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THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA

Journal VOL LV, NO. 1, MARCH 2010


The Garden Club of Virginia exists to celebrate the beauty of the land, to conserve the gifts of nature and to challenge future generations to build on this heritage.

F ROM T HE E DITOR This issue of the Journal features several articles on horticulture. Writers tell us specific tips for existing plants, bulbs and new plants to add to our gardens, documentation of plants in a regional park and a new trophy that honors a beloved horticulturist. The Daffodil Show next month will showcase the blooms that have been protected by the winter’s snows. Horticulture Field Day on the Eastern Shore will be interesting and informative. Sign up early, last year’s tour in Orange County sold out. Spectacular gardens and the homes they embrace will be open during our Historic Garden Week. Celebrate the horticulture we all enjoy. Consider writing for the Journal. We want to read what is happening in your club and your garden. Plan to attend the Journal workshop March 8th at Belmont in Fredericksburg. Our next deadline is April 15.

Journal Editorial Board 2009-2010

Editor and Chairman: Jeanette Cadwallender, The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club ExOfficio Members The GCV President, Cabell West, The Tuckahoe Garden Club of Westhampton The GCV Corresponding Secretary, Meg Clement, Three Chopt Garden Club The GCV Director of Public Relations, Lea Shuba, The Hunting Creek Garden Club Journal Chairman, Aileen Laing, The Warrenton Garden Club Journal Advertising Chairman, Kay Kelly, The Mill Mountain Garden Club Members Mason Beazley, The James River Garden Club, The Garden Club of the Northern Neck Betty Delk, The Nansemond River Garden Club Julie Grover, The Blue Ridge Garden Club, The James River Garden Club Mary Ann Johnson, Roanoke Valley Garden Club Jeanette McKittrick, Three Chopt Garden Club Sarah Pierson, The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club Laurie Starke, The Warrenton Garden Club

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ON THE COVER...

The Garden Club of Virginia Journal The Garden Club of Virginia Journal (USPS 574-520, ISSN 0431-0233) is published four times a year for members by the GCV, 12 East Franklin St., Richmond, VA 23219. Periodical postage paid in Richmond, VA. Single issue price, $5.00. Copy and ad deadlines are: January 15 for the March issue April 15 for the June issue July 15 for the September issue October 15 for the December issue Email copy to the Editor and advertising to the Ad Chairman President of the Garden Club of Virginia: Cabell West Journal Editor: Jeanette Cadwallender P.O. Box 7696 Fredericksburg, VA 22404 Phone: (540) 373-7210 Email: journal@gcvirginia.org Journal Advertising Chairman: Kay Kelly 112 Serpentine Rd., S.W. Roanoke, VA 22401 Phone: (540) 343-9089 Email: KKelly112@aol.com Journal Committee Chairman: Aileen Laing bunreefarm@aol.com

Vol. LV, No. 1 Printed on recycled paper by Carter Printing Company Richmond, VA

This issue is dedicated to Three Chopt Garden Club, host of the GCV Annual Meeting, May 2010, in Richmond. Three Chopt Garden Club takes its name and emblem from the historic Three Chopt Trail which runs from the Shenandoah Valley to the falls of the James River in modern-day Richmond. The site of Revolutionary and Civil War history, it was blazed long before English settlers arrived by indigenous Americans, and marked by three hatchet chops in trees along the path.

IN THIS ISSUE... Slate of Officers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Beautiful Gardens速 Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Arranging Men . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Green Plains and Salubria. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Historic Garden Week Goes International . . 6 Better Flower Shows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 GVC Hires A Director of Development . . . 10 Nominations Sought. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 76th Annual Daffodil Show . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Daffodil Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 51st Annual Conservation Forum. . . . . . . 14 Conservation Lobby Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Horticultural Field Day 2010 . . . . . . 16 Club Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Ex Libris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Lily Notes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Rose Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Hamamelis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 The Annual Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

OTHER REFERENCES... Kent-Valentine House Phone: (804) 643-4137 Fax: (804) 644-7778 Email: director@gcvirginia.org Historic Garden Week Office Phone: (804) 644-7776 Fax: (804) 644-7778 Email: gdnweek@verizon.net www.VAGardenWeek.org POSTMASTER send address changes to: Executive Director 12 East Franklin Street Richmond, VA 23219

MARCH 2010

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The Garden Club of Virginia Slate of Officers 2010 - 2012 President:

Kim Nash (Mrs. Arthur H. Nash) The Warrenton Garden Club

First Vice President:

Ann Gordon Evans (Mrs. Russell Smith Evans, Jr.) The Huntington Garden Club

Second Vice President:

Meg Clement (Mrs. Whittington W. Clement) Three Chopt Garden Club

Treasurer:

Anne Baldwin (Mrs.Robert F. Baldwin, Jr.) The Garden Club of Alexandria

Recording Secretary:

Jeanette Cadwallender (Mrs. Nicholas J. Cadwallender) The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club

Corresponding Secretary: Nina Mustard (Mrs. John C. Mustard III) The Williamsburg Garden Club Directors at large Missy Buckingham (Mrs. Richard P. Buckingham IV), The Boxwood Garden Club Donna Lawhon (Mrs. Richard U. Lawhon), The Garden Study Club Dianne Spence (Mrs. Scott M. Spence), The Williamsburg Garden Club

The Garden Club of Gloucester Presents

THE 60TH ANNUAL DAFFODIL SHOW An American Daffodil Society Accredited Show

ONLINE GARDEN SHOP Call Today for Your Catalog! Flower Arranging Accessories Garden Tools & Supplies Cut-Flower Seeds Locally Grown Cut Flowers

“Blooms

Lisa Ziegler

In Flight”

Cut-Flower Farmer and Speaker Local 757-877-7159 Toll Free 1-888-977-7159 Newport News, Va. lisa@shoptgw.com

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Page Middle School Rt. 17 South, Gloucester, VA Saturday, March 27, 2010 2:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Sunday, March 28, 2010 12:00 – 4:00 p.m.

