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SURVEYING PEOPLE AND ISSUES THAT OFTEN GO UNNOTICED

Winter 2018 | Geneva School of Boerne



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BEHIND THE COVER For Issue two our theme is “Surveying People and Issues that Often Go Unnoticed.� To capture this theme in our cover photo, Jacqueline Knox photographed students (Lindesy Zuniga, Jillian Albus, Brock Ambelang, Emma Wilson, and Allison Cross) behind the fence on the baseball field and the same picture without students. Ruth Wacker photoshopped parts of the students out of the photo to create the illusion of overlooked students. This symbolizes the theme of this issue as we spotlight people who get overlooked or the issues we all deal with on the inside that we try to hide.

SUBSCRIBE: To buy a subscription, contact: rryden@genevaschooltx.org TO ADVERTISE, CONTACT: rryden@genevaschooltx.org FOR OTHER INQUIRIES, CONTACT: rryden@genevaschooltx.org

This is a publication for: Geneva School of Boerne 113 Cascade Caverns Road Boerne, TX 78015

SCHOOL INFO:

The Geneva School of Boerne exists to provide a classical education from a Biblical worldview, to equip students with a lifetime of learning, service and leadership to the glory of Jesus Christ. RHETORIC SCHOOL POPULATION: 210 RHETORIC FACULTY: 32 MAGAZINE SPECIFICATIONS ARE AS FOLLOWS:

Created in InDesign and printed by SchoolPrinting.com. Font families: Pier Sans and Plantagenet Cherokee.

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ABOUT US: All verbal and visual content is solicited and selected by the Quarterly Staff. Approval is garnered from the adviser and Headmaster, Rob Shelton. All writing is subject to byline approval for accuracy and integrity. If you have any complaints or see any errors, please contact rryden@genevaschooltx.org. We are proud to announce our four-year membership to the Columbia Association of Scholastic Press, where we have won the Crown Award the last two years and received a Gold Medalist rating for the last four years. We are also members of Texas Interscholastic Press Association where we have been awarded the highest rating of Award of Distinguished Merit for the last four years and have been members of the National Scholastic Press Association in the last year and received an All American rating, and have had students enter and win the Pacemaker award.


EDITOR THOUGHTS WELCOME TO THE New Year! By the time you read this, you will probably have given up on your New Year’s resolutions. As we enter the second semester, we have a long stretch ahead of us before a relaxing spring break. Please take a break to enjoy volume five issue two of the Geneva Quarterly. We wanted to take this issue to stop and recognize those who go unnoticed on our campus and in our community. Our goal is to uncover and highlight those people and topics that are often overlooked. We discuss issues such as the possible effects of school pressure, depression and peer pressure. We all struggle with these issues in some form, and it is good to acknowledge we are not alone. We also take a look into some of the people who keep Geneva running. Hopefully we will inspire you to take another look at the people around you and go out of your way to appreciate the difference they make in the community. . Good luck in quarter three!

Sincerely, Emme Owens, Chief Editor of Content Ruth Wacker, Chief Managing Editor Carissa Georgelos, Chief Editor of Design



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WINTER 2018

BOARDWALK TALK 8 | LIVING THE GREENLEES LEGACY 11 | NOT ALL HEROES WEAR CAPES | FEATURE

GAME FACE 30 | THE WRIGHT WAY TO WORK OUT 32 | OVERLOOKED: HEROES THAT GO UNSUNG | FEATURE 36 | TAKE A SPRINT BACK IN TIME

BIG PICTURE

ISSUES

40 | THEY’RE ON A MISSION | FEATURE

58 | DEFEATING DEPRESSION | FEATURE

52 | PREACHING WHILE TEACHING

67 | IT’S TOUGH STUFF | OPINION

54 | STEPHANOW PRESSES ON

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70 | WHAT’S BEHIND THE SCREEN | OPINION 72 | IT CAN WAIT


OUT OF THE BOX 78 | THE TALON | SATIRE 79 | ENOUGH KIDD-ING AROUND | REVIEW 84 | TEVELUTION 90 | HEY THERE GOOD BOOKIN’

EXECUTIVES

Chief Managing Editor, Ruth Wacker Chief Editor of Content, Emme Owens Chief Editor of Design, Carissa Georgelos

EDITORS

Photoshop Editor, Anna Riedlinger Indesign Editor, Aisling Ayers Photography Editor, Jacqueline Knox Editorial Editor, Nathan Young

INDESIGN STAFF

Lauren Jarvis Jayne Goodman Alexa Georgelos Ryanne Fitzgerald

PHOTOGRAPHY STAFF

Taylor Tippitt Luke Bower Braden Hall Ashton Landis

PHOTOSHOP STAFF

STAFF MISSION The Geneva Quarterly, a student-led Rhetoric School publication serves to provide Geneva and surrounding communities with relevant and accurate news, opinions and entertainment centered around our student culture. Our staff strives to instill boldness, creativity and excellence through our published work. We aim to discover truth in our community and to write all pieces from a Biblical worldview to the glory of Jesus Christ.

Anson Eggerss Audrey Ryden Sydney Dennis Nathan Zuniga

EDITORIAL STAFF

Matthew Schroder Gabi Griffey Jackson Young Gracyn Freiling

MARKETING

Daniel Grover

ADVISER

Becky Ryden


PEEKING BEHIND THE CURTAIN TO SEE FACULTY AND STUDENT LIFE PHOTO BY LUKE BOWER


BOA R DW ALK TA L K


Mrs. Greenlees has made math approachable for stuents since the beginning of Rhetoric School .

LIVING THE GREENLEES LEGACY

Math teacher Susan Greenlees has been a part of Geneva since the beginning and put both of her children through a Geneva education. She has seen the school grow and change over the years and has also been a part of the journey.

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BY ANNA RIEDLINGER

Layout by Jayne Goodman Photos by Luke Bower Graphic by Anna Riedlinger RIEDLINGER: WHAT BROUGHT you to Geneva? GREENLEES: My son was in first grade when the school first opened. He was in the original group of kids that started Geneva in 1999. He was one of the five first graders, so we were here as parents, as pioneers I guess. And then when it became feasible for me to teach, I transferred over from Boerne High School and started teaching over here. I taught fifth grade initially because that was the highest grade they had at the time. RIEDLINGER: How have you seen the school change? GREENLEES: Early on, there was intentionality in the things that we were doing, but it was definitely a pioneering kind of effort. Now there are things that are fixed in place. There are standards with less opportunity to really change things. In the beginning, one of the things we had to learn was that it’s okay if Geneva is not a fit for all people. When we were just starting out, it hurt our hearts more to see kids and people leave. [Then], we realized that this school was not for everybody. Now we say it freely (not like kicking people out), but there’s a standard that says who we are; you either embrace it or you don’t. RIEDLINGER: How are Geneva students different from other students? GREENLEES: I taught 16 years in public school; Judson High School was just a completely different population of students. I think in some ways the general population is more focused. But then again, they are still teenagers and they still want to do the minimum—some of them do. They still have to find the motivation some place other than the teacher. The effort and desire to do well was still there. In some ways I think that if you have a lot, you take things for granted and you don’t have the ability to work as hard.

HONORING THE LEGEND: “She’s the bomb.com.” -Senior Jax Roberts

“She is the most servanthearted teacher, I believe.” -Senior Will Langenbahn

“I admire how much she served others after Hurricane Harvey.” -Sophomore Lydia DuPerier

“She’s not only a good teacher, she is also fun and it helps me engage.” -Junior Devon Ahrens

“Her stories brighten my day. I literally could not get to the end of my day without them.” -Sophomore Anson Eggerss

RIEDLINGER: What are all the jobs you’ve had at Geneva? GREENLEES: When I started [at Geneva], I was the middle school headmaster for 6th, 7th and 8th (before we had a high school). I’ve taught 5th grade all the way through calculus. In the early years, I taught the students every year. The class of 2013 I taught [in] 7th, 8th, 10th and 11th. Now I’m just the Rhetoric level math teacher. I also started the Geneva chapter of National Honor Society and have coached golf.

“She keeps me in line. She has been the best math teacher I have ever had.”

RIEDLINGER: What jobs did you have before Geneva? GREENLEES: My first job, coming from North Carolina to San Antonio, was working for a marketing company that does all the detergents. [The company] was huge, so I was hired by them to be in sales and management, and they moved me out here. I did that for a year. I was young and successful, but there was a part of me that didn’t get excited by sales quotas and making sales calls. I was good with people, but I didn’t feel like I was making a difference with my life, so I quit, went back to school and got certified to teach.

-Junior Aimee Metzger

-Senior Lauren Jarvis

“I definitely look forward to going to her class.” “She’s the mother away from my mother.” -Senior Conner Tyra

RIEDLINGER: Why did you decide to start teaching? GREENLEES: I had an incredible education experience throughout high school. I went to a private school (not that I am necessarily advocating for private school). I had very intentional teachers who were very qualified. When I was working later in life, I had a good friend who 

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I had met through church who was the varsity tennis coach at Marshall. I used to go to her practices and tournaments, and through that I got to interact with high school students [which] really encouraged me to teach. From that point, it was a really quick decision. I just really felt like the Lord was leading me to walk away. I left my old job and had to go through a lot of questions. They told me [that they] lose people to other marketing firms, and [they] lose people [who] go back and get their MBA’s, but [they never] lose people who go teach high school math. And I just told them, ‘Well, I don’t think God’s on your profile sheet.’

GREENLEES: There were some older women who I played golf with and really modeled hard work. They weren’t the greatest [at golf], but they were solid people. I tend to be drawn to people who are the salt of the earth kind of people, not necessarily the highest people. These women were just good women.

RIEDLINGER: How do you see Geneva in the future? What do you expect to happen? GREENLEES: [Geneva] is going to continue to produce solid graduates and students who understand the value of hard work. I think there are opportunities for all sorts of gifted and talented students here. Whether it’s in athletics or music, for a private school to have as many opportunities as we have is uncommon.

RIEDLINGER: Since we have become bigger as a school, do you feel the student body has changed? If so, how? GREENLEES: There is more of a challenge to be independently motivated. Now that we are bigger, it can be much easier to just ride on the coattails of others. When [we] were smaller, it was much harder to just kind of get by. Also, [the problem of] students comparing themselves to other students is something we have to deal with now that we are a larger body. In a bigger school like Champion, the classes are always being mixed up. But here, [we are] just small enough to where it’s easier to get bogged down by comparison.

RIEDLINGER: How long do you plan on staying? GREENLEES: The joke is that I will retire when the second generation of my students enters my class room (which might be in the next two to three years). But really, I will stay until the Lord leads me someplace else. I will probably retire teaching, but I am still a spring chicken, and I can still dish out my sarcasm, so I guess I’ll just keep going. RIEDLINGER: Is it true you motorcycle on the weekends? GREENLEES: Yes, I ride a motorcycle on the weekends. Well, I [actually] ride on the back of my husband’s. We [usually] ride down somewhere on the weekends, eat dinner and ride back. RIEDLINGER: Who was your childhood role model?

RIEDLINGER: What has been the biggest benefit of having your kids here while teaching? GREENLEES: Well, I knew everything before they did. My relationship with my boys was unique, and I think I just really got to see them interact, develop and grow, and really just be a part of their lives.

RIEDLINGER: What is the greatest thing about teaching that keeps you doing it? GREENLEES: Seeing students see things in themselves that they didn’t think they had. I love 10th and 11th grade so much because I get to see the ones that struggle, and I also get to see the fruit of that. Watching them come to the realization that they can do this is very rewarding. I do love teaching the ones that are excited by math, but I love even more to teach ones that figure out that they are capable of a whole lot more than they knew.|

I THINK THERE ARE OPPORTUNITIES FOR ALL SORTS OF GIFTED AND TALENTED STUDENTS HERE. G| 10


NOT ALL HEROES WEAR CAPES

Even though they play an essential role in the running of BY JAYNE GOODMAN by Jayne Goodman Geneva, many vital staffers don’t seem to get the attention Layout Photos by Luke Bower they deserve. Here is a closer look at some of the individuals that keep Geneva on its feet.

WHAT MAKES GENEVA run? Some may like to think that there is a little fairy that comes at night and does all the paperwork, cleaning and planning with a swoosh and flick of a magical wand. This is not the case, but the people who do make Geneva run truly work magic. Geneva could not possibly function without these people who work hard but hardly get any credit. Please enjoy getting to know some of these people.

MR. ROYAL BROWN,

Logic/Rhetoric Administrative Assistant This December marks Mr. Royal Brown’s second year at Geneva. He wants to work at Geneva because he likes how his job position allows him to make an impact on students’ lives, and is blessed in return by being impacted by the students. Brown enjoys working at the same place as his wife. During the first year of their marriage, they were so busy that they saw each other very little. Now Brown gets to see her all the time, which, in his own words, is “good.” When asked what his spirit animal* was, Carissa Georgelos, who was in the room, promptly responded “Prairie dog!” Brown loves Mexican food and spicy cuisine, in general. Ironically, he does not know what “salty” means. He used to be a drug counselor and has his Masters in Counseling. He did competitive archery in High School and was pretty good.

PLUG

MYSTERIOUS

FUNNY

COOL THE

Mr. Royal Brown works diligently in the Admin building.

A GREAT YOUNG MAN *

No spirit animals were harmed in the asking of this question, nor does anyone truly believe that spirit animals exist. Come on..... 

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MISS CHELSIE JACOBSON,

Rhetoric School Executive Assistant

CARING

Miss Chelsie Jacobson never ceases to have a smile on her face, even while hard at work.

SWEET

Miss Chelsie Jacobson has been working at Geneva for 13 years. Three of those years she taught kindergarten, for two years she taught Spanish, and she also coached cheer. Now Jacobson is Mr. Shelton’s assistant. If you have ever walked past the Admin long after school, you might have seen Jacobson still working at her desk. She said that she stays so late sometimes because there is always something to do. Jacobson found out about Geneva through a friend of the Grammar School Headmaster Mrs. Jessica Gombert. Jacobson visited one day, and she ended up loving it. One of the things that makes Geneva so special in her eyes is the fact that this school has an awesome Christian community that shares one vision. Her spirit animal is a chipmunk, and her dream vacation would be at any mountain range.

NO FLAWS

MAKES THIS PLACE RUN

MRS. KATE LUFFY, Staff Accountant

HELPFUL

The business admin, one of the portables to the right of the MPB, is run by five ladies: Controller Ingrid Joiner, Human Resources Director Sheri Palermo, Bookkeeper Araceli Alvarez, Staff Accountant Brenda Russell and Senior Accountant Kate Luffy. Russell pays all the bills. She makes sure that any supplies the teachers buy for the classroom or projects get paid for. She especially loves starting her day with the faculty devotion time. Russell’s favorite project is Jogathon because she loves seeing how generous the Geneva community is. Luffy is in charge of many different things. She administers payroll, handles all enrollment and re-enrollments, and manages financial aid. On top of all that, Luffy also parents two Grammar School students at Geneva: fourth grader Megan and second grader Mark. Luffy loves working at Geneva because of its faith-based community and the encouragement everyone receives on a daily basis. Her favorite project to work on is the re-enrollment because she loves seeing 95% of the students return. Both Luffy and Russell said that they do not feel overlooked as one of the offices at Geneva, but would like people to know that they have an open-door policy and love for people to stop by. Together, they also said that if they could sum up their job with one word, it would be “blessed.”|

AMAZING

MONEY!

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PROFESSIONAL

Mrs. Kate Luffy is not only Geneva’s staff accountant, but also a mother of two grammar school students.


THE MAN THE MYTH THE LEGEND Now you can finally get to know the man who keeps Geneva functioning. Meet Mr. Charles McMurry, the Big Man on Campus.

BY RUTH WACKER

Mr. Charles McMurry has served the Geneva community for11 years. EVERYONE HAS SEEN Mr. Charles McMurry around campus doing everything from stacking chairs to fixing AC units. As facilities manager, he is constantly at work rebuilding all sorts of broken objects. Most know him as the hardworking man who can fix anything, but since he tends to be a man of few words, not many know much of his incredible life story. McMurry was born in Texas but grew up with his two younger brothers on a dairy farm in Alamogordo, New Mexico. He learned his dedicated work ethic from his father and—as those who know him would agree— this has served as one of his core characteristics. After graduating high school, he married his wife and eventually ended up working for about 45 years using photo optical instrumentation on government missile test ranges. Towards the end of this time, he spent many years helping build and manage one of these covert missile test ranges. “The area I worked for the last 20 years of my working career was in a classified environment and I could not discuss where I worked or what I was doing. I would leave the house at around 3:30 in the morning, get on an airplane, go to work, and [then] come home about 3:30 in the afternoon,” said McMurry. Even his wife did not know where he went or what he was doing there. As his career progressed, he also grew in his walk with Christ. Although he grew up in a Christian home, his family did not go to church very often. After their marriage, his wife played an essential role in encouraging him to attend church regularly. This eventually led to his rebirth as a Christian and his baptism at about age 35. An important moment in his faith was when a large fire broke out on his family’s property. 

