Issuu on Google+

PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

History

Location

Future Proposals

In its heyday Dreamland was home to a cafe known as The Sunshine Cafe, saloon bar, restaurant, cinema, and an auditorium that could seat over 2200 people, along with the amusement park itself. The site has been around since the 1800’s but the Arcade building was built in the 1930’s. nsidered one of the oldest buildings in Margate. In 1919 the Hall By The Sea, as it was known then, was sold to John Henry, who developed the site into an amusment park, Dreamland. Dreamland used to bring in over 2 million visitors a year. Dreamland’s origin dates from 1863 when railway catering contractors Spiers and Pond opened a restaurant and dance hall in the unused railway terminus naming it the ‘Hall by the Sea’. Inspired by Coney Island which he had visited in 1906, Iles renamed the park Dreamland and initiated work on the construction of a Scenic Railway rollercoaster in 1919.

9

The dreamland restoration project has received a multi-million investment from the department for culture Media and sports sea change programme, the heritage Lottery Fund and Thanet District Council. The turner Contemporary located on the seawall, spearheaded the regeneration of the site; using the economic and social success to aid its restoration as a seaside resort. The rebuilding of Dreamland is a community project, more than 160 people volunteered their time and resources to regenerate the site and restore the once 1870s pleasure garden, created by original owner George Sanger. Multi- disciplinary Hemingway designers; Wayne and Gerardine won the proposal by the Dreamland Trust for a new design for Dreamland. The plan is to re-open Dreamland in 2014 as a Heritage Amusement Park featuring historic rides and shows.

7 3

10 4 8

5 1

Dreamland

6

Google Maps (2014)

2

Birchington Blog Spot (2004)

Dreamland (1969)

Looping Star, Dreamland

1 2 3 4 5

Point of arrival into Margate when travelling by car

Margate Train Station. Point of arrival for many tourists

Turner Contemporary Art Gallery

The Margate Museum

Margate Library

Saving Dreamland (2013)

6 7 8 9 10

Google Maps (2014)

Theatre Royal Margate

Margate Winter Gardens - Entertainments venue.

Shell Grotto (discovered in 1835)

Cliftonville Lido

Tom Thumb Theatre - Small scale entertainments venue

Dreamland 1980’s

Hemingway Design

GROUP DREAMLAND RESEARCH (Contributors: Jocelyn, Amy, Samantha and Eliot)


5m

10m

1

C

2

Curtain

C

A

B

3

R5

3

E

13

Entrance & Staircase

Former Public & Saloon Bars Do not scale from this drawing

All dimensions are to be checked on site prior to fabrication and the Architect should be notified of any discrepancy

This drawing is the copyright of guy hollaway architects and should not be copied or reproduced without written consent

PROPOSED BILLIE RAILWAY PLAN

VIN

PA

Existing tree

R9

RED

IN

N1

F

PROPOSED ALTERATIONS & NEW WORKS.

1

13

R12

see saws

merry-go-round

O

Twist-n-turn Moon Raker Merry-go-round Vortex Kiddies train Water chute

R10

7

R7

slide

Seating

confirme d

SUBSTATION LOCATION

line to be

E

N1 N2 N3 N5 N6 N7

R11

R6

Trampoline area

10

Screen

Swing boats

treetop platforms

Integrated woodland playground

Adventure woodland play frame

Helter Skelter

Side shows

EXISTING BIN STORE

Existing f ence

G

ED

R1 Gallopers R2 Austin Car ride R3 Muffin the mule R4 Bumper cars R5 Roller disco on old bumper car track R6 Helter skelter R7 Caterpillar R8 Rocket ride R9 Flying scooters R10 Waltzer R11 Whip (T.B.C) R12 Corbiere wheel

