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GENERIC ANIFESTO Volume Two : Fall | Winter 2012

CONTENT

03 Easy Riders

Photos by Ramon Felix

12

The Liars Photos/text by Dustin A . Beatty

16

RVN G INTL.

Shepard Fairey: Deuce Studio

Photos Jon Furlong/OBEY

P h o t o s b y M a g d a l e n a Wo s i n s k a

32

S h o p Ta l k

S R E

41

Mariachi El Bronx

V i s u a l To u r D i a r y

Keit h Har ing Arc hives

Photography by Jon Furlong/OBEY

50

Photos

D

Te x t b y D u s t i n A . B e a t t y & N i k M e r c e r

I

36

Bukowski’s Guide to DTL A

R

30

The GNRC Eye

A

S

Y

18

Te x t b y N i k M e r c e r

E

28

What the hell is wrong with freedom? That ’s what it ’s all about. E a s y R i d e r ( 19 6 9 ) Cover : Shepard Fairey, Los Angeles, CA . Phot o by JON FURLONG

02

Riders Shawn Mc kinney • 03 Harley Davidson FXDP • Generic Surplus Dom Ryan Benno •Har ley Davidson Dyna FXDX • Gener ic Sur plus Mojave To m m y W i l s o n • H a r l e y D a v i d s o n 19 8 5 F X R • G e n e r i c S u r p l u s D u c k B o o t Gregor y Bolyard • Harley Davidson Spor tster • Generic Surplus Calvar y Keit h Mar low • Har ley Da vidson Dyna W ideglide •Gener ic Sur plus Ledger Mid P H OTO G R A P H Y R A M O N F E L I X

WE’D LIKE TO TAKE YOU INTO THE STUDIO WITH THE LIARS

THE LIARS

THE LIARS

ward and f or t he f irst time I s t ar t ed wr iting about my self more. T h at ’ s what you realiz e using speci f i c s u bject matt er—you can easil y def l ec t t hat inward g az e a little ea s i er. I f any t hing , t he visuals on our Tu m bl r had t o do wit h t he process of m aking t he record.

Aaron i s m ak i n g s om e vi deos an d I m i gh t be m ak i n g s om e t- s h i r ts . I n t h e p r o c e s s o f wa i t i n g f o r t h i n g s t o h a p p e n we ’r e a l l s t i l l c r e a t i n g s o m e t h i n g f o r t h i s c o l l e c t i ve .

JU LIAN: Yeah, we reall y g o t t o ex -

J U L I A N : [ L a u g h t e r ] I t wa s r e a l l y a

Th ere are som e am azing visuals on t h e websit e. Are t h e visual narrat ives c onsis t ent wit h t h e l yr ic al nar rat ives on eac h rec ord ?

per iment wit h tr y ing t o make n ew sounds and explore new wa y s t o express oursel ves, especial l y w i t h t he videos you see on Tumbl r.

space issue and I couldn’t set up my d r u m s . I v i s i t e d t h e m o n c e a we e k a n d b r o u g h t t h e m o r a n g e s , vi t am i n s an d real f ood.

AN GU S : It just depends on t he project. W it h t he last record we developed subject matt er ear l y on so we had stuf f we f ocused on and studied. S ist er wor ld was more f o cused on L A and a lo t of t he visual elements pla yed wit h t hat .

Th at h as t o be an am azing t hi ng t o d o no t onl y as a band but al s o wi t h your ar t bac kg round s as wel l .

An gu s : I t h ad a l o t t o do w i t h ti m i n g an d wan ti n g t o gi ve ou r s el ves as m u c h ti m e as pos s i bl e t o ex per im en t. An exam pl e i s t h at we real l y wan t ed Ju l i an t o ex per i m en t w i t h t h e l i ve dr u m s an d t h e c abi n real l y was n ’ t s e t u p f or t h at. We j u s t wen t bac k an d f or t h u n ti l we f ou n d s om e t h i n g we l i ked.

A N G US: Whe n you ’re asked t he sa m e q u e st i o n over and over how d o yo u no t a nswe r it t he same wa y ? Yo u d eve l o p t hi s habit or r itual of sa yi ng t he sa me t hing s.

f or dinner and watc h t he NBA f inals. I remember t his one Corona commercial t hat had t his song t hat was a t o t al nig htmare! One of us would end up humming it.

JULI A N: So m e t i mes people don ’ t eve n l o o k o n t he W ikipedia and t hey a sk yo u q u e stions t hat are six ye a r s o l d

JU L IAN: We ’re insanel y cr iti cal t oo. I’ll t hink t o my self, “ This sounds like t hat one no t e from t hat one song . N ope, can ’ t do it.”

S o J u l i a n , w hy w e r e n ’ t y o u i n v i t e d to the cabin?

