August 2014 Dairy HORIZONS

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AUGUS T 2014 I N T R O D U C I N G

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Horizons Articles Available in Spanish! Visit http://bit.ly/SpanHorizons

C O M M I T T E D

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J E R S E Y

G E N E R AT I O N

Genex

Cooperative, Inc. A Subsidiary of Cooperative Resources International


The industry Innovator Delivers Again! Introducing A profit-indicating measure to rank Holstein sires that puts greater emphasis on longevity, health, and optimal body size and condition without sacrificing yield and udder traits.

Genex is Known for Innovation … S Calving Ease

S GENESIS Cooperative Herd

S Herdlife

S Calf Math™

S Lifetime Net Merit

S Beef x dairy concept

… And Upholds that Reputation Today with the Debut of the Ideal Commercial Cow Index. ©2014 CRI


TA B L E

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C O N T E N T S

HORIZONS

August 2014 Vol. 20/No. 2

Published three times a year for dairy producers around the globe. |

ADDRESS CORRESPONDENCE Cooperative Resources International P.O. Box 469, Shawano, WI 54166 info@crinet.com 888.333.1783 www.crinet.com

CANADA – Genex Cooperative, Inc.

291 Woodlawn Rd W Unit 4C, Guelph, Ontario N1H 7L6 genexcanada@crinet.com 888.354.4622 Publication Number 40022882

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Paul Greene, President Berlin, N.Y., 518.658.2419

CONTENTS

Duane Nelson, 1st Vice President Winthrop, Minn., 507.647.2540

John Ruedinger, 2nd Vice President Van Dyne, Wis., 920.922.9899

Ronald Totten, Secretary Stafford, N.Y., 585.344.0758

Jim Crocker Valley City, Ohio, 330.483.3709

Jon Wayne Danielson Cadott, Wis., 715.289.3860

Patrick Dugan Casa Grande, Ariz., 520.836.2168

Ted Foster Middlebury, Vt., 802.388.6515

Harlin Hecht Paynesville, Minn., 320.243.4386

Harold House Nokesville, Va., 703.754.9534

Kay Olson-Martz Friendship, Wis., 608.564.7359

Bobby Robertson

Perspective 4 | Genex Has a Reputation for Innovation Membership Matters 6 | Committee Conducts Membership Redistricting Cooperative In The Community 7 | CRI Supports Youth through Scholarships Genetically Speaking 8 | The Ideal Cow Redefined

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Tahlequah, Okla., 918.822.0020

Richard Vold Glenwood, Minn., 320.634.4665

Alfred Wanner, Jr. Narvon, Pa., 717.768.8118

HORIZONS STAFF

Jenny L. Hanson, Editor, jlhanson@crinet.com Andy Graf, Graphic Designer

REPRINTS

Material may not be reproduced in any fashion without Cooperative Resources International’s permission. Cooperative Resources International, their member cooperatives, agents or employees, cannot and do not guarantee the conception rate, quality or productivity to be obtained in connection with the use of their products or recommended techniques. THEY MAKE NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND WHATSOEVER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED WHICH EXTENDS BEYOND THE DESCRIPTION OF THE PRODUCTS AND HEREBY DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. In the unlikely event that any of the products shall be proven to be defective, damages resulting from their use shall be limited to their purchase price.

Facebook.com/GenexCRI

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PROOF HIGHLIGHTS

Get The Inside Scoop!

In the News 14 | Genex Reports Record Beef

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Semen Sales to Dairy Herds

16 | Genex Internships: Fostering the Future of the A.I. Industry Herd Story 20 | From Black & White to the Little Brown Cow:

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S&S Jerseyland Dairy

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| Making an Impact

Reproductive Management 24 | Breeder Checkup Can Help Drive Repro Success Herd Management 19 | The Jersey Generation 26 | Electrolyte Program Gives Newborn

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Calves a Healthy Start

Twitter.com/CRIBrenda Twitter.com/GenexJerseys GenexCooperativeInc ©2014 CRI

Mission Statement: Provide products and services as effectively as possible to maximize the profitability of members and customers worldwide while maintaining a strong cooperative. H O R I Z O N S

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P E R S P E C T I V E

GENEX HAS A REPUTATION FOR INNOVATION By: Keith Heikes // Chief Operating Officer, Genex

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irst, it is certainly an honor to be appointed by the Genex board of directors to serve as the Chief Operating Officer for Genex. In this new role, I look forward to meeting with members throughout the United States as Genex continues to offer the outstanding genetics, superior service and innovative programs you have come to expect from your cooperative.

Innovation Then and Now Genex has a long history of innovative development, ranging from semen production technology to genetic programming. A few of these include: • Pocket Thaw™ • Breeding to Feeding™ • Calving ease sire evaluations • MAP program • Lifetime Profitability Rankings (forerunner to Lifetime Net Merit) • Herdlife (forerunner to Productive Life) • GENESIS Cooperative Herd

Our latest introduction is the Ideal Commercial Cow index or ICC$ index. This is the result of requests from producers for a better way to rank sires that create cows that excel in commercial conditions. The Genex staff has done extensive research and analysis and engaged in deep discussion with industry experts to develop ICC$. I encourage you to review the information on this index included in this issue of Horizons to see if ICC$ provides you with a better way to meet the breeding goals of your Holstein herd. We believe this index is appropriate for many producers and are proud to have the reputation of “sticking our neck out” to provide solutions for progressive producers that challenge traditional thinking.

A World of Opportunity The acquisition of MOFA Global earlier this year was another innovative move by your cooperative. MOFA Global has brought an entirely new world of opportunity to Genex and CRI. We believe this addition offers tremendous opportunities for our members and customers around the globe.

• Calf Math™ • PregCheck™, PregCheck+™ and SynchCheck™ 4

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©2014 CRI


P E R S P E C T I V E

During the past six months, efforts have been underway to integrate MOFA Global into CRI and explore the synergies that might exist between the three CRI subsidiaries Genex, AgSource and MOFA Global. Even prior to the acquisition of MOFA Global, the Genex strategic plan had called for expanding research capabilities; now that endeavor has had a tremendous jump-start. MOFA Global’s International Center for Biotechnology has a staff of 13 scientists who are involved in a wide variety of research projects focused on improved reproductive technologies and associated services. Currently there are more than 50 research projects underway in various stages of development. We expect several MOFA Global research projects will have direct application to Genex and will directly affect the quality of products and services we offer members and customers. The cooperation between Genex and MOFA Global allows a direct link between International Center for Biotechnology researchers, Genex production staff and CRI research staff to collaborate on projects and exchange information and data that moves projects forward quicker. The scientific research team possesses research capabilities in the following areas and more: • Genetics • Genomics • Bioinformatics • Experimental design • Statistical analyses • Market analytics

• Diagnostic testing • Andrology • Embryology • Endocrinology • Material chemistry

• Cell culture and stem cell therapy • Molecular biology, transgenesis, cloning and animal models • Equine and small animal theriogenology

HEIKES NAMED GENEX COO “With the growth of CRI and the recent addition of the MOFA Global subsidiary, the Genex and CRI boards of directors voted to separate the Genex COO and CRI CEO responsibilities. Doug Wilson, who was Genex COO for 21 years and held the joint position for the past 12 years, will continue as CRI CEO. Keith Heikes will serve as the new Genex COO,” states Paul Greene, Genex President and dairy producer from Berlin, N.Y. “Keith has extensive experience within the artificial insemination (A.I.) industry and within this cooperative. His experience, knowledge and dedication to the membership will assure the relevance, growth and influence of Genex in the future.” Keith has devoted 33 years to the bovine A.I. industry. After graduating from Kansas State University, he joined KABSU (Kansas Artificial Breeding Service Unit) where he held responsibilities in dairy sire acquisition, marketing and A.I. training. He then moved to Noba, Inc., in Tiffin, Ohio, where he served as General Manager and led the initiative for Noba to become a part of CRI.

j MOFA Global International Center for Biotechnology

Over the last few months numerous Genex staff members have visited the International Center for Biotechnology, and they practically always come away with this description: “Wow! Now I understand why MOFA Global is part of CRI!” They are not only impressed by the high level of expertise and professionalism exhibited, but also by the new and innovative ideas being tested to one day make livestock producers around the world more profitable. Another advantage in our relationship with MOFA Global is the opportunity to take research that has produced results for one species and apply it to other species. The International Center for Biotechnology conducts research in multiple species (cattle, pigs, horses, sheep and dogs, among others). A great example of this is a new semen extender Genex is testing. It has been used for another species and could provide a great advantage to Genex in the way we process and market semen.

In 1996, Keith was named the CRI Vice President of International Programs and went on to create substantial international growth for the cooperative and develop valuable global relationships. In 2010, he became Genex Vice President of Dairy Genetics & Global Alliance Development before being named Genex Senior Vice President of Product Development and Marketing in 2013. Keith currently serves as chairman of the National Association of Animal Breeders board of directors and is a member of the Council on Dairy Cattle Breeding and the USDA Emerging Markets Program advisory committee. 

We believe there is a huge potential in the acquisition of MOFA Global, and as a member you will see a number of resulting benefits in the years to come. It will be an exciting time as Genex continues to be the leader in providing profitable innovations.  ©2014 CRI

H O R I Z O N S

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M E M B E R S H I P

M AT T E R S

DATES SET FOR DELEGATE MEETINGS

2015 CRI ANNUAL MEETING TO BE HELD JANUARY 27-28

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enex producer members elected as delegates and alternates for 2014 are encouraged and expected to attend the Genex fall meetings. Input gained from these meetings is important and highly valued by the board of directors and staff. Each meeting will begin at 10 a.m. and conclude by 2:30 p.m. More information will be mailed at a later date.

