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ACCUMULATION


Opposite: Confluence Independent Project | 2014 Suminagashi [boku udon dye on paper]


ACCUMULATION Genevieve Doman


INTROSPECTION

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Lynn | Architecture 312 | 2013

SIMULATED TERRAIN

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Lynn | Architecture 312 | 2013

(DIS) LOCATIONS

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Harris | Architecture 322 | 2014

DRAFT

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Harmon | Architecture 202 + 218 | 2012

SHOOT

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Independent Projects| 2010-2014

SCULPT

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Independent Projects | 2008-2010

TIMELINE

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INTROSPECTION


INTROSPECTION Lynn | Architecture 312 | 2013 Set in a chaotic urban setting on South University Ave. in Ann Arbor, Michigan, this unattractive infill site dictates an introspective approach. Orchestrated views of the building’s interior and landscaping create a peaceful oasis for researchers.

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Through slanted panes of glass the library looks in on itself and an interior courtyard. Views from the triple height reading room are shielded from the buildings in front by a freestanding exterior wall and screened by a landscaped strip. These moments provide visual relief for the researching patrons. The courtyard additionally serves as a buffer between the public and private zones of the structure, therefore providing both physical and mental separation for visiting scholars housed in the archive’s guest rooms. The isolated archive portion is protected from harmful UV rays by solid exterior facing, but is revealed to the reading room through the glass interior wall. Access to the archive is controlled by an archivist ,though the entire collection is publicly on display.

02 Opposite: N+S section through the public library, courtyard, and scholar facilities


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01 Street Elevation [graphite and colored pencil with Photoshop overlay] 02 Aerial view of project site 03 View from the gallery in to the public library. [final model with Photoshop overlay]


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02 01 Axonometric program diagram [colored pencil] 02 Final model [basswood and vinyl]


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06 01 N+S Section (Scholar Facilities, Library, and Gallery) 02 E+W Section (Reading Room, Archive, and Scholar Facilities) 03 N+S Section (Archive) 04 Ground Floor Plan 05 Second Floor Plan 06 Third Floor Plan


SIMULATED TERRAIN


SIMULATED TERRAIN Lynn | Architecture 312 | 2013

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This layered model seeks to represent Jeff Depner’s painting Reconfigured Grid No. 10 in a three dimensional form. By interpreting the color gradation in the painting as slope, a typology develops in which the greatest color difference produces the steepest slope and vice versa. Following the same logic, solid color produces a plateau. Through this codification, a topography is carved out within the bounding edges of the painting. The added apertures follow the topography to provide framed views of otherwise invisible interior moments. The resulting object provokes notions about landscape and structure as the slopes collide and deviate.

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Opposite: Final model [museum board] with map of gradient typology and Jeff Depner’s Reconfigured Grid No. 10

01 Jeff Depner, Reconfigured Grid No. 10, 2010 02 Gradient Typology Map [graphite]


Final museum board model imagined as a potential landscape.


The concrete cast of the negative space in the previous layered model brings to light the full complexity of its internal spaces. The construction of basswood formwork requires thorough contemplation of the interior. Ambiguous relationships between exterior and interior must be defined. The apertures become solid, forcing the viewer to circumnavigate the form. The resultant product serves an equally powerful, but entirely different vantage than the original. 12

Basswood formwork


Rockite cast


UNITE

GOUGE


(DIS) LOCATIONS

MELD

(DIS) LOCATIONS Hariss | Architecture 322 | 2013 This project seeks to explore the complex relationship between context and program on architectural design. An extreme sports facility implemented in three radically different sites deals with similar problems in each, but yields very different results. These studies focus on the interaction between the built and the natural. Rock climbing in an sports complex is a mimic of nature, while skateboarding replicates an urban landscape. The tension generated between these two desperate

fields drove the programmatic explorations in this project. (Dis)locations seeks to employ the structure as a mode of resolution between the site and program as well as within the program itself. Each site prompted a distinct solution to this inherent dichotomy of the extreme sports facility program.