I’ ve un de r s t ood t hat Th e Liar s t ake a un ique ap p roa c h t o rec ord ing whe re you guy s wor k on ind ivid ual p ar ts an d t he n com e t og e t h er and share ide as. A N G US: That ’ s how we ty picall y wo r k . We d o a l o t individuall y and so m e t i me s eve n f inish song s ourse l ve s. The m a j o r dif f erence wit h t hi s re co rd i s we decided no t t o

S TUDIO SPACED WITH THE LIARS It ’s no t o f t en we g e t a g lim p s e in t o b e h in d - t he - sce ne s of a f i l m , pi ece o f a r t o r eve n a t h e ma ki ng o f a so ng. T he begi n n in g , m id d le a n d e n d o f t he cre a t i ve proces s i s o f t en t im e s t h e m o s t in t e re s t in g whe re a r tist s are gai ni ng t h e ir f o o t in g , e m b ra c in g t r i a l a nd er ror and put t in g lim it a t io n s o n wh a t t h e f i na l o u t co m e w i l l be. L o s An g e le s a r t ro c ke rs , T h e Li a r s a re f am i l i ar w i t h t h is jo u r n ey a n d f o r t h e b e t t e r p a r t o f a decade ha ve b e e n h a rd a t wo r k o n a n id e nt i t y t ha t r ival s even t he m o s t s e a s o n e d ve t e ra n s . H e re t hey give u s a gl i m p s e in t o wh a t h a p p e n s b e hi nd cl o se d door s , i n t he wo o d s a n d e s p e cia ll y in t h e he a r t o f t hei r s t u di o here in L o s An g e le s . I’d love t o m a ke t h i s t h e i n t e r vi ew T h e Liar s ha ve neve r d one . A N GU S : I f eel l ike a lo t o f w r it e rs a s k a b o u t t he ge n eral s u bj ect m a t t e r o f t h e re c o rd ; in f a c t , t hey d o n ’ t ge t t oo par t i cu la r like a s k in g a b o u t t h e l yr i cs. The n agai n, I ’ m no t t o o s u re I ’d wa n t t h e m t o d o t ha t . [la u ght er ] A A RON: We g e t a s ke d a lo t o f q u e s t io ns ge a re d t owards com pa ct in g it a n d s e llin g it a lm o st l i ke o u r lab el woul d ga t h e r in f o r m a t io n . T h ey a l m o st neve r ge t pas t t he l i s t e n in g ex p e r ie n ce .

d o t ha t . Aa ro n and I move d i nt o t his cabin in t he wo o d s t o f o rce o u r se l ve s t o sha re ideas wa y bef ore we wo u l d no r m a l l y. I f yo u ha ve a c hance t o wor k a l o ne o n a n i d e a yo u ca n al m o st develop it t o a p o i nt whe re yo u f e e l st ro ngl y a b o ut it. It was a vul ne ra b l e ex p e r i e nce . Was goin g in t o t he cabin a wa y t o rem ove your self f rom any outside in f lue n ce s t hat migh t h a ve c rowd ed t he p roce ss? A N G US: I t ’ s i m p o ssi b l e t o shu t music out of your l i f e a nd l e t eve r yt hi ng co m e fro m i n side. In t his da y a nd a ge t he re i s m u si c eve r ywhe re —all t he time. You wa t c h a b l o o d y b a ske t b a l l ga me and Nic ki Mina j i s p l a yi ng i n t he b a c kgro u nd . That stuf f g e ts in my he a d ! JULI A N: I t sne a k s i n. Yo u ’ l l b e i n t he super mar ke t ge t t i ng so me ve ge t a b l e s a nd t here ’s some song t ha t ’ s p l a yi ng t ha t yo u ’ l l e nd u p humming when you ge t ho m e ! A ngu s: Li ke Ja c k Jo hnso n o r so me t h ing ! Ju l i a n: I si t t he re a nd t r y t o f i gu re out why it ’s in my he a d ! A N G US: Mu si c i s ma d e i n su c h a wa y t o inf iltrat e a nd sne a k i nt o yo u r he a d . Fo r ge t tur ning on t he rad i o o r eve n wa t c hi ng T V whe n yo u ’re tr y ing t o wr it e. A A RON: Whe n we we re i n t he ca b in we didn ’ t even ha ve ce l l p ho ne re ce p t i o n. We ’d mee t up ever y nig ht

JU L IAN: The ar twor k was reall y tied t og e t her on t hat record as well. AN GU S : W it h WIXIW we didn ’ t tie oursel ves t o any specif ic subject matt er. We lef t t hing s pre tty openended. It made us tur n reall y in -

ANGUS: Yeah, it ’s the best thing to be able to this into a multimedia project. When we were in ar t sc hool we were all forced to have to work on something specif ic but when we all explored the idea of being in a band we realized we could do it all. We can run the gamut from things being visual to exploring new sounds. JU LIAN: On any g iven da y An gu s is in his room wor king on m u s i c ,

JULI AN : An d I di dn ’ t h a ve t o an n oy t h em w i t h al l t h e l ou d ban gi n g an d 80% of t h e s h i tty s ou n ds .

THE LIARS

Is t he re a B-roll wit h music like t here is wit h f ilm —a bun c h of discarde d wor k? JULI A N: D e p e nds o n how f a r yo u want t o g o bac k .

THE LIARS

What ’s lif e like in L A f or T he Liar s?

