Page 1

Volume 18 / Number 1

Genex

Cooperative, Inc. A Subsidiary of Cooperative Resources International

Spring 2014


N E W

PHOTOS 1AN01310 BREAKING NEWS

1AN01292 ADVANCE, Dam

1AN01280 DOMINANCE, Dam

Koupal Ebonette 734

S A V Blacklass 374

1AN01212 SETTLER, Daughter

1AN01238 RESOURCE, Son

PT Miss Candy’s Kisses 213

S A V Real Estate 3159

1AN01250 FOUNDATION, Son

1AN01208 VANCE, Son

S A V Foundation 3153

SD Vance 2176

1AN01237 ANGUS VALLEY, Daughter

1AN01116 UPWARD, Daughter

PVA Blackcap May H345

Whitestone Everelda 0057

1AN01165 SUBSTANCE, Son

1HP00831 WORLDWIDE, Daughter

1SM00126 TOP GRADE, Daughter

1SM00130 LOTTO, Son

Ellingson Immortal 3043

SHR 1102 Miss World Time 3018

OBCC Temptress P74A

Blacksand Lotto 37A

1AN01249 SOLUTION


A GREAT DAY

BEEF HORIZONS

Published bi-annually for beef producers in the United States.

Address correspondence to: Genex Cooperative, Inc. 100 MBC Drive, P.O. Box 469 Shawano, WI 54166 TEL: 888.333.1783 FAX: 715.526.3219 EMAIL: info@crinet.com WEBSITE: www.crinet.com

Spring 2014

TO BE A COWBOY! Willie Altenburg, AVP, Beef Development, Genex

Stan Lock, eternal optimist and Genex Beef Large Herd Development Manager, often says, “It’s a great day to be a cowboy.” Now, I’m beginning to believe him! At the time of writing this article, the signals in the marketplace are the strongest we have ever seen – strong prices, lower feed inputs.

Vol. 18/No. 1

BEEF HORIZONS STAFF Lindsay Johnson, Editor Brenda Sisung, Assistant Editor Andy Graf, Graphic Designer

CattleFax February 25, 2014: Daily Market Outlook and Analysis FUTURES MARKET SUMMARY

COVER PHOTO

Lindskov-Thiel Ranch – Isabel , S.D.

Genex Cooperative, Inc.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Paul Greene, President Berlin, N.Y., 518.658.2419 Duane Nelson, 1st Vice President Winthrop, Minn., 507.647.2540

Close

Change

High

Low

Live Cattle

$146.450

$1.300

$146.450

$145.350

Feeder Cattle

$171.075

$0.875

$171.100

$171.000

Corn

$4.5575

$0.0425

$4.5600

$4.4875

The nation’s cow herd numbers are the lowest in 30 years, but they are slowly starting to rebuild. Cow/calf producers are making a long-term commitment to the cow herd by retaining replacement heifers.

John Ruedinger, 2nd Vice President Van Dyne, Wis., 920.922.9899 Ronald Totten, Secretary Stafford, N.Y., 585.344.0758

Replacement heifers are setting sale records as well. This winter, commercial bred heifers are selling for $2,400 or more. Heifers are earning added premiums if artificially inseminated (A.I.) to a calving ease sire and even more if pregnancy tested or ultrasounded into synchronized breeding and calving groups. As you can see, there are premiums to be captured for outstanding genetics that are synchronized and bred A.I. The Genex Influenced Bred Heifer sales, held in conjunction with Superior Livestock Auction, are a great place to capture these premiums. Read more on page 12.

Jim Crocker Valley City, Ohio, 330.483.3709 Jon Wayne Danielson Cadott, Wis., 715.289.3860 Patrick Dugan Casa Grande, Ariz., 520.836.2168 Ted Foster Middlebury, Vt., 802.388.6515 Harlin Hecht Paynesville, Minn., 320.243.4386

Cattle earning premium prices for outstanding maternal genetics bred to calving ease bulls will separate themselves from the average. These individuals will continue bringing higher returns and contribute to the thought that it’s a great day to be a cowboy!

Harold House Nokesville, Va., 703.754.9534 Kay Olson-Martz Friendship, Wis., 608.564.7359 Bobby Robertson Tahlequah, Okla., 918.822.0020 Alfred Wanner, Jr. Narvon, Pa., 717.768.8118

TS N E T N O C TS AN N CR I HOS

MISSION STATEMENT

Provide products and services as effectively as possible to maximize the profitability of members and customers worldwide while maintaining a strong cooperative.

F VALU E O

AL M TH E R E ADDE D” PROG RA

10

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12

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4 S 6 IN THE NEW GUIDE E N’S 8 ATOCAUTSTINLEGMINDEXES

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13 NEW SIRES PECIALS PR ING S S 20 BRAZIL ... AINFOREST R 2 BEYOND THE 2


CRI HOSTS ANNUAL MEETING

During 2013 Cooperative Resources International (CRI) expanded its balance sheet through growth in core business areas and created and expanded global opportunities, Chairman John Ruedinger told delegates at the cooperative’s annual meeting held January 28-29 in Bloomington, Minn.

Highlights of 2013, as noted by Romuald, included:

More than 200 delegates – representing members of CRI subsidiaries AgSource and Genex – attended the annual meeting, which included business meetings and 10 educational sessions.

• Growth in plant tissue testing at AgSource Laboratories’ agronomy division.

During the business meeting CRI Chief Financial Officer Larry Romuald highlighted the cooperative’s 2013 financial performance, based on nine months of performance due to a fiscal year change. Consolidated income for the nine-month fiscal year ending September 30, 2013 totaled $128,268,829 with $1,546,431 in post-tax net savings. Although revenue increased, Romuald observed that adverse factors impacted overall revenue. “The wet spring cut short the spring soil testing season for AgSource. And, the wet spring and the challenge for dairy producers and ranchers to secure adequate and cost effective feed supplies impacted Genex.”

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• Increased demand for AgSource milk and blood-based diagnostic tests. • Growth in number of cows and percent of cows DHI tested through AgSource.

• Growth in total semen sales from Genex. • Substantial growth in semen sales from the CRI International division. • Growth in GenChoice™ semen sales domestically and internationally. • Positive revenue contributions from Central Livestock Association, a Genex company that marketed over 551,000 head of livestock. • Record revenue from Genex Farm Systems with construction of 43 slurry structures and seven DeLaval robotic milkers. • Market share growth from CRI’s foreign-owned entities in Mexico and Brazil.


Vold Retires from Genex Board Delegates at the annual meeting had the opportunity to partake in 10 educational sessions. Here, Kim Stackhouse-Lawson of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association speaks on beef sustainability, explaining where the beef industry has made significant improvement and where opportunities exist to achieve a more sustainable future.

Richard Vold from Glenwood, Minn., has retired from the Genex board of directors after 11 years as a dedicated board member. During his tenure, Vold represented the Genex board at Central Livestock board meetings. Genex management also credit Vold for his personal efforts put forth to remind delegates of the importance of attending delegate input meetings. As Genex COO Doug Wilson states, “The gracious manner in which Richard Vold conducted himself was a model and example for us all to live by.”

Hecht Named to Genex Board of Directors At the Genex annual meeting, Harlin Hecht, a Genex member and registered Charolais cattle breeder from Paynesville, Minn., was elected by Genex delegates in Region 11 to serve on the cooperative’s board of directors.