Bumper cars

R4

5

potential workshop area for pinball parlour

Potential Workshop

16

Service area

Circular side show 'hook-a-duck'

bar

ed

Do  not  scale  -­  for  identification  purposes  only THE GAP SITE

F

1

12

confirm

Deck chair seating

7

Back of house

Pin Ball machines

Sliding gates control point

D

to be

chill out area

curb line

Pin Ball Parlor

Existing

Key Vista

Main Entrance Performance space/band stand

12

R3

R2

R1

Existing entrance doors: Part M compliance to be checked

Penny Arcade area omitted

possible roller shutter

Display carels

Roller disco

A

landscaped ampitheatre

2

Info/ ices Tickets, Coats & Buggies

Back of house shop

Till point

6 Teacup tearoom

recesses for penny arcade machines

Entrance Mall

Surface change

Existing entrance doors: Part M compliance to be checked

Display Secondary doors

5 biofolding glass doors

B

attendant store

Baby

Zebra crossing classic poles

Stage Exciting thoroughfare/ hoarding/ signage

Key Vista

Food Court / Seating Area

Dis W/C

Kitchen & Servery

Dis W/C

Waiting area/ safe guard drop off into learning area

Seating 300 approx

learning/ events space

Multi-purpose

Stage

Coats /bags

Emergency escape

Back of house

Compton Noterman Organ (Console)

Surface change

PEDESTRIAN CROSSING POINT

O

1. Restoration of menagerie cages and fort (outside of stage 1 remit) 2. Informal hedge to embankment edge 3. "Tidying up" of embankment, including removal of brambles and cutting of grass- potential for tree planting to boundary if funds permit 4. Scenic Railway restored with new Station 5. Kiosks by others 6. New Paved finish, laid in street 7. Existing paving retained and cleaned 8. Path and planting through scenic railway 9. Willow wall or fence to direct visitors 10. Tree, turf and shrubs 12. Sacrificial wildflowers and tree planting 13. Stabilised gravel walkway for Billie Railway Track 14. Gate access to park 15. Guest rides- big top 16. Service area 17. Future commercial leisure development site & car / coach park 18. Mini-bus & disabled parking spaces 19. Cycle parking 20. Mobile portacabin type units for staff offices 16-20 staff

1m

Stalls Foyer 0m

D

to be checked if required

Emergency escape Existing staircase Exact high level termination tbc

Director’s Room E

Exact outside levels to be checked

Photo opportunity: lollipop lady

Auditorium (Now divided) COACH DROP OFF AREA

E

10

13

N7

N4

14

9

Part M compliant entrance doors

N6

4

14

7

N5

15

18

NICO PARKS RIDES AREA

9

17

20

S S E R 4

14

18

Minibus parking location

Revisions

G O R P N3

10

R8

8

Cycle racks

19

N2

ridge

LIN

Chk'd

| Phoenix Yard

|

65 Kings Cross Road

|

guy hollaway

Drawn

MS

Date

APRIL 2013

Scale

1:500 @ A1 1:1000 @ A3

09.49.sk.101

Drawing Number

London

|

WC1X 9LW

Revision

T +44 (0)1303 260515 | F +44 (0)1303 268214 | E kent@guyhollaway.co.uk | W www.guyhollaway.co.uk

T +44 (0)1303 260515 | F +44 (0)1303 268214 | E london@guyhollaway.co.uk | W www.guyhollaway.co.uk Kent | The Tramway Stables | Rampart Road | Hythe | Kent | CT21 5BG

PROPOSED BILLIE RAILWAY PLAN

Title

London

PRELIMINARY Dreamland Trust

Client

Proposed Alterations & New Works, Dreamland Site, Margate, Kent

Project

PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

G

Ground Floor Plan 1 // Original Ground Floor Plan for the Dreamland Site.

Dreamland Cinema Building 2 // Original First Floor Plan for the Dreamland Site.

3 // Detailed Proposed Plan for the entire park (In progress).

4 // Programmatic Ground Floor Plan of the entire Dreamland Site

PAST AND PRESENT DREAMLAND PLANS SITE PHOTOS (Photos by Sara Ramos)

Site of Ballroom (Reconstructed) Key:


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

The Public Interior Definition: The public interior refers to the interior spaces within public structures such as bars, restaurants, shopping centres, libraries, etc. Most places that are not private dwellings would be considered a public interior. ‘The research of the chair focuses on design problems related to public interiors. The term public interiors refers to spatially contained environments which are experienced as belong to the public sphere. In this definition public interiors include the space inside civic buildings (government buildings) and institutions (e.g. for education, healthcare, culture etc.) The more extensive definition of public interiors as the totality of spaces in which civil society can be seen to operate means that the research extends to those environments, both inside and outside buildings, for the encounter and collective use of private people. These are places of sociability, entertainment, transport, leisure and commerce, as well as culture in the broadest sense’ (Department of Architecture Tu Delft) Key Characteristics: Providing a space for social activity, transport, education, entertainment or leisure. ‘In contrast to civic buildings the use of these public interiors depends on a positive decision on the part of their users, a matter of free choice. These decisions are often made intuitively. For public interiors this means that comfort, convenience, pleasure, recognition and curiosity are essential design concerns. People choose to become users, customers or patrons, because an environment fulfils a certain need, but also because it relates to their view of themselves, their identities or life styles. Public interiors closely reflect cultural, economic and demographic shifts and are subject to changing fashions and life patterns’ (Department of Architecture Tu Delft)

