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Volume 17 / Number 2

Genex

Cooperative, Inc. A Subsidiary of Cooperative Resources International

Fall 2013


NEW

Bull Photos

1SM00121 Upgrade

1SM00137 Rimrock

1AR00948 Stronghold

1AN01253 Namesake

1SM00125 Graduate

1SM00136 All-Around

1AN01239 Cinch

1AN01240 Effective

1AN01244 Declaration

1AN01238 Resource


Have We Turned The Corner?

BEEF Horizons

Published bi-annually for beef producers in the United States.

Willie Altenburg, AVP, Beef Development, Genex

Address correspondence to: Genex Cooperative, Inc. 100 MBC Drive, P.O. Box 469 Shawano, WI 54166 TEL: 888.333.1783 FAX: 715.526.3219 EMAIL: info@crinet.com website: www.crinet.com

Fall 2013

A better summer with favorable moisture for the grass and corn crop along with stronger cattle markets – all signs it might be time to retain more replacement heifers. Maybe we are turning the corner on the nation’s cow herd and rebuilding back its strength in numbers. We need increased cow numbers to meet the demand for consumers’ taste for beef. Not only the choice beef enjoyed by the steak trade, white table cloth and restaurant trade, but the good old fashioned, juicy hamburger enjoyed by all of middle America! To provide all of that and more takes a lot of cattle, more numbers than we have had in recent times. We need to stop the slide of our beef cow numbers below 30 million and start to rebuild with the profit signals that are out in the industry today. The turning point is here; higher prices, better weather conditions, increased forage availability and more affordable corn. The time has come to retain heifers and rebuild the nation’s cow herd!

Vol. 17/No. 2

BEEF HORIZONS STAFF Lindsay Johnson, Editor Brenda Sisung, Assistant Editor Andy Graf, Graphic Designer

COVER PHOTO

Randy Meyer, Brunswick, Mo., and Stan Lock, Genex, discuss Randy’s passion for red cattle. Read more on page 6.

Livestock Marketing Information Center (LMIC) estimates for July 1, 2013:

Genex Cooperative, Inc.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Paul Greene, President Berlin, N.Y., 518.658.2419 Duane Nelson, 1st Vice President Winthrop, Minn., 507.647.2540 John Ruedinger, 2nd Vice President Van Dyne, Wis., 920.922.9899 Ronald Totten, Secretary Stafford, N.Y., 585.344.0758 Jim Crocker Valley City, Ohio, 330.483.3709 Jon Wayne Danielson Cadott, Wis., 715.289.3860

Harlin Hecht Paynesville, Minn., 320.243.4386 Harold House Nokesville, Va., 703.754.9534

Richard Vold Glenwood, Minn., 320.634.4665 Alfred Wanner, Jr. Narvon, Pa., 717.768.8118

Mission Statement

Provide products and services as effectively as possible to maximize the profitability of members and customers worldwide while maintaining a strong cooperative.

2013 as % of 2012 -1.8 -1.5 -2.1 0.5 -1.3 0.0 1.2 -3.4 -2.1 -2.6 -2.3 -2.1

Our customers have been working hard to present an outstanding group of bred replacement females in preparation for the Superior – Genex Influence Sale Friday, November 22, 2013. There will be 50+ potloads of bred heifers consigned from all over the U.S., bred to Genex sires. These will be available on Superior Livestock Auction, read more on page 23. A great way to rebuild your cow herd!

Ted Foster Middlebury, Vt., 802.388.6515

Bobby Robertson Tahlequah, Okla., 918.822.0020

2013 (LMIC)* 96050 39100 29850 9250 15500 4200 4150 7150 13700 1850 25900 33550

*All inventory values in thousand head Chart courtesy of LMIC

Patrick Dugan Casa Grande, Ariz., 520.251.6455

Kay Olson-Martz Friendship, Wis., 608.564.7359

2012 (USDA)* 97800 39700 30500 9200 15700 4200 4100 7400 14000 1900 26500 34279

All Cattle and Calves All Cows Beef Cows Dairy Cows All Heifers Beef Replacements Dairy Replacements Other Heifers Steers, >500 lbs. Bulls, > 500 lbs. Calves, <500 lb. Calf Crop

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4 MEMBERS g Br e e din .I. , Thr e e A s d m r o e r H ee e fit f All Be n s 5 Thr m a r Prog PR Y: AN EX CCU RAC A Y IT R ELIABIL OF

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16 17 18 20

22


MEMBERSHIP NEWS Notice of Genex Equity Redemption

Genex Member Definition to Change

The Genex and CRI boards of directors have authorized the retirement of Genex equity for 1991, 1992 and 1993. For active Genex members, the equity retirement will appear as a credit on your billing. There are no tax implications on this retirement. All equity redemptions have been from qualified issuances with taxes paid at the time of their allocation.

After reviewing delegate and alternate input received at fall delegate meetings in 2011, the Genex board and CRI governance committee supported changing the Genex member definition for 2015. Their recommendation increases the amount of annual allocatable expenditures required to be a Genex member from $200 to $500. The CRI board voted to change the Genex member definition as recommended. It goes into effective in 2015.

This is the official public notice of this retirement and former members must notify Genex headquarters for redemption of their equity. The board reserves the right to suspend redemption if cash flow needs of the cooperative are impaired. If there are any questions, contact Genex Equity Specialist Candie Fisher at 715-526-7657.

Dates Set for Genex Delegate Meetings Delegates and alternates are encouraged and expected to attend the Genex fall delegate meetings. Input gained from these meetings is important and highly valued by the board of directors and staff. Each meeting will begin at 10 a.m. and conclude by 2:30 p.m. More information will be mailed at a later date. The dates and locations for the meetings are:

12

2014 CRI Annual Meeting Slated for January 28-29 Members elected as delegates have the opportunity to attend the fifth annual national meeting for Genex and CRI in Bloomington, Minn., on January 28-29, 2014. The event will feature break-out sessions on current issues, the annual meetings of CRI and Genex and a banquet. Delegate expenses are paid to and from the meeting.

©2013 CRI

Beef Horizons

1 32 4

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• October 16 – Atlanta, Ga. • October 17 – Kansas City, Mo. • October 29 – Harrisburg, Penn. • October 30 – Syracuse, N.Y. • October 31 – Albany, N.Y. • November 5 – Alexandria, Minn. • November 6 – Rochester, Minn. • November 12 – Appleton, Wis. • November 25 – Las Vegas, Nev.

