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the Powerof REPORT CARD FALL 2011


Letter from the Chancellor Just over four months ago The State University of New York issued a first-of-its-kind Report Card. That Report Card was the result of a promise we made in our 2010 strategic plan, The Power of SUNY, to use data to be transparent to our constituents. This document, our second Report Card, is intended to make good on another Power of SUNY promise – to use data to drive decision making and show results. Our first Report Card established a baseline – we told you which 90-odd metrics we deemed most important to the SUNY System and we told you how we did in each of those measurements during the 2008-2009 academic year. Missing from May’s baseline Report Card was context and goal setting. For example – our first time full-time bachelor’s degree graduation rate in 2008-2009 was 62 percent. Is that good? How does that compare? Where do we want to be? In this edition we are not only including data for 2009-2010, but have also included nationally comparable context so you can get an idea of how we are doing. You will see those national context figures in the Competitive SUNY section. This Report Card also reflects campus priorities by identifying which campuses are focused on which of The Power of SUNY Six Big Ideas. The Power of SUNY, now starting its third year, is contingent upon continuous improvement. We are proud of our accomplishments and pledge to continue our work towards driving New York’s economic recovery and enhanced quality of life. Next fall we will show you even more progress. Finally, The Power of SUNY is coming to your region. Over the 2011-2012 academic year we will be visiting each of the ten regions of New York for a day-long campus showcase. Visit www.suny.edu for a schedule. I hope to see you along the way!

Nancy L. Zimpher The State University of New York


Report Card Guide

The SUNY Report Card continues to be an evolving document.

This document is not intended to be a standalone product. To understand the full scope of The Power of SUNY one will need to read the original strategic plan published in April 2010 and the baseline Report Card published in May 2011. As the third document in a sequence, this Report Card focuses on data rather than narrative. This edition introduces a national context element. That data was gathered through a study of publicly available data analytics tools published by the University of Alabama System, the University of California System, the California State System, the California Community College System, The State University System of Florida, the University System of Georgia, the University of Massachusetts System, the University System of Maryland, the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education, the University of Texas System, the Texas State University System, and the University of Wisconsin System. In some cases where data is not available for a full system we used a representative campus – usually the largest in the system. Where possible a table will follow each metric in A Competitive SUNY listing the high, low, and median data points extracted from that comparative data set. Because our Diversity Counts and A Competitive New York sections are unique, similar national comparisons are not possible.

DEFINITIONS & KEY This document represents data summarized over the entire State University of New York System. The following definitions will assist you in reading and understanding our Report Card: BASELINE DATA: Represents SUNY’s status in terms of data available for the 2008-2009 academic year, unless otherwise noted. OUTPUT METRIC: A data element that tracks progress toward achieving a particular goal. PROCESS METRIC: Tracks progress toward implementing a program or system critical to achieving a particular goal. Most process metrics will be exchanged for output metrics once our program or system is in place. WORK-IN-PROGRESS METRIC: A metric for which data is not currently available.

CONDITION MEASURE: Included in each of the Six Big Ideas, these data points define the overall issue or societal condition SUNY seeks to influence. Generally that condition is not something SUNY can control by itself, but SUNY does have the ability to positively impact the condition and influence change. SUNY CONSORTIA: While SUNY campuses are working in each of the Six Big Ideas, each is particularly committed to affecting change in a select few. We will show you which campuses are especially committed to which Ideas.

NATIONAL COMPARISON DATA: Attempts to provide the reader with a fair set of national data for comparison purposes. Denotes: OUTPUT METRIC Denotes: PROCESS METRIC Denotes: WORK-IN-PROGRESS METRIC Denotes: CONDITION MEASURE Denotes: SUNY CONSORTIA

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A COMPETITIVE SUNY The metrics set forth in A Competitive SUNY track our progress in improving the delivery of our core mission – To Learn, To Search, To Serve – to help us to build a better SUNY and enable implementation of the strategic plan. In selecting these metrics, we looked to national best practices and existing databases to inform our thinking. In this section you will find the essential measurements that define public higher education.

• TO LEARN • TO SEARCH • TO SERVE • STUDENTS AND FACULTY • FINANCIAL HEALTH


To Learn SUNY SUCCESS

GRADUATION RATES

88% N/A

76% N/A

55% N/A

75% N/A

FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME BACHELOR’S DEGREE

TRANSFER BACHELOR’S DEGREE

FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

TRANSFER ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

NOTE: SUNY Success Rates are not available for the 2009-2010 academic year because of data warehouse migration.

62% 63% FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME BACHELOR’S DEGREE

61% 62% TRANSFER BACHELOR’S DEGREE

RETENTION RATES

23% 23%

24% 25%

FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE*

TRANSFER ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

83% 84% FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME BACHELOR’S DEGREE

77% 77% TRANSFER BACHELOR’S DEGREE

61% 63%

56% 56%

FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

TRANSFER ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

NOTE: *Figures from 2008-2009 are restated.