The dates and locations for the meetings are: • October 14 – Harrisburg, Pennsylvania • October 15 – Syracuse, New York • October 16 – Albany, New York • October 21 – Las Vegas, Nevada • October 22 – Kansas City, Missouri • November 4 – Alexandria, Minnesota

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• November 5 – Rochester, Minnesota • November 10 – Appleton, Wisconsin • November 11 – Atlanta, Georgia 

j Delegates attending the 2013 fall input meetings.

COMMITTEE CONDUCTS MEMBERSHIP REDISTRICTING

embers elected as delegates and alternates later this year have the opportunity to attend the annual meeting for Genex, AgSource and CRI in Bloomington, Minnesota, on January 27-28, 2015. The event includes breakout sessions on current industry issues as well as the business meetings and banquet. Delegate and alternate expenses to and from the meeting are paid by the cooperative. 

MEMBER DEFINITION TO CHANGE

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fter reviewing delegate and alternate input received at fall delegate meetings in 2011, the Genex board and CRI governance committee supported changing the Genex member definition for 2015. Their recommendation increases the amount of annual allocatable expenditures required to be a Genex member from $200 to $500 annually. All semen, products and services, with the exception of liquid nitrogen, count towards allocatable expenditures. The CRI board voted to change the Genex member definition as recommended. It goes into effect January 1, 2015.

j Pictured left to right are redistricting committee members Bill Zimmerman, Ron Lucas, Jeff Grove, Doug Tate, Scott Erthum, Israel Handy, Fred Weiker, Ron Koetsier, Vernon Hurd, James Loomis, Jody Schaap and Ken Hein. Missing from photo, Allan Johnson.

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he Genex redistricting committee met July 9 at CRI Headquarters in Shawano, Wisconsin. Scott Erthum, of membership Region 12, was elected chairman. Doug Tate, Region 8, was elected secretary and presented the committee results to the Genex board of directors on July 30. The redistricting results will be on the agenda at the fall input meetings. 

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The Genex board also agreed on a member exception clause. If a member spends a minimum of $200 but does not meet the $500 minimum, they can remain a member by annually completing a member exception form. Once the form is completed and submitted to the cooperative, they have all member rights except they cannot serve on the board of directors. The member exception form is on the CRI website at www.crinet.com.  ©2014 CRI


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CRI Supports Youth through Scholarships M

ost cooperatives around the world operate according to the same core principles. One of those seven principles centers on concern for the community. Providing academic scholarships is one way Cooperative Resources International (CRI) shows support for the agricultural community.

Paying it Forward “Scholarships are a great way for the cooperative to support future dairy and beef producers and future employees,” shares Doug Wilson, CRI CEO. “Offering scholarships to youth complements the array of ways this cooperative, its employees and its members fulfill the principle of concern for community.” Finding value in supporting youth, especially youth pursuing careers in agriculture, CRI has annually offered scholarships through industry scholarship programs. The cooperative has also established a scholarship program for children of employees. Soon, a scholarship program directed to members will be added.

Supporting Industry Scholarship Programs Each year, CRI offers scholarships through industry organizations, like the National FFA Organization and the Wisconsin FFA Foundation. In 2014, CRI sponsored two $750 Wisconsin FFA scholarships to students pursuing futures in the dairy industry. The recipients were Sydney Endres of Wisconsin’s Lodi FFA Chapter and Kristen Broege of Wisconsin’s Janesville Craig FFA Chapter. Sydney is a student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison earning her bachelor’s in dairy science and life sciences communications. After college she would like to return to her family's farm (Endres Jazzy Jerseys), open an agricultural learning center and provide farm tours showing dairy production process from start to finish. As she wrote in her application, “In the end, my main goal is to help as many people as possible learn more about agriculture and the dairy industry in fun and interesting ways.” Kristen will be a freshman at the University of Wisconsin-Madison this fall. She too will pursue a degree in dairy science and life science communications. Kristen hopes to find a job promoting the dairy industry and would love to own and operate a dairy farm someday.  ©2014 CRI

CRI Founders’ Scholarships In 2000, CRI established the Founders’ Scholarship program to honor the cooperative’s pioneering leaders like K.E. Wallin, Max Drake, Charlie Krumm, Norris Carnes, Dave Yoder, Willys Gjermundson and others who were affiliated with organizations now a part of CRI. The program was designed to reward young people within the CRI family, children of CRI or CRI subsidiary employees, who have demonstrated exceptional academic and leadership skills. Emphasis is given to youth pursuing a degree in an agriculture-related field Each year CRI awards a minimum of three $750 Founders’ Scholarships. The 2014 recipients include Taylor Behnke of New Glarus, Wisconsin; Klay Oland of Sheldon, North Dakota; Emily Daniel of Tiffin, Ohio; Clint Dallas of Shawano, Wisconsin; and Dustin Salter of Eden, Wisconsin.

CRI Founders’ Scholarship Recipients

Taylor Behnke

Klay Oland

Emily Daniel

Clint Dallas

Dustin Salter

Taylor Behnke is the daughter of Lisa Behnke, Associate Vice President of Marketing and Communications for CRI’s AgSource subsidiary. Taylor has been accepted to the School of Nursing’s Freshman Direct Program at the University of WisconsinMadison Nursing School and plans to become a neonatal nurse. Klay Oland is the son of Ken and Judy Oland, both of whom are employed at the Central Livestock West Fargo, North Dakota, market. Klay plans to attend North Dakota State University where he will study agriculture business. He plans to pursue a career in agriculture off the ranch before returning to his family's beef operation. Emily Daniel is the daughter of Genex Distribution and Laboratory Technician, Roger Daniel. She will attend the Ohio State University ATI and plans to earn a bachelor’s degree in agriculture business so she can better promote the agriculture industry. Clint Dallas is the son of Terri Dallas, CRI Vice President of Information & Public Relations, and Chuck Dallas, Genex Vice President of Diversified Programs, Services & Process Management. Clint will attend the University of WisconsinMadison to major in animal science. He then plans to pursue an advanced degree in genetics or veterinary medicine. Dustin Salter is the son of AgSource DHI Field Technician, Dan Salter. This fall, Dustin will pursue a degree in environmental engineering from the University of WisconsinPlatteville. He would like to design projects to improve the environment and provide health air, water and land for human use.

COMING SOON!

CRI is organizing a scholarship program for members. Watch for additional information. H O R I Z O N S

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G E N E T I C A L LY

S P E A K I N G

The

Ideal Cow Redefined By: Angie Coburn // AVP Dairy Genetics, Genex

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othing is constant. Neither is the Holstein cow. With advances in genetics and management, the dairy producer has developed her into the amazing animal we know today. Her potential to produce milk and milk proteins is more than twice that of her ability just 20 years ago. There are many reading this having milked cows for much longer and are reflecting on just how far the Holstein cow has come. Throughout this span of years, we’ve held the model of the ideal Holstein cow virtually unchanged. The historical textbook characterization of the ideal cow is in reference to her conformation, where our expectation is for snuggly attached udders, free-moving, flexible hocks and a strong shallow heel. We also described her in very classic terms of long and tall with a silky dairy quality. Our use of the ideal cow model to breed for traits indicating a greater ability to produce milk and live longer was, for the most part, useful in the absence of farm computers and big data. Now with the ability to evaluate many traits in addition to yield and type, many producers are breeding for continued genetic progress in health, longevity and production potential. In other words – if we take care of the cow, she’ll take care of you. No one should deny the fact that tall, long and dairy brings with it significant challenges to the health, efficiency and productivity of the Holstein cow. Producers can simply no longer afford to utilize selection indexes that continue to steer genetic progress in that direction. Fertility, body condition, locomotion and the quantity and quality of milk proteins should be utilized as we breed for the cow of our future. Selection indexes are very powerful tools. When they’re designed well, genetic progress for many traits can be achieved simultaneously. With the faster generation intervals achieved through genomics, real impact on farm profitability from bull selection is twice that of five years ago. If the index is leading down the wrong path, you’ll get there just as quickly. There is considerable difference when you compare rankings of Holstein bulls on the various selection indexes. Know your options, understand what traits are emphasized in a selection index, and ask questions to help you achieve the genetic progress you desire. Producers should choose the index that best fits their management priorities and breeding goals. Farm technology provides greater means to capitalize on the genetic potential of our cows. As the landscape of the dairy industry and our expectations for the quality of farm management evolve, so should our definition of the ideal cow. In response to progressive producers’ requests for a better way to rank Holstein bulls to achieve profitability and efficiency, we introduce the Ideal Commercial Cow Index. 

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©2014 CRI


G E N E T I C A L LY

S P E A K I N G

What is the Ideal Commercial Cow Index? The Ideal Commercial Cow Index (ICC$) is a profit-indicating measure and a tool to rank Holstein bulls, published exclusively by Genex. ICC$ uses real-time economic indicators and science-based genetic principles to address the needs of progressive dairy producers. The index incorporates elements from the U.S. national evaluation, as well as other data sources. Use of ICC$ will change the trend for increased stature and indirectly select for improved feed efficiency. ICC$ is the total dollars summation of five easy-to-use subindexes. The sub-indexes, focused on specific areas of farm management, are available for producers wanting to narrow their genetic emphasis. Without compromising a dairy producer’s expectation for high yield and great udders, these sub-indexes allow for greater improvement in fertility traits, body condition, locomotion and milking efficiency. The five subindexes include: Production Efficiency (PREF$), Health (HLTH$), Fertility and Fitness (FYFT$), Milking Ability (MABL$) and Calving Ability (CABL$).

Production Efficiency (PREF$) Health (HLTH$) Fertility and Fitness (FYFT$) Milking Ability (MABL$) Calving Ability (CABL$)

Why was ICC$ created?

What is the means of expression of ICC$?

What is the validity of ICC$ as a sire selection tool?

Why does ICC$ take into consideration body condition score?

Producers asked for a way to rank bulls that are designed to breed for farm profitability and efficiency. ICC$ is made to be real-time and flexible; it can be modified over time as the economic climate changes. ICC$ provides opportunity to quickly address emerging trends, and new traits of economic impact can be added as they become available.