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11 8 9 10 7 5 6

j 2013 Genex Membership Regions


Three Herds, Three Breeding Programs

All Benefit from A.I. Lindsay Johnson, Public Relations Coordinator, Genex

Producers using artificial insemination (A.I.) in their herds reap the benefits of genetic improvements, a consistent calf crop and increased pounds at weaning. Maybe you’ve thought about the idea but aren’t sure what’s involved or how you would implement A.I. into your herd. Read how three operations successfully incorporated A.I. into their programs and will never turn back

Stacking A.I. Pedigrees In the rolling hills of the Ozarks, J.W. Phillips, Phillips Land & Cattle, runs a commercial herd of red SimAngus™ and Balancer cattle. In this environment, selecting for adaptability is key since heat, humidity and fescue are major concerns. This is a no-nonsense operation where cattle need to be easy fleshing, heat tolerant and make do without any supplemental nutrition. As J.W. simply states, “This ranch raises grass and the cattle are the vehicles used to utilize the grass. If I have to supplement them, it becomes cost prohibitive.” J.W. has been utilizing A.I. for seven years. He has been extremely pleased with the results of having 60% of his calves born in the first 14 days of the calving season. As he builds the genetics of his replacement heifers, stacking generations of A.I. pedigrees, he sees A.I. remaining a critical part of his program for years to come. “Too many people look at the dollar amount associated with A.I. and don’t consider the advantages of the better genetics which can be utilized,” stated J.W. “A.I. pays for itself in the earlier born calves and the additional growth those calves have. The A.I. calves have an additional two weeks of growth times $1.75 per pound, and you’ll see it pays for itself. In that respect it’s cheap.” Not only do the A.I. calves have extra pounds on them, this is also the group from which replacements are retained. J.W. picks only those born in the first cycle to be replacements in his herd, expecting them to be more fertile than the others due to the fact their mothers conceived in the first cycle. Each year 400 cows, first and second calvers, along with 350 heifers are A.I. bred. The calving season is split between spring and fall which spreads the labor, use of clean up bulls and marketability. Because he A.I. breeds his younger cows, fewer calving ease bulls are required for clean up which allows him to use more terminal sires on the older cows. He utilizes red halfbloods on his mature cow herd for added fertility (HPG), longevity (STAY) and lower maintenance costs (ME) – capturing the value of maternal heterosis.

When getting started with A.I., J.W. knew cattle handling facilities were necessary. Each of his cattle handling facilities is setup with the Bud box concept, designed by Bud Williams. This system aids in gently handling cattle to limit injuries and blemishes on the carcass as well as future disposition problems. “By having a facility that allows for easy flow of animals it limits injuries to not only the cattle, but people as well,” explained J.W. A.I. allows J.W. to select for the traits he feels will be suited for the future of his herd as well as best match the environment. He selects for below average frame and milk to use on young cows because he worries about his replacements having too much milk or being too big. Adequate growth and carcass along with good feet, legs and udders are essential for the Ozark environment.

“I rely on Genex to provide me with advice on the synchronization protocol to use for my A.I. program,” stated J.W. “This year we tried the 5-day CIDR® protocol on cows and the 14-day CIDR protocol on heifers.” Genex provides chute-side service at Phillips Land & Cattle, offering consulting service on facility design, synchronization protocols and genetics. They work closely with J.W. to provide the service needed to get cows and heifers pregnant. “For those considering A.I., I would suggest getting started with only a small portion of your herd,” informed J.W. “When looking at the protocols to use, the timed A.I. protocol requires no heat detection therefore reducing labor. And above all, I would suggest contacting a professional A.I. service to assist you with the program. Their knowledge and expertise is invaluable as you begin to tailor a program to fit your requirements.” ©2013 CRI

Beef Horizons

5


A Passion for Red Randy Meyer has a passion for the color red, his pastures are filled with red cattle and machine sheds with red tractors. A grain farmer in Brunswick, Mo., Randy has learned A.I. provides him with the best genetics available, a uniform calf crop and saves him time so he can get back to the fields. “I began using A.I. five years ago because I wanted to increase the genetic value of my herd,” stated Randy. “The A.I. calves are more uniform and born in a shorter timeframe which makes my life a little easier.” The A.I. group consists of 80 heifers and 50 first-calf heifers. Since his first-calf heifers are still sorted off from the rest of the cows, they are an easy group to catch and breed. Calving season begins February 1 with 78% of the heifers calving in the first 21 days. “When I first considered A.I., I consulted Genex to find out how to get started,” commented Randy. “They have been extremely helpful in teaching us the steps of the project and always provide me with a calendar of exactly what needs to be completed. Genex trained my nephew, Steve, and me to install the CIDRs and administer shots. They also trained Steve to A.I., and he assists the Genex crew on breeding day.” High genetic value service sires are purchased to follow up A.I. Randy said, “With fewer bulls to purchase for clean up, I can select higher genetic sires that would have been out of my price range if I was purchasing sires for the entire herd.”

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©2013 CRI

Beef Horizons

Randy used TNTS Bank Statement T272 as an A.I. sire and really liked daughters that were going back into his herd as replacements. This past year he used GenChoice™ sexed semen on his heifers, breeding his heifers to have Bank Statement heifer calves. Randy markets bred heifers through the Missouri Red Angus sale and is proud to say his A.I. bred commercial heifers have topped the sale! “It’s a lot easier to sell A.I. bred heifers because the customer knows exactly when they are going to calve and the genetics they are purchasing,” stated Randy. “People will pay more for an A.I. heifer than a bull bred one.” He markets his steers through a special feeder calf auction to capture the genetic value of these calves. For the past three years the same buyer has purchased them, averaging $3-5 per 100 weight than blacks. The advantages of A.I. have paid off in Randy’s herd, at the feedlot and for his customers who are purchasing bred heifers. It has allowed him to increase the genetic value of his red cattle and given him the time to get back on the red tractor. “Genex provides me with professional A.I. service and is with me every step of the way,” stated Randy. “The key to a successful A.I. project is working with a professional company. If I wouldn’t have consulted with them from the beginning, my herd wouldn’t be where it is today.”