NATIONAL COMPARISON Graduation Rates

NATIONAL COMPARISON Retention Rates 97%

89% 83%

83%

66% 2008-2009

63%

57%

2009-2010

41% High Median

N/A

N/A

17%

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Low FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME BACHELOR’S DEGREE

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TRANSFER BACHELOR’S DEGREE

FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

TRANSFER ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME BACHELOR’S DEGREE

TRANSFER BACHELOR’S DEGREE

FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

TRANSFER ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE


CREDITS EARNED AT GRADUATION

STUDENT/FACULTY RATIOS State-Operated Campuses (2008-2009) (2009-2010)

15.6:1* 15.8:1*

Community Colleges (2008-2009) 133

133

135

135

70

74

71

76 (2009-2010)

FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME BACHELOR’S DEGREE

TRANSFER BACHELOR’S DEGREE

FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

TRANSFER ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

NATIONAL COMPARISON Median - First Time, Full Time Bachelor’s Degree: 133

NOTE: *This figure includes highly labor-intensive clinical and research faculty. For example, academic health science center faculty ratios are by necessity considerably lower. In future years we may consider alternate configurations of this element.

NATIONAL COMPARISON Student/Faculty Ratios Bachelor’s, Master’s And Doctoral Degree-Granting Institutions HIGH

COURSES AVAILABLE ONLINE

21.7:1 18.5:1 16.0:1

MEDIAN

LOW

STUDENTS ENGAGED IN INTERNSHIPS AND COOPERATIVE EDUCATION

20.5:1 22.1:1

Associate’s Degree Granting Institutions HIGH

n/a 19.0:1 n/a

MEDIAN

LOW

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RECRUITMENT AND ENROLLMENT OF STUDENTS FROM HISTORICALLY UNDERREPRESENTED POPULATIONS

133,000 total applications (30%) (3%) more applications from historically underrepresented populations vs. -10,000 (-7%) total applications (3%)

NOTE: Applications data collected for the SUNY application only. In 2010 a number of campuses began to participate in a second application vehicle, the Common Application, resulting in a decrease in SUNY applications.

NATIONAL COMPARISON Applications

95,000 total applications (23%)

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128,000 total enrollments (18%)

1,000

(5%) more enrollments from historically underrepresented populations vs. 6,000 (5%) total enrollments (17%)

NOTE: Total enrollments here is defined at entering student enrollments for the Fall to be comparable with applications.

NATIONAL COMPARISON Enrollments

12,000

Low

Low

from historically 22,000 applications underrepresented populations vs.

432,000 total applications (43%)

122,000 total enrollments (18%)

High

High

from historically 188,000 applications underrepresented populations vs.

enrollments from historically 23,000 underrepresented populations vs.

CHANGE

CHANGE

1,000

from historically 22,000 enrollments underrepresented populations vs.

2009-2010

2009-2010

from historically 40,000 applications underrepresented populations vs.

143,000 total applications (27%)

2008-2009

2008-2009

from historically 39,000 applications underrepresented populations vs.

3,000

enrollments from historically underrepresented populations vs.

23,000 total enrollments (51%) enrollments from historically underrepresented populations vs.

21,000 total enrollments (13%)


STEM GRADUATES

2008-2009

9,940

2009-2010

10,640

stem degrees

81,790 total degrees (12%) stem degrees

85,520 total degrees (12%)

NATIONAL COMPARISON High

23%

Low

18%

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To Search FACULTY AND STUDENT RESEARCH AND CREATIVE PRODUCTIVITY RESEARCH EXPENDITURES

RESEARCH EXPENDITURES PER TENURE OR TENURE-TRACK FACULTY 300,000

950,000,000

NUMBER OF LICENSES EXECUTED

50

900,000,000

250,000

49

850,000,000

200,000

48

800,000,000

150,000

47

750,000,000

100,000

46

50,000

700,000,000 2008-2009

2009-2010

45 2008-2009

2009-2010

Total: $849,961,000 $891,200,000

Total: $126,000

$132,000

Doctoral: $720,332,000 $767,003,000

Doctoral: $255,000

$273,000

NOTE: Represents figures from four-year schools only as reported by the SUNY Research Foundation.

NATIONAL COMPARISON Research Expenditures

NOTE: Represents figures from four-year schools only as reported by the SUNY Research Foundation.

Expenditures NATIONAL COMPARISON Research Per Tenure Or

2008-2009

2009-2010

49

46

NOTE: Represents figures from four-year schools only as reported by the SUNY Research Foundation.

NATIONAL COMPARISON

Tenure-Track Faculty

HIGH

$2,169,200,000

HIGH

$293,500

HIGH

194

MEDIAN

$435,200,000

MEDIAN

$267,000

MEDIAN

93

LOW

$30,800,000

LOW

$182,200

LOW

39

Total Doctoral

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Number of Licenses Executed


NUMBER OF FACULTY AND STUDENTS PARTICIPATING IN SPONSORED GRANTS

LIBRARY CIRCULATION AND E-RESOURCE DOWNLOADS NOTE: Data from 2009 will serve as our baseline for E-Resource Downloads.

10,000 9,000 8,000

Circulation 16%

7,000

E-Resource 84%

6,000

3,083,000 2009

5,000 n/a 2008

4,000

63,000 Change

16,240,000 2009

3,000

n/a Change

2,000 1,000

3,020,000 2008

3,920 4,170

5,290 5,290

9,210 9,460

FACULTY

STUDENTS

TOTAL

NOTE: Represents figures from four-year schools only as reported by the SUNY Research Foundation.

