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Michel Proulx

HAPPENINGS

Historic horse barn crosses the street The old horse barn, located on South Campus since 1930, has been moved. The 120-tonne structure, which is 120 feet long by 42 feet wide by 40 feet high, stood north of 65 Ave. and east of 118 St. It was moved west of 118 St. and will stay there until it is moved again later this year to another temporary location near the composting facility, just south of the dairy barn. The move, which was completed in a little over two hours, was necessitated by the construction of the GO Community Centre, a recreational facility which is scheduled to open in the summer of 2011. “It was exciting to watch. I’m glad they’re keeping the 8

alumninews

was located in the barn. He continues to maintain the museum, which has been relocated into an adjacent barn. barn. It has a lot of historical Officials are working on significance because it was finding a permanent location among the first 15 buildings for the horse barn to mainbuilt on (north) campus and is tain its historical significance still structurally sound,” says while contributing to the fabJack Francis, one of several ric of South Campus. Francis people with ties to the barn said he was looking forward who were on hand to witness to the permanent relocation the move, including his wife of the barn so the museum Joyce, professor emeritus may be put back in it. Mick Price, professor Frank The barn was built in Robinson, alumnus Reg 1920 on the site where the Norby and Barry Irving, the Stollery Children’s Hospital manager of research stations. stands today. It was moved, Francis, a former animal along with four other buildtechnician, worked on South ings, to South Campus in Campus from 1949 until his October 1930. retirement in 1992. In 2000, Alumnus Gerry Heath, he was part of a group that ’43 BSc(Ag), remembers that assembled almost 400 items move. A thirteen year-old used by various agriculture at the time, he could see the departments to create the buildings go by on 112 St. agriculture museum, which from his kitchen window.

| Summer 2010

The barn was cut in three to facilitate the move. Once it was relocated on South Campus, the barn was used until 1955 to house three breeds of draft horses. Belgian, Clydesdale and Percheron horses were used to teach students how to judge and were also bred, raised and sold to area farmers as horses were in high demand to do fieldwork. By 1955, the horses were gone and the barn was used to house a few sheep and a provincial lab until 1966 when a quarter of the barn was converted into a meat research lab where Price did much of his work while the rest of the barn was used to store feed. In 2000, the meat research lab was converted again, this time into the museum, which grew and ended up taking half the space.

Alumni News Summer 2010  

Faculty of ALES Alumni News

Alumni News Summer 2010  

Faculty of ALES Alumni News

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