Frank Lloyd Wright, Guggenheim Museum, New York. With little space to work with Wright produced this innovative design for an art gallery, Contrary to the standard layout for an art gallery with a flow between different rooms, this gallery features a continuous spiral ramp along which the art work is displayed. It is said to give the guests a more relaxed experience as there is no abrupt changes to the environment, but instead a continuous flowing journey.

Marlowe Theatre, Canterbury

Natural History Museum, New York

Barcelona University Library, Barcelona

Turner Contemporary, Margate

Tom Thumb Cocktail Bar, Margate

Tom Thumb Theatre, Margate

RESEARCH - THE PUBLIC INTERIOR


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

The Mediating Facade

Meanwhile Use

Definition: The English Dictionary’s definition of ‘Threshold’ is ‘A strip of wood or stone forming the bottom of a doorway and crossed in entering a house or room. (Oxforrd Dictionary) and the definition of ‘Mediation’ is ‘intervention in a dispute in order to resolve it’ (Oxford Dictionary) Therefore my interpretation of a mediating facade would be that that has the ability to breach the threshold between inside and inside.

Definition: The basic definition of meanwhile is using the time inbetween. There is the present and then there are the plans for what is going to happen in the future. The time in the middle is ‘meanwhile’. In the context of our project, the Dreamland site is currently not being used yet has plans to be used in the future for a specific reason. In the meantime we will be occupying the space with our proposals.

(Far Left) Assemble Architectures ‘Folly For a Flyover’ A 9 week project that set about using a disused motorway undercroft in hackney wick, and turning it into a place for cinema, plays and performances. (Left) Assemble Architectures ‘Cineroleum’ Converted a derelict petrol station into a handmade Cinema, demonstrating the possiblities for the 4,000 unused petrol stations across the UK.

Isay Weinfeld ‘Livraria de Vila’, Sao Paulo. This library has rotating bookcases that form the facade and when pivoted to open, they allow people to access the building.

Livraria de Vila, Sao Paulo

(Far Left) Practice Architectures ‘Franks Cafe’ A makeshift cafe/bar on the top floor of a disused parking lot in Peckham. Opens throughout the Summer and due to its success does so every year. (Left) Rem Koolhaas ‘The Imaginarium’ in Selfridges for the Festival of Imagination running from the 17th January to 22nd February.

Jean Nouvel ‘ Arab World Institute’, Paris. This facade responds to the weather conditions. Each panel features a photovoltaic cell that reacts to sunlight and the shutters open and close accordingly.

Arab World Institue, Paris

Ernst Giselbrecht ‘Kiefer Technic Showroom’, Austria. The individual panels move according to the exterior conditions allowing for an optimized internal climate. They can also be controlled manually and are made from perforated aluminium.

(Far Left) Alex Chinneck ‘From the knees of my nose to the belly of my toes’, Margate. Transformed a derelict house that was set for demolition into an artwork (Left) UCA InterFORUM Contemporary Reading Room, Margate. Used a disused warehouse space in the previous Pettmans Depository building to create a contemporary reading rooms for the town for 1 week.

Kiefer Technic Showroom, Austria

RESEARCH - MEANWHILE USE


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME Performance and Spectacle There are many different types of performance such as theatre, dance, cinema, music, etc. Some performance spaces cater to only one specific type of performance, but some are more adaptable and can be used for a variety of different performances.

Assemble Architectures ‘Folly for A Flyover’ hosted a range of different performances such as Plays, Cinema and Perfromances. It seats 250 people.

The Arcola Theatre in London was created in an old Textile Factory on Arcola Street in Dalston. It can seat up to 240 people.

Old Vic Theatre, London

London Fashion Week

Arcola Theatre, Dalston

Marlowe Theatre, Canterbury

Theatre in the Round: Suitable foir high energy productions and those requiring audience participation. An example of such theatre is the Old Vic Theatre in London which was redesigned as a theatre in the round for the production of the Norman Conquests.