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To Serve GRADUATES EMPLOYED IN NEW YORK STATE MEDIAN INCOME OF GRADUATES EMPLOYED IN NEW YORK STATE DIVERSITY CONTENT IN THE CURRICULUM AND COURSE OFFERINGS GRADUATES IN SUPPORT OF NEW YORK STATE WORKFORCE NEEDS CLUSTER Back Office & Outsourcing Biomedical Communications, Software & Media Services Distribution

2009-2010 140 1,320 -

Electronics & Imaging

120

Fashion, Apparel & Textiles

280

Financial Services

-

Materials Processing Miscellaneous Manufacturing Transportation Equipment Travel & Tourism

11,390 3,880 70 10 1,180

Management

7,270

Education, Training, and Library

17,150

Healthcare Practitioners and Technical

14,460

TOTAL

63,700

SYSTEM ENERGY CONSUMPTION

140,565 btu/ft2 134,941 btu/ft2 -5,624 btu/ft2

PURCHASING POWER 2008-2009 2009-2010 CHANGE

Forest Products

Information Technology Services

NOTE: Data from 2009-2010 will serve as our baseline for this item. This metric is for state-operated campuses, excluding medical degrees.

2008-2009 2009-2010 CHANGE

90

Industrial Machinery & Services

$20,920

6,340

Food Processing

Front Office & Producer Services

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AFFORDABILITY/COMPARATIVE DEBT OBLIGATION UPON GRADUATION

$2,848,451,000 $2,868,152,000 $19,701,000


PATIENTS SERVED BY OUR HOSPITALS

INPATIENT: 70,000 OUTPATIENT: 1,088,000 INPATIENT: 3,000 OUTPATIENT: 11,000

13,540 13,850 310 NOTE: Three hospitals only.

MEDICAL STUDENTS 2008-2009 2009-2010 CHANGE

OUTPATIENT: 1,077,000

2008-2009 2009-2010 CHANGE

2008-2009 2009-2010 CHANGE

INPATIENT: 67,000

HOSPITAL AND CLINICAL EMPLOYMENT

In-State

81%

NATIONAL COMPARISON

In-State

In-State Medical Students

82% In-State

1%

HIGH

98%

MEDIAN

89%

LOW

76%

NOTE: We use first year medical students to establish this comparison.

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Students and Faculty STUDENT DIVERSITY

461,400 TOTAL STUDENTS 2009-2010

2008-2009

2009-2010

Change

2008-2009

2009-2010

Change

ALL

439,500

461,400

21,900

100%

100%

0%

WHITE NON-HISPANIC

286,800

289,100

2,300

WHITE NON-HISPANIC

65%

63%

-2%

ALL MINORITIES

90,600

95,600

5,000

ALL MINORITIES

21%

21%

0%

Black Non-Hispanic

39,200

41,200

2,000

Black Non-Hispanic

9%

9%

0%

Hispanic

29,400

31,400

2,000

Hispanic

7%

7%

0%

Asian/Pacific Islander

19,700

20,700

1,000

Asian/Pacific Islander

4%

4%

0%

Native American/ Alaskan

2,200

2,400

200

Native American/ Alaskan

1%

1%

0%

NON-RESIDENT ALIEN

18,200

18,800

600

4%

4%

0%

UNKNOWN

44,000

56,000

12,000

10%

12%

2%

RACE

14

RACE ALL

NON-RESIDENT ALIEN UNKNOWN


DETAIL: PERCENTAGE OF MINORITY STUDENTS (Chart is a 2:1 ratio)

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

21% 21%

2008-2009

2009-2010

2008-2009 18,200 (4%)

NATIONAL COMPARISON Minority Students

83% 18% 8%

HIGH

MEDIAN

LOW

2009-2010 18,800 (4%)

NATIONAL COMPARISON International Students

High (8%)

AVERAGE TIME TO DEGREE First Time Bachelor’s Degree

4.5 years

2008-2009 2009-2010

2008-2009 2009-2010

4.5 years

First Time Associate’s Degree

4.6 years

4.7 years Median (3%)

Low (<1%)

TIME TO EMPLOYMENT UPON GRADUATION

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FACULTY AND STAFF DIVERSITY

87,900

TOTAL FACULTY AND STAFF 2009-2010

2008-2009

2009-2010

Change

ALL

85,800

87,900

2,100

ALL

WHITE NON-HISPANIC

68,600

70,500

1,900

ALL MINORITIES

13,300

14,100

800

Black Non-Hispanic

6,900

7,000

100

Hispanic

3,000

3,100

Asian/Pacific Islander

3,200

RACE

Native American/ Alaskan NON-RESIDENT ALIEN TWO OR MORE RACES*

2008-2009

2009-2010

Change

100%

100%

0%

WHITE NON-HISPANIC

80%

80%

0%

ALL MINORITIES

16%

16%

0%

Black Non-Hispanic

8%

8%

0%

100

Hispanic

3%

4%

1%

3,600

400

Asian/Pacific Islander

4%

4%

0%

300

300

0

<1%

<1%

0%

3,900

3,300

-600

4%

4%

0%

100

100

NOTE: *Federal report requirements changed. Data not applicable for 2008-2009.