Layout by Jayne Goodman Photos by Luke Bower Graphics by Anna Riedlinger “I had never been a very strong praying person, but when this fire broke out and started spreading very fast, I got down on my knees, out in the bushes with fire surrounding me on three sides, and [began] praying for some kind of help,” said McMurry. As an answer to his prayer, two fire crews happened to be close by and managed to put out the five-acre fire, leaving damage only to a few fence posts. This experience was the turning point in McMurry’s faith and caused him to make up his mind about Christianity. As God has continued to work in his life since then, McMurry has seen the Lord do many things, but the one that stands out most is his time at Geneva. After McMurry decided to retire from his previous job, he and his wife chose to move to San Antonio. Here, he planned to open a woodworking shop to build custom cabinets and refinish furniture. Little did he know, woodworking would end up becoming merely a hobby, and God would direct him towards Geneva instead. “I retired and came to Texas… and through some acquaintances, I got hooked up with Geneva. I’ve been extremely blessed over the past 11 years that I’ve been here. It’s been a real blessing not only to me, but to my family, and I couldn’t ask for anything better,” said McMurry. Although this job was never the plan for his retirement, McMurry is very thankful that God led him to the school. He has enjoyed being in the community and watching all the kids grow up over the years. The students and staff think very highly of him and always appreciate the dedication of this quiet man to work hard and fix just about everything. | G | 13


‘TIS NOT THE SEASON BY GRACYN FREILING

Layout by Gracyn Freiling Graphic by Anna Riedlinger

Many people look forward to Christmas with anticipation all year, but how are you supposed to recover when Christmas passes and you realize you have to wait another 365 days before your favorite holiday will return? CHRISTMAS IS ARGUABLY the most anticipated day of the year, and for many people, when the wrapping paper is thrown from the last present under the tree, the anticipation begins for next year. It is a day associated with family, good food and exchanging gifts. Lights flicker everywhere you look, the smell of fresh cookies wafts through the air, and your wallet feels a little lighter than usual. This day brings hope, love, and an undeniable Christmas spirit with it, but what happens when you wake up the next morning and Christmas is over? You realize that there are no more presents to unwrap, stockings to empty, or trees to decorate. You could choose to ignore this fact and attempt to prolong this merry holiday as long as possible, as some people do, or you could simply face the facts and begin the mourning. The inevitable “Christmas blues” have set in, and the only solution is to get past it. Here are 10 sure-fire ways to distract you from your newfound misery and to eventually recover from the treacherous “Christmas blues.”

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SHAVE YOUR LEGS FOR THE FIRST TIME SINCE NOVEMBER “Jeans season” has not done your legs any favors, but spring will be here before you know it and it’s time to prepare. Boys, this one does not necessarily apply to you unless you are curious as to the joy that freshly shaved legs bring, in which case knock yourselves out.

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GET A PEDICURE

Open-toed shoes are sparse in the winter months, even in Texas, and it’s likely that your toes have seen better days. Do us all a favor and take care of it before sandal season approaches.

START A COUNTDOWN TILL GROUNDHOG DAY

Even though the best holiday of the year has just ended, there’s no reason why you can’t start planning for the next best thing. The only holiday where a rodent gets to decide the duration of our seasons Groundhog Day.

START WORKING OUT AGAIN TO ELIMINATE SOME OF THOSE EXCESS COOKIE-CALORIES

The holiday season is full of decadent treats and fattening meals. With the abundance of delicious food constantly present, it’s difficult not to gain a pound or two during the holidays. Now that Christmas has passed, it’s the perfect time to burn off that newly acquired dad-bod.

GET TAN FOR SPRING BREAK

If after taking a glance at your bare legs you are momentarily blinded, the winter months have not been kind to you. It is recommended that you plan some sun exposure prior to Spring Break.

START PLANNING YOUR RESOLUTIONS FOR NEXT YEAR

You might as well start planning ahead for next year because let’s be honest, you know you’ve already broken this year’s resolutions.

FINALLY TURN OFF THE HALLMARK CHANNEL

It has been playing on repeat since the holiday break started, and it’s time to turn it off. As entertaining as it is to watch cheesy, predictable Christmas movies, unfortunately, it will only exacerbate your Christmas blues.

TAKE DOWN DECORATIONS

The inflatable Santa in your front yard has served his purpose, but now it’s time for him to retire. The same applies to the excessive strands of lights, plastic reindeer, and poinsettias.

PUT YOUR WINTER COAT INTO STORAGE

The time has come for you to pack up your winter coat for the year. Let’s be honest, we live in Texas and you’ve already gotten your maximum of 3 wears for the year out of it.

FINISH LEFTOVERS

What’s a holiday meal without leftovers? Nevertheless, all remnants of Christmas must be eliminated in order to cure the Christmas blues, even the leftover ham that has been sitting at the back of your fridge for weeks.|



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SOPHOMORES SHINING BRIGHT

Geneva’s student body is full of talented and unique individuals. This year’s sophomore class is no exception. These highlighted students share about their unique talents. BY GRACYN FREILING

Layout by Jayne Goodman Photos by Luke Bower Graphic by Anna Riedlinger

A GEM OF A GIRL ARE YOU IN the market for some stylish new accessories? If so, then you might want to take a look at some of the cute jewelry pieces that Gill’s Gems has to offer. Gill’s Gems is a small jewelry business run by Sophomore Gillian Loflin. She makes all of the pieces herself and delivers them to customers in cute packaging along with a handwritten letter. Loflin began the business this past summer and it has only grown since. Before Loflin started Gill’s Gems, she was a rep for another small jewelry business. This is what sparked her interest in creating her own pieces. Owning a small business is not a small endeavor. Filling orders in addition to schoolwork G| 16

Gillian Loflin’s jewelry business has take off since she created it this past year.

and extracurricular activities keeps Loflin busy. “It’s harder than it looks. Getting started out of nothing is very difficult. It’s very time consuming, but still rewarding in the end,” said Loflin. Coming up with new designs and turning them into reality is also a challenge. She added that setting a reasonable price point is difficult as well, because you have to charge more than you spent on materials, while still keeping it affordable for customers. The part that makes it all worthwhile for her is seeing people wearing her designs. “It makes my heart all warm and fuzzy! It’s nice to see people enjoying something that I put a lot of hard work into,” Loflin said.


WORKS OF HEART If you’ve had the chance to venture over to the Logic School Campus to take a look at the stunning mural of Middle Earth in Logic School Headmaster Jeff Jones’ room, then you already know the level of intricacy that it contains. It was painted by Sophomores Jayne Goodman, Catarina Flores, Abby Albracht, Elle Albracht and Brooke Secor in their free time. It was not a small project either. Each person spent anywhere from 30-48 hours on the mural. When Art Instructor Cathy Lester asked these art students if they were interested in taking on the project, they enthusiastically accepted. “We thought it would be a fun and rewarding challenge,” said Flores. Sophmore girls spent many hours The girls spent many long hours over painting a mural of Middle Earth for the Logic School campus. several weekends to finish the project, running into several bumps in the road along the way. Secor said that keeping the map in the same position on the projector was the hardest part, while Flores said that color complications and identifying names on the map proved the most difficult. Goodman and the Albrachts added that standing on the exceedingly tall ladder to paint was nerve-wracking. “It was so wobbly,” said Goodman. Even through the difficulties, the project proved to be very rewarding. “The best part was the fact that we were actually able to complete such a large project,” said Secor.

SOCCER GOALS Sophomore Elise Valdez has a contagious enthusiasm that is impossible to ignore. Anyone who has spoken to her for even a minute or two can see this. This enthusiasm and kindness that she carries with her wherever she goes makes her such a great teammate on the soccer field. Valdez began playing soccer at the YMCA when she was seven years old, but didn’t start to really become competitive until she was ten. She has played club for the past six years and is playing on the school team this year as well. Valdez is a fierce defender and a great asset to any team that she plays for. However, playing soccer has taught her more than just ball skills. “Soccer has helped me learn teamwork and perseverance,” Valdez said, “learning how not to blame one person is vital.” She added that the biggest struggle on the field is keeping the team close like a family and stressed the importance of encouragement to accomplish this. |

SOCCER HAS HELPED ME LEARN TEAMWORK AND PERSEVERANCE

Elise Valdez has played soccer since she was seven years old and continues to improve her skill with constant practice.



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MASTERING THE MEDITERRANEAN The Junior year Europe trip is a highlight of the Rhetoric School experience. Here is a list of tips from a senior intended to help the juniors get the most out of their upcoming adventure. BY LAUREN JARVIS

Layout by Lauren Jarvis Photos by Lauren Jarvis Graphics by Anna Reidlinger

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I COUNTED DOWN the days, crossing off the boxes on my calendar until the time when I finally boarded the plane. We had been thinking about and working for this trip since freshman year and it was finally here. So much had gone into this trip and I wanted it to be perfect. I wanted to do as much as I possibly could to make it the best trip my class would ever go on. I had always heard how amazing the Europe trip was, but I didn’t realize just how amazing the experience really is until I got there. The first day, we spent a couple hours walking through the streets of Florecne. I was completely amazed by the beauty of absolutely everything there. The buildings looked like something out of a storybook. I had the biggest smile on my face the whole time because we were finally in Europe, and it was everything I dreamt it would be. That night, we got gelato and it was delicious. After that, we walked around the square and the Duomo, and the boys haggled with some creepy vendors. Being with your friends in such a beautiful place is such a blessing. I swear they just do things better in Europe. However, there are a couple things I wish I would have done differently on our travels. Whether you follow this advice or not, you will have a great time.

Senior Brenna McBroom holds on to her passport after a long plane ride. Italy is famous for its delicious gelato.

TRAVEL TIPS •First of all (and most important) make sure to soak it all in! Ten days sounds like a lot, but it goes by fast. •Don’t pack too light or too heavy. •Bring a whole bunch of snacks for the airplane. •Sit next to someone you can sleep on or talk to on all the buses and air planes. •Don’t make a big deal about who you room with. You’ll end up interacting with almost everyone anyway. •Get to know the various tour guides. P.S. John is THE BEST. •If you see something you like, BUY IT IMMEDIATELY. There are so many things I wish I would have bought. •Capture the experience in some way, whether it be by picture, video or journaling. You are going to want some way to remember everything you did. •If your parents go with you, try to spend some time with them too instead of just your friends. •Try and get to know other people in your grade. Don’t always walk around with your closest friends. •Get to know Mrs. Ward. She is an amazing woman and works really hard to put the trip together for us. •EAT ALL THE GELATO! •Thank your parents when you come home. This is a trip you will look back on for years to come.| 

Zach Scott and Shelby Miller shop for souvenirs in the street markets.

Seeing the Acropolis is one of the highlights of a classical education. Shelby Miller and Lauren Jarvis smile while touring the Coliseum.

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A FRESH TAKE ON THE FACETS OF WINTER SPORTS. PHOTO BY ASTON LANDIS

A FRESH TAKE ON THE FACETS OF WINTER SPORTS. PHOTO BY ASHTON LANDIS


REMEMBERING BASKETBALL’S

GREATEST OF ALL TIME BY ANSON EGGERSS Layout by Aisling Ayers

Nick Thornton

Trey Greenlees

Zack Jonas

Jake Martin

BOYS STARTING 5 Nick Thornton (point guard) (‘13) “Best ball handler.” Trey Greenlees (shooting guard) (‘11) “Best baseline drive.” Zack Jonas (center) (‘15) “6’ 6” beast.” Jake Martin (small forward) (‘14) “Best rebounder.” David Winston (power forward) (‘11) “Did it all.”

BOYS BENCH Zach Arthur (‘17) “Best finisher around the rim.” Logan Ward (‘14) “Floor general.” Nolan Townsend (’13) “Original bruiser.” Kade Leeder (’14) “Best shooter: his threes were always cash money.” David Crossland (‘16) “Greatest shooter.”

MEN’S FACULTY STARTING 5 Aaron Southwick (point guard) “Gets ‘em with that nasty crossover.” Ben Vis (shooting guard) “Cash money from the corner.” James Grover (center) “Posts up all day.” Rodney Lloyd (small forward) “The wise veteran.” Dirk Russel (power forward) “Hits the lefty J every time.”

MEN’S FACULTY BENCH Shawn Harrild “The bruiser: always getting in fights.” Howard Short “Calculates the trajectory of the ball perfectly.” Dodd Naiser “Runs up the score with childlike wonder.” Rick Poole “Can take a charge like a boss.” Royal Brown “Best trash talker.”

David Winston


Abby Leeder

Kendell Lipe

Ally Biedenharn

Caroline Lunsford

Kyrsten Budde

GIRLS STARTING 5 Abby Leeder (point guard) (‘12) “Stellar outside shots complete with great ball handling.” Kendell Lipe (shooting guard) (‘11) “That one player who’s good at literally everything.” Ally Biedenharn (center) (‘11) “The rebounding machine.” Caroline Lunsford (small forward) (‘15) “Too much scoring.” Kyrsten Budde (‘11) “A defensive powerhouse.”

GIRLS BENCH Addie Lipe (‘16) “Incredible handling skills and excellent shots.” Mariah Lowry (‘17) “Toughest in the paint.” Morgan Fowler (‘11) “A true team player.” Emma Ingram (’16) “A three point legend.”

WOMEN’S FACULTY STARTING 5 Catherine Davis (point guard) “The give-and-go master.” Chelsie Jacobson (shooting guard) “The encouraging teammate.” Susan Greenlees (center) “Dunks from the three point line.” Gradi Evans (small forward) “100% from the free throw line.” Shelly Ward (power forward) “Throw those elbows.”

WOMEN’S FACULTY BENCH Jill Daniels “Best follow-through.” Christina Jeffcoat “Backdoor cuts on fleek.” Erin Thomas “Energy right as she steps onto the court.” Hillary Short “Soli Deo Gloria.” Debbie Georgelos “Her spin move destroys the defense.”


Music can only add to the hype and excitement of sports. Here are the top seven songs from Winter sports to add to your Spotify playlist. COMPLIED BY CARISSA GEORGELOS

BASKETBALL

JAMS

Layout by Gabi Griffey

“THUNDER” Imagine Dragons “DYNAMITE” Taio Cruz

GENEVA

“MARIA” Justin Bieber “TOUCHDOWN” Derek Minor “ANIMALS” Maroon Five “BEST LOVE SONG” T Pain, Chris Brown “CHAINS” Nick Jonas “BROKE” Lecrae “DNOU” KB “GREEN LIGHTS” NF “DUNK CONTEST” Andy Mineo and Wordsplayed “TEMPO” KB “BE ME” Tedashii “OUTCAST” NF

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SWIM

SOCCER

“ROBIN HOOD AND LITTLE JOHN” John Strachan

“FETTUCCINE” 1k Phew

“50 WAYS TO SAY GOODBYE” Train

“FIREFLIES” Owl City

“CRUISE” Florida Georgia Line

“DIRTY WATER” Lecrae

“COTTON EYED JOE” Rednex

“SOBER” Childish Gambino

“HOUSE PARTY” Sam Hunt

“RIDING ON THE WIND” Judas Priest

“RUDE” Magic

“DEVIL’S CHILD” Judas Priest

“LET HER GO” Passenger

“THUNDER” Imagine Dragons

“HOW TO SAVE A LIFE” The Fray

“WHATEVER IT TAKES” Imagine Dragons

“UPTOWN FUNK” Mark Bronson (ft. Bruno Mars)

“FEELS LIKE SUMMER” Weezer

“WAGON WHEEL” Darius Rucker

“CHAMPION” Fall-Out Boy

“BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY” Queen

“WALK ON WATER” Thirty Seconds till Summer

“LET THE BODIES HIT THE FLOOR” Drowning Pool

“VICTORY” Will and Alexis

“THE LAZY SONG” Bruno Mars

“GET BACK UP” Toby Mac

“RADIOACTIVE” Imagine Dragons

“I DARE YOU” Bea Miller 

G | 25


She really can do it all. Becky Doran finds time to coach soccer in her “spare time.� G| 26


DOCTOR

MOM

COACH

ATHLETE

ALL OF THE ABOVE

Becky Doran, Geneva mom of five and soccer coach, tells her journey with soccer and how it lead to her passion for coaching.

IT’S 7: 00 A.M. and Becky Doran has already been up for 18 hours straight. As a wife, mother of five, soccer coach, educator and emergency room doctor, Doran has her hands full but still manages to never drop the ball. Basketball, softball, soccer, volleyball, ballet, you name it…Doran has played it. Starting at the age of four, Doran’s passion for sports was kindled and it never dimmed. Little did Doran know that soccer would stick with her for the rest of her life. Doran played all through her high school and college years. After graduating from high school in Houston, Texas, she moved to San Antonio for college where she met her husband, Randy. She attended Trinity University and played soccer all four years. During her freshman year, she played right defender, and she was a center-midfielder for her sophomore through senior years. During her junior and senior years, Doran was able to go to the NCAA playoffs, and she was an All-American in her senior year. Being an All-American meant that she would receive a post-graduate scholarship which eventually paid for the first part of medical school. Doran then stayed in San Antonio for medical school and went into residency in Indiana where she lived for eight years. Her husband was then offered a job back in San Antonio. The Dorans prayed about it and decided to move back to Texas where they would start a family. Between all of the children and their activities, there is never a dull moment in the Doran household. Doran has five kids: Samantha (14), Alexandria (11), Chase (8), Trevor (5) and Charlotte (14 months). The kids are all involved in sports and have different sports going on all year. Doran also coaches for miscellaneous sports teams that her children are involved in. Doran came to Geneva when she was looking for a place to put her daughter, Sam, into kindergarten. In the beginning, she tried to enroll her in public school, but it quickly became apparent that public school was not the place for her daughter. Doran was resistant to look at Geneva because she had heard that Geneva was too traditional. A few weeks later, her family was attending a party with Mr. Doran’s

BY ASHTON LANDIS

Layout by Ashton Landis Photos by Ashton Landis Graphics by Anson Eggerss

boss and his wife. It just so happened that his boss’ wife was the president of the booster club at Geneva. His wife invited Doran to an open house at Geneva which she originally blew off. When Doran arrived home, her husband told her that she really should go to the open house because his boss’ wife was expecting her to come. She complied and reluctantly attended. The open house happened to be at the first grade assembly; Doran was impressed by the knowledge of these first graders. Immediately, she knew that this was the right place for her family. After settling into Geneva, Doran found herself frequently thinking about the Geneva athletics program. One day, Doran was in Starbucks and saw a man in front of her wearing a Geneva Soccer shirt. Up until this point, Doran was unaware that Geneva

DORAN LOVED COACHING AND THE JOB STUCK.



had a soccer program. Her curiosity got the best of her, and she asked the man about the soccer team. He informed her that he was the head soccer coach and was starting up the soccer program at Geneva. They began talking, and Doran voiced her thoughts on having a girls soccer team as well. The next year, Geneva started a girls soccer team and she was thrilled. When plans fell through for a prospective coach, Doran was asked by former Athletic Director Scott Stolle if she would fill in until they could find a permanent coach in Logic School. She loved coaching the team and the job stuck. This is her fifth year to coach and is now helping Coach Mary Moris coach Rhetoric as well. Doran expressed that coaching at Geneva is a one-of-a-kind experience. She loves coaching for Geneva because it breaks the mold and is mission focused and kingdom minded rather than just being focused on the win. Doran’s love for coaching comes from her appreciation of the way soccer shapes people’s personalities and lifestyles. She instills the values of teamwork, selflessness and perseverance in her team.|

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EASY WHEEZY, LEMON SQUEEZY Junior Nathan Zuniga struggles to catch a breath as he endures the wrath of the swimming pool.

