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SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

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Volume 83, No. 34

4 sections

30 pages

Go to www.GCTelegram.com to see a slideshow of the new Scott County Hospital.

As fuel prices rise, so does cost of food Consumers struggle to stretch their dollar. By ANGIE HAFLICH

ahaflich@gctelegram.com

While fuel prices continue to increase, food prices continue to follow suite. As a result, consumers are having to find ways to stretch their grocery dollars. Economically, a number of factors are at play with rising food prices. The most common tool in determining what percentage Americans as a whole spend on particular items is the consumer price index (CPI). According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, CPI is a measure of the average change over time in prices paid

by urban consumers for a market basket of consumer goods and services. Within the CPI calculation, which according to the bureau was at 3 percent for November 2010 through December 2011, are five categories: food and beverages, housing, apparel, transportation and medical costs. Charles Marcy, economics instructor at Garden City Community College, said that based on the bureau’s CPI calculation between November 2010 and December 2011, there are a couple of categories that stand out in terms of the rise in grocery prices. “In particular, in western Kansas, think about the fuel component that it takes. They have to pay to ship everything out here from Wichita or from

wherever it may be. Even the beef from Tyson gets shipped to Wichita or somewhere with a warehouse, where Dillons buys it and then ships it back to Garden City,” he said. “A good portion of the cost of the groceries we buy is that fuel we use to transport it.” Beef prices are expected to increase this year, due to cattle producers downsizing their herds, which also contributes to the overall CPI of groceries. “The meat, poultry and fish category ... makes up almost 2 percent of the whole CPI,” Marcy said. Meat items alone account for half of that category, at almost 1 percent of the total CPI. “Looking at what’s been hapSee Groceries, Page A5

Laurie Sisk/Telegram

Carolynn Polk looks over the selection of meats at Dillons East on Friday. Polk uses coupons to help lower her grocery bills.

Conserving water aim of initiative By RACHAEL GRAY

rgray@gctelegram.com

approximately 200 Scott County Hospital staff, with the core medical team consisting of four family practice physicians, four midlevel caregivers and a surgeon who was recently hired specifically to work at the new facility. Surgeries previously were done by traveling physicians. “For a small town, we have a surprisingly large array of services to offer,” Burnett said. Project Superintendent Kenny Giese of Nabholz Construction said the only items left to complete were flooring, some electrical work and the IT infrastructure that the hospital’s network will work from. Giese said the project was great to work on, with very few change orders during construction and no budget issues. He said the people of the community were excellent to work with, and that he was happy with his team and how the building turned out. “I’m tickled with the building,” Giese said. “Got a great project and a great team.” Burnett said he was pleased

Kansas farmers and producers can now apply for the Ogallala Aquifer Initiative and receive funding for water conservation from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service. The deadline to be considered for fiscal year 2012 funds is Feb. 24. The NRCS will fund this initiative through its Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP). Much of the High Plains region relies on the Ogallala for water but the resource is being depleted due to widespread irrigation use in the High Plains states. The Ogallala Aquifer, also known as the High Plains Aquifer, is a vast but shallow underground water table aquifer located beneath the Great Plains in the United States. It is one of the world’s largest aquifers and covers an area that includes portions of eight states: Colorado, South Dakota, Nebraska, Wyoming, Kansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and Texas. Amanda Shaw, supervisory district conservationist for the local NRCS division, said the funding is available for farmers and producers who engage in water-conservation practices such as switching from irrigated crops to dryland crops and converting flood irrigation system to center-pivot irrigation systems. “Those are the primarily the practices in this area,” she said. She said the land has to be agricultural land or land used for livestock production that produces at least $1,000 of agriculture products within the year. Financial assistance is available through the OAI for producers considering converting from irrigated cropland to dryland cropland, as well as assistance for more efficient irrigation systems and management. All participants must meet EQIP eligibility requirements. In Kansas, socially disadvantaged, limited resource, and beginning farmers and ranchers will receive a higher payment rate for conservation practices related to OAI, according to a release from NRCS.

See Hospital, Page A5

See Aquifer, Page A5

Hospital on the horizon Laurie Sisk/Telegram

An exterior view of the new Scott County Hospital shows the progress being made on the facility.

New Scott City facility nearing completion By JOSEPH JACKMOVICH

jjackmovich@gctelegram.com

SCOTT CITY — The new Scott County Hospital is rapidly approaching completion nearly two months ahead of its construction schedule. The 68,000-square-foot building is estimated to be cleared by the fire marshal for occupancy in mid- or late March, with patients planned to be moved to the new facility on April 9. The original plan had the hospital set for a May 28 completion date. Groundbreaking for the $24 million hospital took place on Aug. 30, 2010. With the hospital currently in its final stages of mostly cosmetic touches, Scott County Hospital President and CEO Mark Burnett said the design was meant to be as efficient and appealing as possible to staff, patients and guests. Hospital staff were deeply involved with the design of the hospital, because Burnett said they know best what kind of layout and design would work. Efficiency was the absolute core of the project, with even

Laurie Sisk/Telegram

Tom Collins, of Intego, works on the wiring for a nurses’ call station at the new Scott County Hospital on Friday. the building’s southwest face designed specifically to allow the maximum amount of sunlight on the parking lot to melt away ice and snow during winter weather. The hospital will have 20 acute care beds, two operating

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rooms, two delivery rooms, 30 exam rooms for resident and out-of-town physicians and four ER patient rooms. The hospital also will provide various rehabilitation and imaging services, a women’s care section and an outpatient clinic. There are

Opinion . . . . . . . . State . . . . . . . . . . . TV Listings . . . . . . Weather . . . . . . . .

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Grain prices at the Garden City Co-op Wheat...........6.30 Corn..............6.52

Milo..............5.99 Soybean......11.44

Schwieterman Inc. reported Chicago Live Cattle Futures: Feb. April June High........... 125.22......128.12.....127.05 Low............ 123.77......126.62.....125.80 Stand......... 124.20......127.05.....126.25

Weather Forecast Today, mostly cloudy, high 26, low 9. Sunday, mostly cloudy, high 38, low 18. Details on page A8.


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Lindsey Miller

SUBLETTE — Thomas James Woodruff died shortly after birth on Feb. 9, 2012. Holding him here for a short time on Earth was his father, Todd Woodruff, and waiting to greet him in heaven was his mother, Lindsey Miller. Thomas was already loved by his grandparents, Jerry and Cheri Miller of Sublette, Kan., Martha Miller of Sublette, Stuart and Tracy Woodruff of Peabody, Kan., Frank and Janice Woodruff of Peabody, and Glenda Vorse of Wichita, Kan.; his uncles, Clayton Miller of St. Louis, and Brandon Woodruff of Peabody; his aunts, Traylee Woodruff and Kathryn Woodruff of Peabody; and godparent and uncle, Dallas Miller of Kansas City. Rosary will be held on Sunday, Feb. 12, at 7 p.m. at St. Alphonsus Catholic Church in Satanta. Funeral services will be on Monday, Feb. 13, at 10:30 a.m. at the Sublette Southern Baptist Church. Interment will be at Haskell County Cemetery. Memorials will be used to create the Lindsey Miller Athletic Scholarship Fund. Memorials may be mailed to Haskell County Funeral Home, Box 607, Sublette, KS 67877. Haskell County Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Friends may call today from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday from 2 to 8 p.m. at the funeral home.

SUBLETTE — Lindsey Rae Miller, 27, died Feb. 9, 2012, the same day she gave birth to her beautiful son, Thomas James Woodruff. Lindsey was born in Ulysses, Kan., to Jerry and Cheri Miller on March 2, 1984. She was in a loving home with her brothers, Dallas Miller and Clayton Miller, with her grandparents, Howard and Martha Miller, and George and Marie Meier, nearby. Lindsey was engaged to Todd Woodruff and will be missed by several loving uncles, aunts and cousins. Lindsey’s countless friends were a huge part of her life. Lindsey graduated from Fort Hays State University with a Masters Degree in Business Administration and Marketing. She was involved with several campus organizations, loved volunteering for charitable organizations involving children and following her passion of refereeing various sporting events. Lindsey worked as the Market Development Director for Nu Life Market in Scott City, Kan. Rosary will be held on Sunday, Feb. 12, at 7 p.m. at St. Alphonsus Catholic Church. Funeral services will be on Monday, Feb. 13, at 10:30 a.m. at the Sublette Southern Baptist Church. Interment will be at Haskell County Cemetery. Memorials will be used to create the Lindsey Miller Athletic Scholarship Fund. Memorials may be mailed to Haskell County Funeral Home, Box 607, Sublette, KS 67877. Haskell County Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Friends may call today from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday from 2 to 8 p.m. at the funeral home.

Donnie Beltz HUGOTON — Donnie L. Beltz, 78, of Greensburg, died Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012, at South Wind Hospice Home in Pratt. She was born July 28, 1933, in Dodge City, to James T. and Bessie Richardson Lappin. On June 10, 1951, she married Elton D. Beltz in Hodgeman County. Ranchers and cattlemen, they also worked with their sons in the oilfield as B&B Fluid Service and owned Argus Hotel and Coffee Shop in Hugoton. Mrs. Beltz had been a Greensburg resident since 1982. Survivors include two sons, Dale R. and Chris L. Beltz, both of Hugoton; two sisters, Anna Mae Weilert Works of Humboldt, and Jimmie Powell of Louisville, Texas; six grandsons; and one granddaughter. She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband; a son, Johnny Wayne Beltz; a sister, Frances Link; and two brothers, David and Wilford Robinson. Funeral will begin at 10 a.m. Monday at Peace Lutheran Church in Greensburg. Graveside service will begin at 3 p.m. at Hugoton Cemetery. Visitation hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and 2 to 8 p.m. Sunday at Paul’s Funeral Home, Hugoton. Memorials are suggested to South Wind Hospice Home, 496 Yucca Lane, Pratt, KS 67124.

Correction In a story in Friday’s edition about a bus being renovated for returning and deploying soldiers, it was incorrectly reported as to who donated the bus. The bus was donated by Kevin Parks.

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INGALLS — Verne L e R o y Markel, 88, died Monday, Feb. 6, 2012, at St. Catherine Hospital in Garden City. He was born Feb. 2, 1924, in Gray County, to Clarence David and Mary Belle Kerr Markel. On March 15, 1946, he married Ruth “Caroline� Betzold in Garden City. She died Jan. 14, 2011. He also was preceded in death by a son, Ronald; and his parents. Mr. Markel was a farmer. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II. Survivors include two sons, Don Markel of Ingalls, and Ken Markel of Weatherford, Texas; eight grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. Private family graveside services were held at Cimarron Cemetery with military rites conducted. Memorials are suggested to the Humane Society, in care of Swaim Funeral Chapel, Box 1057, Cimarron, KS 67835. Thoughts and memories may be shared in the guest book at www.swaimfuneralhome.com.