A N G US: The re wa s a p o i nt a nd i t mig ht be wr itt en o n t he wa l l so mewhe re , whe re we ha ve stuf f f or a p o ssi b l e f o l l ow u p a l b u m. I t wa s t hroug h t hat process t ha t we d e ci d e d wha t wo u l d go o n t he f irst one. We si m p l y ha d t o p u t st u f f t o t he si d e t hat we t houg ht mi ght se e t he l i ght o f d a y a t so m e point. T he reality o f t ha t t i m e l i ne i s so me t i m e s j u st t o o muc h. T he time i t t a ke s t o go i nt o mi x i ng a nd ma st er ing just t akes so l o ng t ha t t he i d e a o f ge t t i ng so m e t hing else out is re a l l y d i f f i cu l t . O ve r t i me , yo u j u st ha ve a t endency t o move o n fro m t he o l d st u f f. I t ’ s a shame but we need t o p u t a l i m i t o n o u r se l ve s. E ve n wi t h ma ki ng t he so u nd s we had t o put con st ra i nt s o n o u r se l ve s a nd sa y, “ N o more exper iment a t i o n; we ne e d t o m a ke so m e t hi ng int eresting .” W it h mi x i ng yo u so m e t i me s ge t t o a p o i nt where you can ’ t eve n d e ci p he r whe t he r o r no t t hi ng s are int eresting o r no t . Yo u j u st he ar t he sa m e t hi ng so many times yo u mi ght no t b e t he b e st p e r so n t o ask if some t hing i s go o d o r no t .

JULIAN: I grew up here so I spend a lot of time w i t h m y f a m i l y. AARON: I kind of gave up life outside of t he band. [ l a u g h t e r ] B u t r e a l l y, I ’ m k i n d o f r e a d y t o g e t o u t but will do what’s right for us.

How did you se ttle on t he ar twor k? Th ere are so m any ide as on t he wall.

You all h a ve a n a f f i ni t y f or Be r l i n co r re ct w hi c h i s a lo t like L A i n s o m e re s pe ct s ?

A N G US: We go t t o t he p o i nt where t here was so mu c h we t ho u ght we ne e d e d t o a sk ano t her ar tist t o ma ke so me t hi ng. Ju l i a n ca l l e d u p Bea S c hling elhof f, who ha d d o ne a co u p l e o f o u r l a st album covers, and a ske d he r f o r so me i d e a s. She se nt us one wit h a shoe o n i t a nd i t b l ew eve r yt hi ng o u t o f t he wat er.

AN GU S : I t ’ s c h eap as c h i ps f or on e. Wh en we f i r s t moved t h ere we were exci t ed abou t doi n g a l o t of East er n Eu ropean t ou r i n g. Wh en you ’re i n B er l i n you ’re as c l os e t o Pol an d ever y t h i n g i n t h at area as you can ge t. We cou l d ge t i n a van an d go t o Sl ove nia if we wan t ed t o, w h i c h we di d a l o t.

JULI A N: We l ove d i t b u t a t t he sa me time we were sho c ke d . A sho e ?! C’ m o n. [l a u ght e r ]

I love Am er i c a bu t I ge t t o a poi n t w h ere I f eel a l i ttl e over whel m ed w i t h t h e c u l tu re i n Am er i c a, w h i c h can g e t pre tt y over w h el m i n g. T h e com m erci al , i n - you rf ace vibe ge ts t o be a bi t m u c h bu t I m i gh t f eel t h e same wa y i f I l i ved bac k i n Au s tral i a. B er l i n i s t h e absolut e rever s e of t h at. I t ’ s a pl ac e w h ere we can shut of f a n d con c en trat e.

A A RON: We we re a l l i n he re b a ng ing our heads a ga i nst t he wa l l a nd t r yi ng t o ge t t o a place where t he st re ss wa s o f f t he d e ci si o n- making process. I t ho u ght u s a gre e i ng o n t he sho e i m ag e was g oing t o p a ci fy eve r yo ne b u t i t cre a t e d so muc h ang er!

To a cer t ai n ex t en t, L A h as t h at t oo w i t h a m u l ti tu de of op tion s t o go t o t h e des er t as wel l as go t o t h e beac h.

JULI A N: A s we we re sa yi ng, yo u ca n do ever y t hing in a b a nd ; t he re a re so ma ny a ve nu e s. S ome times when yo u ’re d o i ng t hi ngs i nt e r na l l y i t ’ s almost im possible t o a gre e . Whe n yo u ge t a t hi rd p a r t y t o do some t hing yo u ca n ’ t re a l l y a r gu e wi t h hi m o r her wit h as muc h i nt e nsi t y a s yo u ca n wi t h e a c h o t he r. 14

V isit liars l i ar s l i ar s . com f or m ore i n f o. T E X T / P H O T O S   :   D U S T I N A B E AT T Y 15

RVN G INTL.

RVN G INTL.

MATT WERTH OF RVN G INTL.