G| 28

Zuniga sulks as he warms himself in the comfort of his Jamaican towel.

BY NATHAN ZUNIGA Layout by Anson Eggerss Photos by Ashton Landis

OH, SO YOU thought I was done with my journey through the world of sports? Do you really think I would give up that easy? If you said, “Yes, Nathan, we all expected you to go home, refill your inhaler prescription and give up,” then you would be wrong! Well, I did refill my prescription (170 puffs, how exciting!), and I thought about giving up for several hours, but Nathan Zuniga is back for the sequel. There is no stopping him now! Actually, please stop me. I may have an asthma attack if you don’t. If you can’t guess what sport I tried out for this time, here’s a clue: *gasp of air* *drowning sounds* *splashing* *gulp of water* *choking sounds* *another gasp of air.* If you guessed soccer, stop reading and go home. For the people who guessed swimming, then congratulations, you get nothing (similar to my experience while swimming—I got nothing out of it except for the reeking scent of chlorine). Let me preface this by saying I was absolutely terrified to do this. Not only was I going to try a sport that I have little to no experience in, but I was also going to look absolutely stupid while doing it. My initial thought of possibly trying this sport was very disturbing because all I could think of was guys having to wear speedos…speedos. Want to try picturing me in a speedo? No, no you don’t. You’re welcome for that beautifully painted image in your head, by the way. I am also not the biggest fan of being shirtless in front of other people so just the thought of me rocking a speedo with no shirt just seemed very, very wrong. And when something’s wrong, what do you do? You put on a shirt and some swim trunks and dive right in with the little dignity you have left. The best thing about this whole experience was that there were barely


WANT TO TRY PICTURING ME IN A SPEEDO? NO, NO YOU DON’T.

Nathan gasps for air after a lap around the pool.

any people there to see me drown and suffer. I was very happy to have senior Carissa Georgelos, freshmen Katie-Grace Styles and Alexa Georgelos by my side throughout this very painful process. The first thing they did was take me to this very sketchy closet to grab “swim gear.” I’m pretty sure it was a secret cellar for dead human carcasses for the swim coach to feast upon. Gotta love the man, but there was something about him that just read “cannibal.” Too far? Anyway, we grabbed our gear: flippers, a kick board and a strange piece of foam to put between your legs. I’m kind of sad because I never got to use the flippers and look like a majestic fish, but oh well. They were five sizes too small anyway. Another huge fear I had about this was that I thought the water was going to be 50 degrees. After dipping my toe in, I was surprised to see that it was actually really warm. This proved to work against me later on; I’ll explain. Once I got in the pool and snapped on my very tight goggles that I found at the bottom of a dirty bin in my garage, I instantly regretted my decision to do this. I mean, seriously, those goggles feel like they are suctioning your eyeballs out of their sockets. And, every 30 seconds you have to extract the goggles off of your face so you can clean the fog off the lenses. And the worst part is that you will just have to accept the fact that that rubbery part that is strapped to the back of your head will unapologetically rub up against your hair and try its hardest to rip your scalp off. I mean, I could just wear a swim cap. But come on, I need to have a little dignity left. We started the warm-up which consisted of a nice, leisurely swim of about, oh I don’t know, 32 laps. Yeah, you bet I gave up after two laps. At first it wasn’t so bad; I almost believed in myself for a second. But then I realized that I would surely drown if I kept going. Using the kick board

didn’t even help much; it just put more strain on my legs (which obviously don’t need to work out, because you already know I’ve got a beautiful set of calves). And by that I mean they actually look like two baby cows. Through the whole process of swimming, I think I swallowed enough water to quench the thirst of a whole country in Africa. I think the scent of chlorine started to get to my head. I started to question my existence in that very pool and why swimming is even a thing. Think about it: we didn’t evolve from fish, so who thought that jumping into a pit of water and trying to survive was a good idea? Humans weren’t made to kick around in water. It’s basically just a survival instinct we don’t need any more. Really, this whole sport is just dropping people into a death trap to see who would be the fastest at getting out. We are not fish, we are humans. Let’s act like it. After the long, agonizing warm-up that I quit after 10 laps, we actually started practice. We had to do a lap of backstroke, breast stroke, freestyle and butterfly (I think), repeated four times. Once I finished doing breast stroke I completely shut down. Remember when I said that the warm water would work against me? Well, once I stepped out of the pool, the sensation started. This sensation quickly turned into hypothermia. But it was a great time to empty my inhaler prescription and try to keep my freezing, soaked shirt from sticking to my body, making me look like a cold, depressed walrus. I walked away from practice cold, wet and defeated. What? Did you actually think I would turn out to be a pro swimmer? We’re talking about Nathan Zuniga here, the person who can hardly breathe air. If I didn’t have a fear of drowning before this, I certainly do now! It ain’t easy being wheezy, but this asthmatic will keep swimming till he drowns.| 

G | 29


THE WRIGHT WAY TO WORKOUT

We all know Coach Wright is known for her buttkicking workouts. If you’re feeling self-motivated, she has made one to kick off that post-holiday fluff. BY BRADEN HALL

Layout by Aisling Ayers Photos by Ashton Landis Graphics by Anson Eggerss

Coach Karen Wright works hard to keep the Geneva teams in shape and she wants to do the same for you.

DID YOU WAKE up from your two week hibernation during Christmas break only to look down and find that your eggnog belly has covered your once flawless view of your feet? It’s time to drag yourself out of your holiday food coma. Our beloved trainer, Coach Karen Wright, knows how you feel and is here to help. Here are some of her workouts to help get you back to wherever you were before the holidays just in time for Spring Break. Check out the workout in action on The Geneva Quarterly’s website: www. genevaquarterly.com. G| 30


Junior Humanities teacher Paul Johnson is a perfexct fit for the lazier types of workouts — like the ones Mr. Shelton designed in the Talon

Want to see a workout made for all of the Mr. Johnsons in your life? Check out “The Talon” for an exclusive workout by Mr. Shelton himself based on Coach Wright’s exercise names.



G | 31


To see how to perform each exercise below, check out The Geneva Quarterly’s website: www. genevaquarterly.com.

DAY 1

WEEK 1

WEEK 2

WEEK 3

WEEK 4

SB Bench Press Into pushups

LT 3x10 x8

LT 3x10 x8

LT+3x10 xl0

LT+3x10 xl0

Squats on BOSU With Med Ball

3x10

3x10

3x12

3x12

Pull ups into Burpees

4x6 x8

4x6 x8

4x8 xl0

4x8 xl0

Side Lunge with Crossover

3x6 each

3x6 each

3x8 each

3x8 each

WT Step ups

3x6 each

3x6 each

3x8 each

3x8 each

Military Press into UprightRow

2x8 each

2x8 each

2x10 each

2x10 each

Superman

3x10 each

3x10 each

3x12 each

3x12 each

Vups into Hallows

3x:45 sec

3x:45 sec

3x 1:00

3x 1:00

DAY 2

WEEK 1

WEEK 2

WEEK 3

WEEK 4

Squats into Wall Sit

12,10,8 3x:30sec

12,10,8 3x:30sec

12,10,8 3x:45sec

12,10,8 3x:45sec

Incline DB Bench

12,10,8,12

same

same

WT Lunges into DB Push/Pull

2x6 each 2x8 each

2x6 each 2x8 each

2x8 each 2x8 each

2x8 each 2x8 each

Single Leg Lift on Bench

3x8 each leg

3x8 ea leg

3x10 ea leg

3x10 ea leg

YWTL’s

3x8 each

3x8 ea

3x10 ea

3x10 ea

Planks on BOSU

3x:45 sec

3x:45 sec

3x 1:00

3x 1:00

3x8 each 3x10 ea

3x8 each 3x10 ea

3x10 each 3x10 ea

3x10 each 3x10 ea

3x8 each

3x10 each

3x10 each

Bicep Curl into Tricep Press Calf Raises In/Out/ Fwd

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3x8 each

same

EQUIPMENT NEEDED AND ABBREVIATIONS REFERENCED: SB: Stability Ball DB: dumbbell BOSU: domed balance ball Step Ups: Steps are needed Med Ball: weighted medicine ball Bench: bench press WT: weighted (use dumbells)


OVER LOOK

ED

HEROES THAT GO UNSUNG

Under-appreciation for many parts of sports is common. Here is a look at what it’s really like being in these unpopular roles. 

G | 33


ATHLETES HAVE ALWAYS earned some sort of recognition for their, well…athletic abilities. Huge amounts of money, food, time and screaming go into the recognition of these talented athletes. But has anyone ever taken the time to look at the unappreciated aspects of these sports? Consider soccer. Everyone watches the players running up and down and up and down…and up and down the field—waiting for them to score a goal. But how much attention does someone like the goalie actually get in these games (and no, the goalie’s

parents don’t count). Or even in basketball games, many assume that once someone slips on that black and white striped shirt and goes by the title of “ref,” they instantly have a lower sports IQ than you. Under-appreciation for small yet significant roles is prominent in almost all sports. But sometimes, there is just under-appreciation for the sport as a whole (I will just go ahead and say what you’re all thinking: swimming). So, here are a few Q&A’s on what it’s actually like playing these roles that lack the recognition they deserve.

ALL THREE OF THESE POSITIONS TAKE RIDICULOUS AMOUNTS OF PATIENCE, ENDURANCE AND WILL-POWER. I THINK BEING KICKED IN THE FACE, SCREAMED AT BY WACK-JOB PARENTS AND SHAVING OFF MANLY LEG HAIR FOR THE SAKE OF THE SPORT DESERVES SOME RECOGNITION.

SO, LADIES AND GENTLEMEN,

PAY YOUR DUES. Soccer goalie and sophomore MacKenzie FitzGerald shared some insight from her life inside the goal.

GRIFFEY: Do you ever feel like a one-man team being alone on one side of the field? FITZGERALD: Well, usually when [my team] is doing badly I feel connected to them because then I have a big part in the loss, and well…they were on my side a lot. GRIFFEY: What is your biggest fear about being a goalie? FITZGERALD: Not catching a really easy ball and letting the other team score, because then it’s all on me. GRIFFEY: Do you have any secret habits as a goalie? FITZGERALD: I definitely stop watching the game

FITZGERALD, MACKENZIE

sometimes, which is really bad. But it’s hard not to get distracted sometimes (especially when your team is so good). GRIFFEY: Do you ever pick flowers or cloud watch? FITZGERALD: When I was goalie for YMCA for six years, that’s all I really did. My team was really good. GRIFFEY: How do you identify with the internetfamous Scott Sterling? FITZGERALD: I get kicked in the face at least twice a season. I don’t mean to cry, the tears just start falling out.

Clearly, the life of a goalie is not as easy as one might think. Suffering from severe distraction, getting whacked in the face and real life "Scott Sterling" incidents are all very possible. G| 34 | FEATURE


Swimmer and senior Austin Salter (yes, there is a swim team) shares experiences from his everyday struggles as a swimmer.

GRIFFEY: What do you think people think about swimming? SALTER: I’m not sure anyone really knows what swimming is. I’m sure the image they get in their head is that of an 80-year-old woman doing water aerobics.

SALTER, AUSTIN

swallow on any given day? SALTER: Well let’s just say you have to use the restroom a lot after a swim. GRIFFEY: Is shaving required for male swimmers? SALTER: At an upper level guys start to wear tech suits, which are extremely tight. So, if their hair is too long they pop out of the suit and create drag. This drag can cost you a small amount of time that may seem insignificant, but it can be crucial in a race.

GRIFFEY: Why do most swimmers do morning practice? SALTER: I like it better because I feel more sluggish in the afternoons. The cold water in the morning wakes you up.

GRIFFEY: What is the advantage to wearing a Speedo rather than a compression suit? SALTER: Guys like to do it. It’s kinda a right of passage; there is serious social pressure. I would say 98% of high school and college age swimmers wear Speedos. But it definitely makes for some interesting team pictures.

GRIFFEY: Do you get thirsty even though you’re in water? SALTER: Well, I don’t because I am like the whale in “Finding Nemo.” The water just comes in! GRIFFEY: How much water do you think you

Swimmers definitely get the award for most insane. There must be some genetic mutation that causes the desire to jump into cold water at 5 A.M. Swimming takes some serious devotion and should receive more attention.

Basketball referee Ralph Turner (also known as Ralph Sr. since he refs with his son whose name also happens to be Ralph) shares the ups and downs of refereeing.

GRIFFEY: What got you into refereeing? TURNER: I was playing basketball in a league in California and one of the refs asked me to be on his team. He was the one who introduced me to refereeing.

TURNER, RALPH

has said to you or called you? TURNER: Players are usually well-behaved….they don’t want to get kicked out. GRIFFEY: What’s the funniest incident you had happen during a game with either a player or a coach? TURNER: The coach was arguing with me but was agreeing with me and was admitting he was wrong. He didn’t realize it, and when he did he just started cracking up.

GRIFFEY: What do you like most about refereeing? TURNER: I just love basketball. Refereeing keeps me around the game. GRIFFEY: What is the most insane thing a parent has said to you during a game? TURNER: 'Do you wanna use my glasses, because yours clearly aren’t working.'

GRIFFEY: As a referee, do you feel underappreciated? TURNER: No. The reason I don’t is because people don’t understand how hard it really is. But I also believe we should be held accountable and expected to do a good job. Also, when my boys were playing I never got a call wrong from the stands.

GRIFFEY: How do you deal with these crazy parents? TURNER: We are actually pretty good refs. So, we don’t have a lot of crazy parent comments, but I am pretty good at tuning the crowd out. GRIFFEY: What is the most bizarre thing a player

Turner definitely has perfected his refereeing game over the years. Understanding that people will not always be civilized, he deals with them in a classy manner. This makes his “Ralphing” something that should certainly be appreciated. | 

G | 35


TAKE A SPRINT BACK IN TIME What did our teachers do in high school besides hit the books? Here is a look into their lives as athletes, or shall I say their “Glory Days.”

DO YOU EVER get that weird feeling when you see one of your teachers at HEB or Whataburger like something isn’t quite right or is out of place? It’s just strange to see your teacher who was standing in front of you, wearing dress pants and a button-down shirt and assigning you homework five hours ago, now in the frozen pizza section in an old Hawaiian shirt. ‘So teachers really do have lives outside of school,’ you think. This startling realization certainly has never crossed your mind before. But the idea of your teachers before they started working at Geneva, maybe even when they were your age, is absolutely incomprehensible. Could Dr. Rosheger have been a jock? Maybe Mrs. Greenlees was the best athlete in the school? And maybe, just maybe, Mr. Harrild may have played a couple of minutes in football. If you take up the task of digging into the ancient past of Geneva Rhetoric school teachers, you might discover the athletic endeavors that they attempted in high school. Fair warning: The results, as expected, may shock you into disbelief. Mr. Russell (but the high school version, so one would assume that he went by “Dirk”) was a shooting guard for his school’s basketball team and played about twenty minutes a game. Russell compared his high school skills to Old Manu Ginobili: unconventional, slightly erratic and with only a few short G| 36

Catherine Davis

BY AISLING AYERS

Layout by Aisling Ayers Photos by Ashton Landis Graphics by Anna Riedlinger

Dirk Russell

Susan Greenlees

Shawn Harrild

Debbie Georgelos

Rick Poole

Royal Brown

John Rosheger

Catherine Davis

Dirk Russell


FOOTBALL

GOLF

ANCIENT ATHLETES

GOLF SOCCER VOLLEYBALL

the curious high school sports history of Dr. John Rosheger. Wrestling was Rosheger’s sport. And yes, you read that right: wrestling. Rosheger walked the halls of his high school in Alaska known as a wrestler who competed and even wore a singlet. Try not to dwell on that image for too long. Apparently, wrestling was popular at his school, especially in the long winter months. Rosheger recalls a humiliating moment when he threw up during a match after overeating beforehand. He remembered that no one even skipped a beat, not even his opponent! Rosheger advocates for a wider appreciation of high school wrestling in Texas. Good luck getting that one approved by Mr. Graham. Finally, if Rosheger could take on any faculty member at the school, he would choose the fit, strong, huge and athletic Dr. Short as his opponent. Although this would be a challenge, it would be an accomplishment to take him down. So, the next time you see that teacher in the frozen pizza section of HEB, don’t be too quick to keep your head down and keep walking. Think about the fact that your teacher was once your age: turning in homework, studying for tests, going to pep rallies and maybe even competing in a wrestling match or two.|

SOCCER

WRESTLING

Dr. Rosheger

Mrs. Greenlees Mr. Russell

Mr. Brown Mrs. Georgelos

VOLLEYBALL

TRACK & CROSS COUNTRY

FOOTBALL

BASKETBALL

Mrs. Greenlees Mrs. Davis Mrs. Lester Dr. Short Mr. Harrild Mr. Russell Mr. Shelton

WRESTLING

TRACK BASEBALL BASKETBALL

bursts of greatness (he later clarified that these were short bursts of mediocrity, not greatness, in case anyone was skeptical). He never received a technical foul and claims that, even though he has already beaten Dr. Rosheger on the court in one-on-one, he could easily do it again (and would enjoy it). Dr. Rosheger has not yet commented on this guaranteed victory for Mr. Russell. Meanwhile, Mrs. Davis (or Catherine, for the sake of accuracy) bumped, set and spiked her way to starting varsity setter in her glory years of high school. Davis explains that the athletes at her school were indeed the “cool kids,” and speculates on how she was cool then, now being a freshman math teacher. Unfortunately, Davis did let the game go to her head. She said that she once, albeit unknowingly, sabotaged her team by choosing not to set to the coach’s favorite player, causing her team to suffer a big loss. Tsk tsk, high school Davis, you may have to be sent Coach Vaughn’s way for that one. Next, let’s take a look at high school Mr. Shawn Harrild. Harrild played football his freshman year in the positions of offensive line and defensive tackle. While Dr. Short was playing college football at the University of North Texas, Harrild admits that he did indeed warm the bench for the first half of the season and received the “cleanest jersey” award from his teammates (It’s okay, it happens to the best of us). Harrild claims that part of the reason for his time on the bench was because he was the lightest lineman on the team. Obviously, Harrild did not go to Geneva and did not have Coach Wright as a conditioning coach, and that shouldn’t be held against him. Not every school can be as lucky as Geneva. Sadly, Harrild didn’t have the grades to keep it up and had to quit football after his first year. Today, Harrild would recruit Mrs. Daniels onto his dream team because she could wreck every player she came into contact with: that much is probably true. And last, but certainly not least, let’s explore

Mrs. Georgelos Mr. Ryden Dr. Short

Mrs. Greenlees Mrs. Davis Mr. Russell Mr. Southwick



BASEBALL

Mr. Poole Mr. Shelton Mr. Russell Mr. Southwick

G | 37


BIG PICT EXPLORING TOPICS THAT HAVE IMPACTS BEYOND GENEVA PHOTO BY CHARLOTTE WALKER


URE


THEY’RE ON BY RYANNE FITZGERALD

Layout by Ryanne FitzGerald Photos courtesy of the Cupit family and Jessica Gombert

On his mission trip to Zambia, Jack Cupit made bonds that he will never forget with the children there. G| 40


A MISSION The Cupit family has recently been involved in mission work which led them to adoption. Jack Cupit elaborates on these experiences that changed his worldview.

