Hospitality Interiors #99

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ISSUE 99 | JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022


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COMMENT Hello and welcome to the first issue of 2022, and what a start we have had with our hugely successful Hospitality Leadership and Design Conference in Los Angeles only a few weeks ago – read the review on page 38 to find out more. Now, we look ahead to our European event later this month, which will be held at the Pan Pacific London on February 23rd. We’re kicking off the year with an exceptional roster of high calibre interviewees within the magazine, too. In this issue, I interview the recently appointed Amber Asher, CEO of Standard International – an exciting hotel group with many planned openings this year (page 46), and my good friend – Jean-Luc Naret, Executive director, The Set Collection, to find out how he plans to steer this portfolio of outstanding properties, and discover his thoughts on the post-pandemic landscape, technology and shifting guest expectations (page 54). Plus, I catch up with JOI-Design Founders, Peter Joehnk and Corinna Kretschmar-Joehnk, who discuss JOI-Design’s 35-year legacy encompassing over 500 one-of-a-kind hospitality destinations in Germany and abroad, as well as serviced apartments, cruise ships and next-generation workspaces, all designed for comfort, wellbeing and belonging (page 68). Then we cross the pond to catch up with the leadership team behind Olson Kundig, one of the world’s leading full-service design firms (page 60). And, if that wasn’t enough, the team at Hospitality Interiors has been busy checking out a number of leading hotels around the world, ranging from the impressive NoMad London (page 78) to the purposefully crafted ME Dubai (page 96), the iconic and luxurious Arizona Biltmore in the US (page 110), to elegant Oxfordshire retreat, The Relais Henley (page 102). Can

Can Faik Can Faik, editorial director can@gearingmediagroup.com @HospitalityInteriorsMag @theofficialcanfaik www.hospitality-interiors.net www.hldc.co.uk



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ISSUE 99 | JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2022

CHAIRMAN Nigel Gearing EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Can Faik can@gearingmediagroup.com SENIOR EDITOR Gemma Lochhead gemma@gearingmediagroup.com

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Cover image: Arizona Biltmore

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News

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HLDC Dubai Review

38

HLDC LA Review

46

Q&A

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Amber Asher

54

Jean-Luc Naret

60

Olson Kundig

68

Corinna Kretschmar-Joehnk & Peter Joehnk

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Projects

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NoMad London

88

W Ibiza

96

ME Dubai

102

Relais Henley

110

Arizona Biltmore

116

The Langham, Jakarta

122

Kisawa Sanctuary

128 Lighting 136 Surfacing 140 Bathroom 142 Products 122


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NEWS

Sarah Derry appointed CEO Accor Pacific Accor has announced the appointment of Sarah Derry as CEO Accor Pacific, effective 1st February 2022. Sarah is currently SVP talent and culture, and joined Accor in 2017 after having owned and operated her own successful business for over 10 years. With close to 30 years’ hospitality experience, working for international hotel

companies and excelling in her early career in operations, Sarah brings formidable experience – not only in talent and culture but in business, strategy and development. As CEO Accor Pacific, Sarah will continue Accor’s growth trajectory in the Pacific, build Accor’s brands, its loyalty network and bring together talent in the region. “I am incredibly proud, humbled

and excited to be leading the Accor team in the Pacific as we see the industry transition from recovery to growth,” comments Sarah. “Providing memorable, world-class experiences for our guests and loyalty members while bringing our teams on the journey will continue to be a priority, and I am looking forward to working closely with our owners, partners and industry colleagues.”

DMA secures planning for lifestyle hotel in Camden Town Dexter Moren Associates (DMA) has achieved planning for a new Camden lifestyle hotel in the vibrant location of Mornington Crescent. The global hospitality design specialist was appointed by RE Capital to review a previously consented hotel scheme at 7ABC Bayham Street, to maximise its potential and improve its buildability. Working within the existing building envelope, DMA has

redesigned the scheme to better suit the requirements of the hotel brand and, in so doing, has created 70 keys – an uplift from the 58 in the original consent. The application also introduces a second fire escape stair from all levels to comply with current fire regulations, as well as quality office space and a reconfigured front-of-house area with a revised bar at ground level. “DMA’s experience in hotel

design and understanding of the regulations has enabled this building to be redesigned to both optimise

space and guest experience,” comments Freya Jones, project lead, DMA. “Once completed, the scheme, taken forward by DMA’s architecture and interior design teams, will exemplify a high level of design throughout. The hotel will contain a reception and cafe, bar, private dining spaces and shared workspace, alongside 70 guest rooms and a dedicated floor of suites.”

The Set Collection has announced that one of Asia’s most lauded luxury hospitality brands, The House Collective, will comprise the next four properties to become a part of its leading-edge hotel representation company. The House Collective’s four hotels – The Opposite House in Beijing, The Upper House in Hong Kong, The Temple House in Chengdu and The Middle House in Shanghai – join

The Set Collection’s four founding member hotels: Hotel Cafe Royal in London; Conservatorium in Amsterdam; Lutetia in Paris; and Mamilla hotel in Jerusalem. “We believe this exciting partnership will further elevate The House Collective reputation in the ultra-luxury hospitality space, and will appeal to the growing number of luxury consumers outside of Asia,” says Dean Winter, MD, Swire Hotels.

The Set Collection announces four new properties

De Vere Hotels announces leadership changes as Tony Troy steps down as CEO De Vere and Tony Troy have announced that Tony will be stepping down from his role as CEO at the end of January to pursue other private investment opportunities. Tony will, however, continue to support De Vere by taking on a non-executive director position. A career hotelier with over 30 years in the industry, Tony has helped shape the UK hospitality landscape from his first management buy-out

in 1994 to more recently managing a multi-billion-pound capital investment and repositioning programme on behalf of Starwood Capital, a global private investment firm. James Burrell, who joined Principal Hotel Company as chief financial officer in July 2014 and greatly assisted Tony and Starwood Capital in the overall strategic development of the group, will take on the role of De Vere’s CEO.

“James is a proven executive with a successful track record of creating growth and value during his time with principal,” says Cody Bradshaw, Managing Director, Global Head of Hotel Asset Management, Starwood Capital. “His leadership has been invaluable, particularly over the last two years, and we look forward to the group continuing to thrive under his stewardship.”


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Nobu Hospitality to make Greek debut this year Nobu Hospitality has announced its first hotel and restaurant in Greece – the Nobu Hotel and Restaurant Santorini, scheduled to open this spring. Situated on the island’s picturesque North-east coast, the boutique hotel houses a signature Nobu Restaurant, full-service spa, fitness facility, dual-level infinity pool and five luxurious pool villas, and offers panoramic views of

both the caldera and Aegean Sea from its unique clifftop location in Imerovigli. Nobu Hospitality has entered a long-term management agreement with MonteRock International (MRI), a group with over 25 years of experience in a variety of core industries including hospitality, media, F&B, real estate, banking and industrial technology.

Jill O’Hare appointed director of sales and marketing at Raffles London at The OWO Raffles Hotels & Resorts, and partners the Hinduja Group and Onex Holding, have announced the appointment of Jill O’Hare as director of sales and marketing at Raffles London at The OWO. Jill brings with her over 25 years’ international luxury brand experience, most recently as

director of sales and marketing at Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park London, a position she held since 2015. She was instrumental in the launch of the Ritz-Carlton brand in Ireland, as well as the opening of the flagship London EDITION property. “Raffles London at The OWO is

one of the most storied hotels I have ever encountered,” comments Jill. “It will be an honour to tell the stories of its heritage and its future, of the people who walked its hallowed halls, and the people, who, under Philippe Leboeuf’s leadership, will make every guest visit extraordinary.”

that best meets their needs. The expansive Heavenly Spa by Westin has been designed to prioritise guests’ wellbeing, with six treatment rooms and an indoor pool which was carefully constructed around the archaeological remains

of the Huggin Hill Bathhouse below. Riverside dining can be enjoyed at two venues – wine bar Hithe + Seek, overlooking the Thames, and all-day dining destination Mosaic, featuring a sustainably sourced menu of nutritious dishes.

Westin Hotels & Resorts makes UK debut Westin Hotels & Resorts has unveiled The Westin London City, the brand’s first hotel in the UK and the 1000th hotel within the Marriott Bonvoy portfolio in Europe, Middle East and Africa. Designed by British architect Dexter Moren Associates, The Westin London City combines meaningful wellness with contemporary fluid and sculptural design. Built on the premise that a connection to nature enhances wellbeing, the design is inspired by

the unique location, with a modern, residential feel. Within the hotel’s 222 guest rooms, guests will enjoy brand signatures such as the iconic Heavenly Bed, a spa-like bathroom, and Sleep Well Lavender Balm to promote a revitalising rest. The hotel experience comes to life through the brand’s six pillars of wellbeing – Sleep Well, Eat Well, Move Well, Feel Well, Work Well, and Play Well – allowing guests to personalise their stay and engage in programming

NH Hotel Group announces raft of new properties for 2022 NH Hotel Group, part of Minor Hotels, has set out to match its pace of new hotel openings in Europe and Latin America to the expected recovery in the sector over the course of 2022. Over the course of the new year, 10 new properties will open under the group’s brands, and another six will be completely refurbished. The hotels added to the group’s

offer belong to the Anantara Hotels, Resorts & Spa, NH Collection, nhow and NH Hotels brands, and will strengthen its position in competitive destinations in Europe, Asia and Latin America. Q2 2022 will see Milan welcome the NH Collection Milano CityLife, and the launch of the NH Collection Oasis Doha hotel in Qatar in mid2022. Finally, The Vyra Suites,

operated under the NH Collection brand, will feature 228 apartments located in West Bay, when it opens in Q4. There will also be a multitude of renovations, including at: NH Collection Venezia Grand Hotel Palazzo dei Dogi; Anantara Grand Hotel Krasnapolsky Amsterdam; and Anantara New York Palace Budapest.


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NEWS

Nobu Hotel Caesars Palace kicks off 2022 with refreshed rooms Nobu Hotel Caesars Palace, the luxury boutique hotel within the iconic Las Vegas resort, has unveiled 182 redesigned guest rooms and suites after completing a multi-million-dollar refresh. Award-winning global architecture and design firm, Rockwell Group, re-envisioned the accommodation. The world’s first Nobu Hotel now features a more modern, residential feel, with

design inspiration from kintsugi, the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with gold epoxy. Highlights of the new guest rooms and suites include custom sofas in a dozen different patchworked upholsteries, from painterly style prints to muted, textured graphics, alongside quartzite coffee tables with gold bases and a cracked kintsugi effect.

Dorchester Collection names first hotel in the Middle East The Dorchester Collection, and real estate development group, OMNIYAT, have announced that the collection’s first address in the Middle East will be called The Lana. Stemming from the Arabic expression meaning ‘for us’ and the Hawaiian ‘floating gently in calm water’, the name pays homage to the hotel’s location beside the Dubai Creek and the Marasi Marina. Opening in Q4 2022 under the

leadership of GM Caroline-Jane Houston, The Lana is situated in the heart of Dubai, in the Burj Khalifa District, overlooking the vibrant Business Bay area. The hotel will be housed in a striking 30-storey tower, designed by award-winning architect Foster + Partners, to capture the essence of its destination. With interiors by Parisian duo Gilles & Boissier, The Lana is designed to accentuate Dubai’s

striking vistas, with views of the Burj Khalifa, beautiful sunsets to the northwest and seemingly endless landscapes to the southeast. All

aesthetic choices are reflective of the hotel’s prime location. The 225 unique guest bedrooms include 69 suites, and all feature floor-to-ceiling windows and light-flooded spaces. The interior is contemporary, inspired by the city setting, with details such as stone parquet flooring, triple-height ceilings and screen dividers to create an ambience that is at once welcoming and discreet.

The Maybourne Bar opens in The Maybourne Beverly Hills hotel André Fu Studio’s latest project, and his first hospitality project in the US, is an elegant bar, discreetly located in the lobby of The Maybourne Beverly Hills hotel. André has sought to unite and celebrate different cultures in his design for the bar, introducing art deco-inspired geometric patterns alongside the vibrant colours of the Californian landscape. High barstools in Yves Klein

blue and bold tangerine perch against a black and white art deco canvas evoking a classic European glamour. Walls of burr walnut panelling in charcoal grey and ivory complement the black and white Hollywood photography of Mary McCartney, while art deco-style lamps cast a soft and welcoming light. Inspired by the idea of creating a ‘hidden jewel’ within the heart

of the hotel, André has anchored the space with a bar carved from solid Turkish silver onyx and accented with polished nickel. Intricate polished nickel metal frames adorn the back bar, that appears to intertwine between the curation of liquor on display, evoking a cascading vignette. The fixture is also magically lit to create a seductive glow, accentuating the sense of glamour.

and replatforming of the company’s ecommerce web and mobile application platform. Taking his unique experience to Rosewood, he will design and implement scalable technology solutions that will deliver the very best customer service and optimise business processes further to build the most effective, datadriven organisation. Dries joins Rosewood after serving as VP, asset management (EMEA)

at Marriott International, leading the structuring, negotiation and execution of corporate transactions affecting Marriott’s long-term management and franchise agreements across his respective regions.

Rosewood Hotel Group makes two key appointments Rosewood Hotel Group has announced two new appointments to commence this year – Taywin (Tex) Khampasri as chief information officer and Dries Deforche as VP, Legal – Europe, Africa, Middle East, and the Americas (EMEAC). Taywin will lead a global team of IT professionals, providing guidance to the group’s digital and technology strategy. Dries will provide strategic legal advice and support to

management on a variety of matters, predominantly in the Americas and Europe regions, with additional matters globally. Taywin has spent over 15 years in IT, having developed enterprise digital technology and data strategy across hospitality, food and lifestyle businesses. Prior to joining Rosewood, Taywin held the role of VP of IT digital for Minor International, where he led the design


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NEWS

Rocco Forte Hotels appoints Antonello de Medici as group director of operations Rocco Forte Hotels has announced the appointment of Antonello de Medici as group director of operations. Born in 1960, Antonello boasts an illustrious career in the hospitality sector, having held management and GM positions for brands including Starwood Hotels, Marriott and Hilton. Since January 3rd, 2022, he has had full responsibility for the operation of the group’s 14 5-star

hotels, overseeing the sales, marketing, human resources and IT strategies. Based in Rocco Forte Hotels’ Rome office, Antonello will initially focus on the Italian hotels’ structures, particularly in view of the upcoming openings in Milan in 2023 – The Carlton and Rocco Forte House. “An eclectic and accomplished man like Antonello will allow us to design an even more solid

corporate structure and accelerate the expansion of the group, which is already under way,” comments Sir Rocco Forte, founder and chairman of Rocco Forte Hotels. “I am delighted that he has chosen to work with us.” “I am honoured to become part of the Rocco Forte Hotels family and to be able to contribute to the development and the growth of such a prestigious brand,” adds Antonello.

The Other House granted permission to develop residents’ club in Covent Garden Further to its May 2021 acquisition of the prestigious Wellington Block in Covent Garden, lifestyle brand The Other House has been granted planning permission to begin transforming the island site into an innovative residents’ club. Located moments from the famous piazza, The Other House Covent Garden will offer the

brand’s signature Club Flats, with public areas comprising a destination bar, casual bistro and rooftop bar. A private members’ area will offer a restaurant, spa with vitality pool, and hi-tech fitness centre. The landmark property comprises seven separate historic buildings, including a former rectory, with plans to create a

striking inner glazed atrium and to add a further three floors, affording guests views across central London. Partnering once again with architect Falconer Chester Hall and interior designer Bergman Design House, The Other House Covent Garden promises bold, distinctive design, alongside stateof-the-art facilities.

W Algarve scheduled for spring opening W Hotels Worldwide is preparing to make its brand entry in Portugal with the launch of W Algarve this spring. Ideally situated on Portugal’s most coveted coastline, this new W Escape offers 134 hotel rooms, suites and 83 residences, complete with azure views and spacious balconies. The guest rooms showcase an Algarve reinterpreted by W –

Atlantic colours and asymmetrical forms mimic the nearby cliffs, while dynamic tile designs are a modern tribute to Portuguese heritage. Signature W amenities complete each room with plush bath robes, spacious bathtubs and rain showers. W Algarve’s high-quality F&B offering includes restaurants The Market Kitchen and Paper Moon,

and bars the Living Room, Sea Sky and Champagne sunset deck, AIR. Last, but not least, the AWAY Spa features six treatment rooms, including one couple’s room, a hair salon, a mani and pedi bar, facial LED mask treatments, as well as express booths for pre-dinner touch-ups.The spa also incorporates a wet area with sauna, steam and jacuzzi, and a covered outdoor relaxation area.

Dubai EDITION opens its doors The highly anticipated Dubai EDITION has now opened, complete with architectural and interior design by LW Design in collaboration with Ian Schrager Company, New York. Set in the heart of Dubai, the hotel is housed within an impressive 100m-high tower, atop a podium rotated 45° offaxis to maximise views of the nearby Burj Khalifa. Dubai EDITION marks the first hotel for which LW Design has completed both the architecture and interiors.

Having started on the project almost five years ago, Pooja Shah-Mulani, design director at LW Design, describes the journey as the most intense but rewarding experience, making its completion the pinnacle of her career to date. “The fusion of working with an international brand such as The EDITION, in one of the most prestigious locations in Dubai, and for a client that trusted us to deliver an exceptional product, meant that expectations were

only ever going to push creative boundaries into delivering something very special,” she says. Matching the EDITION’s vision about design, the brief was to ensure that the spaces never look ‘designed’ but feel appropriately comfortable, with effortless and elegant luxury. The furnishings chosen are not lent to a particular era – they are timeless, classic and comfortable, and flatter the understated luxury synonymous with the brand.


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NEWS

Virgin Hotels announces appointment of Bryan Davern as VP of operations, Europe Virgin Hotels, the lifestyle hotel brand from Sir Richard Branson, has welcomed Bryan Davern as its new VP of operations, Europe. Bryan will spearhead operations for the brand in Europe as it gears up to open its first hotels outside of the US. Commencing with two highly anticipated openings in the UK, Virgin Hotels Edinburgh will launch first this spring, followed swiftly by Virgin Hotels Glasgow in the summer.

Bryan brings over 20 years of experience in hotel and hospitality management, and joins from Press Up Hospitality Group, Ireland’s biggest hospitality operator. Head of hotels for over five years, during his tenure he was credited with the group’s successful expansion, more than tripling the number of hotels operated. Bryan started his career with Four Seasons Hotels & Resorts, holding

various management roles in both the US and Ireland, before moving to manage a range of both independent and branded hotels, including the Delphi Resort in Connemara and Dean Dublin as GM. In his new role, he will oversee day-to-day operations for Europe and will work closely with the Virgin Hotels senior leadership team to develop and execute the strategic plan to drive growth and profitability.

Orient Express to make grand return to Italy Orient Express is soon to return, offering passengers an unforgettable journey through Italy. From the luxury rail tourism project signed by Arsenale, now in association with Orient Express of Accor Group, comes the Orient Express La Dolce Vita, which will welcome its first passengers in 2023. Six trains will embark through several iconic itineraries across 14

regions and beyond. A stopover in Rome will feature the very first Orient Express Hotel, Minerva, scheduled to open in 2024. The concept for the new Orient Express La Dolce Vita trains pay tribute to a historical period of glamour and artistic fervour in Italy during the 1960s. With support from Accor, La Dolce Vita train’s official hospitality partner, and thanks to the partnership with Trenitalia and

Fondazione FS Italiane, the journey invites passengers to travel through more than 16,000km of workable railway lines. Designed by Dimorestudio, the Orient Express La Dolce Vita train embodies the Italian art of living and all its traditions, with a more contemporary spirit of travel. The train’s sumptuous decor will adorn 12 deluxe cabins, 18 suites, and one honour suite and restaurant.

citizenM hotels makes key appointments Dutch lifestyle and hotel brand citizenM has announced the appointment of Hendrik Jan Roel as the company’s new chief financial officer, as well as the promotion of Ernest Lee as the brand’s first-ever global chief growth officer. Hendrik will join citizenM on 1st May, after 22 years at Koninklijke Ahold Delhaize NV, where he most recently (since 2014) served as chief financial officer and EVP of Albert

Heijn, Etos and Gall&Gall. Ernest, who previously served as citizenM’s MD for the Americas, begins his new role this month. Hendrik will bring 25 years of international financial experience, and a rich leadership track record. In 2019, he received the Leadership in Finance award, a well-recognised award in the Dutch finance community. In addition to his professional achievements, he

also brings a passion for art, design and hotels – Hendrik is a member of the board of trustees and the audit committee of the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, and of the Hogere Hotelschool The Hague, as well as being a board member of the Ahold Delhaize Art Foundation. For his part, Ernest Lee brings a wide range of business experience in investments, real estate, finance, strategy and operations, and is

known for guiding the complex, multi-regional expansion of citizenM’s North American portfolio. Based in New York City, as chief growth officer Ernest will directly support and help lead citizenM’s global operating business by implementing new growth initiatives, products and programmes, pursuing strategic partnerships, and developing longterm commercial strategy jointly with citizenM’s chief commercial officer.

Photo courtesy of Hard Rock International

Hard Rock International to purchase The Mirage Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas Hard Rock International (HRI) has announced its agreement to acquire the operations of The Mirage Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas from MGM Resorts International, subject to regulatory approvals and other customary closing conditions. Through the acquisition, Hard Rock plans to build an iconic, guitarshaped hotel, which will be located on the famous Las Vegas Strip.

The iconic hospitality and entertainment brand will enter into a long-term lease agreement with VICI Properties Inc for the real estate property of The Mirage. “We are honoured to welcome The Mirage’s 3500 team members to the Hard Rock family,” says Jim Allen, chairman of HRl. “When complete, Hard Rock Las Vegas will be a fully integrated resort, welcoming meetings,

groups, tourists and casino guests from around the world to its nearly 80-acre centre-Strip location.” Prior to 2020, HRI had no previous involvement with the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas. HRI purchased the licensing and naming rights for Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Las Vegas in May 2020 and vowed to bring the iconic brand to the Las Vegas Strip when the right opportunity presented itself.


