Page 1

Glasgow and the Clyde Valley Housing Market Partnership Housing Need and Demand Assessment Technical Appendix 02 Current Housing Supply / Stock Profile November 2010

HNDA W

O

R

K

I

N

G

D

R

A

F

T


Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Introduction Stock and Household Numbers by Local Authority Tenure by Local Authority Type and Size by Local Authority Stock Age and Condition by Local Authority Council Tax Band by Local Authority Completions by Tenure and Affordability Communal Resident Establishments Summary

List of Figures Figure 1 Figure 2a Figure 2b Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14

Stock and Household Numbers Stock by tenure Stock by tenure Stock by type House Type Trend: Predominant House Type by Datazone Number of Habitable Rooms Number of Rooms Mapped Age of Stock Stock Condition from Scottish House Condition Survey Council Tax Band Council Tax – Predominant Band by Datazone Percentage completions by tenure: 1999-2000; Average; 2008-2009 Affordable Housing Completions 2000-2001 to 2008-2009 Communal Residential Establishments Summary


1

Introduction

1.1

The need to consider the profile of the housing stock is detailed in the Housing Need and Demand Assessment Guidance published by the Scottish Government. The stock is the number and type of housing available within an area at a specific date and how that housing is being used. It is important to assess the overall adequacy of stock and identify key issues that need to be addressed.

1.2

The output of this assessment is an estimate of current dwellings by local authority area in terms of stock numbers, vacancies, tenure, dwelling type, size, age of stock, condition of stock and council tax band. Consideration is also given to of completions by tenure and affordable housing completions. This is taken forward in more detail in Technical Appendix 6 Review of Supply and Demand for Housing, using projections of need, demand and supply.

1.3

Overall, there are some conclusions which can be drawn at this stage: • There is a significant social rented sector in many local authority areas. • There is potentially an over-dominance of higher density housing in certain areas, including high-rise, although there are demolition and regeneration programmes in hand. • Patterns of density are predictably highest in urban centres, lower in suburban and rural areas. • East Dunbartonshire and East Renfrewshire exhibit the characteristics of largely affluent areas, with evidence of affordability issues. • Elsewhere in Glasgow and the Clyde Valley, affordability is largely a localised issue. • There is a discrepancy between stock condition and occupant satisfaction (social rented sector) but this may be overemphasised because of energy efficiency failings and recent improvements in housing stock not reflected in the data.

2

Stock and Household Numbers by Local Authority

2.1

Stock and households are detailed below in Figure 1, derived from GROS data. Figure 1 Stock and Household Numbers Local Authorities

Total Stock

E Dunbartonshire 44,034 E Renfrewshire 36,747 Glasgow City 295,590 Inverclyde 39,334 North Lanarkshire 146,463 Renfrewshire 82,287 South Lanarkshire 141,618 W Dunbartonshire 44,114 GCV TOTAL 830,527 Source: GROS/TA06 (2008)

Households

Vacancy Rate

43,227 35,988 284,553 37,156 143,715 79,037 138,354 42,669 804,709

1.4% 1.8% 3.6% 5% 1.7% 3.6% 2% 2.9% 2.8%


3

Tenure by Local Authority

3.1

Tenure is broken down into private, owner-occupied, social and other, as in Figure 2 below. Social stock includes council and RSL homes. Figure 2a Stock by tenure (2008)

Source: SHS 2008 Figure 2b Stock by tenure (2008)

Source: SHS 2008 3.2

In all areas, the dominant tenure is owner-occupation. There are higher levels of social housing in Glasgow City and West Dunbartonshire and also North Lanarkshire (approximately 30% and above). These are all above the Scottish average. Other areas are closer to the Scottish average (23%) except for East Dunbartonshire and East Renfrewshire, which have notably low levels (approximately 10%) of social housing. Private rented housing is notably high in Glasgow, higher than the Scottish average, but all other areas of Glasgow and the Clyde Valley have lower levels of private rented accommodation.


4

Type and Size by Local Authority

4.1

The Scottish Household Survey identifies three main groups of home type summarised below as: house; flat (new/ tenement), which includes four-in-ablock; and flat (high rise) which includes flats in blocks which are five or more levels in height. Figure 3 Stock by type (2008)

Source: SHS (2008) 4.2

In most areas, houses are the dominant dwelling type. Most areas are close to (North and South Lanarkshire) or below the Scotland average of 67%, but Glasgow is dominated by flats (32% houses, 58% flats and 10% high rise) and both East Dunbartonshire and East Renfrewshire have around 80% houses, well above the Scotland average. This is mapped by datazone in Figure 4 which provides a spatial indication of dwelling type. Flats are largely in urban areas with houses largely in suburban, urban fringe or rural areas.


Figure 4 House Type Trend: Predominant House Type by Datazone

Š Crown copyright and database right 2010. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100032510.