GREEN OFFERING

THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA


Beautiful Gardens® Update By Linda Pinkham The Elizabeth River Garden Club eautiful Gardens®, a broad consortium of Virginia based public and not-forprofit entities, is entering its second year of promoting “Plants of Distinction” for Virginia. A list of participating retailers can be found on the Web site www.beautifulgardens.org. Eight plants are being promoted in 2010. Our much loved native redbud, Cercis canadensis, is one of the plants on the 2010 list. Plant collectors discovered a seedling with golden yellow leaves in North Carolina, and named it ‘Hearts of Gold.’ The tree holds its color all summer when grown in the sun. Yucca filimentosa ‘Color Guard’ has a showy yellow/pink/green coloration that makes it ideal for containers and as a focal point in the garden. Bonus: The deer won’t touch it. Flower arrangers love the rosy buds and zigzag branches of Buttercup Cercis Hearts Of Gold winterhazel, Corylopsis pauciflora. Because it blooms so early and likes some shade, it mixes well with hellebores, primulas, early bulbs and Winter daphne. Who doesn’t love boxwood and vertical accents Corylopsispauciflora in the garden? The pyramidal American boxwood ‘Dee Runk’ has been found to be outstanding. The Autumn fern, Dryopteris erythrosora is hardy across the entire state, and the cultivar ‘Brilliance’ has bronzy new growth that stays that color for a long while. It is very easy to grow and versatile in the garden. If you like to amaze your gardening friends, plant the purple Pineapple lily, Eucomis ‘Sparkling Burgundy.’ The showy purple leaves emerge in the spring. In mid-summer pinkish pineapple-looking flowers appear. A good cut flower for August is ‘Henry Eilers’ coneflower, Rudbeckia subtomentosa. It is easy to grow and the quilled petals are unusual. The last plant is one you have seen many times along the highways of Virginia. It is a selection of a native grass known as bluestem. The winter color is a rich russet and in summer it is a powder blue. Schizachyrium scoparium ‘The Blues’ is a tough plant for a sunny dry area. In addition to promoting worthy plants, Beautiful Gardens® tests plants at five sites across the state. To see where these are or to introduce a special plant you have selected, go to the Web site listed above. Eucomis Sparkling Burgundy

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Arranging Men: Who Would Have Thought? By Jody Bundy The Garden Club of the Eastern Shore eing on the programs committee and struggling with having a meeting that would include our husbands, I was stymied by trying to find a fun and out of the box venue. During cocktails with our president, Tata Kellam and her husband, my husband made the simple comment, “why don’t you have the men do the arrangements.” One glance at Tata, and I knew we had our November meeting planned. The schedule was simple: A Thanksgiving arrangement using either fresh or dried materials (nothing purchased) and completed by men either as individuals or in groups. We held the meeting in our barn and served Eastern Shore steamed oysters, home-made chili, Chatham vineyard wines and other enjoyable beverages. I cleared off 28 feet of continuous counter space just for the arrangements thinking there was no way we would need all this space. The evening began at 6:30. Do you remember the ending of the classic Christmas movie “It’s a Wonderful Life” with Jimmy Stewart? Like the neighbors coming over with gifts, our meeting boasted a flood of proud men carrying arrangements. They embraced the challenge and had very impressive, artistic creations. So many that we ran out of space. The women were pleasantly surprised and amazed! There was an arrangement with gun shells, duck decoys and grasses; another with an old water pump and greenery; one with an assortment of berries; another with a pumpkin as the vase with sunflowers bursting out of the top and yet another with a squash vase with peanut plants. My favorite was a large glass cylinder filled in the bottom with dried corn, then a layer of corn cobs arranged vertically followed by a layer of persimmons with One of the Arrangements nandina and grasses displayed above. Every man who contributed was tagged with a sticker that read, “Real Men Arrange.” A new oyster knife was awarded to those receiving a blue ribbon for their arrangements and for a horticulture exhibit quiz. The husbands competed to identify the plants that their wives had brought for horticulture. After many humorous wrong answers we finally had a correct identification. All in all, the evening was a grand success thoroughly enjoyed by all. The ladies even managed to slip away for a business meeting while the men tweaked their creations before the judging began.

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Green Plains and Salubria to be studied By Calder Loth, GCV Honorary Member ach year the Garden Club of Virginia awards fellowships to students of

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landscape architecture to record privately owned historic gardens. In recent years the program has been expanded to include an important garden owned

by a governmental entity or a private foundation. The Fellowship Committee met last fall to review potential gardens and subsequently made site visits to three gardens. Following its site visits, the committee selected the garden at Green Plains in Mathews County as the private garden to record. The house at Green Plains is a ca. 1800 brick mansion built for the Roy family. The garden preserves a rare, possibly unique, 19th-century scalloped brick wall. The garden was significantly enhanced following the property’s purchase in 1937 by Mr. and Mrs. Francis Higginson Cabot. Under the direction of architect Edward J. Matthews, Mrs. Cabot’s brother, the wall was repaired, ornaments were added, and the perimeter of the current garden laid out. The garden has since been simplified but much can be learned from the Cabots’ son, Francis Higginson Cabot, Jr., a prominent landscape architect who well remembers the garden. For the historic garden owned by a government or foundation, the committee selected Salubria in Culpeper County. Salubria is the property of the Germanna Foundation and is noted for its mid-18th-century brick plantation house. The house was erected for the Rev. John Thompson whose first wife was the widow of Governor Alexander Spotswood. It remains in an unrestored state and contains outstanding Georgian woodwork. The grounds retain the remnants of a large colonial garden marked by a series of earth falls or terraces set perpendicular to the house. Also on the grounds is an unusual circular brick terrace laid out in a complex design. A small park retains several venerable trees. Salubria is a registered historic landmark and is protected by a historic preservation easement donated to thecommonwealth by the late Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Grayson prior to the gift of the property to the Germanna Foundation.