LIVING IN AMERICA where we have a Whataburger, a Chickfil-a or a Starbucks on every corner can make us numb to the fact that in some parts of the world people are starving. In Zambia, a country of 14 million people, 80% of the rural population lives in abject poverty. In fact, 350,000 people in Zambia do not have access to regular food supply. It is hard to wake up to the fact that people are in need unless you travel to those places and see it for yourself. Sophomore Jack Cupit traveled to Africa in 2012, not knowing that his life would be changed forever. He started on the trip open-minded and nervous, but little did he know he would come home saved by Christ, and with a little sister. Jack and his older sister senior Maddie previously attended Covenant Christian Academy in Houston, and they had fellow classmates and teachers who would come back from summer break raving about missionary trips they had gone on with their families. This sparked the inspiration to go for the rest of the family. Brett and Dottie, parents of the Cupits, felt called by God to help in Zambia the following summer. Jack said, “I was actually pretty nervous going into my first trip… I didn’t realize until the week before leaving that I was about to be across the world on another continent.” All the nerves ceased once the family reached the capital of Zambia, Lusaka. They received a warm welcome full of smiles and joy. On a typical day they spent their time sharing Bible studies, worshipping through music, and telling stories about the works God had done in their lives. While all these activities were amazing, the best part of the day was blessing time. “You got your own personal time with a kid and a translator to pray over them and bless them,” Jack Cupit explained, “It was by far the best thing we did.” Family Legacy is a mission organization based in Fort Worth that has been changing lives since 2000. The trip they organize includes a 17 hour flight, and seven days in Lusaka spent teaching and helping the orphans in their organization. Family Legacy’s mission statement is to transform families and individual lives through engaging with orphans and showing God’s love. Their belief is that while helping these children you could be transforming their lives, and in the process personally growing spiritually. As Family Legacy helps children in need through their sponsorship program, they offer adoption and fostering services as well. While on the trip, the Cupits decided to adopt 

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ANY LOVE I WAS ABLE TO SHOW THEM WAS GOD’S LOVE IN ME. Zambia is a very impoverished country, and mission trips like these impact the lives of the people there for the better.

and foster. They chose to open their home to multiple foster children, and one just clicked perfectly with their family. Josie was only two-weeks old when they first fostered her, and yet it only took one weekend to decide they wanted her to be a part of their lives. The family started all the paper work and a year later they had a baby sister. “She is sassy and a ball of fun… I can’t imagine life without her,” Jack said. This summer, Grammar school Headmaster Jessica Gombert went on a similar trip with the organization; however, Gombert went as a teacher and received a whole different experience. She spent the days teaching phonics and math, while also sharing the love of Christ. “Any love I was able to show them was God’s love in me,” Gombert said. Teaching is such an important part of Family Legacy because the knowledge helps to break the cycle of poverty in the children’s lives. It leads them to a better path. Gombert said, “If I asked them how they were feeling, they would respond by saying, ‘We are blessed and highly favored.’ How often in Boerne do we respond this way?” She added, “Most of the time the kids were teaching me.” Gombert wanted to go on this trip as part of a sabbatical, but with donor support she was also G| 42 | FEATURE

able to take her husband Ronnie and son Grant, a sophomore at Messiah College. Mr. Gombert and Grant did the traditional part of the camp while Mrs. Gombert went each day to teach. While mission trips are a great way to delve into God’s word and see life anew, sadness comes along with it. “It’s really hard knowing you have become friends with good kids, and once you leave there is only so much you can do. They are beautiful people who deserve so much better,” Cupit said. The sadness is something you can’t always avoid, but the joy the organization brings seems to overcome it. Cupit explains that telling someone about Jesus and bringing that light into a life is a happiness that will last forever. Although there can be a sadness to saying goodbye to new connections, mission trips are still rewarding. You spend a lot of time getting to know the kids when you hang out with them at your ‘Legacy Lodge.’ The organization made houses for anyone who helps on the trips. Each family is assigned to spend the day with a few of the many children, and the kids you are assigned to can come into the lodge and just hang out. In addition to teaching the kids about God, workers are able to have time to build a common ground of trust and kindness, just like in any other friendship.


Gombert was glad to serve these children, and their joy in return was inspiring.

Mission trips are an amazing way to serve the Lord and spread his word. You can help others in need and grow in your faith. Serving can be a humbling process. It forces one to change one’s perspective on life, and suddenly, the things that seemed so big are now so small. Cupit explained that it can completely change you as a person, making you slow to anger and fast to patience; he even said he doesn’t get mad at as many things now. We can become more thankful for things in life that are so easy to take for granted, and we could all use a reminder every now and then, especially at Geneva. Mrs. Gombert said the hope these kids have in the hard times is truly inspiring. The kids have gratitude, perseverance, and joy, yet they don’t even have a pencil of their own. Seeing the kids’ hearts beam is the inspiration we all need to get out of our comfort zones and make a difference. Boerne is an affluent community where it is easy to take the Hill Country life for granted, but it can lead to complacency and entitlement. How many times can someone get angry when something doesn’t go their way? Abundance can be a trap and can affect people negatively when they have to go without basic comforts. Seeing children grateful for the small things is a good reminder. “We need to remember that the world is not our home,” Gombert said. This is a beautiful reminder that we are the Lord’s vessels, and we are meant for something bigger than ourselves.”| 

GETTING INVOLVED IS EASIER THAN IT SOUNDS. *If you don’t have time to fly all the way over to Africa, you can easily sponsor a child online through Family Legacy’s website: familylegacy.com. You have the opportunity to help a child in Zambia all the way from Texas. You can sponsor a child or provide tuition for them to go to school. *If you indeed do want to fly to Africa, you can get a one-on-one experience with a child and make lasting memories. Slots for trips are closing as this mission organization is getting more popular. A trip costs around $4,950 per person, but you are also paying for a ticket to get a child to the camp in Lusaka, Zambia. There are about 10 children to every 1 American helping out. There are seven weeks throughout the summer, and only two are still open. Others have limited availability or a waiting list. This is something your whole family can do.|

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WALKER ROUND THE WORLD As sophomore, Charlotte Walker, continues in her travel year, she writes about meeting the people who often go unnoticed in your travels through Europe. Each issue of the Quarterly chronicles part of her adventure.

During her hike in Cinque Terra, Walker stopped to snap a picture of the town of Corniglia. G| 44


Outside the window of their Airbnb in Venice, stood the kind beggar Walker spoke with.

BY CHARLOTTE WALKER

Layout by Ryanne FitzGerald Photos by Charlotte Walker

7.442 BILLION PEOPLE and counting. Each with a purpose. Every encounter divinely intertwined. After seeing the Roman Colosseum, the Greek Acropolis, the ancient city of Ephesus, Michelangelo’s David and other world-renown sights, the conversations with a few of these billion have taught me the most. Among the endless gelato, candy colored buildings, crisp blue seasides and lush vineyards, the relationships developed with each new local have constantly opened my eyes to the world around me. Our intense focus on our own lives often numbs us into automatically thinking the worst of people from other cultures. Making assumptions based on preconceived ideas and outward appearances robs us of knowing and understanding the unique individual underneath. We place people in categories based on their background, who they spend time with or what they are doing with their lives, when, in reality, everyone possesses their own specific purpose that defies classification. Exposure to individuals from myriad cultures over the past month has given me further insight into the vast similarities among humans despite the differences between our societies. Conversations with unexpected people excite me the most. For example, while looking for a BNL bank in Milan, we mistakenly stumbled into the National Bank of Milan and eventually resorted to asking the two heavily armed guards for directions. Our question about a bank surprisingly morphed into a conversation about American TV shows, boots in Texas and where to find authentic Bufala mozzarella in Italy. They could have blandly answered our question and sent us on our way, but they chose to strike up a laughable conversation with a few lost Americans. Their unexpected energy and happiness was contagious once we looked past the unwelcoming machine guns and uniforms to see their true personalities. That encounter reminded me that everyone enjoys a friendly conversation—even (or perhaps especially) intimidating Italian polizia who stand inside an almost-empty bank for hours upon end everyday. Similarly, the abundant kindness and hospitality of the international 

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THEY COULD’VE BLANDLY ANSWERED OUR QUESTION AND SENT US ON OUR WAY, BUT THEY CHOSE TO STRIKE UP A LAUGHABLE CONVERSATION WITH A FEW LOST AMERICANS.

crew on our Aegean cruise thoroughly impressed and surprised us. We were on a cruise in the middle of the Greek Isles with endless food and 70-year-olds who could party harder than we could, but the crew was the best part. They weren’t just the people who brought us food and drinks, prepared our beds and made us cappuccinos; they were joyful, kind and genuine people who couldn’t keep from singing when their favorite song came on late at night in the lounge. Being away from home and family for months on end, working for others nonstop and becoming sleep-deprived as a result, could easily justify a little discontentment or disconnection, but the crew constantly radiated happiness, and their joy was contagious. We acquired a new routine just to see them: hot cocoa to chat with the barista Yuli, nightly G| 46

shows to visit our new friend Mark, dance parties in the lounge to get our “usual” two waters and an occasional (non-alcoholic) Pina Colada from Budi, and eating at the Patio Cafe to talk it up with our first friend, Desmond. While the food was wonderful, the sights were breathtaking and the cruise was overall entertaining, the people truly made it meaningful. If you have ever been to Europe, and Italy in particular, you know about the Bangladeshi men who sell lasers and flying gadgets in every piazza within eyesight. You either eventually learn how to refuse their relentless offers or lose your mind. (Having been to Italy before, we were fully aware of their persuasiveness. However, we still needed to buy two lasers and eleven slingshot-light-up-twirler things before we could fully escape their grasp.) Since these


The sunset on the island of Burano is absolutely breathtaking.

men crawl over every public space, advertising their products, people become numb to their true humanity and often treat them like pesky pigeons rather than human beings of equal importance. The same can be said for beggars. Whether they are African men holding out their ball caps, women on their hands and knees completely covered in cloths and holding out a cup, or people handing out little pieces of paper on trains and then returning to collect donations, they have the same importance as everyone else here on Earth. Oh, but how much easier it is to ignore them altogether! One of the kindest beggars we met was an African man in Venice. He stood across the narrow street from our Airbnb and greeted us every morning with a smile and asked how we slept. Although we



didn’t have much money with us, he was incredibly grateful for the few coins we gave him. When my mom asked for a picture with him: his excitement was heartwarming. “Oh, with me?!” he said. After straightening himself up and posing, he asked if he could see the picture. It made me wonder about the last time he saw himself in a photograph. While most people don’t think twice about the privilege of being able to take a picture whenever they want, others may never see a photo of themselves. And don’t we all love a good picture of ourselves? Over 7.442 billion individuals, created for their own specific purpose and loved by God all the same. Our differences distinguish us, yet our similarities simultaneously bring us together. Isn’t that how we are really created to be?|

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BACK TO SCHOOL

They looked cute in their Geneva jumpers and white collared shirts, but now these former Geneva students have grown up, graduated and become teachers themselves. Each of these Geneva grads has a unique perspective on how Geneva has shaped the teacher they have become.

BY TAYLOR TIPPIT

SARAH HEGEDUS

Layout by Carissa Georgelos Photos Compiled by Taylor Tippit

SARAH HEGEDUS (JOHNSON), daughter of Beverly Johnson, was married this summer and moved to Austin to teach at Regents School of Austin. Hegedus (‘11) was in the original first grade class in 1999 when Geneva began. Hegedus said growing up in a Christian school affected how she came to understand the church and her relationship with God. The people at Geneva really stood out to her in a positive way as she saw that her teachers were dedicated to their students and openly spoke about Christ. “Geneva is unique because of the people. The administration’s and teachers’ devotion to Christ primarily informs their dedication to the academic integrity of the students, and their families,” G| 48

Sarah Hegedus formerly,Johnson, teaches at Regents School of Austin.

Hegedus said. Attending a classical Christian school helped her determine what colleges she should look into, what to study and what career path she should take. Hegedus said, “Mr. Rob Shelton, whose teaching in Humanities Lab and Worldview Analysis, greatly influenced how I came to understand Christ’s call on his followers’ lives.” Math instructor Mrs. Susan Greenlees was another teacher who made a lasting impact on Hegedus at Geneva. “She was my fifth grade homeroom teacher and later my Calculus teacher, and has also impacted my teaching now. Her selfless dedication to students and commitment to truth have really stuck with me when I think of my calling as I lead my students,” Hegedus said.


MORGEN LELAND

Hegedus’ favorite memory at Geneva was when she was inducted into Milton House. It was the first ever induction ceremony, and she was a sophomore at the time. Sarah has moved on from Milton House and now teaches at a sister classical school. She has high aspirations for all of her students. “My ultimate hope for my students is for them to know and love Christ, which is the greatest joy in the world,” Hegedus said. Being a Christian has influenced Hegedus in everything she does and it has laid the foundation for how she approaches teaching her students. “Being a teacher means that I am not only leading students with the content I teach, but in the habits I display, the way I discipline and the culture my class has.”

Morgen Leland (Fowler) has just celebrated her one year anniversary of being married to Stephen Leland and is now a teacher at Eden Park Academy in Austin. Leland (‘11) is the daughter of one of the founding families of Geneva: Brian and Cindy Fowler. Her parents are still active on various committees at the school. She began her Geneva journey the first year the doors opened in 1999 as a first grader. In 2011 she graduated with 18 other students in the school’s first graduating class. Leland said, “People always laugh when I tell them I graduated in a class of 19 and they always say, ‘Wow that’s way too small for me.’ I used to think it was too small sometimes too if I’m being honest. But, for the most part, I loved having such a small, strong community around me during my time at Geneva. My teachers knew me personally and were able to push me and challenge me in ways I would not have received at another school.” Leland continued, “Geneva laid a wonderful foundation for me and I am so grateful to have had the opportunity to be a student there.” After graduating from Geneva in 2011, Leland went on to study Elementary Education at Baylor University and now teaches fifth grade science at

MY ULTIMATE HOPE FOR MY STUDENTS IS FOR THEM TO KNOW AND LOVE CHRIST, WHICH IS THE GREATEST JOY IN THE WORLD

Morgan Leland, formerly Fowler, is a teacher at Eden Park Academy in Austin.

Eden Park Academy in Austin. Her time at Geneva influenced the way she approaches her classroom now. “I was constantly being asked to think and engage with my peers and teachers and through their support, I was able to become confident in who I am as a student, believer and now teacher,” Leland said. Leland said she realized she wanted to become a teacher during her sophomore year at Baylor. However, her true inspiration to be a teacher was her mom, Cindy Fowler, who was Geneva’s librarian for eleven years. “I remember coming into her library and watching and listening to her read to students. I always appreciated how she was able to know exactly which book to select for any given student and how their faces lit up the moment she gave it to them,” said Leland. Leland was also deeply influenced by her sixth grade science teacher at Geneva. Mrs. Phyllis Ripkin. Leland said, “She developed a sense of urgency in me that I will always be grateful for —an urgency that I am now able to give to my students. She always made science hands-on and engaging… I carry her teachings with me as I teach and I know that I am a stronger teacher because of her.”


REBECCA WINSTON CLAIRE LUNSFORD

Rebecca Winston (‘12), daughter of Bo and Stacy Winston, has been a part of Geneva’s community from the beginning. She has three other siblings who attended and graduated from Geneva: David (’11), Cinco (’15) and Mary Liz (’16). She now teaches at Wallace Elementary in Dallas and is engaged to marry Travis Floores in January. In 2002, Winston began her Geneva education in the second grade when there were just 75 students in the entire school. Winston said that she didn’t always love school, but that she did always love learning and the conversations she would have in the classroom. Growing up in a Christian school helped shape her worldview and how she interacts with people. Geneva’s goal is to encourage learning and to go deeper than merely stating the facts. She remembers having deep discussions in Mr. Russell’s and Mr. Southwick’s classes. “I believe that so much learning happens when students engage and lead the conversation to make their own connections,” said Winston. Winston learned from a variety of different

Claire Lunsford (‘11) is the daughter of Charlie and Libby Lunsford. Both of her sisters, Mary Kate (‘12) and Caroline (‘15) attended Geneva, and her parents have been very involved in the school

Rebecca Winston is now teaching at Wallace Elementary in Dallas.

teachers at Geneva on how to teach well and how to engage students. Mr. Russell used the class’ conversations to build a relationship with his students. Mr. Southwick asked questions that would make the students think. Mrs. Dunn helped students become consistent in their work. Lastly, Mrs. Byrd taught her that teaching with a hands-on method helps encourage learning and memorization. Winston first realized she wanted to be a teacher when she was in first grade, but then forgot her passion for teaching until she was a junior in high school. She is now a fifth grade English teacher at Wallace Elementary in Dallas. “My hope for my students is that they would grow a love of learning and that they would grow up to be responsible and respectful,” said Winston. She always wants her students to know that they are children of God. “I want to see [my students] the way Jesus sees them. And I always try to be a reflection of Jesus to them in the ways that I treat them individually, extend grace and patience, and bring joy into their learning.”