ICC$ has been thoroughly reviewed and validated by dairy geneticists with doctorates in animal breeding and previewed by commercial dairy producers for their grassroots input.

Where can I find ICC$ sire rankings?

ICC$ rankings will be published and updated with each industry-wide sire summary. The ICC$ rankings are available in the Holstein investment guide on the Lifetime Net Merit sort page. The investment guide also includes lists of the top 25% of the lineup for each of the five sub-indexes. The Holstein sire catalog, MPG (genex.crinet.com/mpg) and Genex website include both the ICC$ and five sub-index values. MPG also includes ICC$ values on all bulls industry-wide that have a published genetic evaluation.

ICC$, like Lifetime Net Merit $, represents the value of one bull’s daughters compared to the value of another bull’s daughters in the same herd. Both indexes use dollars to measure the net profit over the lifetime of the bull’s average daughter.

Choosing bulls that produce daughters with proper body condition score leads to more milk production and less health and reproductive problems. Research also indicates cows with optimum body condition have improved foot health and lower frequency of lameness.

Why is the polled gene given consideration?

Dehorning of cattle presents financial costs to the producer in terms of labor and is a setback to cattle in terms of growth. ICC$ considers these costs and gives bulls with the polled gene a slight advantage over bulls without the polled gene.

How is genetic progress achievable with ICC$?

The desired genetic progress of individual traits from the perspective of members and customers, along with industry trend research, aids in determining which traits are part of the ICC$ index and assigning the weighting of each trait. The combination of trait weightings, each individual trait’s heritability, and correlations and trait relationships enables ICC$ to accomplish the goals established by members and customers. ©2014 CRI

Learn more about the ICC$ sub-indexes on page 10. H O R I Z O N S

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ICC$ Sub-Indexes Targeting Specific Management Areas Production Efficiency (PREF$) PREF$ pinpoints genetics resulting in high yielding cows with lower feed costs, at a ratio of 60% total yield and 40% feed efficiency indicators. Emphasis is placed on pounds or kilograms of protein. Use of PREF$ and ICC$ will reverse the trend for taller cows. • 60% total yield, 40% feed efficiency indicators • 2:1 Protein to Fat ratio • Marginal feed costs account for cost of production and body maintenance • Stops the trend for taller cows

Health (HLTH$) HLTH$ provides opportunity for producers to breed for improved and sustainable health and longevity. High-ranking HLTH$ bulls have daughters with proper body condition, low somatic cell scores and excellent locomotion. • Improves overall health and longevity using direct and indirect measures • Incorporates breeding value for Body Condition Score • Includes a new Locomotion Index • Designed to easily add new health traits in the future

Fertility and Fitness (FYFT$) FYFT$ meets the needs of producers looking to emphasize reproductive efficiency. Selection of bulls with high rankings for FYFT$ results in optimal age of first calving, reduced days open and shorter calving intervals. • Adequately recognizes the importance of fertility • Includes nine measures of cow and heifer fertility • Assigns economic value to the polled genotype

4% Milking Yield

18% Fat Yield

40% Marginal Feed Costs

38% Protein Yield

6% Body Condition Score

20% Somatic Cell Score

40% Productive Life

34% Locomotion

5% Cow 2% Fertility Conception Rate Haplotypes 5% Polled Genotype

46% Daughter Pregnancy Rate

42% Heifer Conception Rate

Milking Ability (MABL$) MABL$ optimizes farm efficiencies with trouble-free milking cows. Components of MABL$ include mastitis resistance, milking speed and temperament, and udder form and function. Ideal commercial cow udder conformation can be described as strongly attached above the hock with appropriate teat placement and length. Choosing bulls using MABL$ will enhance udder texture and manage the emerging trend of shorter teat length. • Optimized efficiency by selecting for trouble-free milking • Incorporates breeding value for mastitis resistance • Udder traits are divided into thirds: udder depth, udder attachments, and teat length and placement • Manages emerging trend for sub-optimal rear teat length and placement

Calving Ability (CABL$) CABL$ focuses on live calves born without difficulty. Select high-ranking CABL$ sires that are also high for ICC$ to use on virgin heifers and give them the best chance to have a successful and profitable first lactation. • Selects for the ability to have live calves born without difficulty • Added emphasis placed on Sire Calving Ease to minimize labor in maternity pens

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3% Milking Temperament 12% Milking Speed 15% Mastitis Resistance 70% Udder Traits

10% Sire Stillbirth 16% Daughter Calving Ease

45% Sire Calving Ease

29% Daughter Stillbirth

©2014 CRI


G E N E T I C A L LY

Comments from Commercial

S P E A K I N G

k A lineup of 1HO08784 FREDDIE daughters at Double A Dairy. FREDDIE ranks fourth in the lineup for ICC$.

Dairy Producers

Don Bennink North Florida Holsteins Bell, Florida j Don Bennink is the Managing Partner of North Florida Holsteins. North Florida Holsteins is the herd with the most 1HO08784 FREDDIE daughters contributing to the bull’s genetic evaluation, totaling 233 daughters milking.

At North Florida Holsteins, we want the kind of cattle that have high production and the fewest problems, because we as commercial producers are interested in bottom-line economics. I think the industry is having a hard time finding correlations between type and longevity or cattle being trouble-free. Type has got our cattle too tall and too sharp. They have lost their disease resistance. They are just not tough and rugged enough. Putting enough emphasis on fertility and longevity has been a real weakness too. We have put more emphasis on traits relating to fertility and longevity, but we are a long ways from putting the level of importance on them that those making our living from milk need. I think people don’t realize Productive Life is closely tied to the transition period problems of displaced abomasums, metritis and retained placentas – those things that reduce life. Cattle with high Productive Life tend to have fewer of those problems, plus they are a lot less apt to be lame. We also certainly need to continue to stress high production.

John Andersen Double A Dairy Jerome, Idaho j John Andersen is the Manager of Double A Dairy owned by the Aardema Group. The dairy milks about 13,000 cows housed primarily in freestalls with some open lots. Cows are milked three times a day in four double-50 parallel parlors.

For Double A Dairy, the ideal cow is a profitable and efficient cow. She's high producing, healthy and easy to milk. Healthy cows are those that are of moderate stature with good body condition, excellent locomotion and well-attached udders. At the end of the day, the ideal commercial cows are the ones you hardly even notice in your herd because they consistently perform and take care of themselves.

The Ideal Commercial Cow index is probably the largest step forward we have seen in meeting the commercial producers’ needs. This index really looks at the characteristics commercial producers, those making a living from their dairy herd, need from their cattle for maximum profit.

©2014 CRI

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P R O O F

H I G H L I G H T S

PROOF HIGHLIGHTS

Get The Inside Scoop! ICC TOP 10

NEW SIRES

TO WATCH

S 1HO11056 TROY . . . . . . +$1083 S 1HO11097 MAGNATE. . . . +$1023 S 1HO11511 TAMPA. . . . . . +$1005 S 1HO08784 FREDDIE. . . . . +$977 S 1HO11426 TUFFENUFF. . . +$976 S 1HO11545 LAWMAN. . . . +$976 S 1HO10890 ADRIAN. . . . . +$958 S 1HO11528 EMERALD. . . . +$957 S 1HO11316 GEMSTONE. . . +$940 S 1HO11541 STAMINA. . . . . +$935

ith the August sire summaries, Genex introduces the new Ideal Commercial Cow (ICC) index. It only seems fair to begin proof highlights with 1HO11097 MAGNATE, the top new graduate for the ICC index at a whopping +$1023. Combined with a +2501 TPI® score, this Mogul son transmits extreme production (+1999 Milk) and trouble-free calvings with a 6.5% Sire Calving Ease (SCE), making him ideal for any operation.

J MGD of MAGNATE: United-Pride Ali 2620, VG-88, EX-MS

In addition, Genex released 20 other new sires. The graduates are from 13 different sires, eight of them are above +$825 Lifetime Net Merit (LNM), eight are above +$900 ICC and 10 are from the GENESIS Cooperative Herd! Two of these, also Mogul sons, are sure to impress: • 1HO11096 PLATINUM is the total production package at +1792 Milk, +84 Fat and +65 Protein, allowing him to be a stand-out on the ICC Production Efficiency sub-index at +$409. With almost +3.00 PTAT and over +2500 TPI, he transmits strong, deep bodies with sound udders. • 1HO11541 STAMINA ranks high on the ICC index (+$935) transmitting a moderate frame with well-attached udders (+3.06 Udder Composite). He is a Fat pounds leader at +81, that improves overall component percentages. 1HO11874 YOSEMITE is another great son from the elite Co-op Boliver Yoyo-ET. With ideal health and fitness traits of +7.0 Productive Life, +2.66 Somatic Cell Score (SCS) and +1.9 Daughter Pregnancy Rate (DPR), this Supersire son transmits high Milk yields (+1767) without sacrificing components (+127 combined Fat and Protein). 1HO11318 CASANOVA, also a Supersire son, transmits impressive all-around production with +1816 Milk, +87 Fat and +58 Protein. With a +2.30 Foot & Leg Composite and 5.4% SCE, he is sure to be a top choice for heifer pens.

24% Health (HLTH$)

H Productive Life 22%

uc Prod

Protein 16%

DPR 11%

Ca

lvin

Fat 19%

Traits Included in j Lifetime Net Merit

gA

ity

$5

Udder Comp. 7%

Conforma

*TPI is a registered trademark of Holstein Association USA, Inc.

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©2014 CRI

4 8%

SCS -10%

its Tra

H O R I Z O N S

Traits Included in Lifetime Net Merit

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46% Production Efficiency (PREF$)

e -6%

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15% Fertility and Fitness (FYFT$)

FL Com

Three new polled bulls were also added in 1HO11871 ROCCO-P, 1HO11886 RUGER-P and 1HO11321 BRIAN-P. This trait figures favorably into the ICC Fertility and Fitness sub-index by assigning economic value to the polled genotype. 

g Sub-Indexes Included in ICC$

10% Milking Ability (MABL$)

Body Siz

Ranking #8 on the TPI list, 1HO10219 JUNIOR is an elite daughter-proven bull and our top pounds of Milk graduate at +2518. With 6.3% SCE and +2.15 Udder Composite, he is another sure bet for heifer programs.