There aren ’ t m a ny in d e p e n d e n t re c o rd l a b e l s l i ke RV N G I nt l ., but , t h e n a g a in , t h e re a re n ’ t ma ny owners as dedi cat e d t o t h e ir s in g u la r v is io n a nd i t s exec ut i on as M at t We r t h , w h o’s o p e ra t e d t he i m p r i nt f or over a deca d e . B o r n in M a d is o n , W isco nsi n, b u t ra i s ed i n L i t t l e Ro c k , Ar ka n s a s , We r t h , n ow, a f t e r t e n year s i n t he Bi g Ap p le , co n s id e rs h im s e lf a N ew Yo r ker. H e m oved t o t h e m e t ro p o lis f ro m P h ilad e l p hi a , i n 2 0 0 2 , w here he p la ye d b a s s in b a n d s a nd o p e ra t e d F il e T hi r t een, a s m a ll p u n k la b e l, o r ig in al l y f o u nd e d in 19 8 9 by a f e llow Ar ka n s a n . “ I t h a d b e e n a ro u nd pr i o r t o m e t akin g it ove r b u t it h a d t h is t ra d i t i o n o f bei ng pas s ed a lo n g f ro m , like , o n e m ic o- ge ne ra t i o n t o t he next ,” s a y s We r t h . H e g o t t h e m u si c b u g fro m his f at her, t ho u g h ; “ h e wa s a n F M jo c k t ur ne d ra d i o st at i on m anage r. M u s ic wa s a ll a ro u n d , e sp e ci a l l y ro c k m u s i c. Wh e n I wa s s eve n , I wa s g if t e d Va n H a le n ’ s 19 84 - t h a t wa s my f irs t a lb u m , a n d I t hi nk i t wa s per f ect l y n o r m a l f o r my d a d t o g ive t ha t t o me .” In P hi l adel phi a , We r t h m e t D a ve P ian ka , a f f e ct i o nat el y cal l ed D a ve P. , wh o , a t t h a t p o int , ha d j u st st ar t ed hi s reg u la r d a n c e m u s ic p a r t ie s, Ma k i ng T im e. Wer t h an d P ian ka h it it o f f a n d d e ci d e d t o jo i n f o rces t o cre a t e a m o re c lie n t - o r ie nt e d co m p a ny, w hi c h even t u a ll y b e c a m e RV N G I n t l. “ We we re wo r k i ng w i t h o t h e r re co rd la b e ls t o p rom o t e t he i r own al bu m s , l i ke He f t y Re c o rd s a n d a lo t o f e l e ct ro cla s h s t u f f t hat wa s h a p p e n in g a t t h e t im e ,” re f l e ct s Wer t h. “A bi t o f a h o d g e - p o d g e o f h ire d eve nt a nd prom o t i o n wor k . I t wa s a n o ka y re s p it e f o r m e , ha v ing l ef t r u nni ng a re c o rd la b e l, b u t , u lt ima t e l y, I f e l t un f u l f i l l ed.” We r t h t h e n t u r n e d b a c k t o p hysi ca l re le as es t o co m ba t h is in a b ilit y t o n o t c o n t inu e o n a s a

“ c ha m p i o n o f t he p a r t y,” whi c h he war ml y descr ibes Pi anka a s. “ We wa nt e d t o p ro d u ce a mix t o send t o p o t e nt i a l eve nt cl i e nt s so we co u l d prove t o t hem t hat we knew wha t we we re d o i ng a nd could select g ood DJs o r wha t eve r. So Ju l i a n G re f e p u t t o ge t he r t he f irst RV N G mix; RVN G PRSNTS MX1, whi c h wa s b asicall y a spra y p a i nt e d CD i n a sp ra y - p a i nt e d ca s e.” Gref e wound u p wo r ki ng o n t he se co nd o ne , t o o, and N ew Yor k Ci t y f i x t u re a nd ra d i o ho st o f Be ats In S pace, T im Swe e ney, wa s b ro u ght o n f o r t he t hi rd. It was around t hi s t i me t ha t a j o b i n t he p u b l i shi n g sect or broug ht We r t h t o NYC i t se l f, whi c h wa s a l so when he st ar t e d re l e a si ng v i ny l re co rd s, st a r t i ng wit h t he NRDS 12” s. “ I t hi nk [my t a ki ng o n t he l a b el alone] just kind o f ha p p e ne d a s I st a r t e d a ct u a l l y r unning t he busi ne ss o p e ra t i o n o f Rv ng. By v i r t u e of time and time i nve st e d , t he l a b e l a sp e ct b e ca m e my f ocus.” RV N G grew q u i c k l y, neve r l o o ki ng b a c k o r second-g uessing

itself. Wer t h beg an one of his most lauded ser ies; FRKWYS , in whic h he pairs an older ar tist wit h one or more new t alents; and beg an sig ning bands in a more traditional f ashion, f ost er ing t heir careers as he unleashed sing les, EPs, and fullleng t h long -pla yers. Take, f or exam ple, B londes, t he lef t-f ield electronic duo on RV N G: “I g uess you could consider me being ver y present in t heir ear l y da y s of pla y ing out live and controlling t he basements and g aller ies t hey were pla y ing ,” reminisces Wer t h. “S t alking t hem a little bit. T here ’s cer t ainl y an A& R aspect t o it.” We r t h h a s p l e n t y m o r e e x c i t i n g y e a r s a h e a d o f him, and he eagerly looks to the future. He recently shac ked up wit h Sweeney himself to bring to life t he muc h-talked-about and long-overdue Beats In Space label, which just saw it ’s first release. The handful of records t hey’ll be putting f or t h in addition t o all t he RVN G ones he has on his plate will keep the man more than suff icientl y busy f or a long while. “Ma ybe [RVN G] is a business but resembles [a] free-form idea or concept. That is, the conceptual interface is a little more abstract.” Stop by igetr vng.com for more information. TEXT : NIK MERCER