MARCH 2010

Salubria

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Historic Garden Week Goes International By Suzanne Munson Executive Director, Historic Garden Week in Virginia rom Quaker homesteads in the Blue Ridge to colonial plantations in Tidewater, our Historic Garden Week tours will offer something for everyone this spring. Known as “America’s Largest Open House,” Virginia’s Historic Garden Week is the oldest and largest statewide event of its kind in the nation. More than 200 of the Commonwealth’s finest homes, gardens and The Pinkham’s Conifer Garden historic landmarks will be open April 17 – 25. Suffolk County Tour Perhaps one measure of Historic Garden Week’s growing international presence is that we now have our own posting on the World Wide Web on Wikipedia, the “people’s encyclopedia. For complete and accurate information, the Wikipedia article links browsers to the GCV and HGW Web site. Additionally, when one uses Google to search for “Garden Week,” the HGW site ranks at the very top, with about 100,000 cyber visits annually. Visitors from as far away as New Zealand and Bangladesh have discovered our beautiful events via the World Wide Web. A recent article in The English Garden magazine invites readers to “Travel to the USA for Virginia’s Historic Garden Week . . . Garden visiting reaches fever pitch in the USA with the annual Historic Garden Week, organized by the Garden Club of Virginia. And 2010 will be the 77th year for this premier event.” Writers and photographers for The English Garden and other UK publications were The Lee House in Lexington invited to Virginia for a media tour last summer, orchestrated by our friends at the Virginia Tourism Corporation. Please visit www.VAGardenweek.org for more information about this year’s outstanding tours. Guidebook copy is attached to each event name on the Schedule page. Be sure to peruse the Tour Highlights section, where notable features of each tour and selected images are featured. E-tickets may be purchased via the site, including a statewide pass, $175 per person and $300 per couple for a full week of touring. Garden lovers will find much to enjoy this year, from the magnificent Mount Sharon landscape in Orange County on April 17 (gracing this year’s guidebook cover) to the “gardeners’ gardens” of horticulturist Linda Pinkham and her husband, landscape designer Bill Pinkham, on the April 23 North Suffolk tour. History lovers

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will be especially interested in houses linked to George Washington and Robert E. Lee (Alexandria and Lexington) tours. Numerous special events sponsored by clubs on their Garden Apple Hill, Millwood Week days include featured on the Clarke County Tour flower-arranging demonstrations, tablescape presentations, a re-enactment of Patrick Henry’s stirring “Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death” oration, floral interpretations of museum artworks, a fashion show and an art exhibit featuring paintings of the private homes open for one of the tours. Additional details are noted on the Tour Highlights pages of the Garden Week Web site. Also, please take a few minutes to log onto www.GCVirginia.org, the Restorations pages, to view the beautiful historic gardens and landscapes that have been restored by the Garden Club of Virginia over the past seven decades, with funding from your clubs’ Historic Garden Week tours. This is a rich and wonderful legacy, one in which all GCV members can take great pride.

Windsor Shades, West Point, King William County tour MARCH 2010

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Better Flower Shows By Betty Murden Michelson, GCV Flower Shows Committee Chairman The Princess Anne Garden Club he Garden Club of Virginia flower shows received a vote of approval during

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roundtable discussions at the October 2009 board of governors meeting. Delegates were asked “How can we make flower shows even better?”

Both the Flower Shows Committee and the GCV board of directors have reviewed the comments and acted upon many of the suggestions. The board of directors has voted to include the chairman of the Flower Shows Committee as a member of the board of directors. This is a strong endorsement of the role flower shows plays within the GCV. Also the GCV board supports the change in the Inter Club requirement. Beginning with the 2010 Rose Show, clubs are required to participate in two of the three flower shows each year. Assignments will be made on a rotating basis. Clubs may choose to enter all three shows. The GCV Inter Club Artistic Award will continue to be awarded based on points earned at the three shows. Many comments focused on frustrations with judging of the artistic classes in the flower shows. The judges are GCV members who are experienced flower arrangers with training in judging. They are required to pass a series of tests and win a ribbon in a show before becoming fully accredited. These women receive continuing education throughout the year and specifically before each show. Concern was expressed about comment cards. The judges are instructed to write these with helpful comments based on the elements and principles of design. The judges’ workshop last year focused exclusively on this topic so more constructive comments should be evident. The Web site has detailed information about how to become a judge. It is an excellent education for anyone who wants to become a better arranger. Flower shows are an integral part of the mission of the club. We offer the public three shows a year where horticulture and flower arranging are featured. Admission is free and often the sponsoring club will have an additional educational speaker. This helps to maintain the GCV’s 501 (c)(3) tax exempt status. National flower societies (daffodil, lily and rose) have long-standing relationships with the GCV through our flower shows. We are fortunate that with the participation of these national groups we have shows of high caliber. For those members who expressed

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interest in more horticultural education, the GCV Web site has photographs with captions of the past 10 years of collections. The sponsoring club may host the show at any location in the state. The show stays with one club for two years. This has proven to be a learning experience in the first year and a cost savings in the second. Clubs who have hosted recent shows praise the experience for the increased camaraderie. The cost associated with hosting a show varies across the state. Sponsoring clubs receive $3,000 from the GCV to assist with their expenses. Many communities benefit economically when the show is in their area. Certainly the name and public awareness of the GCV

Mark your Calendarts for...

18th The

Spring Market 2010

Friday, March 26th, 10 to 7 Saturday, March 27th, 10 to 7 Sunday, March 28th, 10 to 5

reaches across the state with our shows. The updated GCV flower shows handbook is now on the GCV Web site featuring new designs and photographs of winning arrangements. The suggestion of having a photography class met with enthusiasm and is being studied. The suggestion of a class requiring organically grown material to encourage responsible growing practices is one that will certainly be passed on to clubs hosting future shows. A new Flower Shows Committee chairman is appointed every other year. She invites other members to join the committee bringing new and fresh ideas for how to make our shows even better. MARCH 2010

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BIZARRE BAZAAR A Fabulous Spring Marketplace! For information, please contact: (804) 673-7015 or (804) 673-6280

www.thebizarrebazaar.com

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GCV Hires A Director of Development By Missy Buckingham, Personnel Committee Chairman The Boxwood Garden Club he Garden Club of Virginia is delighted to announce the part-time employment of Karmen Payne Gustin as Director of Development. Karmen is an experienced development professional with a passion for helping organizations find the sources of funding they need to advance their philanthropic missions. She has worked in Richmond for the Virginia Home for Boys, United Way and Massey Cancer Center. She most recently served as the Director of the Annual Fund and the Associate Director of Development at the Science Museum of Virginia before taking a six-year hiatus to rear her family. Karmen Payne Gustin Karmen grew up in Norfolk and is a graduate of Westhampton at the University of Richmond. Her grandmother and mother-in-law were Garden Club of Virginia members, and her family is involved in environmental advocacy. Karmen’s office is in the Kent-Valentine House in Richmond. Please join us in welcoming Karmen as the newest member of the Garden Club of Virginia staff.