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RACE

Native American/ Alaskan NON-RESIDENT ALIEN TWO OR MORE RACES*

<1%


DETAIL: PERCENTAGE OF MINORITY FACULTY AND STAFF

16% 16%

2008-2009

2009-2010

NATIONAL COMPARISON

33% 19% 2%

HIGH

MEDIAN

LOW

TENURE AND TENURE-TRACK FACULTY 2008-2009 2009-2010

State-Operated

Community Colleges

64%

54%

State-Operated

Community Colleges

64%

53%

NATIONAL COMPARISON Tenure and Tenure-Track Faculty

HIGH

87%

MEDIAN

51%

LOW

48%

NOTE: Institutions vary in how they define and calculate this metric.

STUDENT AND FACULTY SATISFACTION

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Financial Health FULLY LOADED COST PER STUDENT FTE - State-Operated Campuses 2008-2009

2009-2010

TOTAL

$20,390

$20,260

INSTRUCTIONAL

$18,640

$18,530

$10,290

$10,140

Administrative/ Support

$6,400

$6,400

Capital Expenditure

$1,950

$2,000

RESEARCH AND PUBLIC SERVICES

$1,740

PUBLIC SUPPORT PER STUDENT FTE State-Operated Campuses* (2008-2009)

Direct

$1,720

(2009-2010)

(2008-2009)

2008-2009

2009-2010

$8,800

$8,430

INSTRUCTIONAL

$8,770

$8,400

Direct

$4,360

$4,230

Administrative/ Support

$4,120

$3,990

$290

$180

$30

$30

NOTE: Fully loaded expenditures include direct costs for each mission, plus a distribution of related support costs. Research expenditures do not include those at the SUNY Research Foundation. Figures from 20082009 are restated.

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$5,180 $4,750

Community Colleges — State Support

TOTAL

RESEARCH AND PUBLIC SERVICES

Community Colleges** (2008-2009)

FULLY LOADED COST PER STUDENT FTE - Community Colleges

Capital Expenditure

(2009-2010)

$12,570 $11,830

(2009-2010)

$2,770 $2,520

Community Colleges — Local Support (2008-2009) (2009-2010)

$2,420 $2,230 180

NOTE:* Related state funding includes support for core budget, fringe benefits, and debt service/capital expenditures. Funding for university-wide programs, system administration, and SUNY hospitals are not included. **Community Colleges also receive local sponsor support, often referred to as the local share.


STATE-OPERATED CAMPUSES: PUBLIC SUPPORT & FULLY LOADED COST, PER FINANCIAL SUPPORT PROVIDED BY HOSPITALS TO ACADEMIC STUDENT FTE (AAFTE) HEALTH ENTERPRISES (2008-2009)

(2009-2010)

2008-2009 2009-2010 CHANGE

Fully Loaded Cost $20,390

State Support $12,570

Fully Loaded Cost $20,260

State Support $11,830

Local Support $2,230

2008-2009 2009-2010 CHANGE

(2009-2010)

Local Support $2,420

$201,100,000 $14,600,000

FUNDS RAISED IN SUPPORT OF SUNY CAMPUSES

COMMUNITY COLLEGES: PUBLIC SUPPORT & FULLY LOADED COST, PER STUDENT FTE (AAFTE) (2008-2009)

$186,500,000

$232,821,000 $309,325,300 $76,504,300

NOTE: *Data drawn from the Council for Aid to Education survey.

NATIONAL COMPARISON Funds Raised Fully Loaded Cost $8,800

State Support $2,770

Fully Loaded Cost $8,430

State Support $2,520

1%

Community Colleges

2009-2010

2008-2009

8%

$801,408,000

LOW

$52,000,000

NATIONAL COMPARISON Alumni Giving Rate

ALUMNI GIVING RATE StateOperated Campuses

HIGH

7%

StateOperated Campuses

1%

Community Colleges

HIGH

14%

LOW

9%

NOTE: *Data drawn from the Council for Aid to Education survey.

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20

BUILDING AND GROUNDS OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE


2009-2010

21


DIVERSITY COUNTS The Power of SUNY promised to embed SUNY’s commitment to diversity in everything we do. Diversity enriches our lives and the educational experience, invigorates conversations, awakens curiosity, and widens perspectives. Diversity also ensures our campuses mirror the rapidly changing world, creating an environment that prepares our students to be culturally competent so they can succeed anywhere.