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17

THE DEUCE Street

artist

and

graphic

designer

Shepard

Fairey’s

über secret studio known as the Deuce, is where he and his assistants work on his fine art and large format projects. In these exclusive pictures, we get a peek into the working space of one of the most groundbreaking and influential artists of the last two decades.

PHOTOS: JON FURLONG / OBEY

OBEY for

Generic Surplus A v a i l a b l e F a l l 2 012

B U KO W S K I ’ S G U I D E T O D T L A

THE POET LAUREATE OF SKID ROW

LOS A N G E L E S C E N T R A L L I B R A RY WHY: F inding refuge from a rat her gr itty home life and his fat her ’s abusive tendencies in t he Phil o s o p h y s e c t i o n a t t h e l i b r a r y, B u k o w s k i w o u l d write many of his poems and stories sitting by one of the many desks obser ving his surroundings. It was also here Skid Row’s unof f icial Poe t Laureate discovered fellow L.A .-writer John Fant e ’ s 19 3 9 n o v e l A s k t h e D u s t , w h o s e m a i n c h a r acter Ar turo Bandini would become an impor tant figure in Buk’s life and writing, and subsequently resulting in a Fante revival among Bukowski readers. Despite having gone t hrough several refurbishments, the Central Librar y is still one of Downtown’s f inest arc hitectural buildings, dating b a c k t o 19 2 6 . T h e b o o k s e l e c t i o n a i n ’ t h a l f b a d , e i t h e r.

BUKOWSKI’S GUIDE TO DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES

WHERE: 630 W 5th Street L o s A n g e l e s , C A 9 0 0 71

T H E K I N G E D DY SA LO O N

WHY: Said t o be Los Angeles’ oldest public house, Cole’s claims to be the originator of the F r e n c h d i p s a n d w i c h ( h o w e v e r, s o d o e s i t s l o n g time rival Philippe’s down t he road, but t hat ’s a dif ferent stor y). A frequent lunch stop for the Buke, who undoubtedly appreciated the Frenc h D i p ’ s a b i l i t y t o c u r e a n y h a n g o v e r, n o m a t t e r t h e size of it. Chec k out the dimly lit speakeasy the Va r n i s h a t t h e b a c k t o o ( a l t h o u g h t h e s i m p l e m a n Bukowski himself probably wouldn’t have t he wallet or interest to set foot in t here), t hat ser ve neatly tailored, amazingly tasting cocktails that surely lives up to its name.

W H Y: K i n g E d d y ’ s t a g l i n e , “ W h e r e n o o n e g i v e s a shit about your name: Ser ving you assholes for 30 years”, says it all: This Skid Row dive bar was a sanctuar y for t he hard-dr inking Bukowski. The central hub for illegal alcohol bootlegging in the prohibition era of t he ‘30s, King Eddy’s was par t of an enor mous Downtown tunnel networ k . Having resisted t he “hipsterization” of many ot her dive bars in t he Skid Row area, t he 90-year-old speakeasy is still t he place to go if you want your dr inks c h e a p a n d y o u r s u r r o u n d i n g s s o m e w h a t s k e t c h y. A b l o c k a w a y, o n E a s t 5 t h a n d L o s A n g e l e s S t r e e t , a young Bukowski would, of ten on a daily basis, go to c hec k out t he job boards and obser ve t he skilled workers snap up odd jobs, as t he unskilled writer seldom had much luck himself.

W H E R E : 118 E a s t 6 t h S t r e e t L o s A n g e l e s , C A 9 0 014

W H E R E : 131 E a s t 5 t h S t r e e t L o s A n g e l e s , C A 9 0 013

COLE’S FREN C H DIP SANDWIC H

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S H O P TA L K

SHOP TALK

With vinyl sales up it’s no wonder indie record stores are still thriving cultural bastions. Here are a few of our favorites. vacant wit h plans for a pizza shop in one and t he ot her to-be-determined. The next morning he had keys in his hand. “ When you put t he energy out there things sometimes come together in a way you wouldn’t expect,” he remembers. T h r e e y e a r s l a t e r, O r i g a m i i s a p e r m a n e n t f i x ture in East Los Angeles’ Ec ho Par k neighbor hood wit h diggers traveling far and wide to rummage through Sc hield’s wall-to-wall selection of indie, punk , psyc h and electronic—you name it ; he’s got it. Add to that, unforgettable in-store per formances from t he likes of Sigur Ros’ own, Jonsi, Florence and t he Mac hine and local favorites like Black Flamingo and Origami seems more and more like a pillar of t he community t han just your typic a l v i n y l v e n d o r. O r i g a m i V i n y l i s l o c a t e d a t 1816 We s t S u n s e t B LV D . Los Angeles, CA 90026. Visit origamiorigami.com for more info.

