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Glasgow and the Clyde Valley Strategic Development Plan Strategic Environmental Assessment

Scoping Report GCVSDPA April 2010

Lower Ground Floor 125 West Regent St Glasgow G2 2SA Tel: 0141 229 7731 Fax: 0141 229 7746


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Background Glasgow and the Clyde Valley Strategic Development Planning Authority (GCVSDPA) is preparing a Strategic Development Plan (SDP) covering the eight council areas in the Glasgow and Clyde Valley area, including East Dunbartonshire, East Renfrewshire, Inverclyde, Glasgow City, North Lanarkshire, Renfrewshire, South Lanarkshire and West Dunbartonshire. The SDP comprises a statutory document under the Town and Country Planning etc. (Scotland) Act 2006 requiring submission to and the subsequent approval of the Scottish Ministers. The SDP, following the approval process, will guide development in the wider Glasgow metropolitan area up to 2035. Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) will play an important role in ensuring the long-term environmental sustainability of the SDP. This report sets out information on the Glasgow and Clyde Valley SDP to enable the Consultation Authorities to form a view on the scope and level of detail appropriate for the Environment Report and the consultation period. The SDPA has a duty to carry out a Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) of the SDP. The first reporting stage of the SEA is this Scoping Report. It provides background information on the SDP and explains the proposed assessment methodology and consultation timescale. The comments of the Consultation Authorities will shape the approach to the next stage of the assessment.

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TABLE OF CONTENT

1.

INTRODUCTION Approach

2.

THE STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT PLAN Description of the SDP content and key facts Background

3.

CONTEXT Relationship with other plans, programmes and strategies (PPS)  National context  Strategic Planning: Legacy from current Structure Plan  Strategic Community Planning  Futures Work  Local Planning

4.

ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINE Summary of environmental problems Relevant aspects of the current state of the environment

5.

SCOPE AND LEVEL OF DETAIL FOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Definition and assessment of alternatives Framework for assessing environmental effects Defining significance Scoping in/out of SEA issues

6.

NEXT STEPS Proposed consultation methods, input and timescales

ANNEX A:

REVIEW OF PLANS, PROGRAMMES, STRATEGIES AND ENVIRONMENTAL OBJECTIVES

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1.

INTRODUCTION

1.1

This Scoping Report has been prepared in accordance with the Environmental Assessment (Scotland) Act 2005. The purpose of this SEA scoping report is to set out sufficient information on the SDP to enable the Consultation Authorities and other stakeholders to form a view on the scope and level of detail that will be appropriate for the Environmental Report; and the required consultation period.

1.2

This report has been prepared in accordance with Section 15 of the Environmental Assessment (Scotland) Act 2005. Approach

1.3

The approach to scoping the SEA is as follows:  review of relevant plans and programmes which should underpin the SDP and the SEA of the SDP (Annex A);  identification of relevant baseline information for the GCV area and identification of existing and potential future environmental issues which may influence or be influenced by the SDP (Section 3); and  identification of proposed appraisal methodology for the SEA (Section 4).

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2.

THE STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT PLAN Description of SDP content and key facts

2.1

The following section provides background information on the plan to help the Consultation Authorities determine whether the proposed approach to the SEA is appropriate. It is not possible to provide a full description of the contents of GCVSDPAâ€&#x;s SDP at this stage, as this scoping exercise is being undertaken early in the process of plan preparation.

2.2

The first stage in the development of the SDP is the production of a Main Issues Report (MIR) which sets out key issues for future development and provides an indication of the preferred options to be taken forward in the SDP. The Environment Report will accompany the MIR.

2.3

The key facts relating to GCVSDPA are:

Name of Responsible Authority

Glasgow and the Clyde Valley Strategic Development Planning Authority (GCV SDPA)

Title of PPS

Glasgow and the Clyde Valley Strategic Development Plan

What prompted the PPS (e.g. legislative, regulatory or administrative provision)

Planning etc (Scotland) Act 2006

Subject (e.g. transport)

Strategic Development Planning

Period covered by PPS

2012 to 2035

Frequency of updates

Revision and resubmission within 4 years of the approval date

Area covered by PPS

The SDP covers eight separate Local Authorities namely, East Dunbartonshire, East Renfrewshire, Glasgow City, Inverclyde, North Lanarkshire, Renfrewshire, South Lanarkshire, West Dunbartonshire (excluding that part covered by the Loch Lomond National Park National Park Authority).

Purpose and/or objectives of PPS

The plan will enable and steer future development across the city region.

Contact point

Michelle Carroll, Strategic Planner michelle.carroll@gcvsdpa.gov.uk

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The map below shows the Glasgow and Clyde Valley Strategic Development Plan Area.

Insert gcv map

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Background 2.4

A Development Plan Scheme (DPS) has been produced by the GCVSDPA 1. The DPS sets out the programme for preparing the SDP along with basic information on the content of the plan itself and its broader policy context. The DPS explains the legal requirement for and the purpose of the SEA. It also explains how the policies and proposals contained in the SDP will be assessed for their potential impacts using a systematic assessment process.

2.5

An SDP is to set out a long-term spatial planning strategy that broadly defines the future location of development and related activity. It is to be accompanied by an Action Plan that indicates how such development should be delivered. The plan will replace the existing structure plan for the area the Glasgow and the Clyde Valley Joint Structure Plan 2000 and its four subsequent Alterations. The SEA process for the SDP will draw on previous experience gained from producing the Environment Report for the current Structure Plan.

2.6

The SDP will comprise a vision statement of the GCV area to 2035 and a spatial strategy encapsulating the key strategic changes that the plan seeks to achieve over the period of the Plan. It will differ from the previous generation of Structure Plans in that the SDP will focus substantively upon a spatial strategy and its priority developments and minimise the content of detailed schedules, listings and related policies.

2.7

SDPs have an important role to play at the city region level, in terms of addressing strategic cross boundary planning issues. They cover land use and strategic infrastructure issues and guide the future use of land, the appearance of cities, towns and rural areas. They should indicate where development, including regeneration, should happen and where it should not. There is a statutory duty on development plans to contribute to sustainable development. SDPs are required to set out a vision for their areas, provide a spatial strategy, and to consider development alongside other issues. This includes the principal social, economic, physical and environmental characteristics of the area, land use, population, infrastructure provision and use (including transport, communications, water and energy supplies and drainage) and any anticipated future changes to these matters.