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Nominations for Dugdale Award Due By Anne Doyle, GCV Conservation and Beautification Committee Chairman The Garden Club of Norfolk ominations for the Elizabeth Cabell Dugdale Award for Meritorious Achievement in Conservation must be submitted by May 31 to the chairman of the GCV Conservation and Beautification Committee. This prestigious award is presented each year during the annual Conservation Forum to an organization, industry or an individual, who is not a GCV member, for meritorious work in conservation. The award was first presented in 1974, and in 1989 was named for Mrs. Arthur A. Dugdale of the Ashland Garden Club, an outstanding member of the Garden Club of Virginia who originated the Conservation Forum. Nominations may be submitted by GCV members or member clubs only, and the recipient must have rendered outstanding service in the conservation and wise development of the natural resources of the commonwealth of Virginia. Think of those individuals who have keynoted your conservation programs. Or how about those local organizations that are restoring the water surrounding your neighborhood or safeguarding the landscape adjacent to your property? GCV wants to recognize and honor the kindred spirits who conserve our commonwealth’s natural resources. Help us do this by submitting a simple, one-page nomination. For guidelines, please see: http://www.gcvirginia.org/Awards/DugdaleGuidelines.pdf.

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The Garden Club of Virginia presents The 76thAnnual

Daffodil Show

“The James Runs Through It”

Sponsored by Hillside Garden Club Sanctioned by the American Daffodil Society The Florence Elston Inn and Conference Center Sweet Briar College Sweet Briar, Virginia Wednesday, April 7, 2010 2 p.m. – 8 p.m. Thursday, April 8, 2010 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.

A RT I S T I C D I V I S I O N The artistic classes for this year’s GCV Daffodil Show reflect the significance of the James River to the rich history of Lynchburg and Amherst County. Inter Club Classes – open to all GCV member clubs and exhibited in the name of the club. Class 238A Sweet Briar House of Sweet Briar College - Italian Renaissance arrangement Class 238B Tusculum of Amherst County - Late Colonial arrangement Class 238C Lynchburg-area churches – a creative mass arrangement for a narthex Class 238D South River Meeting House – a simple traditional line arrangement Individual Artistic Classes – limited to six entries per class Class 239 The Monacan Indian Nation - a floor design Class 240 James River Bateau - Novice Class – a synergistic arrangement Class 241 Transportation – a parallel arrangement Class 242 Tobacco – an abstract design representative of the early tobacco trade Class 243 Point of Honor – a Pot-et-Fleur arrangement based on French scenic wallpaper found in the Federal Lynchburg mansion For questions concerning the artistic schedule, contact: Joyce Moorman at 540.586.2231 or moorjoy@verizon.net Special Interest: During the judging on April 7tth at 10:30 AM, please join Garden Club of Virginia Landscape Architect, Will Rieley for a tour of Sweet Briar House, whose gardens were a recent GCV restoration. A boxed luncheon will follow with Sweet Briar College President, Jo Ellen Parker. Reservations for this special event are required by March 30th. Please send your $12 Check to: Meg Laughon 3303 Woodridge Place Lynchburg VA 24503

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Daffodil Notes By Glenna Graves, GCV Daffodil Committee, The Spotswood Garden Club By Jane B. White, Hillside Garden Club he GCV Daffodil Committee is pleased to announce a new perpetual trophy

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for 2010. The award, sponsored by Hillside Garden Club and The Lynchburg Garden Club, honors the achievements of Anne Duvall Miller Massie, a

scholar, horticulturist and one dedicated to the preservation of pre-1940 daffodils in the Lynchburg Old City Cemetery. The trophy will be given for a collection of five pre-1940 daffodils, Class 237. “Susie,” as she was know to her many friends, grew award winning daffodils at her home in Lynchburg where she and husband Robert raised their family. Known as a scholar and a teacher, Susie was a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Randolph-Macon Woman’s College and preferred calling plants by their proper Latin nomenclature in all her gardening endeavors. In 1993 as the Old City Cemetery began renovation from years of neglect, Susie brought from home and planted the first large clumps of N.x mediolutes ‘biflorus’ on the gravesite of George Washington’s great niece, Maria Ball Carter Tucker and her daughter Rosalie. She knew these bulbs were appropriate for the age of the gravesite and could have easily been loved by that family. In future Old City Cemetery projects, Susie was the plant advisor of a historic collection in the Early Memorial Shrub Garden, as well as researching and assisting the planting of the Bea and Karl Hehl daffodil collection which would represent all daffodil divisions. Again and again she was called on to select proper varieties to fit the site and horticultural goals of the historic gardens. This cemetery garden has been selected as a National Display Garden by the American Daffodil Society with much of the credit for this prestigious honor going to Anne “Susie” Massie. Susie owned a distinguished private horticultural library. Many of her irreplaceable volumes have been given to the Old City Cemetery Library. They include works by early 19th century horticultural scholars such as L. H. Bailey and A.J. Downing.

One exceptional volume is a hand printed horticultural book over 400 years old. The few examples cited above have made a difference in the world of gardening, horticulture, scholarship and daffodils in one community. To quote selectively from Ralph Waldo Emerson, “… to win the respect of intelligent people … to appreciate beauty; to leave the world a bit better by a garden patch, and to know even one life breathed easier because you have lived … This is to have succeeded.” MARCH 2010 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG

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51st ANNUAL CONSERVATION FORUM NOVEMBER 6, 2009 CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA A Time Set Aside to Observe, Listen and Learn From Leading Conservationists

Larry Schweiger, National Piedmont Wildlife Foundation President

Darden School Auditorium

Anne Doyle, GCV Conservation; Cabell West, GCV President; Karen Jones, Event Organizer

A call to action

Will Rieley at Monticello with plans for restoration of lawn

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Chris Miller, Piedmont Environmental Council

Organic Roundabout Farm Keswick, Virginia

Lunch Break at Darden

THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA


CONSERVATION LOBBY DAY JANUARY 18, 2010 RICHMOND, VIRGINIA A Time To Gather, Listen and Act We Gathered