PERMANENT RECORDS The creative class has a tendency to follow affordable rent, which sometimes comes with seedy surroundings. That ’s becoming rarer for most neighbor hoods in East Los Angeles. Ec ho Par k , Sil ver lake and now even Highland Par k and Eagle Roc k have turned into havens for t hose wanting to plant roots in an ar t smar t community without dodging too many bullets. It makes per fect sense t hat Chicago-based Per manent Records would open anot her location in t he sleepy section of E a g l e R o c k . O w n e r s , L a n c e B a r r e s i a n d L i z To o l ey boast an excellent selection in t heir budget bins along wit h carr ying new releases for anyone l o o k i n g f o r s o m e t h i n g l e f t o f c e n t e r.

O R I GA M I V I N Y L The stor y of Origami Vinyl is a classic case of the age-old adage that things always happen for a r e a s o n . T h e s e e d w a s p l a n t e d e a r l y f o r f o u n d e r, Neil Sc hield as he explains t he dream to open a record shop was one he had since c hildhood. Incubated by t he revolving door of t he music industr y and a handful of positions that muzzled his creativity and curatorial voice, Sc hield set t he table for his next move unintentionally by selling of f a handful of his unwanted collection to friends. Af ter this, the light bulb went of f and the c hain of events t hat led to t he of f icial ribboncutting started to stack. While att ending a show at The Ec ho, Ec ho Par k’s quintessential indie venue, Sc hield was having a drink across the street at El Prado when he got to talking with an old friend about his life-long goal to sc hlep t he ot her ‘blac k gold.’ As luc k would have it, t he storefronts adjacent to The Ec ho were

T E X T & I M A G E S  : D U S T I N A . B E AT T Y ( L A ) N I K M E R C E R ( N Y ) 32

Permanent Records is located at 1583 Colorado BLVD. L o s A n g e l e s , C A 9 0 0 41. Visit permanentrecordsla.com for more info.

VA C AT I O N V I N Y L of t he indie industr y touting that there is still a customer who shares a special af finity for analog f o r m a t s . Va c a t i o n n o t o n l y c a r r i e s r e c e n t r e l e a s es but also displays a vast, well-curated used selection. Similar to Origami Vinyl—their neighbor d o w n t h e r o a d — Va c a t i o n a l s o e x t e n d s s e r v i c e s like tic ket sales to f ans pr ivy to big box retailers tac king on unjustif iable fees. Now t hat ’s punk.

W h e n Va c a t i o n V i n y l m o v e d t o S i l v e r l a k e t h e y were no strangers to reac hing t he record lovers in East Los Angeles. The reason to relocate was calculated, as t heir previous storefront wasn’t n e c e s s a r i l y t h e b e s t h o t b e d f o r a c t i v i t y. N o w central to most ever yt hing in t he Sunset Junction a r e a , Va c a t i o n h a s s e r v e d a s S i l v e r l a k e ’ s p r e m i e r destination for audiophiles over t he last t hree years, especially for passers by and t he local c o m m u n i t y w i t h a n a t t u n e d e a r. M a n a g e r, P e t e Ma jors p r o u d l y s t a t e s t h a t Va c a t i o n w a s o n e o f the first record shops to open since the decline

Va c a t i o n V i n y l i s l o c a t e d a t 3 815 We s t S u n s e t Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90026. Visit vacationvinyl.com for more information. 33

S H O P TA L K

CO - O P 87 “It ’s not only the more established boutiques that are defining the role of record stores in these tumultuous times, though. On a small, mostly resid e n t i a l s t re e t i n G re e p o i n t , C o - o p 87 i s m a k i n g a bold ef for t to bring relevance bac k to t he traditional record shop. The owners, Ben Steidel, Mike S n i p e r, a n d M i k e C a t a l a n o , c a m e t o g e t h e r i n J u l y o f 2 011 t o p o r e t h e m s e l v e s i n t o t h e i r b r i c k - a n d mor tar aspirations.

OTHER MUSIC Other Music is a record shop that ’s seen it all. F o u n d e d i n 19 9 5 , t h e s t o r e , l o c a t e d m e r e b l o c k s from NYU, star ted out when “indie music had kind of gone through a boom,” only to endure “a b u s t a n d , [ f i n a l l y, ] a s o r t o f r e v i v a l , ” s a y s J o s h M a d e l l , w h o o w n s i t a l o n g s i d e h i s p a r t n e r, C h r i s Va n d e r l o o . B a c k t h e n , “ t h e r e w e r e a l o t o f n e w labels in the U.S. that were putting out singles and new bands. And t here was t his explosion in this, like, underground electronic scene,” notes M a d e l l . “ T h e r e w a s n ’ t a n y s t o r e i n N e w Yo r k t h a t w a s c a r r y i n g a n y o f t h a t s t u f f . We s t a r t e d t h e music section at Kim’s [in the East Village] and were doing really well, but were still working for someone else and couldn’t do what we wanted.” M a d e l l a n d Va n d e r l o o o p t e d t o f o r a g e a h e a d on t heir own, opening t heir storefront across t he s t r e e t f r o m To w e r R e c o r d s , w h i c h s h u t t e r e d i n 2006. “Just being near them seemed like a good t hing... and being right by NYU and t he East Village, whic h, at the time, was where all the best music venues were.”