Claire Lunsfors teaches at Regents School of Austin.

through the Yearbook, Booster Club and the school’s communications and board. Lunsford now teaches at Regents School of Austin in Austin, Texas in the same teaching team as Hegadus.


JAMES GROVER

Lunsford started at Geneva in 7th grade but she had to sacrifice to even stay at the school. “As the oldest, I played the role of ‘guinea pig’ most of my life and starting at Geneva as a 7th grader was no different. I quickly recognized that this place stood out and I wasn’t ready to leave the next year when my class of 8th grade girls ‘graduated’ from Geneva. So I stayed. This meant that I needed to repeat 8th grade.” It was the first time Lunsford said she had to rely on God alone with a decision in her life. She said, “I embarked on the greatest adventure I had experienced at that point and never once regretted my decision. Geneva played a significant role in my life and I would not be who I am without my years at this school.” Geneva also helped to develop Lunsford’s perspective in life. One of the things she enjoyed most about Geneva was the amazing community. Anyone at Geneva can have a relationship with a teacher, parent or student.

James Grover was the first Geneva graduate to teach at Geneva. He was part of the second graduating class and afterwards attended Kings College in New York. Grover (‘12) started attending Geneva in seventh grade and is now teaching at the school he once attended. Grover teaches Senior Thesis, Humanities Lab, Latin 1 and Debate at Geneva. He said, “I joined the Geneva Debate team my junior year of high school and loved it so much I wanted to help with it when I started teaching.” Grover said that learning to use the tools of logic and reason as a student helped to strengthen his faith in God. He used the logic he had learned by giving it a purpose to what he wanted to do in life. Not knowing that he wanted to become a teacher until after high school, Grover was thankful for having teachers at Geneva who demonstrated

“Rhetoric and grammar students not only interact, but have relationships,” Lunsford said. “Geneva instilled in me a strong desire to pursue excellence, truth, and beauty in all things.” Lunsford decided to pursue teaching after her senior year of high school. Lunsford has twelve students and teaches them every subject. “I have learned that I am here for the purpose of loving and impacting these kids in ways that I was loved and impacted. I am able to use my experience at a classical and Christian school to encourage and push my students to be the best that they can be.” She wants her students to love each other well and pursue excellence in everything they do. She hopes her students are prepared to face any difficulties head on and to develop a relationship with God. “I am blessed to teach at a school where my faith is not only allowed in the classroom, but demanded. I love my students with everything I have, and in return I am a witness to their willingness and desire to be fully known and fully loved.”

James Grover Teaches currently at Geneva School of Boerne.

how a good teacher helps their students. He decided to become a teacher during his sophomore year at Kings College. Grover realized that he had a strong opinion on how certain subjects should be taught, and so he decided do something about it and pursued teaching. Teaching at Geneva has helped him view life with a different perspective. Geneva has changed a lot since he graduated when there was only 100 students in Rhetoric school. “It is exciting to be involved with Geneva at two different stages in its development: first as a student and now as a teacher,” Grover said. He really enjoys teaching because he can teach in a Christian environment and help his students become closer to God. Grover explained, “I hope my students are men and women of Christ who pursue knowledge after they leave my classroom. Any career or educational success is wonderful but secondary to that.”|


PREACHINGWHILE Christian teachers from high schools in Boerne explain how they link faith to work in their field.

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BOERNE HIGH SCHOOL

IN GENEVA CLASSROOMS, religion is a common topic of discussion. The school is clearly identified as a Christian, classical school (intentionally in that order). While Geneva has religious classes like Theology, Worldview, Bible Survey and many more, other schools in the area may not offer these same opportunities. Deborah Rios and Keith Jeffcoat are Christian teachers at two public high schools in the area— Champion and Boerne.

JEFFCOAT

KEITH

Keith Jeffcoat is a proponent of the idea that hard work is its own reward, and this will lead to success. Relating to both faith and work, Jeffcoat uses this quote as a mantra for his attitude: “The harder the struggle, the more glorious the triumph.” Jeffcoat is a biology teacher at Boerne High School, and the husband of our very own biology teacher, Christina Jeffcoat. He has been teaching for five years, and loves his job. He said that his favorite part of being a teacher is having the opportunity to influence the lives of his students. While biology is the focus of his class, he believes that there is so much more to teaching than that. He has the opportunity to convey deeper knowledge to his students. He said, “I am teaching them how to be responsible, caring and genuine; how to help yourself when needed and [how to] to push yourself to your fullest potential.” Along with wanting to teach them these things, he also wants his students to feel safe and comfortable. One thing that allows him to create this bond with his students is allowing them to eat in his class at lunch. A crowd of about 10 students gathers in his room every day, and Jeffcoat believes that this is part of what being a teacher should entail. “Teaching is so much more than giving grades and doing lessons,” Jeffcoat said. As a man of faith, Jeffcoat recognizes that there are some professional restrictions when it comes to sharing his faith with his students. However, he uses what he calls “loopholes” to be able to talk to them about this. For instance, if a student initiates a conversation about Christ, he takes this occasion to engage in a discussion with them. He also takes advantage of opportunities to pray before class and is open about his faith with his students. Jeffcoat said that he wants his students to be able to talk to him, and he has had a few take this opportunity. Jeffcoat wants to show Christ to his students through his actions. In trying to be like Christ to the students through loving them, Jeffcoat hopes that they realize that Christ is the source of this love. He said, “More than anything, my job at school is to show the kids that there are people who love them.  This is the way that Christ witnessed to people and this is our job too.” While Jeffcoat is unique at his school because of his faith, he said that the difficulty of being so can sometimes be exaggerated; “I think that there is this idealized fear that Christians are persecuted in public schools and that God is not in school. The reality is that we are in Texas, and as long as we are in Texas, Christ will be in school.” Referring to Ecclesiastes 3, which states, “There is a time for everything,” Jeffcoat said that faith and learning each have their time and place in school.


TEACHING BY NATHAN YOUNG

Layout by Emme Owens Graphics by Sydney Dennis

CHAMPION HIGH SCHOOL

DEBORAH

RIOS

Deborah Rios is a believer in the maxim: “Our actions speak louder than our words.” So, rather than sharing her faith abruptly, she wants her students to see Jesus through her. “What is important, I believe, is letting the students know that I am here if they need me and I care about what happens to them,” said Rios. Rios, a teacher at Champion high school, is one of these people who incorporates her faith into her job. She teaches a wide variety of classes—like Principles of Education and Training, Career Prep, and Human Growth and Development— that mainly involve students who are interested in pursuing a career in Education.     Having been in Education for 32 years, Rios has been able to influence countless students. After all her years of experience, she said that interacting with her students is her favorite part. “Building those relationships that develop mutual trust and respect,” said Rios, is rewarding after seeing what the students accomplish, learn and succeed in. Rios said that due to the nature of her classes, the students have many conversations about what is happening in the world and their causes. She said that she has been able to insert her opinions into the conversation at times. And even though she might not come out and directly share her faith, she said that she would be able to do so outside of the classroom. Her students know where she is coming from in terms of her faith, and she has Christian symbols and devotional books in her classroom. Rios has had the opportunity to assist students outside of class and talk about her faith. Her class was having one of those debates when a student had to start defending her faith. Rios was able to help her to clarify some of the things that she was saying so another student understood. Rios said that she and the student went on to continue discussing apologetics as well as school-related issues. Rios has also helped to teach a teen-pregnancy class at a public school in Northside in San Antonio. In this class she was able to mentor and guide students—letting Christ show through her caring nature. “The students learned that they could come to me for help,” explained Rios. She enjoyed doing this and helping these teens through the issues they were facing. While one may not expect it, her friends on staff are Christians, even though she didn’t go out of her way to just meet them, she said, “Christians just attract other Christians because they have similar beliefs, habits, morals etc.” Rios shared a verse that she feels defines her ministry: John 13:35, “By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.”|

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STEPANOW PRESSES ON Trey Stepanow, freshman, came to Geneva in eighth grade because of his dad’s job. He was willing to share his story with us in hopes to inspire readers. BY TREY STEPANOW

Layout by Ryanne FitzGerald Photo by Taylor Tippit Graphic by Sydney Dennis

Stepanow wants his words to encourage those who might be in a similar situation. G| 54


STARTING FROM THE beginning, I was introduced to God at a young age when I accepted Jesus into my heart at a youth camp. On the second day of Kindergarten, I met my best friend, Quinn. We did everything together, from having sleepovers every weekend to going on trips together. In sixth grade I switched schools and Quinn went with me. In addition to being at a new school, halfway through the year my dad told me that our family could possibly be moving to Texas. At the time, I blew it off—thinking there was no way we would be moving. Nonetheless, we were on a plane traveling 1,500 miles away from our home six months later. Away from everything and everyone I knew, my world was totally different. Everything I knew and loved was gone, and I felt like my life was in pieces. We arrived in San Antonio a week and a half before school started. We lived in a hotel since we did not have a place to stay. During these days, my faith in God had been pushed to the side. Fear and anxiety ruled my life. I despised the school I went to, and only lasted for three days. I switched to Cornerstone, not knowing what my future held. During this time, my dad gave me a talk about how important my faith and God were in my life. From this point forward, I decided to put my faith in God and leave the past behind. I finished the year at Cornerstone. The next year, my parents decided to move me to Geneva. To be honest, I was worried about the new change, but Geneva has been the right fit. My faith has never been stronger, with the faculty and students always pushing me toward the glory of God.

“EVERYTHING I KNEW AND LOVED WAS GONE, AND I FELT LIKE MY LIFE WAS IN PIECES.”

INTERVIEW BY SYDNEY DENNIS DENNIS: What did your dad say that truly put you back on right path? STEPANOW: He said that even though it may seem bad now, in the future things will get better—the hard times are in the past. He motivated me a lot in the hard times. DENNIS: How did you cope with the anxiety and fear? STEPANOW: Mostly just praying and having good friends who had my back. My parents, my sister and I were all new so we had to stay together. DENNIS: How did you know God was there when you were at your lowest? What helped you? STEPANOW: It was super low, but then something would happen and I would get that feeling where you know you’re not alone. It was like an assurance that I wasn’t alone. DENNIS: What did it feel like to lose your best friend? Are you still in touch? STEPANOW: We are still in touch, but it’s weird seeing your best friend with other friends. It can be hard. We still talk all the time but it takes effort. DENNIS: Out of all of this what have you learned? STEPANOW: No matter what situation you’re in, look on the positive side, even though it seems super bad. I never thought that I would be at this kind of school and be friends with these kind of people when I moved here. It may have seemed super terrible at the time, but looking back now my situation is better than it was before. DENNIS: Was the atmosphere a lot different in California? Was it easier to be a Christian there or here? Why? STEPANOW: It’s different in the sense of people. The people are a lot different—they’re ruder there than here. I went to a Christian school, but you could still tell that some were not followers of Christ. DENNIS: Since you’ve moved to Texas, what has kept you in line with your faith? STEPANOW: Going to church as well as a Christian school and having good friends who always have your back and put you on the right path… family too. It’s easy to think God is against me but it’s not like that; it all just takes time. |



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ISS UES


DIVING INTO THE ISSUES OF MODERN SOCIETY PHOTO BY JACQUELINE KNOX


DEFEATING

DEPRESSION Depression and anxiety can be serious problems, here is a look at some of the effects they can have.

SHE IS JUST over exaggerating. She needs to cheer up. Can she just calm down? She just needs to be happy. She isn’t the same person she used to be. She is just doing this for attention. These are all phrases that society has pushed onto those who suffer with depression and anxiety. Maybe it is because of the lack of understanding of what depression and anxiety really are, or maybe it is just because of the stigma that is associated with the phrase ‘I am depressed.’ Whatever the cause, depression and anxiety are everyday problems with which many teenagers are suffering. Anxiety and depression are disorders that affect one’s mental health. A counselor with a Master’s Degree in marriage and family therapy, Christen Engel describes depression as “feeling stuck in some way,” and anxiety as “feeling worried and/or fearful about the future.” However, these are just simple definitions of the disorders, and there is so much more to them. Depression and anxiety are different for everyone who encounters them. Some may have situational depression accompanied by some anxiety whereas others may have clinical depression accompanied with severe anxiety. Although they are separate conditions, Engel believes that “anxiety and depression usually go hand-in-hand.” Now, since high school is such a pivotal time in someone’s life and the decisions one makes during these four years tend to matter the most, depression and anxiety are prevalent at this age. Holly Robles, the Student Assistance Counselor for Boerne Independent School District, said, “Depression and anxiety are everywhere, even at Geneva. Just because we do not talk about it doesn’t mean it is not happening. People tend to think it’s the loners who are suffering with it, but that’s not true, it’s everywhere.” In fact, according to a study done by the National Institute of Mental Health, approximately G| 58 | FEATURE

BY JACQUELINE KNOX

Layout by Jacqueline Knox Photo by Jacqueline Knox Graphic by Nathan Zuniga & Audrey Ryden (next page)

one in five teenagers has an anxiety or depressive disorder.

DEPRESSION Geneva alumnus Emily Riedlinger (’14) was diagnosed with clinical depression the summer after her sophomore year. She knows exactly what it is like to struggle through high school while struggling through depression.

I WASN’T ASHAMED OR EMBARRASSED OF MY DEPRESSION ITSELF, I WAS ASHAMED AND EMBARRASSED OF WHAT DEPRESSION WAS MAKING ME DO OR NOT DO. “You have no drive. You aren’t doing any of the things you should be doing. You aren’t doing any of the things you want to be doing. You want to want to do things, but you can’t, so you just start drowning. You really start to hate yourself,” said Riedlinger. “It made me feel pretty worthless.” Not only does depression affect the way you view yourself by causing an extreme amount of negativity, it attacks the way you function on a day-today basis. The simple tasks that you used to be able to complete with ease are suddenly huge burdens. Even


YOU WANT TO WANT TO DO THINGS, BUT YOU CAN’T, SO YOU JUST START DROWNING. 

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and therapists are trying to figure out why. Robles explained, “This generation of Americans has grown up not experiencing negative feelings. Everyone got participation ribbons anytime something happened so we ended up raising a generation of kids who did not experience failure. So now, when our children experience failure, it is overwhelming for them.” This lack of failure has caused an increase in depression rates because children have no idea how to deal with their failure. Therapists now have to teach distress tolerance, coping skills, problem management, conflict resolution and healthy interpersonal skills to help outweigh these newfound negative feelings. Riedlinger offers some encouragement to those who are currently struggling with these mental health issues: “These thoughts and feelings and the way you think you are living your life or aren’t living your life are not forever. It is okay to just make it to the next day; you don’t have to do any amazing feats. You don’t have to be amazing every single day.” For someone with depression, to just make it through the day is sometimes a feat in and of itself. She goes on to remind people that “you can lay on your floor but the clock will still turn until it’s the next day, then the day after that, and believe it or not, the day after that.” little aspects of life can become extremely difficult. “I wasn’t ashamed or embarrassed of my depression itself, I was ashamed and embarrassed of what depression was making me do or not do,” said Riedlinger. However, one aspect of depression, the fact that it is not just one bad day; it’s months worth of these negative feelings and lack of motivation. “The hardest part of it is that it’s not just one day, it’s weeks and weeks of knowing that I am just a disappointment and I am not living up to any of what is expected of me,” said Riedlinger. “Obviously none of these things are true but that is just what you think.” Because depression affects people for months without end it can cause an overall behavioral change. Former Geneva student Kira Drawe knows exactly what it is like to live with depression and anxiety: “I wanted so desperately to be positive and happy like I was before, but I couldn’t be. My depression was completely changing me.” Depression rates have been on the rise recently,

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ANXIETY

Anxiety is very similar to depression because it also attacks your ability to function by immobilizing you. Riedlinger describes anxiety as a loss of control: “In an anxiety attack, you basically lose control of everything, your breathing, thinking, and movement. You cannot communicate and you cannot stop. It grips you and you can feel it in your chest and your throat but you cannot stop.” Since anxiety and depression are both mental disorders, it is really hard for someone who is not suffering with them to understand what they are actually like. Senior Abbey Giddens has experienced anxiety firsthand. She explains why it can be very hard for others to understand. “It is different than a broken ankle. That is something external that you can see on the outside. But anxiety is more of an internal thing that people can’t see unless they have been through it,” said Giddens. Along with the idea of not understanding what


exactly anxiety is, it is also hard to understand the cause of anxiety. There are multiple things that can trigger anxiety in a patient. Robles said that one possible cause of anxiety is too much pressure placed upon students. “One cause of anxiety with students, especially high-achieving students like Geneva students, is that they feel like they have constant pressures on them to achieve and are constantly worrying about their future. They want to do well to make everyone proud of them but because there is so much pressure put on them, either by themselves or by others, they feel like they will never meet that standard,” explained Robles.

IT IS DIFFICULT TO ADMIT TO A LABEL YOU DON’T WANT OTHER PEOPLE TO GIVE YOU.