• DIVERSITY COUNTS IN A COMPETITIVE SUNY • DIVERSITY COUNTS IN A COMPETITIVE NEW YORK


Diversity Counts in a Competitive SUNY SUNY SUCCESS RATES - N/A SUNY Success Rates are not available for the 2009-2010 academic year because of a data warehouse migration. GRADUATION RATES

63% 1234.5years TOTAL PERCENTAGE OF FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME BACHELOR’S DEGREE STUDENTS WHO GRADUATE ON TIME

AVERAGE TIME TO DEGREE

TOTAL YEARS TO DEGREE OF FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME BACHELOR’S DEGREE STUDENTS

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1. GRADUATION RATES 2. RETENTION RATES 3. AVERAGE TIME TO DEGREE (IN YEARS) 4. RECRUITMENT OF STUDENTS FROM HISTORICALLY UNDERREPRESENTED POPULATIONS AND ENROLLMENT

WHITE BLACK NON-HISPANIC NON-HISPANIC

TOTAL

1 2 3 4

HISPANIC

ASIAN/ PACIFIC ISLANDER

NATIVE AMERICAN/ ALASKAN

NON-RESIDENT ALIEN

UNKNOWN

TWO OR MORE RACES

MALE

FEMALE

FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME BACHELOR’S DEGREE

63%

63%

56%

55%

67%

37%

51%

68%

59%

66%

TRANSFER BACHELOR’S DEGREE

61%

63%

50%

52%

66%

51%

67%

61%

59%

63%

FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

23%

26%

10%

16%

24%

14%

25%

22%

19%

26%

TRANSFER ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

25%

25%

13%

16%

28%

23%

59%

34%

18%

31%

FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME BACHELOR’S DEGREE

83%

83%

83%

83%

89%

68%

85%

86%

83%

85%

TRANSFER BACHELOR’S DEGREE

77%

78%

74%

76%

81%

63%

73%

80%

78%

76%

FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

61%

65%

54%

61%

72%

51%

70%

64%

61%

66%

TRANSFER ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

56%

56%

56%

56%

56%

50%

55%

56%

54%

58%

FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME BACHELOR’S DEGREE

4.5

4.6

4.9

4.6

4.4

5.1

4.0

4.4

4.6

4.4

TRANSFER BACHELOR’S DEGREE

3.2

3.3

3.4

3.3

3.1

3.3

2.6

3.1

3.3

3.2

FIRST TIME, FULL-TIME ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

4.7

4.7

5.3

4.5

4.0

5.1

3.2

4.5

4.4

4.9

TRANSFER ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

3.6

3.7

4.3

3.7

3.0

4.0

1.6

2.7

3.7

3.5

APPLICATION

132,800 100%

68,000 51%

21,000 16%

18,300 14%

8,500 6%

500 <1%

6,200 5%

7,530 6%

2,930 2%

57,300 43%

75,500 57%

ENROLLMENT

127,700 100%

79,500 62%

12,880 10%

9,650 8%

5,050 4%

800 1%

3,620 3%

15,400 12%

840 1%

61,300 48%

66,500 52%

GRADUATES IN SUPPORT OF NEW YORK STATE WORKFORCE NEEDS STUDENTS WHO HAVE STUDIED ABROAD DIVERSITY CONTENT IN THE CURRICULUM

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26


DIVERSITY OF UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE/PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS TOTAL

RACE

UNDERGRADUATES

DIVERSITY OF FACULTY AND STAFF

GRADUATES/ PROFESSIONALS

TOTAL

FULL-TIME FACULTY

PART-TIME FACULTY

FULL-TIME STAFF

PART-TIME STAFF

40,020 100%

14,390 100%

ALL

461,400

100%

419,900

100%

41,600

100%

87,870

100%

15,750

100%

17,710

100%

WHITE NON-HISPANIC

289,100

63%

264,300

63%

24,800

60%

70,500

80%

12,830

81%

16,030

91%

31,070

78%

10,570

73%

ALL MINORITIES

97,600

21%

91,800

21%

5,800

14%

14,070

16%

2,240

14%

1,430

7%

8,500

20%

1,900

13%

Black Non-Hispanic

41,200

9%

39,200

9%

1,940

5%

7,030

8%

620

4%

600

3%

4,990

12%

830

6%

Hispanic

31,400

7%

30,000

7%

1,330

3%

3,100

4%

400

3%

370

2%

1,770

4%

550

4%

Asian/Pacific Islander

20,740

4%

18,350

4%

2,390

6%

3,590

4%

1,150

7%

410

2%

1,560

4%

470

3%

2,370

1%

2,240

1%

140

<1%

290

<1%

60

<1%

50

<1%

150

<1%

40

<1%

18,770

4%

11,730

3%

7,050

17%

3,300

4%

680

4%

250

1%

460

1%

1,920

13%

56,000

12%

52,100

12%

3,900

9%

2,000

< 1%

1,900

1%

20

<1%

60

<1%

20

<1%

10

<1%

20

<1%

20

<1%

MALE

209,600

45%

192,300

46%

17,270

42%

39,690

45%

8,980

57%

8,870

50%

16,120

40%

5,730

40%

FEMALE

251,900

55%

227,600

54%

24,300

58%

48,180

55%

6,770

43%

8,840

50%

23,900

60%

8,660

60%

Native American/ Alaskan NON-RESIDENT ALIEN UNKNOWN TWO OR MORE RACES

ACTIVE MILITARY DUTY

500

500

7

NATIONAL GUARD OR ACTIVE RESERVE

200

200

3,800

3,700

100

VETERAN

27


Diversity Counts in a Competitive New York SUNY AND THE ENTREPRENEURIAL CENTURY GRADUATES IN STEM FIELDS BY ETHNICITY AND GENDER TOTAL