Our first 7” just came out a few weeks ago. It ’s f r o m a l o c a l b a n d c a l l e d E x - C o p s . We h a v e t h r e e a l b u m s c o m i n g o u t t h i s s u m m e r. I t ’ s b e e n r e a l l y fun and kind of a big deal.” O t h e r M u s i c i s l o c a t e d a t 15 E a s t 4 t h S t r e e t N e w Yo r k , N Y 10 0 0 3 . Visit othermusic.com for more info.

H A LC YO N “ H a l c y o n w a s l a u n c h e d i n 19 9 9 , p r e t t y m u c h by accident,” admits owner and founder Shawn Sc hwar tz. At t he time, Sc hwar tz had “been worki n g i n t h e m u s i c i n d u s t r y, f o r c o r p o r a t e r e c o r d labels, whic h was dissatisfying,” and wanted a c hange. He moved to Brooklyn, whic h, “at t he time, was considered, like, anot her countr y by

most people who lived in Manhattan,” and, in an ef for t to rouse curiosity and excitement in his relocation, star ted hosting Saturday af ternoon mus i c s e s s i o n s f o r h i m a n d h i s b u d d i e s . E v e n t u a l l y, so many people floc ked across t he East River to enjoy t he latest in dance music t hat t hey required more space, and t hat ’s when Halcyon opened. “Our shop was of a dozen or less that catered specif icall y t o t he DJ mar ke t,” but “all of t hem were concentrated in lower Manhattan, so, when we opened up, we were the only thing in Brooklyn,” whic h gave Sc hwar tz an advantage and helped him weather the music industr y’s bust in the early a u g h t s . “ We ’ v e a l w a y s b e e n e x t r e m e l y c o m m u n i t y - o r i e n t e d , ” h e a d d s . “ We ’ v e a l w a y s d o n e s t u f f wit h t he idea t hat a record shop is vital, so we’ve done stuff to engage with the community outside of the store and make sure people appreciate the value of what we bring and understand what we o f f e r. We ’ v e p r o d u c e d a n d p r o m o t e d a l l k i n d s of dif ferent events, from in-store t hings to live b r o a d c a s t s t o p o d c a s t s . We r u n a s i t e w h e r e w e r e v i e w r e c o r d s , i n t e r v i e w a r t i s t s . We w o r k c l o s e ly wit h all t he promoters in town to coordinate content wit h events to help drive interest to t he s c e n e . We d i s t r i b u t e l a b e l s . . . a l o t o f l o c a l N e w Yo r k l a b e l s . . . e s p e c i a l l y g u y s t h a t a r e r e a l l y D I Y o r o f a y o u n g e r g e n e r a t i o n . We w o r k w i t h e v e r y b o d y. Yo u c a n ’ t r e a l l y b e i n v o l v e d i n t h e s c e n e and not run into somet hing t hat Halcyon hasn’t had at least some par t in.” H a l c y o n i s l o c a t e d a t 57 P e a r l S t r e e t N e w Yo r k , N Y 112 01. Visit halcyonline.com for more info.

Other Music has adopted to today’s musical lands c a p e j u s t f i n e , t h o u g h . “ We d o l i v e m u s i c p r o m o tion sometimes and put toget her shows, bot h here a n d a t S X S W a n d o t h e r f e s t i v a l s . We a l s o h a v e a lot of par tnerships. Like, we have a good relationship with the Ace Hotel;there’s a kiosk right by t he c hec kout and a lot of t he rooms have turntables in t hem, and we stoc k t hem wit h vinyl.” A l s o , a s o f t h i s y e a r, M a d e l l a n d c o m p a n y r u n Other Music Records “af ter many years of talki n g a b o u t i t , ” h e a d m i t s . “ We p a r t n e r e d w i t h F a t Possum t o manuf acture and distr ibut e t he label.

“ We a l l h a v e b a c k g r o u n d s i n b a n d s a n d i n d e p e n d e n t m u s i c , p e r h a p s m o s t n o t a b l y S n i p e r, [ w h o [ ow n s t h e l a b e l C a p t u re d Tra c k s ,” s a y s S t e i d e l , h i m s e l f t h e b a s s i s t i n L e m o n a d e , a n N YC - by - wa y of-San Francisco trio. “The impetus for this particular shop was t he oppor tunity to take over t he storefront in t he building owned by t he Mexican

Summer/Kemado labels,” he shares. “ They had previously used t he space for a more boutiqueoriented shop, but t he idea of us taking over t he space for a more all-inclusive new and used record store was somet hing t hey were ver y receptive to, and t he timing was right for us.” So how do t hey keep t heir heads above water in t hese crazy times when ever yone seems obsessed wit h social media, Internet connectivity and promotion, and digital retailing? “There’s several ways t o ‘ d o i t r i g h t , ’ o b v i o u s l y, b u t , f o r u s , w e s i m p l y work extremely hard to be a store full of quality records at good prices, and thus far it ’s done ver y well f or us. Per haps better t han expected.” And t hey’re not tr ying to grow at an over-ambitious speed, either; says Steidel, “as far as the greater future of t he store, we’ll let t hings grow at our own pace.” C o - o p 87 i s l o c a t e d a t 87 G u e r n s e y S t . ( b e t w e e n N a s s a u A v e & N o r m a n A v e ) i n B r o o k l y n , N Y 112 2 2 . V i s i t c o o p 87. o r g f o r m o r e i n f o .