Transverse Stage: Provides a very initimate atmosphere and is the structure of catwalks. For example that seen in London Fashion Week. The audience get to be very close to the models, and sometimes the stage is more of a metaphorical space as their will be no raised platform.

Thrust Stage: This stage also provides an intimate atmosphere however unlike the Proscenium theatre, it still retains the back stage area. An example of such layout is the Arcola theatre in Dalston.

Proscenium Theatre: This form of staging allows every member of the audience to have a good view of the performance and creates a window for them to view it through. Examples of this kind of theatre are The Yard Theatre in London and the Marlowe Theatre, in Canterbury.

Practice Architecture’s ‘The Yard’ theatre was constructed in an unsed warehouse in London. It seats 110 people but adding benches to the front is possible to seat more.

RESEARCH - PERFORMANCE AND SPECTACLE


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

Since being refurbished in , the Marlowe Theatre in Canterbury has been home to many a spectacle. On this occasion the show was ‘The Play That Goes Wrong’. A comic take on a serious play where everything persists on ‘going wrong’ had the audience and cast members in laughter. There was a vivid sense of togetherness in the auditorium and the atmosphere was spectacular.

PHYSICAL RESEARCH - CANTERBURY MARLOWE THEATRE - THE PLAY THAT GOES WRONG


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

The purpose built imaginarium on the basement level of Selfridges in London was set up to celebrate the festival of imagination starting in January 2014. The Imaginarium was designed by architect Rem Koolhaas and allows users to escape into a totally different world from that they entered from. The room is clad in mirrors at various angles and on various surfaces creating a similar effect to that of a mirror maze.

PHYSICAL RESEARCH - SELFRIDGES IMAGINARIUM, FESTIVAL OF IMAGINATION, LONDON


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

The sensing spaces exhibition at the Royal Academy looked at reimagining architecture. Installations of various sizes were erected inside the building and the users were encouraged to take an interactive approach. One installation was developed by users by using large coloured straws inserted into a framework to eventually create a beautiful tunnel that had each visitors attention. Another installation was a monolithic style wooden structure which can be accessed through the spiral staircases encased in the large wooden columns.

PHYSICAL RESEARCH - SENSING SPACES - ARCHITECTURE REIMAGINED, ROYAL ACADEMY OF ARTS, LONDON


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME The idea behind the spectacle was to use a single beam laser and reflect this off a number of angles. The most effective way of doing this was to use mirrored material, in this case foil and operate the spectacle in a dark room. The outcome was that the single beam redirected off a number of surfaces and created a greater number of beams

SPECTACLE STILLS AND DIAGRAMS


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME Turner Contemporart Art Gallery

Royal Seabathing Hospital

Cliftonville Lido

Margate Train Station

Tom Thumb Theatre

Site

Reflections seen in Facade

SITE PLAN 1:1250


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Aluminium Frame

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Patch Fitting

Tinted Toughened Glass

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Detail 1:20

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT GLASS CONNECTION DETAIL 1:5


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

ORIGINAL BASEMENT PLAN 1:50


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

ORIGINAL LONGITUDINAL SECTION WITH CONTEXT 1:100


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

ORIGINAL TRANSVERSE SECTION WITH CONTEXT 1:100


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Aluminium base plates attatched to existing brickwork

Lightweight aluminium frame welded together at joints

Frame follows the same hexagonal grid pattern as the whole design

It is to this frame that the glass panels will be attatched to

DETAIL - CONNECTION TO EXISTING 1:5


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Tinted toughened glass

Dual arm

Articulated disc point fixing

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Tension rod

Scaffolding pole

Spider Patch FItting

Tinted toughened glass

The Forum, Norwich

Precedent - The Forum, Norwich The large glass facade is supported by numerous spider patch fittings connected to a large sturdy frame. Allows glass panels to connect without the need for frames.

The Forum, Norwich - Glass Facade

DETAIL - INDIVIDUAL FACADE SPIDER PATCH FITTING 1:5 AND SECTION 1:2


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Parapet wall clamp fixed to existing facade

PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Scaffolding

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Spider patch fittings

Toughened glass to walk on

Hexagonal dark tinted, toughened glass.

Tension Rods

Patch fittings attatched to fins of toughened glass.