Jerry Burden

Lorene Holder

LAKIN — Jerry B u rd e n , 70, died Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2012, at his home in Lakin. He was born Sept. 21, 1941, in Garden City, to Donald W. and Carol K. Steward Burden. He graduated from Lakin High School in 1959. M r . Burden was a lifetime f a r m e r. He was a U.S. A r m y veteran. O n Nov. 18, 1967, he married Karen Ann Sack in Hays. She survives. Other survivors include three daughters, Rebecca Burden of Garden City, Tiffany Smitheran and her husband, Brent, of Olathe, and Melissa Burden of Lenexa; a sister, Judith Ann VanRiper of Hutchinson; a grandson, Skyler Smitheran of Olathe; and one expected grandson. He was preceded in death by his parents and a brother, James D. Burden. Funeral will begin at 10:30 a.m. Monday at the Lakin United Methodist Church. Military graveside service will follow at Lakin Cemetery. Visitation hours are 1 to 8 p.m. today and Sunday at Garnand Funeral Home in Lakin, with the family greeting friends from 5 to 7 p.m. Sunday. Condolences may be emailed to garnandfh@sbcglobal.net. Memorials are suggested to the Lakin United Methodist Church or Kearny County Historical Society, both in care of the funeral home, 508 N. Main St., Lakin, KS 67860.

SCOTT CITY — Lorene “Granny� Holder, 89, died Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012, at Park Lane Nursing Home in Scott City. She was born Dec. 31, 1922, in Wilson, Okla., to Lee Earnest and Asia Mary Orr Hubbard. A resident of Scott City since 2008, Mrs. Holder was a retired custodian. Survivors include a son, Jerry Holder of Ruidoso, N.M.; two daughters, Darla Kinsey of Scott City, and Ruth Grinstead of Liberal; a brother, Earnest Hubbard of Payson, Ariz.; and a sister, Mary Carriker of Oklahoma. She was preceded in death by her parents; a daughter, Mary Gladis Holder; a brother, James Hubbard; and two sisters, Ruby Hubbard and Opal Petree. Graveside service will begin at 2 p.m. Monday at Arkalon Cemetery in Seward County. Visitation hours are 1 to 8 p.m. today and Sunday at Price & Sons Funeral Home, Scott City. Condolences may be given at www.priceandsons.com or pricefh@wbsnet.org. Memorials to the Lorene Holder Memorial Fund may be sent in care of the funeral home, 401 S. Washington St., Scott City, KS 67871.

Vera Glasco Vera G. Glasco, 92, died Friday, Feb. 10, 2012, at Homestead Nursing Home in Garden City. She was born May 28, 1919, in Greenwood County, to Frank and Daisy O’Burn Brown. On June 4, 1943, she married Forrest Glasco in Ft. Worth, Texas. He died July 4, 1990. She also was preceded in death by two brothers and four sisters. Mrs. Glasco was a homemaker. Survivors include two sons, Brad Glasco of Inyokern, Calif., and Robin Glasco of Cripple Creek, Colo.; three daughters, Vicki Olvang of Vange, Sweden, Jill Hemmert of Cimarron, and Kathleen Ramsey of Garden City; 10 grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; and one great-greatgrandchild. Funeral will begin at 11 a.m. Tuesday at Swaim Funeral Home, Dodge City. Burial will follow at Maple Grove Cemetery in Dodge City. Visitation hours are noon to 8 p.m. Monday at the funeral home. Thoughts and memories may be shared in the guest book at www.swaimfuneralhome. com. Memorials to the donor’s choice may be sent in care of the funeral home.

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For The Record

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

“Bill� Butler

Obituary policy Obituaries must be submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday through Friday for inclusion in the next day’s editions.

Kansas Lottery TOPEKA (AP) — These Kansas lotteries were drawn Friday: Daily Pick 3: 5-6-2 2 By 2: Red Balls: 9-17, White Balls: 1-10 Mega Millions: 3-4-18-2950, Mega Ball: 20 Megaplier: 4

Kobach: Panel not sign of ties By MARY CLARKIN

Special to The Telegram

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach said he “had no idea who was going to be on my panel� when he agreed to appear Saturday at the Conservative Political Action Committee conference in Washington, D.C. Kobach will share the stage with Robert Vandervoort, executive director of ProEnglish and who has past ties to the white nationalist group, Chicagoland Friends of American Renaissance, a news release from the Institute for Research and Education on Human Rights critically pointed out Thursday. Va n d e r vo o r t ’ s ProEnglish opposes bilingual ballots, bilingual education, and will host a panel discussion at the CPAC event on “The Failure of Multiculturalism.� Vandervoort also will be a member of an official CPAC event, a panel entitled, “Immigration: High Fences, Wide Gates: States vs. the Feds, the Rule of Law & American Identity.� Kobach and others will be on the panel, too. Kobach has gained national attention for his role writing laws in other states regarding illegal immigration. In Kansas, he pushed through a voter photo identification law last year. Kobach noted that two other members on the panel, U.S. Reps. David Rivera and Mario DiazBalart, both of Florida, are Hispanic. Also, the panel moderator, Congress of Racial Equality’s spokesman Niger Innis, is African-American.

alm st maine A delightful romantic comedy

By John Cariani

Phil Hoke Director

GCCC dinner theater Feb. 16, 17, 18 & 19

Pauline Joyce Fine Arts Building

Doors open at 6:15 p.m.

$20 single/$35 couple Dinner included

276-9540 Reservations

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Roundup Briefs Solid Ground to hold Valentine’s sale Solid Ground Coffee Shop, located at the lower level of St. Catherine Hospital, is having a special sale on Jumpy Monkey Coffee on Tuesday, which is Valentine’s Day. The coffee shop, open from 6 to 11 a.m. Monday through Friday, is staffed by individuals with intellectual disabilities who are served by Mosaic of Garden City. Jumpy Monkey Coffee is packaged by individuals who are served by Mosaic, a non-profit organization that serves people with developmental disabilities. For more information, call 2759180.

Entries sought for Pancake Day contest Area residents are invited to concoct a sweet or savory treat for the annual Pancake Day cooking and recipe contest, set for Feb. 18 at the Knights of Columbus Hall in downtown Liberal. The contest is open to anyone 12 or older living within a 70-mile radius of Liberal. Entrants are to create a unique dish using any type of pancake mix. Prizes will be awarded for first, second and third place, with entries judged on taste, originality and creativity, use of product and appetite appeal. First prize is $300 in cash and merchandise. Second prize is $100 in cash and merchandise. Third prize is $50 in cash and merchandise. Entry forms are available at the Liberal Convention and Tourism Bureau, One Yellow Brick Road, or at www.pancakeday.net. Entries must be submitted at the Liberal Convention and Tourism Bureau by 5 p.m. Thursday. For more information, call Jo Ann Combs at (620) 624-6423 or visit www.pancakeday.net.

Musical program scheduled for Tuesday A free musical program featuring “The Classic Three” will be presented at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Garden Valley Retirement Village, 1505 E. Spruce St. Gary Fuller of Garden City is the director of the group, which includes Burl Loving of Garden City and Max Moomaw of Dighton. The public is encouraged to attend. For more information, call 2755036.

On the agenda County to consider real estate contract By The Telegram County officials who agreed to sell a 50-acre parcel of land to a newly established business at the edge of town will consider a real estate contract next week. Commissioners who meet on Monday will consider the real estate purchase contract to sell the public land at the southeast corner of U.S. Highway 50/400 and Jennie Barker Road to Wyoming-based Transportation Partners and Logistics, LLC. The commission voted last week to sell the land for $1.5 million to the logistics company that is leasing the site to offload and truck wind generating components. The company wants to purchase the land prior to making multimillion-dollar rail investments at the site. During Monday’s commission meeting, County Administrator Randy Partington also will speak to county commissioners about the possibility of sponsoring an employee health clinic. The county meets at 8:30 a.m. at the Finney County Administrative Center, 311 N. Ninth St. Visit GCTelegram.com for a full look at Monday’s agenda.

3.60 3.25 3.37 Prices based on the most recent sampling of Garden City gas stations. Source: AAA Fuel Price Finder

Because...

THE GARDEN CITY TELEGRAM

Region & State

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

A3

Differences emerge among ‘Paint the Town’ partners By SHAJIA AHMAD

sahmad@gctelegram.com

A popular Main Street-centered project, “Paint the Town for the Holidays,” has caused some consternation among the partners involved. The endeavor that started in 2010 is an award-winning partnership between Downtown Vision and dozens of students and their art instructors belonging to the Garden City High School Art Club. But representatives of both parties recently have expressed different ideas about their plans for this upcoming Christmas season. In recent years, the students have taken to Main Street to paint storefront windows with holiday scenes featuring winter themes at participating businesses, both those belonging to the Downtown Vision group and those that are not members. The art teachers who lead the students said this upcoming November, the club would like to focus on the core business district of Main Street and not venture off to some outlying business as they’ve sometimes done in the past. In addition, they’d like to paint as many business — both Downtown Vision members and non-members alike — as possible, as well. “What the art club is trying to focus on is keeping to downtown and celebrating downtown business,” Roy Cessna, an

information officer with USD 457, said Friday. “There’s some Downtown Vision members that are not a part of the core business district, and I think what the art club wants to do is promote the great things that are happening downtown ... It’s also a great way to show off the kids’ artwork as you travel down Main.” Danielle Falor and Andrea Kirchoff, art teachers at the high school, agreed with Cessna. The pair of art teachers said Friday that students previously have spent three school days each November working on the window art, and some of that time has been dedicated to businesses outside the Main Street district area, a move that makes it challenging to supervise the students and will no longer be done. Falor added that details for the next academic year still are being hammered out, but their intention is to get to as many downtown businesses as possible. “What we’ve done in the past has not been a burden on our kids,” Falor said, adding that in years past the young artists have tried to get to as many businesses in and around Main as possible. Beverly Glass, executive director of Downtown Vision, said on Friday the art club and faculty advisors’ plans to paint all downtown business store windows rather than the group’s members only was

news to her. Glass said she agreed with the club representatives that the project should be contained to only businesses in the core downtown district and not in other parts of the town, as the art instructors intend to do, but that she would do her best to convince them to stick with the original intent of the project: decorating the fronts of member shops and offices with holiday-themed images not only as a perk to members but also as an incentive to drive membership into the group. “That’s not their decision to make,” Glass said Friday, referring to the group’s intentions to hit up as many storefronts as possible. “This is a Downtown Vision project. I understand they mean well and want to do everybody’s (storefronts), for the common good ... but it would seriously undermine our relationship,” Glass added. In a letter dated Jan. 20 to Downtown Vision members participating in the Paint the Town project, Glass said the project gives the central business district “added fun, reflects the spirit of the holidays,” and “featured a positive image of two segments of Garden City working together for the greater good.” The Vision director also said that while some art students may have received donations from Main Street retailers for their hard work, the Vision group neither receives

nor gives money to or from the artists. At least 65 businesses participated in the Paint the Town Project in 2010 with paint and brushes donated by many area paint and home improvement stores. Last November, the students painted at least 72 businesses, indicating some spike in interest from downtown merchants to have their storefronts painted with holiday colors for the spirited season. What’s more, the creative work of the students was recognized on a state level. The Paint the Town project won an Excellence in Public/Private Partnerships award from the Kansas Main Street program in October. The award is given in recognition of an outstanding local partnership between Main Street and another organization. At least 23 art students painted holiday scenes and festive borders to add to downtown’s Christmas spirit last November. According to Downtown Vision, the core business area includes Main Street, from Cedar Street to Depot Street; portions of Seventh Street, Eighth Street and Ninth Street that are parallel to Main; and intersecting streets including sections of Garden City Avenue, Spruce Street, Pine Street, Chestnut Street, Fulton Street, and Grant Avenue, all to the east and west of Main Street.