Generations of Known A.I. With many years experience utilizing A.I., Wilbur and Elsie Spreutels along with sons Steve and Eugene, run a herd of Red Angus commercial cows with known generations of A.I. Even though their Koshkonong, Mo. farm has a large number of commercial cows, they keep amazing records on every one. As you sit at their kitchen table, the Spreutels can produce a file for every cow on the place! Preparation plays a major factor in the success of A.I. at Spreutels. Each heifer is weighed and must meet a minimum of 650 pounds and at least 14 months of age in order to be included in the A.I. group. Each year 300 head of heifers and cows are A.I. bred; like many others in this region half are spring calving with the other half calving in the fall. The Spreutels learned early on that having a good facility was essential; it didn’t have to be fancy, just functional. At their operation a good corral system is in place, the corral leads up to a working chute with scale underneath. “We realize A.I. does take a bit of time to prepare for,” stated Wilbur. “However, we’re getting to choose from the best selection of bulls in the country and utilize higher accuracy sires.” They select for carcass and growth bulls because they finish out their own cattle. Cattle go through the Meyer Natural Angus program and receive a premium, which varies according to yield and grade, and an additional $15 per head for wearing the Red Angus Feeder Calf Certification Program tag when slaughtered. Their superb record keeping abilities allows them to turn in birth weight, weaning weight, yearling weight and carcass data to the Red Angus Association of America (RAAA) and Genex. The Spreutels serve as a Genex progeny test herd, providing data on calves which are the result of random matings to Genex young sires. Spreutels are six-time award winners of the prestigious GridMaster Award that recognized them for breeding and owning cattle that meet and exceed strict carcass quality specifications. Cattle must be a minimum of 85% Choice or higher, maximum of 15% Yield Grad 4s and minimum grid score of 100. By utilizing A.I. they have built a marketing equity for their replacements heifers. In past years they have marketed bred heifers through the Missouri Show-Me-Select program and sale. This program requires the heifer’s sire to meet minimum EPD accuracies for

calving ease, weaning weight, carcass weight and marbling. Over the years their cattle have built a reputation for themselves, and bred heifers are now sold via private treaty. As synchronization protocols have changed throughout the years, the Spreutels have changed with them. In past years, they used paint sticks and spent three days watching for heats. Today, they utilize timed A.I. protocols which has eliminated any labor previously needed for heat detecting. The 14-day CIDR protocol is used on heifers and 7-day CIDR protocol used with cows. “Utilizing the 14-day CIDR protocol on the heifers allows us to administer pre-breeding vaccines and dewormer when the CIDRs are installed since it is 33 days before breeding,” stated Wilbur. “This saves us a trip through the chute.” Wilbur and Elsie suggest starting with a small group of heifers if you will be A.I. breeding for the first time. “Start small and work your way up each year,” recommend the Spreutels. “We also want to stress the importance of following the synchronization protocol to a tee. We rely on Genex to assist us with our synchronization program, after all, they do this all the time and we only A.I. twice a year!” On breeding day Genex pulls in the yard with a crew of people who work as a well oiled machine to execute the project quickly and quietly without disrupting the day-today tasks on the farm. These producers have successfully incorporated A.I. into their breeding programs and today reap the benefits. A.I. is providing them with reduced labor costs (as a result of timed-A.I. protocols and Genex chute-side service), tighter calving seasons, superior replacement females and increased profits from greater consistency in marketing feeder cattle. To put it plainly, A.I. is adding profits to their bottom line!

©2013 CRI

Beef Horizons

7


Accuracy: An Expression of Reliability Jack Ward, Chief Operating Officer and Director of Breed Improvement, American Hereford Association

Over time, the beef cattle industry has developed tools that can be used by cattlemen for selection in order to make genetic progress. First, it was visual appraisal and then the collection of individual performance (ratios), then expected progeny differences (EPDs), and, most recently, genomic markers that are associated with genes of traits of interest. It is necessary to understand how to use each of these tools for selection; and, most importantly, it is imperative to understand the goals of your program and how to use the tools to move toward these goals. The industry has obviously been revolutionized with the development of EPDs, which are calculated at different times of the year by each breed association. It is also important to understand that currently, for most breed associations, EPDs can be used within breeds to make genetic change. In addition to the EPD, an accuracy (ACC) is reported with each EPD that is an expression of the reliability of the EPD, and that accuracy may range from 0.00 to 1.00.

As accuracy approaches 1.00, the EPD is more reliable and can be expected to change less in the future as more progeny performance records are added to the National Cattle Evaluation (NCE). Accuracy is a description of the amount of information available in the calculation of an animal’s EPD and can be affected by the number of progeny, the number of herds and the size of the contemporary groups from which data have been reported as well as the change in that animal’s relatives. A higher accuracy means an EPD is less subject to change as more information becomes available. While the animal’s genetic merit will never change (it has exactly the same DNA throughout its lifetime), our ability to predict the animal’s genetic merit may change. As we obtain more information, we can do a much better job of predicting an animal’s true genetic merit, which is reflected by accuracy. The genomic component will change an animal’s EPD and corresponding accuracy. Over the course of the past few years, most breed associations have worked closely with the scientific community to develop breed specific marker

Table 1. The possible change at different levels of accuracy for each trait.

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ACC Value

CE (%)

BW (lb.)

WW (lb.)

YW (lb.)

MM (lb.)

.00 .05 .10 .15 .20 .25 .30 .35 .40 .45 .50 .55 .60 .65 .70 .75 .80 .85 .90 .95 1.00

±8.3 8.1 8.0 7.8 7.6 7.3 7.1 6.9 6.7 6.4 6.1 5.8 5.5 5.2 4.8 4.5 4.0 3.5 2.9 2.1 0.0

±2.7 2.6 2.5 2.3 2.2 2.1 1.9 1.8 1.6 1.5 1.4 1.2 1.1 1.0 0.8 0.7 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.1 0.0

±13.0 12.4 11.7 11.1 10.4 9.8 9.1 8.5 7.8 7.2 6.5 5.9 5.2 4.6 3.9 3.3 2.6 2.0 1.3 0.7 0.0

±21.7 20.6 19.5 18.5 17.4 16.3 15.2 14.1 13.0 11.9 10.9 9.8 8.7 7.6 6.5 5.4 4.3 3.3 2.2 1.1 0.0

±9.4 8.9 8.5 8.0 7.5 7.1 6.6 6.1 5.6 5.2 4.7 4.2 3.8 3.3 2.8 2.4 1.9 1.4 0.9 0.5 0.0

©2013 CRI

Beef Horizons

MCE (%) MCW (lb.) ±9.1 9.0 8.8 8.5 8.3 8.1 7.9 7.6 7.3 7.1 6.8 6.5 6.1 5.8 5.4 4.9 4.5 3.9 3.2 2.3 0.0

±35.7 33.9 32.1 30.4 28.6 26.8 25.0 23.2 21.4 19.6 17.9 16.1 14.3 12.5 10.7 8.9 7.1 5.4 3.6 1.8 0.0

SC (cm)

FAT (in.)

REA (in.2)

MAR (deg.)

