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HUSTON HARRIS 

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Huston Harris is pictured standing proudly at right after losing 175lbs. in just 32 weeks using the Contour Elite™ system and the guidance and support from NUTRISHOP BATON ROUGE.

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Geaux Health and

cover story The Affordable care act PAGE 17 FITNESS MODEL: JAMIE PAPELBON

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EVEN MORE ARTICLES

Winter 2014 05 | Fitmythbuster: High Reps Vs. Low Reps Bypass The Bulk 08 | Body & Sole: Choosing The Proper Footwear 09 | Warm Up For Your Warm-Up 10 | GH&F Winter Workout Routine: Getting Lean in 2014 12 | Inside-Out Makeover 13 | Flab To Fab 14 | Ask The Doctor: Get Heart Healthy During Lent 15 | The Living Engine: Getting The Proper Nutrition 18 | How To Get Your Child To Eat Healthier 19 | Holly Clegg: Kitchen 101 20 | Why New Year’s Resolutions Don’t Work 21 | The Whole Tooth & Nothing But The Tooth 22 | Pet Rx 23 | Do What You Know And Not What You Feel 25 | High School Standout Athletes 27 | High School Sexual Struggles 28 | Events Calendar

MÉNAGE À TROIS:

TECHNOLOGY’S EFFECT ON COMMUNICATION IN RELATIONSHIPS

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GIVING IT HIS BEST SHOT: LSU HEAD BASKETBALL COACH JOHNNY JONES

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Managing Editor | Shantrice Hurst Contributing Photographers Kim Delatte, John Oubre Graphic Designer | Erica Nettles (Noble Design, LLC)

Lead Graphic Designer | Krist Norsworthy (Krist Norsworthy Design)

Sales Director | Sharon Frank Contributing Writers Gabrielle Nickles Rani Whitfield, M.D. Dr. Tammuella Chrisentery-Singleton Erin Fulbright Traci V. Andely Bill Gvoich Pamela Labbe     

Lauren Myers Heather Jiminez David Jones Darryl Hurst Howard White Amber Smith


FItMYTHBUSTER HIGH REPS VS. LOW REPS BYPASS THE BULK

EATING WELL

JUST GOT EASIER!

Looking for help to make healthy, informed decisions without comparing hundreds of nutrition labels? Whether you’re just getting started or you’ve been eating healthy for years, our Health Starts Here® programs will help you navigate our aisles with ease. Ask us about store tours, cooking classes and special events. For help building delicious meals with lower calorie density, check out our recipes at:

wholefoods.com/healthstartshere

A common concern for many people who are new to exercise, especially strength training, is the effect it will have on their body shape.

Men often say, “I just want to tone up. I don’t want to look like Arnold (Schwarzenegger).” Women openly express by Bill Gvoich, M.S. their fear of getting bulky with weight training. This fear has not changed over the years. Fitness centers still carry multi-colored “beauty bells” for women and solid grey or black dumbbells for men. Some popular training systems promise female clients that their system does not build bulky muscles. Talk about false advertising! The popular belief is that if you want to build bulk, you lift heavy weights. For tone, you lift light weights with high repetitions. The good news is that strength training will definitely train your muscles and even add some extra muscle to your body if you have the genetic potential and consistently work hard year after year. The bad news is that for most men and women, it’s really difficult to add noticeable muscle no matter how hard you train. Women do not have enough testosterone (the male sex hormone) to produce large muscles no matter how hard they train. Heavy weights with low repetitions will not result in muscle bulk. It is your diet that will determine bulk. If you put on extra fat on top of toned muscles, the bulk is the result of being overweight. It has nothing to do with strength training. Body builders train with many sets and relatively high repetitions to gain muscle size. Strength training and a healthy diet are going to help you look your best. Don’t let exercise myths sabotage your efforts. GH&F

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a Winter 2014 geauxhealthandfitness.com

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MODEL BEHAVIOR Photography By Kim Delatte, K&S Photography

FEATURING JAMIE PAPELBON Fitness Attire Provided By Match Point Tennis & Fitness Boutique

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Jamie Papelbon, a 23-year-old swimsuit model, took the past year off from LSU-Alexandria to dip her toes into the pool of modeling. The Twin Peaks bartender participated in the Swimsuit USA International finals competition in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico last month. She has also attended New York’s fashion week twice and walked the runway in Paris’ fashion week. The Marksville native advises ladies to always have a goal and remember that “a rose could never be a sunflower and a sunflower could never be a rose.” In other words, girls should be themselves and embrace their differences. What are your fitness goals and accomplishments? “To get in an hour’s worth of working out and to be more strict with my diet. Avoid sodas and fried foods, drink lots of water, and eat more grilled food and less salt.” What is your favorite style of training to look and feel your best? “I like fun exercises like dancing, kickboxing, volleyball and anything active. I like to get my cardio first and then my weights when I am in the gym.” In what way would you say women are too tough on themselves? “Women get defeated before they start. Don’t compare your beginning to someone’s end results.” Do you have a mantra or motivational trick that inspires you to work out? “It depends on what I have going on like a swimsuit competition or something. But if I want to look a certain way, I look at girls who fit the look I am going for. It motivates me to want to go to the gym.”

How important is diet and exercise to you? “It is 100 percent important whether you are overweight or not, because it is all about your health and fitness.” What impact does your physical state have on your quality of life? “Being physically fit helps you become more energetic. It makes me want to go to the gym more and more.” What do your cheat meals consist of? “Pizza and everyone knows it.” Tell us something about you that is unique. “I am very strong despite being skinny. People wonder all the time how I can be so strong. My dad will call me to help move furniture before he calls my brothers.” What are your hobbies? “Running for charity, dancing and volleyball to release negativity, and reading things I enjoy.” GH&F

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BODY & SOLE: Choosing the Proper Footwear Running and walking are great forms of exercise, but unless you’re wearing the proper shoes, you could do yourself more harm than good. Athletic shoes earn ratings for quality, performance and comfort, but that doesn’t mean you should run out and buy those brands without first getting some advice from the experts. Buy the wrong shoe and you could end up with shin splints, sore heels, even back pain. The right shoe for you depends on several factors, says Kristen Manske, manager of Varsity Sports on Perkins Road in Baton Rouge. “These include your body type, your weight, the type of surface you run on, how far you run or walk each week, and the way you run.” Specialty shoe stores are staffed with people who use this information to guide you to the appropriate shoe model. Interestingly, customers are often patients referred by their doctors. “We’ve seen a lot of support in recent years from podiatrists and orthopedic physicians,” Manske said. “They are encouraging their patients to address their foot problems by choosing the best footwear, and they are steering those patients to us.” So what steps should you take? • Know your feet, including size and width. • Know your arch type (high, low, or flatfooted). • Look at your footprint to determine whether you overpronate or underpronate. Overpronation means that your feet roll inward as you walk or run, causing extra wear on the outside heel and inside forefoot. Underpronation means your feet roll outward, causing wear on the outer edge of the heel and little toe. 8