5% Calving Ability (CABL$)

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1HO11863 RENEGADE is a McCutchen son out of an 86-point Atwood Co-op daughter. He leads our new graduates in the ICC Milking Ability sub-index at +$202. With a +3.48 PTAT he offers stylish daughters along with outstanding udder traits (+2.76 Udder Composite) and extreme Fat of +91 and 0.18%.

S ICC$. . . . . . . . . . . . . +$983 S LNM$. . . . . . . . . . . . . +$848 S Milk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . +1533 S Combined Fat and Protein. . . +125 S Productive Life. . . . . . . . . +6.4 S DPR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . +1.9 S SCE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.8% S Stature. . . . . . . . . . . . . +1.4 S Udder Composite . . . . . . . +2.39

ea

1HO11094 MAD MAX is over +3.00 PTAT with a +2.97 Udder Composite and +2.34 Foot & Leg Composite. He transmits phenomenal udders on well-built cows, along with an ideal health trait combination (+6.7 Productive Life, +2.55 SCS, +2.0 DPR) and a sire stack contributing to fewer mating restrictions.

High-ranking ICC index sires possess the genetic characteristics needed to create cows that excel in commercial conditions. The genetic averages of the top 10 Genex ICC sires demonstrate the genetic ability of the index’s leading sires.

tion Traits 35%

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P R O O F

H I G H L I G H T S

It’s that time again … when new sire evaluations are released and the latest bulls appear in the Genex lineup. Staying up-to-date on the new information to maintain genetic progress in your herd isn’t impossible. You may just need … the inside scoop.

MAKING THEIR DEBUT 1

JE00882 FORMIDABLE is an early SCORE son that delivers chart-topping numbers. He is +264 JPI™, +$672 Cheese Merit (CM) and also JH1F. FORMIDABLE will add milk to any pedigree with +2064 fluid pounds and over +120 Combined Fat and Protein (CFP). Rounding out his impressive resume, FORMIDABLE is a standout on health traits with a +0.4 Daughter Pregnancy Rate (DPR) and +6.1 Productive Life. 1JE00876 CARCETTI is a Marvel son with a very complete genetic profile. He is +223 JPI, +3.95 JUI™ and +$539 CM. He is also JH1F and will add production with +1699 Milk. CARCETTI possesses a diverse pedigree on the maternal side with a VG-82% Blitzen dam and a Rebel grandam. 1JE00867 TORTUGA is the lineup’s first Topeka son. He debuts with a standout +4.26 JUI and impressive +215 JPI. He carries an elite +$642 CM and huge components (+0.26%, +86 Fat and +0.07%, +43 Protein) for a CFP of +129. He is JH1F. 1JE00850 DECOY is a Visionary out of a VG-82% Renegade from the famous Daffy family. He is +215 JPI with a +$591 CM. DECOY is over +1500 Milk and has a +4.4 Productive Life. Note he is JH1C. 1JE00881 GEO is our second SCORE son entering the lineup with exceptional health traits: +0.5 DPR, +4.7 Productive Life and +2.89 Somatic Cell Score (SCS). He also makes his appearance at +214 JPI. GEO hails from a different pedigree with a VG-88% Celebrity dam that goes back to the Gratitude family. GEO will add profitability with a +$594 CM. He is JH1F. 

J Dam of FORMIDABLE: Hi-Land Headline Form, VG-88%

SIRES FOR THE JERSEY GENERATION The Genex lineup includes over 40 active elite genetic sires as well as: S 16 sires ≥ +0.0 DPR S 17 sires over +4.00 JUI S 20 sires ≥ +200 JPI S 23 sires over +$525 CM S 30 sires ≥ +3.0 Productive Life S Unmatched pedigree diversity S 30+ sires available in GenChoice™

NOTEWORTHY GENETIC OPPORTUNITIES

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JE00792 MACHETE continues to dominate the lineup at +$698 CM and +242 JPI. This JH1F Vibrant son hails from the famous Maid cow family and carries +129 CFP as well as a +6.4 Productive Life.

a +207. He jumped to +3.36 JUI with more than 1,400 daughters scored. At +1.9 PTA Type, he still maintains over +1700 pounds of Milk. Member satisfaction is unmatched for herds milking PLUS daughters.

1JE00848 ILLUSION continues to climb in JPI and now comes in at +233 with a +4.16 JUI. This Visionary son also increased to +$644 CM, is positive in component percentages and boasts over +1200 pounds of Milk. He is JH1C.

1JE00672 GOOSE-PR jumped in JPI to +184 and is +2.55 JUI making him a top 30 bull on the JPI list among daughter-proven sires. GOOSEPR has a huge +1.3 DPR and a low +2.84 SCS while being JH1F.

1JE00851 LIMELIGHT-P climbed to +196 JPI and ranks as our highest polled sire. The Critic-P son adds nice Fat and Protein percentages, improves udders at +3.75 JUI and is JH1F.

1JE00768 HENDRIX added daughters and landed in the top 100 daughterproven JPI list. He stands at +$483 CM and +156 JPI with a +2.99 JUI.

1JE00711 PLUS continues his reign on the top 10 JPI listing with

©2014 CRI

1JE00763 LANCE-GR also moved to daughter-proven. He carries a +147 JPI and +1.0 PTAT with a +1.73 JUI. 

J DP Hendrix Sadie 1452, HENDRIX Daughter

J GR Pearlmont Goose Ruth Hunter, GOOSE-PR Daughter H O R I Z O N S

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TA I NB LT EH EO FN E CW O N S T E N T S

GENEX REPORTS RECORD BEEF SEMEN SALES TO DAIRY HERDS

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ver the past 30 months, Genex has marketed more than 300,000 units of beef semen to dairy herds. The marked increase in sales of beef genetics to dairy herds is attributed to technological advances enabling producers to target matings to a specific purpose as well as tight beef supplies and record low beef cattle numbers.

BREEDING FEEDING WULF x GENEX CONNECTING SUPPLY AND DEMAND

j Dairy producers are incorporating beef semen into their breeding strategies to produce crossbred cattle, like these Limousin x dairy animals, that earn beef market premiums.

“Dairy producers considering a breeding strategy that speeds up genetic advancement in the dairy herd and produces high quality offspring from both dairy and beef matings are encouraged to utilize the Genex Calf Math™ program,” adds Kristi Fiedler, Genex Associate Vice President of U.S. Technical Services. “Calf Math is a calculator that helps dairy producers build breeding strategies that meet their genetic and herd growth goals by showing cost comparisons for semen type, calf value, reproduction and more.” The online, interactive version of Calf Math is available at calfmath.crinet.com. 

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his spring the University of WisconsinRiver Falls College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences honored Terri Dallas, CRI Vice President of Information & Public Relations, as the 2014 Wisconsin Distinguished Agriculturalist. 

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hrough the first half of 2014, Genex and CRI experienced a 33 percent growth in Jersey semen sales over the same period last year. The increase follows a 26 percent growth in the cooperative’s Jersey sales for 2013 versus 2012.

Realizing an opportunity to capture additional revenue, dairy producers from locations across the U.S. have chosen to breed low genetic merit “This growth is a result of the cooperative’s dairy animals with beef semen and commitment to the growing Jersey produce high value feeder cattle. At the same time, the breeding strategy is breed,” states Keith Heikes, Genex Chief Operating Officer. “In October 2012, benefitting their dairy herds. the Genex board of directors adopted “Strategic incorporation of beef a new delegate-backed Jersey cattle semen into dairies enables producers initiative and Genex staff developed an to expedite genetic progress by aggressive five-year growth plan. Those simultaneously increasing selection initiatives are leading Genex to be the elite intensity of desired traits and decreasing genetic resource for Jersey producers.” the generation interval within a herd,” Also playing a role in sales growth is the states Colten Green, a Genex Dairy availability of GenChoice™ sexed semen National Account Manager in California. from more than 30 Jersey sires and “Some producers are simply placing PregCheck+™ sexed semen fertility ratings. bias against old cows as potential dams of future replacements, through “Further demonstrating our commitment use of beef semen. Others are also to the Jersey breed was the addition of incorporating use of high genetic merit Jerseys to the GENESIS Cooperative Herd gendered semen on heifers to drastically in 2013,” notes Heikes. “Jersey GENESIS shift genetic progress within a herd.” will allow the cooperative to increase the

While dairy producers have utilized Simmental, Angus, Gelbvieh and Limousin genetics for the beef x dairy mating, the Limousin cross has proven the most successful to date according to packing industry carcass assessments. The Limousin cross infuses the correct genetics to improve feed efficiencies, carcass quality and capture the most market premiums. Genex was the first artificial insemination organization to pave the way for Breeding to Feeding™, a program utilizing Wulf Cattle Limousin genetics on dairy cattle with guaranteed calf buyback from Wulf Cattle. Genex and Wulf Cattle earned a 2013 World Dairy Expo Innovation Award for Breeding to Feeding.

DALLAS NAMED UW-RIVER FALLS WISCONSIN DISTINGUISHED AGRICULTURALIST

GENEX ATTAINS EXCEPTIONAL JERSEY SEMEN SALES GROWTH

availability of Jersey semen globally and develop genetics that provide maximum profit potential and adequate diversity for our members and customers.” 