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NEWS

SB Architects can exclusively reveal details of its new studio to Hospitality Interiors’ readers …

SB Architects unveils SB Outside


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SB Architects, an international architecture firm renowned for creating award-winning hospitality, residential and mixed-use design solutions, is proud to announce the launch of its new studio, SB Outside, which creates off-the-grid, understated-luxury hospitality experiences to satiate the palate of the most intrepid traveller. Expanding SB Architects’ commitment to sustainability, SB Outside’s mission is to create environmentally conscious, sustainable spaces that positively impact the locale and community. Future projects will breathe life into outdoor spaces, put indoor living closer in contact with the natural beauty of a site, and allow Mother Nature to take centre stage. “Quenching a thirst for the outdoors is a key driver for SB Outside,” remarks the

president and principal of SB Architects, Scott Lee. “The last few years have underscored the importance of creating opportunities for travellers to decompress in nature and maximise life’s simple pleasures. “Alternative vacations are becoming more ingrained in hospitality, and resorts are beginning to embrace glamping as an experiential element that can be integrated into the overall offering. We’re thrilled to share this announcement – SB Outside is the next milestone in SB Architects’ evolution, helping to strengthen and evolve our portfolio.” Josh Abbey has been appointed as director of SB Outside. Based in Colorado, Josh’s project background, intrepid spirit and experience of designing in complex terrains make him the ideal candidate to spearhead this initiative.

Q&A: Josh Abbey, director of SB Outside What is SB Outside? SB Outside is a new, growing studio of SB Architects, led by four key pillars – nature, sustainability, wellness, and adventure. We focus on alternative, sustainability driven hospitality – glamping, tents, eco-pods, airstream trailers, train carriages – basically anything that pushes beyond typical bricksand-mortar design. We bridge adventure-driven environments with guest access to luxury amenities and resort facilities, and it is our aim to immerse guests in a delicate liminal space where idyllic escape feels exposed to nature – protected and wild at the same time. Why are you creating this as its own brand? At SB Architects, working with the locale and offering the most ‘light-on-the-land’ design solution has always been our priority, and over the last few years, we’ve seen that demand grow. Separating SB Outside as its own studio allows us to evolve and further expand into new project types. What sparked the idea? Why now? As a firm, we’ve never rested on our laurels – we’re nimble, and focused on agile evolution. The number-one driver for SB Outside has been the evolution of consumer behaviour. The industry moves at such a fast pace, with luxury spending shifting from material opulence to experience in the blink of an eye. Travellers are craving destinations that place them closer to nature, allowing them to disconnect with life’s daily demands and engage in the moment. Alongside this, our clients have been more eager to explore alternative uses for their developments. The US has been slower than places like

Europe and Australia to consider glamping in the same league as luxurious resort experiences, but the paradigm shift resulting from this pandemic is helping the concept gain traction. At SB Outside, we cater to today’s mindful travelers and adventure-seekers, who aim to tread lightly, get off the beaten track, and be fully immersed in the destination, providing guests with a sense of transcendence by delivering the adventure, exploration and luxury satisfaction they crave. The allure of adventure is calling. What can we expect, and when? Our team is currently small but diverse in experience, with a spirit of adventure and discovery running throughout. We plan on growing organically, and will add additional team members when the need arises. We will run as our own studio, with our own portfolio, but will collaborate with SB Architects to offer an alternative hospitality option on larger developments. In terms of projects, you can expect fresh ideas with an adventurous twist. People travel to be transported – they want to experience new places, new cultures and new mindsets, and we aim to deliver that. We currently have a few projects under way, including a project in Forestville, California (pictured) where we’ve designed luxurious glamping structures that are situated adjacent to the vineyards of Silver Oak Winery in the Alexander Valley of Sonoma County. While guests won’t have access to temperaturecontrolled guest rooms, the holistic design engages all five senses, with a close connection to the land. We will be able to reveal more soon – watch this space! www.sb-architects.com


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HLDC is firmly in the swing of its international roster of events, with December 2021’s Dubai conference showcasing a prestigious roster of panellists and esteemed attendees.

The conference took place on 8th December in the elegant surrounds of the newly opened Sofitel The Obelisk. Guests were treated to an informative and inspiring series of discussions, with topics ranging from facilitating a luxury guest experience and the role of technology, to discourse on enhancing client engagement and operations. www.hldc.co.uk

Keynote address Sarah Duignan, director of client services at STR, gave a fascinating analysis of the hospitality landscape as the industry recovers from a very trialling period. The outlook for the Middle East was particularly encouraging, with ADR and RevPAR growing strongly and steadily. “Dubai is one of the bestperforming markets in the world when it comes to occupancy,” said Sarah. “Expo, the ICC Men’s T20 World Cup and high season allowed average rate to hit 984 dirhams or £190.” In terms of pipeline, the future looks rosy for the Middle East which, Sarah explained, is the fastest-growing region in the world on this score. “82,901 new rooms

are expected to open in the Saudi Arabian market,” she said. “In the UAE there’s just shy of 50,000 rooms coming, and approximately 35,000 of those are in Dubai.” These properties are predominantly quite advanced in their construction, too, with 70% of the hotels in Dubai’s pipeline already out of the ground and the vast majority of Doha hotels expected to be open in time for the World Cup. “Year-end next year, Dubai is the only market of those that we forecast on across Europe and the Middle East that we expect to grow by comparison to 2019,” Sarah concluded. “Dubai is topping the table for 2022.”

“Dubai is one of the best-performing markets in the world when it comes to occupancy”


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HOSPITALITY LEADERSHIP & DESIGN CONFERENCE - DUBAI REVIEW

Luxury 3.0 Pallavi Dean, founder and creative director of Roar, led an intriguing discussion on the 5*** hotels of the future, with: Anton Bawab, head of operations, The Red Sea Development Company; Haitham Mattar, MD of India, Middle East and Africa (IMEA), IHG Hotels & Resorts; and Sandeep Walia, COO, Middle East, Marriott International. The somewhat controversial opening statement that “good architecture is far more important than great service” offered a catalyst for debate. “I would say both are important, and one shouldn’t be at the cost of the other,” Sandeep put to the group. “I think success would be a good, healthy combination of design and technology on one side, and service and human touch on the other. “In my opinion, good service is ubiquitous,” said Pallavi. “To provide exceptionally good service these days, I think your staff needs to speak four languages fluently. So, how do we get that consistency in

service?” “I think the service staff needs to have one language, not four – it’s the language of anticipation to guests’ needs,” Haitham countered. “I think this is really critical. It’s really important to have a balance of design and great service.” “Design is an enabler,” suggested Anton. “The discussions we continually have with our designers are, ‘design it beautifully, but make it functional’. The back of house, the part that is not visible to all of us, is as important as the part that the guest touches, and it enables it. You can have all the beautiful furniture and fixtures, but if you have to bend over and contort yourself to plug in your laptop under the desk, that is not luxury. The unsentimental part – the back of house, the colleague facilities –are equally important, if not more important, in enabling us to deliver the great service we want to offer.” The discussion turned to technology – how it might be

“I think the service staff needs to have one language, not four – it’s the language of anticipation to guests’ needs”

used to promote sustainable habits, and whether in fact this is compatible with ‘luxury’. One particularly interesting perspective was that hotels are lagging behind the technological progress seen in the travel industry, and need to do more to ensure a seamless guest experience. “With technology, I think there is so much that has evolved, especially when it comes to airports with facial recognition,” said Haitham. “But then you arrive at the hotel lobby, and you have to sign a registration card and give your ID. There’s a lot of synchronisation that needs to take place in order to make the hoteliers work with the government and authorities and make that seamless, taking that whole anxiety out of travel.” The panellists went on to discuss the manifestation of sustainability in luxury hospitality.

“Today’s generation are looking for sustainability,” said Haitham. “I want to experience luxury, but I want a sustainable product. I want to protect the environment, I don’t want to use up everyone’s water.” “I have to disagree, I’m a bit of a romanticist about luxury,” countered Anton. “We’re having that dialogue internally all the time – luxury and sustainability. Luxury and environmental friendliness don’t go hand in hand. You go on your vacation twice a year, you want to splurge. But there is more to it than the bed sheets and the towels and the water flow. Where do your employees live? How much carbon do you burn when they travel to and from work? Where do you buy from and how do you transport it? How do you organise your supply chain? It starts with how you build, so we’re building off-site to reduce our impact on the island.”

21st Century Luxury - Balancing Design Vision with Value Engineering Filippo Sona – Partner and COO, Wood Couture, fostered a compelling discussion on luxury with Jese Medina-Suarez – creative director, principal, EMEA, Campbell House; Olga Sundukovy – co-founder & co-creative director, Sundukovy Sisters; Justin Wells – founder and CEO, Wells International

and Kristina Zanic of Kristina Zanic Design Consultants. One key topic was bespoke design. “This is where our industry is going,” said Justin. “To create bespoke design is what we love to be doing. We’re not just specifiers at the end of the day, we’ve got great suppliers that we love to

“Trying to do something new and freshing requires a bespoke approach” work with, but we’re always trying to reinvent. Trying to do something new and freshing requires a bespoke approach.” “For us what is really great is looking at what’s local,” added Kristina. “More and more we’re looking at our location, and what we can source there. As designers we need to keep researching, we need to look at our supply chains, we need to look at who’s out there and what they’re doing in terms of product and price point.” “There should be a balance,” agreed Olga. “We need to provide

quality and some iconic pieces, but then of course we as artistic designers adore creating things from scratch.” Discussion turned to the fluidity of a luxury product. “Something that could be taken as great service in one country, isn’t in another,” said Jese. “It’s the same with design, and the way that spaces unfold within a hotel. What is luxury in one place is not in another.” The conversation concluded with a focus branding, and how greater agility is perhaps needed from more established and larger brands.


Luxury Bespo ke L ighting D e s ign e d & M anufactured in the UK

© Mondrian Shoreditch

projects@northern-lights.co.uk

Mondrian Shoreditch with Goddard Littlefair

northern-lights.co.uk


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HOSPITALITY LEADERSHIP & DESIGN CONFERENCE - DUBAI REVIEW

Leveraging luxury through design Moderator Esra Lemmens – founder of the Esra Lemmens Agency – explored the ways in which design can be employed to communicate or enhance a luxury guest experience with: Hakan Ozkasikci, senior VP, design and technical services, Kerzner International; and Isabel Pintado, senior VP, design and innovation, Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts. The panellists kicked off with a discussion around guests’ evolving expectations of a luxury experience and the importance of staying agile. “The background of our guests is very varied, but what they have in common is that they are exposed to luxury in their own lives,” said Isabel. “To surprise them and delight them is a little harder. We have to

them feel they belong and are immediately embraced as part of that community.” “How do you cater to these needs while being feasible?” Esra put to the panel. “In our world, in One and Only, we capped our growth,” Hakan responded. “We’re not going to build more than 35 One and Onlys throughout the world, even if it takes de-flagging or re-flagging or rebranding some of the existing properties. “We decided that as the strategy for the next five years. It’s a really bold undertaking in that sense, trying to grow the brand while capping that growth rate. But consistency is key.” A common thread throughout the discussion was authenticity

try to be a step ahead of them, to give them a service that makes

in luxury. “Creating authenticity starts with respect, from the very

“Creating authenticity starts with respect, from the very beginning”

beginning,” Hakan shared. “Respect of the local culture, respect of the people who inhabit that particular location, and respect of the nature and the forces that shaped it. “One of the things that most of our guests require is a sense of immersion into a local community,” Isabel added. “Being exposed to more than an artwork or photo of location, but immersing them from a design aspect so that the culture and traditions are engrained into the design.” Esra rounded off the panel by asking whether designers need to consider guest loyalty in their designs, or whether it’s purely an operator’s concern.

“It’s not really the designer’s responsibility, it’s our brief to them and the way we convey it,” responded Isabel. “The consultants are there to make something magical, but loyalty comes more from how we treat that guest and how we consistently brief different consultants to achieve that quality.” Hakan shared a slightly different perspective. “If that level of humility and honesty is not there in the design, it’s not going to work,” he said. “That creates the loyalty, because the experience is then going to be unique and particular to that place. You have to be really honest in your design thinking so that loyalty comes with that.”

Hotel concepts fail because of a lack of design thinking in operations Moderated by Campbell House’s COO, Monika Moser, this panel incorporated: Tim Cordon, senior area VP Middle East and Africa, Radisson Hotel Group; Marc Descrozaille, COO, India, Middle East and Africa, Accor; and David Todd, head of operations, Middle East and Africa, InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG). “I think one of the very interesting points here is the communication,” Marc suggested. “Bringing operations together with the designers typically doesn’t occur, and I think we don’t allocate enough

time from the outset to understand the concept and the elements which really matter from a functionality point of view.” “My suggestion would be to incorporate as much flexibility into the design as possible,” said Tim. “Having the ability to evolve a space from one use to another not only answers part of that question, but makes the potential profitability of the hotel far greater. That flexibility would be what I’d pitch to a room full of designers about how we are creative in the use of those spaces.” The panel were unanimous in

“Once the design is done and it’s linked to the brand, it’s then about operations bringing this to life and embodying the brand in their service style, behaviours and interaction with the guests” their feeling that classical brands are not as agile as lifestyle brands when it comes to making adaptations in line with guest behaviours. “Lifestyle brands are an answer to the customer need because they’re rejecting this over-commoditisation/ standardised approach,” said Tim. “And I think that’s where design has an enormous role to play in the future of the hospitality industry. To be able to make creative designs that shake off the traditional ideas that we’ve had in the past, but still are operable and profitable. I think that’s a real challenge.” The overarching conclusion was that the success of a hotel comes

down to a fine balance between the designer adequately translating brand characteristics within the interior, and the way in which the team operate subsequently. “I think that the designer needs to understand the essence of that brand from the beginning,” said David. But once the design is done and it’s linked to the brand, it’s then about operations bringing this to life and embodying the brand in their service style, behaviours and interaction with the guests. People are absolutely critical to bringing the hotel to life, the business to life, and driving the ROI, which is what the owners are looking for.”


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HOSPITALITY LEADERSHIP & DESIGN CONFERENCE - DUBAI REVIEW

Future-proofing hospitality design In the penultimate discussion of the day, Shadi Moazami , MD of MAIA, took to the stage with: Shaun Killa, design director, Killa Design; Marie Soliman, founder and creative director, Bergman Design House; Philip Gillard, principal and MD, HBA; and Pallavi Dean, founder and creative director, Roar, to discuss how the hospitality design industry might future-proof itself. The general consensus among the panel was that the postpandemic future for hospitality design does not look altogether that different. It would be unwise to design buildings for a moment, suggested Shaun, while Philip spoke on Covid as another in a series of

catalysts that bring about change and transformation. “What Covid has taken away from us is one of our five senses – our sense of touch,” added Pallavi. “It took that away for a long time, and made us reflect on how we might enhance our design to overpower the other senses, or convey tactility visually.” Discussion turned to adapting to changes in the industry, particularly in appealing to different audiences. “I think more than adapting, it’s embracing the change, because when you say adapt it’s almost like something is wrong and is forcing us to change,” said Marie. “It’s vital to understand the persona of the

“What Covid has taken away from us is one of our five senses – our sense of touch”

traveller. Young travellers and young wealth want an experience that almost unfolds around them.” The panel moved on to key trends that are set to emerge in the next 5-10 years. These ranged from profound changes to business travel and hotels post-Covid, to bleisure travel and the ’ultra-luxury’ sector. One barrier to these trends reaching their potential, the panel deduced, was the slow-moving nature of the industry. “One of the things that we’ve been focused on in the last year is repositioning and

refurbishing existing assets and breathing new life into them so that they have another 20-30 years,” said Philip. “A lot of the challenges we’ve been facing in that respect are that they want the same again, just a little bit better. That doesn’t shift the needle – it doesn’t move or transform the industry. I think we need to show and lead by example so that we can make those changes. But we can only do that by making a deep change, and making those big commitments so that the operators and developers feel comfortable.”

“Take only memories. Leave only footprints.” The Red Sea Project – Perspectives on Designing for the Inner Journey The concluding panel discussion of the day was led by Tal Danai, founder & CEO of ArtLink, and saw an enlightening conversation surrounding the design of the ambitious Red Sea Project. Melissa Messmer – senior director of interior design at The Red Sea Development Company; Alex Yoo – senior director, Design & Project Management, Global Design, Middle East & Africa Marriott International and Seth Matson – vice president Design & Technical Services Luxe MEA at Accor shared their thoughts. Melissa kicked off proceedings with her thoughts on regenerative design. “The way that we look at

it is that we’re not just an owner/ developer company, we’re stewards to this environment and to this project that we’ve been handed,” she said. “How many of us have been part of creating a destination from scratch and transforming a nation culturally, socio-economically?” “I think the ultimate goal is to render the term ‘regenerative tourism’ obsolete, so that we get to a point where sustainability is intrinsic and ubiquitous, where it is woven into the DNA of the design,” Alex added. Conversation turned to creating an emotional connection through design. “I think that sustainability

“How many of us have been part of creating a destination from scratch and transforming a nation culturally, socio-economically?” starts with not leaving a trace on the place that you enjoy,” suggested Seth. “That comes from being attuned, being respectful of a space, and feeling like you are in a defined location that has a particular quality. The whole experience isn’t necessarily just about the design in terms of materials and finishes, but how the spaces create an emotional response and connection.” Tal Danai called on Melissa to expand on a previous comment surrounding the equivocation between simplicity and generosity. “We’re very fortunate to have architecture that makes a statement, so when it comes to interior design it’s really about supporting that statement and doing it in a simplistic but sophisticated way,” she said. “I think when you’re talking about true luxury it comes

down to the simplest of vocabulary. You don’t need a lot to be luxurious. Opulence is out. People want to do what no-one else has done before.” When asked what guides them in their designs, the panel agreed that empathy is fundamental. “Facilitating emotional states has been the key,” said Seth. “To say that we think about guest experience is a cliché, but you really have to put yourselves in someone’s shoes and imagine you’re the person that’s just checked in.” “At the end of the day we’re building hotels, not rockets, but if people can come to our destination and somehow be touched and transformed by these experiences, then we’ve stewarded this beautiful destination and opened it up to the world in a whole new way,” said Melissa.


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COMING UP… In the coming months HLDC will be in London (23rd February), Singapore (21st September), New York (10th November) and Dubai (7th December). If you’ve previously missed out on tickets or sponsorship opportunities, now might be your chance to get involved with one of the upcoming events. For more information, get in touch with the events team at tkts@hldc.co.uk or visit the website, www.hldc.co.uk


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OPENING SHOTS

Al Marjan Island, Ras Al Khaimah Marjan, RAK Hospitality Holding and Wynn Resorts have announced a multi-billion-dollar integrated resort development on the man-made Al Marjan Island in Ras Al Khaimah, United Arab Emirates. The resort covers an area of almost 250,000m2, and will offer a pristine setting with spectacular views of the Arabian Gulf, as well as sandy beaches and a marina. The current scope includes a 1000+ room hotel, high-end shopping mall, a state-of-the-art meeting and convention facility, an exclusive spa, more than 10 restaurants and lounges, a wide array of entertainment choices, a gaming area, and other amenities. The integrated resort will be developed with significant foreign direct investment by Wynn Resorts. It will create substantial value to the local economy by accelerating tourism, creating jobs, and energising the growth of related sectors. Set to be completed in 2026, the entire project will be developed to the highest standards of best practices in sustainability.


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Rosewood Riyadh Set to launch in 2025, Rosewood Riyadh is a new-build luxury hotel situated adjacent to the UNESCO World Heritage Site of At-Turaif, in Saudi Arabia’s capital. Rosewood Riyadh will be located within Diriyah Gate, a progressive, mixed-use development project poised to become a leading cultural and lifestyle destination. The hotel will occupy a standalone building boasting 250 ultra-luxury accommodations, including 202 guest rooms and suites and 48 Wadi Suites, ranging from one to three bedrooms. The property will also feature: four restaurants and bars; Asaya, Rosewood’s integrative wellbeing concept; a state-of-the-art fitness centre; and expansive meetings and events spaces.


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OPENING SHOTS

Scandic Sundsvall Central Scandic Hotels has signed a long-term lease agreement with Skanska for a new 210-room hotel in downtown Sundsvall, due to open in 2024. Ideally located in the city’s harbour area, Scandic Sundsvall Central will offer a cosy restaurant and bar area on the ground floor, with a spa, wellness facilities, gym and meeting rooms on the first floor. The building’s frame, facade and interior will be made of wood, meeting the requirements for the high-ranking environmental certification, LEED Gold. With its choice of energy-efficient materials and solar panels on the roof, the new hotel will be 100% climate neutral during its lifetime.


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OPENING SHOTS

IHG signs multi-resort deal in Vietnam to open in 2026 IHG Hotels & Resorts has announced a four-hotel, 2709-room portfolio deal in Vietnam with Sun Hospitality Group, due to come to fruition in 2026. The multi-property agreement includes the 616-room Holiday Inn Resort Yoko Park Onsen in Quang Ninh Province, expanding on the existing Yoko Onsen Quang Hanh Resort. Three hotels will also be built as part of the ongoing development of Ba Na Hills in the mountains of Danang – the 602-room Crowne Plaza Danang Ba Na Hills, 843-room Holiday Inn Resort Danang Ba Na Hills, and 648-room voco Danang Ba Na Hills.


Ona Collection

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OPENING SHOTS

Jumeirah Marsa Al Arab, Dubai Jumeirah Group has unveiled its latest ultra-luxury resort, Jumeirah Marsa Al Arab, which is expected to open in 2023 and will lead a new generation of Jumeirah Group’s ultra-luxury portfolio. Nestled at the tip of a peninsula at the heart of Dubai’s largest private beach, the property will complete the group’s oceanic trilogy, which includes the wave-shaped Jumeirah Beach Hotel and sailboat-inspired Burj Al Arab Jumeirah. The new resort, with design influences evoking a futuristic superyacht, will feature 386 rooms and suites, four penthouses, and 83 luxury hotel apartment suites, set amid private landscaped gardens. It also encompasses specially integrated wellness and leisure destinations and an impressive line-up of signature restaurants, including a new concept comprising four restaurants in one. www.jumeirah.com



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HOSPITALITY LEADERSHIP & DESIGN CONFERENCE - LOS ANGELES REVIEW

HLDC LA – a meeting of minds

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Building on its reputation as the leading conference on hospitality design, HLDC hosted its first event of 2022 in Los Angeles, with an all-encompassing programme of events and a star-studded line-up of speakers.

