%

100–125k: 6% 125–150k:

12%

150k+:

30%

REGION

Northeast:

22.4%

East No. Central: 12% West No. Central: 4% South Atlantic:

23.2%

South Central:

10.6%

Mountain:

7.2%

Pacific:

20.2%

Top interests include: Health & Wellness Technology Books


2016 Editorial Calendar SU B SC R IB E FO R FR E E GE N O ME MAG.C O M

01 GENOME

YO U R H E A LT H I S P E R S O N A L S P R I N G 2 0 1 4

SPRING 2014

IT’S WHY A $99 HOME DNA KIT IS CAUSING AN UPROAR.

IT’S HOW ONE WOMAN FIGHTS LUNG CANCER.

IT’S HELPING DOCTORS BETTER ANALYZE YOUR DATA.

IT’S REVOLUTIONIZING PRENATAL TESTING.

p. 48

p. 14

p. 20

p. 22

WHAT IS PERSONALIZED MEDICINE? YO U R H E A LT H I S P E R S O N A L

IT’S STUDYING TRILLIONS OF MICROBES IN YOUR GUT. p. 40

IT’S ALL THIS AND MORE. IT’S THE FUTURE OF MEDICINE. p. 32

Genome magazine explores the complexity of genomics and medicine – and the associated ethical, legal, and social issues – but tells these stories in a relevant, easyto-understand manner for a lay audience. We also examine issues that affect our readers on a daily basis, including personal health topics, such as diet, exercise, sleep, spirituality, and more. Editorial schedule is tentative and subject to change.


S P R I N G 201 6

S U M M E R 201 6

In the spring issue, Genome will focus on what healthy people can learn from whole genome sequencing. Another feature will delve into personalized medicine for dogs. Our deep dive will examine the genetic links between celiac disease and autoimmune disorders. We will also explore how biochips and mini-organs are being used in research and discuss the complexities of preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Readers will learn about privacy and testing, and if people can be identified by their genotype.

Genome will spotlight how the smartphone is on the crest of radically changing health care. An additional feature will examine how patients are paying for personalized medicine. Our deep dive will explore how cancer is being reclassified based on molecular profiling instead of tissue of origin. Other topics include discussions on family dynamics if you should get a positive mutation result from testing, the one million person cohort proposed by Obama’s Precision Medicine Initiative, and how to create health reports from 23andMe and other direct-toconsumer tests.

FA L L 201 6

W I N T E R 201 6

In the fall issue, Genome will feature a deep dive into rare genetic diseases. We will also look at how pharmacogenomics is preventing deadly side effects from drugs. Another feature will discuss what functional medicine is and how it is related to genomics. Readers will learn how companies are helping patients gather, track, and organize their medical information, and whether genetic testing motivates behavior change. Race and ethnic disparities in genomic research will also be examined.

Genome will examine how genomic medicine is changing the investigation of outbreaks, such as Ebola. An additional feature will highlight global precision medicine initiatives. Our deep dive will explore how personalized medicine is changing colon cancer. Other topics include what consumers should know about synthetic bacteria and the microbiome, and how genomics is being used to optimize athletic performance. We will also look at STEM education and genomic literacy for the next generation.


Editorial Contributors E D I TO R I A L A DV I S O R S

E D I TO R - I N - C H I E F Jeanette McCarthy, MPH, PhD Adjunct Associate Professor Duke Center for Personalized and Precision Medicine; Visiting Associate Professor UCSF, Department of Medical Genetics

Jehannine Austin, PhD, CGC/CCGC Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair, UBC Departments of Psychiatry and Medical Genetics

Vence L. Bonham, JD

Chief, Education and Community Involvement Branch, Division of Policy, Communications and Education, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health

E D I TO R -AT- L A R G E

Arthur Caplan, PhD Geoffrey S. Ginsburg, MD, PhD Executive Director, Duke Center for Personalized and Precision Medicine; Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Duke Pratt School of Engineering; Director, Center for Genomic Medicine, Duke University; Professor of Medicine, Professor of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center

Professor of Bioethics and Director, Division of Medical Ethics, NYU Langone Medical School

W. Andrew Faucett, MS, LGC

Director of Policy and Education, Office of the Chief Scientific Officer, Geisinger Health System

Thai Ho, MD, PhD

Assistant Professor, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona

Howard J. Jacob, PhD

Faculty Investigator, Executive Vice President for Medical Genomics, and Chief Medical Genomics Officer, HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology

Jean Jenkins, PhD, RN, FAAN

Clinical Advisor, Genomic Healthcare Branch, Division of Policy, Communications and Education, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health