Source: SNS (2008) 4.3

The number of rooms must also be considered, and is detailed in Figure 5 and mapped in Figure 6. There is a preponderance of smaller-roomed dwellings in the City Centre, but also in West Dunbartonshire and, to a lesser extent, a significant proportion in Inverclyde and Renfrewshire. Figure 5 Number of Habitable Rooms

Source: SNS (2008)


Figure 6 Number of Rooms Mapped

Š Crown copyright and database right 2010. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100032510.

Source: SNS (2008) 5

Stock Age and Condition by Local Authority

5.1

The age of the housing stock is summarised below in Figure 7. Most stock in Glasgow and the Clyde Valley dates from between 1945 and 1982, with some areas containing a greater proportion of pre-1919 stock, notably North Lanarkshire. East Renfrewshire, North Lanarkshire and South Lanarkshire have the highest proportions of post-1982 stock Figure 7 Age of Stock 100% 90% 80% 70%

Post 1982

60%

1965 to 1982

50%

1945 to 1964

40%

1919 to 1944

30%

Pre 1919

20% 10% 0%

Source: Scottish Government (1998 to 2010)


5.2

Stock condition is detailed by local authority, captured in the Scottish House Condition Survey over three year blocks for 2004-2007 and 2005-2008, shown below in Figure 8. Figure 8 Stock Condition from Scottish House Condition Survey

Local Authority E Dunbartonshire E Renfrewshire Glasgow City Inverclyde North Lanarkshire Renfrewshire South Lanarkshire W Dunbartonshire

% of private dwellings failing SHQS 20042007 78 76 75 74 70 68 78 70

% of private dwellings failing SHQS 20052008 69 74 69 71 63 70 74 70

% of social dwellings failing SHQS 20042007 74 72 75 77 76 88 80 73

% of social dwellings failing SHQS 20052008 59 66 65 70 75 80 72 69

Social: % adults rating condition as good : 20042007 87.5 88.8 79.9 83.8 81.4 79 86.9 76.4

Social: % adults rating condition as good : 20052008 85.5 88 79.3 83.2 84.1 78.6 83.7 76.7

Source: SHCS (2004-07 and 2005-08) 5.3

There are no notable trends, other than a disconnection between dwellings failing the Scottish Housing Quality Standard and the generally positive rating of householders. This may be due to housing failing this standard on the grounds of energy efficiency and the relative lack of householder concern, and recent assessments indicate a lowered failure rate which reflects recent investment.

6

Council Tax Band by Local Authority

6.1 Council tax banding is summarised below in Figure 9 and mapped in the following Figure 10. Figure 9 Council Tax Band

Source: SNS (2009)


6.2

East Dunbartonshire and East Renfrewshire have the smallest proportion of lowest-band properties, and Inverclyde, West Dunbartonshire, and Glasgow have the highest proportion of lowest-band properties. East Dunbartonshire and East Renfrewshire also have the highest proportions of highest-banded properties. However, even in both these locations, the pattern is not uniform, which is why consideration of spatial mapping is useful, in terms of the predominant council tax band.

Figure 10 Council Tax – Predominant Band by Datazone

Š Crown copyright and database right 2010. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100032510.

Source: SNS (2009) 6.3

Once again, East Dunbartonshire and East Renfrewshire have the highest share of the higher bands and lowest share of the lower bands, in particular concentrations.

7

Completions by Tenure and Affordability

7.1

Completions terms of tenure and affordability are shown in Figures 11 and 12. In most areas, the percentage of RSL (Registered Social Landlord) completions have increased (figure 11) as the percentage of private completions have decreased, with the exception of East Renfrewshire Council and West Dunbartonshire Council. Local authority completions barely feature, with the marginal exceptions of Glasgow and North Lanarkshire. In terms of affordable housing completions in numbers (figure 12), most have been in Glasgow, but the numbers have fallen by approximately fifty percent over the period with most other areas fluctuating and declining, with although North and South Lanarkshire have exhibited increases in the most recent year.


Figure 11 Percentage of completions by tenure: 1999- 2000 vs Average vs 2008-2009 100

90

80

70

60

50

RSL 40

LA Private

30

20

10

0

Source: SNS (derived from NB2 returns)


Figure 12 Affordable Housing Completions 2000-2001 to 2008-2009 2500 East Dunbartonshire East Renfrewshire Glasgow City

2000

Inverclyde North Lanarkshire Renfrewshire

1500

South Lanarkshire West Dunbartonshire

1000

500

0

Source: SNS (derived from NB2 returns)


8

Communal Resident Establishments

8.1

Communal residential establishments are summarised below in Figure 13. A total of just over 23,000 persons are resident within communal establishments. Most are resident within Glasgow City, notably high in terms of the number of residents but this is mainly because of the student population of the city.