2.8

More specifically, the Glasgow and the Clyde Valley SDP will:  cover an area with a population of 1.75 million and 792,000 households;  address forecast population and household growth;  provide a framework for the future development and growth across the Glasgow and Clyde Valley city region from 2012 to 2035;

1

http://www.gcvcore.gov.uk/downloads/gcvsdpa/DevelopmentPlanScheme_ParticipationStatement_Mar ch2009.pdf


 focus the development path for Glasgow and the Clyde Valley incorporating key development „drivers of change‟ including the economy, sustainability, climate change and land-use – transport integration. 2.9

All SDPs are also required to take into account the Scottish Government‟s extant National Planning Framework and Scottish Planning Policy (SPP) and other relevant plans within and adjacent to the SDP area.

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3.

CONTEXT

3.1

Based on the information collected from a review of relevant documents, this section sets the context for the SEA highlighting particular issues and opportunities for the GCV area. Relationship with other plans, programmes or strategies (PPS)

3.2

Part of the process of identifying pertinent environmental issues for the GCV area involves reviewing relevant plans, programmes and strategies (PPS). Documents such as the National Planning Framework (NPF) 2, the previous generation of Structure Plans, local plans and their associated SEAs, public body strategies and programmes, Government policy and guidance as well as national and European legislation are also reviewed. An initial list of these documents and relevant environmental issues is given in Annex A. A list of such plans, programmes or objectives can never be definitive and list will be updated as appropriate as the SEA process progresses.

3.3

The SDP sits within a legislative land-use planning hierarchy. At the top of this hierarchy is the second National Planning Framework (NPF2), published in June 2009. NPF2 is the national strategy for the long-term development of the whole of Scotland and identifies key strategic infrastructure needs as „national developments‟. SDPs sit below NPF2 and cover only Scotland‟s four largest city regions. They set the context for local development plans in these city-region areas and guide decisions on planning applications as well as informing and co-ordinating decisions on strategic infrastructure investment. The third level of the hierarchy is Local Development Plans which deal with the detailed local and site specific issues of the NPF2 and of the SDP. The GCVSDP guides development in eight LDP areas.

3.4

The guidance issued by the Government relating to land use planning is outlined in a number of key documents including the Town and Country Planning Regulations (2008), Planning Circular 1/09 and Scottish Planning Policy (February 2010). New emerging issues for SDPs include:    

climate change; river basin management planning; soil; and waste.

Climate Change 3.5

The Climate Change Act 2009 establishes a legal framework for emissions reductions by 2050. The SDP can only have a limited direct impact on emissions reductions but it can seek a capacity-building role with stakeholders.The SDPA has adopted the Tyndall Institute for Climate Change Research‟s GRIP methodology (www.grip.org.uk). The SDP will be accompanied by an Action Plan setting out how the SDP is to be delivered and the GRIP process will help evaluate how the SDPA might meet the requirements of the Climate Change Bill.

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River Basin Management Planning 3.6

The GCV area lies within the Scotland river basin district. Within this district, eight river basin management plans (RBMP) have been prepared, of which the „Clyde RBMP‟ is pertinent to the SDP area. RBMPs set out how the water environment will be managed over the next six years and the first plan covers the period 2009-2015. Subsequent plans will be published every six years. The plan will set out what needs to be achieved for all water bodies in the district and specifies measures or actions to achieve relevant targets.

3.7

There are several key issues contributing to water bodies in the Clyde area failing to achieve good status. The key issues highlighted in the „Clyde‟ plan include:  urban drainage in the Clyde area which is strongly influenced by the weather, and other factors such as the combined effect of industrial discharges, diffuse sources of pollution, impacts from the sewerage network and management and volume of surface water. Urban drainage is being tackled through a combination of partnership working, the Metropolitan Glasgow Strategic Drainage Partnership (MGSDP) and through Scottish Water‟s investment in its Quality and Standards process and regulation;  diffuse pollution from rural sources, such as excessive application of fertilizer, water run-off from farm steadings containing sediment, nutrients and faecal matter, livestock access to water courses resulting in trampled soil, erosion of river banks and direct deposition of faecal matter and soil erosion from cultivation on steep slopes, winter cropping and preparation of seedbeds; and  the impact of our industrial past such as industrial weirs and other barriers in rivers mean that the return of migratory fish, such as salmon, to some catchments is impossible, even although water quality in many of those rivers can support fish populations. Surface water and groundwater can be affected by the soil on a discrete piece of land. Most commonly this can happen on industrial areas where contaminants from the industrial process pollute the soils. The Scottish Soil Framework

3.8

The Scottish Soil Framework was published in May 2009 and aims to raise awareness of the services soils provide to society and the pressures they face. Scotland‟s soils are generally in good health but the most significant pressures are climate change and loss of soil organic matter. Both affect most soil functions with national impacts which are difficult to reverse. In the case of greenhouse gas emissions, the impacts are global. The Scottish Soil Framework identifies a wide range of activities that will contribute to thirteen soil outcomes. The SDPA will contribute to the outcomes and related actions where appropriate and continue to liaise with the Government and SEPA over strategic planning matter that can inform this issue.

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Zero Waste Plan 3.9

The Scottish Government is developing a new Zero Waste Plan for Scotland which will outline how Scotland can reduce the amount of waste it produces, how it can re-use valuable resources and increase recycling levels to help it to become a Zero Waste society. The Zero Waste Plan will provide direction and guidance on key waste management issues including:  setting and meeting targets on prevention, reuse, recycling and composting, and setting caps on energy from waste and landfill;  waste management and Climate Change;  complying with the revised EU Waste Framework Directive and the Landfill Directive;  delivery options;  improving waste data, to track progress and stimulate investment;  better waste regulation;  land-use planning for waste management; and,  possible implementation of further Landfill Bans

Existing Land-use - Transport Strategies and Policy Context for the SDP Scottish Government NPF2 and Scottish Planning Policy (SPP) 3.10

NPF2 sets out a national vision of development in Scotland to 2030 which provides a context for development planning in Scottish city-regions by addressing spatial issues of national importance which cut across city-region and local authority boundaries. NPF 2 states clearly that the competitiveness of place depends on adequate infrastructure investment. Five of the NPF2‟s fourteen „national developments‟ are located within the SDP area, including:  West of Scotland rail enhancements;  Strategic Airport enhancements - surface access and other infrastructure Glasgow International Airport;  Central Scotland Green Network;  Metropolitan Glasgow Strategic Drainage Plan; and,  Commonwealth Games Facilities and Infrastructure.