Emily Zweber of Zweber Farms and the AgChat Foundation explains how she utilizes social media as a risk management tool for her farm by creating a community, connecting with key influencers and building relationships with decision-makers.

Along with the summary of 2013 performance, delegates were also informed of a major acquisition. CRI CEO Doug Wilson stated CRI has signed a letter of intent to purchase MofA. MofA, headquartered in Verona, Wis., is among the world’s leaders in the development, manufacturing and marketing of artificial insemination and embryo transfer breeding supplies and associated products for the porcine, bovine, equine and canine industries. Looking to the future, and in light of the MofA announcement, Chairman Ruedinger concluded, “CRI is in a position to grow and, as 2014 unfolds, you can rest assured CRI will continue to work with the same aggressive passion for success in the exciting world of production agriculture.”

Hecht and his wife Sue have bred cattle at Double-H Charolais since 1968. Hecht and his family have shown cattle in state and national competitions. He has also been involved in state and national breed associations; Hecht is a past president and director of the Minnesota/Wisconsin Charolais Association and served as president and held several other officer positions within the American International Charolais Association (IACA). Hecht is a member of the Minnesota Livestock Hall of Fame and was named 2006 AICA National Herdsman of the Year. Most recently, he and his wife were honored as the 40th National Charolais Show Dedicatees at the 2009 Fort Worth Stock Show. An active cooperative member, Hecht served on the Central Livestock board of directors from 2009-2010. Since 2011, when Central Livestock became a company of Genex, Hecht has served on the Central Livestock advisory committee. For the past three years, he has also served as the advisory committee representative to the Genex board.

©2014 CRI

BEEF HORIZONS

5


IN THE NEWS Announcing a Change in Liquid Nitrogen Delivery

Genex Member Definition to Change

The delivery of liquid nitrogen (LN2) to members and customers is a vital part of the Genex service commitment. In reviewing our business model to gain efficiencies and with input from the board of directors, field marketing staff and management, Genex is dedicating specific staff to deliver LN2 to members and customers.

After reviewing delegate and alternate input received at fall delegate meetings in 2011, the Genex board and CRI governance committee supported changing the Genex member definition for 2015. Their recommendation increases the amount of annual allocatable expenditures required to be a Genex member from $200 to $500. The CRI board voted to change the Genex member definition as recommended. It goes into effect in 2015.

The LN2 delivery team will also meet your breeding supply needs, including products such as breeding gloves and sheathes. This delivery service began in select areas in November 2013. It is anticipated the service will be expanded to members and customers in the upper Midwest and Northeast. Your local Genex sales representative, called a Territory Sales Manager, will continue to provide semen, genetic consultation, reproductive consultation and information on our complete line of products. The implementation of the LN2 delivery team enables Territory Sales Managers to be more available to meet your needs. Additionally, your cooperative will benefit from new cost saving measures. The current fleet of trucks will be transitioned to more user-friendly vans that increase the comfort, health and safety of Genex staff and operate more fuel efficiently. With our commitment to customer service, the new vehicles have the space needed to have products readily available such as NuLife® ReBOUND™ and NuLife Oral Electrolytes, products that increase the health and welfare of calves and cattle.

NuLife Oral Electrolyte ®

Mix or feed with water and watch as it replenishes fluids and electrolytes in calves.

Genex SHOP NOW!

Cooperative, http://profitshop.crinet.com Inc.

For more info, call 888.333.1783

A Subsidiary of Cooperative Resources International

Phone 888/333-1783 • www.crinet.com

Maximizing their potential is your job, Maximizing potential is your job, helping you their pay for it is ours. helping you pay for it is ours. At John Deere Financial, we make your purchasing power even stronger with payment terms that fit your operation. Versatile and dependable, a multi-use account makes it easy to get what you need when you need it. Get 180 days No-Payments/No-Interest until June 30, 2014 on any initial minimum purchase of $600.00.* Ask your local Genex Representative for complete details. If you don’t have an account, John Deere Financial makes it easy to apply. • Visit JohnDeereFinancial.com/Advantage to complete an application online • Request an application from your local Genex representative • Call 1-800-356-9033 to have an application mailed to you See more of what you can do with John Deere Financial at JohnDeereFinancial.com/Advantage. * Offer ends June 30, 2014. 180 Days No-Payments/No-Interest from the date of purchase, which may be prior to delivery, until June 2014 when the entire transaction amount is due in full. Offer limited to multi-use account agricultural customers. After the promotional period, interest charges will begin to accrue at the rate provided in the multi-use account credit agreement. Subject to John Deere Financial approval and merchant participation. Offer limited to qualifying products and minimum purchase requirements. See your local retailer for complete details. Multi-use accounts are a service of John Deere Financial, f.s.b. CR0314352 (14-01)


IN THE NEWS Woodward to Lead Cooperative Research Program

CRI Buys Animal Reproductive Technologies Company

CRI has hired Brent Woodward as Associate Vice President of Research. Woodward, who holds a doctorate in animal breeding and genetics from Cornell University, has worked in agricultural research for more than 23 years.

CRI has finalized the purchase of the primary assets of MofA, formerly known as Minitube of America. MofA is one of the world’s leaders in the development, manufacturing and marketing of artificial insemination and embryo transfer products and technologies for the porcine, bovine, equine and canine industries. The company now stands as the third subsidiary of CRI, alongside AgSource and Genex.

“In this role, Brent will direct research efforts across CRI and its subsidiaries, AgSource and Genex,” said Peter Giacomini, CRI Vice President of Business Development. “The science behind our primary services offered to agricultural producers is progressing at a rapid pace. Under Brent’s leadership, CRI will establish a more intense research program continuing the cooperative’s efforts in bringing new advancements to our members and customers.” Previously, Woodward served eight years as Director and Senior Scientist for IGENITY research and development. He led IGENITY to an increased portfolio of products, single SNP DNA tests to 50,000+ SNP profiles for 32 traits of economic importance for beef and dairy cattle producers. He has also held the positions of Research Geneticist with the USDA Agricultural Research Service and Extension Animal Scientist with the University of Minnesota.

Kuck Retires After 38 Years with Genex Al Kuck retired February 21 after nearly four decades of employment with Genex and its predecessor cooperatives. “Al has served cooperative members in numerous capacities, most recently as Vice President of Beef Programs,” states Keith Heikes, Genex Senior Vice President of Product Development and Marketing. “During his tenure in the beef division, Al was accountable for Genex custom semen collection, beef sire procurement and initiatives to grow beef programs. In fact, he contributed to domestic and international beef genetics market share growth from 13% and 8% to over 28% and 34% respectively.” Initially, Al had begun his cattle genetics career within the dairy industry. He was hired by Genex predecessor Midwest Breeders Cooperative as Breeding Programs Manager-Dairy. He was later promoted to Vice President of Genetic Services and then held the position Vice President of Dairy Genetics for 21st Century Genetics before accepting a role in beef programs with the formation of Genex. His role within Genex beef programs led to professional affiliations with the Wisconsin Cattlemen’s Association and the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. Al also served on the National Association of Animal Breeders board of directors and committees.