UNITE

Skateboarding was born as an adaptive use of existing cities, thus skate parks must imitate urban landscapes. In the same way, rock climbing comes from a natural landscape and therefore this is recreated in climbing gyms as well. This project seeks to segregate these two disparate programs while employing the building structure as a unifying force. 16 The site is divided by a fissure that is both organically meandering and rigid. The dividing wall between skate park and building continues into the earth, forming the retaining wall for underground parking. Thus the building structure divides the programs underground as well. In plan the imprint of the prior orchard grid dictates the arrangement of newly constructed forms. The grid engulfs the building from the orthogonally inspired urban skate park and is gradually transformed by the natural pull to the other side. In this way the building is torn between two worlds, adapting to both environments. Thus the formal language of the building in this complex unifies two distinct realms by providing a cohesive mode of coexistence.

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01 View of the exterior climbing wall and bouldering area [final museum board model] 02 Floor plan [graphite] 03 Final model [museum board and cardboard] 04 View of the interior climbing wall [final model with Photoshop overlay] 05 View of the skate park [final model with Photoshop overlay]


GOUGE

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This mid-mountain ski resort nestles into the surrounding landscape. As part of a broader mountain range and located at the base of a steep cliff, the site is at high risk for avalanches. The structure therefore seeks to anchor itself to the land as a means of protection. Additionally, the burrowed construction creates a minimal profile on the landscape, making it an unobtrusive addition. Initial studies focused on inlaying the structure into the ground as a minimal slice. This required carving and pushing the ground in order to achieve horizontal and vertical planes emerging out of the sloped site. Finally the gouged cliff face becomes the foundation and rear wall of the building.

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The carved cliff face laterally and vertically supports the building, ensconcing it in the rock. The plane is further manipulated as it is sculpted into a beginners level climbing wall that continues into the central area of the building. In its quest for inconspicuousness, the resort has the potential to go completely unnoticed. Thus the structure seeks to integrate the built and the natural, and act as a bridge between the two. Skiers can move across its roof in a few moments without necessarily recognizing it is there. One must rather actively choose to interact with the building.

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01 View of collective site 02 Elevation [final basswood model with Photoshop overlay] 03 N+S Section [graphite] 04 Floor Plan [graphite]


MELD

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In an urban row house situation, meld seeks to bring the outside in. Programmatic blocks populate the site, the voids between them become occupied by percolating nature. The building thus structures, and is enveloped by, its own environment. Side constrains encourage the blocks to shift, slip, and interlock to elevate the experience and optimize circulation. Overlapping transparencies reveal areas of dense function. The predetermined programmatic spaces begin to leak into one another. Indoor climbing protrudes into the outdoor skate park. The outdoor skate park punctures into retail. The notion of threshold starts to be called into question. Interior spaces are now occupied by traditionally exterior activities. Overhangs create intermediary spaces which are exterior, but sheltered. A double height courtyard is neither interior nor exterior. Punctured through the party wall, it is sufficiently sheltered yet through an opening connects to an adjacent roof terrace and is open air to a void in the neighboring structure as well. A window from the third floor hangout space looks in on the space and out to the void. A skateboarding ramp connects the interior half pipe with the exterior skate park by passing through gaps in the blocking.

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01 View of collective sites 02 Front elevation [final basswood model] 03 Double height courtyard detail [final basswood model with Photoshop overlay] 04 Double height courtyard in party wall [final basswood model]


DRAFT

Detail


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Protectograph Harmon | Architecture 202 | 2012 Graphite


DRAFT

Detail


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Nakagin Capsule Tower Harmon | Architecture 218 | 2012 Graphite


SHOOT


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Opposite: Hierarchy Independent Project | 2010 CathĂŠdrale Primatiale Saint-AndrĂŠ de Bordeaux | Bordeaux, France Digital

Envelop Independent Project | 2013 Instituto Superior de Arte | Havana, Cuba 35 mm film


Intersect Independent Project | 2013 JardĂ­n BotĂĄnico Nacional de Cuba | Havana, Cuba Digital


Vanish Independent Project | 2014 Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge | Brigham City Utah Digital


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Contort Independent Project | 2014 Fiery Furnace, Arches National Park | Moab, Utah Digital


SCULPT


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Opposite: Muqarnas

Muqarnas Independent Project | 2008 Hand built stoneware


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Oxidization Independent Project | 2009 Wheel thrown porcelain


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Silver Flux Independent Project | 2010 Wheel thrown porcelain


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Tracery Independent Project | 2009 Silver


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Ginko Bloom Independent Project | 2009 Silver


TIMELINE Present Taubman College of Architecture + Urban Planning

Drafting

Metals

Photography

Ceramics

1993



Portfolio