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Depending on this information, you’ll need to look for certain qualities in the right shoe. For instance, cushioning shoes provide better shock absorption. Stability shoes are good for those with mild to moderate overpronation. Motion control shoes have stiffer heels and can reduce injury for those with low arches. Once you’ve determined your particular needs and the types of shoes available, a shoe store expert can match you with the right brand. Brett Dismang, manager of New Balance in Town Center, says his store carries a wide variety of models with top ratings. “Our number one style is probably the 1260, a shoe that was recently rated ‘Best Update’ by Runners World Magazine,” he said. “It gives a lot of support and has the most cushioning available. It’s a good fit for a lot of our customers.” New Balance products get great reviews, but so do others such as Brooks, Mizuno, and Asics. There are other steps you can take to ensure that you make the right choice when selecting an athletic shoe. Plan your shopping trip late in the afternoon when your feet are at their largest. Ask the sales clerk to measure both of your feet since it’s common for one foot to be larger than the other. And bring your old shoes with you to give the clerk an idea of the kind of wear and tear you put on your shoes. Once you find the right shoe, walk around the store as much as possible and check on the store’s return policy. Just be sure you’re satisfied before you leave with your new purchase. For more information on running and walking shoes, go to runnersworld.com GH&F


Warm Up for your Warm-Up

by Gabrielle Nickles

Colder months mean hibernation for some of us, but it’s never too cold to work out … or is it? “It’s never too cold to exercise, but it’s important to dress accordingly when you do,” said Jennifer Martinez, a personal fitness trainer at Anytime Fitness in Prairieville. Martinez said exercise enthusiasts should have at least one layer of clothing to ensure protection when going from one climate to another. “You want to stay warm and protect yourself from the elements,” she said. Winter workout clothing gives gym goers an excuse to “dress cute,” Martinez added. “These days, there is a good selection of things to wear. There are a lot of affordable brands such as Danskin, which make great colorful workout gear.” Top brands, which can be found at most department stores, specialize in exercise apparel designed to prevent wearers from overheating and getting saturated with sweat. This is the kind of clothing exercise junkies (and novices) should seek, said Brad Bell of Body By Brad in Gonzales. “Leave the cotton at home,” he said. “Cotton absorbs sweat and doesn’t quickly evaporate. Opt for fabrics that keep moisture away from the body like Capilene (by Patagonia), Coolmax and Dri-FIT (by Nike). If you’re not comfortable in the fit of any of these fabrics, try double-layer tops that offer two shirts in one.” Both Martinez and Bell agree that proper workout attire also includes appropriate athletic shoes and sports bras with adequate support. There are plenty of products to choose from while you aim for that healthy body. GH&F


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GH&F WINTER WORKOUT ROUTINE:

GETTING LEAN FOR 2014

By David Jones

Photography By Kim Delatte, K&S Photography

Functional Fitness training, also known as neuromotor exercise, is the newest addition to the American College of Sports Medicine’s weekly exercise guidelines. Below are 6 neuromotor exercises to increase your balance and coordination while sculpting your body into its leanest shape for the new year. Perform these exercises 2 to 3 times a week for 20 to 30 minutes. Exercise : Tree Lifts

What it does: strengthens thighs, calves, core and feet. How to perform: Standing with feet hip distance apart place your left foot as far up the opposite leg as you can and still maintain your balance (ankle, calf, mid thigh or upper thigh). Raise your arms overhead and touch your palms together. Rise up onto your toes and lower down 8 times. Repeat on the other side.

Exercise: Single Leg Airplane

What it does: Strengthens quads, glutes, back and abs. How to perform: Standing with feet hip distance apart bend forward at the hips and lift one leg as far up in the back as you can and still maintain your balance. Bend the standing leg as deeply as possible and place your arms to the side in airplane position and hold for 10 seconds. Repeat on the other side. Repeat entire process 8 times.

Tricep Planks

What it does: Strengthens the core and triceps. How to perform: From military plank position lower your body slowly for 10 counts with elbows held close to the body. Hover as close to the ground as you can for 10 seconds. Repeat 2 – 3 times.

Bird Dogs

What it does: Strengthens abs, back and glutes and stabilizes the back. How to perform: Start on your hands and knees in all-four position. Extend one arm forward and the opposite leg back and hold for 3 seconds. Keep your hips even with each other and your spine in neutral. Repeat on the other side. Repeat entire process 10 times.

Marching Pelvic Raise Kick

What it does: Strengthens glutes and hamstrings. How to perform: Lie on the mat with knees in bent leg position. Lift your hips off of the mat keeping your shoulder blades in contact with the mat. Extend one leg, lower it and return your hips to the ground. Repeat on the other side. Repeat the entire process 8 times.

Earthquake

What it does: Strengthens abs and back. How to perform: Sit on the floor with your legs extended in front of you. Tuck your pelvis under and lean back as far as you can without feeling pain or pressure in your lower back. Keep your belly pulled towards your spine and your shoulders pulled back and down. Hold until you feel your abs “quake” or as long as you can for up to 1 minute. * Gail Pinsonat YMCA Fitness Instructor GH&F

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INSIDE-OUT MAKEOVER By Lauren Myers

In Partnership with:

reducing stress is good for the skin. As Dr. Dobson says, “Healthy lifestyle, healthy skin.” Next, it was time for a new hairstyle courtesy of Salon Eden & Boutique in Baton Rouge. Miller had not been to a hair salon since her high school prom, and her long hair had become unhealthy. Shelley Fatherree was charged with updating Miller’s hairstyle. Photography By Kim Delatte, K&S Photography

As a customer service professional for more than 20 years, Dorothy Miller knows how to make other people happy. But the working mother and grandmother finally took some time for herself when she won a makeover provided by Geaux Health and Fitness Magazine.

Miller, 59, was a little apprehensive at first, but she could see how years of hard work had taken their toll on her appearance. “I think my looks were the worst part of [being] old,” she confided. “I was looking in the mirror and I would say, ‘There’s that old woman looking back at me.’ And it wasn’t a good feeling.” So with the encouragement of her family and friends, Miller started the journey to feeling good about herself again. Her makeover began with dermatological work at the office of Dr. Mary Dobson. Dobson used a series of treatments to make Miller’s skin appear more youthful. For a brow lift and smoother forehead, Dobson used Botox injections. She then used a laser peel to even out Miller’s skin tone, reduce fine lines and wrinkles, and stimulate collagen. A week later, Miller returned for Juvederm Ultra treatments in her laugh line area, mid-face, cheekbones, and lips to restore volume. Although Miller admits there was some pain involved (she says the initial bruising after the laser peel scared her grandson), she was excited about the results. For anyone looking for healthier, clearer skin, Dr. Dobson suggests eating healthy and drinking water. And although this might be hard for some Louisiana natives to hear, she also suggests that cutting out fried foods will help skin appear brighter. Additionally, 12