±0.62 0.59 0.56 0.53 0.50 0.47 0.44 0.41 0.37 0.34 0.31 0.28 0.25 0.22 0.19 0.16 0.12 0.09 0.06 0.03 0.00

±0.046 0.044 0.042 0.039 0.037 0.035 0.032 0.030 0.028 0.026 0.023 0.021 0.019 0.016 0.014 0.012 0.009 0.007 0.005 0.002 0.000

±0.35 0.33 0.32 0.30 0.28 0.26 0.25 0.23 0.21 0.19 0.18 0.16 0.14 0.12 0.11 0.09 0.07 0.05 0.03 0.02 0.00

±0.24 0.23 0.22 0.21 0.20 0.18 0.17 0.16 0.15 0.13 0.12 0.11 0.10 0.09 0.07 0.06 0.05 0.04 0.02 0.01 0.00


Proven. Reliable. Accurate.

panels that can be used to change an animal’s EPD and make the number much more reliable by adding to accuracy. Basically, what this process does is identify the favorable or unfavorable markers associated with genes that affect traits. So, on a non-parent animal, an accuracy could change by 100% for some traits of interest. Incorporating genomic data allows us to predict future progeny performance with a much higher degree of confidence. EPDs should be used to decide which bulls are selected, but accuracy values suggest how extensively the bulls should be used. Bulls with favorable EPD values and corresponding high accuracy values can be used with confidence that they will contribute favorably to genetic improvement of the herd. Changes in EPDs can be expected to fall within the possible change interval 68% of the time. Table 1 shows the possible change at different levels of accuracy for each trait. The potential change or confidence range is the EPD plus or minus the possible change value. The confidence range is simply the interval in which one would expect an individual animal’s true EPD to fall.

For most cattle, the EPD should not change more than the confidence range from one genetic analysis to the next. As the accuracy increases, then the possible change decreases and the confidence range narrows. Confidence ranges, accuracy and possible change values all relate to the reliability of a particular EPD. For example, if the accuracy of a bull’s weaning weight (WW) EPD is .30, the expected possible change in EPD is plus or minus 9.1 lb. For a bull with a WW EPD of 40, the potential change or EPD confidence range is 30.9 to 49.1. In contrast, if another bull has the same WW EPD of 40, but an accuracy of .90, the possible change in EPD decreases to plus or minus 1.3 lb. His confidence range would be 40 plus or minus 1.3 or, in other words, 38.7 to 41.3. A confidence range is not and absolute limit of an EPD change but is correct for most cattle. Cattlemen should use as many tools as possible to find the cattle with the least amount of risk to be used for genetic improvement. Selection pressure should be put on traits of interest that affect bottom lines and the selection of bulls with higher accuracy to increase your confidence in how they will perform.

©2013 CRI

Beef Horizons

9


FALL

2013

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Beef Horizons

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15%

female $20, male $17 Thomas Oahe Wind 0772ET P x LHD Cigar E46

$ 20 Now $  17

MCE

FAT

1CH00959 Fire Water

MR NLC Upgrade U8676 x MCM Marbler 307N

$ 35 Now $  25 MM

SC

10%

female $20, male $17 1SM00121 Upgrade

$ 25 Now $  20

MILK

Reg# M704588 CE

BW WW YW

-9.7 2.6 31 51 .60 .90 .84 .78

$ 20 Now $  18

MILK

10 .55

TM

SCR

25%

2%

CW

26 1.40 18 .68 .36

REA

FAT

MARB

0.62 0.018 -0.12 .34 .31 .29 2%

female $20, male $17

Special Runs September 1 - December 31, 2013. Special prices can be combined with Volume Special. Utilize with the John Deere Financial beef deferral program. Contact your Genex representative or visit profitshop.crinet.com for current availability.

©2013 CRI

Beef Horizons

11


FORTITUDE 1AN01299 PA FORTITUDE 2500 Reg: 17418539 / Born: 12/15/2011 Birth Wt.: 80 lbs. / 205 Days: 823 lbs. 365 Days: 1519 lbs.

 Fortitude will add thickness, muscle, performance, calving-ease and growth. This bull is unique; he will add marbling and ribeye, while reducing external fat.

Rito 1I2 of 2536 Rito 6I6 GAR-EGL Protege L B 6807 Isabel 339 CED

BW

ACC .40 RANK 15%

.46

WW

YW

RADG SCR

DOC CEM MILK MW

EPDS 10 0.9 67 123 0.25 0.49 36 .35

.37

.34

3%

2%

10%

.46

.38

9

.17

1%

30 23 .23

.34

MH

SydGen C C & 7 G G Clara 0171 G G Clara 7192

$EN

CW

MARB

0.1 -18.03 36 .31

0.70

.29

15%

.41

20%

15%

RE

FAT

$W

$F

$G

$B

1%

2%

10%

2%

0.75 -0.007 45.58 66.20 41.86 93.09 .33

.31

10%

25%

EPDs as of 8/23/13

INVESTMENT 1AN01300 SITZ INVESTMENT 660Z Reg: 17179119 / Born: 1/26/2012 Birth Wt.: 86 lbs. / 205 Days: 905 lbs. 365 Days: 1503 lbs. / Yrlg. Frame: 5.0 Scrotal: 38.8 cm. @ 12 mos.

 Investment’s combination of excellent phenotype, performance, outcross pedigree and EPD tabulation make him a must use young sire. Connealy Product 568 Connealy Final Product Ebonista of Conanga 471 BW

WW

YW

ACC .39 .46 RANK 10% 20%

CED

.35

.37

2%

2%

RADG SCR

DOC CEM MILK MW

EPDS 11 0.1 69 123 0.16 1.22 9 .30

.47

.30

15%

12 39 .12

.21

10%

1%

2

.26

MH

Sitz Upward 307R Sitz Ellunas Elite 656T Sitz Ellunas Elite 35M

$EN

CW

MARB

.26

.38

0.1 -30.61 51 .19

0.48

3%

RE

FAT

.30

.28

$W

$F

1%

2%

$G

$B

0.68 0.067 48.80 65.15 22.12 83.10 15%

10%

EPDs as of 8/23/13

CERTIFIED 1AN01301 GW CERTIFIED 103 C Reg: 17067746 / Born: 1/4/2011 Birth Wt.: 57 lbs. / 205 Days: 650 lbs. 365 Days: 1167 lbs. / Mature Frame: 6.0 Scrotal: 39.0 cm. @ 32 mos.

 A stout, rugged, cowman’s bull whose blend of EPD spread and outcross pedigree put him in a different league. His pedigree is very unique blend; he’s a potential calving ease with explosive growth. SydGen C C & 7 Hoover Dam Erica of Ellston C124 CED

BW

WW

YW

RADG SCR

ACC .34 .41 RANK 10% 15%

.32

.34

.32

.38

4%

4%

2%

15%

DOC CEM MILK MW

EPDS 11 -0.4 65 115 0.30 1.30 17 12 39 .31

.16

20% 10%

.23

1%

MH

Vermilion Payweight J847 Basin Blackcap 1605 Basin Blackcap 925L $EN

CW

MARB

.23

.29

.41

10%

15%

81

0.8 -38.24 38

3%

.28

0.47

RE

FAT

$W

$F

$G

$B

10%

4%

20%

5%

0.85 -0.017 37.92 56.60 36.51 88.12 .32

.31

4%

15%

EPDs as of 8/23/13

Unless noted as Developmental Duplication Carrier (DDC), all bulls are tested free or results are pending as of 9/3/13. Check the Genex website for up-to-date information on test results.