GENEX FARM SYSTEMS REALIGNS

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enex Farm Systems, the Genex division marketing milking and farmstead solutions in the upper Midwest, has undergone changes to create labor efficiencies and better meet profit goals. In April, Farm Systems management in Menomonie, Wisconsin, was consolidated with the division’s Minnesota managers. Service teams provide product service and assist in construction projects in both Wisconsin and Minnesota. The Genex board of directors decided to discontinue involvement in Farm Systems Great Lakes territory, covering Michigan and Ohio, effective May 31, 2014. Profit goals for the territory were not being met. To learn more about Farm Systems service area, products and services, visit farmsystems.crinet.com.  g Dean Dale Gallenberg presents 2014 Wisconsin Distinguished Agriculturalist Award to Terri Dallas. ©2014 CRI


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GENEX TAKES SAFETY INITIATIVE WITH SAFETY VESTS

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dairy farm is not a hazard-free work setting. Therefore, ensuring family members, employees and visitors on the farm are kept out of harm’s way and remain injury-free demands good workplace safety protocols and procedures. “Safety is a priority for both Genex and our members, and the use of high visibility safety clothing is one method for safeguarding individuals on the farm,” explains Jeff Gundrum, CRI Director of Safety & Wellness. “Recently members may have noticed Genex employees wearing reflective safety vests when working on farms. In hopes of preventing an accident, Genex took the initiative to make safety vests available that increase personnel visibility on the farm.” High visibility safety vests are required in many different work environments, and there is good reason for it. There are plenty of distractions which can draw a machine operator’s attention away from others passing through or working in the area. Plus, as the average farm size grows, so does the size of the equipment. Reflective high visibility safety vests improve the ability to be spotted easily in the work-place, even from a far off distance. In recent years OSHA has become more active in regulations within large cattle operations. Due to the OSHA safety push, the agricultural industry will continue to be proactive in safety protocols and awareness. For instance, many large dairies already require Genex staff to wear safety vests and even eye protection. Through this Genex safety initiative new Genex employees will be issued a safety vest embroidered with a CRI logo. Current employees are also able to order a vest at no cost through the end of August. Members wishing to join the safety initiative may purchase safety vests from Genex for $8.75 each. To order, contact your sales representative. 

©2014 CRI

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CRI HOLDS LATIN AMERICAN COLLABORATIVE BEEF CONFERENCE

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hrough a U.S. Department of Agriculture emerging markets program grant, CRI assessed the beef industry in three developing Latin American countries and then held a collaborative conference to define future improvement opportunities.

Over the past year, teams of individuals with diverse expertise in beef markets visited Colombia, Honduras and Nicaragua to assess the beef industry and identify industry stakeholders and influencers. Within the assessment phase, the teams visited slaughter facilities, feedlots, beef retailers and beef ranches. In April, CRI led the Beef Congress of the Americas collaborative conference in Campo Grande, Brazil, to share assessment results. The conference brought together 48 people, including individuals from Colombia, Honduras, Nicaragua, Brazil and the U.S. The conference included discussion panels on cattle artificial insemination and genetics programs as well as presentations by the American Angus Association, JBS and the Brazilian Angus Association. Participants also toured Brazilian beef operations.

j Individuals from Colombia, Honduras, Nicaragua, Brazil and the U.S. gathered in Campo Grande, Brazil for the CRI-organized Beef Congress of the Americas.

“The final phase of the program,” explains Dean Gilge, CRI Associate Vice President of Global Development, “was to work with the representatives from Colombia, Honduras and Nicaragua in developing action plans for beef genetic improvement programs. Participants found this to be a valuable step in planning for the future of the beef industry within Latin America.” 

CRI RESEARCHES OPPORTUNITIES IN BALKAN REGION

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arlier this year CRI conducted an assessment of the cattle industry within the Balkan region, including the countries of Albania, Bosnia, Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Kosovo, Macedonia, Montenegro, Romania and Serbia. A team representing CRI visited with ministry officials, dairy producers, processing facilities and dairy producer organizations to better understand the area’s production model and potential for industry growth upon the 2015 expiration of the European Union’s milk quota system. The assessment team consisted of CRI business development employees, Dean Gilge and Angie Ahlgrim, AgSource representative Erin Berger and Matt Steiner Sr., Genex delegate and owner of Pine Tree Dairy in Rittman, Ohio. During the week-long assessment, Matt contributed his dairy management and genetics expertise. This assessment was made possible through a U.S. Department of Agriculture emerging markets program grant. These grants are designed to improve exports of U.S. products into the emerging markets of developing countries. 

j The assessment team poses with a Bosnian dairy producer. From left, Matt Steiner, Alex Gomez of CRI Europe, a Bosnian producer, Angie Ahlgrim, Dean Gilge and Erin Berger. H O R I Z O N S

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TA I NB LT EH EO FN E CW O N S T E N T S

GENEX INTERNSHIPS:

FOSTERING THE FUTURE OF THE A.I. INDUSTRY By: Anne Davison // National Account Specialist, Genex

j A recent herd health check required the Sire Production Intern to record data.

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ith my grey Volkswagen Jetta packed to the roof, my GPS set to Shawano, Wisconsin, and a snowy 24 hour drive in front of me, I set off on my adventure to become a GENESIS intern with Genex. When I left my small family farm in New Hampshire, I had no idea I would stumble upon so many opportunities during the duration of my internship. Being a GENESIS intern wasn't an easy job – especially when it was January in Wisconsin with 4:00 a.m. calf feedings and midnight calvings. However looking back I can tell you, I would not have traded any of those snowy, zero-degree Wisconsin mornings for a sunny Florida one!

g Anne Davison found a nice Wisconsin day to check on one of the GENESIS calves.

During my internship I had the opportunity to learn extensively about cattle reproduction, calf care and nutrition, embryo transfers, synchronization protocols and ultra sounding. The internship gave me the opportunity to take what I had learned in theory from college and put it into practical application. Not only has my internship been invaluable to my career, but it also gave me the opportunity to learn a lot about myself.

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When I started my internship I had no idea what I wanted to do for a career, and let's face it, I was terrified to leave my family and friends and move to Wisconsin. The only thing I knew was I loved cows, agriculture and somehow I was lucky enough to get chosen for this internship. Soon after I arrived in Shawano, the feeling of being terrified subsided and excitement replaced it. Excitement for the opportunity to learn, excitement about my future and excitement because of all the new people I was meeting. Genex and CRI gave me so many opportunities to network with industry professionals that it opened my eyes to all of the possibilities within the A.I. industry. Soon I was able to focus my view on what I really loved (which is reproduction, genetics and working with producers) and find a position within Genex that fit with my interests. Today I work as a Genex National Account Specialist covering the Northeast. I focus on large herd reproductive consultation, genetics, value-added programs and one of my favorite parts of my job, working with producers. I get the opportunity to learn something new every day, and I wouldn't change that for anything. As I mentioned before, my internship was an invaluable tool for my career. Not only am I able to take what I learned about reproduction and genetics and apply it to my job, but I learned many other valuable tools I use every day, such as communication skills, how to work in a team and how to prioritize. However, I think the most important thing I learned during my internship is how to adapt, even if I am uncomfortable in a situation or don't know what to expect. Working with Genex isn't just a job, it's a career. I am very blessed that I had the opportunity to start as an intern in such a progressive organization and continue as a full-time employee. 

©2014 CRI


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What other CRI and Genex employees are saying about their experience as GENESIS Interns.

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Genex Internship Opportunities Abound

Morgan Kliebenstein, Dairy Procurement Specialist, Genex “There’s no better way to expose yourself to the culture and inner workings of a company than having an internship. I was able to get a glimpse of the big picture and meet several influential individuals within the company. I think that without those opportunities, I wouldn’t have had as much success in pursuing my current career.“

Brenda Sisung, Public Relations Specialist, CRI “The GENESIS internship was a professional opportunity to gain real-world experience working for a reputable company in the bovine breeding and genetics industry. For me the internship wasn't about the day-to-day tasks of feeding calves, managing recipient heifers or assisting the reproductive specialist. The real objective was about networking, leaving a positive impression and having a foot in the door with a key player in the production agriculture industry. I was able to achieve this and without the internship experience my career wouldn't be where it is today, in the beginning of my fourth year as a full-time employee in the Public Relations department.“

j Gina Byrd, Cow Sense and Science Intern, works to complete a breeding project using Genex chute-side service.

Fifteen college students spent this summer discovering more about themselves and the A.I. industry. • Cole Anderson, Field Intern • Alexandra Kiser, Field Intern • Jerad Brown, Field Intern • Kathryn Ruhr, Field Intern • Nathan Bos, Field Intern • Sarah Paskewitz, Field Intern

Sarah Thorson, Beef Education Manager, Genex “For me the internship prepared me for a career with Genex in that it opened the door to a lot of opportunities. It allowed me to learn more about the co-op, meet great people and helped me decide that cattle genetics was the career I wanted. Now that I have the opportunity to work with interns I always tell them to work hard and take the opportunity to learn about Genex and CRI. Even though the internship might not be the exact job you see yourself doing for the rest of your life, there are so many opportunities within the CRI family, and I think we (CRI) does a great job finding fantastic, young talent and putting them in a position that fits them!“

• Brandon Scharping, Field Intern • Jessica Pearce , Field Intern • Kody Guden, Field Intern • Jacquelyn Mariano, GENESIS Intern • Marissa Wade , GENESIS Intern • Kaylyn Andrews, GENESIS Intern • Wyatt DeVries, Cow Sense and Science Intern • Gina Byrd, Cow Sense and Science Intern • John-Trevor Corboy, Sire Production Intern To learn more about current internship opportunities visit crinet.com/careers.

Angie Ahlgrim, Global Alliance Development Coordinator, CRI “As an intern, I got to experience a little bit of everything in terms of what the company does. I got to learn about the culture of the cooperative and the areas that CRI placed as priority. The GENESIS internship is basically day one for the dairy bulls in our lineup. It was a good way to learn the ‘behind the scenes’ steps of how matings are made and bulls are cared for before they make it to the lineup. Going through the A.I. school gave me the opportunity to meet full-time employees and see what my next steps could look like at CRI. Most importantly, the internship gave me a chance to get my foot in the door at a company I was interested in working for and meet the people that I hoped to someday work with.“

©2014 CRI

j Genex Field Intern, Cole Anderson spends time chalking tails and monitoring cows for heat. H O R I Z O N S

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GENEX IS ALL IN Genex

Cooperative, Inc. A Subsidiary of Cooperative Resources International

Phone 888/333-1783 • www.crinet.com

TO SERVE YOU!