WHITE NON-HISPANIC

BLACK NON-HISPANIC

HISPANIC

ASIAN/ PACIFIC ISLANDER

NATIVE AMERICAN/ ALASKAN

NON-RESIDENT ALIEN

MALE

UNKNOWN

FEMALE

UNDERGRADUATE CERTIFICATES

200

100%

150

73%

11

5%

11

5%

8

4%

2

1%

4

2%

18

9%

160

81%

40

19%

ASSOCIATE’S

2,130

100%

1,660

78%

120

6%

100

5%

60

3%

13

1%

50

2%

120

6%

1,790

84%

340

16%

BACHELOR’S

6,100

100%

3,620

59%

300

5%

240

4%

750

12%

19

<1%

390

6%

770

13%

3,790

62%

2,310

38%

MASTER’S

1,620

100%

530

33%

30

2%

23

1%

110

7%

3

<1%

840

52%

80

5%

1,040

64%

580

36%

DOCTORAL

550

100%

200

36%

13

2%

11

2%

20

4%

1

<1%

260

48%

40

7%

330

60%

220

40%

GRADUATE CERTIFICATES

50

100%

22

47%

3

6%

2

4%

1

2%

16

34%

3

6%

24

51%

23

49%

SUNY AND THE SEAMLESS EDUCATION PIPELINE INTERVENTION STRATEGIES DEVELOPED FOR HISTORICALLY AND ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED POPULATIONS (ASSOCIATED WITH OUR STRIVE CRADLE-TO-CAREER SITES) SUNY AND A HEALTHIER NEW YORK GRADUATES WITH HEALTHCARE CREDENTIALS BY ETHNICITY AND GENDER

28

BLACK NON-HISPANIC

ASIAN/ PACIFIC ISLANDER

NATIVE AMERICAN/ ALASKAN

NON-RESIDENT ALIEN

TOTAL

WHITE NON-HISPANIC

TOTAL

9,340 100%

6,310 68%

840

9%

370

4%

810

9%

50

1%

210

2%

740

8%

2,030

22%

7,320

78%

UNDERGRADUATE CERTIFICATES

720 100%

540 75%

60

8%

30

4%

24

3%

12

2%

3

<1%

50

7%

140

20%

570

80%

ASSOCIATE’S

4,220 100%

3,210 76%

340

8%

200

5%

150

3%

30

1%

21

1%

280

7%

750

18%

3,480

82%

BACHELOR’S

2,240 100%

1,260 56%

250

11%

90

4%

290

13%

6

<1%

60

2%

280

12%

460

20%

1,780

80%

7%

HISPANIC

UNKNOWN

MALE

FEMALE

MASTER’S

930 100%

570

61%

120

12%

30

3%

80

9%

2

<1%

70

8%

60

130

14%

800

86%

DOCTORAL

240 100%

170 69%

12

5%

3

1%

15

6%

1

<1%

19

8%

25

10%

80

32%

160

68%

FIRST PROFESSIONAL

880 100%

490 56%

50

6%

21

2%

240

28%

3

<1%

27

3%

40

5%

440

50%

440

50%

GRADUATE CERTIFICATES

120 100%

90 74%

3

3%

3

3%

7

6%

0%

12

10%

5

4%

40

31%

80

69%


SUNY AND AN ENERGY-SMART NEW YORK MEASURE CAMPUS-BASED PROGRAMS DESIGNED TO EDUCATELOW-INCOME FAMILIES IN BECOMING ENERGY-SMART SUNY AND THE VIBRANT COMMUNITY CERTIFIED DIVERSITY COUNTS SERVICE-LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES SUNY AND THE WORLD STUDY ABROAD BY ETHNICITY AND GENDER INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS STUDYING AT SUNY BY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN

CANADA 1,100

SOUTH KOREA 2,720

CZECH REPUBLIC 220 CHINA 2,950

TURKEY 1,020 OTHER COUNTRIES 5,760

2009-2010 Total 18,800

INDIA 2,560

JAPAN 790 TAIWAN 660

SINGAPORE 1,020

29


A COMPETITIVE NEW YORK The Power of SUNY’s Six Big Ideas represent areas where SUNY, with focused resources and expertise, can make a tangible difference for the State of New York. The pages that follow translate our Six Big Ideas into condition measures, processes, and outcomes that we think drive A Competitive New York.

• SUNY AND THE ENTREPRENEURIAL CENTURY • SUNY AND THE SEAMLESS EDUCATION PIPELINE • SUNY AND A HEALTHIER NEW YORK • SUNY AND AN ENERGY-SMART NEW YORK • SUNY AND THE VIBRANT COMMUNITY • SUNY AND THE WORLD


SUNY and The Entrepreneurial Century NEW YORK RESEARCH EXPENDITURES

RESEARCH EXPENDITURES BY REGION*

TOTAL (2008-2009) (2009-2010) (Change)

$4,034,100,000 $4,224,500,000 $190,400,000

$10,982,000

JOBS CREATED IN NEW YORK STATE (NYS DEPARTMENT OF LABOR) (2008-2009) (2009-2010) (Change)

58,000 -237,100 -295,100

NEW YORK STATE AVERAGE WAGE (NYS DEPARTMENT OF LABOR) (2008-2009) (2009-2010) (Change)