We Listened

We Acted

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Horticultural Field Day 2010 By Suzanne Tankard The Garden Club of the Eastern Shore he Garden Club of the Eastern Shore will host the 2010 Horticultural Field Day on Wednesday and Thursday, May 19 and 20, 2010. On Wednesday afternoon two gardens in Accomack County, Queen Hive and Mount Custis, will be featured. Queen Hive contains a woodland garden connected by a series of winding paths artfully planted with rare native and exotic species of plants. Mature trees and boxwood tower over perennial borders in Mount Custis’ seaside landscape which includes a large vegetable and cutting garden and a wooded pasture with a small herd of nanny goats. Wednesday evening an Eastern Shore clam steam will be held at a beach cottage that occupies a natural setting on the Chesapeake Bay. The property, known as Mattissippi, has received a Virginia Forestry Stewardship award and its open land is enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program which protects environmentally sensitive land and restores wildlife habitat. Thursday morning participants will meet at the Barrier Island Center, a unique museum dedicated to preserving the coastal culture and heritage of Virginia’s barrier islands, for tours of the four gardens featured in Northampton County and lunch. The four gardens are Sea View, Eyre Hall, Fern Point and Mill Pond Point. Sea View, as its name implies, overlooks the marshes, bays and barrier islands of the Atlantic coast. The garden was designed by internationally-known landscape architects Oehme and van Sweden, famed for their natural, self-renewing landscapes. Eyre Hall’s brick-walled boxwood gardens with traditional swept paths and English-style mixed borders are among the oldest in the country. Fern Point, overlooking Church Creek, features garden rooms with plants that offer texture and color along with uniqueness of bloom time and juxtaposition of material. Sited at the head of another tidal creek, Mill Pond Point’s pastoral gardens include five large mixed borders as well as a cutting garden, vegetable garden and herb beds. Registration forms and additional information can be found on the GCV Web site. The Holiday Inn Express, a new motel in Exmore, has reserved a block of rooms for May 19. For reservations call (757)442-5522 and ask for the GCV Horticultural Field Day block; the rate is $79. The Best Western in Exmore, phone (757)442-7378, has offered a rate of $74; again mention GCV. Registration is limited to 120 people.

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Friday, November 5, 2010

Save the Date Conservation Forum ❖ Williamsburg

Partnering with VIMS and the College of Willam & Mary 16

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Club Notes

The Hunting Creek Garden Club ne of the environmental treasures of Northern Virginia is Huntley Meadow Park, part of the Fairfax County Park Authority. The 1,500 acres of woodlands, now surrounded by suburban sprawl, have a stream running through that forms a non-tidal marsh. Native plants include Christmas and marginal fern, purple and blue giant hyssop, big-leafed mountain and Meehan’s mint, golden ragwort and creeping phlox. Eventually these shrubs will be added: shrubbery St. John’s wort, Jersey tea, lowbush blueberry, silky dogwood, mountain laurel and coastal leucothoe. A survey of the plants, shrubs and trees made 20 years ago shows that many still exist. Amazingly, in spite of development outside the park, there are still deer, beavers, muskrats, foxes, squirrels, rabbits, snakes, frogs, fish, land and water fowl and many species of insects. The park’s paths and boardwalk are delightful places to walk. Park administrators and volunteers use the park for both research and teaching. There are classes about Native Americans who inhabited the site. There are night activities involving hooting owls, bats and gnawing beavers. The Hunting Creek Garden Club made a $5,000 grant to the park for the park’s outdoor classroom activities, and $1,000 has been spent to research herbaceous material that thrives in the Chesapeake Bay area to see if it will survive deer browsing.

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Club Notes



Sara Ann Lindsey

Albemarle Garden Club unny Williams, internationally-renowned interior designer and Charlottesville native, delighted and entertained friends, family and all who attended the second annual Design Forum, sponsored by the Albemarle Garden Club on May 7, 2009. With stories about her life and career as well as practical decorating tips, Bunny takes the fear and intimidation out of decorating. She endeavors to make homes soft, livable and inviting, advocating a bar in every room, a throw for dogs on every couch and a cleverly concealed television, because we all drink, have dogs and watch television. Homes should, according to Bunny, reflect who we are and how we live, rather than dictate our lifestyles. In her amazing life and collaboration with husband and fellow designer John Rosselli, Bunny Williams has been able to “create relaxed, intimate spaces that are so inviting, her clients never want to leave them.” Her books: Point of View and An Affair with a House illustrate those points. She traces the evolution of her own homes and those of clients as they progress into the elegant, sophisticated, entirely inviting and livable spaces she advocates. Income from the Design Forum has made our community service efforts possible. The Albemarle Garden Club is grateful to Bunny Williams.

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Brooke Spencer MARCH 2010

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Ex Libris

Jacob Weidenmann: Pioneer Landscape Architect By Alice Martin, GCV Library Committee The Petersburg Garden Club

fter more than 40 years of painstaking research, Rudy J. Favretti has produced

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a marvelous book tracing the life and the work of Jacob Weidenmann (1829-1893). Mr. Favretti is surely well known to garden club members as an

expert horticulturist and skilled landscape architect who has applied his considerable knowledge and talent to many a GCV restoration project. The subject of his book, however, may not be as readily recognized by us, but this most readable volume on Weidenmann will quickly conquer that deficiency. Jacob Weidenmann’s practice began in New York and the surrounding area immediately after his migration from Switzerland in 1856. His career was closely entwined with that of his better-known friend and colleague Frederick Law Olmsted. Therein lies the problem and the need for such careful research, so that the two careers might be separately studied and the merits and accomplishments correctly credited to each man. Weidenmann’s grandest public projects, Bushnell Park and Cedar Hill Cemetery, both in Hartford, Connecticut, are still in use and remain faithful to his plan. He used an “open lawn system” where landscape contours flow, and where “no fences, walls or curbs would be allowed for they would interrupt the natural.” Swans glide as gracefully on the ponds as walkways undulate with the topography, providing a peaceful place for people to stroll and enjoy nature. Many prominent citizens of Hartford are buried in Cedar Hill, including Wallace Stevens, J.P. Morgan, Katherine Hepburn and Weidenmann himself. Jacob Weidenmann also received numerous commissions for private gardens of stately houses, and in 1870 published his own book, Beautifying Country Homes. Mr. Favretti credits Weidenmann as being the “father of our present system for the educating of landscape architects.” He designed a college program as well as allied apprenticeships that would best prepare the student for a career in this field. The Cedar Hill Cemetery Foundation commissioned this book which was authored by Mr. Favretti, Professor Emeritus of Landscape Architecture at the University of Connecticut. Sketches and photographs abound throughout the book offering a visual feast of Weidenmann’s work and his valuable contribution to landscape architecture. We are most grateful to Mr. Favretti for his tireless research, scholarly interpretation and for his most generous donation of this book to our Kent-Valentine House Library.

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This new publication includes site plans for each main entry, splendid color photographs, some historic photographs and a master plant list. $49.95

Book

$ 7.50

Shipping and handling

$ 2.87

Virginia state tax

$60.32

Total per copy

Please send check or money order, payable to The Garden Club of Virginia to:

Have You Bought Yours Yet? The Garden Club of Virginia's preservation work in thirty historic gardens

MARCH 2010

The Garden Club of Virginia Attention: Christine Harris 12 East Franklin St. Richmond, VA 23219

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Lily Notes By Mary Nelson Thompson, GCV Lily Chairman The Franklin Garden Club he GCV Lily Committee has chosen six superior bulbs for the 2010 Lily

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Collection. These bulbs have been through extensive testing in all regions of the United States for tolerance of hot, cold, humid, dry and wet conditions.