©2013 CRI

Beef Horizons

13


WESTERN CUT 1AN01302 CONNEALY WESTERN CUT Reg: 17304232 / Born: 1/28/2012 Birth Wt.: 70 lbs. / 205 Days: 789 lbs. 365 Days: 1392 lbs. / Yrlg. Frame: 6.1 Scrotal: 36.0 cm. @ 12 mos.

 Western Cut stands on a perfect set of feet and legs, strides wide and true with an athletic, proud posture and lots of eye appeal. G A R Retail Product D R Sierra Cut 7404 D R Dobra 3453 CED

BW

WW

YW

RADG SCR

DOC CEM MILK MW

EPDS 10 -0.1 59 111 0.21 0.92 22 13 27 ACC .38 .46 .35 .36 RANK 15% 15% 15% 10%

.29

.46

15%

.37

.13

.20

10%

4%

25%

25 .31

MH

S A V Bismarck 5682 Eura Elga of Conanga 9109 Eura Cal of Conanga 56B $EN

CW

MARB

.29

.41

0.3 -11.79 27 .26

0.56

RE

FAT

$W

$F

$G

$B

3%

5%

10%

10%

1.04 -0.012 41.02 54.43 42.60 84.06 .33

.31

2%

20%

EPDs as of 8/23/13

BALANCE 1AN01303 CONNEALY BALANCE Reg: 17302340 / Born: 1/18/2012 Birth Wt.: 64 lbs. / 205 Days: 773 lbs. 365 Days: 1280 lbs. / Yrlg. Frame: 5.8 Scrotal: 36.0 cm. @ 12 mos.

 Balance is flawlessly designed from the ground up with ample rib, depth, width, breed character, thick topped and EPDs that land him in a league of his own. Connealy Tobin Connealy Confidence 0100 Becka Gala of Conanga 8281 CED

BW

WW

YW

.39

.46

.35

.35

1%

4%

RADG SCR

DOC CEM MILK MW

EPDS 15 -1.7 59 102 0.16 0.30 11 15 26 ACC RANK

.26

.45

.37

.07

15% 15%

.15

1%

67

0.8 -14.37 42

CW

MARB

.18

.25

.38

10%

10%

10%

.25

MH

$EN

Connealy Consensus Elfeena of Conanga 0938 Eltina of Conanga 5382 2511 0.86 10%

RE

FAT

.29

.27

$W

$F

$G

$B

5%

20%

5%

1%

0.98 0.016 38.62 43.02 44.93 98.78 2%

EPDs as of 8/23/13

AMERICAN CLASSIC 11AN01306 DAMERON C-5 AMERICAN CLASSIC Reg: 17471320 / Born: 4/5/2012 Birth Wt.: 76 lbs. / 205 Days: 818 lbs. 365 Days: 1428 lbs. Scrotal: 41.5 cm. @ 12 mos.

 American Classic, a full brother to now deceased Dameron

First Class, is poised to be one of the next great sires of Angus show heifers. Use American Classic with confidence to produce champions that will get you in the winner’s circle.

Exar Lutton 1831 EXG RS First Rate S903 R3 Rafter S Blackcap P909 CED

BW

.05

.05

WW

YW

.05

.05

RADG

SCR

DOC

.05

.05

.05

CEM

MILK

MW

MH

$EN

Dameron P V F Raptor 702 Dameron Northern Miss 3114 Dameron Miss 550 CW

MARB

RE

FAT

.05

.05

.05

$W

$F

$G

$B

EPDS I+5 I+2.7 I+53 I+95 I+0.23 I-0.55 I-3 I+11 I+27 I+69 I+0.9 -14.20 I+34 I+0.17 I+0.18 I+0.009 27.94 37.29 13.67 60.69 ACC RANK

14

©2013 CRI

Beef Horizons

25%

10%

.05

.05

.05

.05

.05

15%

25%

10%

5%

25%


AUGUSTUS 1SM00140 ASR AUGUSTUS Z2165 Reg: 2653966 / Born: 3/12/2012 Birth Wt.: 68 lbs. / 205 Days: 534 lbs. 365 Days: 1178 lbs. / Yrlg. Frame: 5.6 Scrotal: 35.0 cm. @ 12 mos.

 Augustus is a potential calving ease sire with an outcross pedigree sired by RCR Augustus out of a SHEAR FORCE x ASR Little Bear female. Ideal mating for the Tanker and Upgrade daughters. PAP Score 39. ESNK31 RCR Augustus R54 RCR Nicole N32 CE

BW

WW

.20

.35

.32

2%

1%

YW

MCE

MM

MWW

.36

.18

.19

.23

EPDS 16.2 -2.0 59.0 101.3 11.8 19.4 48.9 ACC RANK

25%

Hooks Shear Force 38K ASR Ms Jordan W916 ASR Ms Jordan T734

STAY

23 .11

15%

DOC

CW

YG

.13

.29

.18

MB

BF

.17

.19

REA

SHR

API

TI

2%

15%

12.3 27.9 -0.30 0.24 -0.030 1.01 -0.46 148.9 73.5 20%

15%

.16

.10

10%

10%

SUNDANCE 1CH00964 LT SUNDANCE 2251 PLD Reg: M820210 / Born: 3/15/2012 Birth Wt.: 90 lbs. / 205 Days: 853 lbs. 365 Days: 1626 lbs. Scrotal: 41.0 cm. @ 12 mos.

 Sundance is a big time growth and performance prospect that will improve feet, scrotal, depth of body and predictability. Homozygous Polled. LT Bluegrass 4017 P LT Ledger 0332 P LT Brenda 6120 PLD

LT Easy Pro 1158 PLD LT Ballet 9219 Polled LT Ballet 6233 CE

BW

WW

YW

MILK

BK

BK

BK

BK

BK

EPDS 6.0 0.1 38 65 ACC RANK

10

15% 15%

TM

29

SCR

15%

CW

REA

FAT

I

I

I

2%

25%

MARB

35 0.29 0.032 0.18 I

8%

BANDIT 1CH00963 WCR BANDIT 2164 P Reg: M817600 / Born: 3/17/2012 Birth Wt.: 84 lbs. / 205 Days: 762 lbs. 365 Days: 1344 lbs.

 A homozygous polled Charolais calving ease prospect. Bandit is a bigger framed Big Ben son with excellent feet and legs and a phenomenal two-year-old dam.