3.11

The Scottish Government has rationalised its suite of Scottish Planning Policies (SPP) and its extant National Planning Policy Guidelines (NPPG) into a single SPP document. This document sets out the Scottish Government‟s national level policy on a wide range of planning issues. It is not necessary, nor is it part of the Scottish Government‟s culture shift in Planning, in either the MIR, SDP or SEA to rehearse the breadth and depth of the policy content of the SPP, but that it is suffice to acknowledge its import as a framework within which the GCVSDPA will prepare its SDP.

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Strategic Planning: Legacy from Current Structure Plan 3.12

In terms of the previous generation of strategic land-use plans, the GCV area has had the benefit of a long-term development strategy, first approved in 2002, aimed at generational „step-change‟ of the GCV area. This Strategy has been subject to a five-yearly review and approval process and many of its key elements are wholly incorporated in the original NPF and successor NPF2. Owing to the generational nature of the change framed by such strategy, there are substantive elements which provide a legacy for the spatial perspective for the SDP  the Clyde Corridor with the Clyde Waterfront and the Clyde Gateway development „engines‟;  Ravenscraig;  the GCV Green Network;  13 Community Growth Areas; and  supporting transport and infrastructure priority investments. Strategic Transport Projects Review

3.13

In 2008, the Scottish Government published the Strategic Transport Projects Review (STPR) which included the West of Scotland Strategic Rail Enhancements (Project 24) with specific focus on sustainable public transport improvements and integration. Strathclyde Partnership for Transport (SPT) has commissioned the „West of Scotland Conurbation Public Transport Study‟ (WSCPTS) to address the range of priority needs including capacity constraints, cross city rail, improved integration, service frequency and quality on corridors, accessing development on the Clyde corridor. Discussions are continuing between SPT and Transport Scotland with a view to the WSCPTS providing details relating to the West of Scotland Strategic Rail Enhancements and NPF2. A firm commitment on this project is expected in the near future. The GCVSDPA will continue to liaise with SPT and the Scottish Government over this matter to ensure it will be embedded in the SDP. Regional Transport Strategy for the West of Scotland 2008-2021

3.14

The Regional Transport Strategy (RTS) informs future national and local transport strategies and local authorities and designated health boards are required to be consistent with the RTS. The current RTS is particularly focused on  planning and providing a „step change‟ for bus services, standards    

and infrastructure; revitalising the Subway network; improving cross-city and cross-region links on strategic corridors; improving access to services including health care and education; planning transport provision for the 2014 Commonwealth Games;

and,  improving sustainable connectivity for business and freight.

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Visioning and the Wider Macro-environmental Context for the SDP Glasgow and the Clyde Valley Strategic Community Planning 3.15

A Metropolitan Glasgow vision for the City Region (2008-2013) has been prepared by a partnership of the eight constituent local authorities at the political leadership level. It is a vision which seeks the “Glasgow City Region to be one of the most dynamic, economically competitive and socially cohesive regions within Europe”. The GCVSDP, as with its predecessor plans, is a tool to deliver the land-use priorities of this corporate framework of the GCV partnership. Strategic Futures Thinking

3.16

The Scottish Government‟s Planning legislation expects SDPs, in part, to be visionary and to look long into the future, with development alternatives to be outlined and subject to SEA at the Main Issues Stage and ensuing stages. As discussed in the preceding paragraph, the GCV partnership of local authorities has published a corporate vision. The GCVSDP and its component stages will set out the land-use and physical expressions of this vision and their long-term alternatives for delivery.

3.17

The GCVSDPA is already engaged in a process of identifying potential future scenario contexts and has brought together a Strategic Futures Group (SFG) which comprises twenty-two key organisations operating within the GCV Cityregion. The SDPA wants to gain a better understanding of how long-term issues could shape the spatial distribution of development. Work on these issues and their relationship to the various remits of organizations comprising the SFG, is focused on identifying emerging trends through extensive scanning and information gathering from a wide range of sources. Other methods such as structured questions and scenario analysis have been used to engage partners and stakeholders. By involving these partners, the GCVSDPA aims to build a consensus around the potential long-term risks to the development strategy and around the remedial actions associated with different scenario futures.

3.18

This work has provided a platform for the key stakeholders from across the region to examine critical trends and produce spatial scenarios or „stories‟ for Glasgow and the Clyde Valley up to 2035 2. These scenarios provide a perspective on alternative development locations for the SDP and their associated risks. The emerging preferred strategy and associated reasonable alternative locations will form the basis for the GCVSDPA‟s wider engagement strategy with the stakeholder community, the public and other interested groups.

3.19

The Futures work provides a context for long-term strategic planning and a basis for evaluating the spatial responses necessary to meet changing contexts based on the identified „stories‟. However, it is important to stress that it does not aim to identify what the world of 2030-2035 will look like nor

2

http://www.gcvcore.gov.uk/downloads/futures/StoriesWorkshop.pdf

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does it seek to describe that future world and prescribe a strategic response in the form of a plan, since the future is too uncertain and certain drivers for change can vary in their dynamics and their impact. 3.20

The Futures work is not complete and it is difficult to summarise the detail of key outputs at the time of writing this Scoping Report. As the Futures process completes its various stages, outputs will become clearer. In the meantime, more detailed information on the scenarios or „storiesâ€&#x; can be found at the website link below3. Local Planning

3.21

The eight constituent planning authorities within the GCV are tasked by legislation to prepare Local Development Plans outlining the local, detailed context of the SDP. These plans provide information on common and significant environmental issues which are broadly discussed in Table 1 and Annex A. Bringing together these findings and the issues identified in the SEA of NPF 2 and the Scottish Planning Policy, a number of regionally relevant SDP environmental issues are summarised in Table 1. These issues will be revisited and supplemented as the assessment continues.

3.22

Many of the environmental issues raised in these existing documents will have been assessed under their own SEA process. The Environment Report for the MIR/SDP will determine whether these have been undertaken at an appropriate level of detail for strategic regional planning.

3

http://www.gcvcore.gov.uk/downloads/futures/StoriesWorkshop.pdf

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4.

ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINE

4.1

An essential part of the SEA process is the identification of the current baseline conditions and their likely evolution. It is important to consider the SDP within its planning hierarchy as well as within a network of existing SEA work at both national and local level. The following section provides a summary of key issues relevant to the production of the Environment Report for the MIR. Summary of environmental issues

4.2

Whilst many SEAs include a comprehensive description of the baseline environment, this approach sometimes can overlook the key issues which are of the greatest relevance to the specific plan area, and which could have the most significant environmental effects arising from the plan.