They go through eight to ten years of trials from seed to market. The thousands of seedlings tested each year are reduced to around 70 bulbs for the final trials. The 2010 collection includes: ‘Sun Valley,’ ‘Orange Valley,’ ‘Napa Valley,’ ‘Ocean Breeze,’ ‘Yellow Hornet’ and ‘Raspberry Swirl.’ The cost for all six is $28. These beautiful Asiatic lilies should be blooming at the time of our show. The world floral market is experiencing a shortage of lily bulbs. The lily is the most popular cut flower for designers and the commercial demand for lilies increases each year. Breeders are enticed to develop new color combinations to enhance the latest in the decorative arts. As our lily shoots begin to emerge from the ground, we must protect them from freezing. It helps to place a layer of pine straw or light mulch over the bed in the fall but that is often not enough protection. For a short-term remedy it may be necessary to cover the lily bed with fabric or plastic. Those of us who have experienced a prolonged rainy and cold fall, winter and spring may have a problem with botrytis blight on our lilies. This fungus causes brown spots on the leaves. Damaged leaves will result in fewer blooms next year. Low planting areas with little air circulation due to thick stands of trees or shrubs can promote this disease. The best defense against botrytis is to plant in a raised bed, provide good air circulation and clean up old lily stems in the winter. Botrytis can be stopped with three applications of fungicide sprayed on tops and undersides of leaves. Organic gardeners may wish to spray foliage weekly with onefourth teaspoon baking soda mixed in one quart water. The Petersburg Garden Club and the Lily Committee are hosting a workshop on “Grooming and Showing Lilies.” It is scheduled just before the show in order to help you prepare to win ribbons with your entries. The date is May 5, 2010, 3:00 p.m., at St. Mark’s United Methodist Church in Petersburg. Notify Sally Seward, Petersburg Garden Club president, if you would like to attend the workshop and don’t miss the 68th Annual Lily Show in Petersburg on June 16th and 17th.

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Rose Notes

By Pat Taylor, GCV Rose Chairman The Boxwood Garden Club arch is the time to prune roses. Although healthy, established

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roses will survive frigid winter temperatures at the root level, their canes can be damaged by freezing weather. Care should be taken to

remove any damaged parts of the canes. For Hybrid Teas and Grandifloras, major pruning is necessary to rejuvenate the plant. For bushier-growing roses, such as Floribundas, Minis, Shrub Roses and Old Garden Roses, snip off one third of the length of the canes to shape the plant. When pruning roses, make the first cut at the desired height on the cane, depending on the type of rose, at an outward facing bud node. Look closely at the color of the pith inside the pruned cane remaining on the bush. Healthy tissue will be almost white, resembling the color of milk. If the pith is brown the plant tissue is damaged. You should continue to prune the cane until you reach white tissue. It is tempting to deem a cafe au lait color as close enough to white, but keep pruning until you reach white tissue. If it is necessary winter-damaged roses can be pruned all the way to the bud union so that only a nub remains. A rose is capable of growing new canes and recovering remarkably well. A rose’s ability to recover from such a shock or to endure a severe winter is directly linked to the care it received last season. Healthy, well-cared-for plants that are relatively disease-free and well fed tend to bounce back from trauma, whereas ailing plants do not have the energy reserves to perform in the same way. If you will be planting bare root roses this spring, consider planting them above ground in large black plastic pots for a few months, then transplanting them into your garden. Many experts think that the heat absorbed from the dark plastic encourages more root growth than could be expected from roses planted in the cool soil of the rose garden in spring. Why not give it a try? Please log onto the GCV Web site and visit the Rose Page. There you will find links to information regarding present and past rose collections as well as recommendations for good rose varieties and tips for growing roses.





The Garden Club of Virginia appreciates responsible advertising and reserves the right to accept or reject submitted advertisements. Inclusion in the Journal is not and is not to be construed as an endorsement by the Garden Club of the advertised goods or services. MARCH 2010

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Hamamelis Caroline Church Parrish, GCV Horticulture Committee The Warrenton Garden Club inter blooming shrubs, such as the Hamamelis species, have a special place in the native woods and cultivated gardens of Virginia. Walking down a trail in the Shenandoah National Park, I happened upon a glorious sight, a mature Hamamelis virginiana in full bloom. Surrounded by the subtle forest colors, this common witchhazel, with its bright yellow wisps of crumpled petals, was illuminated by the rays of the sun streaming down. On this early winter day the canary yellow shouted through the dulled grays of the woods and created such a visual impact that I can recall it perfectly today. Hamamelis x intermedia steals the winter’s spotlight in the cultivated garden with its mixed colored foliage in autumn and its masses of blooms in late January and February. ‘Diane’ and ‘Arnold Promise’are standouts among the multitude of cultivars being hybridized. The petals of ‘Diane’ are a deep orange-red and when they open they look deceptively delicate. ‘Arnold Promise’ has an upright growing tendency with flowers in a clear yellow with a hint of red at the cup. The petals are almost an inch long and spicy fragrant. In my country garden, I seem to be forever trying to contain the space, as the eyes tend to wander into the pastured fields and mountains beyond. Shrubs are an easy way to add a boundary to the garden and if you use Hamamelis a delightful one.

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The Annual Fund By Marsha Merrell, GCV Finance Chair The James River Garden Club o you have a tendency to nod off when a financial report is given at your club meetings? Admittedly, it’s not as stimulating as the flower arrangements, horticultural exhibits, conservation report or the program, but a financial review reflects the use of your dues and monies raised. This year, the GCV Finance Committee decided to rework the report we provide to our membership with a more complete picture of our budget. Instead of an accounting of how your dues will be spent, we are providing information on the way all monies are used, including dues, Historic Garden Week and restoration activities. Rather than a report on the $134,960 we receive in dues, we’re accounting to you for the entire $1.5 million GCV budget. The Finance Committee asked all activity areas to look for reductions, and the GCV made many changes. We have asked for new bids on contracts, changed vendors, changed banks and taken other measures which have resulted in savings in excess of $25,000. Historic Garden Week has made similar changes. Even with intense scrutiny of our outlays, we still rely on a three to five percent draw on our endowment to make up the difference between income and expenditures. With the financial crisis of last year, it became apparent that even a conservatively invested endowment can lose value. Reluctant to take five percent, we found ways to cut expenses and took just four percent to balance the budget. To protect our endowment, the GCV board decided to start an annual fund drive, giving the membership the opportunity to support our organization directly. This provides a means to give relief to our endowment and, it is hoped, to forego further increases in dues. The Annual Fund is off to a good start for a first-time appeal. I sincerely thank you for your response. Twenty percent of the $50,000 goal has been given by the board of directors, and nearly 10 percent of the membership made a donation by the end of 2009. June 30, 2010, is the end of the GCV fiscal year. You can help us meet our goal when you make a gift by mail or through our secure Web site by that date. Please help us make our goal.