LT Bluegrass 4017 P WC Big Ben 9036 P VCRMissDuchess9506Polled CE

BW

WCR Sir Duke 6090 ETP WCR Ms Duke 0147 P WCR Ms Design 758 P TW WW

EPDS 1.9 -1.5 34 ACC RANK

BK

BK

BK

15%

20%

YW

62 I

20%

MILK

TM

SCR

CW

PE

I

12

29

1.2 12

25%

15%

6%

BK

©2013 CRI

REA

FAT

MARB

I

I

I

-0.01 -0.002 0.01

Beef Horizons

15


FINAL ANSWER 1AN01044 S A V FINAL ANSWER 0035, recognized by beef producers around the globe, has reached a milestone rarely accomplished in the beef cattle artificial insemination industry. On July 25, 2013, FINAL ANSWER produced his 500,000th unit of semen. FINAL ANSWER was born at Martin & Angie Schaff’s ranch in St. Anthony, N.D. on February 22, 2000. FINAL ANSWER’s production success began with heavy use in commercial heifer projects. Registered herd owners saw the impressive progeny and followed suit. In 2012, he became the number one registration bull in the breed and joined elite company with over 22,000 lifetime registrations in addition to countless commercial progeny. FINAL ANSWER’s genetics and the high-quality care provided by Genex production division staff have also enabled the 13½‑year‑old bull to remain healthy and agile for optimal semen collection. FINAL ANSWER is a world renowned bull that has achieved a great feat for any beef sire by producing half a million units of semen.

Vn eo, To watch the vid it: vis or scan the QR code P m B4 3D y/1 http://bit.l

16

©2013 CRI

Beef Horizons

FINAL ANSWER spermometer

Produces 5OO,OOO Units of Semen

500,000 497,500 495,000 492,500 490,000

Watch Final Answerb’se! Milestone on YouTu


In the News Developmental Duplication in Angus cattle There has been a recent announcement by the American Angus Association (AAA) regarding the current findings of the genetic condition Developmental Duplication (DD). You can find more details on the condition and policy of the AAA by going to their website www.angus.org. No immediate action is required on any bulls or animals found to be carriers. The policy adopted by the AAA is very open with full disclosure making breeders and the industry aware. As we have stated numerous times, the genomic era in cattle breeding will mean the discovery of numerous genetic conditions. We congratulate the AAA for modifying their policy as we expect announcements such as this to be routine in the future for not only Angus but all beef and dairy breeds. The genetic condition is a simple genetic recessive and can be managed with a carefully managed breeding program. To view the most up-to-date list of all Genex sires tested for DD visit the Genex website.

Introducing Final Answer II Cloning has become a practical management tool that can be used to extend the marketing life of some of the breed’s great bulls. Genex made the decision to clone 1AN01044 FINAL ANSWER in late 2010. The methodology has been described numerous times, and while the procedure is complex, it can be explained relatively simply. A sample of the animal’s tissue, usually an ear notch, is used to start a cell line. This cell line is used to provide the genetic material for the clone. A donor provides an egg from which the nucleus, which contains all the genetic material, is removed. The nucleus is removed from one of the cells of the Final Answer cell line and inserted into the donor egg. The egg is stimulated to begin division, cultured and then placed in a recipient animal, similar to what is done with standard embryo transfer. The process worked with Final Answer, and we now have an exact genetic copy of the original, known as Final Answer II.

AL AN SWE R

A V FIN 1AN01259 S

CRI Development Around the Globe

Brad Johnson, Genex Beef Product Development Manager, Daniel de Carvalho, Beef Product Manager – CRI Brazil, and Michael Sleeper, CRI International Beef Development Manager, visit with a beef producer in Colombia this spring. As part of an EMP grant, CRI is learning more about export opportunities of the beef industry in Central America. Sarah Thorson, Beef Education Manager – Genex, and Daniel de Carvalho, Beef Product Manager – CRI Brazil, visit with a Red Angus producer in Nicaragua. This EMP is focused on learning more about the needs and growth opportunities in the Central American beef industry. Dr. Amy Radunz, University of Wisconsin – River Falls and Adam Zeltwanger, Wulf Cattle, explored the beef industry in Honduras as part of the Central American Beef EMP project.

0035 II

gend SAV of the breed le e genetic e on cl a is II m er ❯ Final Answ 0035. He offers the exact sa semen. r unit of pe st Final Answer co e th action of r material at a fr mmercial heife eal to use in co ease Final id is II er sw calving ❯ Final An ing the proven er the last decade. projects need ov r fo n ow en kn Answer has be ate dence, and m er II with confi e original. sw An l na Fi th ❯ Use you would use him exactly as ©2013 CRI

Beef Horizons

17


FA O E IF L E H T IN K E E W A

n r e t n I x e Gen search Intern Griffin, the Beef Re llie Ca I’m , ne yo er is fall I will Hey ev in Billings, Mont. Th er m m su is th x ne for Ge ana State of college at Mont ar ye or ni ju my begin g 2015 with an to graduate in sprin s an pl th wi ty rsi Unive siness minor. I and agricultural bu r ajo m ce ien sc al anim ’s ranch where ntana on my family Mo rn ste ea in up within a five mile grew us cattle. I’ve lived ng l/A ta en m Sim ise cle’s family all of we ra and grandpa and un a dm an gr my of radius rk alongside family ays felt lucky to wo alw ve ha d an e lif my I hadn’t worked fore this summer, Be y. da ch ea rs be mem excited when I nch, and was really ra e th t bu re he anyw rilled my dad, didn’t know how th I . ip sh rn te in e th got learned their hired uld be when they wo d cle un or a dp gran zed how happy an , but I quickly reali ne go it! be it m uld ad wo to hand n’t want re even if they did supportive they we do many e opportunity to th d ha e I’v , er m m This su two week training nex. I attended a Ge th wi gs in th nt differe ople, learned ere I met several pe wh sin on isc W in class e dairy industry. I and a lot about th y an mp co e th t abou m Argentina and oup of visitors fro gr a th wi ed ur to West. My main also at Genex Hawkeye n io ct lle co th wi d assiste y test herds to rking with progen wo en be ve ha ts ec proj me feet and leg data and taking so ty e ili rt fe ll bu er gath nal, “A Week in th . My five-day jour es sir x ne e Ge th of of g os phot u a samplin tern,” will give yo Life of a Genex In . rn I had as an inte great experiences

Two days before I arrived in Sioux Falls, S.D. to begin my journey with the Argentina beef tour. This group of 44 people was customers and representatives from CRI Argentina’s distributor, Juan Debernardi. After meeting everybody and doing one day of touring at Mohnen Angus, we arrived at Penrhos Farms, Britton, S.D. Just like everything else we had seen so far, the grass was thick, green and lush. It seemed like there was water standing everywhere you looked. I quickly realized that I needed to stop marveling at the beauty and get in gear because this was my most important stop on the tour. One of my main projects for the summer was to collect fertility data on the sires Penrhos Farms has used. For those of you

June 26, 2013

18

©2013 CRI

Beef Horizons

Callie Griffi n& Sarah Thor son

Callie Griffin working on projec t

who may not know, Penrhos Farms is a Genex progeny test herd and they artificially inseminate (A.I.) hundreds of cows and heifers to Genex sires every year. I was scheduled to meet with Susan Jones to go over which records I would need. To be honest, I still can’t believe how many records I saw that day and was slightly overwhelmed at first. Any type of record you needed or asked for, Susan had it and knew the exact color of notebook it was in. We talked about the project, she emailed me files I would need and I felt ready to begin. Unfortunately, by the time we met up with the Argentina visitors, they were already done touring. They did say they were very impressed with the cows and calves, and really enjoyed being able to see such a great commercial herd. After that, it was back on the bus to travel to our next destination.