PEOPLE

s The Genex Team

GENETICS s Conventional s GenChoice™ s Beef

PLANNING s Calf Math™ s Sire Sorting s Female Index

SUPPORT

s Product and Repro s A.I. Team s Genetics s Technical Support

Genetics Fertility Commitment TRAINING

s A.I. and Heat Detection Training s Breeder Refreshers/Audits s Bilingual Training Services

WE’VE WITNESSED THE PROFITABILITY OF THE JERSEY COW. WE ARE EXCITED TO BE A PART OF THE JERSEY GENERATION. To view the Genex lineup, scan the QR code or visit bit.ly/GenexJersey ©2014 CRI

PRODUCTS

s A.I. Supplies and Equipment s Herd Management Products

Genex

Cooperative, Inc. A Subsidiary of Cooperative Resources International

Phone 888/333-1783 • www.crinet.com Genex/CRI

@GenexJerseys


H E R D

M A N A G E M E N T

THE JERSEY

GENERATION By: Leah James // U.S. Jersey Marketing Manager, Genex

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hen you look at the dynamics of the current dairy industry, the color scheme has changed. The growing Jersey breed is led by a cow that carries a report card with numerous high marks; efficiency, less inputs, great component yields, reproductive advantages, no calving problems and longevity are just a few.

At Genex, we are excited to offer a complete Jersey program. Following the October 2012 board-approved Jersey initiative, our commitment to the Jersey breed further increased. We embraced the Genex Jersey plan and are excited to be the elite genetic resource for our Jersey members moving forward. We don’t offer just a product, but instead offer the complete package to be your partner in profitability during The Jersey Generation. People. From the U.S. Jersey Marketing Manager to our Strategic Marketing team, complemented by the Technical Services team and Genetics staff, Genex is unmatched in bringing experience and expertise to members and customers. This team works closely with localized Genex staff and sales representatives to provide the highest level of service and expertise possible. You can rest assured that our team will work to meet your herd’s unique needs. Genetics. Understanding commercial producers’ needs for profitability, high priority is placed on providing the latest and most cutting-edge genetics. Genex genetic sire analysts work with the most progressive herds in the nation to ensure our lineup’s genetic levels match market needs. Emphasis is placed on high Cheese Merit and Jersey Production Index™, genetic diversity, sire fertility, increasing protein yield, and improving Daughter Pregnancy Rate and health traits while maintaining and improving udders. Last year also marked the exciting addition of Jerseys to the GENESIS Cooperative Herd. Jersey GENESIS allows us to increase the availability of Jersey semen globally and develop genetics that provide maximum profit potential and adequate diversity for our members and customers. GENESIS includes real-world cows and heifers that make their living in large, commercial environments.

©2014 CRI

Products. The array of products available for Genex members and customers is exciting. From ear tags to REVEAL™ livestock markers and NuLife ® ReBOUND™, we aim to offer a complete line of user-friendly, value-added products. The ease of convenience with product delivery right to the farm along with unmatched product support have spurred a huge growth in our product lineup. Training. The Genex training team has evolved and adapted to the changing needs of members and customers. Today we can provide training right on the farm for activities such as artificial insemination and heat detection. Our Technical Services team also now has staff dedicated to offering bilingual training on the farm. Support. In order for a herd to be profitable, all aspects of the operation must run smoothly and efficiently. Our Genex Jersey team can offer support including reproductive audits, product knowledge and experience, and of course elite genetic herd consultation. Planning. Having a defined herd plan and specific goals is a prelude to elite herd performance. At Genex, we are dedicated to helping herds with the planning process. We offer tools like Calf Math™ (calfmath.crinet.com) that enable producers to input herdspecific data points and see how different breeding strategies position the dairy for success as well as sire sorting and female indexing services. The possibilities are endless when herds can customize their breeding programs to attain maximum value from the calves produced. Our excitement and commitment to the Jersey breed and its growth is led by our competitive genetic offering and industryleading fertility. This complete program of Jersey services allows us to provide unmatched customer service to our progressively minded members and customers. Join us today in The Jersey Generation. Inquire how the Genex Jersey program can fit into your herds needs.  A Author Bio: Leah James grew up on her family's dairy farm. She graduated with honors from the University of Wisconsin-River Falls with a bachelor's degree in agriculture education. She has work experience within the A.I. industry and for the American Jersey Cattle Association. Today, she and her husband also operate a 150-cow dairy.

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F ROM BL ACK & W HI T E to the

LITTLE BROWN

COW! By: Jenny Hanson // Communications Manager, CRI

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he American Jersey Cattle Association and Jersey breeders across the U.S. have accomplished much in breed growth throughout recent years. The projection of Jerseys expanding to 25% or more of the dairy cattle population by 2020 simply wows me. But there are many factors making that projection seem attainable. For instance, over the past 15 years total semen sales within the U.S. have grown by 70% however Jersey semen sales have grown by 278%! Genex is proud to partner with Jersey producers in achieving the growth goal. Our efforts to increase the availability of Jersey semen globally, develop genetics that provide maximum profit potential and adequate diversity, and offer a complete circle of genetics, products, training, support, genetic planning and Jersey-focused professionals demonstrate our commitment to helping achieve the goal. In July, I had the opportunity to visit a dairy that is contributing to the growth of the Jersey breed. I met with Dena Schmidt of S&S Jerseyland Dairy near Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin. I knew of the Schmidts previously, as their operation has been a tour stop for many CRI visitors from abroad. However, the operation has undergone a transformation in recent years. It is no longer the heifer raising facility once known as S&S Ag Enterprises. Instead it’s a growing, thriving Jersey dairy.

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g Following the decision to milk Jerseys, a rotary parlor specifically sized for Jerseys was built. k Calves are kept in indoor hutches until picked up and taken to a calf ranch. They return to the dairy at 4 months of age. j Calving takes place in individual pens. Cows are milked in the calving pen before being moved to a fresh pen. Colostrum is kept in the calving barn where the young calves are housed.

A Look Back

A Fresh Start

Back in the mid-1990s, the Schmidt family owned a dairy and In preparing for the transition from a heifer raising facility to an milked about 70 Holstein cows. In late 1996 their barn caught fire, active dairy farm, the Schmidts carefully considered their options. and they were forced to sell the cows. In 1997, the opportunity “We already had freestall barns, manure storage and feed. We came about for the family to raise replacement heifers for other just needed to add a parlor and a maternity area,” explained local dairies. Over the following years, Randy and Dena Schmidt Dena. “We also had to consider that the facilities we had were and Randy’s parents Adrian “Ace” and Kay Schmidt grew the made for heifers. If we wanted to milk Holsteins, we would have heifer raising operation, called S&S Ag Enterprises, and at one to significantly alter the freestalls.” point had about 6,000 heifers, primarily Holsteins. “Therefore, we considered milking Jerseys. We tried it and The Schmidts were successful loved it. The Jerseys fit well into the freestall barns which had heifer raisers maintaining a low previously served Holstein heifers, and the Jerseys produce high death loss rate and excellent protein and butterfat.” services per conception. However, as Dena explained, “We always “Overall, for a startup dairy, the transition went really well,” she knew we wanted to milk cows noted. Today, after building the maternity area and 70-stall again one day.” So that’s exactly rotary parlor and sourcing Jersey cattle from across the U.S., what they did. On November 1, the Schmidts milk about 2,300 Jerseys three times a day. The 2012, after a 16 year hiatus, they herd fills more than two tankers of milk per day, averaging 3.6% began to milk cows once again. protein and 5.0% fat. j Dena Schmidt

©2014 CRI

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Idea. Plan. Action. Together with Genex professionals, the Schmidts have formed a detailed plan to maximize the value of calves born at S&S Jerseyland. The breeding program enables the dairy to produce high genetic merit Jersey replacement females and plenty of them, as they continue to fill the current facility and look to grow the herd into the future. The plan also includes matings to beef semen, allowing the dairy to earn premium prices for beef x dairy crosses. More specifically, Kim Egan, Genex National Account Specialist, ranks the herd’s females genetically by estimated Cheese Merit (CM) and relative value. The top quarter of the herd is bred to Jersey sexed semen for the first two services. The middle half of the herd gets one service to sexed semen before using conventional semen. In both instances, Pete Weber, Genex Dairy National Account Manager, works with the Schmidts to choose appropriate mating sires based on Protein, CM and fertility. The bottom quarter of the herd is bred to Wulf Limousin semen as part of the Breeding to Feeding™ program offered through Genex and Wulf Cattle. g This Limousin x Jersey cross calf is part of the Breeding to Feeding program. The dairy receives a premium based on current Holstein bull calf market prices for each calf in the program.

MAXIMIZING THE VALUE OF CALVES • ESTABLISH DAIRY GOALS for genetic quality and number of calves born per year. • DETERMINE NUMBER OF REPLACEMENT HEIFER CALVES needed per year to meet future herd goals. • USE CALF MATH™ to compare potential breeding strategy outcomes. • DETERMINE THE MOST EFFECTIVE COMBINATION of semen products to create your ideal profit opportunity. • RANK FEMALES GENETICALLY using tools such as the AgSource Genetic Selection Guide, genomic testing, parent average or other custom genetic sorts. • UTILIZE GENCHOICE™ on the herd’s highquality heifers to increase genetic progress. • MAKE LOWER GENETIC MERIT CALVES MORE MARKETABLE AND INCREASE PROFITS. Create beef x dairy crosses through Breeding to Feeding™ with semen tested in dairy herds for fertility and calving ease.

What Does the Future Hold? Opportunities abound for S&S Jerseyland. The Schmidts already have plans on the horizon to build another freestall barn.