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Luncheons meetings cocktail parties graduation parties wedding receptions Ease and elegance in entertaining at the Kent-Valentine House. For availability contact (804) 643-4137or director@gcvirginia.org GCV members and friends receive a 25% discount.

K E N T- VA L E N T I N E H O U S E

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CONTRIBUTIONS Report Period From 10/1/09 Through 12/31/09 Common Wealth Award Fund Provides monies to individual clubs for local civic beautification efforts. Donor In Honor of The Williamsburg Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Elaine Hunt Abbott Gale Abbott Roberts Donor In Memory of Rivanna Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sarah Smith

Restoration Supports GCV Restoration projects across the Commonwealth. Donor Mr. and Mrs. Michael R. Crane Donor In Honor of The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mrs. Margaret Page Bemiss Mr. William D. Rieley The Warrenton Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mary Lou Seilheimer

The Annual Fund Provides essential ongoing support necessary to maintain GCV operations. Donors Ann Kiley Crenshaw Mary Virginia Brogan The Hampton Roads Mary Louise Brinckirhoff Anne Geddy Cross Garden Club Barbara L. Cummings Brown The Huntington Garden Ruth Cunningham Mardi Brownell Club Mary Hart Darden Linda Penn Wheat Bryan Catherine G. Adams Mrs. Huntley Davenport Richard and Missy Dana H. Adams Fleet Davis Buckingham Betsy Agelasto Joan D. Dawson Deedy Bumgardner Suzanne Aiello Gaye M. Deal Jody Bundy Kathryn S. Allen Mrs. Alfred P. Dennis Mrs. L. David Butler, Jr. Claire Amott Claiborne Dickinson Jeanette Cadwallender Rebecca W. Atkinson Imogene Birdsong Calvert Anne J. Doyle Cary W. Baber Mary T. Eades Nancy N. Campbell Nita Bagnell Joan Eliot Kay Cardwell Holly T. Bailey Androniki Fallis Mrs. John A. Carlston Marilyn C. Barrow Mrs. Vance B. Field Robert Carter Charitable Sugie Battin Carter Blackford Filer Trust Anne Beals Rossie Fisher Wayne and Susan Elizabeth Lamar Boetsch Adrianne P. L. Foshay Chatfield-Taylor Brenda M. Boidock Connie Walton Fulton Kathryn H. Clary Kae N. Bolling Pamela W. Gale Meg Clement Mrs. Richard K. V. Z. Lynn F. Gas Lee Stuart Cochran Bolton Hylah and McGuire Boyd Elizabeth (Boo) Compton Mary Ann Gibbons Mrs. Pearson G. Gibson Mrs. John P. Bradshaw, Jr. Jane H. Cooper Mrs. Thomas T. Gilpin Jane Ellis Covington Jody Dennis Branch Mary Bruce H. Glaize Jane Cowles Gail Braxton Mrs. George B. Craddock, Jr. Freddie Gray Lynda H. Briggs MARCH 2010

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Mrs. James C. Greene Marge Grills Bettie H. Gutherie Caroline S. Guy Suzanne LaPrade Haaland Cynthia D. Hall Virginia B. Hall Elizabeth Hamilton Patricia Hammond Melinda Culvahouse Hardy Sara Scott Hargrove Virginia J. Harris Mrs. William O. Harris III Elizabeth Ruffin Harrison Margaret Dietz Henderson Janet G. Hickman Ann Hohenberger Mrs. Charles R. Hooff III Mac Houfek Mrs. William A. Hudson Pamela Hudson Lucy Huff Mrs. Robert K. Huffman Mrs. W. E. Hunt, Jr. Mrs. Charles K. Hutchens III Diane K. Hynes Ms. Therese Iverson Mr. and Mrs. Wescott Jacob Heidi F. James Missy Janes Anne Jennings Mrs. Lucius J. Kellam III Aileen W. Kelly Ellen Kelso Mrs. R. Calvin Keyser Ann Kington Mary Ann B. Lamb Susan Landin Donna Lawhon Joni Lawler Betty H. Lesko Ingrid Hinkley Lindsay Mrs. Arthur H. Lipscomb, Jr. Ellen E. Lusk Barbara B. Luton Joan Lyons Julie W. MacKinlay Mildred M. Mason Emily Ann Mason Susan F. McNeely Nancy McWane

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Mrs. Benjamin W. Mears, Jr. Rexanne D. Metzger Josephine J. Miller Ann Milliman Forrest Moore Sue Ann Morgan Margaret C. Moring Mrs. W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr. Jean B. Murray Kimbrough K. Nash Caroline H. Neal Muff Nolde Suzanne S. Obenshain Mercer O'Hara Jamie A. Old Merry A. Outlaw Mrs. William C. Overman Frances Hix Padden Susan W. Pannill Mrs. William G. Pannill Dana C. Parker Elizabeth J. Parrish Sara Belle E. Parrott Mary Bryan Perkins Nancy J. Philpott Helen Raney Pinckney Mary Louisa Pollard Mrs. J. Ridgely Porter III Charlotte Porterfield Marianne Prentiss Jane M. Purrington Mrs. Douglas E. Quarles, Jr. Elizabeth M. Quarles Linda D. Reynolds Joyce Rice Grace A. Rice Mrs. Emma H. Rich Kay Justice Ridinger Mrs. Robert W. Robinson, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Dale Rucker Mary Kay Ryan Helen J. Ryan Whitney and Ellen Saunders Gail L. Savage Evie Scott Margaret W. Scott Mrs. William Seale, Jr. Mrs. J. Brooks Semple Sally Seward Betty L. Shaw