MARIAC HI EL BRONX’ VISUAL TOUR DIARY

Mariachi el Bronx’ Visual Tour Diary Just returning from accompanying the Foo Fighters on their Wasting Light World Tour, the Mariachi el Bronx is the alter ego of Los Angeles-based punk band the Bronx, sound leased

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self-titled LP followed last summer.

ALL PHOTOS: MARIACHI EL BRONX

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MARIAC HI EL BRONX’ VISUAL TOUR DIARY

MARIAC HI EL BRONX’ VISUAL TOUR DIARY

Inside the Haring Archives The legendary street artist and social activist Keith Haring and

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search and document for an upcoming project. Here’s a glimpse into their visit.

TEXT: SHEPARD FAIREY PHOTOGRAPHY: JON FURLONG/OBEY All photos taken with kind permission of The Keith Haring Foundation, New York.

O B E Y WO M E N for

Generic Surplus A v a i l a b l e F a l l 2 012

KEITH HARING ARC HIVES

Though Keit h Har ing died onl y two years af t er I st ar t ed making stree t ar t, his ar t and practice had already made a profound impact on me. At ar t college a n d o n t h e s t r e e t s o f N YC i n t h e l a t e 8 0 ’ s a n d e a r l y 9 0 ’ s , Ke i t h ’ s r a d i a n t baby and ot her images could be seen on t he tees of all t he flyest hipsters. Keit h Har ing was a prolif ic ar tist wit h a distinct sty le of dra wing and painting t hat was simultaneously ref ined, but primitive, deliberate but lyrical and energetic. Haring believed “t he public has a right to ar t” and t his philosophy informed his populist approach to spreading his ar t and messages. He pursued his art with a deeply personal vision, but also as a champion of social j u s t i c e a n d a b e l i e f i n t h e i n t e r c o n n e c t e d n e s s o f h u m a n i t y. H a r i n g d e m o n strated t he power of ar t on t he streets, but he also put his ar t on t-shir ts and r e c o r d c o v e r s . H e e v e n o p e n e d a r e t a i l s p a c e i n N YC c a l l e d T h e P o p S h o p . Eventually Haring’s ar twork became widely respected, displayed, and sold as “ f i n e a r t ” . H a r i n g r o s e f r o m t h e 8 0 ’ s N YC g r a f f i t i s c e n e t o n o t o n l y a f f e c t t h e ar t wor ld, but t o dramaticall y im pact pop culture. Inspired by Keit h Har ing’s ac hievements, I pursued my ar t career wit h t he optimism t hat my goals could be attained.

S h e p a r d F a i r e y 2 012

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This Page:

01-Origami Vinyl’s, Neil Schield and artist, Steven Harrington at the ‘Sun Dunes’ party

07-White Arrows at the SXSW Throwdown.

celebrating Harrington’s boot collaboration.

08-Henry Clay People at our Record Store Day event with Origami Vinyl and The Echo.

02-Musician, Gerry Beckley at home in his loafer collaboration with Generic Surplus.

09-The Allah Las at the SXSW Throwdown.

03-Unknown Mortal Orchestra at the SXSW Throwdown.

10-Race’s set list at our Record Store Day event with Origami Vinyl and The Echo.

04-Writer at the SXSW Throwdown.

11-Ryan from NO at our Record Store Day event with Origami Vinyl and The Echo.

05-Light Asylum at the SXSW Throwdown.

12-At The Drive In at Origami Vinyl picking up their new pairs of Generic Surplus

06-Fidlar at the SXSW Throwdown.

01

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05 Steven Harrington and his assistant, Brandon next to the completed Trippy Triptych on the Ace Hotel grounds

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This Page: 01-Steven Harrington fully zen on day three of Trippy Triptych Mural. 02-Steven Harrington on day two of Trippy Triptych Mural. 03-Questlove holding it down at Do-Over The Ace Hotel Palm Springs. 04-Artist, Steven Harrington starting the Trippy Triptych Mural as part of our collaboration with The Ace Hotel Palm Springs. 05-Florence and the Machine private show at The Ace Hotel Palm Springs. 06-Our own, Julie Buchser and comedian Fred Armisen at the Wayyy Out pop-up shop at The Ace hotel during Coachella.

EDITORS INTRO

genericsurplus.com

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Generic Surplus Borstal Cust om print ed canvas by ar tist

Steven Harrington

A v a i l a b l e F a l l 2 012


Generic Manifesto: Volume Two (FAll 2012)