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Fatherree added a demi permanent color to add depth and help the hair appear thicker. She added Balayage highlights, which Miller raves about, to add texture and volume. Fatherree also cut significant length from Miller’s hair and added layers for more volume. She then used a volumizing shampoo and conditioner and root lifter before brushing and rolling Miller’s hair. After a quick brush out, Miller was ready for a new wardrobe. From there, Miller headed to Head Over Heels to work with owner Susan Holliday on a new style. Holliday wanted to keep Miller’s look casual and low maintenance, but still trendy. To keep it simple, she put Miller in dark-wash skinny jeggings and a black sweater. She added low-wedge boots since Miller wasn’t used to wearing heels. A leopard shawl was the statement piece of the ensemble. The shawl is also a versatile piece that Miller can wear with jeans or a dress. According to Holliday, there are multiple ways to update one’s look. She encourages people to try different styles even if they aren’t trendy. “Jewelry, accessories, a handbag … these things can always dress up a look,” she said. “And I love anything animal print.” Miller was extremely pleased with the results. “It was like looking into a mirror that transported me back in time,” she said. “[Everyone was] floored. I think they were a little envious.” And her grandson? “He said I looked beautiful.” Miller has only positive things to say about the experience, especially the way everyone treated her. “They showed me southern hospitality,” she said. Although she was apprehensive about the process at the beginning, she couldn’t be happier with the results. “It made me feel special,” she said. If you would like to nominate someone who deserves a makeover, send an email to info@geauxhealthandfitness.com and tell us why. GH&F


FLAB TO FAB

By Heather Jiminez

In just eight months, Huston Harris has transformed his body, his health, his attitude and his personality. The 19-year old student and Nutrishop employee lost 175 pounds after making a commitment to take control of his life and his health.

Huston was a high school senior when he got serious about his weight. He suffered from depression and high blood pressure. He was a victim of bullying. Doctors told him he was on his way to an early death. At the time, Huston weighed 395 pounds. In January 2012, Huston quit his job, signed up at Anytime Fitness, and started working with personal trainer Bill Troupe. He hasn’t looked back. Troupe recommended that Huston visit Nutrishop and meet Scotty Vowell, who faced many of the same struggles Huston had endured. He took Huston under his wing, armed him with a good eating plan and got him started with supplements that could help him along his journey. Huston’s battle with the bulge was filled with challenges. One of his biggest temptations was eating at Hooters and Buffalo Wild Wings every weekend for the UFC fights. Instead, he went straight the gym after long days at school. He lost a few friends who claimed that he wasn’t making enough time for them … but he was determined to succeed. He followed the Nutrishop diet plan, checked in often for adjustments, and the pounds disappeared. Throughout his journey and even today, his mother has been his biggest supporter. She helped him stay focused on his goals and made him push himself harder than he imagined he could. The once shy and overweight Huston Harris is now a fun, outgoing young man who is addicted to weight training. He continues to eat healthy while doing weight training six times a week and cardio four times a week. “When I look back on old pictures and see myself, it makes me proud of what I have overcome in a short time,” he said. “The new me is never going in reverse. I’m addicted to training and I love being open and not as shy. I really have found myself in the world and I know I’m gonna help people meet their goals.” In fact, he is now employed at Nutrishop on Airline Highway, where he inspires people every day and helps them reach their own personal goals. Like any other 19-year-old, Huston is unsure of his future, but he is currently attending college and majoring in nutrition and exercise science. He has fallen in love with the sport of bodybuilding and plans on competing in a show in the future. GH&F

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ASK THE DOCTOR

by Rani G. Whitfield, M.D.

GET HEART HEALTHY DURING LENT

During the 40-day Lenten season, many choose to give up a behavior that’s unhealthy. Some of those “sacrifices” are potentially life-saving. Although Lent is not celebrated by all religions, everyone can benefit from this 40-day challenge. Here are a few things you could choose to give up or positive behaviors you could adopt in order to improve your health:

Quit smoking: Smoking is the single most preventable cause of death in the United States and a very expensive habit. Stop smoking and your lungs and your wallet will love you. Exercise: Start walking every day for at least 10 to 15 minutes. Walking is fun, inexpensive, and a great way to burn extra calories. It can also add years to your life! Give up sweets: Cut out the candy and treat yourself to nature’s candy --- fresh fruit and vegetables. Diets high in fruit and veggies can lower blood pressure, reduce your risk of heart disease, and fight against certain cancers. Aim for 7 to 9 servings of fruits and vegetables each day. Sleep well: Make time for sleep. Lack of sleep has been linked to colds, the flu, diabetes, obesity and heart disease. Adults should try to get 7 to 9 hours per night. Try these tips, which will also help you get heart-healthy. And don’t wait for Lent. Start today!

GH&F

THE DEADLIEST SKIN CANCER IS NO LONGER AN OLDER PERSON’S DISEASE

ASK THE DOCTOR

by Tammuella Chrisentery-Singleton Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Section Chief - Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Louisiana Center for Bleeding and Clotting Disorders, Tulane University School of Medicine Malignant melanoma is no longer considered an older person’s disease. It is the most common skin cancer in children and adolescents less than 20 years old. If not caught early, melanoma can spread from the skin to other organs, and often ends with deadly results. Melanoma can appear on the skin on any part of the body, and may or may not develop from a mole. Warning signs that a skin lesion (mole) may be a melanoma include changes in color, increase in size, irregular shape/ border, pain, bleeding or itching. The incidence of melanoma is on the rise, especially among teens, and research shows that the increase may be partly related to sun exposure during childhood. In the United States, the percentage of people who develop melanoma has more than doubled in the past three decades. Scientific evidence shows that artificial tanning also raises the risk of melanoma. The American Academy of Pediatrics and other organizations strongly recommend legislation to ban minors under age 18 from indoor tanning. The good news is that you have the power to lower your family’s risk of melanoma by protecting kids from the sun and paying attention to moles. Make sure children and teens know from an early age to avoid tanning beds, and to always wear sunscreen with a high SPF. GH&F

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THE LIVING ENGINE

GETTING THE PROPER NUTRITION

By Bill Gvoich, M.S.

The body is a “miracle” engine and food is the fuel that feeds it. We know this, but we still fail to appreciate the importance of eating healthy. More than 80 percent of the diseases that kill us are lifestyle-related — obesity, heart disease, diabetes, stroke, cancer and high blood pressure. Eating clean is not rocket science. Carbohydrates are essential to the brain, muscles and liver. They provide energy, vitamins, minerals and fiber. Our brain needs about 80 to 130 grams of carbohydrates a day to maintain our blood sugar levels. But we have to make a distinction between good and bad carbs. The obesity epidemic is largely a result of people eating too many bad carbs found in processed, sugary foods. We need to eat more whole foods such as fruits and vegetables, low-fat dairy products, whole grains, beans and nuts in their natural state. Dietary fiber helps our digestive health and lowers the risk of diabetes, some cancers, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure. And be aware of hidden sugars buried on the food labels. If the ingredient list has more than six items, consider an alternative.