June 28, 2013

Conditions didn’t change in North Dakota as we saw more green grass and good looking cattle at Schaff Angus Valley. Every new pasture we visited had more great cattle. The calves looked uniform and by the end of the day, I concluded that it was nearly impossible to pick a favorite bull. Just like every place we had been before this, the hospitality was to be admired. It seemed like they were just as excited to have us there as we were to be there. I left that day feeling extremely fortunate and even a little inspired. After eating two week’s worth of food at a fantastic Brazilian steakhouse, we all prepared for the next day of touring and lots of traveling.

July 2, 2013

S C HAF F

ANGU S

June 30, 2013 Yesterday was spent at Lindskov-Thiel touring their Charolais and Angus herds and then traveling to Montana, my home state! The group said goodbye to me for one night and I was able to go to my house to spend the night at home. This morning I caught up with the group in Miles City and we headed to Genex Hawkeye West, the largest of the Genex custom collection facilities. While talking with the Argentines on the bus ride, I learned they were eagerly looking forward to visiting the stud; they had seen a lot of progeny, but were now ready to see the actual bulls. They were impressed with how everything looked; their favorites by far were 1AN01224 CEDAR RIDGE and 1AR00948 STRONGHOLD. After eating a great lunch, it was time for me to say goodbye. What a phenomenal tour it was! I enjoyed meeting everyone and learning about what they do in Argentina. I really enjoyed tagging along on their tour and learning about some of the most impressive cattle operations in the entire country. photo: background EL RANCH HI -T OV LINDSK

VAL L E Y

Things finally settled down after the tour and I began working on my fertility data project. With the help of Sarah Thorson, Beef Education Manager, we decided which information would be valuable to gather. I started with data from 2013 calves and worked my way back from there. With the information I found, I made spreadsheet after spreadsheet that showed bull fertility data. Crossing a year off my list was most definitely rewarding and it felt like progress was being made when I began another year. With many exchanged phone calls and emails to Susan, it took me a little less than two weeks to gather eight years of fertility data.

Argentina beef tour

I got to take a break from working on my spreadsheets to help Ryan Thorson, the custom collection manager, on collection day. It was nice to get out of the office for the morning and help out. After learning about what they do in the lab and preparing AVs, I finally got a chance to help in an entirely different way! Ryan told me it was time for me to hold the mount and even collect. I like to think I am a “go-getter” so I decided, “Sure, why not?” Certainly not wanting to show any nerves, I went ahead and did what I was supposed to do. Lucky for me, I think I had beginner’s luck because I did perfectly on my first try. It’s definitely harder than it looks and most likely isn’t something everyone dreams about doing, but I think I still deserve a little bragging rights, don’t I?

JULY 12, 2013

My summer has proven to be a great learning experience. I got the opportunity to see almost every side of what Genex offers, and cannot help but look forward to the advancements that will be made in my lifetime within the beef industry. Looking back on the people I met and the experiences I had this summer, I expect the future of agriculture to be nothing but bright. Thank you to everyone at Genex Hawkeye West and especially my supervisor, Sarah Thorson, for making this summer a great one!

©2013 CRI

Beef Horizons

19


CAN REPRODUCTIVE TRACT SCORING

CHANGE YOUR BOTTOM LINE?

Patsy Houghton, PhD, Owner/General Manager | Janet Rippe, Director of Research & Information Transfer | Heartland Cattle Company, McCook, NE

to work from the University of Missouri that shows as many as 35% of all beef heifers remain pre-pubertal at 15 months of age.

Cow herd reproductive performance is the biggest factor related to ranch profitability. More calves produced with less production expense should be a primary goal of every rancher. Selection, management and timing of breeding replacement heifers are important components of total cowherd reproductive efficiency.

Multiple data sets have shown RTS to be highly correlated with first service conception rate and/or seasonal pregnancy rate. For example, data from Heartland Cattle Company’s heifer development program shows the probability that an actively cycling heifer will conceive on her first service is 11% higher than a pre-pubertal heifer; and 32% higher than a heifer with an infantile reproductive tract. Higher first service conception rate translates to higher seasonal pregnancy rate, especially in heifers exposed to a restricted breeding season lasting only 30-45 days.

When heifers are bred at 14 months of age to calve as 2-year-olds they will produce more total calves in their lifetime than heifers that are bred for the first time later in life. Age at puberty and reproductive development can sometimes be a challenge when breeding heifers at 14 months of age. Reproductive tract scoring (RTS) is a quick, low-cost rectal palpation procedure to evaluate ovarian and uterine horn development; ranchers can use this to help identify heifers that have reached puberty, are actively cycling and ready to breed.

The effectiveness of RTS in predicting reproductive performance of yearling heifers depends upon accuracy and timing of the procedure. Data published in “Theriogenology” shows the accuracy and repeatability of RTS performed by trained technicians to be highly correlated to ultrasonography and serum progesterone concentrations for determining the pubertal status of heifers. A number of animal science and veterinary programs throughout the country teach RTS procedures, so the best way to identify a trained technician in your area would be to contact reproductive physiology faculty from these programs.

Various numerical RTS systems have been developed and used throughout the industry, but what each system has in common with the others is to identify normal vs. abnormal reproductive tracts and actively cycling vs. pre-pubertal heifers. In a nutshell, an effective RTS system will identify infantile reproductive tracts due to either age (youth) or hormonal imbalance; pre-pubertal heifers; and normal, actively cycling heifers. Identification of “calf-breds” is another important benefit of RTS. Data from Heartland Cattle Company, from nearly 20,000 heifers over the past five years, shows a normal distribution of 2% infantile tracts and/or free-martins, 25% pre-pubertal heifers and 73% actively cycling heifers at 35 to 45 days pre-breeding. This corresponds

Positive correlations to first service conception and pregnancy rates increase when the timing of RTS is closer to the breeding season. Reproductive tract scoring data collected at Heartland Cattle Company is from 35 to 45 days prior to synchronized breeding date.