A day in the life of a USD 457 school counselor By RACHAEL GRAY

rgray@gctelegram.com

When three Garden City Public Schools counselors were asked to describe a typical day, they say such a day doesn’t exist. The counselors of USD 457 busy themselves daily with enrollment, academic advising, post-secondary planning, state assessment preparation and personal counseling. Some also do classroom visits and projects with students. Schools celebrated National School Counseling Week this past Monday through Friday. Kae Lee Hogan, Garden City High School counselor, has been a counselor for 19 years. During those nearly two decades Hogan has seen the job of school counselor transform. She said she deals more with academics than she used to, and spends more time with more students. “Before, we waited for kids to come and see us to catch up with them,” she said. “Now we develop a comprehensive program for every student. We want them to be successful before problems arise.” She said counselors now try to monitor grades during the semester instead of waiting to see students’ grades. “We can talk to them and try to get them going in the right direction,” she said. In her 19 years as counselor; Hogan said most of the problems teens face haven’t changed. She said a lot of students come to her to talk about problems they face with friends and parents. She said bullying is something she deals with at the high school, and she believes students are better about not bullying and excluding each other than they used to be. “The kids at Garden City High School are pretty nice to each other. It’s a big high school, so there’s different activities and different groups of kids. There’s something for everyone. At this high school we can all exist together,” she said. Hogan is one of six high school counselors. At Abe Hubert Middle School on Thursday, Mary Guymon was busy running back and forth between St. Dominic Catholic School and St. Mary Catholic School, working with students and parents on enrollment for the fall. Hogan has been a counselor for eight years at AHMS and has been working in the district

Things Happ en

Laurie Sisk/Telegram

Mary Guymon, a counselor at Abe Hubert Middle School, helps a student with career assessment software at AHMS on Thursday. for 15 years. She previously was a physics teacher. Hogan’s job has three components: career, social/emotional and academic. What she likes the most about her job is that no day is the same and the subjects counselors deal with are always changing. “I like all parts of my job. One thing is that it’s constantly changing,” she said. “A day is never set — there’s always a variety of things happening.” She said the job changes from year to year, as well. “This year, the sixth-graders wanted to know about texting and if we allow it at AHMS. Well, we don’t allow texting. But a few years ago, it was about whether they could chew gum. Now it’s all about the technology age. You can see how that changes over time,” she said. One of the ways in which technology is changing her job is now she addresses cyber-bullying and teaches lessons about it to students. “We have to make sure we’re up to date with that,” she said. Sheila Patchin, school counselor at Bernadine Sitts Intermediate Center, said she deals more with student issues instead of academics at that level, but still provides academic advising. Patchin helped create a student council, which combines

with the Leadership Club as a way to give younger students more responsibility and activity. In her nine years as counselor, she said, student issues have changed and many have to do with technology or familial structures. “I think children have exposure to more information and more experiences — things that they used to not have been exposed to until much later in life,” she said. Patchin said technology plays a big role in that because students have access to information via the Internet and cell phones 24 hours a day. “A lot of the children aren’t monitored or have their cell phones with them all night,” she said. “They stay connected 24 hours a day.” She said technology is wonderful in opening the door to more information but also can be harmful. Patchin said cyberbullying is an example. “Bullying hasn’t changed much over the years, but we’re talking about it more. And a lot of students don’t understand the harm in sharing information like photos and videos on the Internet — those spread like wildfire,” she said. Patchin said children are growing up faster than they used to and often take care of each other while parents are at

work. Some parents work opposite shifts, leaving children to look after each other. “Most children say they want to spend more time with their parents,” she said. Patchin also said children are dealing with familial issues at younger ages because some students deal with family members being in the court system because of alcohol or drugs. The best part of Patchin’s job, she said, is being a familiar face students can come to with problems. “The best part is when I go down the halls and students greet me. I don’t have classes with them and don’t work with them daily, but they still greet me. That means a lot,” she said. In November 2011, USD 457 counselors received the 2011 Kansas School Counseling Standard of Excellence Award from the Kansas State Department of Education (KSDE) for the district’s Comprehensive Counseling Program Guide. The award honored the district for achieving excellence in the area of school counseling. KSDE honored 17 schools at the Annual Fall Counselor Conference at Emporia State University last November. The district was the only one to receive the award — the others recognized were individual schools.

(620) 276-7671 302 North Fleming, Suite #1 Garden City kellerleopold.com


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Opinion

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

THE GARDEN CITY TELEGRAM

COMMENTARY LEONARD PITTS Miami Herald Dena Sattler, Editor/publisher

denas@gctelegram.com

Public faith vs. private faith

Our View

High honor

R

Local award puts spotlight on many difference-makers.

L

ast year, a local organization took on the challenge of choosing an outstanding leader in nonprofit endeavors. It was a lofty task in a community that sees countless examples of excellent leadership at work every day for the many nonprofit agencies called on to serve Finney County. Which nonprofit organiFrom orgazations do the most to improve Finney County? nizations that Add your comments at aid children — the end of the online verBig Brothers sion of this editorial at Big Sisters GCTelegram.com/opinion. of Finney and Kearny Counties, for example — to a resource for older residents in the Senior Center of Finney County, nonprofit agencies help people of all ages. And those missions have become all the more difficult in the midst of ongoing financial challenges. With that in mind, High Plains Grant Makers crafted the Non-Profit Leader Award to honor local individuals who have a significant impact on their organization and community. Consisting of representatives of the granting organizations Western Kansas Community Foundation, Finnup Foundation, Kemper Foundation and the Finney County United Way, High Plains Grant Makers provides resources to help meet needs of nonprofit agencies that don’t always have funds to travel for workshops on grant writing and other vital areas. The organization is moving forward again this year with the Non-Profit Leader Award, which includes $2,500 to be used for professional development — a significant sum at a time state budget cuts and other setbacks have made dollars tight for so many nonprofit agencies. Award nominees must work or volunteer extensively with a 501(c)3 organization in Finney County and be at least 18 years old.   An online application for nominations is available at highplainsgrantmakers.org. Or, call (620) 276-3032 for more information. Not surprisingly, the High Plains Grant Makers fielded an impressive number of strong nominations last year. John Hogg, executive director of Santa Fe Trail Council Boy Scouts of America, eventually was named winner of the Non-Profit Leader Award. Hogg was one of 15 nominated for the award — a who’s who of people who make a difference every day through their jobs and volunteer efforts. Expect another crowded field of outstanding nominees this time around in a community that depends on many caring individuals to do the good work of nonprofit agencies.

Today’s Quotes “Come on commissioners you can’t enforce the zoning laws that are on the books now. ...”

— Online comment at GCTelegram. com in response to a story on a Garden City Commission move to amend zoning regulations that will now allow keeping limited numbers of some fowl — female chickens and ducks — in residential areas in Garden City.

“I think in learning to love an animal, it makes you a person that is so forgiving and so cautious, and I think it even made me a better parent.”

— Judy Belknap of Garden City, from a feature story in today’s edition on her family life as the daughter of longtime local zoo superintendent Claude Owens.

Letters Policy The Telegram welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include the writer’s address and phone number. All letters will be confirmed before publication.

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Letters are subject to editing for libel and length, and must be 500 words or less.

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Thank-you letters should be general in nature. Form letters, poems, consumer complaints or business testimonials will not be printed.

Write to:

Attn. Editor 310 N. Seventh St. Garden City, KS 67846

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Online

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Baby boomers smitten with JFK J

ohn F. Kennedy is the man whose picturesque presidency launched a thousand coffee-table books. When the late conservative writer William F. Buckley was asked to explain Kennedy’s enduring appeal, he said, “His sheer beauty.” Mimi Alford’s account of life at the White House as a 19-year-old intern who caught the president’s eye is a vividly personal portrayal of the ugliness behind the alluring images. Alford’s belated tell-all, “Once Upon a Secret,” should be assigned in women’s studies classes as an illustration of the power imbalances in employer-employee sexual liaisons, especially those involving commanders in chief and their interns. It’s not news that JFK had an, ahem, active personal life. But a certain romance has attached to it. Marilyn Monroe’s famously breathy rendition of “Happy Birthday, Mr. President” is redolent of knowing, sophisticated fun, of adults in on a seductive secret. The reality wasn’t as magical. Within her first week as an intern, JFK’s friend and procurer Dave Powers invited her to a midday swim with the president and some of the gals from the secretarial pool. At the end of the day, the rising sophomore at Wheaton College was invited to a gettogether in the family residence. She was plied with daiquiris, then the president peeled her away from the group with an invitation to a private tour of the residence. Alford lost her virginity

on the fashionably elegant Mrs. Kennedy’s bed. “I wouldn’t describe what happened that night as making love,” Alford writes. “But I wouldn’t call it nonconsensual, either.” That double negative captures the entire relationship, if that’s not too glorified a word. Alford says she was thrilled by JFK’s attentions, it made her feel “special.” He was playful and gentle with her, supposedly called her at school, and opened up a world of power and glamour unimaginable to the average college senior, let alone a sophomore. Ultimately, though, she was a plaything at the sultan’s court. He never kissed her. Once, as she was smuggled along on a trip with JFK, Dave Powers made her sit on the floor of his car to hide from the White House staff — unsuccessfully. During a White House swim, she says, JFK commanded her to perform oral sex on Powers, and, to her humiliation, she complied. Later, he prodded her to do the same for his “baby brother,” Teddy. No one can confirm what happened in JFK’s pool so many decades later. But as The New Republic’s Timothy Noah notes, “The likelihood that Alford is making this story up is extremely remote.” Alford didn’t write her book until she was outed

by a JFK biographer and an enterprising journalist. If the broad outlines of her book accord with what we already knew about JFK, the details suggest he wasn’t just a standard-issue womanizer but a loathsome creep. For Kennedy worshipers, this is out-weighed by ... what? By the fact that he was their first political love. By his martyrdom. And by “his sheer beauty.” MSNBC host and author Chris Matthews, who is all too willing to perform the journalistic and historical equivalent of Mimi Alford’s services, is the perfect archetype of the baby boomer who started out smitten by Kennedy and has never stopped. He calls his recent hagiography “Jack Kennedy: Elusive Hero.” The search for what it is in JFK’s record that justifies the adulation is just as elusive. Ordinarily liberals wouldn’t be so forgiving of a president who was cautious on civil rights, whose administration surveilled Martin Luther King Jr., who began our involvement in the Vietnam War. According to Alford, JFK was obsessed with his hair. He let her administer his daily hair treatment, insisting on products only from Frances Fox and on a brush, not a comb. When they broke up after she got engaged, he gave her gold-and-diamond pins — and a photograph of himself, at the helm of the yacht Manitou. It’s a terrific photo, of a man who was a handsome lie.