“The purchase of MofA is the largest single step CRI has taken to further increase our influence in production agriculture,” states Doug Wilson, CRI CEO. “The subsequent expansion of CRI core business areas continues to set this organization apart from the rest of the industry.” Back in 1993, CRI became known as the nation’s first direct link between a dairy herd improvement organization and a provider of bovine artificial insemination service, organizations now known as AgSource and Genex. Today, with the addition of MofA, CRI adds to its distinctiveness creating new business relationships particularly within the porcine industry as well as those specialized in reproduction in other species. “Furthermore, MofA’s International Center for Biotechnology provides CRI with a direct research connection and fast forwards our dedication to advancing internal research through business development,” states Wilson. Since establishing the International Center for Biotechnology in Mt. Horeb, Wis., in 2004, MofA has conducted cutting-edge research spanning several animal species and specifically focused on advanced reproductive technologies, molecular and cell biology, and DNA and genomics research. MofA was established in 1986 by Ludwig and Becky Simmet. Within the CRI structure, Ludwig Simmet will continue to lead MofA as this new subsidiary’s chief operating officer. “The addition of MofA to the CRI family is a significant diversification step for this cooperative,” notes Wilson. “Along with new business fronts, technology potentials make CRI an enticing employer for young professionals looking to join the agriculture industry.”

©2014 CRI

BEEF HORIZONS

7


A CATTLEMEN’S GUIDE

TO USING INDEXES Matt Spangler, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Beef Genetics Extension Specialist, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Selecting to improve multiple traits simultaneously can be cumbersome. Just open any sale catalog and it’s easy to become immediately confused. Economic indexes can help alleviate this confusion. They do so by combining multiple EPDs, each weighted by an economic value, into one numeric value often expressed in dollars per animal.

Economic Indexes Defined

Cow Energy Value ($EN)

An economic index is a collection of EPDs weighted by their economic value such that traits with greater impacts on production goals have a larger economic weight associated with them. The basic equation of an economic index is:

A component of $W, $EN is measured in dollars of savings per cow per year. It takes into account energy requirements due to mature size and milking ability. As both mature size and milking ability increase, additional protein and energy are required. Females with a high genetic potential for milk production require additional nutrients even when they are not in production due to the increased size of their visceral organs.

I = EPD1 x a1 + EPD2 x a2 + EPD3 x a3…EPDn x an Where: I is the index value; EPDn is the EPD for trait n; and an is the economic weight associated with trait n. The following includes some examples of currently available economic indexes. Angus, Hereford, Charolais, Gelbvieh, Limousin and Simmental all publish at least one economic index. A full description of all available economic indexes can be found in the University of Nebraska NebGuide G1847 available at http://www.ianrpubs.unl.edu.

Weaned Calf Value ($W) This Angus index is designed for producers who primarily sell calves at weaning and is interpreted in dollars per head of added profit. The $W index incorporates EPDs for birth weight, weaning weight, milk and mature cow size.

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Example: Bull A +10 $EN Bull B +5 $EN The daughters of Bull A should require less energy (feed costs) due to lactation energy requirements and/or differences in mature size. In this example, daughters from Bull A would save $5 per head per year on average compared to those of Bull B. In order to help improve production traits while avoiding high maintenance females it can be particularly useful to select animals from within an acceptable window for $EN. This is especially beneficial in limited feed and high-stress environments.


Beef Value ($B)

Choosing an Index to Use

The Angus index $B includes EPDs for yearling weight, carcass weight and carcass traits. Producers wishing to enhance growth and simultaneously select for quality and yield grade should use this index. It is a terminal index and caution should be used if replacement females are retained to avoid increasing mature female weights.

When making selection decisions based on economic indexes, it’s important to consider your particular breeding objective and the traits that will achieve desired production goals. If your production goals include retaining replacements and selling cull heifers and steer progeny at weaning, an index assuming offspring are sold on a grid-based system is inappropriate for your operation. If a large component of an index is yearling weight, and your goal is to moderate the mature size of replacement females, then using a growth-oriented index would be counterproductive. As with any selection or breeding decision, your particular production environment will dictate what production goals are feasible.

Example: Bull A +65.60 $B Bull B +52.50 $B We would expect calves from Bull A would be worth $13.10 per head more than those from Bull B if retained through a feedlot and sold on a Certified Angus Beef (CAB) grid.

Baldy Maternal Index ($BMI) The Hereford index, $BMI, is designed to select bulls for use on Angus cross cows and heifers where some replacements are kept and other offspring are sold on a grid-based system. These cattle could potentially qualify for either Certified Hereford Beef (CHB) or CAB. Both calving ease and fertility, as measured by scrotal circumference, are emphasized. Weaning weight is weighted positively, while yearling weight is weighted slightly negatively in an attempt to promote preweaning gain, but minimize mature cow size. Marbling is emphasized more than ribeye area in order to enhance quality grade while maintaining an acceptable yield grade of three or lower.

Accuracies of the EPD traits that are components of indexes are important in determining how reliable an index value is. If an Angus sire has relatively high accuracies for growth EPDs, weaning weight and yearling weight, but relatively low accuracies for carcass traits, which are heavily weighted in the $B index, the index may be less reliable due to the heavy influence of carcass traits. It is also important to know the breed averages for particular indexes and to use percentile ranks to determine how far above or below average a particular animal is compared to the rest of a breed.

All-Purpose Index (API) The API Simmental index assumes the sire will be used on both cows and heifers and heifers will be retained as replacements while other offspring are sold based on grade and yield. This index is targeted at a producer looking to optimize revenue from fed cattle and maternal characteristics of replacement heifers. Example: Bull A +138 API Bull B +118 API We would expect the calves from Bull A would be worth $20 per head more than those from Bull B. Over a span of four years Bull A could generate $2,400 in more revenue than Bull B if mated to 30 females per year.

Š2014 CRI

BEEF HORIZONS

9


THE REAL VALUE OF

“VALUE-ADDED” PROGRAMS Kevin L. Hill, DVM, Merck Animal Health Technical Services

Increasing Revenue for Cow/Calf Operations

Value-Added Health Programs

Cow/calf producers have relatively few options when it comes to increasing ranch revenue. Value-added programs that make each calf worth more are a proven way to increase ranch profits. Most of these programs are not new, and many producers have taken advantage of them to prepare their calves for selling. For those who are not aware of, or may doubt the value of such programs, it is important to understand what they have to offer and what premiums are expected. Knowing this helps decide whether the program is feasible to implement in an operation. Some will make sense for nearly every production system, while others will only be profitable if carefully executed with one eye on cost and the other on potential returns.

A solid vaccination program is the most common ranch management practice for which calf buyers are willing to pay. There is good consensus within the industry that healthy calves are far more profitable for a feeder than sick calves. The primary question to explore is how much added net value can be obtained when also accounting for any increased cost of the planned vaccination program.

Fortunately, we have very good data that helps look at the cost/benefit relationship of these various programs. Superior Livestock Auction has collected detailed sale data since 1995 that provides useful historical trends, but more importantly provides a large database that accurately defines the current value of these programs. What may be very difficult to see while sitting in the auction barn, the true differences in calf value relative to value-added practices, is readily apparent by studying the summaries of these large volume sales.