Held on 26th January at the glamorous Waldorf Astoria Beverly Hills, more than 120 industry experts gathered in the ballroom to discuss hospitality and design topics as far ranging as design concepts and trends to strategising and development, and to connect with both old and new business contacts. Comperes Beth Campbell, CEO, Campbell House, and Barbara BestSantos, director of interiors, Hart Howerton, were the perfect doubleact to lead the day’s event with their witty banter and approachable manner.

Photography by Madeleine Farley

Attending the conference, as well as speaking on panels, were a carefully selected mix of well-known design and hotel personalities representing some of the biggest brands in hospitality – from Hilton, Viceroy and Rosewood, to Hyatt, Six Senses and Four Seasons, and design studios including HBA, Richmond International, Pierre-Yves Rochon, 1508, GA Group and SB Architects. Making these conferences a possibility in the first place, the friends and event sponsors for this event were AXOR, encore, Kaldewei, Laufen, Samuel Lawrence Hospitality, LaBottega, Montrose Hospitality, Bernhardt Hospitality, Dornbracht, EzSpec, Hansgrohe, ICE International, Lasvit, Moroso, Interra Contract, Kohler, Lusive, My Drap, Preciosa, Infinity Drain and Lily Jack. www.hldc.co.uk

Keynote address Opening the day’s programme of talks, Zachariah Demuth, senior research manager, Hotels & Hospitality Group, JLL, gave an overview of the hotel industry, focusing largely on the US but including global trends, while sharing some surprising statistics from the last two years. “Following near-enough 24 months of Covid, the hotel industry

was impacted like never before. April 2020 saw the lowest occupancy rates in the USA ever, of just 24%. 2020 was the worst year in the USA, worse than 9/11 and the great financial crisis combined. Many hotels were forced to close due to lack of demand – but the good news is we’re now in a much better place.” To illustrate his optimism, Zachariah ran through some hopeful numbers from 2021: “We finished the year in the US on $38b in total transaction volume, which, to put it in perspective, is four times what we did in 2020 and +40% more than we did in 2019, which is actually the second-highest year ever on record. If you look at a global perspective it’s about $69b – the US has the lion’s

share of that, followed by Europe, the Middle East and Asia.” He went on to explain that the market is beginning to see a lot of activity again, from an investment perspective, and that despite no foreign transaction activity in the US in 2021 due to borders being closed, the market had one of its best years on record. Looking at recovering to pre-Covid levels, Zachariah confirmed things looked good for the year end of 2022: “We’re about 83% of pre-Covid recovery. There’s still a way to go, but I think it’s a lot better than we all anticipated, and if you look at STR’s most recent forecast, they’re saying that RevPar will fully recover by the end of this year.”

He told us that, moving forward, the industry needs to focus on developing markets, including bleisure travel and technology, with behind-the-scenes tech being more important than ever, and adding the significance of sustainability being factored in when where building new hotels. “The last big focus for us is ESG, but specifically sustainability. Booking.com surveyed over a million travellers, and 80% said they would pick a hotel that showed sustainable metrics over one that didn’t.” In conclusion, Zachariah said: “There’s a lot of opportunity in the future, and we think 2022 has the opportunity to be one of the best years for the industry.”

“There’s a lot of opportunity in the future, and we think 2022 has the opportunity to be one of the best years for the industry” – Zachariah Demuth


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HOSPITALITY LEADERSHIP & DESIGN CONFERENCE - LOS ANGELES REVIEW

20/22 Vision Moderating a discussion on what we don’t know about the hospitality industry in 2022, Rick Evans, president, Samuel Lawrence Hospitality, posed questions for panellists Hamish Brown (partner, 1508 London), Therese Virserius, (co-founder, Virserius Studio,) Vince Stroop (founder, stroop Design) and Kathleen Dauber (partner, Hirsch Bedner Associates) to find out more about the projects they’re currently working on. Kathleen spoke about the two residential towers and InterContinental hotel in Bellevue Washington she and her team are working on: “It’s been interesting, as most of the design effort was pre-Covid, and we’ve had to work through things with the consultants and the client virtually.” Hamish talked about 1508’s

work on the Mandarin Oriental Residences in Beverly Hills: “It’s the first new-build development in The Golden Triangle in 40 years, which is tremendously exciting. I think the balance between residential and hospitality is becoming so intrinsically linked, and we can see branded developments coming up all over the place.” Telling us how he feels about the blending of markets, Vince explained that he was currently working on an office refurbishment that had the potential to combine a hotel and residences within the same building, and Therese told us about the big project she’s working on in Berlin, which has the aim of becoming an organic addition to the local community, that incorporates a number of cultural aspects. The group discussed different

factors that have impacted their designs, and the topic of technology features heavily. “Technology-wise I think I’m just scratching the surface in terms of concept design, but I think it’s a given that there will be

“I think the balance between residential and hospitality is becoming so intrinsically linked” – Hamish Brown

new touchpoints that we have to integrate without even thinking about it,” said Vince. “We’re looking a lot at wellness,” added Hamish, “working out how that can be incorporated seamlessly into people’s everyday lives. We have the ability in hospitality to really push the boundaries with those things.”

A ‘brand’ new world – leading by design Leaders from three giants of the hospitality world shared insights on how design is influencing the guest experience and how their brands are evolving to meet ever-changing guest expectations. An engaging conversation led by moderator Barbara Best-Santos, director of interiors, Hart Howerton, saw panellists Audra Tuskes (VP, Global Design Strategies, Marriott International), Kara Siffermann (VP design, Resorts World Las Vegas), and Crystal Vinisse Thomas (VP and global brand leader, Lifestyle & Luxury Brands Hyatt) discuss some brilliant ideas around the ways in which design has a direct impact on how their guests perceive their brands, and how that generates loyalty and return custom. Some of the overarching factors addressed practicality and use, and tapping into the psyche of a different generation of traveller looking beyond beauty when it comes to design. Meaningful

travel is on the rise, and the way we design should reflect the way we think and feel in a particular space, they concluded – branding is being redefined for the better, and becoming less about look or statement, and more about aligning with guests’ values.

“Meaningful travel is on the rise, and the way we design should reflect the way we think and feel in a particular space”


ITALIAN DESIGN RUGS & CARPETS

Axminster - Handtufted - Broadloom For Hospitality and Cruise WWW. L OL OEY . C OM


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HOSPITALITY LEADERSHIP & DESIGN CONFERENCE - LOS ANGELES REVIEW

Current trends that define luxury hospitality Talking all things luxury and taking a closer look at the trends impacting hotel design and operation the most – from sustainability to staffing issues, keeping up with customer expectations and choosing the right artwork – Hemanshu Parwani, CEO, Olson Kundig, acted as moderator for the session, with a dynamic panel made up of Bill Walshe (CEO Viceroy Hotels and Resorts), Caroline MacDonald (SVP of operations, Americas, Rosewood Hotel Group), Ari Kastrati (chief hospitality officer, MGM Resorts International), Kristie Goshow (chief commercial officer, KSL Resorts) and Peter Humig (regional VP, Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts). Looking at whether luxury and sustainability are at odds with each other, Caroline made the point that

sustainability looks different in every market: “It might be that we do something to help employees with their day-to-day living. In some of the hotels we might be doing restoration work or using less energy or desalination. We try to make an impact in every location.”

“I think design has to play a pivotal and a critical role in experience” – Ari Kastrati

Kristie agreed: “Sustainability is so much more than the natural environment, it’s social, it’s cultural, and as operators and managers we have a responsibility, we are stewards of those assets, of those buildings and of those communities, and we need to work out what can we give back. Doing good is good business.” The panel were asked how intrinsic they thought design was

to the success of a hotel. “I think design has to play a pivotal and a critical role in experience,” said Ari. “It is one element of it, it is not the whole thing but it plays such an emotional role in how people make decisions. Design can be transformative, just like music can be, just like reading a book can be, and it can be done extremely well if you select the right designer and pair them with the right architect.”

New beginnings With a conversational talk led by Alastair Graham, president, Montrose Hospitality, the group in session, comprising panellists Amy Jakubowski (principal and MD, Pierre-Yves Rochon) Dennis Irvine (director, Richmond International), Robbyn Carter (founder, Studio Carter) and Johnathan Garrison (principal, G.A Group, New York) discussed their recently embarkedupon ventures within some of

world’s finest hospitality design studios, and explained how they’d each arrived at this point in their careers. For Johnathan, he was looking for a way to reconnect with his love of design: “I spent 16 years at Yabu Pushelberg. I decided it was a time for a change when I felt I was being challenged by things that weren’t related to design. I wanted to learn something new, I wanted to see how

“I kind of had an epiphany, I wanted to go back to design and work with people with a different skillset” – Dennis Irvine other people did things, I wanted to approach design differently.” In contrast, Amy says she hadn’t considered moving on from her previous role until she was approached: “I was offered this great opportunity. The more we talked and I discovered more about the company, I realised this was something I was ready for and wanted to do. We meet regularly with the female directors, and that sense of empowerment and growth potential, and ability to learn from other women, was huge – it sealed the deal for me.” Robbyn says she set up Studio Carter two-and-a-half years ago, after living outside of the US for 12 years, and wanted to take her experience from her time in

Amsterdam and Singapore to run her own studio: “I have my own mistakes to make, which is a little scary, but the decisions I make are my own – for better, for worse. It’s been interesting to break free from always having someone there to tell you how it should be done, it’s quite liberating.” Dennis worked at Fox Linton Associates for 16 years before forming his own studio, but after six years on his own decided he wanted to get back into a larger studio that would enable him to focus on his design skills: “I kind of had an epiphany, I wanted to go back to design and work with people with a different skillset that can help me, and that’s how I ended up at Richmond.”


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Vision to reality Moderator Dallas Chapman, VP and GM, Bernhardt Hospitality, uncovered what it takes to bring a client’s vision for a concept, brand or property to life by asking panellists Philip Sandhaus (head of WME Legends, Endeavor), Ebbie K Nakhjavani (president and CEO, EKN Development), Scott Lee (president and principal, SB Architects) and Kay Lang (president and CEO, Kay Lang + Associates) more about taking an idea and seeing it all the way through the process. Playing the role of client with a vision, Philip told us how the Notorious B.I.G. estate, which Endeavor manages, is looking at breaking into hospitality, with a view to creating hotels that tap into the values of their hip-hop market from all aspects, including music and wellness: “We’re looking to be true

to what our brands stand for, be true to their reach, and articulate new experiences and move forward.” From initial idea to development, Ebbie explained that his job is to ‘sell’ the idea to investors and secure the funding and teams to make the project a reality: “Fun and funding are the two elements we look at! What I’m looking for from our creative teams is for them to work with us as partners and not just to follow direction. In every project we engage the creative team as early as we can.” From an architectural perspective, Scott told us: “We’re in the communication business. We may be architects, but our job is to take and synthesise what Philip does, what Ebbie needs, and turn it into something that’s physically tangible – we’re helping to tell a story.”

“In every project we engage the creative team as early as we can” – Ebbie K Nakhjavani

Bringing the finer details together, Kay said that having a great team was 90% of the battle, but that ultimately it’s about understanding what the client needs: “We’re passionate storytellers, and sometimes if you don’t have a brand you have to come with a vision, and that can include a multitude of different things. We

bring all our experience to the table, but the very first thing we do is listen.” Everyone agreed the key to the success of each individual project was collaboration, and the factor that determined whether or not that collaboration had been successful was the enjoyment of the guest at the finished project.

Development strategies for tomorrow – “defining the main thing” The final panel of the day saw Beth Campbell, CEO, Campbell House, direct the conversation between Judy Chen (VP of development, Dream Hotel Group), Andrew Miele (head of development, Americas, Six Senses Hotels Resorts Spas) and Erik Eveleigh (senior director of Luxury Development, Hilton), and began by quoting American educator and keynote speaker, Stephen Covey – “The main thing

is that the main thing remains the main thing” – to consider development strategies and design solutions that will accommodate the needs of tomorrow’s traveller. Beth asked the panel how they deal with the ever-evolving factors of design, technology and guest experience while being mindful of finances. “We all work for different companies but we’re all in the money-making business,” said

“The longevity of a hotel and its interests, and continuing to keep that relevant and engaging, is about creating spaces that aren’t singular” – Andrew Miele Judy. “So whatever it is you do, we’re all chasing deals and leads, and in this environment it has been challenging. We’re starting construction in June on Dream Vegas, and we already know that what’s relevant today is not going to be relevant in June, let alone when it opens in 2024. No-one has a crystal ball, we almost need to build or develop for flexibility.” Building upon making a project design-centric, the panel was asked how they consider that demand against brand standards and the bottom line. Erik felt flexibility and dynamism in the approach was key: “The message in the 80s, 90s and early 00s was to recognise the brand first and location second,

but we’re very much turning that philosophy on its head now and doing the opposite.” Looking to the future, the panel considered their strategies for 2030-40. “The longevity of a hotel and its interests, and continuing to keep that relevant and engaging, is about creating spaces that aren’t singular,” said Andrew, who spoke about the different uses in lobbies and different programmes made available to visitors. Judy added: “We should be creating memories, where people are looking back over their photos and sharing moments with friends – those are the things that are valuable, and it’s the best kind of advertising for any brand.”


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HOSPITALITY LEADERSHIP & DESIGN CONFERENCE - LOS ANGELES REVIEW

COMING UP… In the coming months HLDC will be in London (23rd February), Singapore (21st September), New York (10th November) and Dubai (7th December). If you’ve previously missed out on tickets or sponsorship opportunities, now might be your chance to get involved with one of the upcoming events. For more information, get in touch with the events team at tkts@hldc.co.uk or visit the website, www.hldc.co.uk



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Q&A - AMBER ASHER


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Amber Asher CEO of Standard International Hospitality Interiors had the pleasure of speaking with Amber in her most extensive interview since being appointed CEO of Standard International. With a decade of experience at The Standard alone, Amber has been instrumental in the company’s global growth and, in her new role, will lead the organisation and its portfolio into an exciting new phase of expansion. Read on to discover more about her career to date, her aspirations for Standard International moving forward, and valuable industry insights … What was your background prior to working for Standard Hotels? I started my career as a real estate and finance lawyer at Latham & Watkins in NYC. I went in-house in 2008 to Morgans Hotel Group months before the recession as associate general counsel and SVP. That was quite a ride. The hospitality business was upside down … similar to today. We navigated many challenges, and I learned a ton. In 2011, I was on maternity leave and was recruited to be general counsel and EVP for André Balazs Properties, which at the time owned the Standard hotels and his luxury properties like the Chateau Marmont, The Mercer, Sunset Beach and eventually Chiltern Firehouse in London (a deal we worked on together). In 2013, I represented André in the sale of the majority stake of The Standard brand to a group led by Amar Lalvani, our current executive chairman, and former CEO. The day after the deal closed, I, along with most of the team, started working for Standard International, the new company created by Amar to grow the Standard brand globally. Almost 10 years later, our dreams are really coming to life. What are the most challenging issues you face in your current role? The last two years have been incredibly challenging in the hospitality industry, with ever-changing travel restrictions, the priority of operating safely for our employees and guests, and finding talent to add to our growing team. That said, I believe the worst is behind us. As hard as this period was, we had extreme focus on our teams’ wellbeing and development, global growth, creativity, profitability and operational excellence. Many of our hotels were back to 2019 numbers right before Omicron. We signed 11 new hotel deals across our three brands

(Standard, Bunkhouse and Peri) and will have opened eight new hotels during Covid (inclusive of The Standard, Hua Hin that opened in Thailand this past December, and our two beautiful new Standard hotels in Ibiza and Bangkok, opening this spring). What’s one unexpected shift you’ve seen in guest expectations or demands in the last five years? Booking windows are shorter, which has been exacerbated by the pandemic. People are afraid of booking too far in advance in this uncertain world. We saw this trend years ago, and capitalised on it with the apps we have launched, like One Night Standard and One Night. We do not see this changing any time soon. With the increase in ‘work-from-anywhere’ policies across all industries, our guests appreciate the perks that come with a longterm stay. We created a programme years ago called Stowaway to cater to this preference, offering perks like discounted stays, room upgrades, flexible check-in and check-out times, a personal concierge and exclusive fitness experiences. Guests really took advantage of this programme during Covid – whether at The Standard, East Village, or in remote locations like The Standard, Maldives, our first true island resort.

“To us, the key is building and developing strong and dynamic local teams to welcome our guests – whether in Old Town, Ibiza, or the beautiful beach town of Hua Hin”


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Q&A - AMBER ASHER

How do you see the company changing in the next two years, and how do you see yourself creating that change? Global expansion is our mission – bringing The Standard to the world. We will strive to maintain the uniqueness and individuality of the hotels, and embrace the local cultures of all of the various cities across the globe, while ensuring a common thread so that our guests and loyalists will always feel at home. To us, the key is building and developing strong and dynamic local teams to welcome our guests – whether in Old Town, Ibiza, or the beautiful beach town of Hua Hin (Thailand). We are also committed to the expansion of the Bunkhouse collection of hotels in the Americas – a company we took a majority stake in back in 2015 – and the Peri brand, a brand we launched in Asia during the pandemic. What role does Europe play in Standard Hotels’ growth? Europe has always been a key target market for The Standard since I started at the company over 10 years ago. We opened a flagship, The Standard, London in Kings Cross in 2019, with incredible partners, Crosstree. With the success of this opening and incredible team, we have quite a large pipeline in Europe. Our next opening will be The Standard, Ibiza, opening in late spring. We feel Ibiza is a perfect location for The Standard. We are also working on projects in Lisbon, Brussels, Dublin, Milan and many others at earlier stages. We have only scratched the surface. Our list of dream cities in Europe is long! How does design play a role in driving customer loyalty? The environments in which we live, work and play have a tremendous impact on our experience. The Standard customer

The Standard Spa, Miami Beach

The Standard, London

“Design is a central pillar of our brand, and we have been fortunate enough to partner with some of the best talent in the world to realise our vision”


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The Standard, Maldives

The Standard, Hua Hin

expects innovative yet timeless design from our hotels. From our long-time collaboration with world-renowned designer (and friend) Shawn Hausman – most recently to create our award-winning The Standard, London and the refresh of The Standard Spa, Miami Beach – to our work with Jaime Hayon on The Standard, Bangkok Mahanakhon, opening in May, we continue to innovate while maintaining a design language that inspires our guests to return to our hotels again and again. What is the biggest challenge you’re facing in improving guest experience today? Labour shortages, although it is finally getting better. In which parts of the hospitality experience is good design most important? We integrate whimsy and humour in subtle ways through design details throughout our properties. In the guest rooms, comfort is key, while the public spaces, restaurants and bars – like The Standard Grill, Boom Boom Room, Decimo and our new Thai Izakaya, Praca at The Standard, Hua Hin – should inspire.

The Standard, East Village

How important is interior design in your hotels? Creating a rich and distinctive design experience at our hotels is essential. Design is the language we use to communicate with our guests in subtle and creative ways. The design of our environments allows us to employ suspension of disbelief and create a real escape for our guests.


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Q&A - AMBER ASHER

The Standard, High Line


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“We create unmatched experiences through design, culinary and carefully curated events that are innovative, engaging, and memorable”


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Q&A - AMBER ASHER

Have you noticed any particular trends in interior design? Yes. The trend we have noticed most in the past two years is an increased yearning to be outside in safe and creatively reimagined environments that become an extension of the hotel experience. We have created compelling outdoor experiences to provide environments for our guests that are both safe and fun: The Forest at The Standard, High Line, where we screen movies curated by our team in a series called Pix on the Plaza, which has been a tremendous success; while The Winter Garden at The Standard, East Village offers an ever-evolving experience that changes seasonally with a lush garden featuring oversized, magical topiaries in the spring, and cosy yurts in the winter. How important is choosing the right designer for each hotel? Design is a central pillar of our brand, and we have been fortunate enough to partner with some of the best talent in the world to realise our vision. All of our hotel design projects are led by our incredibly talented in-house team, but choosing the right design collaborator is critical. When we get it right, magic happens. How would you define Standard Hotels’ identity? As we say – we are “anything but Standard”. The Standard Hotels are stimulating cultural hubs and social destinations. We create unmatched experiences through design, culinary and carefully curated events that are innovative, engaging, and memorable. Our unconventional approach promotes a certain kind of freedom, where guests are immersed in our unique approach to lifestyle. We are not for everyone, but everyone is welcome.

The Standard, Maldives

What is the magic ingredient that helps you deliver the best service to your customers? Our people – the magic ingredient is the diverse collection of team members, collaborators and guests who choose to call the Standard home. Which is your favourite Standard Hotel property, and why? It is hard to choose – like picking your favourite child. Even if you have a favourite, you are not allowed to say. I would just say … she has a British accent (I am only kidding!). What plans and aspirations do you have for Standard Hotels? To continue to celebrate this special brand by introducing it to new destinations around the world! What’s your biggest dream in life? Besides raising my daughters to be strong, kind, self-reliant and happy women, I would like to bring The Standard to the best cities in the world, and work with our incredible team to create something very special in each city. What one thing have you not yet done that you really want to do? Open a Standard in Paris. What one word best describes you? Determined. www.stndintl.com



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Q&A - JEAN-LUC NARET


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Jean-Luc Naret Executive director, The Set Collection Jean-Luc brings a wealth of experience in creating and opening resorts across the globe, as well as an exacting eye for luxury hospitality, to his role as executive director of The Set Collection. Read on to find out how he plans to steer this portfolio of outstanding properties, and discover his thoughts on the post-pandemic landscape, technology and shifting guest expectations ... What was your background prior to working for The Set Collection? Before The Set Collection, I was the CEO of La Reserve Hotels in Paris, Geneva and Ramatuelle. Prior to this, I was the MD of the Michelin Guide for seven years, travelling around the world from Paris to Tokyo, New York to San Francisco. I’ve also been fortunate to manage many luxury hotels worldwide, and I started my consultancy (www.jlnandco.com) in 2019.

How is The Set Collection planning to hit the ground running again in the coming months? After the announcement of The Set Collection’s expansion, the objective over the next few months is to work on new members joining that have the same spirit as The House Collective and our founding members. A carefully curated selection of properties worldwide is being created, by destination, with the initial goal of 20-30 new members by the end of the year.

What does your current position involve? My current position involves carefully curating The Set Collection and deciding which hotels have the spirit, location, design and values that we feel would fit with the others represented. My current title is executive director, but I like to call myself chief creative curator/officer.

You’ve noted that expansion is high on the brand’s agenda. Where is The Set Collection putting its focus in terms of growth? Around the world. Wherever our clients would love to travel to. Especially now, when you can travel near-enough everywhere again (but not to the moon just yet – but why not?).