Email Rich Lowry at comments. lowry@nationalreview.com.

Seeking a little more passion I

t seems to me that what is missing in the top two contenders for the Republican presidential nomination is passion. While Ron Paul speaks with passion of the Federal Reserve and Rick Santorum speaks with passion about life, Newt Gingrich speaks passionately mostly about Mitt Romney; and Mitt, it seems, merely speaks in sound bites. I don’t know about you, but I want to see them seek to build their own shining city on a hill such as that my dad envisioned, and not simply attempt to recreate that vision and make it their own. I want them to stop speaking merely in sound bites, but rather to speak to me in parables to which I can relate. I want to feel their speeches, not just hear them. It needs to be more than “I’m not Mitt,” or “I can beat Obama.” I want them to convince me they really mean what they say, not what they think I want to hear. If indeed Newt and Mitt can find the passion of Rick Santorum, and even that of my dad, they will go a long way towards winning not

only the Republican nomination, but also the presidency itself. As many readers know, I have endorsed Newt and traveled with him on the campaign trail as a private citizen, but he can do better in this respect. We Americans prefer to hear the real truth, not what politicians want us to hear. In the era of Barack Obama the message we hear from Washington is, “Trust me, we know what is good for you.” That’s the message of tyrants, as many who lived under Hitler and Mussolini discovered as they were herded into concentration camps. In those dreadful times, Germans, Italians and others under their rule were fed slogans such as those seen on signs above the entrances of concentration camps: “Arbeit Makt Frei — Work Makes Freedom.” To the Nazis and Fascists, freedom and death and work and slavery were conflated with respect to

individuals; all that mattered was the state. One of the early signs of an incoming dictatorship is a government’s attack on the Christian church. Tragically, we are beginning to see something like that now, in the Army’s attempt to censor chaplains — to tell them what they can or cannot say in their sermons. The government in this case appears to believe that it is superior to any religion — that it is entitled to overrule the doctrines of faith by which all legitimate religious organizations live. We must, in their view, submit our articles of faith for government review and tolerance. Accept this and bid freedom of religion farewell. Let’s find the passion to make Obama a one-term president.

Michael Reagan is the founder and chairman of The Reagan Group and president of The Reagan Legacy Foundation. Email him at Reagan@caglecartoons.com. Distributed by Cagle Cartoons Inc.

eally? Seriously? In the history of pro sports, men have done all sorts of things to commemorate their feats on the field or the court. They have flopped like seals, walked like gorillas, head-butted like bighorn sheep. They have high-fived, low-fived, dog-piled, chestbumped, wept, kissed their own biceps. They have breakdanced, riverdanced, jitterbugged and otherwise tripped the light fantastic. Yet Tim Tebow becomes a figure of national fascination, consternation and controversy because he takes a knee and bows his head in a gesture of Christian faith? The latest example of the enduring interest in that ritual came Saturday on the “NFL Honors” program on NBC as host Alec Baldwin imitated the quarterback’s signature pose. Baldwin’s mimicry was a gentle poke in the ribs — Tebow, who was in the audience, even came onstage to help him get it right — but not all the commentary has been so mild. Many of the professionally snide — like “Comedy Central’s” Daniel Tosh, and the inexplicably self-satisfied Bill Maher — have been notably vicious in their lambasting of the Denver Broncos playmaker. (“Jesus just — expletive — Tim Tebow bad,” tweeted Maher after a Broncos loss.) It is amusing to imagine the outrage those same folks would (rightly) spew if some Muslim player were attacked by the Christian right for genuflecting to Allah during the game. Many in this country — perhaps more accurately, many in the media — seem nonplussed and discomfited by any expression of faith. Penis jokes are fine and grisly violence is still as American as apple pie, but God talk makes people nervous. That speaks volumes. Of course, there is another side to that state of affairs. Take this neither as criticism of Tim Tebow nor as exoneration of Bill Maher, but organized religion bears some onus for that hypocrisy. To the degree faith is seen as synonymous with the aforementioned Christian right, it becomes a thing to be brayed by conservative extremists for political gain. It becomes a crowd gathering on courthouse steps to bemoan the removal of a rock bearing the Ten Commandments, becomes a school board trying to use the Book of Genesis in high school science classes, becomes a justification to abuse Muslims and gays. It becomes license for regrettable behavior. Moreover, it becomes a whirl of God talk and God iconography, a cross as fashion statement, a WWJD bracelet, a football player kneeling on the field. But that is faith externalized for public consumption, faith that runs the risk of being shiny and superficial. It doesn’t speak to the decisions we make, the people we are, when despair comes creeping into the midnight hour. Nor does it speak to any obligation toward the scabrous, the lost, the unwashed, the impoverished, the disgusted, the detested, the detestable. Indeed, those whose faith is most loudly externalized are often the ones most conspicuously silent on that obligation. Reputation, it is said, is about who you are when people are watching; character is about who you are when you are alone in the room. There is a similar duality in modern faith, a tension between faith externalized for public consumption and that which wrestles despair in the midnight hour. Each has its place. But only one will see you through till the morning comes. ••• NOTE: In a recent column, I announced a giveaway of 50 copies of “The New Jim Crow” by Michelle Alexander. Twelve thousand entries later, the winners have been chosen. Go to miamiherald.com to see if you were one of them. If you are, the book should be in your mailbox soon.

Leonard Pitts is a columnist for the Miami Herald. Email him at lpitts@miamiherald.com.


THE Garden City Telegram

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

A5

Groceries: As fuel prices rise, so does cost of food Continued from Page A1

Laurie Sisk/Telegram

The lobby of the new Scott County Hospital begins to take shape in preparation for an April opening.

Hospital: New facility nears completion Continued from Page A1

with Giese’s work, calling it a first-class job. The main entrance to the hospital is met with a high ceiling with numerous windows for light and gently curving hallways with natural stone along a portion of one wall. The main hallway leads westward to an open dining area that is open to the public, something Burnett said is somewhat unusual for a small hospital. The dining area is a central feature of the hospital, and Burnett said that if someone loses their way they can get their bearings as long as they know where the dining area is located. A central meeting area near the dining area allows for several configurations, so the room may be broken into two or opening additional seating for people eating. Across the hallway from the dining area is the surgery waiting area, to allow people to grab a quick bite without leaving the waiting area. Inside the waiting area are four pre/post-op rooms, a scoping room and two operating rooms. The operating rooms already were filled with overhead booms, monitors, lights and other equipment.

After construction is completed, two separate teams will give the area a cleaning to make the area completely sterile. “We’re proud of this OR,� Burnett said. “This is going to be a whole lot better.� Next door to the surgery section are the two delivery rooms, which Burnett said was done for a reason. In continuing with the plan of efficiency, the delivery rooms were placed next to the operating rooms in case something happened during delivery that required urgent medical attention. In between the two delivery rooms is a central storage area, allowing staff to only have to travel a few feet to get needed supplies regardless of what room they are working in at the time. Down the hall is the acute care ward, which is designed as two triangles inside of one another with gently curving hallways. The hallways are curved to discourage the travel of sound, which creates quieter patient rooms. The inner triangle of the ward is for storage and supplies, with the rooms taking up the outer triangle. Each room will have Wi-Fi access and a computer terminal to allow staff to review charts and order tests.

“I think this whole building is an interesting design,� Burnett said, speaking about the layout of the acute ward. “I didn’t want this place to feel like an institution.� Next to the acute care ward is the imaging department, which provides services such as X-rays and mammograms. The area doubles as a Federal Emergency Management Agency storm shelter, with heavy double doors making that area of the hospital feel distinctly different from the rest. The administrative offices, which consist of seven offices and a board room, were placed on the periphery of the hospital to allow for future expansion. Burnett said administration is the easiest section to displace, so he wanted it out of the central area so it could be moved more easily if the hospital needs to grow in the future. On the east side of the hospital are the outpatient services, which include the clinic and rehabilitation. Local physicians each will have their own office and separate hallway of exam rooms, making trips between exams simpler. The hospital’s design as a whole reflects

Aquifer: Conservation the focus of USDA initiative Continued from Page A1

“In Kansas, water quantity and quality is a high priority resource concern under EQIP,� said Eric B. Banks, State Conservationist for NRCS in Kansas. “The additional funding will allow the opportunity for agriculture producers to address these concerns, by implementing conservation practices such as irrigation water management, crop rotations, and replacing inefficient gravity irrigation systems.�

Burnett’s desire to bring more accommodating service to the hospital experience. He said he wanted to focus on making the facility seem more like a hotel, allowing patients to center on what they can directly appreciate, like the quality of their rooms and food. He said it was all part of the hospital’s motto, “We treat you like family.� Burnett said that most of all he was happy with how the vision he had two years ago was perfectly brought into reality. He said that while the hopital isn’t meant to compete with larger facilities in the area, he intends for the hospital to be top of the line for the population it serves. “The colors are right, the design is right, and the architecture is right,� Burnett said. “In the segment we provide, we aren’t going to be second to anyone.�

pening with the smallersized cattle herds here in the U.S. over the last year — now you’re seeing some of the impact of that,� he said. “In addition to the fact that fuel prices have remained high, it isn’t much of a stretch to connect the rise of grocery prices to these two factors.� Ironically, for Dillons customers who possess a Dillons fuel card, the higher the grocery bill, the greater possible savings on fuel. Fuel reward points are accumulated each month for customers who possess a fuel card. The card not only provides a discount on featured groceries, but the higher the grocery bill, the more fuel reward points can be accumulated. Carolynn Polk of Garden City said that because her children are grown, she does not frequent the grocery store as much as she used to but that less frequent trips have resulted in larger grocery bills. In some cases, the larger the grocery bill, the greater the overall savings. “When you shop at Dillons, they send you personal coupons so I had one this morning — it was so many dollars off if you spent more than $120 in groceries. The bill this morning was $170, and it ended up being $130,� Polk said. Lyn Roth of Garden City has found some other ways to save. “Most of the time, I use coupons. But when certain products rise in price, I look for the knockoff or store brands that are cheaper and work just as good, like value brand

stuff at Walmart,â€? she said. Debra Bolton, area extension specialist at the Finney County K-State Research and Extension office, said that their organization helps low-income families stretch their grocery dollars. One suggestion she had for saving on groceries, particularly food, is to cook from scratch. “You might have to invest a little more upfront by purchasing the flour and other ingredients, but it’s not mixed for you, so it doesn’t cost as much. Plus, you can control the amount of fat, sodium and sugar that you put into it — so it’s a healthier option too,â€? Bolton said. In the book, “Savvy Shopping: How to Reduce Your Weekly Grocery Bill to $85 Per Week — or Less,â€? author Toni House has several tips for saving grocery money: • Be patient. Save pricier purchases for double coupon days. • Be detail-oriented. How much more will a coupon be worth on double coupon days? • Plan ahead. Instead of always playing catchup, replacing what you’ve run out of, you only purchase an item when it’s on the menu. • Instead of making expensive foods (meat) the centerpiece of each meal, design menus that use the most expensive foods less often. • At the grocery store, buy only what you can eat. • Grocery store prices for non-food items are higher than you’ll pay almost anywhere else. • Do use coupons, but only for products you actually need.

presents

         

EQIP Sign-up Information • To sign an application for OAI stop by the local USDA Service Center and visit with the NRCS staff. For more information about OAI and other natural resources conservation programs, contact local NRCS office or conservation district office. The office is located at your local USDA Service Center. • Garden City’s local USDA NRCS center is located at 411 N. Campus Drive, or call 275-0327. • More information is available on the Kansas wesbiste: http://www.ks.nrcs.usda.gov�www.ks.nrcs.usda.gov. Follow NRCS on Twitter @NRCS_Kansas.

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A6

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THE Garden City Telegram

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

A7

Romney and Paul: Not allies but not foes, either PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Mitt Romney and Ron Paul rarely even acknowledge each other in the Republican presidential race, focusing their attention and attacks on rivals Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum instead. That curious detente is being tested in Maine’s caucuses this week, where Romney’s reputation as a political shape shifter is going head-to-head with Paul’s consistent libertarian views. The caucuses began Feb. 4 and will continue today, when the state party will announce the results of the nonbinding presidential straw poll. Paul has campaigned hard in the state, and Romney has taken steps to shore up his position there to offset a potentially embarrassing loss following defeats in Missouri, Colorado and Minnesota. Romney unexpectedly added two caucus appearances to his schedule early today, an indication that the campaign is concerned about the potential of another defeat in the low-turnout affair. And the significance also is great for Paul, who has staked his candidacy on winning at least a handful of smaller caucus states. Santorum, who won the three contests earlier in the week, has not competed actively in Maine, nor has Gingrich. That leaves an unusually direct contest between Romney and Paul, pitting the former Massachusetts governor’s establishment support and geographic advantages against the Texas congress-

man’s relatively small but passionate band of activists. In many ways, the two candidates could not be more different. While Romney has changed positions on a number of important issues including abortion, gay rights and health care policy, Paul has hewed to his small government message since entering Congress in 1978. The Maine face-off also is renewing attention to the persistent deep divisions in the GOP — the more moderate, business-oriented wing represented by Romney and the restless tea party voters who’ve been receptive to much of Paul’s platform. Romney’s aides say they do not view Paul as a threat to winning the nomination. But Romney and his team have also been mindful not to do or say anything that might anger Paul’s loyal supporters. “I think he’s being very careful because he knows how important the Ron Paul voters are — they obviously represent a very different dynamic,” said Mike Dennehy, a former top aide to Republican John McCain’s 2008 campaign. “They are the most passionate and the most frustrated of any voters heading to the polls. And many of them are independents.” To be sure, Romney and Paul do share some similarities. Both have decades-long marriages — Romney and his wife, Ann, have been married for 43 years, while Paul and his wife, Carol, have been wed 55 years. The two couples each have five

Associated Press

In this Jan. 23, 2012 photo, Republican presidential candidates, Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, right, and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney share a laugh during a break in a Republican presidential debate at the University of South Florida in Tampa, Fla. Romney and Paul rarely acknowledge each other in the Republican presidential race, focusing their attention and attacks on rivals Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum instead. That curious detente will be tested in Maine’s caucuses today, where Romney’s reputation as a political shape shifter is set to go head-to-head with Paul’s quirky but consistent set of libertarian beliefs. children and large broods of grandchildren. Both Romney and Paul are physically fit and highly disciplined in their personal habits. They’re also religious — Romney is a Mormon, and Paul is a Baptist who leaves the campaign trail most Sundays in part to attend church services near his Texas home. Both men are veterans of the 2008 Republican nomination contest and are on friendly personal terms, as

are their wives, aides say. The relationship in part explains their unwillingness to attack one another. Paul’s TV ads, which have included harsh, pointed critiques of Santorum and Gingrich, have been much easier on Romney. Paul’s campaign ran one ad casting all three rivals as “counterfeit conservatives,” but otherwise he has not criticized Romney with the same intensity as he has Gingrich. He slammed Gingrich for

his work for the federal mortgage giant Freddie Mac, and he cast Santorum as a “corporate lobbyist and Washington politician.” Paul has also defended Romney against attacks on Bain Capital, the investment firm where Romney made millions. Critics, including Gingrich, have criticized Bain for consolidating companies and laying off workers to make big profits for Romney and other executives at the firm.

Santorum, Romney sell selves to conservatives WASHINGTON (AP) — GOP presidential rivals made contrasting appeals to conservatives Friday, with Mitt Romney saying he proved his mettle as Massachusetts governor and Rick Santorum saying Romney is so moderate that electing him would be a “hollow victory.” Their speeches to the Conservative Political Action Conference came as Santorum tries to convert his surprising caucus wins this week into a resilient, muscular campaign and Romney seeks to persuade conservatives that he won’t disappoint them. Santorum’s tack was unorthodox, and perhaps risky. Facing Republicans who desperately want to replace President Barack Obama, Santorum said it’s even more vital to put a conservative crusader into the White House. “We will no longer abandon and apologize for the policies and principles that made this country great for a hollow victory in November,” he said. If voters see that as a hint that it’s more important to be ideologically pure than to oust Obama, Santorum may have to explain more fully in the days ahead. Romney, speaking a few hours later, said his four-year record in Massachusetts proved that he will fight for conservative values against the toughest odds. “I know conservatism because I have lived conservatism,” he said. Veering briefly from his written text, he called himself “severely conservative.” But Romney skated past details of his administration that trouble some right-leaning groups, including requiring state residents to obtain health insurance. Without saying Romney’s name, Santorum said the former governor’s health care record would make it impossible for him to draw needed contrasts with Obama. He said Romney had created “the stepchild of Obamacare.” Saying the Obamabacked 2010 health care law “will crush economic freedom,” Santorum urged Republicans not to nominate “someone who would simply give that issue away in the fall.” Santorum warned Republicans against a premature emphasis on moderate voters, who could decide the presidential election in swing states.

“We always talk about, ‘Oh, how are we going to get the moderates?”’ Santorum said. “Why would an undecided voter vote for a candidate of a party who the party is not excited about?” Romney alluded to his rivals obliquely, never saying their names. Presidential leadership “isn’t about getting a bill out of subcommittee or giving a speech,” he said. “I am the only candidate in this race, Republican or Democrat, who has never worked a day in Washington.” His r e m a rk s appeared aimed at former Pennsylvania Sen. Santorum, former House speaker Newt Gingrich and Rep. Ron Paul, all of whom spent years in Congress. Gingrich was scheduled to address CPAC later Friday. Paul was not scheduled to address the conference. Romney tried to reassure the audience that antipathy to Obama will energize millions of voters this fall, an indirect way of saying the lukewarm reception he gets from some conservatives isn’t crucial. Obama “is the conservative movement’s top recruiter,” he said. Romney said he would cut federal spending like he cut state spending in Massachusetts, although he vowed not to touch military budgets. “I was a conservative governor,” he said. “I fought against long odds in a deep blue state. I understand the battles that we, as conservatives, must fight because I have been on the front lines.” Santorum and Romney criticized the Obama administration’s bid to require Catholic-affiliated employers to cover birth control in their health insurance plans. After Santorum’s morning speech and before Romney’s afternoon address, Obama announced an update. He said religious-affiliated employers will not have to cover birth control for their employees. Instead, the government will demand that insurance companies be directly responsible for providing contraception. Santorum, a Catholic with a strong record of fighting legalized abortion, said Obama is “telling the Catholic Church that they are forced to pay for things that are against their basic tenets and teachings.” “It’s not about contraception, it’s about economic liberty,” he said.

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“If he loses the election because he restructured companies, I don’t think that’s a healthy way to sort out the candidates,” Paul said in New Hampshire when asked about Romney’s history at Bain. Romney won New Hampshire’s first-in-thenation primary, and Paul came in second. Romney has returned the favor, occasionally praising Paul in debates for his understanding of health care. Paul is a former Air Force flight surgeon and obstetrician. “You do exactly what Ron Paul said ... you have to get health care to start working more like a market,” Romney said in a debate in December when asked how he would improve health coverage as president. Romney reiterated that praise this week in a conference call with Maine supporters, saying Paul’s years as a doctor gave him real world experience Gingrich and Santorum lack. For Romney, staying on Paul’s good side is also strategic. Paul’s presence in the race weakens Gingrich and Santorum, making things easier for Romney, the field’s front-runner. Paul has earned more than 10 percent of the vote in every contest so far, except for the 7 percent he earned in Florida. And he’s finished in the top three in three of the first eight contests. Those are voters who might otherwise support Gingrich or Santorum, since there is little overlap between Romney’s voters and Paul’s.


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SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

the Garden City Telegram

THE WEATHER

5-DAY GARDEN CITY FORECAST

Abortion foe blocks proposed Kansas abortion ban

GARDEN CITY ALMANAC

Statistics are through 7 p.m. yesterday

TODAY

Temperature

Mostly cloudy and colder

26°

Wind: ESE 8-16

SUNDAY

Mostly cloudy, breezy and not as cold

38° 18° Wind: S 20-30

MONDAY

High Low Normal high Normal low Record high Record low

35° 21° 47° 18° 79° (1999) -14° (1981)

Precipitation 24 hours through 7 p.m. yest. 0.00" Month to date 0.31" Normal month to date 0.17" Year to date 0.31" Normal year to date 0.64" Record for the date 0.89" (1993) Days of precipitation in February 3

TODAY'S HEAT INDEX

Clouds giving way to a brightening sky

An indication of how hot it feels based on the humidity and temperature.