ADDRESSING THE ISSUE It is frightening to think that even with many teenagers suffering; society pushes mental health issues under the rug giving them a certain a label. “[People] make you think that there is something wrong with you, but that isn’t the case because so many people go through this,” said Drawe. Society tends to make those who are suffering feel trapped as if they cannot talk to anyone about what they are going through. This is mainly because of the label that comes with depression. “The moment you say that you suffer from something, whether it be depression or any other mental illness, people already have an image of what they think that is. It is difficult to admit to a label you don’t want other people to give you,” said Riedlinger. There is also the idea that society just brushes depression and anxiety off. “I never really thought that anxiety and depression were that big of a deal until I suffered with them,” explained Giddens. Depression and anxiety are prevalent in high school students in this day and age. Brushing them off and leaving them unaddressed will not fix this problem. Depression and anxiety need to be addressed and explained to teenagers. That way ,those who are suffering know what to do and those who have friends suffering know how to help.

depression at one point in their life,” she said. “There are a lot of suffering teenagers that don’t have to suffer. There are a lot of people around them that care about them and want to help. But they have to open their mouth and tell someone. They don’t have to suffer alone and with help and support they can stop feeling like this.” Giddens also speaks to this by adding, “For the people that do have anxiety or depression, always reach out. I hope the people who read this reach out to those who contributed to the article. It’s not something to be ashamed of or hide, especially if it is really weighing on you.” Riedlinger talked about how some of her high school teachers really helped her get through some of her worst times, and she encourages others to do the same. “Geneva is a good place for this because the teachers will talk to you and they care about you—they won’t just tune you out. For a student to go to a teacher and tell them that they are really struggling, that’s why teachers are teachers: to help kids. They love y’all, so let them,” said Riedlinger. Depression and anxiety are serious problems that should not be taken lightly. If you are struggling, I encourage you to please seek help. Whether you talk to a friend, counselor, parent, teacher, sibling or doctor, they want to hear about what is going on with you. This is not something for you to keep hidden down inside or go through alone. Engel said, “Having anxiety or depression is one thing that you are dealing with in a moment of time. You don’t have to live like that, and it doesn’t have to follow you around the rest of your life.”|

FINDING HOPE Robles encourages those suffering with depression by urging them to seek out help. “You don’t have to do this alone anymore. There is help and the hardest part is asking for help the first time. Having these feelings doesn’t make you crazy because 90% of the population has suffered with



FEATURE | G | 61


BE MY VALENTINE

Here are the do’s and don’ts for gifts on Valentine’s Day.

BY ALEXA GEORGELOS

Indesign by Alexa Georgelos Graphic by Sydney Dennis VALENTINE’S DAY IS like a box of chocolates... you never know what you’re going to get. One of the most important days of the year is coming up and an essential part of Valentine’s Day is the gift. Even though you promised yourself that you will spend time on a gift this year, somehow you find yourself

late at night in the greeting card aisle of Wal-Mart, and possibly returning home empty-handed having no gift for the next day. Luckily, some students have shared their thoughts about what gift they would like to receive, what they would not want to receive and what gift they would get someone else.|

GIRLS TO MY VALENTINE: “I think that I would get him Mary’s Tacos and his favorite candy.” “Definitely get him his favorite food.” “I would get him candy...guys love candy.”

FROM MY VALENTINE: “I would want a huge stuffed animal and lots of my favorite candy.” “He should definitely bring something on Valentine’s Day.” “I would want to receive chocolate, a handwritten note and other nice things.” “If someone got me a puppy, I would cry.” “I would want something personal that shows that he cares.” “I wouldn’t want him to do something over the top.” “I would want him to get me a stuffed animal, chocolate and socks.” G| 62


GUYS TO MY VALENTINE:

“I would get her a teddy bear.” “It’s a day where people show love and affection towards each other no matter what the relationship. So as long as you get her something, I think she’ll be happy.” “Valentine’s Day is a day to express your love so I would get her food and flowers.” “I would probably get her favorite food or candy and flowers.” “I would get her chocolate.”

FROM MY VALENTINE: “I would not want pointless candy.” “As a gift I would want chocolate and Whataburger.” “I would want a Rolex or a box of chocolates.” “Honestly, I’ll take what I can get.” “I would want her to get me chocolate.”



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NE’S SOCIAL GROUP IN ORDER TO BE LIKED OR ACCEPTED. A FEEL AT ONE MUST DO THE SAME THINGS AS OTHER PEOPLE IN ONE’S CIAL GROUP IN ORDER TO BE LIKED OR ACCEPTED. A FEELING TH UST DO THE SAME THINGS AS OTHER PEOPLE IN ONE’S SOCIAL G ORDER TO BE LIKED OR ACCEPTED. A FEELING THAT ONE MUST D ME THINGS AS OTHER PEOPLE IN ONE’S SOCIAL GROUP IN ORDER ED OR ACCEPTED. A FEELING THAT ONE MUST DO THE SAME THI OTHER PEOPLE IN ONE’S SOCIAL GROUP IN ORDER TO BE LIKED CEPTED. A FEELING THAT ONE MUST DO THE SAME THINGS AS O OPLE IN ONE’S SOCIAL GROUP IN ORDER TO BE LIKED OR ACCEPT FEELING THAT ONE MUST DO THE SAME THINGS AS OTHER PEOPL NE’S SOCIAL GROUP IN ORDER TO BE LIKED OR ACCEPTED. A FEEL AT ONE MUST DO THE SAME THINGS AS OTHER PEOPLE IN ONE’S CIAL GROUP IN ORDER TO BE LIKED OR ACCEPTED. A FEELING TH UST DO THE SAME THINGS I AM DOING WHAT I WANT NOW AS OT OPLE IN ONE’S SOCIAL GROUP IN ORDER TO BE LIKED OR ACCEPT FEELING THAT ONE MUST DO THE SAME THINGS AS OTHER PEOPL NE’S SOCIAL GROUP IN ORDER TO BE LIKED OR ACCEPTED. A FEEL AT ONE MUST DO THE SAME THINGS AS OTHER PEOPLE IN ONE’S CIAL GROUP IN ORDER TO BE LIKED OR ACCEPTED. A FEELING TH UST DO THE SAME THINGS AS OTHER PEOPLE IN ONE’S SOCIAL G ORDER TO BE LIKED OR ACCEPTED. A FEELING THAT ONE MUST D ME THINGS AS OTHER PEOPLE IN ONE’S SOCIAL GROUP IN ORDER ED OR ACCEPTED. A FEELING THAT ONE MUST DO THE SAME THI OTHER PEOPLE IN ONE’S SOCIAL GROUP IN ORDER TO BE LIKED CEPTED. A FEELING THAT ONE MUST DO THE SAME THINGS AS O OPLE IN ONE’S SOCIAL GROUP IN ORDER TO BE LIKED OR ACCEPT FEELING THAT ONE MUST DO THE SAME THINGS AS OTHER PEOPL NE’S SOCIAL GROUP IN ORDER TO BE LIKED OR ACCEPTED. A FEEL AT ONE MUST DO THE SAME THINGS AS OTHER PEOPLE IN ONE’S CIAL GROUP IN ORDER TO BE LIKED OR ACCEPTED. A FEELING TH UST DO THE SAME THINGS AS OTHER PEOPLE IN ONE’S SOCIAL G ORDER TO BE LIKED OR ACCEPTED. A FEELING THAT ONE MUST D ME THINGS AS OTHER PEOPLE IN ONE’S SOCIAL GROUP IN ORDER ED OR ACCEPTED. A FEELING THAT ONE MUST DO THE SAME THI OTHER PEOPLE IN ONE’S SOCIAL GROUP IN ORDER TO BE LIKED CEPTED. A FEELING THAT ONE MUST DO THE SAME THINGS AS O OPLE IN ONE’S SOCIAL GROUP IN ORDER TO BE LIKED OR ACCEPT FEELING THAT ONE MUST DO THE SAME THINGS AS OTHER PEOPL NE’S SOCIAL GROUP IN ORDER TO BE LIKED OR ACCEPTED. A FEEL AT ONE MUST DO THE SAME THINGS AS OTHER PEOPLE IN ONE’S CIAL GROUP IN ORDER TO BE LIKED OR ACCEPTED. A FEELING TH


UNDER

LING S HAT ONE GROUP DO THE R TO BE INGS OR OTHER TED. LE IN LING S HAT ONE THER TED. LE IN LING Friends can make you do just about anything, but when they make you do something you S don’t want to do, how do you react? HAT ONE GROUP NOW I JUST want to start by would make fun of me and make DO THE saying that I am no expert on peer me feel bad about not having one. R TO BE pressure. I have led a privileged Still, I didn’t want one. I didn’t INGS life because I have never been succumb to the peer pressure. pressured to do anything terrible Fast forward to high school, OR or disgraceful. I have though, felt during my sophomore year, own kind of peer pressure when Snapchat became the new OTHER my different from what most people Webkinz. This time around, TED. think peer pressure is. For the most my young high school self I try to stay independent, succumbed to the social norm. LE IN part, but anyone can feel the public Everyone was getting a Snapchat, LING pressure to do something you so in order to be connected to my aren’t comfortable with. grade, I also got one. I felt like S Throughout my life, I have I was so cool to have one, and I never really cared about what used it constantly. I went a step HAT ONE else was doing. In further and got an Instagram GROUPeveryone Grammar School, everyone in my account. Social media became my grade was obsessed with Webkinz. life; it became all I wanted to do DO THE They would come to school with with my time. As the year went R TO BE those stuffed animals, bragging on and I became more and more INGS about how well they were doing obsessed with my social media, in the game. It seemed like I also grew severely depressed. I OR some people’s lives were in their questioned my motives as to why rather than in reality. I had all of these accounts, and OTHER Webkinz I never had a Webkinz. I was I realized they didn’t make me TED. content with my hand-me-down happy; I was only keeping them animals, and I didn’t for others. Why should I succumb LE IN stuffed really see the point in Webkinz. to peer pressure if it’s going to LING Whenever I told people that, they make me so unhappy?  S HAT ONE

PRESSURE BY AUDREY RYDEN

Layout by Jacqueline Knox

WHY SHOULD I SUCCUMB TO PEER PRESSURE IF IT’S GOING TO MAKE ME SO UNHAPPY? OPINION | G | 65


Peer pressure is not new to my generation. It has been around since the beginning of culture, I suspect. Its object of desire has changed guises throughout the years. In the 1980s, it became associated with drugs: poisoning the teenage mind and coercing its fellow classmates into the drugged haze. The drug epidemic took over the youth of the 80s,

WE FEEL ITS ICY, MANIPULATIVE HAND CONTROLLING US AND MAKING ITS WAY INTO EVERY ONE OF OUR DECISIONS. submerging the young minds indefinitely. Organizations were made to stop it; parents took action and involved themselves in their children’s lives in order to set them “on the right path.” Since the 60s drugs have remained a problem, but other issues heaped onto the pile. People became more open about feeling pressure to dress a certain way, to drink even if they were never interested and to talk about certain things because some topics of conversation became too weird and out of place. Now, thirty years later, peer pressure has broadened its horizons to encompass all social pressures under the sun. It uses social media over word-of-mouth. It is part of our everyday lives, and impacts us at a younger age than ever before. We feel its icy, manipulative hand controlling us and making its way into every one of our decisions. It pressures us to do things we normally don’t want to do, completely stripping us of our true selves. Peer pressure is defined as “influence from members of one’s peer group.” The stereotypical G| 66 | OPINION

image of peer pressure is of teenagers at someone’s house, getting drunk while their parents are away and pressuring other teenagers into drinking as well. That used to be how peer pressure worked. It still is that way to an extent, but it has surpassed those boundaries drastically. Now, peer pressure is everywhere. Kids feel peer pressure as early as kindergarten: like I did as I mentioned earlier. Middle schoolers do stupid things to feel accepted. High schoolers follow the trends set by their classmates in order to impress others and feel connected. According to a recent survey, over 75% of teenagers have tried alcohol and 30% do drugs due to peer pressure. These numbers are the highest they have ever been, and if teenagers keep valuing the desires of others over their own, they will keep climbing. Peer pressure, at its core, is just our desire to follow others’ lead because we aren’t confident enough in ourselves to forge our own path. Don’t feel like you have to rely on others for everything. Do what feels comfortable to you or what makes you happy. Don’t ever let anyone force their lifestyle or decisions on you. Just be yourself. Every now and then I still check my Instagram because I have learned that I actually enjoy it if I limit myself to what I look at. I’m not trying to shame anyone for having a social media account, or telling anyone to stop doing what I wrote about, because that would be my pressuring you to do something you normally wouldn’t do. All I am saying is find your passion. Think about your motives behind everything you want to do, and make sure you are proud of what you are doing because you know it is good and pleasing in God’s eyes. We are here because of Him, so do what He would want you to do because He loves you and knows what’s best.|


IT’S

TOUGH STUFF School is supposed to be challenging, but it’s harder for some people.

IT’S THE 100-METER dash, and every student is at the starting line. At first glance, it’s not easy to pick out who’s slow and who’s fast, because in this race of Geneva students, “slow” is almost non-existent. If you’re a little slower than others, you’ll soon find out that going slow is not an option if you want to finish the race; the only option is running. And for some, running is significantly harder. Some students have asthma, some may have a sprained ankle and some may just forget that the race has started at all. For other students, running can’t be easier. They may think, “Come on, it’s only 100-meters.” The student with asthma is trying the best they possibly can, but, despite their efforts, their options are to give up or finish the race by putting in twice the work. And, sometimes putting in the extra work isn’t worth the asthma attack. For me, this is what school can feel like sometimes. I have never thought of myself as “smart,” and by that I don’t mean I think I’m stupid. What I really mean is, I’ve never been an academic role model, which is fine. If we were all equally academically inclined, then there would be no such thing as a role model. Schools need a standard, and I was never that. But, like all of us, I wanted to be for so long. At a young age, I thought that it really wasn’t that hard to be a great student. All I would have to do is try my best and I could achieve any goal I wanted. I later found out that it just wasn’t as easy as I thought. I am not—and I never was—the kind of student who understood the math lesson on the first go or retained the history information down cold. I was the type of student who couldn’t remember what I had studied all week when I got to the test, or the student who could stare at the white board for hours and interpret chemistry equations as some lofty rocket science. For the longest time, I never understood why I was like this, and I always came to the conclusion that I just wasn’t trying hard enough, when that wasn’t the case. I had this false idea in my mind that everyone had the same learning capacity

BY NATHAN ZUNIGA

Indesign by Alexa Georgelos Photo by Jacqueline Knox Graphic by Nathan Zuniga

that I had, but I just never used my brain to its full capacity. What I later realized completely changed how I view education as a whole. School isn’t supposed to be easy, it never has been and it never will be. Schools like Geneva are meant to challenge you, not to congratulate you with every right answer you get. I know myself to be a very competitive person and I know if I put my mind to a goal, I can achieve it. I really didn’t have any natural talent or much passion for a lot of my

SCHOOL ISN’T SUPPOSED TO BE EASY, IT NEVER HAS BEEN AND IT NEVER WILL BE. SCHOOLS LIKE GENEVA ARE MEANT TO CHALLENGE YOU, NOT TO CONGRATULATE YOU WITH EVERY RIGHT ANSWER YOU GET. achievements in life, but because I was completely confident that if I were to try my best and really believe in myself, I could do anything. This, however, could never be said about school for me. The problem never lied in my realization that school wasn’t as easy as I thought. It lied in my realization that school was as easy as I thought for


Sophomore Nathan Masso like many others has too much on his mind.

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other students. This is where my completely false idea that everyone learned at the same pace fell apart. I started to realize that the majority of my peers did much better than I did in their grades. I remember hearing about how easy this test was and how easy that lesson was, and I just sat there wondering, “Why wasn’t it easy for me?” I always used to beat myself up about how I wouldn’t try hard enough, so I would try harder. But I couldn’t keep up with my peers, and sometimes it seemed like they were cruising on auto-pilot while I was just struggling to keep my eyes on the road. I wish I could say I never wanted to hear about other people’s grades, but to be completely honest, I was obsessed with comparing myself to others. And the worst part was that no one knew this about me. I constantly lied about my grades to my peers just so I could get that sweet satisfaction that someone thought I was “smart.” I would do anything to be known as the smart kid. And it wasn’t that I wanted to be on this pedestal above everyone else; I didn’t want to be the best or even better than anyone. At Geneva, that pedestal doesn’t really exist because most students do very well academically. All I wanted was to catch up with them: to fit in. I had a crippling fear that if anyone were to see my real grades, I would be that outcast that everyone knew as “the dumb kid.” There is always that kid who we all know struggles, and I would do anything to keep myself from taking on that stereotype. Comparing myself to others never got me anywhere. It didn’t drive me to do better; if anything, it drove me away from working hard. I felt hopeless at times. I would always go back to that question: “Why can they do it, and I can’t?” I guess I just didn’t fully realize that I am one of those students who just has to try twice as hard as everyone else. That was my biggest realization: that I wasn’t supposed to be like the rest of the students in that school came naturally to them, and that’s fine. Sometimes it didn’t feel like it was worth it. I don’t want to sound pessimistic, because I know that with every failure there is so much to learn and grow from. But when I would fail after knowing that I tried my best, it felt very wrong. I felt cheated. And being surrounded by so many great students who were praised for their ability to do minimal work for a 100 made it seem so unfair to me. I now know that some students don’t need to try as hard to achieve the standard, and that’s okay. Coming to that realization though, was not easy. I became jealous of people whom I loved. I didn’t think of them as real friends. I started to think of them as competitors in a sick competition. I only thought of them as the number in the grade book and all I wanted was to reach that number as

well. I envied their intellect. I envied how easy it was for them to understand hard concepts. I envied that big 100 on the top of their tests. And I started to hate myself for not being able to do it like they could. It dawned on me that all of this jealousy and hate was so pointless. I became so blinded by my own jealousy and self-hate that I couldn’t realize my own talents and passions. My talent wasn’t to understand the math lesson on the first try, and I should never have hated myself for that. This all being said, I don’t want to group “the other students” into one category. In no way do I mean that every person that does well at Geneva does it naturally. I am aware that there are students who have to try very hard to succeed, because I am one of those students. The difference is, I fall short more than most. And I am absolutely not trying to say that students who don’t need to try as hard to be successful are in any way bad people; if anything, I admire their abilities. To be envious of a naturally academic student is like being envious of a painter for their ability to paint. It’s a natural talent they can’t help. I never understood this when