A team of Genex professionals – including Megan Zeman, Craig Redeker, Chris Kinnard and Dennis Jahnke – manages the daily tasks associated with the herd’s breeding program. They walk and chalk the herd using Reveal™ tail paint and follow the breeding protocol ensuring the right cow is bred with the appropriate semen type (GenChoice, conventional or Limousin). In the last six months, the team has averaged a 24% pregnancy rate.

The herd itself also holds opportunities. The first Jersey calves born on the dairy are now joining the milking herd. As calves born from the current breeding strategy mature, calve in and enter the milking string, the genetic progress achieved will be even more exciting to witness. As for the family itself, Randy and Dena have three sons who have taken an interest in the operation. Derek, 25, is a graduate of the Farm and Industry Short Course at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and enjoys working on the cropping side of the dairy. Tanner, 20, is currently attending Fox Valley Technical College for agricultural business. When not at school, he assists with feeding. Their youngest, Devin, is a sophomore in high school and helps out in various capacities around the dairy. With much to look forward to at the dairy, the Schmidts also find community involvement and education important. Each spring and fall they produce a newsletter for neighbors within a five mile radius, and they also invite local high school students interested in a future in the dairy industry to the farm. 

A Author Bio:

j Kim Egan, left, of Genex and Megan Zeman, a Genex Breeding Program Specialist, discuss the breeding program protocols at S&S Jerseyland dairy. 2 2

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Jenny Hanson is a graduate of the University of WisconsinRiver Falls with a degree in agricultural communications. She joined Cooperative Resources International in 2005 and has served as editor of the Dairy Horizons since May 2006.

©2014 CRI


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PATHWAYS • GenChoice ™ • Fertility • Breeding to Feeding  • Genetics • People SM

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R E P R O D U C T I V E

M A N A G E M E N T

BREEDER CHECKUP CAN

HELP DRIVE REPRO SUCCESS

By: Miguel Perez // A.I. Training Specialist, Genex //// Phillip Lunn // National Account Specialist, Genex

W

hile Genex professionals provide many members with cattle artificial insemination (A.I.) service, there are also dairies across the U.S. that utilize on-farm herd inseminators. These farm-employed breeders may be graduates of an A.I. school or may have received on-the-job training. Regardless, continual learning and evaluation is necessary to achieve ongoing breeding program success. Genex provides a service aimed at assisting herd inseminators in attaining optimal results. A breeding program audit – a Genex program called A.I. AccuCheck – is a comprehensive observation and evaluation of a herd inseminator’s technique designed to monitor performance and facilitate the exchange of knowledge and new information. Why is there a need for A.I. AccuCheck? In today’s dairy industry, herd inseminators are busy and often have a difficult time keeping up with advancements in A.I. simply because they are focused on their daily work. In other instances, breeders are taught how to perform a task but not why it is important to do it correctly. Other herd inseminators are veterans of the position, having been trained quite a few years ago with no follow-up. Finally, though one may not like to admit it, it is human nature to cut corners and develop bad habits over time.

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A.I. AccuCheck provides opportunity for Genex training specialists to share new techniques and recent research with herd inseminators while supplementing inadequate or outdated training. The program helps a breeder understand the impact they have on the dairy’s bottom line. Regular, comprehensive evaluations can also help to uncover small problems before they become larger issues. In dairy reproductive programs, one of the unfortunate realities is that problems can be hidden for weeks, until a vet check. On a large dairy, this can amount to hundreds of services and thousands of dollars in lost opportunity. So, what is evaluated during an A.I. AccuCheck? The simple answer is – everything. Experienced Genex professionals evaluate every aspect of breeder performance. During this evaluation, we communicate to the breeder that our goal is to help them improve their performance and make them an even more valuable farm employee. The evaluation is not about finding fault; it’s about identifying areas of opportunity, incorporating research-based proven techniques and praising breeders for what they do correctly.

©2014 CRI


R E P R O D U C T I V E

M A N A G E M E N T

Let’s look at some attributes of the A.I. AccuCheck program: Scheduling: While the frequency of visits may vary from farm to farm, it’s important they occur on a regular basis. This helps to detect problems early. It also enables the breeder and Genex training specialist to get to know each other. Initially, the breeder may be nervous to have someone evaluating their work. However, over time the breeder should realize the knowledge gained and personal development achieved only makes him or her a more valuable farm employee.

the chances of attaining a pregnancy. One needs to ensure cleanliness each time the cow is entered for breeding; the uterus of a cow is the perfect environment for bacteria to thrive, leading to infections. Record-keeping: Accurate record-keeping is necessary for evaluating reproductive program performance. Remember, performance results are only as accurate as the data points recorded. Therefore it is important to correctly and consistently record the bulls being used, the technician name or number, and other comments related to the breeding event. With accurate and detailed information, the dairy management team is better able to the monitor reproductive program success and make decisions regarding farm reproduction and profit goals. Following a thorough evaluation, the most significant areas for improvement are focused on first. Then over time, smaller issues can be tweaked. The goal is not to overwhelm the breeder or dairy with changes, but to make manageable improvements over a logical timeframe.

j Miguel walks with a herd inseminator observing heat detection procedures.

Equipment: For reproductive success one must make sure all equipment is in good working order and functioning properly. An A.I. AccuCheck evaluation includes examining equipment. For instance, is the thaw unit the right temperature? Is it clean? How often is the water changed? If a gun warmer is used, how often is the insert cleaned or changed? Is it dirty inside? Genex training specialists also observe how equipment (scissors, tweezers, etc.) is stored. Those items should be stored in a container, such as a breeding kit, for cleanliness and to prevent loss or damage.

The success of a dairy’s reproductive program is important as it directly affects the farm’s bottom line. Through A.I. AccuCheck and the assistance of a Genex training specialist, on-farm inseminators are re-motivated to drive reproductive program success as they develop and refine their technique and learn the science behind their work.

Heat Detection: If heat detection is used, the Genex training specialist walks pens with the breeder to see if detection is conducted properly. Is tail chalk or paint being applied and read correctly? Does the breeder know and understand the signs of heat? If the breeder is asked how they decided a particular cow is or is not in heat, can they respond directly and confidently? Semen Handling: More infractions are committed in this performance area than any other, so it’s important to go through a semen handling checklist with the breeder explaining the importance of each step and the consequences of cutting corners. Also evaluated is thaw time, time from straw thawing to semen deposition, etc. A.I. Technique: The Genex training specialist observes every part of the insemination process from the point of entry into the cow until the breeder withdraws the insemination gun. Observation indicates how gentle the breeder is while working the gun through the cervix, the level of ease the breeder has in moving the gun through the cervix, the speed at which semen is deposited, the semen deposit location and more. Cleanliness: Cleanliness cannot be overlooked. Cleanliness is observed in every step – from semen handling until the breeder withdraws the A.I gun. Specific areas examined include: Is a paper towel used to wipe the vulva before inserting the insemination gun? Is the A.I kit and everything inside it clean? Is the inside of the gun warmer (if used) clean? Being clean not only makes a breeder look professional but also increases ©2014 CRI

j Genex A.I. Training Specialist Ana Contreras works with a herd inseminator on improving A.I. technique.

To learn more about having a breeding program evaluation conducted on your dairy, contact your local Genex representative. A.I. AccuCheck is not available in all locations. 

A Author Bios: Miguel Perez earned an associate's degree in dairy science from Modesto Junior College and has 10 years of work experience in the dairy industry. Before joining Genex, he served as a herdsman on a California Jersey farm. He joined Genex in 2012. Miguel served as a Genex Regional Account Specialist before becoming an A.I. Training Specialist.

Phillip Lunn holds a bachelor’s degree from Middle Tennessee State University and a master’s degree from the University of Tennessee at Martin. He also previously ran a family farming operation and worked at the University of Tennessee Dairy Research Center. Today, he is a Genex National Account Specialist.

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M A N A G E M E N T

ELECTROLYTE PROGRAM GIVES NEWBORN CALVES

A HEALTHY START By: Robert East // Nutrition Additions Program Manager, Genex

C

alf scours can be a problem on dairies of all sizes. According to the 2014 Hoard’s Dairyman Continuing Market Study, 63.3% of herds reported cases of calf scours with an average of 20.4 cases per herd (average milking herd size of 189.9 cows). The predominant causes of calf scours were E. coli, salmonella, cryptosporidium, rotovirus and corona virus. The 2014 Hoard’s Dairyman study also indicated 89.2% of herds use an electrolyte and 25.4% feed an electrolyte as a routine treatment.

The advised NuLife Pre 14-14 protocol is to add 14 grams of the oral electrolyte to a quart of warm water and offer it to a calf at the midday feeding. This protocol should begin on the calf’s third day of life and continue for 14 days. If a calf would develop scours, the amount of NuLife Oral Electrolyte should be increased to a standard 100 gram rate in two quarts of water offered twice daily for two days. Please note that NuLife Oral Electrolytes can be fed without withholding milk.

It is important to remember scours is a visible clinical sign, not a disease. Calf death is a result of electrolyte depletion, acidosis and dehydration from the body's rapid response to flush the disease.

The NuLife Pre 14-14 program has benefits year-round, as calves can suffer from mild dehydration in both hot and cold weather. In winter, calves are extremely vulnerable to cold, and dehydration is a major concern. In summer, heat stress combined with a scour event is a serious concern, and nutritionists agree feeding an electrolyte with the proper formulation is a good idea for all calves.

Young calves are especially vulnerable to calf scours. A University of CaliforniaDavis Vet Views1 article indicates calf scours are common in the first few days of life, typically by day five and around days 10 to 21 of life.

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NuLife Oral Electrolytes help maintain and encourage water consumption. This is important as water consumption is the key to feed consumption during periods of stress. Genex members with herds of all sizes as well as calf ranches have given great reviews of the NuLife Pre 14-14 program. These members accept the fact calves are probably going to scour and proactively set calves up to handle the event quicker and easier. In response to the wide-spread acceptance of this program, NuLife Oral Electrolytes are offered in individual 100 gram packets as well as 44 pound bulk boxes with volume pricing.