4.3

In addition to the description of the current baseline environment, the Environment Report must include a description of existing environmental issues, especially those relating to any areas of particular importance. This process helps to focus the SEA on regionally specific environmental challenges and opportunities, and therefore forms a focus for the scoping work undertaken to date.

4.4

An initial analysis of the baseline environment reveals the key strategic issues for GCV, a summary of which is contained alongside PPS information in Annex A. It draws on key data sources, including information produced by the Scottish Government, the Scottish Environment Protection Agency and Scottish Natural Heritage. This information is also expressed in first column of Table 1 below.

4.5

In order to understand further the aims set out in Table 1, a key question is whether or not the provisions in the SDP will have a negative impact on certain regionally identified issues and also whether the SDP can help achieve specific targets e.g. can the SDP help achieve the biodiversity target of 95% of designated sites reaching favourable condition. The fifth column of Table 1 asks this question and feeds directly into the information contained in Table 2 Scoping of SEA Issues.

4.6

Shaded rows in Table 1 identify regionally relevant issues and their significance to the SDP. It is recognised that in some instances, the SDP will not necessarily be able to deliver but may be able to influence or to adopt a „ringleaderâ€&#x; role. These issues will be given further consideration in the Environment Report.

4.7

The information in Table 1 attempts to encompass as many strategically relevant environmental issues as possible whilst remaining proportionate to the strategic and concise nature expected of the new SDP, however, there may be gaps. Any comments on missing elements or issues raised above will be gratefully received.

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Table 1 Summary of environmental issues relevant to GCV SDPA Regionally Identified Issues

Regionally relevant to GCV? Sustainable Development Need to promote Yes development patterns that fit the needs of this generation without compromising those of future generations.

Key Elements

Data Source

Relevant to and significance for the SDP?

There are a number of shared themes relating to sustainable development, key elements of which are listed in this table. Those of specific mention at this stage relate to sustainable settlement patterns and specific planning aims set out in NPF2 and SPP.

Scottish Government

This is a key driver for the GCV place-setting and economic competitiveness agendas with the Green Network thinking at its heart.

GCV monitoring returns


Table 1 Summary of environmental issues relevant to GCV SDPA Regionally Identified Issues Biodiversity Condition of designated sites or significant gaps in strategic habitat networks Continuing need to protect designated biodiversity sites, and enhance them (to ensure that 95% reach favourable condition by 2010). Climatic Factors Increasing energy demand

Regionally relevant to GCV?

Key Elements

Data Source

Relevant to and significance for the SDP?

Yes

This is the responsibility of the European Union and the Scottish Government but will not be directly addressed in the SDP.

UK Biodiversity Strategy and Local Biodiversity Action Plans

The planning process can have a significant impact on biodiversity. The protection of biodiversity is dealt with at a more site specific/species specific level. This is dealt with in LBAPs and LDPs must respect this aim through development proposals and development management.

Increasing demand on fossil fuels for transport.

Strategic Transport models

Yes

Yes

Increasing levels of car ownership and usage Improve access to public transport

SNH site condition monitoring

Modal shift and increased public transport usage are essential to a sustainable lowcarbon future and thus will Transport Scotland; DVLC underpin the spatial strategy of the SDP.

SPT

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Table 1 Summary of environmental issues relevant to GCV SDPA Regionally Identified Issues

Regionally relevant to GCV?

Key Elements

Data Source

Relevant to and significance for the SDP?

and active travel opportunities.

Continuing reliance on the car to travel to work and growing travel distance overall.

Climate change impacts on the environment, including landscape, the water environment, soils and biodiversity.

Yes

Yes

Increasing demand Forestry Commission for low-carbon fuels Scotland for energy.

Alternative energy sources to carbon fuels are key to low carbon futures

Continuing carbon dioxide emissions from the transport sector.

Recognise how the SDP strategy can influence sustainable travel patterns, through land-use and transport integration.

Good access to public transportation in GCV but more can be done. Increasing energy demand. Increasing renewable energy generation.

SPT Link to AQMAs and CNMAs

SNIFFER and UKCIP09 Greenhouse gas emissions inventory

Continuing reliance

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The SDP can continue its support for:  renewable development in appropriate locations;  increased usage of public transport;  increased usage of active transport and green


Table 1 Summary of environmental issues relevant to GCV SDPA Regionally Identified Issues

Regionally relevant to GCV?

Key Elements

Data Source

on the car.

Population and Health Population Yes

Relevant to and significance for the SDP? network;  demand management to mitigate GHG emissions urban forestry in appropriate locations to help mitigate GHG emissions.

Ageing population

Census

Number of households in GCV predicted to increase above Scottish average (development pressure on land for new developments)

GROS; Regional demographic projections

Potential for restricted access to natural resources and community facilities is an issue

Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD)

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Links into Green Network thinking and in particular to the GCV Green Network Partnership action programme; however, the detail of


Table 1 Summary of environmental issues relevant to GCV SDPA Regionally Identified Issues

Regionally relevant to GCV?

Key Elements

Data Source

in some areas.

Continuing high levels of preventable disease arising from low levels of physical activity.

Yes

Continuing health inequalities.

Yes

Scottish Government Health Statistics Glasgow Centre for Population and Health

Participation rates in exercise and active recreation in the GCV area are highly variable with correlations to level of opportunity

Scottish Government Health Statistics SIMD

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Relevant to and significance for the SDP? achieving this is dealt with at a site specific level which is more appropriate to the remit of LDPs. Links into Green Network thinking and a sense of place. In particular relates to the establishment of a quality environment through the delivery of a Green Network. . However, the detail of achieving this is dealt with at a site specific level which is more appropriate to the remit of LDPs Links into Green Network thinking and a sense of place. In particular, relates to the establishment of a quality environment through the delivery of a Green Network. . However, the detail of achieving this is dealt with at a site specific level which is more appropriate to the remit


Table 1 Summary of environmental issues relevant to GCV SDPA Regionally Identified Issues

Regionally relevant to GCV?

Key Elements

Data Source

Relevant to and significance for the SDP? of LDPs Links also to regeneration, health and education which the SDP can influence but the detail is dealt with at site specific, local level.