What do you love most about what you do? I never thought I’d have the ability and pleasure of choosing my dream job. When you’re lucky enough to choose your passion as your job, it becomes everything you work on in your life. It’s a difficult time for the hospitality industry. What do you think will be the sector’s biggest challenge, post-Covid? The hospitality industry has been seriously affected throughout the world due to Covid – we’ve seen job losses, visa cancellations, etc. Some were supported by the governments, which created a big void in the industry. However, following the reopening, I think people’s passion has grown, making them even more welcoming to the guest. One key challenge will be to maintain and increase the attractiveness of the sector to find the greatest talents to join us.

What do you think will be the biggest change in how you do your job, post-Covid? The pandemic has highlighted how limited and outdated some traditional hotel representation companies are. The demand for luxury is now stronger than ever, along with the demand for travel. One of the biggest challenges will be in supporting our partners to bounce back to pre-pandemic figures. Hopefully, I’ll be back to travelling freely without various restrictions, so we can grow our portfolio quicker.

“I think we have seen even in the last two years that a two-star hotel can be very design orientated, but at the same time affordable and chic”


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Q&A - JEAN-LUC NARET

What’s one unexpected shift you’ve seen in guest expectations or demand in the last five years? Well, safety was one of the main issues. You must ensure guests are comfortable travelling, and that safety is a prime concern. The second shift is displaying accurate information. With worldwide restrictions changing so rapidly, such as masks, testing, etc, precise information must be readily available. When you’re checking on our website or with the hotels in the collection, we want to ensure that the regulations are clear, as it could damage a guest’s experience in a very bad way if they’re not aware ahead of time. What role does Europe and the Middle East play in The Set Collection’s international growth? Europe is the foundation of The Set Collection, with the founding members based in Amsterdam, Paris, and London. Now, adding The House Collective and having a footing in Asia brings us to three continents, and the world is made up of five. So, we will be expanding.

The Temple House, Chengdu

How important is interior design within your many hotel brands? Well, design is a very important part of it. Architecture is part of our logo, and we’re very clear that it’s crucial. It’s essential when choosing the right hotel partner that we ensure they have similar characteristics in terms of the designer they choose – but we’re not just a collection of design hotels. We’re not only looking at the design, we’re looking at everything else. Have you noticed any particular trends in interior design? Design has always been an integral part of hotels, but it was only part of boutique brands. I think we have seen even in the last two years that a two-star hotel can be very design orientated, but at the same time affordable and chic. You don’t have to use Starck or an expensive designer, you can now work with young, up-and-coming designers that have a sense of style as well, in a very different way.


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Lutetia, Paris

“In the future, hoteliers will have to reinvent themselves and their creative ideas”

Conservatorium, Amsterdam

Hotel Cafe Royal - Regent Suite - Bathroom

How do you think people’s expectations of hotels are changing? People are now travelling around the world again and having different experiences. One of the aspects right now is that the travel industry is more environmentally conscious. Of course, you are staying in a hotel and expect your bedlinen to be changed all the time. Still, now you can see that more and more guests choose not to have their room made up. It’s not because of the cost, but because people are more conscious of the environmental impact and realise the effects of climate change – especially in places like the Maldives. How do you think the influence of new technology affects the traveller, and might in the future? Well, even with your phone, you can do anything – you can book your travel, reply to emails, and even open your hotel room sometimes. It’s very straightforward. I mean, a few years ago, we used to have fax machines, and you would have to plug your computer into a network cable inside the hotel to get a dial-up tone. So, all that has changed, and now you can watch Netflix on your phone. So, everything is happening very rapidly, which is very useful. It obviously must be beneficial, and it must be free. I still don’t understand why hotels are charging guests to use Wi-Fi.


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Q&A - JEAN-LUC NARET

Hotel Cafe Royal


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What is the biggest challenge that you’re facing to improve the guest experience today? Our sophisticated and well-travelled guests come with a set of expectations that develop constantly – something that delights them on their first stay will be expected on their next. As such, our teams are passionate about meeting these expectations, but then constantly exceeding them. We are creating a problem for ourselves in our success, of course – with every visit our guests become harder and harder to please – but this is a problem we are proud to manage!

“A carefully curated selection of properties worldwide is being created, by destination, and with the initial goal of 20-30 new members by the end of the year”

What does this mean for the future of hospitality? In the future, hoteliers will have to reinvent themselves and their creative ideas. I mean, the objective of the meeting with your team every morning is to discuss how we are going to do things differently today. And how are we going to improve?

Where would you say are the three best places you’ve ever stayed? Tokyo, for the cutting-edge everything – the sense of service, food, etc. New York is a vibrant and energising place full of creativity, and Paris and London for the artistic atmosphere. I cannot limit it to three!

What plans and aspirations do you have for The Set Collection? Lots! You’ll have to wait and see them play out. What would be your dream hotel project? The next one. I’ve been fortunate in my life to experience many beautiful hotels around the world, and I’ve participated in building

Lastly, share some good news … have you done anything to stay busy in these crazy times? Yes, I’m always busy. I’ve been active on every single project I’ve been working on, and it’s always a good time to create new companies and new ideas – but at the same time, I’ve been closely

quite a few of those, but the next challenge is always the following one. The next-best hotel is being built right now, and we don’t know about it yet …

working with other people that need support as well. It’s not all about you. It’s about helping the industry and others. www.thesetcollection.com

Lutetia, Paris


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Olson Kundig Based in Seattle’s historic Pioneer Square neighbourhood, Olson Kundig is a full-service design firm providing integrated architecture, exhibit design, interior design, urban design and landscape architecture for clients around the world. Here, the firm’s owners and founder - Tom Kundig, Jim Olson, Kirsten Ring Murray, Alan Maskin, Kevin Kudo-King and Hermanshu Parwani - share the firm’s approach to design.

“The most successful spaces balance being cosy and somewhat protective from the elements with being very integrated with the natural setting.” - Tom Kundig


PROFILE - OLSON KUNDIG

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Photography by Rafael Soldi

Tom Kundig, FAIA, RIBA Principal/owner

Project by Tom Kundig, FAIA, RIBA

Photography by Aaron Leitz

Comedor Restaurant, Austin, Texas, US

“In truly great hospitality projects, the nature of the interiors flows seamlessly from the nature of the landscape,” says Tom. “When the design breathes like a whisper between the two, the best guest experience emerges.” Tom Kundig has received some of the world’s highest design honours, including recognition from the American Institute of Architects, Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum and American Academy of Arts and Letters. He was also named in The Wallpaper* 150 as a key individual who has influenced, inspired and improved the way people live, work and travel, and was inducted into the Interior Design Hall of Fame in 2012. Tom is known for his contextual approach to design, drawing inspiration from the unique physical, cultural and historical characteristics of the site. Often materials are left in their raw or natural states to evolve over time through exposure to the elements. “Buildings become more beautiful with time,” he shares. “They acquire a patina of time that cannot be bought. And, as they weather, they slowly merge with the landscape, which is an important part of the design.” Kinetic architecture often features in Tom’s work, highlighting his keen interest in solving design challenges through innovation and experimentation. These functional and elegant devices allow the architecture to morph and flex, controlled by human touch. “When someone takes hold of a wheel and turns it, opening up some aspect of a building, its effect is not only physical and tactile but emotional,” he says. “It promotes a kind of mindfulness about how you take up space.” An avid outdoorsman and designer working in dramatic landscapes around the world, Tom has longstanding interest in the ways people interact with their environments. His projects are known for deliberately blurring boundaries between interior and exterior living spaces. In hospitality and residential settings especially, his work balances an innate human desire for prospect and refuge. “The most successful spaces balance being cosy and somewhat protective from the elements with being very integrated with the natural setting,” he says. “It’s a delicate balance between intimacy and adventure.”


PROFILE - OLSON KUNDIG

“I have spent my life exploring ways to bring architecture and nature closer together, to frame nature so that its beauty is celebrated.”

Jim Olson, FAIA

Photography by Rafael Soldi

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Principal/founder “In today’s world, healthy lifestyles and sustainable architecture have become top priorities,” says Jim. “Beautiful environments that speak holistically to these priorities can significantly affect our wellbeing and enjoyment of life, while also protecting and preserving this amazing planet that we call home.” The founding partner of Olson Kundig, Jim Olson has explored the aesthetic interplay of art, nature and architecture, and the relationship between light and space, for over 50 years. He is the recipient of numerous awards and honours, including induction into the Interior Design Hall of Fame in 2012. Though perhaps best known for his residential and hospitality work, Jim also designs museums, religious spaces and commercial buildings. He is currently working on private residences for clients across the US, Europe and Asia. Jim’s work seeks to introduce a holistic experience of architecture, interiors, art and landscape, deferring to the surrounding environment, rather than trying to dominate it. “Architecture is subtle and acts as a vehicle to observe nature and art,” he shares. “My work tries to bring the outside and inside

together by blurring the boundary between the two.” His process merges both practical and poetic considerations, including the unique opportunities and restraints of the project site, the client’s vision and lifestyle, and a keen appreciation for living within nature. In addition to considerations of scale, proportion, texture and colour, Jim’s work is often characterised by the integration of natural light. As Jim describes it, “working with light is an opportunity for the architect to sculpt and modulate an element that is essential to our humanity.” His work in the hospitality sector likewise embraces and celebrates the interplay of built and natural environments. This is especially evident in his design of the JW Marriott Los Cabos Beach Resort & Spa, which combines colours, textures, framed views and outdoor living spaces to evoke an almost spiritual experience of the ocean and landscape. “I have spent my life exploring ways to bring architecture and nature closer together, to frame nature so that its beauty is celebrated,” Jim shares. “Living close to nature is the greatest luxury on earth.”

Photography by Benjamin Benschneider

JW Marriott Los Cabos Beach Resort & Spa, San Jose del Cabo, Mexico Project by Jim Olson, FAIA & Kevin M. Kudo-King, AIA, LEED® AP


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Photography by Yves Sucksdorff

“Creating hospitable and responsive interior design for public places is a specific form of spatial choreography.”

Alan Maskin Principal/owner “Without quite intending to do so, my career designing architecture in the public, cultural realm has transitioned in recent years,” says Alan. “All of my current work repurposes existing buildings, with a major emphasis on interior design, hospitality and the visitor experience.” For over two decades, Alan Maskin has pursued unconventional design challenges in public places. As principal and owner of Olson Kundig, Alan leads much of the firm’s cultural and public work. His international portfolio includes: the new Bob Dylan Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma; ANOHA –The Children’s World of the Jewish Museum Berlin; the Bay Area Discovery Museum in Sausalito, California; and the renovation of Seattle’s iconic Space Needle. Informed by extensive research and ideation with both project stakeholders and user groups, Alan’s approach pushes design beyond common cliches, instead crafting an authentic and engaging experience that holistically considers architecture and interiors. He leads a highly collaborative design process that incorporates a diverse range of partners – including artists, researchers, designers and educators. “I’m always seeking to

answer the question, what can we do together than we cannot do apart?” he shares. “My best ideas emerge in dialogue.” Alan’s approach also draws on creative techniques outside of architecture, including cinematic storyboarding, to imagine the visitor pathway along a narrative arc. For the recent Space Needle renovation, for example, his vision for the tower’s revised hospitality experience began with guests purchasing tickets online, then considered their arrival and entry, their journey 500ft into the air, and the sights that would greet them when the elevator doors open. Ultimately, this progression culminates in a groundbreaking design and an entirely new way of observing and experiencing cities, featuring the world’s first rotating glass floor. Sustainable design moves feature highly in Alan’s projects. Working primarily on adaptive projects that reuse existing buildings, he works to incorporate natural and repurposed materials that support a low embodied carbon footprint. “I love inheriting an existing framework, discovering the underlying logic of the existing conditions, and then pushing it to perform beyond what anyone thought possible,” he says.

Photography by Hufton & Crow Project

ANOHA - The Children’s World of the Jewish Museum Berlin, Berlin, Germany Project by Alan Maskin


PROFILE - OLSON KUNDIG

“I see my work as one element in the layered expression of the built environment.”

Kirsten Ring Murray, FAIA

Photography by Rafael Soldi

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Principal/owner “Well-designed hospitality spaces can provide a backdrop for people to truly experience a city, district or neighbourhood,” says Kirsten. “When I travel, I’m often seeking to discover unexpected spaces, whether historic or contemporary, that reveal something about the nature of a place, its people and culture. I work to bring that sensibility into the places I design, as well.” Kirsten Ring Murray’s body of work is characterised by authentic, contextual buildings. She is known for integrating stakeholders and community members throughout the process, shaping the design around their collective goals. Throughout her tenure at Olson Kundig, Kirsten has created buildings and spaces that strengthen and enrich communities. She is especially interested in adaptive reuse, and architecture that blends old and new. Her contextually responsive designs translate the innate conditions and history of the site into a built form that draws on the collective intelligence of users and designers. “I see my work as one element in the layered expression of the built environment,” she says. “I always try to think about what’s going

to happen next, to frame design as part of a trajectory of ongoing change.” Long inspired by Scandinavian modernist traditions, Kirsten’s architecture emphasises warmth, natural materiality, tactility and refinement. Her creative and innovative projects, especially those in the urban realm, exemplify her interest in revitalising cities and improving the pedestrian experience. Kirsten infuses this work with principles from her vast residential experience, reimagining a lobby as a public living room, or an informal workspace as a front door. “Ultimately, my goal is to create sophisticated yet hardworking spaces that respond to the needs of users and communities,” she shares. “It’s very much about creating a framework for people to activate and enliven.” Kirsten is currently leading a range of projects across the US and Europe, including hospitality and commercial projects, multifamily and private residences, and workplaces for global leaders in technology.

Photography by Related Companies

The Cortland, New York, New York, US Project by Tom Kundig, FAIA, RIBA and Kirsten Ring Murray, FAIA


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“The most meaningful experiences occur when people are able to connect to the special qualities – both physical and metaphysical – of the places they inhabit.”

Photography by Yves Sucksdorff

Kevin M Kudo-King AIA, LEED AP Principal/owner “My aim is always to design hospitality spaces that are deeply experiential, where users feel connected to the surrounding nature and culture of that specific place,” shares Kevin. “I believe the most impactful architecture recedes into the background, supporting the guest experience instead of competing for attention.” Over the span of his 25-year tenure at Olson Kundig, principal/ owner Kevin Kudo-King has played an integral role in the design, production and management of numerous award-winning projects. Inspired to draw, design and build structures from a very young age, Kevin discovered architecture to be an ideal outlet for and means of combining these passions. After earning a Bachelor of Arts in architecture from the University of Arizona, Kevin sought out Olson Kundig, attracted by the firm’s reputation for craft and contextual design – sensibilities already at the forefront of his own approach to design. Kevin has since emerged as a leader of many of the firm’s hospitality projects, spanning diverse locations around the globe, from Japan to Saudi Arabia. “For every client, my goal is to create spaces that inspire people to be fully mentally and emotionally

Costa Rica Treehouse, Santa Teresa, Costa Rica Project by Tom Kundig, FAIA, RIBA & Kevin Kudo-King, AIA, LEED AP

present,” he shares. “The most meaningful experiences occur when people are able to connect to the special qualities – both physical and metaphysical – of the places they inhabit.” Drawing on biophilic design principles, Kevin’s work centres a direct connection between users and the environment. He frames the guest experience as an unfolding progression through this natural context, flowing between indoor and outdoor spaces with varying degrees of prospect and refuge. “I’m always trying to provide a diversity of experiences, from the arrival sequence to interior views, punctuated by special moments,” he says. Kevin is also a deeply collaborative designer, known for architecture informed by a history of craft and artistic production. He prioritises the integration of artists and craftspeople that are local to his projects, deepening connections to place and crafting an even richer experience. “You add new layers of meaning when the hand of the maker is visible,” he says. “A deliberate expression of craft creates a tactile connection between guest and culture, resulting in something wholly unique and completely authentic to that place.”


PROFILE - OLSON KUNDIG

“We know how to craft buildings and spaces that are both functional and deeply personal, where even the smallest details contribute to the experience of the project as well as its surrounding context.”

Hemanshu Parwani

Photography by Rafael Soldi

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CEO/owner “For Olson Kundig, hospitality design is about placemaking – the holistic experience of architecture, interiors and landscape creates a wide variety of opportunities to make memories,” expresses Hemanshu. “We’re always excited to work with brands who share that ethos of people-centered, authentic design.” CEO Hemanshu Parwani – or “HP” as he is called by friends and colleagues – leads Olson Kundig’s strategic direction, including the firm’s business and organisational management, operations and talent development. In his role, HP supplements the firm’s designfirst philosophy by establishing the vision, direction and strategy to achieve its foundational objectives. A dedicated strategist and frequent speaker at hospitality industry events, he works with leading hospitality brands to envision opportunities to blend worldclass architecture and elevated guest experiences. A true global citizen, HP has travelled around the world and lived in Asia, the Middle East and North America. These experiences helped to develop his appreciation for hospitality and keen interest in this market sector. “Hospitality is more than just lodging,” he shares. “People yearn for an authentic experience where

they can engage deeply with a place – its people, culture, food. That philosophy is embedded in Olson Kundig’s approach to architecture, and evident in all of our work.” In his role as CEO, HP works closely with Olson Kundig design leaders on each of the firm’s hospitality projects. “Though these projects are at a larger scale than our typical residential work, that experience serves us well,” he says. “We know how to craft buildings and spaces that are both functional and deeply personal, where even the smallest details contribute to the experience of the project, as well as its surrounding context.” HP is also a dedicated mountaineer who has climbed some of the world’s most challenging peaks – including Everest. Mountaineering reflects HP’s larger approach to business and operations – he believes in fostering a team mentality where trust emerges as colleagues work together towards a common purpose. “In hospitality and in business, relationships are the core foundation,” he says. “It’s vital the entire team feels connected to each other and to the project vision. Users can sense a disconnect in the final product, and it impacts their experience, too.”

Photography by Binyan Studios

8899 Beverly Boulevard, West Hollywood, California, US Project by Tom Kundig, FAIA, RIBA and Kirsten Ring Murray, FAIA


BURLINGTON WASHABLE AND 100% FIRE RETARDANT FOR MAXIMUM DURABILITY @CLARKE_CLARKE_INTERIORS


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Q&A - CORINNA KRETSCHMAR-JOEHNK & PETER JOEHNK


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Corinna Kretschmar-Joehnk & Peter Joehnk Founders of JOI-Design Led by founders and co-MDs Peter Joehnk and Corinna Kretschmar-Joehnk, JOI-Design’s 35-year legacy encompasses over 500 one-of-a-kind hospitality destinations in Germany and abroad as well as serviced apartments, cruise ships and next-generation workspaces, all designed for comfort, wellbeing and belonging. What three words would you use to describe JOI-Design? Peter: Co-operative (internally and externally), open-minded, futurist. With so many hospitality designers in the industry, how does JOI-Design stand out? Corinna: We create imaginative solutions, designs with a sense of humour, and interesting details that guests notice upon second glance – these are the visible aspects that distinguish our work. But what we do behind the scenes before the actual design is evaluate fitting concepts that relate to the city and the site of the project, to the given brief, to the anticipated guests, and to the brand. The concept then leads to an authentic story that is perfect for the project’s microlocality and forms the inspiration for our design. What does design mean to you? Corinna: Design is not art, and design is not personal taste! Design is the solution to a challenge, the answer to many questions that aren’t often asked. That’s why our process starts by questioning each project, because that’s what helps us develop the right concept and explain why our design has a certain look. Our goal is to always have reasons and arguments that support our ‘visible’ design choices. How can design be used to manage the guest’s expectations of the hotel experience? Peter: The guest experience is the result of the concept and story we create. Their expectations are often related to the brand identity, the location, and the quality level of the design. Design usually has the most influence on their decision about what hotel

fits them best, because it indicates what kinds of experiences that will have. Three examples from our recent projects really illustrate this idea: • Moxy Hamburg City A party brand for younger guests, the design features a local touch by referencing Hamburg’s famous carpet warehouses – all presented with a sense of humour (flying carpets are suspended from the ceiling and hang above street art). • Vivanta Bengalaru Designed with high-spirited energy in the bar, Wink, and, in Mynt restaurant, the glamour desired by young tech professionals, the interiors are an expression of their personalities and create a place where they will meet like-minded people. • Fraser Suites Hamburg This former tax office in a listed 1910 landmark had a very majestic – but not at all charming – appearance, and had to be converted into a hotel. Guests certainly don’t expect to spend their money for a luxurious night in a tax office! Therefore, we came up with a concept that expresses the positive vibe of the times in which it was built – a design that celebrates the glamour, dancing and liberal attitudes of the emerging era, the Roaring Twenties.

“We create imaginative solutions, designs with a sense of humour, and interesting details that guests notice upon second glance – these are the visible aspects that distinguish our work” ›


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Q&A - CORINNA KRETSCHMAR-JOEHNK & PETER JOEHNK

Turning to the topic of authenticity of experience, how do you approach each project? Corinna: As previously mentioned, we find an authentic story for each place that can be supported by neighbourhood experiences. We work with local creatives, as seen for example with the street art in the Moxy Hamburg, who then become ‘brand ambassadors’ for the hotel by telling guests the story of contemporary Hamburg through their works. In a draft concept we pitched for a luxury hotel in Vienna, we used the idea of a kaleidoscope to bring together varied types of authentic Viennese style – Empire, Art Deco and contemporary design. Hotel guests journey through different periods of time, but they always experience a kaleidoscopic glimpse of the other eras. How important are public spaces in hotels? Are there ways in which you’ve used innovative design in these areas to facilitate innovative usage? Peter: Once guests have a first impression of the public areas, it becomes very difficult for their opinions to change – either the spaces fit their personality and feel welcoming, or it seems they were designed for a different kind of traveller. Innovation comes into play with the flexible use of space – for

example, reception services located at the bar or a co-working space placed between an easy-going living room lounge, bar and bistro. We even included a full kitchen for individuals to use in the lobby of the new extended-stay brand, Stay KooooK, in Bern, Switzerland. At the me and all hotel in Kiel, Germany, zoned areas and varying floor heights make the open-plan public spaces feel larger, yet at the same time quite intimate. The more a hotel has to follow rigid brand guidelines and have a conventional, standardised look, the harder it is to introduce innovation, which is why so many conventional properties only have a ‘normal’ use of space. Do designers think about loyalty when they design a hotel or a serviced apartment, or is it just an operator’s concern? Corinna: A successful design is one that helps our clients earn money, and the best way is through repeat guests – so thinking about loyalty is certainly part of our job! Of course, we are always asked to design for Instagrammable moments because they help sell the hotel, but details noticed upon second glance also reinforce positive memories that guests want to recapture, and humorous touches are what people tell their friends about, so these approaches also encourage repeat business.