$60,384 $57,794 -$2,590

NATIONAL AVERAGE SALARY (NYS DEPARTMENT OF LABOR) (2008-2009) (2009-2010) (Change)

$43,460 $44,410 $950

$5,847,000

$7,593,000 $294,724,000

$201,090,000

$43,848,000

$7,182,000 Economic Development Regions Capital Region

Mohawk Valley Region

Central NY Region

New York City Region

FingerLakes Region

North County Region

Long Island Region

Southern Tier Region

Mid-Hudson Region

Western NY Region

Red denotes decrease from previous year NOTE: Represents figures for state-operated campuses only as reported by the SUNY Research Foundation

32

$59,673,000

$203,319,000 $56,941,000


RESEARCH EXPENDITURES BY REGION*

JOBS CREATED THROUGH SPONSORED PROGRAMS USING STAR METRICS

2008-2009

2009-2010

Change

Capital

$294,137,000

$294,724,000

$587,000

Central NY

$53,700,000

$59,673,000

$5,973,000

$5,790,000

$5,847,000

$57,000

$177,513,000

$203,319,000

$25,806,000

Mid-Hudson

$7,689,000

$7,182,000

($507,000)

Mohawk Valley

$5,902,000

$7,593,000

$1,691,000

(2008-2009)

New York City

$51,738,000

$56,941,000

$5,203,000

(2009-2010)

North Country

$11,252,000

$10,982,000

($270,000)

Southern Tier

$39,843,000

$43,848,000

$4,005,000

Western NY

$202,398,000

$201,090,000

($1,308,000)

Total

$849,962,000

$891,199,000

$41,237,000

(2008-2009) (2009-2010)

Finger Lakes Long Island

5,360 6,130

CHANGE

770

NUMBER OF INVENTIONS DISCLOSED

320 260

CHANGE

-60

SUNY’S ENTREPRENEURIAL SUPPORT OF NEW YORK FIRMS ENROLLMENT IN COURSES WITH ENTREPRENEURIAL CURRICULUM

33


SUNY and The Seamless Education Pipeline N NEW YORK STATE 9TH G GRADERS WHO GRADUATE FROM F COLLEGE IN A STANDARD TIME FRAME:

19% For both 2008-2009 and 2009-2010.

AVERAGE NEW YORK STATE UNEMPLOYMENT RATE:

2008-2009

2009-2010

5.3% 8.4%

SUNY URBAN-RURAL TEACHING CORPS 2008-2009: 0 2009-2010: 0 SUNY WORKS 2008-2009: 0 2009-2010: 0 NOTE: These programs were first developed in 2010

NUMBER OF NEW YORK SITES QUALIFYING FOR MEMBERSHIP IN THE STRIVE NATIONAL CRADLE-TOCAREER NETWORK 2008-2009: 0 2009-2010: 0 NUMBER OF STUDENTS RECEIVING COLLEGE-LEVEL CREDITS IN EARLY COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOLS

2008-2009

2009-2010

193

192

CHANGE

34

-1


SUNY and A Healthier New York DEVELOPMENT OF THE SUNY INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH POLICY AND PRACTICE

THE RIGHT HEALTH PROFESSIONALS IN THE RIGHT PLACES NEEDS ANALYSIS PRODUCING MORE WELL-TRAINED HEALTH PROFESSIONALS THE SUNY WELLNESS NETWORK IDENTIFY WELLNESS ISSUES BY EXECUTING A BEHAVIORAL RISK FACTOR SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM NUMBER OF TOBACCO FREE CAMPUSES EXTERNAL FUNDING FOR THE FOUR SUNY REACH PILLARS

DEVELOP THE SUNY SCALE EXTERNAL FUNDING TO EXPAND SUNY’S HEALTH POLICY IMPACT

$4,637,500 2008-2009

$4,932,000 2009-2010

35


SUNY and An Energy-Smart New York NEW YORK’S SHARE OF THE RENEWABLE ENERGY MARKET AND GREEN COLLAR WORKFORCE AND NEW YORK’S ENERGY CONSUMPTION INCREASING QUALITY STUDENT EXPOSURE TO ENERGY-SMART EDUCATION

ENERGY-SMART RESEARCH

INCREASING QUALITY ENERGY-SMART CONTINUING EDUCATION AND JOB TRAINING

NOTE: Represents figures from state-operated campuses only as reported by the SUNY Research Foundation.

Utilized:

Produced:

SUNY RENEWABLE ENERGY PRODUCTION/UTILIZATION (kWh)

36

(2008-2009) (2009-2010)

(2008-2009) (2009-2010)

546,286 546,286 39,523,786 40,780,786

2009-2010

CHANGE

$23,524,400

$42,722,000

$19,197,600

SYSTEM ENERGY CONSUMPTION 2008-2009 2009-2010 CHANGE

ENERGY-SMART INVENTION DISCLOSURES

2008-2009

140,565 btu/ogsf

61.97mmbtu/aafte

134,572 btu/ogsf

59.08mmbtu/aafte

-5,993 btu/ogsf

-2.89mmbtu/aafte

SYSTEM CARBON FOOTPRINT (MTC02E) Emmissions per OGSF (KG/OGSF)

9.6569 2008-2009

Emmissions per AAFTE (MTON/AAFTE)

9.2170 2009-2010

NOTE: Figures from 2008-2009 are restated

4.2519 2008-2009

4.0942 2009-2010


SUNY and The Vibrant Community COMMUNITY WELL-BEING INDEX In January 2012 SUNY will publish a full report detailing the newly developed community well-being index.