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Vac 24 is the most basic program in the Superior Livestock database. It requires only a single respiratory vaccination and a clostridial vaccination at two to four months of age. In 2013, when compared to calves presented for sale with little or no vaccination history, calves advertised as Vac 24 did not realize any significant premium. Therefore, producers should not expect a single calfhood vaccination to have any value to a potential buyer. Vac 34 requires a single round of respiratory and clostridial vaccinations given two to four weeks prior to delivery to the buyer. These preconditioned calves are significantly more valuable to buyers, bringing an average premium of $2.86 per hundredweight more than similar Vac 24 calves. For a 550-pound calf that would add $15.73 per head for preconditioning. Since most operations should be able to accomplish this single vaccination process for far less than


$15.73, this appears to be a highly profitable strategy for true added value and increased net revenue. In fact, this is the most popular health program recorded in the Superior Livestock database, representing 46 percent of the calves in the 2013 sales. The Vac 45 program gets more complicated, but promises greater rewards. Vac 45 requires preconditioning followed by boosters two to four weeks later and weaning at a minimum of 45 days. About 31 percent of the calves sold in 2013 were advertised as Vac 45. They registered a $6.13 per hundredweight premium or $33.72 per head more than Vac 24 calves and $17.99 per head more than Vac 34 calves. Producers considering this weaned calf program must understand the efficiency of feed and labor are the primary drivers of profitability. While they can confidently expect the premium identified in the data, they will need to pencil out carefully the costs required to achieve those rewards. If labor and feed costs are too high or weight gains are too low during the weaning period, the result could be a loss of revenue rather than a gain.

Genetics, BVD and Brucellosis Other management practices that have recently shown promise for profitable returns are genetic quality assurance, Bovine Viral Diarrhea-Persistent Infection (BVD-PI) testing and brucellosis vaccination of heifers. In the coming years when replacement-quality heifers are in demand, these premiums would logically be expected to strengthen. In 2013, BVD-PI negative calves netted a $1.80 per hundredweight premium or $9.90 per 550-pound calf, and progressive genetics earned calves a $1.59 per hundredweight premium or $8.75 per 550-pound calf. Brucellosis vaccinated heifers only gained a $.60 per hundredweight premium, still enough to cover the typical cost of vaccination. Value-added practices are certainly too valuable to ignore. The economic signals from calf buyers described in the Superior Livestock database are telling us exactly what these programs are worth. Every producer should carefully determine which programs can work to add revenue to their cow/calf enterprise.

Growth Implants One of the most surprising observations, in the Superior Livestock data, shows there is no price discount for implanted calves. While some non-hormone treated cattle and natural programs may still offer small premiums, the data from 2010 through 2013 shows no overall difference exists for calves sold as implanted versus never implanted. With expected gains of 20-25 pounds per calf from implants, producers are leaving $30-$40 on the table by not implanting, or if their natural program does not reward them enough to offset that unrealized weight gain.

Š2014 CRI

BEEF HORIZONS

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SUPERIOR AND GENEX ...

THE FIRST SUCCESSFUL JOINT BRED HEIFER SALE The Plan is Simple

A Superior - Genex Joint Sale In May 2012 Genex announced a joint effort by Genex Cooperative, Inc. and Superior Livestock Auction.

“The plan for Genex and Superior is simple – Genex will assist large herd producers sell their cattle through Superior and in turn, Superior will assist Genex service Willie Altenburg (left), Genex large herd A.I. producer,” and Jim Odle, Superior says Willie Altenburg.

After completing the first year of Superior and Genex field representatives working together it was time to offer something more for producers. Thus, the first Genex Influenced Bred Heifer sale via Superior Livestock was set for November 22, 2013. The objective was to bring forward a powerful group of heifers bred to Genex calving ease sires, and offer them for sale. With the nation’s cow herd poised to rebuild and economic signals and weather conditions indicating positive rebuilding signs, the timing was right.

Superior Livestock is one of the largest and most progressive marketing arms in the industry. By focusing on what we each do well and working together, we have the opportunity to help our customers enhance their profitability. Genex is dedicated to providing high quality semen, progressive genetics and professional service. The current beef lineup consists of bulls that match today’s market needs and enhance the profitability and long-term sustainability of Genex members’ and customers’ herds. Genex offers the industry’s best chute-side service, with the technician service and manpower to get the job done. Genex is the source for assistance with A.I. projects.

The Genex Influenced Bred Heifer sale offered 20 plus pot-loads of A.I. bred heifers that were sold via Superior Livestock’s video auction. Over 1,000 bred heifers sold for an average of $2,011 per head. Now by today’s standards that may not sound high, but back in November, heifers synchronized and A.I. bred to calving ease bulls brought a premium of at least $300 per head.

2014 Genex Influenced Bred Heifer Sales • March 20, 2014 • October 23, 2014 • November 20, 2014 Two Ways to Participate: 1. Consign heifers Work with your local Genex sales representative to synchronize and A.I. your heifers to calving ease sires, helping improve their marketability. Contact Genex or Superior Livestock to consign them to one of these sales. 2. Bid To bid utilize Superior Click-To-Bid. As you rebuild your cow herd, take advantage of heifer A.I. and these consignments.

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TEN SPEED 1AN01320 S A V TEN SPEED 3022 Reg: 17633563 / Born: 2/17/2013 Birth Wt.: 69 lbs. / 205 Days: 991 lbs. / 365 Days: 1584 lbs. Yrlg. Frame: 6.1 / Scrotal: 41.0 cm. @ 12 mos.  Ten Speed, the talk of the beef industry for the spring 2014 sale season, ranks in the top 1% of the breed for four EPDs and indexes. Recording a 112 WW ratio and 107 IMF ratio, he combines a low birth weight, high carcass tabulation with a true beef bull look. His attractive and productive two-year-old Bismarck dam is perfectly uddered with an ideal body type and unmatched maternal lineage. Mytty In Focus A A R Ten X 7008 S A A A R Lady Kelton 5551 CED

EPDS ACC RANK

8

.38

BW

WW

YW

.43

.33

.36

RADG SCR

.31

.45

1%

1%

2%

20%

DOC

HPG

.39

.17

CEM MILK

.14

.21

20%

25%

10%

0.7 74 131 0.29 1.27 11 11.0 10 32

MW

62

0.6 -27.03 53

CW

MARB

.23

.18

.33

15%

20%

3%

.32

MH

$EN

S A V Bismarck 5682 S A V Madame Pride 1134 S A V Madame Pride 9100 0.91 5%

RE

FAT

.25

.30

10%

15%

$W

$F

2%

1%

$G

$B

5%

1%

0.83 -0.017 50.46 79.04 47.42 118.04 EPDs as of 2/28/14

Ten Speed is a unique outcross curve bender that has excelled from start to finish. He combines a low birth weight and high carcass tabulation with a beef bull phenotype, a maternally superior cow family and a pedigree that is outcross to most bloodlines. He will be an important part of the SAV program with potential to impact the breed. – Kelly Schaff, Schaff Angus Valley

1AN01320 TEN SPEED, S A V Madame Pride 1134, Dam

IMPRESSIVE 1AN01322 MOHNEN IMPRESSIVE 1093 Reg: 17532083 / Born: 1/14/2013 Birth Wt.: 79 lbs. / 205 Days: 899 lbs. / 365 Days: 1473 lbs. Yrlg. Frame: 6.0 / Scrotal: 39.2 cm. @ 12 mos.  Impressive has an outcross pedigree in a clean fronted, long made and good footed package. He combines muscle and true breed character with enough volume to be a cow maker. Impressive is a top-end calving ease sire prospect whose daughters will exhibit the Genex phenotype that’s become well recognized in the industry. Basin Expedition R156 Basin Excitement Basin Lady S532 AK WW