47° 22°

25°

Wind: NNW 7-14

20°

25

22

19

13

15° 10°

TUESDAY

Partial sunshine

52° 27°

SUN AND MOON

Wind: SSE 10-20

WEDNESDAY

Mostly cloudy with rain and snow possible

9 a.m.

Noon

3 p.m.

Sunrise today Sunset tonight Moonrise today Moonset today New Last

6 p.m.

7:39 a.m. 6:17 p.m. 11:02 p.m. 9:28 a.m. Full First

47° 25° Wind: NE 10-20

Feb 14

Feb 21

Feb 29

Mar 8

STATE FORECAST Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonight's lows.

Colby 20/10 Hays 20/7

Atchison 20/1 Kansas City Topeka 22/8 22/4

Belleville 18/3 Salina 22/9

Emporia Dodge City Wichita 22/6 Hutchinson 22/9 26/9 24/5 Liberal Coffeyville 26/11 25/10

Garden City 26/9

AGRICULTURE REPORT Forecast for Garden City and the surrounding area Mostly cloudy and colder today.Winds east-southeast 8-16 mph. Expect less than 2 hours of sunshine with average relative humidity 40%. Partly cloudy tonight.Winds south-southeast 10-20 mph. Average relative humidity 50%. Mostly cloudy, breezy and not as cold tomorrow.Winds south 25-35 mph. Expect 2-4 hours of sunshine.

Soil Temperature Yesterday

Growing Degree Days Used to measure crop development. They are determined by subtracting 50 from the day's average temperature with negative values counting as zero.

Yesterday Season to date Normal season to date

0 4414 3418

Livestock Stress Index Temperature-Humidity Index Cattle Stress Category Poultry Stress Category Swine Stress Category

34°

35 Safe Safe Safe

source: Iowa State University

NATIONAL FORECAST Saturday, February 11, 2012 Seattle 48/40 Billings 26/18

San Francisco 56/47

Minneapolis 14/4

Detroit 24/14 New York 39/22

Chicago 23/10

Denver 28/10

Washington 44/22

Kansas City 22/8 Los Angeles 64/51

Atlanta 40/19 El Paso 65/40

Houston 56/31

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

-10s -0s

Miami 78/50

Cold Warm Stationary

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

0s

10s

20s

Today City Albuquerque Atlanta Billings Boise Boston Charlotte Cheyenne Chicago Columbus, OH Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Las Vegas Little Rock

Hi 58 40 26 48 36 52 22 23 26 42 28 18 24 65 81 56 26 67 38

Lo 32 19 18 36 19 19 9 10 14 23 10 4 14 40 69 31 10 46 21

30s 40s

50s

60s

70s

80s

Sun.

W pc pc c pc r pc sn pc sf pc sn s pc s s pc pc pc pc

Hi 49 43 39 47 26 45 32 30 31 44 36 26 29 59 81 53 31 62 39

Lo 32 25 24 33 17 19 19 18 17 35 19 17 20 43 69 43 17 46 33

Fronts

90s 100s 110s

Today W r s pc pc pc s c s pc pc c s pc r pc pc s s pc

City Los Angeles Memphis Miami Minneapolis New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tulsa Washington, DC

Hi 64 32 78 14 52 39 32 16 41 74 26 52 26 48 62 56 48 26 44

Lo 51 21 50 4 31 22 15 -3 24 55 13 34 14 31 53 47 40 14 22

W pc pc t pc pc sn pc s sn pc sn pc s pc pc c c pc sn

Sun. Hi 64 39 68 26 50 34 38 23 35 70 27 52 36 47 63 58 49 37 33

Lo 52 25 53 14 38 26 31 18 24 48 14 37 23 31 53 45 39 31 26

W s s pc s pc pc pc pc pc pc sf r s sh s s r pc pc

Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2012

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TOPEKA (AP) — An influential anti-abortion legislator is blocking the push for a ban on abortion in the Kansas Constitution, highlighting a split among abortion opponents over tactics and frustrating the group advocating the “personhood” proposal Friday. Chairman Lance Kinzer said he doesn’t plan to have a House Judiciary Committee hearing on the proposed constitutional amendment, which is sponsored by 25 other House members. Kinzer is the leading supporter of a bill to add new requirements for abortion providers into state law and ensure that the state doesn’t provide even indirect financing of abortions through income tax credits or deductions. Kinzer, an Olathe Republican and attorney, said he doesn’t believe the proposed constitutional amendment would withstand a court challenge and could lead to a U.S. Supreme

Court decision that could hamper abortion opponents’ attempts to enact new restrictions. Kansans for Life, the anti-abortion group with the most influence at the Statehouse, takes the same position. But the Personhood Kansas Committee, the Wichita-area group promoting the proposed amendment, strongly disagrees, and Chairman Bruce Garren said he’s surprised that Kinzer won’t at least agree to a hearing, particularly because there’s interest among Kinzer’s colleagues. “We have 25 co-sponsors in the House of Representatives. You’d think that would be enough to get a hearing,” Garren said. “It’s really frustrating.” Both chambers would have to adopt the proposed amendment by two-thirds majorities — something that’s likely in the House but uncertain in the Senate. If both did, the measure

would go on the statewide ballot in the Aug. 7 primary election, where approval by a simple majority would add it to the Constitution. Passage of a bill like the one Kinzer favors would require only simple majorities in both chambers and Brownback’s signature. Kinzer is pushing a 68-page bill to rewrite the state’s “informed consent” law on abortion, requiring doctors to provide certain information before terminating a woman’s pregnancy. Among other things, it would require doctors to allow their patients to hear a fetal heartbeat. The bill also would ensure there is no change to printed materials for patients, including one part that discusses alternatives to abortion and says, “What about adoption?” Also, the bill would prohibit schools from incorporating materials for any group that provides abortion services into classes that deal with human sexu-

ality or sexually transmitted diseases. Kinzer said he’s pursuing proposals that are likely to “maximizing the number of babies that we can save immediately” and trying to “push the boundaries” of restrictions allowed under federal court rulings. “Neither of those goals really is advanced by the personhood amendment,” Kinzer said. Sarah Gillooly, a lobbyist for Planned Parenthood of Kansas and Mid-Missouri, which provides abortions, said many abortion opponents understand that pursuing the personhood amendment is risky. If supporters succeeded in amending the Kansas Constitution, a court challenge is considered likely. In fact, supporters of the proposed amendment see it as a way to directly challenge Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision by the U.S. Supreme Court establishing a right to an abortion.

Lawmakers take stock of mental health diversions TOPEKA (AP) — Most of the troubled youths diverted from psychiatric residential treatment facilities after Kansas began reviewing the screening process for the homes have received some type of mental health service, a state official testified during a joint hearing of two state House committees following up on the matter. The SRS began reviewing residential treatment screenings last June amid concerns that the facilities, which are meant to treat children with psychiatric conditions, also were admitting those with other conditions, such as mental retardation, autism and drug addiction. Of the 220 youths ordered diverted from residential care from July through this month, 25 appealed the decision and 12 appeals succeeded, Gary Haulmark, the acting deputy secretary of the Kansas Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services, told the lawmakers Thursday. He said of the remaining 195 youths, all but 33 received some sort of community-based mental health services, while 14 of those 33 ended up in a residential facility within 30 days of diversion, The Topeka Capital-Journal reported. The committees also heard from Linda Davis, of Manhattan, who said her grandson attacked her in their home after he was twice denied admittance to a residential facility in favor of home-based services. He pleaded guilty to sexual battery and the juvenile justice system arranged for him to receive residential facility treatment. “Our family is exhausted and traumatized,” Davis said. “We have been urged repeatedly over the years to just give up custody. But we acted responsibly, caring for our child ourselves. We asked for help only when we truly needed it, and then we didn’t get it.” She said her grandson, who has three mental disorders, was making progress in his third residential treatment facility when the new screening measures were enacted. “Then, at that critical point, because of a change in state policy driven by finances, (he) did not screen for an extension of stay at the PRTF,” Davis said. “There was no option except for him to come home.” After spending nine days in a private psychiatric facility, he was sent home, where his behavior steadily declined. Davis said that after a trip to the emergency room, hospital officials described her grandson as “psychotic, delusional and aggressive,” however he again was denied admission to a residential facility and sent home. Less than a week later, he attacked his grandmother. “People say ‘the system is broken,”’ Davis said. “But I don’t think ‘system’ is the right word for the assortment of agencies in Kansas that all seem to have the motto, ‘It’s not our department.”’

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Southwest Kansas

L i v e

on Stage

Announces it’s Membership Campaign for the 2012-2013 Season! Anyone not a member may become a member for the 2012-13 season and attend American Spirit on March 8, the final show of the 2011-12 season, free of charge. Just stop by the membership desk at our next show, Guy Penrod on February 14. Renewing members may purchase their memberships at the membership table as well. All shows start at 7:30, unless otherwise noted, in Clifford Hope Auditorium, Garden City High School. For more information or questions call 620-275-1667. Memberships also may be purchased on our website: www.swks-liveonstage.org

Shows selected for the 2012-13 season are: Redhead expRess & The walkeR family Tap masTeRs of moTown The abRams bRoTheRs TeRRy baRbeR pRima TRio side sTReeT sTRuTTeRs 42five

Remaining shows in the current season are:

guy penRod

february 14 - 7:30 pm

ameRican spiRiT march 8 - 7:30 pm

a membership for 2012-2013 is $55 for adults, $35 for students, and $135 for families. (family membership includes a maximum of 2 adults and any number of students living at home.)

early bird discount: purchase memberships by february 14, 2012 for a discount of $5 adult/student and $10 family 212416


Picture This

Carolyne and Tinley Hays. Photo contributed by Norma Schiffelbein, Garden City.