Protein is associated with a healthy immune system, strong bones and muscles. It is found in lean meat, low-fat cheese, yogurt, milk, eggs and beans. High quality protein helps you feel full, stabilizes blood sugar, and helps with weight loss. A healthy breakfast that includes quality protein is a key step to better health. If you are active, you need more protein. Older adults, however, do not process protein as well. Fat is often viewed as a villain, but it has multiple functions in the body. We need to eat some saturated fats, but in moderation. Trans-fats that prolong the shelf-life of foods are dangerous to our health and should be avoided. Polyunsaturated fats that include the right balance of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids help prevent disease and strengthen our immune system. Fruits and vegetables that contain phytochemicals (plant nutrients) might be the real secret to good health. Vitamin supplements do not come close to duplicating the nutrients found in plant foods. Yes, food is fuel for the body, but exercise is what makes it work. Exercise keeps the body strong and functioning at a high level. Feed the engine high performance fuel to fully enjoy the ride. GH&F

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by Gabrielle Nickles

Despite its January 1, 2014 mandate, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is still causing a divide among political parties, insurers, the insured and the general public. When the act was signed into law by President Barack Obama on March 23, 2010, no such overhaul had made such an impression since President Lyndon B. Johnson’s 1965 “war on poverty” with his Medicaid and Medicare package. Open enrollment for the ACA initially was set to begin October 1 and coverage is set to begin on January 1, 2014. However, confusion about who is eligible for what coverage is a question many are trying to answer, including state and federal governments, health care providers and insurance companies. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 80 percent of Louisianans who have insurance now have more choices and stronger coverage. However, the remaining 20 percent don’t have coverage or are unhappy with what they have. That’s where the ACA comes in.

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Not so fast, said U.S. Senator David Vitter (R-La.) “I oppose the ACA because it gives Washington the power to take over health care decisions from doctors and patients. I’m concerned that President Obama’s health care law will ration care, limit choices for patients, and put bureaucrats in charge,” Vitter said in an e-mail. “The law is already proving its unsustainability with the massive amount of cancellations and skyrocketing premiums … young Louisianans are facing an average premium increase of 103 percent, and a 79 percent increase for folks in their 40s. Making health care more affordable is and has been the top goal, but now we’re seeing the Affordable Care Act fail to do that. “Simply put, the ACA will mean rising costs for folks throughout Louisiana and will mean a lot of individuals and families will be forced out of heath care plans they like,” he said. Vitter may be right about cancellations. In the existing system, employers are still allowed to maintain their current insurance. Employers are “warned” against changing insurance because they won’t receive any help in paying for premiums. This is where the skyrocketing comes into the picture. Let’s say an employer’s insurance premium for individual coverage costs more than 9.5 percent of that person’s household income or an employer’s plan pays less than 60 percent of covered benefits. In that case, an employee is allowed to opt out of his coverage and exchange it for a different health insurance. In addition to the confusion of who is eligible and exactly what the mandate entails are the delays in the open enrollment process. The White House pushed back its enrollment deadline to December 23. It also pushed back individual enrollment from October 1 to October 15, and subsequently November 15. The Obama Administration gave critics another reason to oppose the ACA when it announced that the small business online portal to shop for plans through the federal government wouldn’t be ready until next year.

Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-La.) agrees there are glitches that need to be fixed. But she said instead of picking apart the process, both parties need to work together to improve it so that constituents’ qualities of life can improve as well. “What we can’t do is go back to a time when insurance companies could deny coverage for 1.9 million Louisianans — including 266,000 children — because they have preexisting conditions, charged women more and said simply being a woman was a preexisting condition, and prevented 53,000 young adults in Louisiana from staying on their parents’ plans until they are 26,” Landrieu said in an e-mail. According to the federal Health and Human Services website, the ACA will make the Medicare options stronger by making prescription drugs more affordable for seniors and covering preventive services with no deductible or co-pay, among other things. Other benefits of the ACA include: • New coverage options for young adults • Ending discrimination for pre-existing conditions • Scrutinizing unreasonable premium increases • Removing lifetime limits on health benefits • Covering preventive services with no deductible or co-pay “The rollout of the Affordable Care Act has been plagued with problems that are completely inexcusable,” Landrieu said. “People expect their government to be smart, lean and accountable. That’s why I’ve called for the administration to work overtime to fix the website and for officials to be held accountable. We need to fix and strengthen the law so it is implemented as intended. I am willing to work with anyone who wants to make this better …” GH&F

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HOW TO GET YOUR CHILD TO EAT HEALTHIER

By Traci V. Andely Chef, Nutrition & Wellness Coach, TVA Consulting, LLC

The amount of information on healthy eating options for kids is enough to make your head spin. Gluten-free, organic, non-organic … it gives parents a lot to consider each time they feed their children. But the vastness of this topic doesn’t have to be overwhelming. Advice from area experts may provide some insight. Sophia Johnson Riley is an attorney, wife and mother of two, who continued to provide nutritious foods to her daughter Simone after she faced a myriad of food allergies, including dairy, eggs, seafood, tree nuts and peanuts. “My kids eat healthy because that is the only option that they have ever had,” Riley said. “Chicken, fruits, vegetables and rice are all that Simone can have.” Simone’s food restrictions provided her entire family the opportunity to adjust their eating habits. Simone is on a whole foods diet (foods that are not processed). Although not clearly defined, one can assume that if food has been altered in any way from its raw or original form, it has been processed in some way. This ranges from pre-packaged veggies to heavily processed meals like frozen pizza. Riley offers the following healthy snack options for Simone … sliced fruits, organic apple sauce, pretzels, soy smoothies, sugar snap peas, edamame, baby carrots, sliced cucumbers and non-dairy yogurt. “Snacks play an important role in managing kids’ hunger and ensuring adequate nutrition,” said nutritionist Laura Decuir Moran, MS, RD, CDE. Other healthy snack options include sliced fruit, yogurt, whole grain crackers, low-fat cheese, veggies with light ranch dressing, hummus, whole grain cereal with low fat milk, air-popped popcorn, trail mix and hard boiled eggs. “It is important for parents to not allow children to graze all day long,” Moran said. “Often, children who graze throughout the day have a hard time figuring out when they are actually hungry compared to when they are just bored.” Instead, Moran encourages structured meal times. She also discourages parents from using food to reward positive behavior. A better idea, she says, are non-food items such as nail polish, a football, or movie tickets. Pediatrician Tiffanny Chevalier, MD, FAAP, lists another reason to improve a child’s diet … the dangers of obesity. “One of the most difficult problems we encounter in addressing childhood obesity is that most parents are unaware that their child is overweight,” she said. “The good news is that you have more control over your child’s diet than you think. Even the pickiest of eaters are not the ones buying the groceries.” Dr. Chevalier advises parents to do the following:

- Turn off electronics during meals to prevent overeating - Monitor portion sizes and eat more slowly - Learn to decipher nutrition labels - Encourage your child to drink water and low-fat milk - Get your kids to try something new when they are hungry - Set an example for your child

It is imperative that parents adopt healthy eating habits to encourage children to make healthy choices and avoid the temptation of highfat, high-calorie foods. GH&F

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HOLLY CLEGG:

KITCHEN 101

By David Jones

Even after seven cookbooks, more than $1 million in sales and a career spanning more than 20 years, Holly Clegg has never lost her Southern charm. With her Trim & Terrific cookbook series, the self-published author, chef and mother of three continues to prove Southern food can be healthy, savory and cooked in under 30 minutes. “I only wish I was as smart as Rachel Ray and coined a 30-minute cooking phrase,” Clegg joked. Clegg attributes her passion for cooking to her childhood love for food. In high school, the Texas native began her own catering business, baking cakes for local restaurants out of her parent’s kitchen. Her hometown hobby eventually blossomed into a fullfledged career when she attended college at Newcomb University in New Orleans. Clegg said she was inspired as she began to delve into the unique culture and cuisine offered in the Big Easy. “I took every cooking class I could and went to every restaurant in New Orleans,” she said. “It’s when I really began to understand Louisiana cuisine and what it was all about.” With a newfound appreciation for Southern food and an English degree under her belt, Clegg decided to write the first of her cookbook series, Trim & Terrific Louisiana Kitchen, in 1993. She said her aim was to produce a health-conscious cookbook that didn’t sacrifice taste, but some people did not understand it. “I got advice from people who said, ‘I can’t give this to my daughter. She’ll think I’m telling her she’s fat,’” she said. Three years later, consumers caught on. By 1996, her book had sold more than 150,000 copies and captured the attention of Random House Publishing, which gave Clegg a two-book deal. Her success continued when she became one of the first chefs to do a cooking segment on NBC. Shortly afterward, she said, she remembers fan mail pouring in. She and her children spent hours responding to her readers. However, as her career flourished, her family time suffered. After the release of her second book, Clegg began doing long book tours around the country and felt the absence of those who meant the most to her. “My goal wasn’t to be on a big network and be famous,” she said. “My goal was to make a difference in people’s lives. My biggest success story was my three kids.” Clegg returned home to her family and continued self-publishing, a decision that proved to be more beneficial in the long run.

Now, as a resident of Baton Rouge, Clegg said she understands the difficulty of eating healthy in the South. But her solution is simple --- eat at home. She said a well-stocked pantry is essential and should include key ingredients such as lean meat, seasonings, broths, vegetables and fruits. “Eat with color,” she said. “ Every time you make a salad, toss a few berries in. If you eat chocolate cake, add some strawberries.” Clegg stressed healthy eating is not dieting or eating less, but rather eating better. She encourages everyone to splurge from time to time, but not overindulge. “Anybody that knows me knows I clean my plate,” she said. “Don’t deprive yourself. Just make healthier choices.” In addition to continuing her cookbook series, Clegg’s newest venture will involve a partnership with the cafeteria at Our Lady of the Lake Hospital. As an expert in cooking to alleviate symptoms of arthritis, cancer and diabetes, Clegg plans to add a new zest to traditional hospital food. “It’s my goal to have it as a dining destination,” she said.

GH&F

Winter 2014 geauxhealthandfitness.com

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WHY NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS DON’T WORK By Bill Gvoich, M.S.

Every New Year’s Day, we resolve to lose weight and keep it off for good. Any dieter who has failed will give you a number of reasons why you will fail also. 1. You Underestimate the Power of Your Hormones. The body is designed to sabotage long-

term weight loss. When dieting, leptin, the hormone that signals fullness, drops dramatically. The hunger hormone, ghrelin, along with other appetite stimulators goes up, which makes dieters feel really hungry. Obesity researcher Donna Ryan says, “If you lose 15 percent of your body weight, leptin is going to drop by 65 percent, which means your body thinks it’s starving. All you want to do is eat! eat! eat!” Your resting metabolic rate, the number of calories you burn at rest, is also lowered. If you lose 10 percent of your starting weight, your metabolic rate is reduced by 20 percent because your thyroid hormone drops. To keep the weight off, you have to reduce the calories even more. You start nibbling here and there, and you regain the weight you lost. You may end up heavier than before.

2. You Don’t Exercise. Over the last 20 years, the National Weight Control Registry has studied more than 10,000 people who have lost an average of 70 pounds and have maintained the loss for more than 30 years. The one habit that stands out above all others is their commitment to be physically active at a moderate intensity for 60 to 90 minutes per day. If you’re not prepared to exercise, keeping the weight off will be next to impossible. Why? People who succeed in keeping their weight off burn about 450 calories with daily activity to compensate for their lower metabolism. Those who include strength training in their fitness program build muscle, which burns more calories, improves body shape, and increases self-esteem. Exercise neutralizes the negative effects of your appetite control hormones, which helps you keep the weight off for good. 3. You Are Sleep Deprived. “Insufficient sleep affects your appetite control hormones,” says Leslie Boncie, RD, MPH, Director of Sports Nutrition at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Sleep deprivation disrupts the hormones that control hunger, making it harder to choose foods wisely. The tendency is to get a quick boost of energy with processed, sugary foods and extra caffeine, but this just sabotages your efforts to change. Adults need seven to nine hours of sleep every night, yet nearly 30 percent get six hours or less. Research from Case Western Reserve University shows that those who sleep five hours per night are 32 percent more likely to gain weight, compared to those getting seven or more hours per night. Sleep-deprived folks eat about 300 extra calories a day, reports the New York Obesity Research Center, and most of those calories tend to be eaten after 8 p.m. Can we reverse the obesity epidemic? Probably not, but for those who do want to change, it is possible with a better diet, regular exercise and the will to succeed. GH&F

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geauxhealthandfitness.com Winter 2014


THE WHOLE TOOTH & NOTHING BUT THE TOOTH By Pamela Labbe

Stinky breath can be an indicator that your pet suffers from gum disease or more serious issues. Studies suggest that 85 percent of cats or dogs over the age of

six have some form of dental disease. Left untreated, dental disease can lead to more serious conditions, including infections of the heart, liver, kidney or skin. Conditions that lead to dental disease can be blamed on either genetics or environmental issues. But while we can’t do much about genetics, owners can control environmental conditions by making better choices for our pets while they are still young.

Dry Food Diet

Choosing a dry food diet and giving hard biscuits or treats can encourage chewing. Avoid canned or soft foods, which lack the necessary abrasive action needed to help prevent tartar from forming on teeth. Prescription-grade dental dog food is available through your veterinarian.

Treat Time

Avoid letting your dog chew on cow hooves, bones or rocks as this can chip enamel or break teeth. Avoid pig ears as well, which can carry bacteria. Instead, try Greenies, popular treats that are available for both felines and canines.