Photography by Christian Kretschmar for JOI-Design

Moxy Hamburg City


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Photography by Christian Kretschmar for JOI-Design

me and all hotel Kiel, Germany

“A well-thought-out design sets the stage for optimal service delivery. Good design and a variety of atmospheres make guests stay longer and spend more money, so quality design definitely offers ROI for developers” How high on the list is revenue creation for designers? Peter: A well-thought-out design sets the stage for optimal service delivery. Good design and a variety of atmospheres make guests stay longer and spend more money, so quality design definitely offers ROI for developers. Sometimes this can be a gamble between proven successful solutions that are not new and are on their way to becoming boring, and innovative new concepts with the potential to be even more successful – but also threaten to be no success at all! It’s not just designers who might be playing with investors’ money. New concepts require the whole team to be on board with supporting a fresh idea. For example: hotels created to feel like a ‘club’ where people from the neighbourhood hang around the lobby or there’s a performance space for bands or comedians; properties where there’s a mix of many levels of room types and services; and conference spaces with a wide range of multifunctional uses – all require a high degree of operational co-ordination. How do you think the influence of new technology affects the luxury traveller, and could do in the future? Corinna: For luxury guests, we currently need to provide digital

and analogue systems in parallel, as some of them are just not interested in technology. As a hotelier, you don’t want to educate them if they don’t want to be educated. But of course, the technology is present and used by some guests, and will be much more so in the future. When at last luxury travellers use self-check-in, too, digital hotel services can become a greater part of the conversation and will be able to help guests before they even have the chance to ask their questions. Technology must make their lives easier, not harder, so it has to be simple to use. Do you believe simple design has become luxurious? Peter: Yes, 100% – well, at least it’s a trend! The majority of luxury hotels have traditionally ‘rich’ designs, and many new projects go this route, too. But then again, there are also so many luxury concepts where unexpected simplicity is the main feature. I smiled a bit when three years ago, before Covid, the founder of Design Hotels, Claus Sendlinger, said, “Gardening is the new golf” – but he was right! Covid proved it! Another aspect of heavenly simplicity and clearness is the relaxation of one’s spirit and mental state. Staying in such a hotel is a holiday for body and soul, placing mindfulness before ‘bling bling’.


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Q&A - CORINNA KRETSCHMAR-JOEHNK & PETER JOEHNK

So far, we haven’t had the opportunity to design an ultra-luxury hotel in an ultra-minimalist style, but it would be a dream! What we often do, though, is a conscious reduction of interior patterns and colours in order to celebrate the exterior – as seen, for example, with the Park Inn Sky Suites Berlin, with their breathtaking view of the skyline, as well as with il Salotto Wines & Resort in Tuscany, where a tranquil design lets the surrounding vineyards and sea beyond feel even more magnificent. What particular trends have you noticed in interior design? Corinna: Hospitality design is everywhere! We get requests to design office projects, senior living communities and cruise ships, that all want to have the hospitality touch. And then on a bit more of an abstract level, many trends are happening in parallel: • The enduring trend towards green, natural and organic materials with raw, unrefined textures • Minimalism continues, now fine-tuned with biophilic forms and natural materials • A playful approach that embraces a colourful mixture of all styles • Preference for outdoor spaces and for hotels, using them in ways not originally intended • Increasingly flexible layouts, especially as, thanks to remote working, unused office buildings are retrofitted into hotels. One solution is the mobile wall in each guest room at Stay KooooK Bern. ‘The Slide’ glides back and forth to add an extra two square metres of living space when using the wardrobe, sofa, bed and kitchen

Is there anything exciting you’re working on that you can tell us about? Corinna: A-Rosa Cruises commissioned us to reposition their brand as a provider of “city-hopping” river cruise experiences for families and cultured travellers in their 40s to 60s. The new prototype we’ve designed will be rolled out across its entire fleet, and is aimed at attracting people who want to experience ‘slow travel’ as an antidote to the stress of daily life. The maiden voyage is slated to take place May 2022. We’re also working on the interior design of the public spaces in a new landmark on Hamburg’s skyline. It’s very exciting, yet still confidential – so stay tuned! What’s next for you both, and the future plans of the studio? Peter: We have hundreds of ideas, both as a company and as individuals, and we are always developing and learning to keep up with the times and move forward. For almost five years we’ve had three partners who have each worked with JOI-Design for more than a decade. They all have different talents and strengths, and we believe that the combination of Sabrina Voecks, Heinrich Boehm and Thomas Scholz creates a perfect package to look positively at the future and that, one day, they can even do better than Corinna and me as they take JOI-Design into the next chapter. We’re already taking steps to develop a broader base of projects

Photography by Christian Kretschmar for JOI-Design

Photography by Christian Kretschmar for JOI-Design

Where do you see hotel design going in the future? Peter: For a hotel, the greatest luxury is having an authentic legacy with a location in an existing landmark such as a monastery or even a bank – buildings that are icons themselves in their location.

Luxury is also local, handmade craftsmanship with valuable materials and meticulous detailing, all reflecting the location, the city, the country. And, in the Western world, simplicity and sustainability will be the new guidelines for luxury. At the same time, there’s a drive for hotels designed with a young-spirited party vibe – but these are lower priced, and most likely won’t transfer to the luxury market.

Fraser Suites Hamburg

Moxy Hamburg City


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Photography by A-ROSA Flussschiff GmbH

A-Rosa Sena river cruise ship

beyond hotels by introducing hospitality approaches into other sectors – serviced partments, senior living communities, offices and cruise ships. We’re also broadening the geographic areas where we work. Although we’ve always designed projects around the world from our office in Hamburg, four years ago we opened a physical office in India with our local partner Gaurav Premchandani, who is a great, reliable and experienced hotel designer. We’re already working with several brands in India, but it all started with IHCL (Taj Hotels), because Puneet Chhatwal, CEO and MD of IHCL, wanted more international design in the country. Our Indian office is growing despite Covid-19, and we now have many hospitality industry clients, including local investors and international operators. One of our best senior designers moved to Zurich last year for personal reasons, and as we have projects in Switzerland, we realised his move offered us the possibility of having an office there. Our team’s 35 years of experience in the hospitality industry allows us to consult with clients about FF+E, budgets, project co-ordination and takeovers/handovers through a separate department within JOI-Design. And with our dedication to providing massive amounts of research for concepts and storytelling, we also have a different stream from our design studio that offers marketing, concept development and graphics as an additional service. Although Corinna and I still dedicate our lives only to JOI-Design, we still have fun with this life, as we do most things together, so there is no gap between business and private life. But of course, we

“The more a hotel has to follow rigid brand guidelines and have a conventional, standardised look, the harder it is to introduce innovation, which is why so many conventional properties only have a ‘normal’ use of space” are also looking for more free time and holidays, and retirement is somewhere on the horizon. The good thing with JOI-Design is that the next generation is already in charge and can take over more and more responsibilities so that, in the future, Corinna and I will get to work only for fun! What would be your dream hotel project? Peter: As dreams don’t need to be realistic, I would really like the challenge of building luxury hotels underwater, in space and/or on the moon, in the Arctic, in the Forbidden City of Beijing, in the Kremlin, a swimming island hotel, a hotel inside a world monument or one with a monument integrated inside the property. Also a cave hotel in a stone quarry, a treehouse hotel, or in a minimalist monastery (as mentioned above – this might be the most realistic possibility) – any new challenge that the world hasn´t seen yet would give me a special kick! www.joi-design.com


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NEWH – The Hospitality Industry Network

20 years of NEWH UK by Alison Kells, marketing director, NEWH UK NEWH is the hospitality industry’s leading notfor-profit network, and provides scholarships, education, leadership development, professional recognition of excellence, and business development opportunities across the UK, France, Italy, the US and Canada. In 2022, we celebrate the 20th anniversary of the NEWH UK chapter. For the last two decades, the UK chapter has been proud to recognise the talent and ability of students in order to encourage their progression in the

Photography by Susan Smart Photography

hospitality industry. At the same time, it has facilitated networking for interior designers, architects, suppliers, operators, procurement companies and the wider hospitality industry. Following the 2020 launch of NEWH in Milan and Paris, the three European chapters have worked together to create the La Pause webinar series, serving the global member base with virtual conversations on various industry topics and trends including spa design and cruise interiors, plus panels with top hoteliers. These collaborative webinars will continue throughout 2022. NEWH has been able to grow thanks to

the continued support of its members and incredible board of directors who, over the years, have dedicated their own time and volunteered to build the thriving networking organisation that exists today. Special mention must go to NEWH’s former president and longest-standing member, Lynn Fisher of the Sanderson Design Group, who has been involved with the UK chapter since its inception, and has served on the board for 18 years. As a nod to her dedication to NEWH, Lynn was welcomed into the NEWH College of Fellows, a prestigious honour that this year was also awarded to 2018-19 president Jonathan Young of JY Associates. Rebekah Ellis from AD Associates has sadly stepped down from the board in 2022 – her wisdom and bubbly personality will certainly be missed! Rebekah, alongside her sister Hannah Rogers of Tessere, were both recently recognised for over 10 years of dedicated service with a Baccarat crystal heart award from NEWH Inc. The close of 2021 marked an end to the presidency of Caroline Cundall of House of Caro, who steered the board and the wider NEWH UK organisation through a very challenging two years. She worked hard to keep members connected via a multitude of online social events, and her experience leading the board will continue to be much appreciated as she steps into an executive advisor role. The 2022 NEWH UK board looks forward to building on the last two decades by continuing to provide scholarships and actively promoting the education of students who aspire to enter the hospitality industry. Our hope is that NEWH will continue to flourish through 2022 and beyond, and we look forward to welcoming current and new members as we celebrate our 20th year.


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This year we welcome Libby Bull from HKS Hospitality Interiors as the 2022 president of NEWH’s UK chapter. Libby has been a valued member of the NEWH board for five years, and her caring nature and passion for students and raising scholarships are only some of the reasons why we are delighted to have her as our new president. Over the past 16 years, her portfolio has expanded across a broad range of interiors disciplines, from children’s libraries to wellness resorts, cruise ships and signature restaurants – with her career highlights so far including being part of the design team for the Waldorf Astoria, Amsterdam and Harrods Beauty Halls, London. Now an associate at HKS Hospitality Interiors, Libby specialises in designing luxury hotels and resorts for both individual owners and some of the world’s leading operators. Her true passion is for design narrative and seeking out local identity. HKS Hospitality Interiors work closely with their architectural and landscaping colleagues within the London team. All three disciplines combined create a unique inclusive service for creating outstanding, unique resorts and urban hotels. Current projects being developed include The Limassol Green Golf Resort Cyprus, St Regis Mardavall Resort Mallorca, AMAALA Yacht Club and the Four Seasons Puglia. Here, Libby answers a few questions about herself and her new role as president … Tell us about your current role with HKS Hospitality Interiors … My role at HKS Hospitality Interiors covers everything from concept design to site completion, but usually I’m heavily involved in the finding and forming of the research

and narratives that help create exciting guest journeys and spaces. This could be anything from a new-build, five-star contemporary active coastal complex one day, to a serene heritage renovation in the middle of a forest the next one. With operators and owners all now reaching out in new directions, you never know what exciting brief is going to land on your drawing board! HKS Hospitality Interiors has always been very supportive of my involvement in the nonprofit organisation NEWH, and already has many initiatives within the studio to encourage student mentorship, such as volunteer experience days and internships. They also strongly encourage graduate positions across the company on an international basis, so it was a huge win for me to join a company that aligns with my own thinking.


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NEWH – The Hospitality Industry Network

Why did you get involved with NEWH, and what makes it different from other networking organisations? Seven years ago, I accepted an invite to a supplier and networking event, the NEWH Scholarship Fundraiser. I quickly realised this was not your ’usual’ event, but a collection of designers, suppliers and hotel operators celebrating how the design industry can actively ’give back’. I was blown away at how easily I could both be involved in my day-to-day work while simultaneously supporting students hoping to join the industry within a couple of years. I was approached by former president Rebekah Ellis to be involved, and soon after joined the board as the scholarship director. I was very lucky to have an incredible work experience during my time at university and be given fantastic mentors throughout my career. I truly believe I would not be where I am now without that experience and guidance. The ‘N’ and ‘E’ in NEWH stand for Networking and

We try to host a wide range of events, from tours of newly opened hotels to the latest creative craze, so there is something for everyone, and hopefully something unexpected. At our networking events, the formalities of business are broken down, which is great for both industry figures and students alike. Now, with events becoming more and more popular and membership rising, we have the joy of seeing many returning faces, so it really does feel like a family. Finally, what sets us apart from most is that our events raise money for our NEWH scholarships, and it is great to see exactly where the scholarship funds are going when we award these to talented students each year and follow the stories that lead to their first design jobs!

Education, and we see them go hand-in-hand – whatever age and experience you are! We all know the importance of making new industry connections, and how those opportunities can really make the difference – and here at NEWH we hope that, with the help of our members and supporters, we can provide these ’stepping stones’ to as many students as possible.

places, meeting new people, and exploring different cultures and experiences (plus of course, some sunshine on my face!). HKS Hospitality Interiors has several international offices, so I’m also looking forward to going on exchange and meeting face-to-face the colleagues I’ve been working with for the last two years! I’m incredibly excited to take up the baton

What are you most looking forward to in 2022 and in your role as president? Travel! Like most people, be it for business or pleasure, I’m desperately missing seeing new

as NEWH president in our 20th year. I know we are going to have huge year filled with fantastic events, and I am looking forward to hosting Top ID at The Roca Gallery in March, where we will award our top three NEWH interior design supporters and take a sneak peek at their work. This year’s winners are THDP, AD Associates and Sparcstudio Design Consultants. In my role as NEWH UK’s scholarship director, I saw first-hand the amazing impact our scholarships can make, and now as president, working with our amazing board, I look forward to the challenge of spreading the message of NEWH further, while making great new connections and friends along the way! www.newh.org/chapters/united-kingdom/

Sponsorship and membership Sponsorship is key to the success of the NEWH events, and allows the organisation to achieve and exceed its scholarship goals. Anyone interested in sponsoring a NEWH event should contact Hannah Rogers on newhuk@gmail.com. Stay up to date with the news by following NEWH on social media and signing up to its mailing list. For any other queries, contact newhuk.marketing@gmail.com.

HOW CAN YOU JOIN THE WORLD’S BIGGEST ORGANISATION FOR NETWORKING IN THE INTERNATIONAL HOSPITALITY DESIGN INDUSTRY? NEWH continuously welcomes new members into its UK chapter – there are two options for joining:

PERSONAL MEMBERSHIP: £90 (annually) Are you an individual looking to join? This is the membership for you, with an annual fee of £90.

BUSINESS MEMBERSHIP: £300 (annually) This covers two people from a company, with the option of two more to join at a -50% discount.

For an application form, please contact the director of membership Kevin Swart at kevin.swart@northern-lights.co.uk, or visit www.newh.org to find out more. You can also stay abreast of what’s happening in NEWH-UK through the following: NEWH/United Kingdom @newhuk

NEWH UK (company page)

newh_UK

NEWH UK chapter @NEWHuk


Nominate an ICON by March 15th! Each year NEWH gives out its most prestigious award, the ICON of Industry. The award celebrates leaders in hospitality manufacturing who have uniquely impacted the industry throughout their innovative work, consistently dedicated their time and efforts to community or industry outreach through education and/or corporate giving, and been doing business in hospitality manufacturing for more than 30 years.

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In addition, an international scholarship is given in the recipient’s honor to one exemplary student who has completed at least half of their program toward a degree in the hospitality industry, has a minimum 3.0 GPA, has participated in an industry internship, and exemplifies the highest standards of professionalism and scholarship. This award and scholarship is presented at the Gold Key Awards Gala in New York City, held in conjunction with BDNY and HX: the Hotel Experience on November 13-14th, 2022.

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS Look for the announcement at the NEWH Young Entrepreneurs Breakfast at HD Expo in Las Vegas NEWH ICONS OF INDUSTRY

2021 Lawrence Chalfin

2019 Sandy Banks

2019 Curtis Breedlove

2018 Esther Cohen

2017 Janice Feldman

2016 Jane Skeeter

2015 Deborah Herman

2014 Bob Thomas

2013 Ray Anderson

2012 Herbert V. Kohler, Jr.

2011 Harvey Nudelman

2010 Judy Dobin

2009 Jerry Hruby-Holly

2008 Roger Milliken

NOMINATE AN ICON TODAY! For criteria and nomination form, visit newh.org/nominate-ICON All previously submitted nomination forms remain on file; please do not resubmit

2007 Manfred Steinfeld

2006 Maya Romanoff

2004 Thomas Durkan


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PROJECTS


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NoMad London London, UK When Sydell Group announced it was bringing its NoMad brand to London, expectations were immediately raised. However, the property – occupying a historic London space with a compelling past, and boasting superb architecture and interiors masterminded by an experienced and talented team – has not failed to deliver …



PROJECTS

There are not many hotels that can claim court proceedings against Oscar Wilde and the Kray twins took place within their walls. Occupying the Grade II listed structure famously known as The Bow Street Magistrates’ Court and Police Station, NoMad London is steeped in 250 years of criminal history. Honouring this storied past, as well as the remarkable architectural shell the hotel has inherited, required great sensitivity from all parties involved in the project. It is also a landmark property in the sense that it marks the first international outpost for the NoMad Hotel brand. At 91 keys, it is rather more intimate than its LA and Las Vegas sister hotels, and although it displays the richly layered narrative at the heart of the NoMad philosophy, it nevertheless represents a rebirth of the brand in London.

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“Occupying the Grade II listed structure famously known as The Bow Street Magistrates’ Court and Police Station, NoMad London is steeped in 250 years of criminal history” Photography by Emsie Jonker


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PROJECTS

Photography by Simon Upton

It was thus fitting that New York-based interior design firm, Roman and Williams, assumed the mantle from Jacques Garcia on this particular project. EPR Architects worked alongside the Sydell Group and Roman and Williams to deliver the property. “Transforming the once-fortified Bow Street Magistrates’ Court into a warm and welcoming hotel required an imaginative architectural solution,” says Mark Bruce, director, head of hotels, EPR Architects. “By introducing a new glazed courtyard in the heart of the space, we were able to retain and celebrate the original building’s form and celebrate the rich history of the property. Now fully accessible, we’re delighted that this unique hotel serves as a social haven on the edge of the bustling Covent Garden district.”

Photography by Sydell Group

“Among the most historically significant rooms within the hotel, the Magistrates Court Room has been reimagined as a formal ballroom” Acclaimed construction and interior fit-out company BECK undertook the formidable task of excavating and forming three new basement levels – with a view to creating additional space, while preserving the period facade – alongside creating mansard roofs, installing new lift shafts, new reinforced concrete and steel framing, and more. Not only this, but BECK applied its expertise in fibrous works and in-house joinery production, among other specialisms – all executed with its renowned quality and attention to detail. It is clear to see the pride and passion of all teams involved in the reimagining of this historic venue. With the additional and unprecedented challenges of the pandemic, the agility and skill of those involved were tested, and not found wanting. “The journey we all went on – not just my team, but the full extended team – is what made the project so special,” says Edward Kent, board director at BECK. “Without that relationship, and that collaborative way of working, I don’t think it would be the huge success it is now.”


J.T.Kalmar GmbH | Bennogasse 8 | 1080 Vienna | Austria | +43 1 4090880-0 | sales@kalmarlighting.com

www.kalmarlighting.com


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PROJECTS

Photography by Simon Upton

Photography by Simon Upton

Public spaces The contrast between old and new is one of many dichotomies within NoMad London’s design. The identities of – and cultural exchange between – New York and the UK is an undercurrent throughout, and there are surprising twists and turns, with spaces rooted outside of a specific time period. As guests enter through the existing carriage porte-cochere and into the lobby, reception and main stair beyond, they are immediately greeted by this confluence of influences. Within the lobby, a steel catwalk hanging from above adds a sense of theatre to the space, enhanced by the main staircase, which is fully clad in elegant mahogany panelling and framed by a proscenium, as if ready for an act to unfold. The reception is tucked to one side, and features an abundance of high lacquer and cobalt upholstery. A hand-embroidered version of Watts of Westminster’s archival pattern, Pear, has been painstakingly applied to the reception’s paravent, taking two months to produce. The NoMad restaurant’s soaring threestorey atrium, meanwhile, brings to mind an Edwardian greenhouse. By day, this lush space is flooded with natural light, while by evening the room transforms into a decidedly more intimate, moody space. This change in energy is aided by uniquely designed, acid-edged patterned pendants by Kalmar.

“Set in the building’s former police station, Side Hustle transports guests to the golden age of locomotive travel” Just off the majestic Atrium, the Fireplace Room offers a more intimate take on the aura of the garden. Hand-painted botanical wallpaper envelops the room, framed by dark timber panelling and inset antique mirror. An antique stone fireplace acts as the central axis of the space, around which upholstered perimeter banquettes and lacquered seating and tables are positioned. When it comes to bars, guests are truly spoilt for choice at NoMad London. Set in the building’s former police station, Side Hustle is NoMad’s take on the classic British pub. The space transports guests to the golden age of locomotive travel, with an array of mahogany and leather booths, embossed leather upholstery ensconced by millwork panelling, and linen-shaded sconces by Kalmar. The NoMad Bar offers a more maximalist perspective, with eccentric styling and lavish furnishings. Aesthetic movement furniture, Delft objects and Italian modernist lighting create a cacophony of period styles, while

an eye-catching golden damask fabric by Rubelli covers each of the ebonised mahogany panelled walls. New for 2022, Common Decency marks a first for the NoMad Hotel brand. This subterranean craft cocktail bar was designed as “a gathering point for eccentrics and creatives, barristers and financiers alike”. Last, but by no means least, is The Library. This room has become a mainstay of the NoMad brand, and takes on a ‘moderne’ aesthetic for its London iteration. Roman and Williams settled on vintage deco seating here, awash with guafraged velvets and woven flame stitch, and surrounded by luxuriously tall sapele millwork shelves. A unique, custom-designed chandelier in the centre of the space was created by Kalmar, complete with 12 red arms. Burnished brass picture lights illuminate the room’s intriguing selection of oil paintings, paper ephemera and selection of antique books, while an assortment of rugs bring comfort and texture underfoot.