Southwest Life THE GARDEN CITY TELEGRAM

PETS: Consumers pamper pets with healthier products Page B2

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

B

85 Years & counting The following are some, but not all, of the highlights of Lee Richardson Zoo’s rich history. 1919 — George Finnup donates 105 acres of land for a park in memory of his father, Frederick Finnup. 1922 — The pool is built with volunteer labor and touted as world’s largest outdoor concrete municipal swimming pool that is free to the public. 1927 — The Garden City Zoo is established in Finnup Park by the local chapter of the Izaak Walton League. Two skunks are brought in by Lee Richardson, who is the chief of police and park and zoo superintendent. 1929 — A male raccoon is added in February, and later that year the Denver Zoo donates two bear cubs. Salt Lake City, Utah, offers a pair of mule deer in October. And a pair of bobcats are acquired sometime between 1927 and 1929. 1932 — Claude Owens, who frequently works in the park planting trees and shrubs, is hired to take care of the park and zoo department under Chief Richardson. 1948 — A pair of 8-month-old polar bears from Alaska, weighing 75 pounds each, are donated by Stanolind Oil Co., and transferred by rail express to Garden City from Anchorage. Stanolind has plans to build a plant in Garden City but never does. 1950 — The Garden City Zoo is formally renamed Lee Richardson Zoo on April 26. 1951 — Death of Lee Richardson; Claude Owens is named parks superintendent. Also, the birth of Tommy the Lion, who becomes the 1952 star of an educational film. 1956 — Penny, the zoo’s first elephant, is donated by the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo in Colorado Springs, Colo. 1961 — The zoo’s first hippo was acquired from the Philadelphia Zoo. “Tela” was paid for and donated by The Garden City Telegram. 1963 — A historical museum is established. 1965 — A major flood inundates most of the zoo and many of its animals cages to heights of 5 to 8 feet deep. Many animals are rescued; others are lost. 1970 — Superintendent Owens retires after 38 years. 1975 — Garden City Friends of the Zoo is established as a support organization. 1977 — A perimeter fence is installed to control vandalism to animals, grounds, equipment, and keep out dogs. 1980 — One-way traffic through the zoo implemented; African Plains exhibit constructed. 1984 — River otter exhibit completed in remodeled seal/alligator pool. 1985 — Garden City Friends changes name to Friends of Lee Richardson Zoo, as the group is known today. 1987 — Flamingo winter quarters are built, and a new summer yard is completed west of primate exhibit. 1990 — Zoo holds its first Conservation Day. 1992 — First female reticulated giraffe calf born to pure-bred pair acquired in 1986. 1994 — A $1 million gift from Finnup Foundation is made to construct Finnup Center for Conservation Education. 2002 — 75th anniversary; new entrance and directional signage installed for Finnup Park and zoo. 2008 — Zoo receives giant anteater, red ruffed lemurs, and five Chilean flamingos. 2010 — Additions to the Finnup Center include the Hart Conference Room, new HD Distance Learning studio, and improved housing for education animals. 2011 — Cat Canyon fundraising is completed Nov. 1. Association of Zoos and Aquariums grants accreditation to zoo for five more years.

Photo Courtesy of Finney County Historical Society

In this 1950s era photo, Kimberly the Lion and Judy Owens, known today as Judy Belknap, drink milk at the Owens family home.

At home at the zoo

As zoo celebrates 85 years, Belknap remembers growing up with the animals.

thing else,” she said. “It was very common to come into the house, and Mother was always taking care of babies. ... (It was) an amazing childhood — I couldn’t have had a better life or learned more.”

By SHAJIA AHMAD

The early years

sahmad@gctelegram.com

A

lion cub in the bedroom, a baby alligator in the bathtub, and a newborn polar bear on the back porch. Believe it or not, when Judy Belknap was growing up, these were common sights at her family’s South Seventh Street home. It’s the house that’s been in the family for more than 100 years, the home where her mother, Mary Owens, was born and where her father, Claude Owens, often brought in the

Photo Courtesy of Finney County Historical Society

Dan Baffa, a former Lee Richardson Zoo director, stands inside the Owens Giraffe Barn in this 1993 photograph. baby animals that needed extra attention from the Garden City Zoo where he was a superintendent for nearly four decades. It’s the same house that Judy, 66, still lives in today, and

where decades of memories of the Owens family were created alongside baby deer, raccoons, badgers, lions and leopards. “I grew up that way and don’t know that I knew any-

The Garden City Zoo was officially renamed Lee Richardson Zoo in 1950, more than two decades after it first opened its gates in 1927. Lee Richardson, then chief of police, was named the first park and zoo superintendent and held that title until his death in 1951. Following Richardson’s death, the reins were passed to Claude Owens, the newly named park and zoo superintendent, and Judy’s father.

Source: Staff of the Lee Richardson Zoo

See Zoo, Page B3

Poor decisions prevail when actions lack common sense A

little common sense could go a long way. Columbus (Neb.) High School officials are taking a lot of heat because of a decision to complain about the uniforms worn by Omaha (Neb.) Burke High School during their girls basketball game. Monday, the Burke girls wore pink uniform tops and shorts, which were to be auctioned off after the game to raise money for the Make-A-Wish Foundation. Columbus High Athletic Director John Krogstrand informed his coach, Dave Licari, at halftime that Nebraska state athletic rules require the home team (Burke in this case) to wear predominantly white uniforms. Licari made the decision to tell the officials, who in turn gave Burke a technical. Columbus High made the two free throws and broke open a one-point game, cruising to the win. A fews weeks ago in

Michigan, a cancer survivor, J.T. Gaskins, 17, was suspended for growing his hair long. He was growing long hair with the intent to later have it cut off and donate it to Locks of Love. The organization uses donated hair to provide hairpieces for those who lose their hair because of cancer. The Columbus High incident ended up on the front page of the state’s largest circulated newspaper, the Omaha World-Herald, and made the rounds on the Internet. Columbus’ superintendent said the two schools are working on a joint fundraiser, and to Burke’s credit, the school has stated there are no hard feelings. Gaskins has decided to leave the school rather than cut his hair. Both schools were well within the rules of a basketball game and the school’s dress code concerning long hair. But there are times when

rules should give-way to common sense. These are two of those instances. I am sure neither school is heartless or meant to cause such a stir. They were just following the rules. Since all calls for the athletic director are being directed to the Columbus superintendent, he is not speaking for himself, so his thought process cannot be followed. I think it is safe to assume, though, he never meant any harm, and certainly did not think this would be something that would end up on Huff Post, an Internet newspaper.

Sometimes in the heat of the moment, people do not stop to think about the ramifications of their decisions or actions. Do not forget that even though the AD brought the uniform violation to the coach’s attention, Licari had a choice to make, too. He could have told Krogstrand it was not an issue, or that the good cause outweighed the rules. Instead, he decided to alert the officials to the issue. He made the wrong choice. The officials, although they are not to blame, could have asked Licari if he really wanted to pursue the violation or they could have told the coach they were going to let it slide this time. The same could be said of the Michigan school board. It could have allowed an exception to the dress code for Gaskins after it learned why he was growing his hair long. There are exceptions to every rule. In both cases, people trying

to do good deeds were punished. Both issues have drawn a lot of attention, and it will be a long time before they are forgotten. All either school can do at this point is try and learn from the incidents. Maybe the Michigan school board makes changes in its dress code or at the very least allows for some exceptions. As for Columbus High, officials must try and make amends, and a shared fundraiser would help. Some will never forgive Columbus, and that is wrong. People made bad decisions and will have to live with them, learn and do better from this point forward. It is all we can do as human beings. It is all we ask our children to do. Admit mistakes, make amends and become better people.

Patrick Murphy, of Columbus, Neb., is a former assistant managing editor of The Telegram.

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The 2012

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B2

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

the Garden City Telegram

Consumers pamper pets with healthier products DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Like many pet owners, customers at April Lawrence’s pet bakery and boutique in central Iowa want the best for their fourlegged family members. That means high-quality, safe and eco-friendly products, from organic food and treats to BPA-free toys and water dishes. And they don’t mind paying extra. “The customers are looking at their pets as part of their extended family,” says Lawrence, adding that the organic, baked-fromscratch, healthy treats she sells at Bone-a-patreat Pet Bakery and Boutique are especially popular. “They’re better than what I eat!” Many pet owners began looking for safer products

after huge pet food recalls in early 2007 that followed the renal failure and death of hundreds of animals, says Leslie May, who operates Pawsible Marketing, a firm that helps pet-related businesses, in Blue Ridge, Ga. “It really prompted people to wake up and look at what’s in their pet’s food and what’s around their pet’s life, in their environment,” she says, adding that there’s also a growing awareness of lead in dog toys made in China, and of the dangers posed by some plastics used in many pet products. Social media sites have provided a forum for people to learn more about pet health, she says, and that also leads to a demand for safe, well-made items.

“You are getting higher quality, which last longer, so you actually come out even or ahead in the end,” says May. For example, a food bowl free of the chemical bisphenol-A, or BPA, may cost twice as much as an ordinary bowl, but it can last a dog’s lifetime. Brad Weston, chief merchandising officer for Petco, a leading pet-products retailer with more than 1,100 stores, says there’s definitely a trend toward healthy, eco-friendly products as pet owners project their own lifestyle choices onto their pets. “(Pets) are increasingly thought of as family members, so not only are we willing to dig deeper into

our pockets for our pets, the choices we make for them are a direct reflection of our personal preferences, values and ideals,” he says. Petco stores include a Natural Shop, featuring natural and organic foods and treats. And the company has introduced a line called Planet Petco, with earthconscious products that are non-toxic, chemical-free and made from sustainable materials. No matter if the economy is slumping, Weston expects the trend in premium pet products to keep growing. “For the most part, as parents, we don’t skimp on our kids until or unless we really have to. And same goes for our pets today,” he says.

A mother struggles with constantly missing mittens By JENNIFER QUIST Wisdom consists of the anticipation of consequences. — Norman Cousins

I

t’s like the Bermuda Triangle. There’s definitely some kind of vortex between the bus stop, the playground and the boot room of every elementary school all over this country. But it’s not siphoning airplanes and sailboats out of this dimension and into oblivion. It craves something else — something smaller and woollier. It wants mittens. Like most kids, my five sons do their best to keep this sucking chasm of mitten doom well fed. Between October and April, my shopping list always includes the perennial items of tissues, oranges and, of course, mittens. It’s inevitable, frustrating and it’s starting to get expensive. Maybe I should have accepted the mitten drain a long time ago. It was certainly part of life when I was a child growing up in this chilly climate. I spent hundreds of frigid mornings frantically digging through my parents’ mitten bin until long after I should have already left for school. In desperation, I’d finally surface with mittens that were painfully different in color or size — or both. At the worst of times, the only

For a support group to be included, call The Telegram at 276-6862 Ext. 242 or (800) 475-8600. For information about other support groups in the state, call the Self-Help Network of Kansas at (316) 978-3843 or (800) 445-0116, or visit www. selfhelpnetwork.wichita.edu.

Domestic violence Family Crisis Services (HEART), Garden City. Support group for those in abusive relationships, shelter for domestic violence victims and rape crisis support. Transportation and child care services are provided. Contact: 275-2018; Referral Hotline, 275-5911; (800) 2750535. FAX: 275-2761.

Substance abuse Tuesday Night GetAlong Group. A 12-Step recovery for co-dependents and adult children of alcoholics. Time/Location: 6:30 p.m. Mondays, Community Congregational Church, 710 N. Third St. Contact: Jim Good, 275-7365. Alcoholics Anonymous Hotline. Information for AA groups in the Garden City area. Contact: Hotline, 272-5623. Garden City 12 x 12 AlAnon Family Groups. For families and friends of alcoholics/addicts. Time/ Location: 7 p.m. Thursdays at 116 Chestnut (A.A. Hall). Narcotics Anonymous. Time/Location: 7 p.m. Mondays and Saturdays, women’s meeting at 4 p.m. Wednesdays, and book study at 6 p.m. on the second and fourth Saturdays at 416 Magnolia. Contact: (620) 899-5420.