Colorado State University RTS System: Single Digit Scoring Reproductive Tract Score

Uterine Horns

1

Size and Characteristics of Ovaries Length

Height

Width

Ovarian Structures

Immature <20 mm diameter, no tone

15 mm

10 mm

8 mm

No palpable follicles

2

20-25 mm diameter, no tone

18 mm

12 mm

10 mm

8 mm follicles

3

25-30 mm diameter, slight tone

22 mm

15 mm

10 mm

8-10 mm follicles

4

30 mm diameter, good tone

30 mm

16 mm

12 mm

>10 mm follicles, Corpus luteum possible

5

>30 mm diameter, good tone, erect

>32 mm

20 mm

15 mm

>10 mm follicles, Corpus luteum present

Note: Reproductive tract scores are determined approximately 1 month pre-breeding by rectal palpation Source: Anderson, K.J., D.G. Lefever, J.S. Brinks, and K.G. Odde. 1991. The use of reproductive tract scoring in beef heifers. Agri-Practice 12(4):19.

20

©2013 CRI

Beef Horizons


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This correlates to the same time a rancher would want to collect yearling weights, pelvic measurements and provide pre-breeding vaccinations to their replacement heifers. In summary, scoring heifers for reproductive development via rectal palpation is a low cost procedure that will help eliminate poor replacement prospects prior to investing time, labor and expense into breeding those heifers. When only the most fertile heifers are retained for breeding, they will perform at a higher rate reproductively than the industry average; and result in lower breeding costs for the rancher. Additionally, when poor replacement prospects are identified prior to breeding it allows the rancher to merchandise them in a timelier manner resulting in improved cash flow, a reduction in total carrying costs and less pressure on precious feed and forage resources. Yes, reproductive tract scoring replacement heifers can improve your bottom line.

Heartland Cattle Company RTS System: Two Digit Scoring Number left of hyphen describes ovarian development: 2

Infantile or pea size ovaries, no significant structures

3

Normal size ovaries, no significant structures

4

Normal size ovaries, palpable follicle or Corpus luteum (CL)

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This is a great source for information on what is happening at Genex that pertains to beef. Information ranges anywhere from new bull photos to new sire acquisitions to anything happening at Genex. We invite you to learn more and stay connected with us! To sign up, scan the QR code or visit http://tiny.cc/p7j50w

Number right of hyphen describes uterine horn development: 2

Infantile or pencil sized tract

3

Normal tract prior to exposure to reproductive hormones

4

Normal, well vascularized tract indicating reproductive hormone exposure

Note: Reproductive tract scores are determined by rectal palpation 35-45 days prior to synchronized breeding dates. Developed by Dr. Mike Slattery, DVM, Cattleman’s Consulting Service, McCook, Neb.

Examples: 2-2 = Infantile tract 3-2, 3-3 = pre-pubertal heifer 4-4, 3-4 = actively cycling heifer ©2013 CRI

Beef Horizons

21


Large Herd Producer Roundtable

These progressive large herd producers have incorporated artificial insemination (A.I.) into their operation. Get the inside scoop from these three operations and learn about their success, what they look for when choosing sires and the advice they have for other operations.

Todd & Lisa Geiken (above) and Shane & Lisa Geiken (right) Gothenburg, Neb.

Craig & Alicia Sibley Wolf Point, Mont.

Justin & Jenny Jacobs Prairie City, Ore.

The main reason we A.I. is the added value to our heifers.

To have the synchrony for calving and known, reliable genetics we can trust.

We A.I. all our heifers and approximately 20 percent of our cows to improve genetics quicker by keeping more uniform replacements and having a more consistent calf crop.

What are the biggest factors to the success of your A.I. program?

We have found the biggest reasons for success to be God’s blessing, nutrition, good A.I. technician (our Genex representative is excellent) and good cattle handling techniques and facilities.

We consider a successful A.I. program when we have good conception rates and a positive experience for the cattle.

Nutrition is key; having heifers and cows in good shape definitely helps. If you get behind, it definitely has a domino effect with opens, weaning weights, next year’s calf vigor and the following year’s pregnancy rate. Handling facilities are also important, the calmer and less stress the better.

What do you look for when choosing A.I. sires?

We look at sires with high accuracy, good calving ease, growth and maternal traits and usually not a heavily used sire in the industry because we want our customers to be able to keep replacements out of the bred heifers. We highly value the information our Genex representative gives us in choosing sires.

We look for balanced, multi-trait EPDs with consistency and dependability.

A bloodline or bull that can complement our herd and environment. Maternal is huge – udder quality, calving ease so the cow can rebreed, along with good growth and above average carcass quality to match. No longer are there just a couple of bloodlines that fit all of these categories, there are several to pick from.

What is the main reason you utilize A.I. in your operation?

How is your Genex representative involved in the A.I. project?

Our Genex representative is involved in our program from start to finish.

Breeding and helping with planning synchronization.

We have had discussions on A.I. techniques and handling issues that fit our operations the best and what sires will complement our bloodlines. There are so many factors with environment and type of cattle so we appreciate outside input to help us make decisions that are best for our operation.

What advice do you have for others considering implementing an A.I. program?

The advice we would give is to have a good A.I. tech/Genex representative and use a program that fits your operation.

At first it looks like a lot of work and hassle, but after you become familiar and comfortable with the process, it will become very routine.

We think if most people had the facilities, time, circumstances; people would love to use A.I. more. It definitely gives you more consistency, marketability and a chance to improve your herd faster.

22

©2013 CRI

Beef Horizons


Superior Livestock & Genex Cooperative

are teaming up to bring you the first ever joint bred heifer sale.

November 22, 2013 Broadcast Live on RFD-TV

Consign your cattle “The Superior Way” and reach out to over 8,000 registered buyers Selling potloads of bred heifers with the influence of Genex, either sired by or A.I. bred to Genex sires. For more information contact your local Genex representative at 888.333.1783 or Superior Livestock representative 800.422.2117.

Genex

Cooperative, Inc. A Subsidiary of Cooperative Resources International

www.SuperiorLivestock.com ©2013 CRI

Beef Horizons

23


Genex Cooperative, Inc.

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID MERRILL, WI 54452 PERMIT NO 24

P.O. Box 469, 100 MBC Drive Shawano, WI 54166

CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

With

chute-side service

and a fixed-time heat synchronization protocol, your A.I. season is 4 hours long. And 6 of every 10 females are pregnant as they leave the breeding barn on the very first day of your breeding season!

Contact YOUR

representative to learn more.

Š2013 CRI

Product of the U.S.A.

B-05695-13

Profile for GENEX

Genex Beef Horizons-Fall 1013  

Genex Beef Horizons-Fall 1013

Genex Beef Horizons-Fall 1013  

Genex Beef Horizons-Fall 1013