Lea Carter Shuba Mrs. W. Ware Smith, Jr. Kitsy Smith Mr. and Mrs. Gerald F. Smith, Jr. Ellen Soyars Mrs. Joseph H. Spencer II Lois P. Spencer Laura S. Spratley Mrs. James. D. Sprinkle, Sr. Hollis Stauber Carol E. Strange Ms. Page D. Styles Mrs. E. Armistead Talman Suzanne S. Taylor Mrs. T. Eugene Temple Judith Boyd Terjen Mrs. W. McIlwaine Thompson, Jr. Mrs. Addison B. Thompson Emmy Lou Thomson Scottie Thomson Mrs. C. Kent Titus Blanche H. Toms Marcia B. Turner Mr. and Mrs. Harrison Ruffin Tyler KVA Foundation Bernice Walker Mary G. Walker Jessica Bemis Ward Betty Byrne Ware Fayetta Weaver Joan Wehner Martha Wertz Suzanne S. Wescoat Abbie Wharton Jane Baber White Dr. and Mrs. David C. Whitehead Catherine C. Whitham Mrs. Debi Whittle Mary Ratrie Wick Mrs. William N. Wilbur Mrs. Vann T. Williams Widget Williams Susan Winn Libby Singleton Wolf Mina Wood Betty W. Wright Page H. Young Kate Zullo

THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA


Donor

In Honor of

The Garden Club of Gloucester . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cabell West The Garden Club of Norfolk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cabell West The Petersburg Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Judy B. Perry E. Ann Stokes The Virginia Beach Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cabell West The Garden Club of Warren County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Di Cook Cabell West The Warrenton Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dr. Aileen H. Laing Candace Carter Crosby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mrs. W. Bedford Moore III Mr. and Mrs. Howard T. Holden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .The Augusta Garden Club Marty Jones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Karen Jamison Betty Kipps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jean Ince Aileen Laing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .The Warrenton Garden Club Anna Baldwin May . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Anne G. Baldwin Susan S. Mullin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mina Wood Nina W. Mustard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Karen Jamison Mr. and Mrs. Arthur H. Nash The Warrenton Garden Club Dianne N. Spence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Roxanne Brouse Karen Jamison Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. McDaniel Mr. and Mrs. Arthur H. Nash William D. Rieley Jane Clayton Webster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Robin Ingram Ann S. Wentworth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Emma Read Oppenhimer Cabell Goolsby West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mason Beazley Aurelia Lewis Donor

In Memory of

Mr. and Mrs. James. D. Blackwell, Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doris F. Blackwell The Charles Fund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sarah Eisenhart Carolyn Faison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Laurie Dudley Kathleen Hobson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Emily Alexander Aurelia Lewis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Laurie Dudley Mr. and Mrs. Harry Milan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Rosalind Abercrombie Charles Schwarzschild Jewelers Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Laurie Dudley Cabell Goolsby West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Laurie Dudley MARCH 2010

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The Garden Club of Virginia Endowment Supports the ongoing preservation of the historic Kent-Valentine House, headquarters of the Garden Club of Virginia and Historic Garden Week. Donor The Mill Mountain Garden Club The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club Sally Guy Brown Elisabeth Reed Carter Di Cook Ann Gordon Evans Ellen G. Godwin Virginia B. Guild Mary K. Hubard Trust Jeanette McKittrick Kimbrough K. Nash Steve and Judy Perry Mrs. W. McIlwaine Thompson, Jr. Mina Wood Donor In Honor of The Garden Club of Alexandria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mary Lou Seilheimer Chatham Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sharon Scott The Hampton Roads Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lee Snyder The Nansemond River Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mr. Tim Johnson Lou Pollard The Princess Anne Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cabell West Deedy Bumgardner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Rieley and Associates Jeanette Cadwallender . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mason Beazley Lis Doley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Millie West Mrs. Robert L. Galloway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mrs. James S. Redmond Margaret C. Moring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .The Hunting Creek Garden Club Mrs. Emma H. Rich . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Marcia-Lee Rich Donor In Memory of Fauquier and Loudoun Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Millicent West The Garden Club of the Middle Peninsula . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C. Tabor Cronk Temple Ryland Andrew L. Turner Nancy and Bo Bowles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Laurie Dudley Lucy R. Ellett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Anna Belle Brown Eason Nan Freed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dr. Lilburn Talley Tyler B. Kilpatrick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Laurie Dudley Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Laurie Dudley Charles and Ann Reed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Laurie Dudley Dianne Nea Spence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nannie Frank Dr. and Mrs. E. Armistead Talman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Laurie Dudley

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The GCV Conservation Fund Supports GCV clubs in local and statewide conservation projects. Donor Berenice D. Craigie Flossie Bryan Fowlkes Celie Harris Jil W. Harris Donor In Honor of The Garden Club of Danville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ms. Sallie Sebrell The Nansemond River Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Merry Outlaw Sallie Sebrell Candace Carter Crosby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mrs. James B. Murray Coralee B. Davis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fleet Davis Carter Blackford Filer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sally Guy Brown Gin Harris Cabell West Donor In Memory of The James River Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Bessie Bocock Carter Rossie Fisher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Bessie Bocock Carter

Symposium Sponsorship Provides support for the GCV 2010 Symposium. Donor Union Bank and Trust – Platinum Sponsor Blue Ridge Landscape and Design Glaize Apples Grelen Nursery Hilldrup Moving and Storage Hoffman Beverage Company The Homestead Macaulay & Burtch, P.C. Universal Leaf Tobacco Company, Inc. The Virginia Eye Institute Virginia Outdoors Foundation Virginia Beer Wholesalers Association Virginia Wine Wholesalers Association Donor In Memory of Anonymous Charlotte Benjamin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lucile H. Stump Lisa Cresson Cessie Howell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lucile H. Stump Mary Wynn McDaniel

MARCH 2010

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The Garden Club of Virginia Journal (USPS 574-520) 12 East Franklin Street Richmond, Virginia 23219

May 19-20

May 11-13

April 17- 25

April 15

April 6-8

March 8

Dugdale Award deadline for nominations

Horticulture Field Day, Eastern Shore

Annual Meeting, Richmond

Historic Garden Week in Virginia

Journal deadline

Daffodil Show, Sweet Briar College

GCV Journal workshop, Fredericksburg

THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA CALENDAR 2010

May 31

Dates and events as posted on the GCV Web site at http://gcvirginia.org. See Web site for further additions.

Periodicals Postage Paid At Richmond, Virginia And Additional Offices


GCV Journal March 2010