Bracket fixed to existing wall

Dark tinted, toughened glass for maximum reflectiveness

DETAIL - FACADE 1:20 AND CLOSE UP 1:5


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

MEDIATING FACADE STUDY SKETCHES, MODELS AND COLLAGES


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME Similar to the Peppers Ghost precedent and again using mirrors to create an illusion like the periscope, the Dalston House Project mirrors the facade of a house that is mounted on the floor. In the reflection users can see themself and the building as if it is erect.

Dalston House Project

Analysis of the Dalston House Project

It was evedent from when we first entered the site that mirrors had become a big part of its use as an Arcade.

Photograph by Sara Ramos

Initial sketch of the Dreamland Arcade building.

INITIAL CONCEPT GENERATION (not to scale)


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME When the idea of a spectacle came up, initial research brought up the precedent of ‘Peppers Ghost’ this was an illusion from the 1800’s where a light was shone on an actor below stage level and their reflection appeared on a sheet of glass in front of the stage, the translucency of the projection made it appear ghost like.

Peppers Ghost Illusion

The science behind periscopes plays a large part in the peppers ghost illusion. The outcome is relient on the correct angling of the mirrors. Periscopes, often used in submarines allow the user to ultimately see around corners or in the case of a submarine, above water.

My initial idea sketch, influenced by peppers ghost.

My initial spectacle device influenced my idea through the use of mirrors, illusion and the distortion of a reflection.

INITIAL CONCEPT GENERATION (not to scale)


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

1m

2m

The original idea for the grid came from my research into mirror mazes. Mirrors had featured quite a lot in my initial research and designs due to the spectacle illusion and the site itself.

My initial grid has sides of 2m and allows for larger spaces to be created ans also at minimum 1m passages.

When it came to fitting the grid into the context of the building it became apparent a smaller grid may be needed also, to utilise the space best and allow for more initimate spaces to be created.

There is also a relation in history to do with a mirror maze on the site when it was functioning as an Amusement Park. When researching how mirror mazes work i discovered it was made on a hexagonal grid.

GRID BREAKDOWN (not to scale)


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 1:200


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT (not to scale)


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

MODEL ITERATION 1


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

MODEL ITERATION 2


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

For the spectacular lunch, i made a cake in the shape of the turner contemporary, the art gallery in Margate. Inside the cake was layers of different coloured sponge concealed by icing so that when the user cut through the cake it would be a surprise.

The diagram represents the interactions that took place at the spectacle lunch. This informed my idea as i found that people across the table didnt really communicate, most people only spoke to those next to them. This led me to decide that my design would feature intimate areas in the refreshment space.

SPECTACLE LUNCH PREPARATION AND RESULTS


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

1 // Existing Structure 2 // Remove necessary area of floor slab 3 // Insert performance area stairs/seating 4 // Insert grid into site 5 // Erect glass panels 6 // Final outcome

1

4

2

3

5

6

KEY MOVES DIAGRAM (not to scale)


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

1 3

2

1 // Entrance into Public Interior 2 // Bar area 3 // WC and fire escape 4 // Performance space 5 // Dressing rooms and prop storage

4

5

KEY AREAS DIAGRAM (not to scale)


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

On the Kent Coast of England is the historical fishing town of Margate. Once a thriving seaside resort, Margate is home to a beautiful sandy beach, lido, and Dreamland Amusement Park. However in recent years as cheap package holidays have become readily available, Margate has lost its appeal and unfortunately in 2006 Dreamland opened its doors for the last time, and the decline of Margate continued on a downward spiral. Now in 2014, due to the passion of local residents, Dreamland is set to open once more. The project is located in the former bar in Dreamland, which has more recently seen use as an amusement arcade. The proposal is informed by the reflective nature of both the amusement arcade and the history of Dreamland, which was once home to both a fun house and mirror maze. The proposal responds to the need for a theatre and refreshment space in the new heritage park. The project aims to create a faรงade which acts as a mediator between the exterior promenade which runs parallel with the beach, and the new public interior. It aims to invite passers by in and create a sense of intrigue from afar. When first approaching the facade of the building the user will be faced with an arrangment of glass that reflects both themselves, the environment around them and, due to the presence of a glass floor, reflections of the performance space below.They will then continue to enter the interior. The visitor, at first experiences disorientation due to the specific arrangement of tinted glass and their reflections. However as their journey continues individidual spaces will become clearer. The performance space is the heart of the project, set in a double height space where spectators will take their place on tiered seating, starting at ground floor level and travelling down into the current basement space of the building.