YW

ACC .31 .35 .29 RANK 10% 25% 10%

CED

BW

.32

RADG SCR

.25

4%

25%

DOC

EPDS 11 0.3 63 116 0.20 0.89 36 .46

.39

1%

HPG

2.9 .15

CEM MILK

12 29 .09

.17

10%

20%

MW

56

0.6 -18.79 40

CW

MARB

.13

.16

.32

20%

20%

15%

.26

MH

$EN

Mohnen Brushpopper 353 Mohnen Jilt 787 Mohnen Jilt 1655 0.43

RE

0.18 .24

FAT

$W

$F

10%

3%

$G

$B

0.045 43.50 63.43 19.69 79.05 .29

EPDs as of 2/28/14

We feel Impressive will leave an everlasting impact on our herd as well as the entire Angus breed. He stuck out all summer, and his flush sisters are unreal! He has outstanding phenotype and breed character, with excellent feet and legs and above average muscling for a calving ease bull. The mating flexibility is unlimited with his outcross pedigree. The Jilt cow power behind Impressive is second to none with his dam, grandam and great grandam all being top-end donors and Pathfinders® cows. Impressive will be one of the heaviest used sires in our breeding program on heifers and cows. – Joshua Mohnen, Mohnen Angus

Mohnen Jilt 539, Maternal Sister

©2014 CRI

BEEF HORIZONS

13


MONTANA 1AN01315 SHIPWHEEL MONTANA 2600 Reg: 17524723 / Born: 5/29/2012 Birth Wt.: 80 lbs. / 205 Days: 757 lbs. / 365 Days: 1256 lbs. Yrlg. Frame: 6.5 / Scrotal: 43.0 cm. @ 12 mos.  The Chisum son we’ve been looking for to carry on his legacy, Montana is a gentle, bold ribbed, deep-bodied bull with tremendous fleshing ability and testicular development. Longevity is bred into this total outcross sire whose pedigree is stacked with proven donor cows. S Alliance 3313 S Chisum 6175 S Gloria 464 CED

EPDS ACC RANK

6

.34

BW

WW

YW

RADG SCR

DOC

HPG

CEM MILK

1.1 65 113 0.22 1.55 23 12.1 11 32 .43

.33

.36

.31

.35

.27

.18

.15

.23

5%

5%

15%

10%

10%

15%

15%

10%

MW

33 .27

MH

Apex Wide Track 374 Dr J Ms Wide Track 374 M15 DR J Miss Guru I6 $EN

CW

MARB

.20

.33

0.3 -19.75 55 .13

0.42

RE

0.50 .25

FAT

$W

$F

3%

10%

$G

$B

0.031 48.28 58.11 22.83 92.00 .31

2%

10%

EPDs as of 2/28/14

ENVISION 1AN01325 44 ENVISION Reg: 17448751 / Born: 1/28/2013 Birth Wt.: 64 lbs. / 205 Days: 827 lbs. / 365 Days: 1285 lbs. Yrlg. Frame: 5.8 / Scrotal: 36.0 cm. @ 12 mos.  The Ten X son that has it all – calving ease, growth, carcass and “cow sense” phenotype. Envision displays gentle disposition and is ideal to increase volume, body depth and rib shape without sacrificing numbers. His productive young dam records an 89 BW ratio and a 108 Nursing ratio on two calves. Mytty In Focus A A R Ten X 7008 S A A A R Lady Kelton 5551 CED

BW

WW

YW

RADG SCR

DOC

EPDS 13 -1.6 69 124 0.22 0.57 18 ACC RANK

.35

.41

.31

.35

.32

4%

4%

3%

2%

15%

.44

.30

HPG

6.4 .18

20%

CEM MILK

13 33 .13

.21

4%

10%

MW

21 .34

MH

$EN

G A R Predestined Maurer’s Ms Predestined W10 G A R 1I2 Rito C446 CW

0.2 -20.12 46 .25

.19

10%

MARB

RE

1.21

0.85

1%

10%

.33

.26

FAT

$W

$F

1%

2%

$G

$B

4%

1%

0.040 56.66 71.60 48.98 114.30 .31

EPDs as of 2/28/14

VOLUME 1AN01317 UPCHURCH VOLUME 422 MR SCC Reg: 17565639 / Born: 12/5/2012 Birth Wt.: 60 lbs. / 205 Days: 805 lbs. / 365 Days: 1230 lbs. Yrlg. Frame: 5.5 / Scrotal: 40.0 cm. @ 12 mos.  Volume combines efficiency, maternal and calving ease. He’s the No. 1 bull in the breed for $W while maintaining a positive $EN. Phenotypically, he’s big middled, excellent footed, sound, thick and docile. A 122 WW ratio gives him credentials to add trouble-free pounds without sacrificing maternal function. Sitz Traveler 8180 S A V Final Answer 0035 S A V Emulous 8145 CED

BW

WW

YW

.35

.41

.32

.32

2%

4%

15%

RADG SCR

DOC

EPDS 14 -1.7 58 88 0.11 0.90 12 ACC RANK

.34

.35

.29

HPG

9.1 .20

CEM MILK

11 24 .18

15%

.24

MW

15 .34

MH

-0.3 .25

$EN

1.70

O C C Paxton 730P O C C Revolution Rose 813U O C C Revolution Rose 743K CW

MARB

.22

.35

6

0.31

RE

0.39 .28

FAT

$W

$F

$G

$B

0.024 53.20 28.41 26.96 41.04 .33

1%

EPDs as of 2/28/14

14

©2014 CRI

BEEF HORIZONS


WILLIE 1AN01318 BALDRIDGE WILLIE Y34 Reg: 17074451 / Born: 2/14/2011 Birth Wt.: 87 lbs. / 205 Days: 773 lbs. / 365 Days: 1187 lbs. Yrlg. Frame: 6.2 / Scrotal: 38.5 cm. @ 12 mos.  Willie is an elite Waylon son capable of being a true calving ease leader for marbling and $B. He combines an unmatched EPD profile with a deep body, gentle disposition, flawless feet and added scrotal circumference. Willie is out of the same dam as Genex sire Optimum and their maternal grandsire is known for leaving a trail of productive individuals. GAR-EGL Protege Baldridge Waylon W34 Baldridge Blackcap T163 CED

BW

WW

YW

RADG SCR

DOC

EPDS 12 0.6 57 106 0.20 1.10 25 ACC .44 .56 .43 .40 RANK 10% 25% 20% 10%

.27

.49

.36

25%

25%

10%

HPG

7.5 .13

CEM MILK

12 22 .10

.17

MW

36 .26

MH

0.3 .14

$EN

-5.21

10%

Baldridge Navigator N5 Baldridge Duchess T69 Baldridge Duchess R51 CW

40 .20

15%

MARB

1.38 .34

RE

0.54 .28

FAT

$W

$F

15%

10%

$G

$B

2%

1%

0.019 39.35 52.69 51.96 110.02 .32

1%

EPDs as of 2/28/14

BRICK HOUSE 1AN01319 BALDRIDGE BRICK HOUSE A011 Reg: 17639060 / Born: 1/8/2013 Birth Wt.: 80 lbs. / 205 Days: 783 lbs. / 365 Days: 1455 lbs. Yrlg. Frame: 6.0 / Scrotal: 40.0 cm. @ 12 mos.  Brick House combines an outcross pedigree with the Genex body type. He’s thick, wide-based, level-topped, good footed, sound with large testicles and exhibits true breed character. From birth, to weaning, to a yearling, Brick House has been a stand out sire. Hoover Dam Baldridge Xpand X227 Baldridge Blackbird N10 CED