C O M P L E T E R E N O VAT I O N O F T H E H I S TO R I C G R A D E I I L I S T E D B O W S T R E E T M A G I S T R AT E S ’ C O U R T INTO A LUXURIOUS BOUTIQUE HOTEL.

Working in close collaboration with the professional team, BECK are delighted to have been the main contractor on NoMad London. To find out more, please contact Vanessa Budd: vbudd@beckinteriors.com


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Photography by Simon Upton

Photography by Simon Upton

Photography by Simon Upton

Photography by Simon Upton

Photography by Benoit Linero

Guest rooms and suites The guest rooms and suites echo the eclectic and narrative-laden styling of the public spaces. Each room features a marble fireplace, gilded tracery wardrobe, lacquered minibar console, custom marble vanity, art nouveau chandeliers by Kalmar and contemporary artwork. The light-filled suites offer the ultimate in luxury, appearing more as well-appointed apartments, awash with choice furniture, lighting and art pieces. They offer their own living and dining spaces, with in-bedroom claw-foot tubs. The marble mosaic bathrooms feature TOTO RX Washlets, equipped with all the latest technology including EWater+ with state-of-the-art hygiene features and outstanding comfort, along with luxurious Argan bath amenities by Côté Bastide.

Events Among the most historically significant rooms within the hotel, the Magistrates Court Room has been reimagined as a formal ballroom, complete with two adjacent private dining rooms, a separate bar and a dedicated entrance from the street. A large-scale mural commission by French artist, Claire Basler, takes centre stage here. The piece is gestural rather than pictorial in style, and creates an incredibly atmospheric backdrop. Large chandeliers hang from the original ceiling (now exposed), while handblown, botanical-form sconces by Kalmar spring from the surface of the gestural mural. www.thenomadhotel.com www.romanandwilliams.com


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W Ibiza Ibiza, Spain

Baranowitz + Kronenberg has masterfully reimagined a tired beachfront property, creating an energised and locally driven new interior befitting the W name.


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W Ibiza cuts a striking figure on the idyllic, palm-fringed beachfront of Santa Eulalia. This distinctive Balearic structure from the 1980s belies a completely reimagined interior, masterminded by Baranowitz + Kronenberg (B+K). Thanks to B+K’s vision and experience, this former 3-star hotel is now an elevated and imaginative space that embodies the bold, playful spirit of the W brand. Passing through the intriguing installation of masts in the street outside the property, guests are drawn into an exceptional ground floor space. Extensive internal modifications (more details on which can be found in an interview with B+K on p94) have created a wonderful flow between the main entrance esplanade through the building to the outdoor pool and sea. Ascending amphitheatre-style platforms have been artfully created to connect the space, inviting guests to engage or retreat, according to their preference.

“Extensive internal modifications have created a wonderful flow between the main entrance esplanade through the building to the outdoor pool and sea”


W Ibiza / SPAIN W Ibiza / SPAIN


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A concrete floor and steel-wired, handwoven, laced ceiling provided the perfect canvas for B+K’s selection of surfaces, colours and textures. The bohemian culture of Ibiza, the fascinating mythology of the island and its flora and fauna all inform and inspire the design narrative here. “It was important to us to capture the spirit of Ibiza within this project,” affirm Irene Kronenberg and Alon Baranowitz, the co-founders of B+K. “‘Flower Power’ led our design strategy – laid back, colourful, simple, transparent, engaging, and letting the sun shine in, are notions which flow throughout the public and private spaces of the hotel.” Curated street art, spectacular lighting and vibrantly-toned soft furnishings layer together beautifully with the architectural form of the property to create a refreshing and engaging space. Acclaimed Turkish furniture designer and manufacturer, Parla, supplied striking custom-made pieces throughout the public spaces and guest rooms. As well as making extensive use of natural and locally manufactured furnishings and

“‘Flower Power’ led our design strategy – laid back, colourful, simple, transparent, engaging, and letting the sun shine in”


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“B+K opted to collaborate with local craftsmen to create one-of-a-kind, meaningful pieces that would honour the island’s heritage”

materials, B+K opted to collaborate with local craftsmen to create one-of-a-kind pieces that would honour the island’s heritage. W Ibiza’s F&B offerings have been designed as “anchoring bays, rather than destinations”: Steakhouse, La Llama; relaxed beach restaurant, Chiringuito Blue; and modern health food bar, Ve Café, offer cutting-edge, individual F&B concepts that aim to bring people together. These are joined by rooftop cocktail bar, Glow, and W’s renowned WET Deck, with its glistening pool and oversized loungers. Completing the offering is the serene, 4000ft2 Away Spa, and a colourful, fullyequipped gym, sauna and steam rooms. W Ibiza’s 162 guest rooms continue B+K’s Flower Power design narrative. The light, fresh feel here, emphasised through the natural tones of the walls and floors, as well as furniture by Parla, is punctuated by bright pops of colour from the vibrant scatter cushions, striking lighting pieces, and eye-catching Jackson Pollock-style headboards, which were created by a local artisan. www.marriott.com www.baranowitzkronenberg.com


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Hospitality Interiors’ Gemma Lochhead caught up with the talented Alon and Irene to discover more about their design for W Ibiza, the fascinating backstory to the project, and the studio’s visionary approach and perspectives ...

Q&A Irene Kronenberg & Alon Baranowitz, founders of Baranowitz and Kronenberg

“Taking an old structure, which exists as a hotel but is not relevant anymore, and performing a 180° conversion on the soul of the building – in our minds that’s one of the most sustainable things you can do”


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How did you get involved with the project? Irene: We got a phone call from an investor who had bought this beachfront property, and who was keen to make it a W Hotel. It’s located between two roads, with the rear of the property facing onto the beach, but differing interior levels meant that the sea views were completely obscured from the front of the building. Having viewed the property, Marriott had expressed that it wasn’t suitable, and, when we arrived at the location, we were extremely doubtful of its viability as a W Hotel. W Hotels are all about being together and connecting, and the space just didn’t work. We sat down and thought out of the box – if there were no limitations on our ideas and money wasn’t an object, could we do something without destroying the structure? We came to an understanding that if we changed the internal section of the building from the entrance level to the lower level of the backyard, creating connecting terraces in the process, it could work. The investor looked over the sketches and he understood the enormous potential – not many people are going to give up on 400m2 of prime real estate. We were invited to make a presentation to W, who were initially still quite sceptical, and expressed our belief in the project. After seeing the plans, they said “we have a W”. Could you talk about the history of the building itself? Irene: It was formerly an all-inclusive, threestar hotel from the 80s. In our industry, we’re always seeking ways to make our work more sustainable. Taking an old structure, which exists as a hotel but is not relevant anymore, and performing a 180° conversion on the soul of the building – in our minds that’s one of the most sustainable things you can do. We worked with local people – the furthest members of the team were from mainland Spain. We also collaborated extensively with local creative forces from Spain and from the Balearic Islands. Could you talk about how you reconfigured the property to encourage that sense of social connection? Alon: First it’s people, then it’s space, then it’s building. This is how we see what we do. Irene: Exactly – it’s not only about design, it’s about understanding space and understanding energies, architecture and lifestyle. Everything that you do needs to be rooted in how people will move within and use a space. How do you want people to communicate with each other? When you’ve established this, you can then come up with a design strategy – you cannot

create a design strategy and then dictate how people use it. Alon: When you approach the hotel, there’s a beautiful esplanade in front of the entrance, where the long glass facade of the hotel overlooks the street. What was very important for us was that the energy inside didn’t dissipate out of the building due to this glass facade. We didn’t want to share the hotel with the street too much, but we wanted to create a filter at street level that would speak to the energy and language of the hotel, enticing people to come closer and explore. We decided to introduce hundreds of white metal masts, which double as light fixtures, to create an almost sculptural installation. A beautiful pergola on top was formed from ship ropes made by people of the island. If you look at W’s Instagram, so many people are taking pictures amidst those masts. It was a really fascinating moment that screens the hotel from the street, but is very playful. What was the framing concept or inspiration for the interior design? Alon: We explored the concept of ‘flower power’ for the hotel. When you speak about ‘flower power’, a lot of people immediately think of sex, drugs and rock and roll, but it’s also about engaging with people, accepting other kinds of people. It’s about the older population of the island living side-by-side with the hippies that started coming in the 70s. The island was an escape for all kinds of intellectuals and people fleeing their governments. So, there’s a beautiful history of co-living, and bringing people together from all walks of life. This is combined with the rich history and legends of the island, such as Bes, god of music and merriment, and Tanit, goddess of fertility and dance. There is, in fact, a small island called Es Vedrà off the island of Ibiza, which is said to be where sirens would lure sailors from passing ships with their song. Actually, these islands have a very high density of metal, with a very strong magnetic field, so there is a correlation between the physical attributes of Es Vedrà and the stories of Homer’s Odyssey and the sirens. There is something really fantastic about all these myths and legends, so for us ‘flower power’ meant creating spaces that entice people to come together, giving them a really varied set of options. You can be alone together, you can be together alone, you can be in the pool, you can be in the restaurant or the rooftop bar. The joy of life was a leading theme, and is an integral part of W’s DNA. Could you talk about the guest rooms? Alon: They are completely inspired by ‘flower power’. All of the bases and headboards for

the beds were actually created on-site by a local company, that used Jackson Pollockstyle action painting to spread the paints on the canvas. It means that each and every headboard is unique. What were the main challenges you faced, and how were they overcome? Alon: I think everybody understood the idea that necessity is the mother of invention, so almost any means were on the table to make this project happen. There was a lot of out-ofthe-box thinking, there was a lot of intuition and organisation and some surprises along the way, as is natural when you take on a preexisting building. If you don’t make a fuss about it, but go with the flow, and take it as an opportunity rather than a hurdle, then I think you open yourself up to a beautiful world of potential – and I think that’s exactly what we did. This island inspires you to be free, to think about things in a very different way. It’s not about formalities, it’s not about how things are done or should be done. Irene: We adhered very carefully to the soul of the building. We let the building tell us what it wanted to be. How is 2022 shaping up for you as a team? Are there any upcoming projects you’re able to share? Irene: One month ago, we were awarded the Prix Versailles for the New York boutique we designed for Âme. It’s a new brand of labgrown diamond jewellery, and the boutique opened just at the beginning of the pandemic. Our practice is not just involved in hotels, but in all aspects of lifestyle. We love getting to the heart of why and how people connect in different spaces, and find it so rewarding to create platforms that really fulfil their needs. Besides this, we’ve been very busy in our home studio in Israel. The hotel industry is changing here, finally. People are understanding that brands are important, and that not every project is for everybody. They’re seeing the value of design in creating an identity for these projects. Because we work across both architecture and interior design, we have the tools to discover the soul of the project. It’s not about functionality and programmes, it’s about understanding what a project needs to be. When you understand this, you don’t need to talk about textures, colours and forms ... it’s about spatial experiences. Alon: We’ve also completed an amazing project in Manchester, UK, that’s just about to open, called The Urban Playground. It’s a huge 4000m2 venue for competitive socialising. www.baranowitzkronenberg.com


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ME Dubai Dubai, UAE Hospitality interiors explores Zaha Hadid Architects’ iconic design for ME Dubai.


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Photography by Laurian Ghinitoiu

Photography by Laurian Ghinitoiu

ME Dubai is one of those pinnacle projects that comes around very rarely. As the only hotel for which Zaha Hadid created both the architecture and interiors, it has become her legacy project – its futuristic style and bold form paying testament to her talent and versatility. The hotel occupies the first five floors of The Opus, a true architectural masterpiece in the Burj Khalifa district, adjacent to Downtown Dubai and Business Bay. Spanning 84,300m2, the structure explores the dichotomy of solid and void, opaque and transparent, interior and exterior. Two separate towers amalgamate into a singular whole to form a cube, the heart of which appears as if eroded, with a remarkable free-form void. “The precise orthogonal geometries of The Opus’ elemental glass cube contrast dramatically with the fluidity of the eight-storey void at its centre,” explains Christos Passas, project director at Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA).

“The precise orthogonal geometries of The Opus’ elemental glass cube contrast dramatically with the fluidity of the eight-storey void at its centre”


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Photography by Laurian Ghinitoiu

Photography by Deseo Photography

Photography by Laurian Ghinitoiu

The Opus forms something of a departure from ZHA’s portfolio. The firm is renowned for properties that are geometrically complex upon first take, yet The Opus takes a rather simplistic form, until one views it from the front or rear to reveal this startling twist to its design. The emphasis and visual impact here was as much about what has not been built, as what has been.

A long-distance perspective is only part of the journey of discovery one embarks on with this property. Up close, the cube’s doubleglazed facade incorporates a UV coating and mirrored frit pattern. This is primarily with a view to reducing solar gain, but also effects a continuous play of light varying between ever-changing reflections and transparency. By

day, the cube’s facade reflects the sky, sun and surrounding cityscape, while at night, the void is illuminated by a dynamic light installation of individually controllable LEDs within each glass panel. This dynamism, and wonderful experimentation with form, is echoed within the property’s interior. With its series of white, curved balconies, beautifully lit to underscore their undulating forms, the eye is drawn upwards to the glass roof at the bottom of the void, and beyond. Plum-coloured Petalinas sofas in striking flowing formations and Ottomans from Zaha Hadid Design complete the space, echoing the sculptural balconies above. Guests can proceed from the light-filled lobby to ME Dubai’s 93 serene guest rooms. Available in a choice of midnight blue (inspired by Dubai’s stunning skyline by night) or bright white (in tribute to the soft hues of the UAE landscape), the rooms are contemporary and imaginative in style. Bespoke furniture by the ZHA design team – in particular the uniquely shaped Opus beds and Work & Play combination sofa with desk – has allowed a level of creativity and customisation that might otherwise have been impossible. Plush bathrooms incorporate ZHA’s Vitae bathroom collection, designed in 2015 for Noken Porcelanosa.


Photography by Laurian Ghinitoiu

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Photography by Laurian Ghinitoiu

In terms of ME Dubai’s F&B offering, there are numerous options to suit every taste. Designed by the talented Paul Bishop of Bishop Design, Deseo is a restaurant, urban terrace and lounge inspired by Latin America. Bishop Design was tasked with re-envisaging the existing pool deck, and has extended a small seating podium to encompass an entire decking platform, before converting a rectangular planter into a double-sided bar. The venue’s Aztec and floral-patterned rugs, cushions and fabrics draw from the textures and colours of Tulum, Mexico, while large pot plants bring lush greenery to the space.

Photography by Laurian Ghinitoiu

“By day, the cube’s facade reflects the sky, sun and surrounding cityscape, while at night, the void is illuminated by a dynamic light installation of individually controllable LEDs within each glass panel”

Central Cosmo Tapas & Bar presents a modern and cosmopolitan take on a Spanish tapas bar, while Botanica, located in ME Dubai’s lobby, is a sophisticated gin and tonic bar. Finally, Roka’s contemporary take on Japanese robatayaki cuisine can be enjoyed on the first floor.

Concluding the public spaces is the hotel’s wellness offering, which takes in a state-ofthe-art gym spanning 7000ft2, a world-class spa, and a pool terrace with views over the skyscrapers of Downtown Dubai. www.melia.com www.zaha-hadid.com


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Relais Henley Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire Relais Retreats is an impressive series of waterside properties from acclaimed hotelier, Grace Leo. Here, Hospitality Interiors explores the brand’s Oxfordshire retreat – a 16th-century coaching inn that has been sensitively reimagined to create a luxury boutique escape.


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In conceptualising a new hotel, it is perhaps most challenging to articulate the fundamental quality that both compels guests to visit and encourages them to return. This demands a richness and a complexity that does not come from a single creative impulse or design, but rather, especially in the context of a historic building, from myriad ideas and elements that combine to create a unique experience – a story that unfolds from arrival, and is co-authored by guests who progressively write a narrative of their stay that is meaningful to them. This is the almost alchemical quality of authenticity sought by guests and prized by hoteliers, and is something that is almost impossible to contrive. The refurbishment of the Relais Henley, formerly known as the Red Lion Hotel, in Henley-on-Thames, has been a far more ambitious undertaking than it might appear at first glance. Both client and design team dedicated themselves to refurbishing the

building to a condition appropriate to its

properties developed by Grace Leo and her

location in the picturesque market town of Henley-on-Thames, as well as its historical status, but this came with a series of complex challenges and was delivered on a relatively fast-track programme. The hotel is the first of a series of waterside

co-investor Tim Hartnoll. Nicholas de Klerk and Sze Wei Lee of Translation Architecture led the architecture and planning of the project, while the interiors were designed by Paris-based Pascal Allaman in close collaboration with Grace.


LUXURY WOOD FLOORING AND CLADDING +44 (0)1524 737 000 | www.havwoods.com/uk | info@havwoods.com


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The Grade II listed building is what heritage professionals refer to as a multi-phase development. The timber frame of the west range has been accurately dated to 1462 through a process known as dendro-dating, while the remainder of the complex has been subject to multiple extensions and alterations in the intervening 560 years. It has been a form of lodging accommodation for much of that time. The elegant red brick facade dates to the late 18th century, and unites a series of independent buildings of various ages. It also benefits from very generous publics areas in proportion to the number of guest rooms the hotel has, with two bars, a 60-cover restaurant and a deli. The Palm Court, which was originally designed as a series of extensive coffee lounges during the Victorian temperance era, has been refurbished to take advantage of a dramatically increased appetite for remote and co-working.

“The interior design concept draws on several influences, including the history of the building itself, Temple Island in the Thames, as well as the rowing history of Henley-onThames”


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The team’s approach included the reversal of some recent insensitive and unconsented alterations, using a major 1897 Victorian renovation as a benchmark. This included reinstating the double-height volume in the restaurant and the corridor that connected it to the main reception, which was itself restored to its earlier size. Bedrooms were stripped out and redecorated and, for the first time in the building’s history, provided with air conditioning. This required detailed coordination with planners and conservation officers, setting out principles and routes for pipe runs (in many cases using existing notches in floor beams). Extensive repairs were also undertaken by specialists to the historic building’s fabric, including lath and plaster ceilings and internal and external lime render, alongside upgrades to the building services infrastructure. The interior design concept draws on several influences, including the history of the building itself, Temple Island in the Thames, as well as the rowing history of Henley-on-Thames. These influences are seen in the selection of furniture and fabrics, including the bold, striped carpets and upholstered headboards, while the surrounding verdant countryside finds its


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“This investment has extended the lifespan of the building for another generation and perhaps more and, as a team, we feel privileged to have become part of the story of this building” way into the interior in elements such as the bespoke armoires finished in botanical paper, as well as an array of beautiful wallcoverings. Bespoke joinery, in the form of banquettes, desks, console tables and cabinets were designed and made specifically for the hotel. Antique furniture in the existing hotel, including four-poster beds and armchairs, was fully restored and reupholstered, while artworks, including portraits of previous guests Charles I and the Duke of Marlborough, bought with the hotel, have been retained as part of the hotel’s collection. A wide selection of objet, artworks and ceramics, personally selected by Grace and Pascal, are positioned throughout the public areas, and add texture, detail and interest to the interior spaces.

Pure Fitout was tasked with the restoration and refurbishment of the Grade II listed building. The specialist fitout company utilised its in-house workshop to manufacture and install the exquisite joinery and metalwork throughout the hotel. Many of the existing features were protected and restored to their former glory by the many skilled craftsmen involved in the project. The experience that has been crafted is rich and complex without being intimidating.

Comfort, luxury and accessibility has been prioritised at every turn. “This investment has extended the lifespan of the building for another generation and perhaps more and, as a team, we feel privileged to have become part of the story of this building, and a few of many, many hands that have shaped it over the centuries,” says Nicholas de Klerk. www.therelaishenley.com www.translation-architecture.com www.pascalallaman.fr


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Arizona Biltmore Phoenix, Arizona The multidisciplinary NYC-based team behind Virserius Studio has worked alongside PHX Architecture to reimagine this historic hotel, elevating it for the 21st century while preserving its emblematic architectural roots.


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Originally opened in 1929, the Arizona Biltmore, a Waldorf Astoria Resort, is heralded as something of an architectural masterpiece. The property was designed by Albert Chase McArthur, a protégé of celebrated architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, who consulted on the project alongside him. Having exchanged hands multiple times in the ensuing years, and having played host to a plethora of famous names – from Marilyn Monroe and Frank Sinatra to Ronald Reagan and Barack Obama – the property has just undergone a major $70m renovation to preserve its glamour and appeal for the 21st century and beyond. Though many of the original elements of the Biltmore had been modified or eliminated over the years, Frank Lloyd Wright’s much-lauded prairie architecture has mostly been retained throughout. There are nods, too, to American Art Deco influences throughout the space, as seen in the various geometric patterns. For Virserius Studio and PHX Architecture, it was crucial to preserve the respective legacies of Wright and McArthur, while ushering in a new chapter for the resort. The property’s accommodation and public spaces have thus been mindfully reimagined, alongside entirely new additions such as The Spire Bar and the Tierra Luna Spa. Saguaro Pool “The adults-only Saguaro Pool was created as part of the designer’s master plan,” comments Virserius Studio’s founder and principal, Therese Virserius. “As Wright was known for his ornate stained glass and mosaics, we designed Italian mosaics which illuminate the bottom of the pool, while the magnificent limited-edition sculptures along the cabanas

“The scalloped mosaic around the bar evokes the golden age of Art Deco, with deep-saturated blues, greens and gold, which stand in contrast to the poured concrete floor”


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“Every detail has been thought through,” says Therese. “When it is hot in the summer you are met with shade, misters, greenery and water to cool you down, while in the winter, fire pits, small heaters and beautiful throws keep you warm.” Wrights Bar When it came to the Wrights Bar, Virserius Studio played around with beautiful contrasts, focusing on opening up the space architecturally by setting it against the signature Biltmore Blocks. A variation on a textile block first used by Wright, these blocks feature abstracted leaves inspired by the trunks of palm trees. “We introduced rich, deep colours into the space to create an intimate and segmented

experience,” explains Therese. “The space was layered with the use of custom screens, individual living room areas, and sculptural elements in the furniture. We placed contemporary modular sofas in the centre of the floor to provide the flexibility for guests to gather around the various seating arrangements. “Pay particular attention to the custom parquet flooring tied to the architectural Biltmore Block, and the way it adds warmth. Custom Persian rugs add a bohemian flair, while the geometric patterns and rich tones provide needed layering and depth. “To finish the look and feel of a modern 30s space for socialising and entertaining, we included jewellery-like light fixtures that draw their design from the Art Deco period.”