Concentrations of social exclusion linked to environmental factors (e.g. proximity to derelict land).

Yes

Soil and Land Quality Continuing levels of Yes vacant and derelict land as a brownfield resource to the deliver the SDP strategy.

Link to VDL and SIMD lower quartile.

SNIFFER Environment Justice Research

Links to education and regeneration which the SDP can influence but the detail is dealt with at site specific, local level.

Quantity and longterm nature of some areas. Constant churn of uptake and fall out.

Report GCV monitoring returns for Vacant & Derelict Land.

The SDPA monitors changes in the scale and nature of vacant and derelict land in the SDP area.

Vacant & Derelict Land Survey

The SDPâ€&#x;s influence in improving  levels of remediation of

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Table 1 Summary of environmental issues relevant to GCV SDPA Regionally Identified Issues

Regionally relevant to GCV?

Key Elements

Data Source

Relevant to and significance for the SDP? Vacant and Derelict Land;

Changing soil quality functionality and stability, with issues arising from climate change, loss of organic matter, soil sealing and cultivation.

Yes

Prevent further degradation and preserve function and restore degraded soils to a level of functionality.

SEPA/Scottish Government

Consider how the SDP can influence and improve

Forestry Commission Environmental Monitoring (Minerals)

Land management practices e.g. agriculture and forestry. Land stability. Vacant and Derelict Land. Mineral workings and landfill sites require completion and restoration. Local issue?

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 impact on soil as a result of mineral extraction;  impact from waste management activities particularly landfill;  issues relating to River Basin Management (increased siltation and water contamination);  influence designated and protected sites such as peatbogs;  the impact of sewage sludge;  the impact on agricultural soils  impact on soil quality from flooding


Table 1 Summary of environmental issues relevant to GCV SDPA Regionally Identified Issues

Regionally relevant to GCV?

Key Elements

Data Source

Relevant to and significance for the SDP?

SEPA River Basin Management Planning Data: Clyde Area

Consideration should be given to how the SDP can:  minimise water pollution;  affect water quality, quantity or cause changes in hydromorphology;  control discharges to inland surface waters, territorial waters, inland coastal waters and groundwater.

The Scottish Soil Framework 2009 Flooding Water Number of water Yes bodies which may not reach good ecological status by 2015.

Poor water quality in some stretches of watercourses. Urban drainage and diffuse pollution from rural sources and impact of industrial past, point source pollution, abstraction and flow regulation and changes to morphology (Draft Clyde Area Management Plan 2008).

The SDPA would have a limited role as the site selection and management of the waste facilities is a matter for local authorities and SEPA.

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Table 1 Summary of environmental issues relevant to GCV SDPA Regionally Identified Issues

Regionally relevant to GCV?

Key Elements

Data Source

Relevant to and significance for the SDP?

Flood plain development pressure (add flooding element to environment monitoring).

SEPA River and Coastal Flood Maps.

Consideration should be given to how the SDP could impact on and mitigate against flood risk.

Localised flooding exacerbated by urban drainage

Metropolitan Glasgow Strategic Drainage Plan (MGSDP)

2008 (CAFÉ) Directive on Ambient Air Quality and cleaner Air for Europe, 2004 Directive relating to arsenic, cadmium,

GRIP model

Rising mine waters may cause pollution.

Flood risk, exacerbated by climate change in the long term.

Air Poor air quality within urban areas resulting largely from concentrations of transport emissions.

Yes

Yes

GRIP Model

Strategic Land-use Transport Model (SITLUM) Air Quality Management Plans

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Consideration could be given to any significant changes to emissions of the pollutants covered by the Directives. This is relevant to regional level plans associated with activities potentially causing


Table 1 Summary of environmental issues relevant to GCV SDPA Regionally Identified Issues

Regionally relevant to GCV?

Key Elements

Data Source

mercury, nickel and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient air (to be merged with the CAFÉ Directive at a later date), 2001 Directive on National Emissions Ceilings (on 4 key air pollutants; sulphur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, volatile organic compounds, and ammonia).

Relevant to and significance for the SDP? exceedances or emissions of the pollutants e.g. transport, energy, industry etc. The SDP would have limited role in controlling these emissions, however, the GRIP and SITLUM models may assist in assessing projected impact. Number and location of AQMAs in the GCV area including why and how they are designated and how further development could add or reduce pressure.

Report on level and key issues of Air Quality Management Areas. Material Assets Ongoing requirement for

Yes

SDPA area forms the principal

Report GCV monitoring returns for mineral

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Continuing demand for mineral extraction to meet the


Table 1 Summary of environmental issues relevant to GCV SDPA Regionally Identified Issues

Regionally relevant to GCV?

Key Elements

Data Source

Relevant to and significance for the SDP?

distribution area for the GCV and Ayrshire region for aggregate provision. It is required to provide at least a ten year landbank.

applications.

development demand of the SDP strategy.

Continuing growth Yes in waste arising including from the construction sector, offset to an extent by an increase in recycling and composting.

Levels increasing and diversion from landfill.

SEPA (although there is limited data across all waste streams in licensed sites.

SDPâ€&#x;s ability to address strategic waste management issues given data issues and the management and licensing of waste facilities being a matter for local authorities and SEPA.

Ongoing need to reduce reliance on landfill sites and in particular levels of biodegradable waste going to landfill.

Increasing diversion from landfill.

National and GCV monitoring returns on progress made and continuing targets.

SDP ability to address strategic measures on waste disposal/landfilling throughout the community.

minerals extraction, alongside the need to protect the environment.

Yes

Scottish Aggregates Survey 2005 British Geological Survey

SEPA.

26


Table 1 Summary of environmental issues relevant to GCV SDPA Regionally Identified Issues Cultural Heritage Vulnerability of protected and nonprotected historic and cultural buildings, sites, areas and landscapes to insensitive developments.

Regionally relevant to GCV? Yes

Key Elements

Nationally important sites Report on what could become is known. No focus for GCV-level „destinationâ€&#x; monitoring. development. How vulnerable are Level of loss of our valued heritage resources historic and of regional and cultural national heritage assets significance to insensitive developments? Respect for urban form, settlement pattern and identity?

Data Source

Relevant to and significance for the SDP?

Historic Scotland Historic Land Use Assessment

An aspect of the place-setting agenda of the metropolitan development strategy, however, the solution is essentially a design element which requires a local approach and only in exceptional circumstances would there be a key role for the SDP.