TO BE ENVIOUS OF A NATURALLY ACADEMIC STUDENT IS LIKE BEING ENVIOUS OF A PAINTER FOR THEIR ABILITY TO PAINT. I was younger; I thought it was unfair. It’s stupid to think I could be envious of someone’s natural ability when I myself am an artist. Now more than ever, I feel confident in myself. I realized that having to try harder is not a disability, it’s an advantage. One of my favorite stories that Mrs. Greenlees reads from “Chicken Soup for the Soul” is the short story “A Lesson in Heart.” It’s about a 10-year-old girl who wore a leg brace due to a missing muscle in her foot. She had come home from school one day and told her dad about how the students competed in “field day.” Because of her disability, he had already assumed what she was going to say, and had come up with things to build her up. To his surprise, she had won two of the races. The Dad immediately thought she must have had some kind of advantage, like a head start. She did have an advantage, but it wasn’t a head start. The little girl said to her dad, “Daddy, I didn’t get a head start…my advantage was I had to try harder!”||


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WHAT’S BEHIND THE SCREEN Taking a look at violence through the perspective of a Christian. EXTREME ACTS OF violence are becoming a normal thing, with recent instances in places like Littleton, Las Vegas and Sutherland Springs. It seems like these tragedies can’t be stopped or prevented, and we are becoming accustomed to this violence that we see everywhere we look. This can’t happen. Violence is not just a problem in the media. We see it in things like movies and video games too. It may not be as bad when we know it’s not real, but the fact remains that we cannot ignore it; we have to do something about it. Studies have shown that when people are constantly exposed to violence they become less compassionate and more afraid of the world around them. They can also become more likely to act in an aggressive way toward others. More than 3,500 research studies have been performed about the relationship between media

BY JACKSON YOUNG

Indesign by Alexa Georgelos Photo by Jacqueline Knox Graphic by Sydney Dennis

Both of these thoughts are correct to a certain extent. Yes, we can become desensitized to violence over time, and sometimes seeing violence can make us aggressive or uneasy. But seeing something violent does not instantly make us a different person. Violence affects everyone on a different level. For some people who are naturally aggressive, it can activate and amplify that side of them. But for those who are more calm and composed, violence does not affect them as much. Indeed, some people are not affected at all by violence. The amount that violence affects you depends entirely on what kind of person you are. So, as Christians, what should we do about this? Where do we stand? There is no perfect or easy answer. Violence is actually a large part of the Bible. A majority of the Old Testament is centered around war. The Israelites came into the Promised Land

WHEN PEOPLE ARE CONSTANTLY EXPOSED TO VIOLENCE THEY BECOME LESS COMPASSIONATE AND MORE AFRAID OF THE WORLD AROUND THEM. violence and violent behavior. Only 18 of these studies have found no relationship between the two. Through these studies, we have developed two schools of thought. One of these is that it causes desensitization: someone is exposed to so much violence that they slowly start to accept it as normal and eventually do not label it right or wrong. The second is that it causes catharsis. This means that once you see a certain amount of violence, it changes you and makes you more aggressive and impulsive. Former president Bill Clinton said, “The more children see violence, the more numb they are to the deadly consequences of violence. Now, video games like ‘Mortal Combat’, ‘Killer Instinct’ and ‘Doom’— the very games played obsessively by the two young men who ended so many lives in Littleton— make our children more active participants in simulated violence.”



with orders straight from God to destroy anyone and anything that stood in their way, and that is exactly what they did. As a sign of His power, God uses violence in a just and righteous way. Violence can be used for good to help people in trouble, but watching an excessive amount of even “good” violence can still be bad. So, violence cannot just be ignored entirely. We must see violence in our modern society for what it is: just another temptation that can become an idol. Today, inappropriate use of violence is impossible to avoid. It is in the news, video games and just about every movie. Because we cannot wholly ignore violence, we have to resist it. We have to treat excessive violence just like every other issue that can lead to sin. We need to prevent it from becoming an idol or an obsession that overrules our lives.|

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STOP THE WRECKS

STOP THE TEXTS

DISTRACTED DRIVING IS THE NUMBER ONE KILLER OF AMERICAN TEENS.


IT CAN WAIT Although we are constantly warned about the dangers of texting and driving, many teenagers (and adults) still engage in this dangerous activity. Here are some of the alarming statistics about texting and driving.

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BY JACQUELINE KNOX

Layout by Jacqueline Knox Photo by Jacqueline Knox Graphic by Nathan Zuniga

TEXTING AND DRIVING IS 6 TIMES MORE LIKELY TO GET YOU IN AN ACCIDENT THAN DRUNK DRIVING.

5

That’s right, it is actually safer for someone to be wasted than texting behind the wheel.

seconds is the average time one text takes your eyes off the road. Enough to cover the length of a football field while driving 55 MPH.

Americans are killed every day from motor vehicle accidents that involve distracted driving, such as using a cellphone, texting or eating.

USING A CELLPHONE WHILE DRIVING INCREASES THE RISK OF CRASHING BY 4 TIMES.

All Statistics can be found on the NSC and CDC websites. 

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OUT OF THE BOX


A QUIRKY LOOK AT THE CULTURE AT LARGE PHOTO BY BRADEN HALL


LET’S

TACO-BOUT IT Sophomore Luke Bower takes on the challenge of reviewing the old and new taco joints to determine the best one.

IT’S REALLY QUITE simple—you take a tortilla and fill it with virtually anything you want. What was once only a crispy shell filled with ground beef, lettuce, tomato and cheese has morphed into something entirely different. Over time, Americans have taken the traditional taco and done what Americans tends to do with things:

BY LUKE BOWER

Layout Lauren Jarvis Photos by Luke Bower Graphic by Audrey Ryden

add about 1,000 calories. Whether they’re on flour or corn, or filled with beans, eggs, meat or all of the above, tacos have become one of America’s favorite foods. In this issue, I visit Boerne’s newest taco places, along with those that have stood the test of time, in a quest to find the perfect Boerne taco.

ZY’S | MARY’S FUZ E| US HO

E TACO HOUSE | B RN OE RN E

U

’S | MA FUZZY RY’S T | E S ACO S |B O H OE O C RN A T ET AC O

S TACOS |BOERNE TACO HOUSE | FUZZY’ | MARY’S TACOS | B OE G| 76


BOERNE TACO HOUSE Boerne Taco House is brand new and poised to be a star. A very clean and bright atmosphere and super fresh food makes it a must-try. The most popular tacos at Boerne Taco House are the Taco Pirata for $3.50 and the Rango for $2.50. The Taco Pirata was my favorite. It is filled with tender, extremely flavorful carne guisada and melted cheese. Unfortunately, only the corn tortillas are homemade at Boerne Taco House, but the flour tortillas aren’t at all bad. The Taco Pirata was perfectly seasoned, grilled to crispy perfection on the outside, with a layer of gooey cheese on the inside. It was incredibly delicious. The staff is very friendly and there is plenty of open seating. I whole-heartedly endorse Boerne Taco House and can see it becoming a Boerne favorite in the near future. HOURS OPEN: MON. - SAT. 7 AM TO 2 PM. LOCATED ON 209 LOHMAN ST.

MARY’S TACOS

FUZZY’S

Another relatively new restaurant to Boerne., Fuzzy’s Tacos is the only chain being reviewed in this issue, and is just one of 13 sites. This place has a super fun and inviting atmosphere that is great for families. Fuzzy’s menu has all the classic Mexican favorites such as burritos, quesadillas and enchiladas. However, they are known for their tacos. Fuzzy’s is popular for its shrimp and fish tacos. A favorite is the Cali Heat for $3.19. This taco is a little more adventurous than your traditional taco. It holds tempura shrimp, bacon, avocado, cheese and pico de gallo, all topped off with a siracha lime sauce and feta cheese. You can choose flour or corn tortillas. As you can imagine with such a wide array of ingredients, the flavors explode in your mouth. One negative at Fuzzy’s is the size of the tacos. You will definitely need two or three to make a meal, which makes it a little more expensive. But, you can’t go wrong with the flavors. Fuzzy’s has both indoor and outdoor seating and a bar and trivia games played every Sunday and Wednesday. This place is a definite must-try for a fun atmosphere and a unique menu.| HOURS OPEN: MON. - THU. 7 A.M. TO 10:00 P.M., FRI - SAT. 7 A.M. TO 12 A.M., SUN. 7-8 LOCATED AT 1540 RIVER RD.

Most Geneva students are familiar with local favorite Mary’s Tacos. Boerne’s iconic taco haunt has done more than satisfy taco-loving customers. Known for its convenient location and delicious tacos, Mary’s never disappoints. At any given time, the line at Mary’s stretches to the door. Mary’s is ALWAYS crowded, but don’t worry. No matter how long the line is, it is safe to say that the amount of time between you and your tacos is a maximum of 10 minutes. The service is fast, and while you are waiting, you can watch your tacos being made. The most popular taco at Mary’s is the Sean Special. It has mounds of chopped potatoes, scrambled eggs, bacon, refried beans and cheese all resting on top of a warm homemade flour tortilla—all for the low price of $2.25. If you’re not up for the beans or their after-effects, Mary’s offers a Silent Sean without beans. I tried the Sean along with the Pork Verde taco and both were amazing. The tortillas are perfect—not too thick and not too thin. Mary’s doesn’t skimp on fillings either. Just one taco can satisfy an average adult. The only negative side to Mary’s is the seating. It is always packed and the restaurant feels cramped if you aren’t lucky enough to find a table in one of the strange little alcoves tucked into the back room. But, who needs seating with tacos this good? Just get your tacos to go. All in all, there is something special about the tacos at Mary’s, and I highly recommend stopping by. HOURS OPEN: MON. - SAT. 6 A.M. TO 1:30 P.M., SUN. 7 A.M TO 1 P.M. LOCATED ON 518 E BLANCO RD.


THE

TALON Established 2006

For those who are afraid of working out and might be scared off by Coach Wright’s nomenclature, we offer the following explanation of her exercises: SB BENCH PRESS INTO PUSHUPS: SB stands for “soda bottle”; thus, the “bench press” is pressing the edge of the bottle cap against a bench to remove the cap before you “push up” the bottle to your lips

SQUATS ON BOSU WITH MED BALL:

SQUATS INTO WALL SIT: There is EQUIPMENT NEEDED: actually a comma missing (between “wall” and “sit”) from this exercise name and an apparatus (a chair) is involved—simply put the chair against the wall and then squat into the wall until you sit

BOSU stands for “Big Ole Stinky Underwear,’ so you have to know what the squat involves; Med is shorthand for “medieval,” and everyone wore BOSU to a ball in the Middle Ages (it was a dirty grimy time)

INCLINE DB BENCH:

PULL UPS INTO BURPEES: “Pull ups”

WT LUNGES INTO DB PUSH/PULL:

are intermediate diapers and “burpees” is a euphemism for what happens in diapers

SIDE LUNGE WITH CROSSOVER: The side lunge is a description of leaping across the dinner table for the last of the sides (normally mashed potatoes) while the crossover is actually a redundancy since leaping across the table means you have already crossed over

WT STEP UPS: WT stands for “wing tips” and we all know that wing tips are a kind of men’s dress shoe, so “step ups” is shorthand for getting better dress shoes (namely, wing tips)

MILITARY PRESS INTO UPRIGHT ROW: Rowing upright is extremely difficult because the boat tips and you lose your balance, thus the need for soldiers to press against the boat to hold it steady (hence the name “military press”)

Similar to SB Bench, DB is slang for “drink bottle,” but in this case, “incline” refers to the angle of the bench that allows for the best drinking motion As you would suppose, this involves two people fighting over a drink bottle (probably Dr. Pepper) after lunging at each other in their wing tip shoes

SINGLE LEG LIFT ON BENCH:

This involves lying on the ground next to a bench and relaxing one leg on the bench (not both legs—just one…otherwise this is way too relaxing)

YWTL’s: This stands for “You Win; They Lose” and is the follow up celebration for the winner of the DB Push/Pull

PLANKS ON BOSU: Of course BOSU is “Big Ole Stinky Underwear” and a plank is a political point or platform; thus, this involves delivering speeches regarding your position on BOSU (whether at medieval balls or not)

BICEPS CURL INTO TRICEPS PRESS:

a towel around your neck and jumping off of the roof of your house.

Turning two ceps into three ceps via the method of curling would be amazing and worthy of a news story, hence the press

VUPS INTO HALLOWS: This is not

CALF RAISES IN/OUT/FWD: Raising

SUPERMAN: This involves safety-pinning

even English: “vups” is German slang for “whoops,” which in this exercise implies slipping into some sort of Harry Potter idiom (without the “deathly” part) G| 78

cows is a worthwhile endeavor whether the cattle are raised inside or outside, and all is for the benefit of “Famous Worldwide Dairies”


Kenny Kidd artistically poses in front of the “The Grand Budapest Hotel” which is one of the movies he mentions for the ISFP.

ENOUGH KIDDING AROUND Brother and sister come together to recommend songs and movies for our/ your specific personalities.

BY KENNY KIDD

Layout by Braden Hall and Audrey Ryden Photos by Braden Hall

NOTA BENE: THE Myers-Briggs Type Indicator is completely theoretical. Granted, so is gravity, but I do not believe the MBTI works perfectly as a tool to classify everyone into sixteen different personalities. It is a fascinating, extremely valuable starting point in understanding others; however, there are more than sixteen people in the world, and no one fully fits the mold of each combination of letters (for example, I have a problem with the Introverted/ Extroverted dichotomy—I think that varies by the day). E/I for extroverted or introverted, S/N for sensing or intuitive, T/F for thinking or feeling and J/P for judging or perceiving. 

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That being said, I think that someone’s taste in movies, or any form of art, is rooted in what they think about, how they feel, and how they perceive the world. Different personalities can have a completely different response to the same movie; someone’s favorite movie can be someone else’s least favorite. Below I’ve found a few movies that I believe fit the theoretical

cognitive functions for each MBTI type. If you’re an ENFP, you may still love movies that I would recommend to ISFJs, but I simply think that there are films that fit your enthusiastic, creative and passionate personality more so than an ISFJs gentle, humble, and peace-seeking mindset. So, without further ado, here are some recommendations for each type.

FILMS FOR EACH MBTI TYPE

INFJ

Introverted/Intuitive/Feeling/Judging: “Magnolia,” “Her,” “The Perks of Being a Wallflower.”

ENFP

Extrovert/Intuitive/Feeling/Perceiving: “Dead Poets Society,” “Moulin Rouge,” “Swiss Army Man.”

These films are rooted in deep emotion, seeing beyond the surface of a situation and finding your purpose in this world. There’s a profound sense of meaning and longing for human connection in each of them.

INFP

Introverted/Intuitive/Feeling/Perceiving: “Spirited Away,” “Midnight in Paris,” “Pan’s Labyrinth,” “Lord of the Rings.”

INTJ

Introvert/Intuitive/Thinking/Judging: “Inception,” “Memento,” “Seven,” “Fight Club.” It is rare for a movie to be complex and brilliant enough to stimulate your mind. If a film can puzzle you, engross you, and keep you genuinely intrigued then you’ve found a film you can love. The strong sense of purpose and unique, puzzle-like structures of these movies are something you’ll respond to.

INFPs generally seek passion and a unique voice through art. Odds are you love the imaginary worlds of Middle-Earth and Narnia and relate to the head-in-the-clouds, lost-in-your-own-world kinds of characters. These movies provide a wonderful escape for your strong passion and wistful imagination.

ENFJ

Extrovert/Intuition/Feeling/Judging: “Les Misérables,” “La La Land,” “The Truman Show.”

INTP

In these movies, your powerful heart and drive for peace in the world have found kindred spirits. Your passion, longing for novel ideas and fantasies for changing the world for the better are found in “Les Mis” and “The Truman Show.” G| 80 | FEATURE

All of your passion, lust for adventure and freedom, zany ideas, along with your surprisingly gentle heart and search for authenticity, need a home, and here they are. It’s hard to find movies as unique and layered as you bunch are, but I believe I’ve found a few, especially in “Dead Poets Society.”

Introvert/Intuition/Thinking/Perceiving: “Interstellar,” “Primer,” “Arrival,” “Blade Runner 2049.” I would recommend Christopher Nolan to NTs. As you’re constantly analyzing and rationalizing everything around you, I would recommend these brain games to you brilliant, scatterbrained folk. The science, ideas and originality in these movies will leave you thinking.


ENTJ

Extrovert/Intuitive/Thinking/Judging: “Gladiator,” “The Social Network,” “Steve Jobs,” “There Will Be Blood.”

ESFP

Extrovert/Sensing/Feeling/Perceiving: “Baby Driver,” “Hairspray,” “Singin’ in the Rain.”

Among the strongest and most driven, visionary of people, it’s rare that a movie will impress you, much less a character in a movie. These films all contain whip-smart, strong characters with an insatiable drive to accomplish their goals. Aaron Sorkin’s fast, clever writing in “The Social Network” will appeal to you as well.

The crazy, enthusiastic energy of each of these movies is almost enough to match the never-still ESFP. Naturally bright and energetic, this type will respond to the relentless pacing, bright colors, wonderful aesthetic and infectious tone of these movies, along with the surprisingly strong sense of morality.

Extrovert/Intuition/Thinking/Perceiving: “The Martian,” “Rushmore,” “Juno.”

Introvert/Sensing/Thinking/Juding: “Saving Private Ryan,” “Braveheart,” John Wayne Movies.

ENTP

ISTJ

There isn’t a type with a taste as varied and straightup bonkers as the ENTP. Anything that can get you excited by its new idea is just your speed. The exciting science of “The Martian” and the kindred spirits found in “Rushmore” and “Juno” would work for you too.

ISFJ

Introvert/Sensing/Feeling/Judging: “The Shawshank Redemption,” “Stand By Me.”

The classic strength and sense of duty in these movies is something an ISTJ will respond to. These are movies imbued with loyal devotion to the people in your life, to your mission, and to a formula that works.