“We introduced rich, deep colours into the space to create an intimate and segmented experience”

of the adult pool are by Italian manufacturer Bisazza. Each private cabana is encased in black steel with geometric patterns.” Another key element of the space are the living plant walls, which remain green and lush thanks to an in-built water hydration system. As well as being aesthetically pleasing, they provide coolness against the Arizona heat. The geometric patterns extend into the pool bar, which is lined with tiles that mimic the vibrant colours of nature and the sky. Spire Bar The Spire Bar’s flower glass centrepiece pays tribute to the stained glass of Frank Lloyd Wright, but is set within a contemporary backdrop. The scalloped mosaic around the bar evokes the golden age of Art Deco, with deep-saturated blues, greens and gold, which stand in contrast to the poured concrete floor. The organic elements of the curved banquettes are all defined by fire pits and custom-designed Spanish tile, while the fountains that flow around the Spire Bar keep it cooler in the otherwise brutally hot desert.


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Luxury cottages “Our design intent for the luxury guest cottages was to create an atmosphere that truly felt like the home you wish you had,” says Therese. “Taking a master plan approach to the space, the first step was to reorganise it, providing a floorplan that flowed naturally from all angles.” The living room is awash with earthy colours, woods and stucco walls for a welcoming feel, complete with lighting created by Virserius Studio. Bespoke joinery from Samuel Lawrence

“Our design intent for the luxury guest cottages was to create an atmosphere that truly felt like the home you wish you had”

Hospitality (SLH) can be found throughout, including for the open shelving units. SLH also supplied bespoke consoles, dining tables, dining chairs and benches. A verdant corridor leads to the outdoor terrace, which boasts striking mountain views. The plants are maintained by a self-planting trough that cools down the space, which is especially important in the Arizona sun.

“The design of this space combines both crafty and very tailored elements,” says Therese. “Wright’s signature concrete patterns are beautifully contrasted by woods, while the glass was used to provide both transparency and privacy. Relaxation is the name of the game.” www.virseriusstudio.com www.phxarch.com www.arizonabiltmore.com


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Contact us for more information. Century House, Premier Way, Lowfields Business Park, Elland, West Yorkshire, HX5 9HF

T: +44 (0) 1484 658341 E: info@decorativepanels.co.uk www.decorativepanels.co.uk

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As a trade laminator of sheet materials for the furniture and allied industries, dp-lamination can offer an extensive range of surface designs incorporating this technology laminated to many different substrates. These substrates can then be converted into finished product either in house at sister companies dp-furniture and dp-components or externally by fellow manufacturers.

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*Tested in accordance with ISO22196:2011

Biomaster is proven to inhibit the growth of microbes by up to 99.99%.

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The Decorative Panels Group and Biomaster® working in partnership to offer a 24/7 lifetime protection that contains inbuilt antimicrobial protection that does not wear off or leach out over time.

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PROJECTS


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The Langham, Jakarta Jakarta, Indonesia This highly anticipated property boasts superb facilities and effortlessly sophisticated interiors by Singapore-based Smallwood Reynolds Stewart Stewart.


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This impressive 65-storey, 223-key hotel in Indonesia’s capital marks The Langham brand’s first property in South-east Asia. Well positioned in the new and highly prestigious District 8 at Sudirman Central Business District (SCBD), the hotel is set amidst the complex’s mix of residences and amenities – all within close proximity to the city’s most important financial, cultural and entertainment centres. In partnership with premier Indonesian developer Agung Sedayu Group, Langham Hospitality Group has worked to deliver an ultra-luxurious hotel that delivers the exceptional facilities, services and aesthetic for which the brand is known, while establishing a unique and characterful new addition to the portfolio. Smallwood Reynolds Stewart Stewart (SRSS) has created an interior design to match this premier location and status, fusing classical design elements with urban sophistication. “We were recommended by the operator, Langham Hospitality Group, to the owner, due to the successful design we did for The Langham Haikou, China,” explains Charlotte James, formerly of SRSS. “Being a Langham hotel, there was no brief as such, as the design philosophy stems from the operator itself, so we used the historic elements of the brand as our starting point.” The hotel offers an exceptional arrival experience, with a towering 10m-high dome and oculus adorned with intricate plaster

“The piece draws inspiration from the remarkable butterflies within Indonesia’s rainforests, incorporating an elaborate champagnecoloured lattice reminiscent of a monarch butterfly’s wings”

detailing. As guests enter the arrival lobby on the hotel’s ground floor, their eyes will likely be drawn to the spectacular chandelier created by acclaimed Czech lighting manufacturer and designer, Lasvit. Entitled Haven, the piece incorporates 3000 fluttering crystal butterflies, some of which are suspended by intricate wire work. The piece draws inspiration from the remarkable butterflies within Indonesia’s rainforests, incorporating an elaborate champagne-coloured lattice reminiscent of a monarch butterfly’s wings. Undeniably opulent in both scale and grandeur, SRSS has ensured that the property nevertheless exudes a residential feel. Inviting, walnut-trimmed banquettes and leather rolltop chairs flank marble fireplaces dressed with homely combinations of artwork, lamps and objets d’art. These atmospheric vignettes have been consciously and meaningfully created throughout the property to maintain a warm, personalised air.

F&B offering Guests are spoilt for choice when it comes to The Langham, Jakarta’s F&B offering. One of the hotel’s exceptional restaurant partnerships is with celebrated UK chef, Tom Aikens. Named Tom’s, the restaurant provides an elevated dining space for guests to enjoy the chef’s breakfast, lunch and dinner menus. “The flagship destination bar and restaurant is one of our favourite spaces,” comments Gareth James, formerly of SRSS. “The whole space is panelled in dark blue and mirror, and at the heart of the restaurant is a residentialstyle kitchen complete with cheese, wine and charcuterie rooms. These are detailed as if they were small shops within the restaurant itself – a reference to walking through Burlington Arcade in London. “The buffet concept has been removed here entirely, with all food being served a la carte, elevating the guest experience once again. Using the grand ceiling heights, we were able


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“Here we created a formal garden that could be used for events, complete with kitchen, herb garden and bar, all surrounded by a Bali-meets-English formal garden” to add an additional mezzanine level above the bar, giving the whole space various experiences and ambiances. “For breakfast the two spaces combine with the bar area, allowing a more relaxed, easy breakfast. As the day progresses, they divide to create two destinations in one, provoking an incredibly rich atmosphere.” Opening this year, T’ang Court will be inspired by its 3 Michelin-starred Cantonese restaurant namesake at The Langham, Hong Kong. The restaurant is situated on the 61st floor and, naturally, features floor-to-ceiling windows for a spectacular perspective on Jakarta’s skyline. Elsewhere, world-renowned chef Masaharu Morimoto from New York City will present haute Japanese cuisine at Morimoto. Concluding the restaurants, Alice is housed within a grand dining emporium and, in addition to its breakfast, lunch and dinner menus, honours the legacy of afternoon tea at The Langham’s hotels. Alice draws inspiration from Lewis Carroll’s famous novel, offering a playful yet elegant space within which guests can enjoy modern French fare. “Alice is a statement in simplicity of detail and form,” explains Charlotte. “Beautifully detailed plaster ceilings, and painted in pure, brilliant white, so it remains fresh and current.

This ceiling hangs alone from the walls, becoming an artwork in its own right. “The marble mosaic flooring used throughout holds the fine, black metal arched mirrors and pinstripe white-panelled walls in place. Along with the cocktail bar and the patisserie, Alice really is an all-day experience. White is the perfect colour to maximise and use the changing nature of light as the day passes to night.” Last but by no means least, those familiar with the Artesian at The Langham, London will welcome its latest outpost on The Langham, Jakarta’s impressive rooftop. Wellness Located on the sixth floor, The Langham, Jakarta’s Chuan Spa offers treatments inspired by traditional Chinese medicine philosophies within a serene, meditative setting. Spanning 670m2, the spa offers private treatment rooms,

sauna and steam rooms, and a 20m outdoor swimming pool with lush greenery and a striking cityscape backdrop. “One of the highlights of the project was our design for the landscape at the outdoor pool,” says Gareth. “Here we created a formal garden that could be used for events, complete with kitchen, herb garden and bar, all surrounded by a Bali-meets-English formal garden. Topiarystyle box hedging combines with tall palm trees to provide a subtle divide between our lawns and the infinity pool overlooking Jakarta below.” On the 63rd floor, a fully equipped fitness centre, complete with Technogym equipment, adds to the hotel’s wellness offering, alongside a 16m indoor infinity pool with a phenomenal vantage point over Jakarta. Guest accommodation The Langham’s 223 guest rooms are graced with floor-to-ceiling windows which flood the rooms with light as well as providing impressive panoramic views of the city. State-of-the-art in-room entertainment, smart technology and opulent marble bathrooms complete the space. In terms of the interiors, high-quality materials and craftsmanship were integral. “Knowing the fresh, pure, brilliant-white-painted panels were going to be the mainstay of the design, the first materials we selected for the guest rooms to accompany it were a classic, honey-toned European oak, a Calacatta Oro marble and a soft, creamy cotton velvet,” explains Gareth. “The warm timber and the rich veining of the marble, set off by the white panels, is an effortlessly elegant look, and the velvet headboards simply layer back.


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“The Calacatta marble is a repeated element in the rest of the property, with the type becoming more luxurious in key areas of the hotel. For example, the client wished to use an even richer Calacatta Vagli in the sky lobby, which juxtaposes with contemporary black marble and antiqued mirror panels.” Meeting rooms and event spaces With more than 2100m2 of flexible space – including a 688m2 ballroom and 11 meeting rooms – The Langham, Jakarta is a suitable venue for all manner of events. The ballroom, in particular, provided a key design challenge for SRSS, but a late decision ultimately worked to the team’s advantage. “The escalators to the ballroom level had to be placed above the centre of Alice halfway through the design development, which meant our ceiling heights would go from around 10m to just above three underneath in this space,” explains Charlotte. “It was decided to utilise this area and create an intimate, dedicated gin and champagne bar, adorned with ribbed bronze metal, rippled mirror ceilings, glossy, curly, walnut timber panels, and dramatic cosmic black granite.” www.langhamhotels.com www.smallwood-us.com

“Being a Langham hotel, there was no brief as such as the design philosophy stems from the operator itself, so we used the historic elements of the brand as our starting point”


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Kisawa Sanctuary Benguerra Island, Mozambique It is rare to find a property so proactively involved in protecting the landscape it calls home. Read on to discover more about Kisawa Sanctuary’s immersive approach to hospitality, design and environmental conservation …


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Kisawa Sanctuary is the first hospitality project from entrepreneur, creative director and philanthropist, Nina Flohr. Having previously worked as creative director of VistaJet, Nina has applied her expertise and years of experience in the luxury sector to forge an exclusive experience amidst the idyllic beaches and coastal forest of Benguerra Island, Mozambique. It is, however, her passion for the heritage, people and natural landscape of Mozambique that truly drives this project. Kisawa Sanctuary has a symbiotic relationship with its sister property, the Bazaruto Centre for Scientific Studies (BCSS), whereby (for-profit) hospitality contributes directly to (non-profit) marine science and research. As Africa’s first permanent ocean observatory, BCSS facilitates marine research and conservation, with a view to preserving these exceptional landscapes for generations to come. Its data and knowledge output inform the environmental decisions of the sanctuary, from design choices to shaping unique guest experiences.


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“Nina was adamant that the sanctuary should blend in with, rather than interrupt, the surrounding landscape”

This pairing of cultural celebration and environmental conservation is a consistent thread throughout Kisawa Sanctuary, beginning with its fascinating architectural design. From the outset, Nina was adamant that the sanctuary should blend in with, rather than interrupt, the surrounding landscape. The sanctuary’s structures thus feature soft, organic forms, making use of natural materials, and erected without the use of heavy machinery. The design features a wonderful pairing of innovation and traditional craft. Nina opted to work extensively with skilled artisans from Benguerra and the neighbouring islands, commissioning bespoke pieces from local weavers, thatchers, carpenters and textilemakers. In fact, 80% of the construction workforce were from Benguerra Island, and half of them women. Patented 3D printing technology has its place here, too. Offering a more sustainable alternative to traditional materials, the team has created a building component from the island’s sand and seawater. When this mortar is fed into the 3D printer, it is printed onto the specified construction element to create a wonderfully tactile, natural-looking finish.


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Kisawa’s 22 spacious bungalows draw on this same mission to bond people and place. Some of the residences lie on the calmer, cove side of the island, while others are nestled in the dunes on the ocean side. Each has been consciously positioned to create a secluded plot of at least one acre, giving guests the opportunity to immerse themselves in the landscape and luxuriate in the privacy of their surroundings. Moving into the heart of the sanctuary, guests will find a collection of shared spaces dedicated to dining, relaxation and wellbeing. Seven culinary locations, including the Main Terrace, Baracca and two Mussassas, offer a broad array of dishes, with a particular focus on Mozambican and African flavours. The emphasis here is on organic, sanctuary-grown produce, alongside fresh and local supplies from a carefully selected network of farmers and fishermen. Wellness, too, plays a fundamental role in Kisawa’s offering. The Natural Wellness Centre incorporates an array of treatment

“Nina opted to work extensively with skilled artisans from Benguerra and the neighbouring islands, commissioning bespoke pieces from local weavers, thatchers, carpenters and textilemakers” spaces – including a state-of-the-art Japanese Iyashi dome sauna – and lies adjacent to a fully equipped gym and dedicated yoga and pilates dome. An organically shaped 25m pool connects to the wellness centre, complete with wonderful sea views. As within the residences, the public spaces

embrace the continent’s rich cultural history with a combination of unique art and antique pieces, alongside locally made bespoke furniture. Colourful patterns and prints, with an artful layering of textures, tie the spaces together. www.kisawasanctuary.com


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LIGHTING

Photography by Yan fei

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Lighting Images brings expertise to Banyan Tree Nanjing Garden Expo Lighting Images is an independent lighting design team dedicated to understanding and practicing the ‘true value of light’. The company provides customers with professional and efficient lighting design, consultation and other services. Lighting Images recently completed the lighting design for the recently opened Banyan Tree Nanjing Garden Expo – China’s second quarry-based hotel, located in Nanjing’s new landmark Garden Expo Park. Aero Light acted as lighting supplier to the project. Here, the Lighting Images team tells Hospitality Interiors more about the project …

Could you give us a bit of background on the project? The Nanjing Garden Expo project is a government mandate with an investment of US$53m, and spans a total area of 3.38km2, exhibiting various botanical attractions and accommodating seven hotels. Nanjing Banyan Tree has been built on an abandoned quarry of 1.1km length, 240m width and 140m height which actively operated in the 1990s, until it concluded its purpose and fell into disuse. Now it’s being beautifully revived for a whole new purpose.

Could you tell us more about your design concept for the project? The entrance of the hotel is situated on the top of the cliff, and the lowest level is at the bottom of the valley – the entire hotel is cocooned in the quarry cliff. There are 115 guest rooms in total, and all rooms accommodate hot spring baths on the terrace with magnificent quarry cliff views. In order to support the immersive experience of the spectacular landscape, we carefully designed the artificial light to substitute the natural sunlight discreetly, without disturbing


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Photography by Yan fei

the guests. For the ceilings, we have used highquality fixtures with darklight reflectors. In order to align with the rustic and natural interior decor, our lighting scheme was planned in the same tone. We opted for lower light levels and colour temperatures to create a soft and comfortable light environment. What were the most challenging aspects of the project? The most outstanding feature of the hotel is the gigantic cocoon structure covering the lobby reception. This cocoon consisted of over 2000 wooden and acrylic panels with an LED light source in every piece, which blinks at a very slow speed to make the cocoon look as if it were organically breathing. However, this

concept required a very complicated design adjustment. Every panel was swivelable in order to match the cocoon arc, which made it difficult to control the glare. We spent vast time on-site for the adjustment, and finally eliminated glares for all angles. Also, making the panel look as if it were organically breathing with soft light distribution on such a small surface was extremely difficult. We went through many rounds of trial and error and, thanks to the art consultant’s patience, we finally managed to achieve the effect we were looking for. Which areas of the Banyan Tree Hotel project do you feel are most striking? My favourite area captures the signature charm of the hotel, with its surrounding of rustic rock walls. We dimmed the light to the limit, placing small particles of lights among the rock walls with fibreoptics to create a fantastic ambience which brings out the magnificence of the aweinspiring cliff view outside. Soaking in the hot spring, gazing at the cliff and thinking about past days in this quarry will transport guests to nostalgic memories of this desolate mining valley. www.lightingimages.cn www.aerolight.cn

“We opted for lower light levels and colour temperatures to create a soft and comfortable light environment”


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ADVERTORIAL

Exploring No.1 York with Northern Lights northern-lights.co.uk

Established in Chesterfield in 1987 as a small family business, Northern Lights has grown into the UK’s leading manufacturer of bespoke decorative light fittings. The business has been carefully developed from the craftsmanship of a small team of skilled artisans who have grown in size and honed their craft to develop high-end award-winning bespoke lighting. Northern Lights has supported many renowned designers in realising their visions for grand hospitality lighting schemes all over the world. Along with their bespoke creations, Northern Lights also has an exquisitely designed standard range which is made exclusively in the UK. Their unique designs utilise in-house processes, specialising in metal fabrication and finishing and have facilities to create glass, wood and acrylic elements. Luxurious elements and detailing are sourced from glass, alabaster, marble, metal casting & forging companies in the UK and Europe.

Opened December 2021, inside this Grade II-listed townhouse, guests are rewarded with huge, gorgeous sash windows, heightened ceilings, and a sweeping central staircase surrounded by dark walls and a candle-lit entrance – an ode to York’s gothic past. Jay Grierson at Martin Hulbert Design is the mastermind behind the interiors and has packed the spaces full of whimsical wonderment. Engineering themes, beautifully crafted rugs, and upholstery inspired by the textiles industry are all a nod to York’s historical heroism. Northern Lights worked closely with Jay and his team to realise their vision for the regal Georgian building by delivering a range of uniquely designed bespoke light fittings. These ranged from the contemporary floor and table lamps to more traditionally designed lanterns. Jay’s eclectic mixture of spaces paved the way for an assortment of lighting that feels both accommodating to guests and nostalgic of York’s steep history.

No.1 York with Martin Hulbert Design © GuestHouse


LIGHTING 131

Presenting PHONO from Chelsom Chelsom has introduced PHONO, from its latest collection, EDITION 27. The range includes table, floor and wall light options available in brushed brass, effortlessly balancing flawless product design with function. PHONO’s conical fabric shades fit seamlessly into spun brushed brass cone holders, emitting a warm light designed to enhance the ambience of any room. Table and floor lamps stand on heavy satin black cylindrical bases. 01253 831400 www.chelsom.co.uk


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Dernier & Hamlyn’s craftsmen create bespoke lighting for Nobu The design concept for Nobu London Portman Square centred on an atmosphere of timeless elegance and contemporary luxury. Lighting was to be an essential element in creating the right ambience and, when it came to statement decorative fittings, bespoke lighting manufacturer Dernier & Hamlyn – which has worked with David Collins Studio on many other projects – was the obvious choice. Dernier & Hamlyn has been making bespoke lighting since 1888, and utilised this extensive experience and the team’s wide-ranging artisan skills to produce more than 100 individual pieces, crafted from brass and hand-finished in bronze. Lighting made by Dernier & Hamlyn features in many of the hotel’s standout areas,

including wall, ceiling and pendant lights in the restaurant, bar and private dining room – all individually manufactured to David Collins Studio’s designs and exacting standards. Among the standout pieces are four bronze pendants, finished in antique brass some 1300mm in length, above the sushi bar. These were hand-cut, shaped and welded before being fitted with bespoke, handmade, seeded glass shades. Within the main restaurant, 12 ceiling lights feature reeded glass tubular shades and handformed brass end caps. They are fixed using 1m-long handcrafted brass rods, fitted with solid brass spheres. Twelve colonnade wall lights are installed in the lobby ceiling, which were formed from

brass sheets, cut by hand. All pieces are individually silver soldered and finished in a unique bronze shade created by the David Collins team. Light is softly dissipated through the 22 shades, created by sandwiching luxury Spanish parchment between glass panels. “This project utilised many of our team’s skills to ensure the lighting we manufactured achieved the quality and attention to detail required,” says Lyn Newcombe, Dernier & Hamlyn’s head of projects. “The lighting they produced for Nobu Hotel London Portman Square is even more exquisite than we hoped for, and we have no doubt that the hotel’s guests and diners will have their experience enhanced by the mood it helps to create.” www.dernier-hamlyn.com


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Quintessentiale by Elstead Quintessentiale is an eclectic and curated range from Elstead Lighting. Pictured is the Skye 6 light cluster pendant, which was designed by Californian Lisa McDennon and produced by Hinkley Lighting. Each clear, open globe is encircled with a slender ring in a subtle heritage brass finish. The opening is off-centre, and the globes fall to different lengths that can be adjusted with the cinching ring. There is also a single pendant in this range which is perfect for a row over a kitchen island, bar or reception desk. Lisa has also designed several other attractive statement lighting fixtures. For more information, request a catalogue or view this collection online. 01420 82377 www.elsteadlighting.com


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Haiti by Cameron Design House The Haiti chandelier by bespoke sculptural lighting brand, Cameron House, is named for the highest peak in Finland. This sculptural exploration of gravity combines individually handblown glass spheres with brass fixtures to deliver a striking design that looks beautiful whether on or off. Available in endless combinations, colours and finishes, the unique structure of Haiti makes for a truly show-stopping piece. Founded in 2014, Cameron Design House is an award-winning British bespoke sculptural lighting company based in London. Each of its pieces is conceived and handcrafted in its studio workshop in St John’s Wood. www.camerondesignhouse.com

Nulty lights up DC Comics-inspired Soho restaurant Cutting-edge lighting design consultancy, Nulty, recently created the lighting scheme for Park Row, Soho’s latest fine-dining concept. The main challenge was to deliver pieces that would reinforce the restaurant’s DC Comics theme, while respecting the historic interiors of the building. Among the highlights of the scene is a 10m-long chandelier which illuminates a deep, black stairwell connecting the foyer to the Batcave. The chandelier consists of 25 transparent discs, balanced within a twisting helical structure. Each 400mm disc, edged with LEDs, lights up in a pulsating sequence, referencing the echolocation frequency ability of bats. A dramatic neon light within the ceiling coffer at the bottom of the stairs, teamed with a wall of mist, marks the transition from Batcave to a glamorous world of cocktails, dining and entertainment. The space is designed as a series of bars and restaurants on Park Row – a notorious street in Gotham’s dark history. In Pennyworth’s Bar, sophisticated, brasscoloured table lamps perch on each table

and the central bar is lit beneath the counter, highlighting the blue surface beneath. LED strips tucked within the sides of the gold leafinlaid pillars bring a warm glow to the space. Within the dark, speakeasy-style room named Old Gotham City, Nulty supplied seedy feeling neon wall lights, along with a few dark pendants, burlesque-like feather floor lights and picture lights. www.nultylighting.co.uk


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Fireborn by LASVIT Fireborn is a design concept by LASVIT’s Jana Růžičková. It centres on the idea that all glass is born of the four elements of fire, water, earth and air, but fire makes their fusion possible. “Fireborn is an ode to the poetics and raw beauty of glass craftsmanship,” comments Jana. “We draw from the aesthetic of Bohemian glasswork, with all its geometrical

irregularities, its glass shards, its tumult, its hot air and heaving bodies, and transpose this

have a light smoke or light amber finish. LASVIT has created variations where

unique atmosphere into some of the most elevated interiors in the world.” The glass consists of huge, hand-stamped strips of high-quality optical glass, each an original. The edges are hand-sanded, dulled and then polished. The glass can be clear, or

this base is plated with different semitransparent coatings on one side. Because each component is different and differently oriented to the construction, the layer appears differently from contrasting perspectives. www.lasvit.com

Gabriel Scott launches Luna Kaleido lighting collection Canadian luxury handmade furniture and lighting brand, Gabriel Scott, has launched the Luna Kaleido collection. As the second chapter in the brand’s bestselling Luna lighting range, this customisable modular series includes two stackable glass lighting fixtures – a horizontal chandelier and a vertical pendant.