Howard Levy, MD, PhD Assistant Professor, Division of General Internal Medicine and McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University

Michael Linderman, PhD

Assistant Professor, Icahn Institute for Genomics and Multiscale Biology, Department of Genetics and Genomic Science, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Jack Maypole, MD

Director of Pediatrics, South End Community Health Center; Director of Comprehensive Care Program, Boston Medical Center

Helen Messier, PhD, MD

Medical Director, Healix Health

Amy M. Miller, PhD

Executive Vice President, Personalized Medicine Coalition

Sharon Terry

President and CEO, Genetic Alliance

Eric Topol, MD

Director, Scripps Translational Science Institute; Chief Academic Officer, Scripps Health; Professor of Genomics, The Scripps Research Institute

Steven Tucker, MD, FACP, FAMS

Senior Consultant, Medical Oncology and Internal Medicine, Tucker Medical, Singapore; Global Health Advisor, Singapore Telecommunications

Kristin Weitzel, PharmD, CDE, FAPhA

Clinical Associate Professor and Associate Director, Personalized Medicine Program, Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research, University of Florida College of Pharmacy


Distribution Each quarter, Big Science Media publishes 325,000 copies of Genome for national distribution to medical institutions where personalized medicine is a priority. We make copies of Genome available in the pointof-care setting, where treatment options are being explored and patient education is taking place. Distribution includes targeted outreach to professionals who are dedicated to offering their patients the most effective, efficient, individualized care available — based on the latest genomic research.  

TOTA L C I R C U L AT I O N :  

325,000 R AT E BA S E :  

300,000 TA R G E T E D O U T R E AC H TO :

Specialty Physicians (cardiologists, neurologists, oncologists, etc.) Genetic Counselors Patient Education Departments Geneticists Specialty Pharmacies Patient Navigators Office Managers Personalized Medicine Service Providers Select Nonprofits

Genome also offers home subscriptions on a complimentary basis. Requesters to receive home delivery of each quarterly issue to enjoy and save for future reference.


Ad Specs M E C H A N I CA L R E Q U I R E M E N T S FULL PAGE TRIM SIZE: 8.375" X 10.875" LIVE AREA: 7.375" X 9.875"

FULL PAGE (BLEED)

BLEED:

8.625" X 11.125"

(.125" ALL SIDES)

2-PAGE SPREAD TRIM SIZE: 16.75" X 10.875" LIVE AREA: 15.75" X 9.875" BLEED:

17" X 11.125"

(.125" ALL SIDES)

F O R M AT All ad files must be submitted as print-ready PDF/X-1A files or flattened TIFF files, with all fonts and high-resolution images embedded Please include all printer’s marks (crop, bleed, registration, color bars) Printer’s marks should be offset by 0.25" Embedded images should be: 300+ dpi CMYK only (no spot or PMS colors) TIFF, EPS or PSD files

HALF-PAGE HORIZONTAL (BLEED 3 SIDES) TRIM SIZE: 8.375" X 5.5" LIVE AREA: 7.375" X 4.5" BLEED:

8.625" X 5.625"

(.125" ALL SIDES)

PROOFS For color sensitive work, digital files must be accompanied by two composite proofs of your ad. Acceptable proofs include dye sublimation prints, Iris prints, color laser prints, etc.

NON BLEED

½ PAGE

LIVE AREA: 7.375" X 4.4375"

NO BLEED ALLOWANCE

THIRD-PAGE VERTICAL (BLEED 3 SIDES) TRIM SIZE: 2.75" X 10.875" LIVE AREA: 1.75" X 9.875"

¹⁄³ PG

BLEED:

2.875" X 11.125"

(.125" ALL SIDES)

NON BLEED LIVE AREA: 1.75" X 9.875"

NO BLEED ALLOWANCE

SUBMISSION Send all artwork and related questions to: Sam Solomon, Creative Director Big Science Media 6900 Dallas Parkway Suite 200 Plano, TX 75024 ssolomon@bigsciencemedia.com


Special Projects

Big Science Media knows how to arm people with the information they need to make health decisions that are right for them. We create content that educates people, inspiring them to take an active role in their health. Whether you’re looking for ways to help patients combat side effects, stay on treatment, find resources, or simply be more informed about their disease, Big Science Media’s Custom Publishing Division can help. Big Science Media works with clients to improve communication between patients and their healthcare providers, resulting in a more satisfying experience for everyone.

OUR SERVICES INCLUDE:

Brochures Books Events Websites Videos Recognition programs Mobile apps Focus groups Welcome kits


Big Science Media 6900 Dallas Parkway Suite 200 Plano, TX 75024 (972) 905-2920 bigsciencemedia.com

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