Basic Brushing

Dentists suggest that canine tooth brushing should be done twice daily. If you choose to go this route, pick an appropriate toothbrush. A soft-bristled toothbrush made especially for dogs can be purchased at a pet supply company or from your vet. For pets weighing less than 30 pounds, use a finger toothbrush which fits over the tip of your finger. Special toothpastes suitable for cats and dogs are also available. Avoid using toothpaste designed for humans as they have baking soda, detergents or salt, which are unsuitable for animals. Pet toothpastes that contain enzymes help control plaque and cost about $9 for a 2.5-oz. tube. If you start the tooth brushing process when your cat or dog is young, you’ll have an easier time. First, pull your pet’s upper lip gently upward to expose the teeth. Once your pet is used to having his teeth examined by you, the next step is to use only warm water and the brush to get your pet used to being brushed. Add toothpaste once your dog is comfortable with the toothbrush. The outside of the upper teeth should be given the most attention. Place the bristles at the gum line where the teeth and gums meet at a 45-degree angle. Brush in an oval pattern.

Deep Cleaning

While dogs and cats seldom get cavities, tooth sensitivity and abscesses do happen. Other noticeable signs that your pet’s dental health is in trouble are red swollen gums, loose teeth, or yellow or brown accumulation (tarter) on the surface of teeth. If your pet suffers from advanced dental disease, consider a full dental cleaning. A professional dental cleaning, while not cheap, might be necessary. Under general anesthesia, your cat or dog is kept comfortably sedated so that tartar and plaque can be removed, fluoride can be applied and extractions, if needed, can be made. GH&F

Winter 2014 geauxhealthandfitness.com

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PET RX

If you own pets, you already know how much they love physical touch.

You can tell by the way Princess purrs when you stroke her fur or the way Fido wags his tail when you pat him on the head. But did you realize that you, too, are experiencing real physical benefits from this interaction?

Physical Benefits

When you spend time with your pet, whether you are holding him, petting him or simply returning his gaze, you experience a soothing, relaxing calmness. Research shows that bonding with an animal lowers your blood pressure and your stress level. Serotonin, a chemical associated with feelings of well-being, is produced at higher levels within your body. This is one of the reasons that physicians encourage elderly and sick patients to adopt a pet if they don’t already have one.

Social Interaction

Pet ownership has psychological benefits as well. Dog owners are usually more physically active, simply because they develop a routine of walking their dogs on a daily basis, and exercise always elevates one’s mood. Walking a dog also offers an opportunity for social engagement with other dog owners.

Depression and Loneliness

Many counselors and therapists promote “pet therapy” for patients who suffer from loneliness and depression. Whether it’s a canine companion or a feline friend, a pet shows unconditional love, something that’s hard to find in human relationships. Pets are happy to be with you no matter where you are or what you are doing. The simple act of feeding and grooming a pet give purpose and meaning to one’s life, and allows you to focus on something outside yourself. It’s a reminder that you have value and importance, and that someone (your pet) depends on you. GH&F

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geauxhealthandfitness.com Winter 2014


DO WHAT YOU KNOW

By Howard White

AND NOT WHAT YOU FEEL It plagues people way too often in life. It holds us back from what we desire in life… the relationships we deserve… the success that we deserve. I am talking about doing what you feel and not what you know. I challenge you to consider doing what you know and not what you feel. In almost every area of your life, you have been guilty of not doing what you know is best and

instead, succumbing to what you feel. You probably

know people who hit the snooze button two or

three times in the morning … who resolve to eat

better, yet grab dessert when it’s available … or put

on that gym outfit and then do something else like

watch TV or check email. You get the picture. And why is this so? Because we all want to spend our

lives in the “comfort zone,” that place that lets us operate in a stress-free environment that carries

little or no risk.

Abraham Maslow, an American psychologist

known for creating Maslow’s “hierarchy of needs” said that when individuals are faced with change,

they must either step forward into growth or step

back into safety. And there it is. Stepping forward

to growth is achieved by doing what you know and

not what you feel. So step out of that comfort zone and choose to grow. GH&F

Winter 2014 geauxhealthandfitness.com

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GIVING IT HIS BEST SHOT: LSU HEAD MEN’S

BASKETBALL COACH JOHNNY JONES By Erin Fulbright

Finding a balance in life is a challenge. Most of us overload our schedules and push health concerns to the side. But it’s important to find balance for every aspect of our lives --family, career, and physical and emotional health. LSU Head Basketball Coach Johnny Jones is one of those rare people who has actually found the key to a healthy, happy lifestyle. Somehow, he finds time to lead an SEC basketball team, host a coaching show, work out on a regular basis, eat healthy, and attend his children’s sports games and practices. If he can do it, so can you. Jones is entering his second year as head basketball coach, and he’s going full force. He expects a lot from his players … passion, pride and adherence to his HIT philosophy (hard, intelligent, together). He successfully teaches this method to his players because he lives it. The balance he has created allows him to work “hard, intelligent and together” in both his personal and professional lives. “There is a lot going on and not enough hours in the day,” Jones said. “Not only with being a head basketball coach, but also being a husband and father at the same time.” With a 13-year-old daughter and 15-year-old son, Jones makes it a priority to attend his kids’ functions as often as possible. When there are conflicts and he can’t attend his son’s basketball games or daughter’s volleyball games, he makes their practices instead. “You have to make time for each thing you put out there,” he said. “You have to prioritize. It’s the little things that matter.”

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geauxhealthandfitness.com Winter 2014

In spite of his other activities, Jones finds time to work out at least four days a week with an hour on the elliptical and time in the weight room. He says the workouts release stress. He also follows a healthy eating plan, even when he’s on the road, which is often. Most of the time, he chooses salad or pasta with baked or grilled chicken. It helps that meals are prepared for the team ahead of time so everyone usually follows the same plan. Players are not allowed to eat fast food during the off-season, Jones said, and it’s only right that the head coach should play (or eat) by the same rules. Another key to balance is what Jones calls “me time.” It’s important, he said, to let players have time to enjoy themselves in the evenings away from basketball. His advice to those who want to balance work and home is simple: “Schedule things that are important to you. Remember the little things and don’t take anything for granted.” GH&F


HIGH SCHOOL STANDOUT ATHLETES

By Erin Fulbright

Johnathan Stove Johnathan Stove is a 6’4” small forward senior at Christian Life Academy. Stove wants to make his senior year one to remember, hopefully becoming Louisiana’s star basketball player. CLA Head Basketball Coach Stephen Dale describes Stove as an “absolutely great person, student and player with a great work ethic in practice and the weight room. We are expecting big things from him this season.” Geaux Health and Fitness writer Erin Fulbright recently spoke with Thompson. Below are some excerpt from their conversation.

How does it feel playing the last year of high school basketball?

It is weird. I have been playing so long I guess I thought I would never get to this point. It’s fun and it’s going to be good.