Figure 13 Communal Residential Establishments Local Authority

Number of Est.

Number of Residents

NHS

Psychiatric

Local Authority

Other

Children’s Home 0.4%

Housing Association

Other Residential Care Home

Other Children’s Home

40.2% 45.7% 22.7% 28.5% 37.3% 38.0% 47.5% 37.6%

7.7% 18.5% 7.6% 28.3% 8.9% 11.8% 14.0% 8.5%

3.1%

Other Care or Medical

Other Est. *

Other

ED 46 1113 2.7% 0.3% 0.1% ER 36 656 10.7% 6.4% 3.4% GC 447 11558 3.9% 1.4% 0.7% 8.9% 0.6% IN 79 1108 16.6% 4.2% 0.7% 3.8%8 2.5% NL 143 2800 8.3% 3.9% 1.7% 11.6% RE 158 2011 14.0% 9.1% 2.1% 7.9% 0.8% SL 145 3122 9.0% 14.0% 1.6% 8.8% WD 64 715 13.4% 2.1% 29.2% * including Defence establishments, prisons, educational establishments, hotels and hostels

Source: General Register Office Scotland, 2003 (2001 Census)

Other Nursing Home

0.0%

4.2%

8.4% 0.6% 0.9% 3.5% 0.1% 2.3% 3.5%

40.8% 7.0% 53.5% 14.4% 24.9% 12.1% 2.8% 5.6%


9

Summary

Figure 14 Summary Scotland GCV Total Stock Households Vacancies Tenure - Owner Occupied Tenure - Social Tenure - Private Tenure - Other Type - House Type - Flat (New/Tenement) Type - Flat (High Rise) Type - Other Rooms - 1 to 3 Rooms - 4 to 6 Rooms - 7 plus Stock Age pre 1919 Stock Age 1919-1944 Stock Age 1945-1964 Stock Age 1965-1982 Stock Age post 1982 Public Dwellings failing SHQS 05 to 08 Private Dwellings failing SHQS 05 to 08 Adults rating condition as Good Council Tax dwellings band A-C Council Tax dwellings band D-E Council Tax dwellings band F-H Completions 2008-2009 Private Completions 2008-2009 LA Completions 2008-2009 RSL Number of Communal Establishments Number of Communal Residents

830,527 804,709 2.8% 66% 23% 10% 2% 67% 29% 3% 1%

0% 0% 0% 0% 45% 49% 4% 3% 24% 37% 34% 2%

1,088 23,083

ED

ER

GC

IN

NL

RE

SL

WD

44,034 43,227 1.4% 85% 11% 2% 2% 81% 17% 2% 1% 27% 64% 8% 2% 31% 39% 26% 3% 59% 69% 85% 0% 1% 1% 79% 0% 21% 46 1,113

36,747 35,988 1.8% 86% 10% 3% 0% 80% 19% 1% 0% 29% 62% 9% 0% 27% 45% 21% 6% 66% 74% 88% 0% 1% 1% 90% 0% 10% 36 656

295,590 284,553 3.6% 49% 32% 15% 3% 32% 58% 10% 0% 57% 38% 3% 2% 27% 35% 36% 1% 65% 69% 79% 0% 1% 1% 65% 0% 35% 447 11,558

39,334 37,156 5.0% 68% 25% 6% 1% 54% 40% 5% 1% 44% 52% 4% 3% 23% 25% 48% 1% 70% 71% 83% 0% 1% 1% 67% 0% 33% 49 1,108

146,463 143,715 1.7% 64% 30% 4% 2% 71% 26% 3% 0% 39% 57% 4% 9% 19% 32% 36% 4% 75% 63% 84% 0% 1% 1% 80% 0% 20% 143 2,800

82,287 79,037 3.6% 70% 24% 5% 0% 61% 35% 3% 1% 45% 51% 3% 4% 31% 39% 25% 2% 80% 70% 79% 0% 1% 1% 86% 0% 14% 158 2,011

141,618 138,354 2.0% 74% 17% 8% 2% 73% 25% 2% 1% 36% 57% 6% 0% 24% 41% 30% 4% 72% 74% 84% 0% 1% 1% 84% 0% 16% 145 3,122

44,114 42,669 2.9% 61% 33% 4% 2% 57% 38% 4% 1% 52% 44% 2% 1% 15% 51% 33% 0% 69% 70% 77% 0% 1% 1% 79% 0% 21% 64 715


Glasgow and the Clyde Valley Strategic Development Planning Authority Lower ground floor, 125 West Regent Street, Glasgow G2 2SA t  0141 229 7730  |  e info@gcvsdpa.gov.uk |  w www.gcvsdpa.gov.uk


HNDA TA02 Current Housing Supply / Stock Profile  

HNDA TA02 Current Housing Supply Stock Profile

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you