The collection is inspired by a kaleidoscope, which is derived from the Greek words kalos (beautiful), eidos (form) and skopeo (to look at). Like a kaleidoscope, the glass shapes have been designed to offer infinite interpretations of tone, shape and refracted light. When stacked, the lights become a glass mosaic with varying tones and patterns – each colour and texture

distorts light in a different way. Soft, iridescent colours, including pinks, blues and greens, are fused with clear glass to create a sophisticated colour spectrum. The lights are available with six different surface textures including Smooth, Gridded, Regadines, Bubbles, Lines and Dots. www.gabriel-scott.com


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SURFACING

Bespoke sculptural walls from Lincrusta Lincrusta’s exceptional range of wallcoverings, dado panels, friezes and borders allows for the creation of eye-catching, bespoke interiors. Its durable and versatile nature makes it perfect for hospitality interiors in particular. With its rich and illustrious heritage, Lincrusta is a great British success story. This sculptural wallcovering was the ingenious creation of Frederick Walton, who had pioneered the development of linoleum floor coverings during the 1860s. Lincrusta was an instant success, replacing painstaking artisan plasterwork and appealing to Victorian England’s tastes because of its visual appeal, practicality and durability. Lincrusta designs quickly found their way into notable buildings throughout the world, such as The White House and the

Titanic. Unique and exceptionally beautiful, these wallcoverings are celebrated for their deeper emboss, exquisite detail and enduring strength. A natural product, made from linseed oil, Lincrusta is still manufactured by craftsmen in the UK using the original recipe and process, and to the same exacting standards. It is supplied in its natural nude colour, providing a textural blank canvas onto which the designer/ architect can project their own style, to create a truly unique look. The depth of these embossed wallcoverings allows them to be decorated using a variety of different paint effects and colour combinations. The patterns within the collection take inspiration from a variety of sources – from the classical architecture of

Tropical Leaf

ancient Greece and Rome to cutting-edge contemporary influences. Not only the reserve of walls, Lincrusta can enhance a myriad of surfaces including ceilings, furniture, doors and bars. Lincrusta has sustainable qualities, in that it can be reused, repaired and reimagined, becoming part of the fabric of the building. When it is time to transform a space, one can change the colour or ambience by adding different paint effects. With over 140 years’ history, not all Lincrusta designs are still available, so the company has developed restoration kits to provide a solution. Trained installers take an impression of the original design that needs repair, and replicate it in other areas with a seamless finish. www.lincrusta.com


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Camira reaffirms commitment to marine protection In a continuation of its partnership with the SEAQUAL Initiative, global fabric manufacturer Camira has launched Quest – a recycled polyester fabric containing SEAQUAL yarn, made from plastic waste taken from the oceans. Joining Oceanic, Camira’s inaugural multi-award winning SEAQUAL fabric launched in 2020, Quest cements the company’s longstanding commitment to creating fabrics woven from sustainable materials. With a lightly textured surface, and a balanced hopsack weave enhanced by discatdyed SEAQUAL yarn, Quest is simple in its aesthetic, and coloured to create a subtle twotone weave detail. The lightweight fabric can be used on a range of seating types – including sofas, conference chairs and restaurant furniture – and can be treated to meet the UK commercial FR certification for public spaces (Medium Hazard Crib 5), making it the ideal textile for hospitality spaces. Collaborating with contemporary landscape artist Maggie Cochran on the launch, Camira has commissioned a large-scale artwork to showcase the depth and breadth of the Quest colour palette, with the painting featuring shades taken directly from its range of 27 colourways. Set to be installed in Camira’s London Clerkenwell showroom, the artwork will be available for visitors to view when exploring the new fabric collection. “Created with a conscience, Quest is a

beautiful addition to our SEAQUAL collection of fabrics, and we are so proud to continue our partnership with the SEAQUAL Initiative,” comments Lynn Kingdon, head of creative at Camira. “Woven entirely from recycled plastic, it really does epitomise waste made wonderful, and, with its casually elegant aesthetic and evocative colour palette, it’s the ideal textile for inclusion in contemporary commercial interiors with a sustainable ethos.” Each metre of Quest contains the equivalent of 23 plastic bottles. To further assist in the fight against plastic waste, Camira makes a give-back donation directly to the SEAQUAL Initiative for every metre of fabric sold. www.camirafabrics.com


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A masterful take on oak Unilin Panels has introduced UNILIN Master Oak – melamine and HPL panelling with lifelike natural oak designs. After several years’ research and development in the authentic recreation of natural materials, Unilin Panels has released a collection of six ready-to-use designs that bring the lifelike look and feel of oak. Stain-proof, scratch-resistant, colourfast in sunlight and made of 100% recovered wood,

UNILIN Master Oak represents the future of decorative panels, states Unilin Panels. Achieving a look this lifelike has seen Unilin Panels combine a matt finish with a uniquely patterned textured surface that is further enhanced with different types of pore and depth variation. Every Master Oak panel enjoys nature’s imperfections, for faultless authenticity.

With little ongoing maintenance required, this finish has many applications. Ideal for use in hotels, retail stores, restaurants, bars and other heavy-duty environments, UNILIN Master Oak lets spaces enjoy the natural beauty of oak with the simplicity of excellent durability and low maintenance. What is more, Unilin Panels makes UNILIN Master Oak decorative panels from 100% recovered wood. This has been made possible by a process of investment over the last six years, to the sum of €40m. Now, Unilin Panels takes 90% of the wood used in its panels from post-consumer sources. UNILIN Master Oak is available in six colours – Brown, Natural, Double Fumed, Light Natural, Everest White and Elegant Black – in a range of HDF panel sizes, as well as HPL and edging tape, for use in doors, walls, shelves and bespoke furniture production. UNILIN Master Oak can also be combined effortlessly with any type of substrate, and comes in fire-retardant, moistureresistant and formaldehyde-free variants. With the lifelike UNILIN Master Oak, projects can enjoy the premium look of oak surfaces, with the practicality and affordability of modern decorative panelling. www.unilinpanels.com


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Bolon launches the Truly collection Truly is the latest flooring collection from Bolon, the award-winning and sustainable Swedish design company. Defined by its enlarged patterns, colour effects and hyper texture, the innovative flooring solution is ideally suited to hospitality venues and other public or communal spaces. This bold collection was created in-house, and shaped around the passions and expertise of the five women who make up Bolon’s design team. ANYTHING EVERYTHING is reflective of creative director Annika’s creativity, and

features a graphic pattern, building rooms within a room. Colours drift from intense green to glossy white on a dark blue background. DISRUPT AND DISCOVER is shaped around Cathrine, head of R&D, and her craft. It is an elegant, multicoloured check, with soft glimmers of yellow, white and green that appear dark and inky on a deep blue base. 100% pays homage to the passion of the head of product management, Klara, with a sparkling, out-of-focus zig-zag pattern in a vibrating ultraviolet light on a black, oily base.

PRECIS, a flowing pattern in magnified formations, represents product manager Lisa’s love of colour, with its deep black base, copper sheen and blue sparkles. Lastly, I SEE YOU is a collage-like pattern with layers upon layers of subtle surfaces. It is an experiment on a chalky white base, and celebrates Bolon’s CEO, Marie, and the brand’s heritage. The product is easy to maintain, has a high performance classification (33 Heavy commercial) and a 15-year warranty. www.bolon.com

Antolini to bring its versatile product offering to SDS 2022 Antolini will present its Exclusive Collection, Textures+, and Precioustone at the upcoming Surface Design Show. The Exclusive collection features a carefully selected portfolio formed from extraordinary natural materials from some of the globe’s finest quarries. Each variety has been painstakingly chosen to contribute to the formulation of an authentic, spontaneous style. Textures is defined by the original

patterns on its surfaces. Ideal for covering interiors in a naturally sophisticated way, the collection experiments with chromatic and graphic effects obtained by means of skilful workmanship, whereby the materials are treated to bring out refined tactile qualities. Precioustone, meanwhile, incorporates over 130 varieties of precious gemstones, such as amethyst, quartz, jasper and agate, transformed into unique, theatrical facings. The

translucent varieties, utilised with backlighting, are especially effective, with their inimitable and original chromatic characteristics. Antolini will also showcase its A-Tech and A-Quartz collections, a series of facings whose technical virtues make them a valid choice especially in residential and/or contract applications for bathrooms and kitchens, where hygiene is a true priority. www.antolini.com


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BATHROOM

TOTO brings latest innovations to The Londoner Hotel

After eight years and a £500m investment, The Londoner, the world’s first super-boutique hotel, opened its doors in September 2021. The latest project by Edwardian Hotels London, The Londoner was designed in collaboration with world-renowned architectural designer, Yabu Pushelberg, and structural architect, Woods Bagot. Acclaimed bathroom supplier TOTO was selected to supply some of its latest technical innovations throughout the hotel’s bathrooms. The Londoner’s guest room bathrooms have been designed in materials and finishes of exceptional quality, including handcrafted Japanese tiles in a sophisticated palette. Each of the lavish guest bathrooms feature luxury TOTO Washlets, offering guests the ultimate in hygiene and comfort. The Residence, a 24-hour, guest-only, members’-style club, features a row of SG 2.0 Washlets. These offer the highest standards and comfort and cleanliness, in keeping with the luxury feel of the hotel. The dramatic, emerald-coloured space, with complementary tonal green marble flooring and lacquer doors – designed for functionality as much as spectacle – can be found nestled on the ground mezzanine. www.toto.com/en/washlet www.thelondoner.com


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“Perfect hygiene and pure design”

With recent events calling into consideration the future landscape of hygiene requirements in hospitality spaces, the RIVA shower toilet from Laufen captures an emerging demand within the European market. The purist, no-frills design by Swiss designer Peter Wirz features an elegant, closed ceramic body, hardly differing in appearance from a classic toilet. Only a stainless steel rotary switch on the side gives a subtle hint of the complex technology that is completely concealed within. Another key appeal is the convenient and intuitive operation of the two CLEANET models, with all operations for setup, flushing, cleaning and maintenance controlled by the rotary switch located on the side of the WC, or an intuitive app interface. In addition to glossy white and matt white, RIVA is now also available in both a glossy black and matt black finish. The side rotary switch is available in a stainless steel finish, alongside four new metal finishes – gold, matt white gold, rose gold and puristic matt white – allowing for co-ordination with other fittings within the bathroom. www.laufen-cleanet.com


BECK | the perfect fit 142

ADVERTORIAL

BECK | the perfect fit our primary office headquarters, a sizable

BECK Interiors is a leading specialist contractor, operating within the Luxury, Lifestyle and Museum world. Our inBECK Interiors a leading in specialist contractor, house fit-out is expertise these sectors, operating the Luxury,by Lifestyle and Museum is furtherwithin strengthened our Bespoke world.Construction Our in-house fit-out expertise these and services. We in are proud sectors, is further strengthened our Bespoke to remain a privately ownedbybusiness and Construction services. We are to and uphold a commitment to proud our clients remain a privately owned and worlduphold a for manufacturing andbusiness delivering commitment our clients for manufacturing class quality.toOur main facility is locatedand delivering world-class Our maincentral facility is in Chessington, 30 quality. minutes from located inand Chessington, 30 minutes from central London has grown to encompass

joinery workshop and storage facilities. We are supported with our sister office office headquarters, a sizable joineryacross workshop in Scotland and several offices the and storage facilities. are supported with our globe, enabling usWe to deliver outstanding sister office in Scotland regardless and several offices across projects worldwide, of size, the globe, enabling us toOur deliver outstanding complexity or value. comprehensive projectsofworldwide, regardless size, complexity range complete turnkeyof services take a or value. vision Our comprehensive range ofconcept, complete to client’s and initial project turnkey services take a client’s vision and initial an inspiring, finished interior. Last year we projectproud concept, an inspiring, finished interior. were toto feature in The Sunday Times Last year were proud to feature in The Sunday Top Trackwe250.

Recent Hotel Experience: NoMad London; The Carlton Tower Jumeirah; Bermonds Locke; Hard Rock RecentLondon; Hotel Experience: NoMad London; The Hotel The Cadogan, A Belmond Carlton The Tower Jumeirah; Bermonds Locke; Hard Hotel; Mandrake; W London; Rock Hotel Grand London;London The Cadogan, Belmond Sheraton Park A Lane; The Hotel; The Mandrake; W London;London; Sheraton Grand Lanesborough; Rosewood London Park Lane; The Lanesborough; Rosewood InterContinental London Park Lane, an IHG London;COMO InterContinental LondonLondon; Park Lane,The an Hotel; Metropolitan IHG Hotel; London; The Arts Arts ClubCOMO HotelMetropolitan and Four Seasons Hotel Club Hotelatand Four Seasons Hotel London at London Park Lane. Park Lane. beckinteriors.com

London and has grown to encompass our primary

Times Top Track 250.

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Complete renovation of Bow Street Magistrates Court to a 5* Star Hotel


THE AGE OF

REMOTE WORKING WORKING TRENDS POSTTCOVID As the effects of the pandemic connnue to hover around the world, businesses are using a hybrid model where employees work from home. Acceppng this hybrid model, more and more interior designers are designing offices within hotel rooms and residences these days. With more me spent working from home, interior designers blend the home and office to create a more balanced and harmonious experience. Whether you have a dedicated room for a home office or an office corner in an open living space, a minor design can go a long way—helping you maintain your focus and produccvity while working from home. While working from home can be a great lifestyle choice, it can also mean spending too much me with technology (as opposed to actual human interaccon) and not feeling produccve. Interior Designers now strive to provide an environment that brings out creaavity, and at the same me, be funcconal for the individuals to enjoy it. They now idennfy the core requirements of the home office, such as access to natural light, appropriate temperature, comfortable furniture, and a strategy for minimizing distraccons. Minor things like keeping in mind colors that simulate different moods and atmospheres that promote creaavity are taking precedence. For example, a splash of green could inspire creaavity, or red could help bring aaennon to detail. There is also an element of adding touches of nature inside with handy houseplants, floral prints, and environmental photographs. As we connnue to combat a global pandemic and its aaermath, the way we work and design workspaces will never be the same again, and our future workplace designs must keep on adappng to the rules of the New Normal.

www.woodcouture.com


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PRODUCTS

Grand Rapids Chair Co presents Rita Commercial furniture manufacturer, Grand Rapids Chair Co (GRCC), has launched Rita – the latest lounge seat in the newly revamped GRCC product family, and the first designed for indoors and out. Crafted with sustainable, exterior-grade materials, with an easily customisable design, Rita is a lively addition to hotel lounges, co-working offices, outdoor patios, and everything in between.

Designed by long-time collaborator, Filter Studio, Rita incorporates Grand Rapidsʼ signature powder-coated steel frames and rounded edges, with additional comfort. Defined by two angular intersecting cushions, Rita is cosy yet sturdy, for productivity and engagement in commercial spaces. Available in three variations — a base model, with optional arm caps, or a 10in side table

— Rita can hold everything from laptops and notebooks to happy-hour cocktails. It is offered in 29 standard powder-coated steel colours – two of which are custom-designed by GRCC – and custom-upholstered with fabrics designed by partnered textile mills. Ritaʼs Dri-Fast outdoor-grade foam cushions, which are Velcro-attached, capture the look of residential lounge furniture while withstanding the elements. The cushionsʼ foam has an opencell structure that does not hold onto moisture or let bacteria grow. www.grandrapidschair.com

Jaipur presents Inde Rose – an iconic collection of coordinated rugs The Inde Rose collection is a coming together of Jaipur Rugs, which has more than four decades of experience in the artisanal carpets market, and Vinita Chaitanya, who, for more than 30 years, has been designing exquisite,

exclusive spaces that celebrate glamour and luxury, while staying true to India’s design heritage and craft traditions. Vinita drew from the image of a rose in bloom for the collection, which is made in silk with 121 knots per square inch, and employs a sculpting technique locally known as gultaraash — quite literally, the pruning done by a gardener. Inde Rose incorporates five carpet pairings, each with one graphic-heavy piece, and a visually lighter one to complement it. This allows the user to create unique combinations of colour and texture according to their preference. The palette draws from the jewel tones of Indian miniature paintings, but filters them through a contemporary lens, transforming them into dusty pinks, pale jades, and muted blues and purples. Inde Rose is a beautiful illustration of Jaipur Rugs’ expertise in amalgamating the vision of designers and creatives with the ancient weaving techniques of rural India. www.jaipurrugs.com


145

Moda Furnishings launches B2B proposition, Moda Commercial At the forefront of British garden furniture design, Moda Furnishings is an omnichannel retailer of premium modular furniture based in the North West of England, with international reach. October 2021 saw the launch of Moda Commercial, an exclusive B2B arm of the business and a reaction in part to the increase of enquiries from commercial clients, but also to the suffering endured by many industries as they faced the threat of the pandemic. Moda Furnishings’ flagship Trafford showroom Moda Furnishings is listening closely to its clients’ needs, integrating new approaches such as investment in stock and its delivery fleet, new product development and client care strategies. Moda Commercial caters to the increasing demands of specialist market sectors including hotels, spa resorts, luxury lodges and developers. The B2B proposition – a tailored approach With a dedicated Moda Commercial team, clients can choose from a vast collection of furniture sets to meet all business

requirements. Expert account managers are available to help quickly and effectively, offering a tailored approach. With Moda’s market-leading 3D rendering service, designs can be modelled into business’ properties and spaces, providing visual impressions and assisting with further planning and decisionmaking. Expert delivery and installation Moda Furnishings has made a multi-millionpound stock investment to ensure the business

meets the demands of the commercial markets. Its stock is available for timely delivery with a large fleet of in-house Moda Commercial delivery vehicles. Market-leading guarantee Moda Furnishings’ three-year commercial guarantee offers commercial clients peace of mind, and its aftercare policy and maintenance packages reinforce its commitment to client satisfaction. www.modafurnishings.co.uk

Style supplies The Londoner with multiple moveable walls Dubbed ‘the world’s first super-boutique hotel,’ The Londoner offers a collection of spaces, tastes and experiences, brought to life across 16 elegant storeys. Delivering flexible space to cater for a myriad of impressive events, Style installed a 6m-high Skyfold vertical-rising moveable wall in the main ballroom, as well as a combination of Dorma Hüppe Variflex

sliding walls and smaller Skyfold systems throughout the event areas. This focus on adaptable space, combined with Style’s expertise in delivering partitioning walls with impeccable acoustic performance, gives the hotel multiple options for opening out or dividing the available areas and maximising room hire revenue.

Allowing two events to run concurrently, the main ballroom is divided by a fully automatic Skyfold moveable wall. Discreetly housed in the ceiling cavity, the wall descends effortlessly into place at the push of a button and offers an impressive 59dB Rw acoustic rating. In the hotel’s meeting rooms, Style installed semi-automatic Dorma Huppe Variflex doubleglazed moveable walls with 52dB Rw acoustic ratings and fully glazed pass doors. The meeting areas are then further sub-divided using smaller Skyfold vertical-rising walls. www.style-partitions.co.uk


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PRODUCTS

New automatic storm lobby improves visitor access Privately owned Lincolnshire golf club, Thonock Park, has recently completed an extensive refurbishment of its main building. Updating the front entrance, TORMAX worked closely with Window Concepts to deliver fully automatic access into the main reception via a contemporary, all-glass storm lobby. Comprising inner and outer sliding doors that operate in tandem, heat loss from the building is significantly reduced during wet and windy days. The entire refit had to be completed to a very tight timescale. With this in mind, TORMAX recommended powering the doors with its reliable 2201 door operators, which benefit from a patented component fasting mechanism, making them extremely quick and easy to install. “There really was no margin for error in this project,” comments Joe Allmond, contracts manager for main contractor, Gelder Group. “In addition to the storm lobby, we also refurbished the reception area, ground and first floors. The newly refitted club was ready in time for the busy winter events calendar, with the new entrance providing a smart yet highly functional access solution.” www.tormax.co.uk

Beautiful Designer Ceiling Fans

Don’t miss the opportunity to be part of Hospitality Interiors’ 100th Anniversary issue!

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Alongside our usual roster of high-quality editorial features, we’ll be focusing on: Floorcoverings Furniture Outdoor THE BOOKING DEADLINE IS 18TH MARCH 2022 Please contact sales manager, Lou Opitz to become part of this milestone issue:

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