EPDS ACC RANK

6

.32

BW

WW

YW

.27

.31

RADG SCR

DOC

1.3 60 111 0.18 1.51 24 .39

.27

15% 10%

.43

.34

10%

10%

HPG

5.9 .15

CEM MILK

7

.09

29 .16

MW

45 .26

MH

$EN

Woodhill Mainline Baldridge Treasure Y39 Baldridge Treasure S282 CW

MARB

.17

.32

0.4 -16.06 42 .15

20%

0.38

10%

RE

0.61 .23

FAT

$W

$F

10%

10%

$G

$B

0.009 41.96 58.02 27.77 87.86 .30

20%

15%

EPDs as of 2/28/14

McCOY 1AN01316 S McCOY 124 Reg: 17007979 / Born: 3/16/2011 Birth Wt.: 80 lbs. / 205 Days: 724 lbs. / 365 Days: 1330 lbs. Yrlg. Frame: 5.8 / Scrotal: 36.2 cm. @ 12 mos.  A “bet the ranch” heifer bull transmitting consistency to progeny that stand out for their wide and level hip structure, strength of top, expressive quarter and impeccable feet and leg integrity. Out of a young, solid producing Pathfinder® cow, McCoy is stacked with generations of productive females assuring he’ll stand the test of time and leave a legacy of great daughters. Reich Lead On 424 RA Lincoln W144 RA Brandy P11 CED

BW

WW

YW

.54

.71

.59

.37

4%

10%

RADG SCR

DOC

EPDS 13 -1.1 46 89 0.10 0.87 33 ACC RANK

.32

.47

.39

1%

HPG

7.1 .14

CEM MILK

8

.12

28 .20

25%

MW

-1 .34

MH

0.0 .19

G A R Grid Maker S Mayflower 751 S Mayflower 2118 $EN

-2.65

CW

MARB

.30

.43

18

0.38

RE

0.60 .33

FAT

$W

$F

$G

$B

0.063 42.26 35.66 25.95 58.20 .36

25%

10%

EPDs as of 2/28/14

©2014 CRI

BEEF HORIZONS

15


HIGH STAKES 1SM00143 WS HIGH STAKES W115 Reg: 2499571 / Born: 2/10/2009 Birth Wt.: 83 lbs. / 205 Days: 892 lbs. / 365 Days: 1341 lbs. Scrotal: 45.2 cm.  High Stakes is a “bet the ranch” calving ease bull boasting a CED EPD in the top 1% of the breed. He’s a homozygous polled, red purebred Simmental with an outcross pedigree almost everyone can use. Look for High Stakes to follow in the path of Genex sires Shear Force and In Dew Time for their use on heifers for calving ease. TJ 57J The Gambler HSF High Roller 12T HSF Red Fortunes Sis 33

LBR Crockett R81 WS Miss Dolly T10 WS Miss Real Deal P88

CED

BW

WW

YW

MCE

MM

MWW

STAY

DOC

CW

YG

.60

.69

.66

.65

.44

.44

.50

.31

.51

.50

.34

1%

1%

2%

2%

10%

EPDS 19.8 -4.9 63.7 95.6 17.0 33.7 65.6 21.0 15.9 19.5 -0.40 ACC RANK

1%

MB

BF

REA

SHR

.43

.39

.34

.22

API

TI

3%

5%

0.15 -0.067 0.83 -0.04 151.5 80.4

10%

ALL IN 1SM00145 GSC ALL IN 72A Reg: 2812085 / Born: 1/8/2013 Birth Wt.: 78 lbs. / 205 Days: 673 lbs.  Complete is the best way to describe All In. Phenotypically, he’s big middled and sound with a great hip and hind leg set. He’s a calving ease prospect with the look to sire show stoppers and fantastic females. His sisters have sold for record prices and tallied up wins at major shows, plus he’s homozygous polled and homozygous black. SVF/NJC Mo Town M216 JS Sure Bet 4T JS Black Magic Woman 13P

GR Dream Catcher 03R Miss Werning KP 8543U Miss Werning 534R

CED

BW

WW

YW

MCE

MM

MWW

STAY

DOC

CW

YG

.20

.21

.21

.21

.20

.20

.20

.11

.15

.18

.12

25%

15%

EPDS 10.3 0.7 51.7 69.3 12.9 29.6 55.5 22.9 11.6 12.0 -0.44 ACC RANK

20%

20%

MB

BF

REA

SHR

.13

.15

.11

.05 1%

API

TI

0.17 -0.079 0.77 -0.66 127.5 64.9

3%

10%

INCENTIVE 1SM00144 RUBY NFF INCENTIVE 307A Reg: 2765084 / Born: 1/3/2013 Birth Wt.: 75 lbs. / 205 Days: 707 lbs. / 365 Days: 1216 lbs. Yrlg. Frame: 6.4 / Scrotal: 41.0 cm. @ 12 mos.  Incentive is a calving ease, homozygous polled and homozygous black SimAngus™ sire that combines a superior EPD tabulation with real world phenotype. The Angus breed’s Incentive genetics and the Simmental breed’s In Dew Time really clicked producing an impressive genetic script backed by the world famous Ebonys Joy cow family. S S Objective T510 0T26 S S Incentive 9J17 S S Miss Fran P142 B76 CED

BW

WW

YW

MCE

MM

MWW

.27

.43

.38

.42

.17

.17

.23

10%

15%

15%

20%

EPDS 15.7 -1.7 63.3 91.6 ACC RANK

16

©2014 CRI

BEEF HORIZONS

9.3 28.9 60.5

STAY

HTP SVF In Dew Time Ruby NFF Joy 101Y JF Ebonys Joy 732T

DOC

CW

YG

MB

BF

REA

.12

.34

.26

.40

.25

.32

15%

20%

13.9 21.7 -0.31 0.54 -0.017 0.96 10%

3%

SHR

API

TI

10%

20%

152.6 78


OLD SCHOOL 1HH00111 CRR 109 OLD SCHOOL 301 Reg: 43384569 / Born: 2/7/2013 Birth Wt.: 69 lbs. / 205 Days: 729 lbs. / 365 Days: 1244 lbs. Yrlg. Frame: 5.5 / Scrotal: 37.0 cm. @ 12 mos.  Phenotypically, Old School is nearly flawless with perfect hip and hind leg structure, solid feet, a conservative mark and as much body and thickness as you would want. He’s a potential lighter birth weight calving ease prospect with breed-leading EPDs and physical prowess, making him a big time herd bull in the making. TH 122 71I Victor 719T CRR 719 Catapult 109 CRR 4037 Eclipse 808 CED