PROJECT STATEMENT


1650mm

1650mm

1100mm

950mm

500mm

650mm

500mm

Buying/Selling Tickets

400mm

400mm

950mm

1100mm

1300mm

1650mm

1650mm

PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

300mm

200mm

>1500mm

Watching/Performing

500mm

300mm

300mm

500mm

Buying/Making a Drink

500mm

500mm

Sitting

300mm

Standing

ERGONOMICS


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

Scrape back and reveal on existing beams to reveal the concrete beams beneath the plasterwork

Scrape back and reveal on existing columns ro reveal the brick infill beneath the timber cladding.

APPROACH TO EXISTING STRUCTURE


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

Public Space

Private Public Space

Private Space

PROGRAMMATIC DIAGRAMS 1:200 - PUBLIC AND PRIVATE


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

Performer entering dressing room

Customer using WC’s

Customer watching a show

Member of staff for bar and box office

Customer visiting bar

Circulation

Key Route

PROGRAMMATIC DIAGRAMS 1:200 - CIRCULATION AND KEY ROUTE


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

COLLAGES (not to scale)


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

For part of the lighting scheme i want to illuminate the brick columns. I think the history of this site is incredibly important and so it should be made a feature of in the final design, in a similar way to the Istanbul Basilica Cistern.

After experimenting with various soft and hard acoustic materials i decided on the panels facing away from the stage use a mixture of tinted glass hexagonal panels and felt panels. This will mean the panels contain an equal amount of absorbing panels as reverberating panels. It should allow the users to get a clear performance with no echoes but they will also not struggle to hear the performers.

For the other part of the lighting scheme i plan to fill in all the remaining recesses, where there are no glass panels, with blue LED lights and cover with glass in order for it to become flush with the rest of the floor. This will illuminate the remainder of the building.

Cushioned fabric

Perforated card with polystyrene filling

Black felt

Back painted glass

Cushioned felt

Plywood board

TInted glass

Discover Greenwich Visitor Centre

The lighting in the performance space will be mounted on the stage facing panels with the opposite ones being used for accoustics.

Marlowe Theatre, Canterbury

LIGHTING AND ACOUSTICS

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Istanbul Basilica Cistern


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME Steel Column

Steel I-Beams

Running the perimeter are strips of gold and red metallic material that date from when the site was an amusement arcade.

The steel I-Beams are clad in plaster with a distinctive grape pattern, this can be seen in past photographs of the site. Since damaged by a suspended ceiling.

Saloon Bar, Dreamland, 1934 (Source: Margate Local History.

Steel Column Brick Infill Plaster Board

Brick infill around steel column

Brick infill above steel columns

Some of the walls are clad in a carpet like material, this could be for decortation but also holds some acoustic qualities.

The base of each column is clad in timber. Small voids have been cut, possibly where it has previously been used to conceal wiring.

Each of the columns in the site is clad in Mirror. This remains due to the sites most recent use as an amusement arcade.

EXISTING SITE ANALYSIS


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

1

1 // Framework made especially for test 2 // Window tint on acetate 3 // Tracing paper in acetate 4 // White card behind acetate 5 // Tissue paper in acetate 6// Black window tint on acetate 7// Black card behind acetate

2

3

4

5

6

7

MATERIAL INVESTIGATION


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

INTERIOR VIEW - BAR AREA


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

INTERIOR VIEW - REVOLVIND DOORS ADVERTISING


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

INTERIOR VIEW - PERFORMANCE SPACE


member of an audience should clearly see a performance, • Each screen or speaker, as well as clearly hearing speech, music or sounds. Auditorium design must consider audience comfort, fire safety, • acoustic quality, sound insulation, sound systems, lighting,

priate level of comfort and essentially to ensure a means of escape in an emergency, such as a fire, within the time required by safety considerations and by legislation.

receptive atmosphere and access to technical equipment.