What goals have you set for this season?

First, I’d like to lead my team to the state championship, and of course, win district. I want to solidify myself as the best player in the state by leading my team to a state championship.

What has been your favorite basketball moment?

District games against Southern Lab because they’re always fun to play in. You are playing against people

James Thompson James Thompson, a 6’9” power forward senior at Parkview Baptist High School, is one of the most soughtafter high school basketball players in Baton Rouge. His coach, Don Green, describes him as extremely engaging --- quiet yet funny, serious, but forever playful. “As his work ethic increases, so shall the opportunities to succeed,” said Green, who is also assistant headmaster of Parkview’s high school division. Geaux Health and Fitness writer Erin Fulbright recently spoke with Thompson. Below are some excerpts from their conversation.

What are your goals for your last year in high school? Just trying to play every game … and raise my GPA. As far as the basketball season, what are you looking forward to?

Last year we did well as a team and made it to the Final Four. This year I expect us to win state.

You have been offered a chance to play at LSU, Auburn, Kansas State, Oklahoma, Oregon State and Florida. How does it feel to have all of these offers? It feels good. It’s hard deciding which

school is right for you. I’m trying to wait it out. The best fit would be a team that gets the big man the ball, has a fast pace to it, runs up and down fast. I’ll know in January.

who live across the street from you.

Have you decided on a college yet?

I committed to ULL (University of Louisiana at Lafayette) last week. It is the best fit for my family and me, for academics and basketball. It is close to home, so it works out.

How do you spend your free time away from basketball and AAU?

I hang out with my friends and listen to music. I hang out with friends whenever I get a chance.

Who is your favorite NBA and college player?

In the NBA, Kobe Bryant. College is tough. I have three favorites ---Langston Galloway from St. Joseph University and Frank Bartley from BYU because they are local guys. And I would say Jabari Parker from Duke.

How do you stay healthy and fit?

Off-season I try and lift four days a week. During the season I lift twice a week. My mom is a health fanatic, so she keeps me eating healthy. I eat a lot of protein.

What’s your favorite healthy go-to snack? I’m not sure how healthy it is … peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and pineapples. GH&F

Do you want to go away from home? Yes, at least eight hours … (somewhere) still close enough for my parents to travel to games. Has basketball always been your first love? I played football until the eighth grade. Then my coach told me I should try basketball, so I did, and I’ve been with it ever since. What NBA player and college players do you follow? I’m a Carmelo Anthony fan and I like the way Jabari Parker from Duke plays. What are some ways you practice health and fitness? After practices, I work out with my AAU coaches on ball handling and shooting. At home, I run around the neighborhood, do push-ups and pick-up games on the side. My mom cooks healthy meals, which I like. I don’t eat fast food during the season and try to avoid it off-season as well. Why is it important to have a healthy diet? Because if you are not in shape, you can get hurt and not be able to play to your full potential. How does it feel to be one of the top high school players in Baton Rouge? I don’t think about it like people may think I

do. I just want to go out and play for my team each game. GH&F

Winter 2014 geauxhealthandfitness.com

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MÉNAGE À TROIS: TECHNOLOGY’S EFFECT

ON COMMUNICATION IN RELATIONSHIPS By Darryl Hurst

As a husband, I think God’s greatest gift to us is the ability to passionately make love to the woman you’ve devoted your life to. In the beginning stages of marriage, there is an undeniable feeling that happens when she brushes against your body. The way she looks at you from across the room brings chills to your spine and lets you know that you are in for a treat. The poetry you write, love songs that you hear on the radio, and other sweet whatnots that you run across all remind you of the one who makes your heart skip a beat. She is your rock and you will do anything that you can to let her know it. Because of the time spent selflessly pleasing each other, the sex is amazing and the world becomes clearer every time you hold her in your arms in the hopes of reaching the top of the mountain together. Then, life begins to take over. The love is still there, but it doesn’t pay the bills and there’s another whole world outside the four walls of your home. This world includes people who demand your attention and will find any way they can to grab hold of you. Your email is constantly pinging, your smartphone is getting text message after text message, your Facebook has more than 100 likes on a picture you posted, people are commenting on your Instagram, and of course, you have to stay up-to-date with twitter to know who won the LSU or SU game. And don’t forget the games that have sucked us in like Candy Crush, Words With Friends, Ruzzle and a host of others that you’re “invited” to on a daily basis. The irony is that while the Internet and applications have allowed us to stay connected to the world, it has created a disconnect between spouses.

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geauxhealthandfitness.com Winter 2014

Your wife begins to think that she is in an everyday threesome --you, her, and your smartphone or tablet. While you are talking to her, you are glued to the phone and no longer making that intimate eye contact. She begins to miss the connection she once felt because it seems that you find work, friends and everyone else more important. When you are with her, your reflexes are being driven by the pinging sounds of your cell phone. You feel phantom vibrations in your pocket, but your phone is on the table. The technology bug has bitten you. At this point, you and your wife are like two ships sailing in the night. The in-love feeling is slowing down and all she wants is for you to put your phone down and give her the attention she deserves. Women are complex creatures, but very simple when it comes to relationships. In a marriage, they want to know that they are unconditionally loved and that their opinion matters. But most of all, they want a partner who is a good listener. Men are naturally fixers, so when a woman brings an issue to the table, he is back on his cell phone looking up answers, which puts him back in the doghouse that he just got out of. The solution is to sit there and give your wife your undivided attention. While technology has surely improved the world in many ways, it has damaged our verbal communication and has caused as many problems as it has fixed. My advice to men is to “unplug” and invest in something that will provide the greatest return on investment. I am not a marriage counselor, but I believe that life is the best lesson. GH&F


HIGH SCHOOL SEXUAL STRUGGLES

By Gabrielle Nickles

Life as a teenager is a breeze,

said no one. As every child experiences the metamorphosis from pubescence and adolescence into young adulthood, he is also sure to experience peer pressure from many directions … especially sexual peer pressure.

According to a June 2013 study released by the Guttmacher Institute, most young people have sex for the first time at around age 17, but do not marry until their mid-20s. This creates nearly a decade-long window of increased risks for pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

with my family and I’ve been with his, so we know what to expect from each other.”