BW

WW

YW

ACC .11 .43 RANK 15% 20%

.32

.33

3%

10%

DM BR Sooner CRR 435 Kelly 178 CRR D03 Kelly 361

MILK M & G CETM SCR

EPDS 4.2 1.6 67 100 24 .13

FAT

REA

IMF

.21

.16

58 2.6 0.9 -0.006 0.53 0.04 .09

.15

.19

10%

$BMI

$CEZ

20%

20%

20

20%

18

$BII

14

$CHB

33 5%

AMERICAN HEREFORD 1HH00112 TH T90 11X AMERICAN HEREFORD 16A Reg: 43346709 / Born: 12/26/2012 Birth Wt.: 96 lbs. / 205 Days: 729 lbs. / 365 Days: 1247 lbs. Yrlg. Frame: 6.0 / Scrotal: 40.3 cm. @ 12 mos.  American Hereford is a massive powerhouse that will work in the show ring and pasture. His famous dam boasts impressive ratios on three calves: 98 BW, 104 WW and 103 YW. Phenotypically perfect, he travels flawlessly on a huge foot with superb heel depth. His attractive pattern, wide base, muscular posture, dark red pigment and performance information make him a must use sire. TH 122 71I Victor 719T TH 71U 719T MR HEREFORD 11X TH 7N 45P Rita 71U CED

BW

WW

YW

P

.27

.23

.24

EPDS 1.4 2.2 53 83 ACC RANK

MILK M & G CETM SCR

HH Advance 3196N GO Ms 3196 Advance T90 GO Ms L18 Excel P8 FAT

REA

IMF

P+

P+

P+

26

52 0.2 0.5 0.009 0.45 -0.06

20%

25%

.11

P

.15

$BMI

12

$CEZ

14

$BII

9

$CHB

22

DISTINCTION 1HH00110 UPS DISTINCTION Reg: 43311214 / Born: 3/4/2012 Birth Wt.: 60 lbs. / 205 Days: 607 lbs. / 365 Days: Yrlg. Frame: 5.3 / Scrotal: 35.0 cm. @ 12 mos.  Distinction is a heifer bull in the making; chosen for his unique combination of phenotype, calving ease and marbling. He posted an astonishing 137 IMF ratio amongst a stout contemporary group. His dam recorded six calves with ratios of: 100 BW, 110 WW, 102 YW, 100 REA and 115 IMF. UPS Domino 3027 Churchill Sensation 028X Churchill Lady 7202T ET CED

BW

WW

YW

.23

.36

.30

.32

2%

3%

EPDS 7.6 -0.8 54 73 ACC RANK

BCD 721G Knight 4K UPS Miss Knight 4841 UPS Miss Star 9567

MILK M & G CETM SCR

FAT

REA

IMF

.28

.27

.25

28

55 4.1 1.2 0.070 0.29 0.44

15%

15%

.16

.18

.21

15% 15%

2%

©2014 CRI

$BMI

$CEZ

$BII

$CHB

4%

2%

10%

10%

27

23

22

BEEF HORIZONS

30

17


DAKOTA HEREFORD 1HP00842 TH 120W 11X Dakota Hereford 20A Reg: 43343888 / Born: 1/3/2013 Birth Wt.: 85 lbs. / 205 Days: 626 lbs. / 365 Days: 1160 lbs. Yrlg. Frame: 5.0 / Scrotal: 38.0 cm. @ 12 mos.  Dakota Hereford, sired by the legendary deceased Mr. Hereford, offers a tremendous combination of pigmentation, muscle pattern and overall quality. He scanned a 122 IMF ratio and a 107 REA ratio and his dam has nine progeny with 110 IMF ratios and 101 REA ratios. Look for this young stud to sire extra marbling and end product merit. TH 122 71I Victor 719T TH 71U 719T MR HEREFORD 11X TH 7N 45P Rita 71U CED

BW

P

.26

WW

YW

.23

.24

EPDS 2.6 2.9 55 80 ACC RANK

25%

NJW FHF 9710 Tank 45P TH 122 45P Dominette 120W KBCR 19D Dominette 122

MILK M & G CETM SCR

FAT

REA

IMF

P+

P+

P+

15%

10%

27

54 -0.9 0.7 -0.023 0.69 -0.03

20%

15%

.10

P

.16

$BMI

16

$CEZ

15

$BII

13

$CHB

27

20%

STRATEGY 1HP00841 KCF BENNETT STRATEGY Z303 ET Reg: 43387250 / Born: 9/19/2012 Birth Wt.: 76 lbs. / 205 Days: 725 lbs. / 365 Days: 1171 lbs. Yrlg. Frame: 6.6 / Scrotal: 39.0 cm. @ 18 mos.  Strategy is a gentle natured young sire that rewrites the script for EPD and performance excellence. This long-bodied, sound structured bull is built on a solid hoof and takes a long easy stride. He is the perfect match for cattle lacking performance; he will add pounds to your calf crop and dollars to your pocket. SCHU-LAR 5N of 9L 3008 HU-LAR on Target 22S SCHU-LAR 208 of 1H 121 ET CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK M & G CETM SCR

EPDS 4.7 1.6 71 118 26 ACC RANK

.28

MSU TCF Revolution 4R KCF Miss Revolution X338 ET JW 718 Victoria 9106 FAT

REA

IMF

62 1.9 1.5 -0.008 0.87 0.35

.22

.21

.21

.16

20%

1%

1%

20%

.24

3%

.18

.18

5%

.18

.17

2%

3%

$BMI

$CEZ

$BII

$CHB

2%

15%

10%

1%

29

19

23

44

BETTER ANSWER 1AR00949 BROWN BETTER ANSWER Z7257 Reg: 1550475 / Born: 2/7/2012 Birth Wt.: 76 lbs. / 205 Days: 720 lbs. / 365 Days: 1067 lbs. Scrotal: 43.0 cm.  Better Answer is backed by predictability – Final Answer on the top side and Monu 4X and Julian B571 on the bottom side. His productive dam’s MPPA is 102.0 and his EPDs rank in the top 20% of the breed or better for CED, BW, YW, HPG, CETM and STAY. This, coupled with the maternal influence of his sire, is a dynamic combination. S A V Final Answer 0035 LCS X2 BDEE Miss Page 748 CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

.27

.29

.22

EPDS 10 -4.8 63 103 16 ACC RANK

18

©2014 CRI

BEEF HORIZONS

.30

.33

5%

4%

25% 15%

TM

47

BJR Monu 4X-303 Brown Ms Monu P7930 RABS Ms Vicila H7552 ME

0

.02

HPG CETM STAY

13 .21

9

.35

13

5%

10%

20%

.41

MARB

0.44 .32

YG

0.22 .25

CW

REA

FT

.24

.27

.36

24 -0.07 0.040


2O14  SPRING BEEF SPECIAL * There will be a limited amount of semen available at this special price so Order Early!

*LIMITED QUANTITIES!

*LIMITED QUANTITIES! Reg# 17016630

1AN01237 ANGUS VALLEY

$30 Now $22

Reg# 16805884

Reg# 15148659

1AN01117 THUNDER

$ 20 Now $  17

Reg# 16981588

1AN01242 FULL POWER

$ 22 Now $  18

Reg# 15511451

1AN01170 CHISUM

20

©2014 CRI

BEEF HORIZONS

$25 Now $20

1AN01313 INSIGHT

$ 20 Now $  17

Reg# 16761484

1AN01215 IRISH

Reg# 15688392

1AN01141 PIONEER

$ 25 Now $  20

$ 18 Now $  15


Special runs March 1 - May 31, 2014 Special prices can be combined with Volume Special. Utilize with the John Deere Financial beef deferral program. Contact your Genex representative or visit profitshop.crinet.com for current availability.