• Stage and audio-visual technologies are constantly evolving. Contents 1 Introduction 2 Seating 3 Auditorium design 4 Theatre 5 Studio theatres 6 Concert hall 7 Conference halls 8 Cinemas 9 Multi-purpose auditoria 10 Support facilities 11 Facilities for people with a disability 12 Legislation

2 SEATING 2.01 Design of the auditorium seat The aim is to provide an appropriate standard of comfort. The range of human body dimensions is wide; while in most auditoria a single size of seat is provided, 33.2 and Table I. Tolerance levels vary: young people can tolerate simple seating found less comfortable by

PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

1 INTRODUCTION The three-dimensional volume of an auditorium is conditioned by the need for all members of the audience to be able to see the whole of the platform or stage; and to hear the actor, singer, musician or speaker, 33.1. Seating density, floor rake and seating layout are

2-14

Basic design data: People and space

33.2 Auditorium seating: definitions of terms and dimensional information (to be read in conjunction with Table I): a Plan. b Section a Edging width: suitable for short distances or occasional use

Table I Dimensions of auditorium seats

b One person width (750 clearance would give comfort for various postures)

c Normally used by one person, but occasional passing required

Dimension

Description

A B

Overall seat depth Tipped seat depth (same as length of arm) Seatway (unobstructed vertical space between rows) Back-to-back seat spacing Seat width for seats with arms Seat width for seats without arms Armrest width Seat height Armrest height Seatback height Seat inclination from horizontal Back inclination from vertical

C D E

d Two-person use in same direction

33.1 Visual and aural limitations: a Plan: for a performer at centre stage B there is an arc Y beyond which visual and aural perceptions are impaired. However, for performers nearer the sides of the stage at A and C produce e Two more peoplerestrictive passing curves X. b Section: Similarly, visual and aural limits in section also set an arc centred on the performer

F G H I J K

Minimum 600 mm 425

Maximum Drawn as 720 mm 500

305

650 mm 450 400

760 500 450

750

50 430 600 800 7 15

450 850 9 20

850 525 50 440 600 800 7 15 33-1

2.35 Corridor widths Restaurants and foodservice facilities

Basic design data: People and space 2-9

17-7

17.7 Small formal dinner arrangement

2.36 Space requirements between walls allowing 10 per cent for easy movement

17.8 Banquet layout. The U arrangement can be extended in both directions to the limits of the banqueting room

2.19 DSS model 8G wheelchair, a common type

2.37 Space requirements for closely spaced groups

17.10 Recommended circular table sizes for various place numbers

3.12 Large hotels and resorts provide a choice of restaurants and facilities offering different menus, sophistication and prices, 17.11.

2.39 Greatest density possible 6 people per m2

2.38 Pace measurements

17.9 Recommended rectangular table sizes relating to place numbers

2.20 Dimensions of different percentiles of adult male wheelchair users. These dimensions and those in 2.21 relate to people who use standard wheelchairs and have no major impairment of upper limbs. Figures are given for 95th, 50th and 5th percentiles or two of these

17.11 Food and beverage services in large hotels

5-18 Design basics: Buildings and movement

Design basics: Buildings and movement

5-21

5.29 Hand-rinse basin and activity space

5.39 An alternative facility (by Alan Tye Design)

5.30 Recessed hand-rinse basin and activity space

5.42 Small wheelchair-accessible WC compartment at entrance level in a family house

5.31 WC and washbasin compartment, appliances on same wall

Metric Handbook

5.40 WC compartment for ambulant disabled person from Approved Document M. The outward-opening door is preferred for people using crutches, but an inward-opening door can be used if the compartment is at least 200 mm deeper

5.32 WC and washbasin compartment, inward-opening door, appliances on adjacent walls 5.43 Even smaller WCs for entrance level WCs in family houses. In these, transfer cannot be achieved with the door shut

5.41 Inclined rails mounted on walls of WC

5.44 Single urinal and activity space

5.33 WC and washbasin cubicle, outward-opening door, appliances on adjacent walls

PROGRAMMATIC AREA STUDIES (not to scale)


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

SITE MODEL 1:50 (contributed to by; Sara, Molly, Doug and Anoud)


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

Eliot, Elia

Elizabeth, Kehan, Fiona and Samantha

OTHER SITE MODELS


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

1:20 SECTION MODEL


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

1:50 MODEL ITERATION 1 & 2


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

1:50 MODEL ITERATION 3


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

PRESENTATION MODEL 1:50


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PROPOSED SECTION 1:50


PROJECT 04 - MEANTIME

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PROPOSED SECTION 1:50


Portfolio Year 2