Proactively set calves up to handle a scours event quicker and easier.

With all of this in mind, CRI developed a program called NuLife® Pre 14-14, utilizing a low dose feeding of NuLife Oral Electrolytes. Feeding a low dose of electrolytes during the time period calves are especially vulnerable to developing scours helps to prepare calves should an episode of diarrhea occur and to maintain hydration and appetite. Veterinarians Dr. Sassi and Dr. Whitten assisted in developing this concept of pre-hydration using NuLife Oral Electrolytes. 1

“Feeding Cows to Prevent Scours in Calves.” UC-Davis Vet Views. 2002.

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In closing, Genex strives to produce a top-of-the-industry electrolyte product with quality ingredients. These products come backed by consultants and industry professionals. For dairy producers currently using NuLife Oral Electrolytes and the Pre 14-14 program, thank you for entrusting your calves to Genex. For those looking for an effective electrolyte program, please ask contact your Genex representative for more information on our products.  A Author Bio: Robert East is a graduate of Virginia Tech University. He has spent more than 30 years in the industry. Since joining Genex, he has worked to develop a high-quality life event supplement program to benefit members' and customers' herds.

©2014 CRI


GENESIS IN THE BEGINNING …

25 YEARS LATER: CELEBRATING OUR SILVER ANNIVERSARY


H E R D

S TO R Y

MAKING AN IMPACT B

ack in 1989, when the GENESIS Cooperative Herd was first started as a trial embryo program, the cooperative’s newsletter noted the goal of the program was “to make available higher genetic merit bulls that will return more profit to the cooperative and its members.” Twenty-five years later, Angie Coburn, Associate Vice President of Dairy Genetics, defines the GENESIS breeding goals in a similar manner. “We select for profitable genetics as defined by our members’ needs.” Over the years, the GENESIS herd – a herd of Holstein and Jersey cattle owned by the Genex membership – has produced profitable genetics for members. Also of importance, these progressive genetics have come backed by powerful precision.

A prime reason for the precision, accuracy and stability of genomic predictions of Co-op prefix bulls is the structure of the program. GENESIS females function in real-world commercial settings. The cooperator herd setting allows for these bull dams to be put to work in an unbiased herd environment. A second reason is the extensive genomic testing of GENESIS cow families and their herdmates. The 14 GENESIS cooperator herds have an important role in producing rapid genetic progress and contributing to the credibility and stability of GENESIS animals’ genetic evaluations. This article features two cooperator herds and demonstrates their involvement in GENESIS success.

Dykstra Dairy Maurice, Iowa In 2002, after attending college in Iowa, Darin Dykstra moved from California to northwest Iowa and established Dykstra Dairy with his wife Linda. Darin and Linda operate the dairy under the philosophy that “as stewards of what God has given us, we need to take excellent care of the cattle and land, while producing quality food that people need. We strive to produce our food efficiently, producing more with less.” The Dykstras have placed their genetic focus on developing medium-sized, efficient and durable cows that lead to healthy, high-producing animals with good reproduction. An intensive breeding strategy is in place within the 3,400-cow herd to achieve those genetic goals and further the herd’s genetic level. Eric VanWyk, Dykstra Dairy General Manager, explains the breeding strategy. “We’ve been using embryo transfer for the past three years. First, we genomic test all female calves to better know their genetic level. Then every two weeks we flush four high genomic heifers and one or two high 2-year-old cows. Heifers that genomic test at $550 Lifetime Net Merit (LNM) or below serve as the embryo recipients.” In the last year the farm implanted 50 to 60 embryos per month. The majority of embryos were produced on the farm. Heifers that don’t settle with an embryo are bred to sexed semen for one service and then to conventional semen, if needed. The local Genex service team provides the daily heat detection and breeding for both the heifers and cows. Several females from the Dykstra herd are already impacting GENESIS. A few are pictured here, such as Stonyvale Baldwin

j Stonyvale Baldwin CRI-ET 2 8

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CRI-ET. Stonyvale Baldwin is a daughter of the previously active 1HO10061 BANNING and is currently a flush animal within the GENESIS program. Richlawn Avia CRI-ET is a milking daughter of 1HO10218 DENIM, contributing data to the genetic evaluation of this recently daughter-proven bull. She is also a full sister to two active sires: the +$818 LNM and +$958 ICC 1HO10890 ADRIAN and the +$748 LNM and +$865 ICC 1HO11161 AMBIENT. In addition, Richlawn Avia is a maternal sister to an exciting up-and-coming genomic giant named 1HO11889 AVENGER. This bull stands at +$932 LNM, +8.1 Productive Life, +2.62 Somatic Cell Score, +3.8 Daughter Pregnancy Rate and +2.42 PTA Type. The Dykstra herd is also home to Co-op Perry Classy 6614-ET. She’s a Perry sister to the well-known 1HO10396 CABRIOLET and the conformation specialist 1HO10989 CHRISTO.

j Richlawn Avia CRI-ET

j Co-op Perry Classy 6614-ET ©2014 CRI


H E R D

S TO R Y

j Co-op BSF Fredi Teddy-ET

Brown-Star Farms Gillett, Wisconsin Brown-Star Farms is owned by Dan and Carol Brown and their daughter and her husband, Kim and Matt Bjelland. The family farm has a long history as the Browns and Bjellands celebrated the operation’s 125-year anniversary in 2011. In recent years, the dairy has undergone changes with the addition of new freestalls and two large calving pens, a swing-16 parlor, a facility for 2 to 16-month-old heifers and a calf barn with automatic feeders. Today, following those changes, the dairy is milking around 400 cows.

j Brown Star Mas Cotton Candy

In an effort to produce more profitable cows that breed back, have high production and good udders, Matt began purchasing GENESIS embryos back in 2002. As the GENESIS Cooperative Herd evolved, the dairy became a cooperator herd and actively flushes GENESIS donors housed at the dairy in addition to implanting embryos. Among the impactful GENESIS females at Brown-Star Farms is Co-op BSF Fredi Teddy-ET. This 1HO108784 FREDDIE daughter is the dam of the +$842 ICC sire 1HO11024 TENDER. Another high-performing daughter of a Genex sire is Brown Star Mas Cotton Candy, daughter of 1HO10217 MASTER *BY.

j 1HO11327 Co-op BSF GATEKEEPER-ET

Also hailing from the dairy is genomic giant 1HO11327 Co-op BSF GATEKEEPERET. This 18-month-old bull has a +$873 LNM with 132 pounds combined Fat and Protein, +6.8 Productive Life, +2.66 Somatic Cell Score, +1.6 Daughter Pregnancy Rate and +2.22 PTA Type. 

GENESIS COOPERATOR HERDS s Aardema Dairies, Jerome, Idaho s Brandvale Dairy Farm, Ellsworth, Wis. s Brown-Star Farms, Gillett, Wis. s Double A Dairy, Jerome, Idaho s Dryhouse Farm, Belleville, Pa. s Dykstra Dairy, Maurice, Iowa s Fairmont Farm Inc., East Montpelier, Vt.

This is the third in a series of stories on the GENESIS cooperator herds. Follow the GENESIS 25-year celebration and cooperator herd features throughout the year. ©2014 CRI

s Harmony-Ho Holsteins, Stratford, Wis. s Heidi Farms Inc., Bainsville, Ontario, Can. s Hyde-Park Holsteins, Zumbro Falls, Minn. s River-Bridge Holsteins, Brillion, Wis. s Rosedale Farm LLC, Jeromesville, Ohio s Schmidt’s Ponderosa, Bonduel, Wis. s United Pride Dairy, LLC, Phillips, Wis.

GENESIS H O R I Z O N S

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Dairy Producers Asked, Genex Delivered … Again! Introducing A profit-indicating measure to rank Holstein sires that puts greater emphasis on longevity, health, and optimal body size and condition without sacrificing yield and udder traits.

Top 10

Ideal Commercial Cow Makers

S 1HO11056 TROY S 1HO11097 MAGNATE S 1HO11511 TAMPA S 1HO08784 FREDDIE S 1HO11426 TUFFENUFF

S 1HO11316 GEMSTONE

High-ranking Ideal Commercial Cow (ICC) index sires possess the genetic characteristics needed to create cows that excel in commercial conditions. The genetic averages of the top 10 Genex ICC sires demonstrate the genetic ability of the index’s leading sires.

S 1HO11541 STAMINA

S +$983 ICC

S +1.9 Daughter Pregnancy Rate

S +$848 LNM

S 6.8% Sire Calving Ease

S +1533 Milk

S +1.4 Stature

S +125 Combined Fat & Protein

S +2.39 Udder Composite

S 1HO11545 LAWMAN S 1HO10890 ADRIAN S 1HO11528 EMERALD

S +6.4 Productive Life ©2014 CRI


Jaelyn and Jaxson Brady, children of CRI Communications Specialist Brenda Brady.

Financing for Your Future and Theirs. Rely on John Deere Financial for the financing you need. Genex is pleased to offer John Deere Financial to provide you with unique finance options to meet the specific needs of your operation. Whether you’re thinking about the next day or the next generation, John Deere Financial is a name you can rely on.


PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID Columbus, WI Permit No. 73

P.O. Box 469 Shawano, WI 54166 Phone 888/333-1783

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Your PregCheck+ Fertility Leaders S 501HO10837 FLYN S 501HO10800 OUTACITE S 501HO10738 JITTERBUG S 501HO11200 LOMBARDI S 501HO10644 INDY S 501HO10648 PUZZLE S 501HO10455 KRISTOFF S 501HO10601 DYMON S 501HO10660 UNIQUE S 501HO02747 MAYHEM S 501HO10446 WOLFGANG S 501HO10296 BOYOBOY S 501HO02509 FLAWLESS

©2014 CRI

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