Reg# 1025891

1AR00907 BIG SKY

$ 20 Now $  17

Reg# 1506922

1AR00950 NEW DIRECTION $ 25 Now $  20

Reg# P42800895

1HP00829 VICTOR 719T

$ 25 Now $  20

Reg# 43092364

1HH00109 SENSATION

Reg# 2474338

1SM00121 UPGRADE

$ 35 Now $  25

$ 25 Now $  20

Reg# 2470581

1SM00113 TANKER

$ 25 Now $  20

©2014 CRI

BEEF HORIZONS

21


BRAZIL .  ..Beyond the Rainforest Brenda Sisung, Public Relations Specialist, CRI

Whether you’re traveling to a new city, state or country there’s always something to be learned and new things to see. Like in Brazil, it’s more than just a tropical forest filled with plants, insects, birds and mammals. It’s an agricultural country that supports over 212 million head of cattle and is the number one beef exporter in the world.

Where it Rains Every Day You’ve heard of those places where it supposedly rains every day and questioned whether it was really possible. However it is possible, and does happen, as I witnessed on a recent trip to Brazil with other Genex and CRI representatives. While all states in the U.S. experience four seasons that is not the case in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso do Sul. It experiences two – wet and dry – and these two seasons have shaped the agricultural industry. Ranchers have adapted to produce cattle and crops specifically for this environment. As the trip started I quickly learned the breed of cattle that excels in this hot two season environment, Nelore. While they’re not the cattle I’m used to seeing in the frozen tundra of Wisconsin, I appreciate their heat tolerance and parasite resistance, crucial for this environment. I had never actually seen Nelore cattle, so it was fitting our first herd visit was to Quilombo, a purebred Nelore operation. The owner, Frederico Moreno, explained how the seedstock operation must sustain itself. Six years ago Frederico was challenged by his profit margin so decided to invest in technology by creating an integrated system combining crops and cattle. On his 17,290-acre ranch he grows corn,

22

©2014 CRI

BEEF HORIZONS

soybeans, grass, native plants and trees along with raising 2,500 Nelore. Because of the weather and soil, double and triple cropping is common. In one year, on the same land, Frederico plants and harvests soybeans, then plants corn and grass together, harvests the corn, and then turns the cows out on the remaining grass. This system helps maximize productivity of the land and cattle. At Quilombo, the goal is to produce two types of bulls, one that excels in a grass system and one that adds yield to the carcass. This is achieved through A.I. and Gene Plus data, which is equivalent to EPDs. During the wet season, December to March, breeding occurs. At Quilombo, everything is A.I. bred once, with Nelore heifers inseminated at two years of age so they calve at three years old. After calving, heifers are raised and incorporated back into the herd. The bulls are sold through an online sale or live auction in July and September. As Frederico states, “Every production system needs a clear vision and ours is to utilize moderate animals with consistent genetics to produce cattle for the commercial industry.”


Let’s Make Protein Taking a different approach on the use of Nelore cattle is Sete Voltas Ranch or Seven Turns Ranch. The philosophy is simple, as owner Paulo Almedia told us, “Let’s make protein.” While it took more than seven turns and going over more than seven bumps to get to the ranch, what I saw upon arrival made it worth it. This 18,000-acre ranch runs along the Seven Turns River and supports 7,500 animals, 3,000 of which are cows. The base cow herd is Nelore due to their heat and tick resistance, but in order to produce protein Angus, Brangus and Wagyu genetics have been incorporated. When Paulo took over management of the operation in 1997 there was a lot to be learned. The biggest change began in 1999. With the assistance of veterinarian Marcos Santos, his old friend and current CRI Genetica Brazil field representative, they introduced synchronization and A.I. It was a step in the right direction but came with struggles such as identifying the correct bulls for the environment. They had started using Simmental, Braunvieh and Angus sires with high growth EPDs. Paulo recalls, “Those calves were tall and heavy with high growth, but we were not able to finish them with a desirable fat cover. That type of crossbred needed to be fed differently. They needed more than just pasture.”

Realizing the problem, they began using American Angus sires with excellent fleshing ability rather than high growth traits. Moderate-framed bulls with high fat EPDs were more appropriate for the pasture system. In 2013 alone, Paulo used 1,500 units of Chisum. Mated to purebred Nelore, the Angus produce an F1 crossbred that combines some heat and tick resistance with added carcass yield and quality. In Brazil there are three rules for crossbreeding cattle. Produce something that is black, shiny and has short hair. Many Brazilian producers create this F1 cross and deem it a terminal animal. Sete Voltas Ranch does not, because they’re in the business of producing protein. Paulo realizes the benefits of the F1 and breeds them via A.I. to Brangus and Wagyu sires to produce terminal F2 crosses. The F2 cross lacks heat and tick resistance but the carcass is highly desired by slaughter plants such as JBS or Marfrig, Brazil’s No. 1 and No. 3 food processing companies, which Sete Voltas works with. “To be a good businessman you have to have good working relationships outside the farm in order to compete and grow,” informed Paulo. “It’s these relationships with the slaughter plants, our veterinarian and CRI Genetica Brazil that have advanced us to where we are in the cattle industry today.”

The South, Where Angus Are Raised Who knew you had to travel south for it to get colder but this is the case in Brazil. The southern portion of Brazil is similar to the U.S. with both a summer and winter. Therefore there are less Nelore cattle and more Angus and Red Angus cattle. In the southern tip of Brazil is Porto Alegre. There, I learned about the Brazilian Angus industry. I toured S2, a purebred Angus and Red Angus operation comprised of 150 cows, 90 percent of which are Angus and 10 percent Red Angus. S2 utilizes A.I. and embryo transfer, specifically U.S. genetics. The herd began 25 years ago with an embryo from the U.S., and they continue to use U.S. sires such as Traveler, Density, Net Worth, Final Answer, Chisum, Big Sky and Sakic. U.S. genetics, specifically Angus, have highly impacted the cattle industry in Brazil. Since the first Angus bull was

imported from Uruguay in 1906, many influential Angus bulls have been introduced. Of the top 15 most relevant Angus bulls, five are from the U.S. and two are Genex sires: Make My Day and Net Worth. In 2013, the Brazilian Angus Association’s top two sires for registrations were Genex sires: Pendleton and Net Worth. According to the Brazilian Angus Association, in 2012 over 1.6 million units of Angus semen were imported from the U.S. This number continues to rise and so does the overall number of cattle in Brazil. Brazil is more than just a rainforest; it’s a diversified agricultural country with sights set on the future - agriculture and the cattle herd are expanding. So whether a producer is utilizing Nelore, F1 crosses, F2 crosses, Angus or Red Angus they’re crucial to the continued growth of the Brazilian beef industry.

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Genex Beef HORIZONS  

Spring 2014 Genex Beef HORIZONS

Genex Beef HORIZONS  

Spring 2014 Genex Beef HORIZONS