A. Lewis, 16, is a high school junior who says she can wait. Lewis has been in a committed relationship for almost a year and says any sexual pressure she has experienced has come from friends rather than her boyfriend. “They asked me if I was going to ‘do this’ or ‘do that,’” she said. “My boyfriend doesn’t pressure me at all. He’s been

Lewis isn’t alone. Though the study showed 70 percent of females and 56 percent of males reported their first sexual experience was with a steady partner, teens are waiting longer to have sex. In 2006-2008, approximately 11 percent of never-married females age 15 to 19 and 14 percent of never-married males in that age group had had sex before age 15, compared with 19 percent and 21 percent, respectively, today. Tommy Parker, 36, was 17 when he lost his virginity and said it was definitely peer pressure that made him do it. His uncle, who was just a year older, urged him on. Though Parker used protection the first time, he didn’t always use it. A few months after his first sexual encounter, when he was enrolled in a summer program at the University of South Carolina, the same girlfriend surprised him with a visit and the news that he had a son on the way. “We weren’t in a relationship. We were just ‘kicking it,’” Parker said. “My mom told me she had received a phone call from the young lady’s mother claiming I had gotten her daughter pregnant. I was terrified. I was in my first semester at USC when I got the call that the baby had been born. Eighteen years later, he’s now about to graduate.” Parker said his actions prompted him to have “the talk” with his own son about peer pressure and sexual responsibility. Studies show that when parents are more involved with their teenagers’ lives, peer pressure doesn’t have as much influence. Here are some things parents can do to effectively communicate with their teens: • Offer support without judgment

K now your teen’s friends • Talk about issues that concern your teen • Set healthy boundaries •

Lewis said her family is very supportive, and it helps her realize that peer pressure is just pressure and not a mandate to change her life. “I really don’t succumb to peer pressure because I don’t need to ‘fit in,’” she said. “I live my life so there will be no regrets, and at the end of the day, I don’t (have any).” GH&F

Winter 2014 geauxhealthandfitness.com

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EVENTS CALENDAR January 4th

Laketown 10 Mile & 5K

Kenner, LA

5

Geaux 365 Workouts (Whole Foods)

Baton Rouge, LA

Jackson Day Race & 5K Kids Run

New Orleans, LA

Louisiana Marathon

Baton Rouge, LA

Geaux 365 Workouts (Whole Foods)

Baton Rouge, LA

5K Resolution Run for Recess

New Orleans, LA

25

Sportspectrum Trail Run

Shreveport, LA

25

Elmwood Classic Race (10K & 5K)

Harahan, LA

26

Beignet Boogie 5K

Abbeville, LA

th

12

th

18

th

& 19

th

19

th

25th th th th

February 1st

Cherokee Chase 10K/5K Trail Run

Carencro, LA

1st

ING Kids Rock

New Orleans, LA

1st

Touchdown Tapas Super Bowl Event - Try Super Bowl Party Food (Whole Foods)

Baton Rouge, LA

2nd

Rock ‘n’ Roll New Orleans Marathon & Half Marathon

New Orleans, LA

Geaux 365 Workouts (Whole Foods)

Baton Rouge, LA

4

Kids on the Run Series 2013-Race 3

Shreveport, LA

8

2

nd th

For the Love of the Game (Whole Foods)

Baton Rouge, LA

8th

Battle on the Bayou Crossfit Challenge

Slidell, LA

8

Kids Dish Cooking Class (Whole Foods)

Baton Rouge, LA

8

5K/Walk with Mary

Thibodeaux, LA

8

Cupid’s Dash

Crowley, LA

8

End of the Human Race - Zombie Run

Lake Charles, LA

8

Race to College

New Orleans, LA

8

St. Pius Cougar Cup 5K

Lafayette, LA

th

th th th th th th

8

Heart & Sole Run/Walk

New Orleans, LA

15th

Amedisys Mardi Gras Mambo 10K/5K

Baton Rouge, LA

15th

Cupid Shuffle 5K

DeRidder, LA

th

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geauxhealthandfitness.com Winter 2014


15th

for the Love of Running: Valentine 5K

Ruston, LA

15th

King Cake 5K

Lafayette, LA

15th

Run for the Roar

Monroe, LA

15th

SRF We’ve Got Your Back New Orleans Race for Spinal Health

New Orleans, LA

15th

The Run for the Roses 5K

Youngsville, LA

Crescent city Classic

New Orleans, LA

Geaux 365 Workouts (Whole Foods)

Baton Rouge, LA

Uptown Clasic Run/Walk

New Orleans, LA

1st

Mumbo Gumbo Mardi Gras 5K

Leesville, LA

1

Run to the Battle

Monroe, LA

1

Zombie Run

Baton Rouge, LA

2

Geaux 365 Workouts (Whole Foods)

Baton Rouge, LA

Skeeter Run 5K

Baton Rouge, LA

Street Food Festival (Whole Foods)

Baton Rouge, LA

8

Komen Baton Rouge Race for the Cure

Baton Rouge, LA

8

11

th

16

th

16th

March st st

nd

2nd 7

th th

Q50 Marathon and Half Marathon

Franklinton, LA

th

8

Race Judicata

New Orleans, LA

8th

Red River Run

Alexandria, LA

th

9

Baton Rouge Dietetics Association 5K/1Mile Fun Run

Baton Rouge, LA

th

14

Kids on the Run Series 2013 - Race 4

Shreveport, LA

th

15

Keep the Pace 5K

Baton Rouge, LA

th

16

Shamrockin’ Run - New Orleans

New Orleans, LA

16th

St. Patrick’s Day 3.2M Run, Fun run

Baton Rouge, LA

16th

Geaux 365 Workouts (Whole Foods)

Baton Rouge, LA

5K Run Walk & Kids Fun Run

Baton Rouge, LA

5K Foam Fest - Baton Rouge

Denham Springs, LA

Zydeco Marathan and Half Marathon

Lafayette, LA

4th

Gulf Coast Interstate Relay (Run or Ride)

New Orleans, LA

5

Hill’s Great Rover Road Run

Baton Rouge, LA

Geaux 365 Workouts (Whole Foods)

Baton Rouge, LA

12

Child Advocacy Services Blue Run - Gonzales

Gonzales, LA

12

Run or Dye New Orleans

New Orleans, LA

A Run Through History

New Orleans, LA

Fatboy 5K

Baton Rouge, LA

Ochsner Ironman 70.3 New Orleans (Triathaon)

New Orleans, LA

Geaux 365 Workouts (Whole Foods)

Baton Rouge, LA

th

22

nd

29

th

30

th

April th

6

th th th

13th 13

th

13

th

20

th

To submit your event to Geaux Health & Fitness Magazine, Please Email info@geauxhealthandfitness.com with the event name, date and city Winter 2014 geauxhealthandfitness.com

29


We enjoyed an amazing 40 percent increase in enrollment in our freshman class this year.

Why?

The word is spreading that Southern University is an affordable and wise investment on SUccess.

Take a look at Southern University and A&M College 225-771-SUBR | subr.edu


In traditional procedures, the heart is stopped and a heart-lung machine is used to perform the body’s functions. It’s an artificial method that can sometimes lead to future complications. At Our Lady of the Lake, we prefer a technique that allows the heart to continue beating during surgery. While it requires more expertise, this procedure reduces risk of stroke and shortens hospital stays. And we do it because we believe healthcare works best when it’s constantly striving to be better. Learn more at ololrmc.com.

Leading a healthier Louisiana. Providing a smoke free campus. 00

brhealthandfitness.com Fall 2013


Geaux Health and Fitness Magazine Winter 2014 Edition  
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