INCREASING CAMPUS-COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT CAMPUSES COMMITTED TO SERVICE LEARNING PLANS AND SIGNATURE COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT PROJECTS

NATIONAL RECOGNITION OF CAMPUS COMMUNITY SERVICE Carnegie Elective Classifications for Community Engagement 2008-2009 2009-2010

0

SUNY PASSPORT PARTNERS RECRUITED 2008-2009 AND 2009-2010

0

NOTE: SUNY Passport program was developed in 2011.

1 5

President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll 2008-2009 2009-2010

19 19

QUANTIFYING THE IMPACT OF VOLUNTEERISM PERFORMED BY SUNY STUDENTS, FACULTY, AND STAFF

37


SUNY and The World

BUILDING A GLOBAL TALENT POOL ENROLLMENT IN EDUCATION ABROAD INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

NEW YORK STATE EXPORTS (INTERNATIONAL)* (2008-2009) (2009-2010) Change

$81,386,000,000 $58,743,000,000 -$22,643,000,000

NEW YORK STATE JOB CREATION (NYS DEPARTMENT OF LABOR) (2008-2009) (2009-2010) Change

58,000 -237,100 -295,100

2008-2009 18,200

2009-2010 18,800

CHANGE 600

STUDENTS ENROLLED IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE COURSES Post Graduate 540

NEW YORK STATE AVERAGE WAGE (NYS DEPARTMENT OF LABOR) (2008-2009) (2009-2010) Change

$60,384 $57,794 -$2,590

4,900 Advanced Undergraduate

39,500

NOTE: May not fully account for exports to Canada

Total: 44,940

38

2008-2009 n/a

Introductory Undergraduate


EARNING INTERNATIONAL PRESTIGE PRESTIGIOUS EXTERNALLY AWARDED INTERNATIONAL SCHOLARSHIPS FOR SUNY STUDENTS

42 (2008-2009)

64

(2009-2010)

HARNESSING THE IMPACT OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS CHANGE

2009-2010

2008-2009

$378,952,000

$406,802,000 $27,850,000

NOTE: According to NAFSA: Association of International Educators

ECONOMIC IMPACT OF INTERNATIONAL ACTIVITY 2008-2009 2009-2010 CHANGE

$42,515,000 $31,219,000

BUILDING A GLOBAL FACULTY NUMBER OF INTERNATIONAL TALENT POOL FELLOWSHIPS TO FACULTY AND STAFF 18

2008-2009

19

2009-2010

CHANGE

1

-$11,296,000 39


Conclusion In the year ahead we will be talking a lot about

Each of these initiatives is at its core about making SUNY stronger, more impactful, and sustainable – so it

systemness, or the SUNY Advantage – in other

can be the best State University FOR New York.

words, the true value and potential of a system of higher education over and above that of the

This Report Card, as one in a series, combined with The Power of SUNY document, is designed to show

individual campuses we serve.

you that SUNY is a system devoted to excellence and committed to continuous improvement.

Most of what you will hear will be exciting –

New Yorkers are working towards a better future, and the SUNY family pledges to lead the way.

bringing the promise of The Power of SUNY to product, fostering a national dialogue around

Join us.

HOW to measure University impact on economic development, showcasing the best of each of

Together, we are

our SUNY campuses, implementing a rational fiveyear tuition plan, and executing NYSUNY2020. Some will be more controversial, such as sharing services among the SUNY family.

the

Powerof


SUNY Consortia Key Not Yet Aligned

Potsdam SUNY and the Entrepreneurial Century

SUNY and a Healthier New York

SUNY and the Seamless Education Pipeline

SUNY and an Energy-Smart New York

SUNY and the Vibrant Community

Plattsburgh

Canton

Clinton North Country

SUNY and the World

Oswego Buffalo University

Jefferson

Environmental Science & Forestry

Brockport

Upstate Medical

Monroe Niagara County

Adirondack

Fulton-Montgomery SUNYIT

Empire State NOTE:Has a significant presence throughout the state.

Herkimer Onondaga

Buffalo State

Genesee Erie

Fredonia

Geneseo

Mohawk Valley

Schenectady

Cayuga Finger Lakes

Morrisville

Hudson Valley

Cobleskill Cortland

Albany Oneonta

Alfred

Cornell University Statutory Colleges

Tompkins Cortland Columbia-Greene

Delhi

Corning

Sullivan County

Ulster County

Jamestown Broome Alfred University College of Ceramics

New Paltz

Binghamton Orange County Rockland

Purchase Maritime Optometry Fashion Institute of Technology

Dutchess

Westchester

Stony Brook

Old Westbury

Nassau Sulffolk County Downstate Farmingdale Medical



SUNY Report Card - Fall 2011