ISTP

Introvert/Sensing/Thinking/Perceiving: “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly,” “No Country for Old Men,” “Mud.”

“The Shawshank Redemption” is a classic, warm, and heartfelt movie that makes you want to believe the best in people. This fits the ISFJs gentle demeanor, and with “Stand By Me” you get a nostalgic story of childhood friendship, something that would touch you emotionally.

ISFP

Introverted/Sensing/Feeling/Perceiving: “Whiplash,” “Captain Fantastic,” “The Grand Budapest Hotel.”

These movies are driven by a sense of rationality. They’re more cold than warm, but there is a sense of depth in each of them—they are movies that you need to try to understand the logic of their world, however cynical it might be. The quiet, rational beauty and thoughtfulness of each of them will warrant responses from ISTPs.

ESTJ

Extrovert/Sensing/Thinking/Judging: “The Godfather,” “American Sniper.” This type should love the strong characters present in “The Godfather” and “American Sniper,” along with the traditional themes of devotion to family and internal conflict over making the right decision. “The Godfather” especially is very well-structured, which ESTJs should appreciate.

The passion and desire to explore the world, and cherish all of the beauty in it, is found in a few ways in these movies. The driven passion of Andrew in “Whiplash”, the beautiful idealism of the family of “Captain Fantastic” and the unique tone and beauty of “The Grand Budapest Hotel” will all affect you.

ESFJ

Extrovert/Sensing/Feeling/Judging: “The Princess Bride,” “Forrest Gump,” “The Help.”

ESTP

Extrovert/Sensing/Thinking/Perceiving: “Goodfellas,” “Mad Max: Fury Road,” “Pulp Fiction.”

These movies have an inherent sweetness about them, something very giving and caring and considerate, which makes the audience feel like they’re being given a warm hug. Along with their collective sense of nostalgia, these are movies that will remind people of the ESFJs in their lives. 

The pure adrenaline present in these movies is enough to please any ESTP, who are just trying to get the biggest rush they can from their sensory experiences. They should also respond to the clever, in-the-moment planning of the characters in these movies, who are driven and bold enough to accomplish whatever goal they have.

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GET THIS IN YOUR EARS

Cammie Kidd presents her music recommendations for Myers-Briggs

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BY C. EDEN KIDD WHAT’S A SONG without personality? For starters, it’s nearly impossible. Anything created by a creature with a personality is naturally going to have some sort of personality in itself. As many of you probably know, my brother and I have gotten roughly eyebrow deep in the Myers-Briggs personality test. This is a quiz that we have each had many people take which describes you using four letters: E/I for extra or introverted, S/N for sensing or intuitive, T/F for thinking or feeling and J/P for judging or perceiving. It would take a whole magazine to explain

the whole thing and I can’t possibly be equipped to do that anyway. (You can take the test yourself at myersbriggs.org. It is highly interesting stuff and I recommend reading up on it.) But what I can attempt to do is provide each of the 16 personalities with a theme song. These are songs that I feel convey a sense of each personality type as they are on paper, not necessarily songs you will like just because I matched it with your fourbig-letter adjective. But I do hope you enjoy them or find the exercise fascinating in some way. Here we go!

DIPLOMATS

EXPLORERS

INFP: “Soul Meets Body” by Death Cab for Cutie This is 100% poetry, most convincingly about finding beauty in the world despite the world.

ISFP: “I am the Fire” by Halestorm Much like this song, ISFPs are passionately themselves, nothing else, whether you like it or not.

ISTP: “My Generation” by The Who On the surface an anthem of a rebellious teenager, somewhere deeper is a heart with a “do unto others” attitude.

INFJ: “Astrovan” by Mt. Joy This enigma mixes the purity of art with the perversity of struggle in attempt to encourage struggling artists.

ENFJ: “All in This Together” from High School Musical These peeps love to band everyone together and are best at doing it.

ESTP: “Green Lights” by NF These are the people who know what they want and how to get there, but never stop at just knowing.

ENFP: “First Time in Forever” from “Frozen” A tribute to a world full of possibilities, this song is exciting, scary, full of joy and opportunity, and best of all, unpredictable.

ESFP: “Believer” by Imagine Dragons This is a song that sees past experiences as a means to the here and now. Any past pain just makes them more driven now.

SENTINELS

ANALYSTS

INTJ: “Black Mirror” by Arcade Fire These people possess the kind of intuitive eye that can see the path their society is taking and where it will lead.

ISTJ: “I’m Gonna Be” (500 Miles) by The Proclaimers This is a song that demonstrates golden-retriever level loyalty and dedication with a steady structure.

INTP: “Another Brick in the Wall” by Pink Floyd This song is a protest of conformity’s impact on areas of life in which most people wouldn’t have noticed it.

ISFJ: “City Bird” by Of Montreal The singer exhorts a bird in the city to be free, without a thought that he might be stuck in the same city blocks.

ENTJ: “Just Can’t Wait to be King” from “The Lion King.” Fixated on a vision and thrilled to imagine its fulfillment, prepared to be a wonderful leader.

ESTJ: “Free Bird” by Lynyrd Skynyrd Unless it was their idea, “this bird you cannot change.” And they like their freedom that way.

ENTP: “Bohemian Rhapsody” by Queen (mostly the rock opera part) This takes an idea quick-wittedly down every surprising path and somehow does it all fluidly.

ESFJ: “Hiding” by Florence + the Machine If there is only one type who will always be there when you need them, even if you’ve cut them to the core, it’s ESFJs. |



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The birth of television and how it became the norm of everyday life.

BY MATTHEW SCHRODER

Layout by Lauren Jarvis Photos by Lauren Jarvis Graphics by Audrey Ryden

WHEREVER YOU GO, there are electronics. I mean, of course, there are constantly smartphones in your hands, but it has gotten to the point where they really are a necessity of life. However, one thing that has evolved out of entertainment and has not developed out of actual need, is television. When pondering over the greatest and most influential inventions, the wheel, printing press and steam engine may come to mind. These are often pointed out as being influential because of the profound impact they have had on society. However, nothing has had more of an impact on the evolution of society than television (when I say television I mean the entire field of audio-visual entertainment). Society took probably the sharpest turn with the introduction of television. I don’t mean to take away anything from any other revolutionary discoveries, but nothing can take the throne from TV. Sure, the wheel radicalized transportation and helped allow for the expansion of humanity; the printing press gave us the ability to share written communication and helped to influence and teach numerous generations; and the steam engine threw the entire industrial revolution into fruition, but nothing did as much as television. TV has brought about a new age and only proves to do more each day. Electricity, discovered by Benjamin Franklin (although he really only demonstrated that lightning was in fact electricity), proved to be a vital piece in the coming of the television. After around 85 years, the curiosity in electricity took another turn when Michael Faraday’s discoveries led to further understanding electromagnetism—a crucial 

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1900

First TV officially revealed

1902

First acual film, “A Trip to the Moon,” released

1954

First color TV released

1969

TV broadcast from the moon

1977

First true LED flat panel television screen

step in television’s development. Around the time of the Civil War, the first picture was sent through wires with the invention of the Pantelegraph. Then, upon the first motion picture ever, in which Edward Muybridge took several pictures of a galloping horse, people started to get some creative ideas. In another 30 years, at Paris’ World Fair in 1900, the first TV was officially revealed. Once unveiled to the world, the floodgates were opened. Over the next century, the television evolved from a novelty to a family tool. It was closer and ultimately to the point it is today: a tool of power for those involved and pleasure for those on the outside looking in. When the television was first introduced, it completely turned the world upside down. But what was to be done with it? There was now a vacancy in the entertainment universe that never had to be filled before. Only 24 years passed between the first actual film of George Miles’ “A Trip to the Moon” in 1902 and the first public demonstartion of television in 1926. What would happen next? No one knew what to expect. Most of the first movies that were made were experimental and just went along with the goofy comedy of the day. For instance, one of the more popular actors of early days of film, Charlie Chaplin, made his living off acting like an oddball while the story lines of early film and TV lacked any sense of real drama or suspense. Most of TV—such as “The Aldridge Family” of the 40s, “Leave it to Beaver” of the 50s, “The Andy Griffith Show” of the 60s—were based around families. This trend continues now because, with all of the confusion and tragedy that constantly happens globally, people want to be happy; they want to be entertained. That’s it. People don’t really want to watch how terrible the world they live in is. They want to watch people, with problems similar to their own, resolve any and every issue that may happen to them in a 30-minute period. Even though that may never happen in anyone’s life, seeing happy endings works as an invisible force that leads us to believe that we can do anything or that things will always work out for the better. As a society, although we recognize the television as an outstanding innovation, we have become desensitized to the point of complaining at every inaccuracy, and even complaining that old fashioned things are better. Each generation has something to say about what was better about their television: “Back in my day we had go to a drive-in theater,” or “back in my day we had two channels and a 4 inch screen,” or “...there wasn’t any smut on television,” or “...we had Selena Gomez, not some of these whoserwhatsits.” Additionally, in the 1940s or even up to around ten years ago, people would have been more than fine with a TV that was decently sized but was without HD graphics. Now, wherever you go, there is always a “but.” It may be a good TV…but it’s a bit too hard to learn to navigate. Or, it’s a good price…but the refresh rate is too low. On top of becoming dissatisfied with what could be considered a gift to mankind, the TV, along with other technologies, has allowed us to become dissatisfied with the human interaction we once cherished. Before the television,


WHEN THE TELEVISION WAS FIRST INTRODUCED, IT COMPLETELY TURNED THE WORLD

UPSIDE DOWN

families took time at the end of a long day to enjoy each other’s company: maybe to tell a story or read together. However, once this new form of entertainment arrived, these occasions were thrown out the window for a much more easily attainable distraction. For instance, before the invention, living rooms often had an open layout that encouraged gathering. There was a seating area around the edges that all pointed back to each other. The common room soon morphed into somewhat of a movie theater: everything pointed to the screen. Although not completely thrown out all at once, these valuable occasions slowly dwindled. For a little while, the Television actually helped to do what not having a television does now: it helped bring families together by giving them a common goal, per se. But after the TV’s novelty faded, so did watching it as a family affair, and different family members went off to participate in different activities now that being together wasn’t the most fun thing anymore. All things considered, I have a recommendation for you all, if it isn’t too brash. First, take a moment to look at your TV. Take a look at what is inside it and what makes it work. If need be, pry that baby open to get a good idea of what you’re working with. Really appreciate how many hours inventors poured into that little box with which you spend all of your time and how much money it cost to bring this to your everyday life. After that, take some time to do what every single person did before the invention of the TV…just spend some time with your family.|


GENEAGLE

A glance at some of the interesting things you wish you knew about campus people and random facts you may quickly forget.

HOW LONG DO YOU KEEP YOUR CHRISTMAS TREE UP? BY LAUREN JARVIS

Layout by Anna Riedlinger Photos by Braden Graohics by Anson Eggerss

For 1 week after Christmas:

50%

Multiple months:

20%

At least one month:

27%

All year long:

3%

WHO WOULD WIN?

It’s Fight Club except imaginary, but the question still stands: would these Geneva teachers win? Mr. Gardner VS. a bear

BY ANNA RIEDLINGER

At first glance, you might ask ‘how is this even an option?’ The bear would win hands down. But bear with me (hee hee bear). Mr. Gardner knows a lot about physics and trajectory stuff (Is that even a thing?) I’m not sure, I’m in Earth and Space Science). Anyway, he could most definitely outsmart the bear. Maybe he could think of a way to shinny up a tree, then wait at the right moment to tackle it from behind. He is also so low to the ground, if he lays down and it’s snowing, there’s no way the bear would even see him, giving Gardner a major advantage. The bear would probably not want to hurt Gardner in the first place; I mean really, who would want to hurt him. Miss Jacobson VS. the abstract concept of sadness. If this fight were to happen, it would not last long. We all know how upbeat and happy Miss Jacobson is. Jacobson would have won before it even began. She wouldn’t hurt sadness; she would just be so happy and positive about the situation, thus defeating sadness. More realistically, sadness would not even show up to the fight.


ROUNDING CORNERS What’s the next million dollar idea? These genius inventions may not be too far off…

BY MATTHEW SCHRODER

PORTABLE STADIUM SEATING

Can anything compare to the unending back pain and overall luxury of the stadium seats prevalent in your friendly neighborhood football stadiums? Nothing ever will. But wait! Maybe nothing ever has to! With the all new PORTABLE STADIUM SEATING you can take this awesomeness with you to attach to every uncomfortable and comfortable chair alike. Its ingenious design of a two-foot segment of your average stadium seat is easily placed over a wide variety of seats with little to no overlap, and can be effortlessly dragged behind you by the rope that comes with every model. BOOMBOX HEADPHONES

SUNSCREEN BOWL

Despite the ability of the large and clunky boom boxes of the 80’s and 90’s to liven up any venue, the one common complaint was that it was hard to carry around everywhere. BUT... what would you say if it were able to be brought with you everywhere you went without taking away its funky vibe? You would say I’m crazy, right? Of course you would, and I would completely understand, for that is a madman’s dream. However, this madman is a little bit more willful than the rest. Introducing Boombox Headphones. The Boombox delicately placed upon the head with an expert stitching job combining it with a multicolored hat that is close enough for you to hear. They rival even the best headphones without even having to connect to your ears in any way at all! WALKING HELMET

Isn’t it such a nuisance to have to apply sunscreen every time you go outside? Stop whining, you albino freak, because now you can simply dunk your face into any Sunscreen Bowl and enjoy the benefits of the vast amounts of time you will save in a lifetime.

Have you ever accidentally bumped into something while walking? I give you the Walking Helmet. (Warning! not to be used at a brisk pace). No longer do you need to fear getting a concussion walking into doorways and walls.


HEY THERE GOOD BOOKIN’ This issue’s teacher recommended reads are sure to have your weekends booked (and it should be fun to see the Roman Catholic and Protestant authors battle it out).

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BY EMME OWENS

Layout by Lauren Jarvis Photos by Braden Hall Graphics by Audrey Ryden


MR. STEVE TYE humanities instructor

This was a game-changer. This book still has me reevaluating EVERYTHING. Liturgy, culture and anthropology, oh my!

I’ve never laughed or cried harder than while reading this book. Everything Wendell Berry writes is the most beautiful thing I’ve ever read, but this book is the most beautiful thing I’ve ever read.

We build some really bad cities in the United States. Kunstler explains why and provides a glimpse of how we should be building instead. History, political science and urban design have never been so fun (or full of f-bombs).



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MRS. DEBBIE GEORGELOS spanish instructor

I couldn’t teach at Geneva if a C.S. Lewis book didn’t top my list of favorites, and with one title I’ve included seven! I loved reading them as a child because they transported me to a land full of fun and adventure! Who doesn’t love talking animals? And if you’ve never wanted to be a king or queen, prince or princess, then something is seriously wrong with you! Obviously, as an adult, the books have a much deeper spiritual meaning. Although I captured some of it when I was young, I can’t get through a lot of the books now without being brought to tears by the beautiful ways C.S. Lewis portrays God’s incredible love for us.

Jesus was a Jew and Christianity has its roots in Judaism. This book helped me understand aspects of the Jewish culture that enriched my reading of the Bible. Things I used to skim over in the Bible had new meaning when I understood the Jewish cultural and historical contexts.

She’s Jane Austen! I love the tension, the wit and the dialogue.

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MR. DODD NAISER chemistry instructor This is the first book I read after I attended my first Christian retreat; a Christian retreat that turned my life around. Some days after reading this book I had a sort of a “Damascus Moment.” This book gives a beautiful explanation of the last supper and how it translates into how we celebrate the mass today. It was a life changing read for me and by far the most inspirational book I’ve ever read.

This was the second book I read after I attended the life changing Christian retreat mentioned above. I read this book, one chapter a day, during the 2013 lent which immediately followed my “Damascus Moment.” The book itself helps a person get on a path that should result in complete surrender to Jesus. It helped for me.

This was the third book I read after the life changing retreat described above. After a significant “come-to-Jesus” moment in my life, I developed an insatiable appetite for learning about Jesus and those close to Him. Of course I read the Bible, but I also wanted to know more about the lives of those closest to Jesus. Well, if you want to get to know someone, it’s a very good idea to start with the person’s parents. I was drawn to this book in particular. This one was written by the author of my favorite book. I made the assumption that this book should also be very good. Well, it was!


QUARTERLY COMIC Looking at the colors of the ocean through a different lens.

ILLUSTRATION BY NATHAN ZUNIGA


HOLIDAYS | HAPPY HOLIDAYS | HAPPY HOLIDAYS | HAPPY HOLIDAYS | HAPPY HOLIDAYS |

TheBriffey, Geneva Quarterly Ashton Landis, Gabi Aisling Ayers Staff and Anson Eggerss Photos by Jacqueline Knox

JACKSON YOUNG, ALEXA GEORGELOS, JACQUELINE KNOX, NATHAN ZUNIGA

TAYLOR TIPPIT, SYDNEY DENNIS, RYANNE FITZGERALD, NATHAN YOUNG

ASHTON LANDIS, GABI GRIFFEY, AISLING AYERS, ANSON EGGERSS

AUDREY RYDEN, LAUREN JARVIS, MATTHEW SCHRODER, BRADEN HALL

LUKE BOWER, GRACYN FRIELING, ANNA REIDLINGER, JAYNE GOODMAN

BECKY RYDEN, CARISSA GEORGELOS, DANIEL GROVER, EMME OWENS

IDAYS | HAPPY HOLIDAYS | HAPPY HOLIDAYS | HAPPY HOLIDAYS | HAPPY HOLIDAYS | HAPPY H

HAPPY HOLIDAYS | HAPPY HOLIDAYS | HAPPY HOL

OLIDAYS HAPPY | HOLIDAYS HAPPY HOLIDAYS | HAPPY


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Geneva Quarterly issue 2 2018  

A Rhetoric School publication for the Geneva School of Boerne, Texas

Geneva Quarterly issue 2 2018  

A Rhetoric School publication for the Geneva School of Boerne, Texas