Local authorities

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Table 1 Summary of environmental issues relevant to GCV SDPA Regionally Identified Issues

Regionally Key Elements relevant to GCV? Place-setting and the Built Environment Poor settings of Yes Locating urban and periCommunity Growth urban communities, Areas impinging on wellbeing and quality of Design issues life. GN issues but there are difficulties in monitoring this.

Data Source

Relevant to and significance for the SDP?

Environment Monitoring returns.

An aspect of the place-setting agenda of the metropolitan development strategy; however, the solution is essentially a design element which requires a local approach and only in exceptional circumstances would there be a key role for the SDP.

AQMAs CNMAs SNH Natural Heritage Futures

Coalescence of communities through urban expansion/ribbon development. Air Quality and Noise Management issues. Environmental vandalism – strategic matter?

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Table 1 Summary of environmental issues relevant to GCV SDPA Regionally Identified Issues Loss of diversity in the landscape and dilution or erosion of distinctive character. Attrition of undeveloped, remote and wild countryside, and coasts.

Regionally relevant to GCV? Yes. This is reported as an issue in most local plan environment reports.

Key Elements

Data Source

Relevant to and significance for the SDP?

Cross-boundary issues including loss of diversity in the landscape issues?

SNH

An aspect of the place-setting agenda of the Metropolitan Development Strategy; however, the solution is essentially a design element which requires a local approach and only in exceptional circumstances would there be a key role for the SDP.

Candidate Noise Management Areas (CNMAs)

Vulnerability of key areas to inappropriate development? Poor quality urban fringes. Coalescence of communities through urban expansion/ribbon development. Capacity of landscapes to absorb development and change.

29


Table 1 Summary of environmental issues relevant to GCV SDPA Regionally Identified Issues

Regionally relevant to GCV?

Key Elements

Data Source

Relevant to and significance for the SDP?

Impacts on undeveloped, remote and wild countryside, and coasts. Erosion of rural character of Lowland Scotland through suburbanisation and the intrusion of noise and artificial light (refer to constituent local authorities?). Generally poor standards of design.

Yes. Many LAs report this as an issue in their Environment Reports.

This is a detailed design issue.

An aspect of the place-setting agenda of the Metropolitan Development Strategy; however, the solution is essentially a design element which requires a local approach and only in

Specific design issues for particular sites are the responsibility of the

30


Table 1 Summary of environmental issues relevant to GCV SDPA Regionally Identified Issues

Regionally relevant to GCV?

Key Elements

Data Source

LAs.

Erosion of rural character of Lowland Scotland loss of features, intrusion of noise and artificial light reducing tranquillity, suburbanisation.

Yes

Pressures on land to accommodate the increasing number of households. Green Belt development pressure/quality of greenspace.

SNH Local Authorities

Need to identify, protect and enhance the greenspace network and important areas of forestry/woodland. Some elements such as artificial light are local issues.

31

Relevant to and significance for the SDP? exceptional circumstances would there be a role for the SDP. An aspect of the place-setting agenda of the Metropolitan Development Strategy; however, the solution is essentially a design element which requires a local approach and only in exceptional circumstances would there be a role for the SDP..


Relevant aspects of the current state of the environment 4.8

In order to define the current state of the environment with a view to informing the SEA, we expect to combine spatial (mapped), statistical and more qualitative information. It is currently expected there will be sufficient data available to allow accurate and comprehensive characterisation of the environmental baseline, which in turn can be used to directly inform the assessment. Table 1 outlines the proposed data sources to provide a baseline for this assessment.


5.

SCOPE AND LEVEL OF DETAIL FOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

5.1

This section sets out the proposed methodology for the SEA. Our current views on the most appropriate approach to the assessment are set out below although the methods remain open to further discussion with the consultation authorities. Definition and assessment of alternatives

5.2

The SEA is required to assess the environmental effects of a proposed plan and reasonable alternatives to it. There is a parallel requirement for the Main Issues Report (MIR) to set out the alternative development locations considered during the plan preparation and to identify a preferred strategy to take forward into the Proposed Plan. The Environment Report accompanying the MIR, therefore will present the environmental effects of the alternatives published in the MIR. Framework for assessing environmental effects

5.3

Many SEAs are based on the use of objectives. Others use mapping to explore environmental effects. It is proposed that the assessment of environmental effects also maintains a broad spatial perspective allowing different options to be explored in a way that adds value to the plan making process. Consideration has been given to a range of methodologies for the assessment and three options are identified below. We are keen to discuss these further with the Consultation Authorities.

Option 1: An objective-led approach to the assessment This approach would involve firstly defining a range of SEA objectives, against which the plan will be tested. These objectives would be expanded further by a set of accompanying more detailed sub-criteria. The objectives would be defined on the basis of the baseline and contextual analysis, and would focus on the potential contribution that planning can make to key environmental challenges within the SDP area. Each key policy and proposal within the plan would be tested against these objectives. The findings would be set out in a matrix, with summary symbols, characterisation of effects, and a column providing a clear commentary of the effects. Professional judgement would be combined with research, consideration of the baseline and use of best available evidence, to provide a robust assessment. Cumulative and synergistic effects would be identified by reflecting on the findings set out within the matrix. Advantages: This approach would ensure that the assessment is robust, clear and systematically recorded. Careful construction of the SEA objectives can be used to ensure all of the SEA topics are covered and also properly focused on regionally important environmental issues. This approach is generally familiar to consultees and should therefore be easy to understand

33


and generally accessible. Disadvantages: Accessibility could be hampered by lengthy outputs including detailed assessment matrices which do not focus on regionally significant issues but include all likely effects from the plan. The approach may also miss an opportunity for spatial analysis of the SDP, although there should be scope to build this into the analysis if the baseline assessment was geographically defined. This is possibly a more effective tool for analysis of more detailed, local level plans. This approach can tend to be reactive, assessing the impacts of the plan as it develops, as opposed to leading the development of the strategy for the area.

Option 2: Constraints mapping This approach would focus on the spatial characteristics of the area in environmental terms, defined through a series of maps showing key constraints to development. Environmental constraints maps would be overlain with the development strategy for the SDP area, to identify any areas of potential conflict. The maps have been prepared in the early stages in the SDP process to allow decision makers to have sight of the opportunities for environmental enhancement and potential issues of capacity before the SDP strategy itself is provided. Each of the SEA topics would be described in a summary constraints map, and these would also be combined to allow for further exploration of spatial cumulative and synergistic effects. The analysis would take the form of a commentary to accompany each map. Spatial analysis could be used to explore where constraints overlap with development in key areas (e.g. area of habitats lost, likely scale of landscape change within a landscape character type, length of river that may be vulnerable to change). Advantages: This approach would fit well with the spatial emphasis of the SDP itself and is likely to retain a broad, strategic level focus. The results would be relatively easy to understand, particularly due to the use of maps and illustrations to define the key findings. The assessment could draw from mapping that would be undertaken during the preparation of the plan itself, reducing resource requirements for the SEA and achieving fuller integration with the plan making process. Disadvantages: This approach would be suited to exploration of the effects of the spatial strategy as a whole, but may overlook some components of the SDP which are more difficult to define in terms of geographic options or strategic locations. It may be difficult to differentiate between insignificant and significant environmental effects. Mapped datasets for some environmental topic areas could be limited or may be too detailed in some cases, reducing scope for strategic interpretation.

34


Option 3: Thematic analysis This approach would be similar to Option 1, but would use written commentary instead of matrices to record the findings. Each environmental topic would be explored and reported on as follows: a) definition of policy context: what are the existing objectives for biodiversity, soil, water air etc? b) baseline description: what is the current state of biodiversity, soil, water, air etc. in the area? c) identification of relevant environmental trends and pressures: how is the baseline expected to evolve over the plan period? Are there any issues around capacity / limits that have the potential to raise significant effects? d) what impact will the plan have on this aspect of the environment? e) definition of likely environmental effects of the plan as a whole on the baseline, highlighting key policies or proposals that may have the most significant interactions with the topic area; f) identification of cumulative effects arising – thematic and spatial; g) definition of interaction with other topics (synergistic effects); h) requirements for mitigation to avoid, reduce or offset these environmental effects; and, i) conclusions on the likely significant residual effects of the plan as a whole on the topic area. Advantages: This is a relatively broad brushed approach that allows the effects of the plan as a whole to be considered. The approach should limit the length and detail of reporting, and help to generate a more accessible, and digestible Environmental Report, by reducing the risk of including irrelevant baseline information and analysis within the Environmental Report. Resources should focus more directly on relevant information and significant environmental effects. The reporting should ‘tell the story’ of the effects arising from the plan as a whole and therefore be better placed to help influence its content. Disadvantages: The approach could require accompanying maps if it is to maintain a spatial perspective. May provide only a generalised picture of the effects and could be viewed as superficial by some. Like option 1, this may be a more reactive as opposed to proactive approach to the assessment, depending on how it is timed and integrated into the plan preparation process. 5.4

An SEA of strategic level PPS should be proportionate and fit-forpurpose so that outputs are manageable and the findings help to highlight regionally significant environmental effects. Given the role of the SDP in setting a framework for local level development plans, it is important to recognise that the assessment will focus on the strategic level of plan-making. It will therefore be important to supplement any conclusions arising from the assessment with advice on the respective SEA of these local level plans and policies. 35


5.5

The Consultation Authorities are invited to comment on the options for the assessment process. In the context of proportionality and the definition of significance, a combination of options two and three is preferred because it is important to present SEA data in as simple a format as possible in order to engage as many stakeholders as possible. Using maps to represent the data for regionally significant issues will be more visually appealing and better understood than a long series of matrices or text. In addition, the assessment will make use of maps used for the preparation of the plan itself, thus maximising the resource requirements for the SDP as well as providing added value to the SEA process which becomes fully integrated with the SDP process.

5.6

That said maps alone may not be able to distinguish between insignificant and significant environmental effects and for this reason, in certain instances, thematic analysis will be appropriate. This provides a broad brush approach which allows the effects of the whole plan to be considered as well as facilitating a proportionate approach to the Environment Report. In turn, this generates a more accessible and digestible Environmental Report. In keeping strictly to the „story‟ of effects arising from the plan, the SEA is more likely to increase its influence on the SDP content. Defining Significance

5.7

It is important that the SEA (of the SDP) focuses on environmental effects which are considered to be regionally significant. As a result, it is proposed that the following factors are combined and used to identify the significance of effects:   

magnitude of effect: what is the geographic extent of the effect? sensitivity of the receptor: is something of international, national or regional value being affected? Is the resource replaceable? can the SDP have a significant effect on the receptor?

Scoping in/out of SEA Issues 5.8

The GCVSDPA has considered whether the environmental effects (positive and negative) of the SDP are likely to be significant and a summary of our conclusions is given in Table 2.

5.9

A summary of the findings from this broad analysis is set out in Table 2 and outlines an initial description of the environmental context within which the GCVSDP operates.

36


Table 2 Scoping SEA Issues Proposed Objectives (SEA Issues from Table 1) Promote a Sustainable Settlement Pattern and Physical Infrastructure

Safeguard and Enhance the Living Environment of People and Communities (Population

Comments

Scoped Proposed sub-criteria for assessment of in or out MIR

This is the crux of the Scottish land use planning system – to allow Scotland to grow into a globally competitive country in a manner that does not diminish the needs of future generations to achieve their needs.

In

Promote settlement expansion that protects the existing character of settlements and reflects their current and future capacity to accommodate change.

In

Promote sufficient infrastructure to be in place to accommodate future sustainable development needs. The Environment Report will need to consider which particular infrastructure can be delivered.

In

Support climate change adaptation and mitigation as an integral part of sustainable settlement planning.

In

Increase the benefits of greenspace and green belts (green network thinking).

The SDP may generate significant positive or In negative effects, depending on local needs and development proposals. The SEA should seek to ensure that any negative longer term, strategic effects on communities are avoided In and that cumulative effects do not particularly

Avoid further blight in disadvantaged communities by sensitively siting development in appropriate locations. Health improvement - improve community health and well-being by promoting access to


Table 2 Scoping SEA Issues Proposed Objectives Comments (SEA Issues from Table 1) and human health) disadvantage any specific settlements. The criteria opposite also established health inequalities.

Scoped Proposed sub-criteria for assessment of in or out MIR

address

quality green network for leisure pursuits and active travel including the effective use of Vacant and Derelict Land. Show this as mapbased information.

This is perhaps a difficult area for land use planning to influence directly. It may also prove difficult for the SDPA to provide statistical evidence on this. This requires further consideration in the Environment Report. Protect and Enhance Biodiversity, Flora, Fauna

The SDP has the potential to generate In significant environmental effects. Implicit within the designation (and therefore within the SDP) is the continued protection of Out internationally and nationally designated sites. In other words, the SDP will not provide additional protection to designated sites, therefore, in the interests of proportionality the SEA process for the SDP will not assess against these already protected sites. The SDP will, however, encourage expansion and enhancement of habitats and species

38

Promote expansion and enhancement of habitat networks and improve connectivity (Green Network thinking/linking). In the interests of proportionality, specific protection of designated sites is unlikely to appear in the SDP. The reason for this is that the SDP does not and cannot provide additional protection to these sites. Government guidance states that planning authorities should not place additional buffers around designated sites (when identifying


Table 2 Scoping SEA Issues Proposed Objectives Comments (SEA Issues from Table 1) through improved connectivity using mechanism such as the Green Network.

Scoped Proposed sub-criteria for assessment of in or out MIR

Seek Improvement in the Quality of Environment for People and Communities (Population and human health)

In

Improve community health and well-being by promoting access to quality green network for leisure pursuits and active travel.

In

Encourage creation of „sense of place and spaceâ€&#x; as integral part of all strategic development through recognition of wider (non-designated) environmental settings.

The SDP may generate significant positive or negative effects, depending on local needs and development proposals. The SEA should ensure any negative long term strategic effects on communities are avoided and that cumulative impact does not particularly disadvantage any specific settlements. The criteria opposite also established health inequalities.

areas of broad search for wind farms etc.) as protection of these sites (and their settings) is implicit within the designation. Therefore, it is considered unnecessary to assess against this criterion.

address

Promote Place-Making Depending on the scale and location of (Community Setting) development, the SDP has the potential to generate significant effects on communitysetting..

Encourage improvement of the setting of existing settlements using promotion of green

39


Table 2 Scoping SEA Issues Proposed Objectives Comments (SEA Issues from Table 1)

Scoped Proposed sub-criteria for assessment of in or out MIR

In

In Encourage Efficient use of Material Assets

The SDP will encourage efficient use of land In and resources. Issues around transport infrastructure, waste, derelict and vacant land and sustainable waste management will all In be explored within the SDP, and as a result the SEA has a role to play in maximising positive effects from the development In strategy.

In

40

network thinking. Ensure development takes place in appropriate locations protecting and improving the setting of settlements. Encourage sustainable management of change in settlements using mitigation. Protect minerals resource from sterilization by development. Encourage and monitor levels of re-use of derelict and contaminated land. Encourage sustainable rural development through sensitive siting of development in appropriate locations. Encourage place-making agenda in terms of treatment of edge of settlements. There is clearly a role for master planning and this issue may be more appropriately dealt with at local authority level; however, there is a clear link to green network thinking. Further


Table 2 Scoping SEA Issues Proposed Objectives Comments (SEA Issues from Table 1)

Scoped Proposed sub-criteria for assessment of in or out MIR consideration will be given to this issue in the Environment Report.

Climate Change: Reduce Energy Consumption and/or CO2 Emissions (Climatic Factors)

The SDP has the potential to generate significant impact on climate change mitigation targets. The SDP should play a key role in contributing to a reduction in emissions from the area as a whole. The SDP is also in a position to make a significant contribution to the need for longterm adaptation to climate change.

In

SDP can influence air quality associated with activities potentially emissions of the Directive pollutants e.g. transport, energy, industry etc.

In

In reality, the SDP has limited role in controlling these emissions, however, the GRIP (Climate Change Mitigation) model may assist in assessing projected impact. This requires further consideration for the assessment of the MIR.

Potential for effects on water quality, water supplies, drainage, flooding and morphology.

In

Complement the emerging role of River Basin Management Plans, Area Action Flood Groups and Marine Planning.

It is recognised the SDP has the potential to

In

Impact may arise depending on the overall development pattern taken forward by the SDP and the extent to which these could increase or reduce travel distance and emissions from transport. Climate Change: Reduce Water Pollution and Enhance Water Quality (Water)

41

Continued support for sustainable water management and demand of new


Table 2 Scoping SEA Issues Proposed Objectives Comments (SEA Issues from Table 1) generate significant environmental effects. Similar to the issue raised with habitats, species and landscape designated sites, protection is implicit within the RBMP process and the SDP does not provide additional protection. Therefore, in the interests of proportionality the SEA process for the SDP will not assess against these already protected sites. The SDP will, however, encourage improved water quality using mechanisms such as sustainable water management in line with emerging River Basin Management Plans, Flood Plans and Marine Plans.

Scoped Proposed sub-criteria for assessment of in or out MIR

Protect and Enhance Soil Quality

In

The SDP has the potential for significant cumulative effects, depending on approach to strategic land allocations and overall spatial patterns of growth, which may have implications for levels of brownfield and greenfield development.

42

developments e.g. SUDS etc. Strategic elements of this are relevant at SDP level, however, this is also appropriate at local authority level.

Avoid adverse direct and indirect impacts of developments on soil stability, structure and quality.


6.

NEXT STEPS Proposed policy preparation and consultation timescales

6.1

Stakeholder consultation will be an ongoing part of the development process of the SDP, to ensure that it is developed with key stakeholder inputs, including the wider public. Comments are sought from the Consultation Authorities on the outlined approach to the SEA process and whether the correct scope for the SDP has been identified. Similarly, comments are sought on any omissions or gaps and we urge you to draw these to our attention.

6.2

Consultation and engagement will be undertaken for both the SDP and the SEA by various means including:   

6.3

use of the GCVSDPA web site for rapid information exchange, updating on timescales and events and inviting comment and feedback; organised events (workshops) and meetings; feedback from SDP consultations relevant to the SEA. This will include convened meetings with the Statutory Consultees, interviews (either face to face or by telephone) with regional consultees and facilitated discussions.

The information below sets out the proposed programme for the SEA, alongside that expected for the drafting and consultation on the SDP:

Timescale

SEA Milestones

April 2010 – September 2010

Scoping Report State of the Environment Report Review of PPS Assessment of Alternatives and background technical work/supplementary guidance Environment Report and consultation Amended Environment Report and consultation (if required)

September 2010 March 2011

October 2011

Amended Environment Report and consultation (if required)

Strategic Development Plan On-going technical work

SEA working group MIR and consultation Publication of Proposed Strategic Development Plan and consultation Submission of Finalised Strategic Development Plan

SEA Scoping Report April 2010  

SEA Scoping Report April 2010

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