Health Garden City Area

Chicken Soup for the Soul mittens I could find were both meant for the same hand. Remember how comfortable that feels? Still, as a parent I was sure my boys and I could outmaneuver the mitten vortex. Fortunately for keen parents everywhere, the dilemma of lost mittens happens to be the quintessential example of a parenting philosophy known as the “Natural and Logical Consequences” method. According to this very sensible approach, parents should not throw themselves between their kids and the direct results of the kids’ actions. In the case of the lost mittens, it means a parent should let a careless child experience the full brunt of the effects of losing mittens. The child’s hands should be allowed to go unprotected from the elements so the discomfort of cold hands can help the child learn to value his mittens and take better care of them. But in Canada — particularly the northern boreal forest region, where I raise children — the natural and logical consequences of losing mittens and having to go without when it’s minus Alzheimer’s and Other Dementias Support Group. The support group welcomes any family members or friends caring for someone with Alzheimer’s Disease and other dementias. Time/Location: 2 to 4 p.m. the third Monday of each month in the main parlor of First United Methodist Church, Main Street and Kansas Avenue (use entrance off Main Street). Contact: Mary Seibert, 276-8933, or Barbara McKenna, (620) 937-1766. TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury). To aid and support people with brain injuries and their families. For information, contact Logie Asebedo, (620) 384-5048. Builders of Hope Cancer Support Group. Open to all patients, family and/or friends touched by this disease. Time/Location: 2 p.m. on the first Sunday of each month at Downtown Vision, 413 N. Main St. Contacts: Builders of Hope mentor hotline, 290-3970; Chaplain Remy Ekweariri, 272-2513; Kris Hughes, 272-2526. Builders of Hope mentor program/hotline. Providing information, support and hope by matching newly diagnosed patients with those who are survivors of the same or similar condition, providing comfort and education. Contact: Builders of Hope mentor hotline, 290-3970, available seven days a week. Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis Support Group. For patients, friends, family and caregivers. Time/Location: 7 to 8 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month at St. Catherine Hospital, 401 E. Spruce St. For details, email unhappygut@yahoo.com. Garden City “Wolf Pack” Consumer Run Organization (C.R.O.) Inc. A non-profit organization that serves persons with selfidentified mental illness. It is a member run organization that is centered on peer support. The CRO focuses on leadership, education and community involvement. Time/Location: 3 to

40 degrees might amount to something more than just a logical breakthrough. The consequences could be something much more memorable — like, say, a trip to the emergency room for some frostbite treatment. With this clever parenting strategy ruled out, I looked for a more concrete solution to the problem of missing mittens. And I found one in an old classic: mittens-on-a-string. But then I learned a bit of cruel elementary school slang for string-mounted mitts. Some kids call them “idiot mittens.” It’s probably evidence of my own social anxiety issues that I stopped short of branding all my kids “idiots” by stringing their mittens through their coat sleeves. Instead, I let my boys know that the next one of them to lose a mitten would be sentenced to a full month of wearing the hand-knitted, mostly polyester, barn-red pair of mitts my grandmother had mailed us all the way from Nova Scotia as part of our last Christmas package. We called them “the punishment mittens.” These drafty, single-ply, flea-market mitts were blasts directly from my past. They were indistinguishable from mittens I’d worn when I was in elementary school, and somehow I made it through the 1970s with all my fin-

gers intact. But compared to the modern fleece mitts of the 21st century, they were abominations — my kids knew it. Regardless of the threat, it wasn’t long before my oldest son was trudging out to the bus stop with his little white hands clad in the red, 25-cent mittens zapped here from another decade. I felt a little sorry for him. But at least his handmade mittens were a matching set. A month later, his sentence of wearing the punishment mittens was over and my son had proved he was starting to understand their true value. We celebrated his enlightenment with a trip to the store to buy a brand-new pair of sleek but well-insulated gloves in the same shade of navy blue every other boy at school was wearing that winter. It was an important lesson, not just for my son’s benefit, but for mine, too. It seems keeping my kids in mittens all winter long, whatever the cost or trouble, is really just keeping myself in mittens. No matter what the parenting books say, we all know what happens in the real world when a real mom has a real kid with really cold hands and long-lost mittens. “Here,” the mom will say, tugging somewhat irately at her own gloves. “You can wear mine.”

6 p.m. Wednesday through Friday at 409 N. Eighth St. Contact: Alexis Fluellen 260-9970.

participants may join or exit the groups at any time and all groups are free. Time/Location: 7 to 8:30 p.m. on the first Tuesday of each month and 2 to 3:30 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month at the Senior Center of Finney County, 907 N. 10th St. Contact: Chaplain Billy Kryger or Gina Cash, St. Catherine Hospice, 272-2519 or (800) 281-4077. Divorce Care. You don’t have to go it alone, find support from others who understand at the weekly Connect Group meetings. Time/Location: 7 p.m. each Tuesday at Garden City Church of the Nazarene, 2720 N. Campus Drive. Contact: 275-4278. Celebrate Recovery. A faith-based, Christ-centered, recovery program for people struggling with all kinds of issues and not just for those struggling with chemical and alcohol addiction. Time/Location: 12-Step Program at 7 p.m. Mondays and the Open Share Group at 6:15 p.m. Fridays, both at Bible Christian Church, 1501 E. Mary St., Garden City. Contact 276-8356 for additional information.

Social groups Gay Men’s Support Group. Weekly support group meeting. Time/ Location: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Area Mental Health Center, 2101 W. Highway 50 Bypass, Dodge City.

Weight loss TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly). An affordable group for those wanting to lose weight. Time/Location: Weigh-in is from 8:15 to 9 a.m., with the meeting starting at 9 a.m. each Thursday in the Blue Room at the Senior Center of Finney County, 907 N. 10th St. Contact: Kathy Howard at 276-7919 or Patti Barton at (620) 521-1672. Garden City Weight Watchers. Time/Location: 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m. Tuesday at the First United Methodist Church, 1106 N. Main St. (use the east entrance on Seventh Street). Contact: Norma Nolte, 276-2520. TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly). Nonprofit organization providing weight-loss support since 1948. Contact/ more information: (800) 9328677 or email Bednasek@ networksplus.net.

Other Celebrate Recovery. A faith-based, Christ-centered, 12-Step recovery program for people struggling with all kinds of issues and is not just for those struggling with chemical and alcohol addiction. Time/Location: 7 p.m. Mondays, 308 W. Fifth St., Scott City. Contact (620) 872-2339 for additional information. Grief Support Group. To allow participants to share their feelings and gain the tools to help them after suffering the loss of a loved one. These are open support groups with no age limits;

Engagement Announcements Hill-Johnson David and Pamela Hill of Baldwin City announce the engagement of their daughter, Jessica Marie Hill, to Taylor James Johnson, the son of Jim and Tami Johnson of Garden City. Grandparents of the bride-to-be are Charles and Mary Ann Hill of Lawrence; and the late Dean and Catherine Peak of Norton. Her fiancé is the grandson of Bill and Marilyn Phillips of Garden City; Don and Karen Pabst of Missoula, Mont.; and the late James and Marian Johnson of Deerfield. The bride-to-be graduated from Baldwin High School in 2006 and from Baker University in 2010 with a bachelor’s degree in molecular biology. She is pursuing a doctor of dental surgery degree from the University of Missouri-

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Kansas City School of Dentistry. Her fiancé graduated from Garden City High School in 2007 and plans to graduate in May 2012 from the University of Kansas with a degree in computer science. They plan to marry Aug. 25, 2012, at Annunciation Catholic Church in Baldwin City.

Carabajal-Richter Ernest Sr. and Cynthia Hernandez of Garden City announce the engagement of their daughter, Jade Carabajal, to Douglas Richter. He is the son of Randy and Nora Richter of Lakin. The bride-to-be graduated from Hugoton High School in 2002 and from Seward County Community College with an associates degree in respiratory therapy. She is a respiratory care supervisor at Kearny County Hospital. Her fiancé graduated from Lakin High School in 2003 and attended Barton County Community College. He is employed by the City

Jade Carabajal Douglas Richter of Garden City. They plan to marry April 28, 2012, at First Southern Baptist Church in Garden City.

VanEpps-Dunn Ron and Cindy VanEpps of Hays announce the engagement of their daughter, Patricia Jean VanEpps, to Micah Tyrrell Dunn. He is the son of Jerry and Penny Dunn of Lakin. The bride-to-be graduated from Hays High School and attends Fort Hays State University majoring in marketing. She is employed by Showcase Diamond Jewelers, Hays. Her fiancé graduated from Lakin High School and attends Fort Hays State University majoring in music education. He is the manager of Hays

Patricia VanEpps Micah Dunn Aquatic Park and FHSU Wellness Center, Hays. The wedding is planned for June 16, 2012, at Celebration Community Church, Hays.

Who’s New Brooklyn Nicole Best is the daughter of Justin and Ashley Best of Newton. She was born Jan. 15, 2012. Grandparents are Craig and Pam Brungardt of Garden City; and Gary and Reta Best of Edon, Ohio.

Great-grandparents are Edith Knoll and the late Timothy Knoll of Garden City; Cathy Brungardt of Garden City; Marie Best and the late William Best of Edon; and the late Herman and Effie Wilson.

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THE Garden City Telegram

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

B3

Zoo: Belknap remembers growing up with the animals Continued from Page B1

Her childhood home â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the one she still lives in today with her husband, Gerald â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is only a hop and a skip away from the perimeter of the zoo, as well as its main entrance. When her father took on the role of zoo director back in 1951, he was hardly new to the job, having overseen the park and zoo operations under Richardson since 1932 and having had a passion for and connection to the animals in the park like no other man before him or after him, according to his daughter. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I watched a man that lived the zoo â&#x20AC;&#x201D; it was his life,â&#x20AC;? the lifelong Garden City resident said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Without Claude Owens, there would be no zoo, and there will never be another Claude Owens. ... If Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d have known him, and had he not been my father, I would feel the same.â&#x20AC;? Back then â&#x20AC;&#x201D; from the 1930s to 1970s â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the zoo looked a lot different. There was no fence around the grounds, no paved roads, no elaborate entrance or habitats like the indoor aviary or Wild Asia exhibit that allow visitors to experience the animalsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; natural habitats. But there were sea lions and polar bears, and even larger animals like lions and elephants and hippos, habitats for which were all built by the same men who fed, cleaned and looked after the animals. At that time, the animals were fed with a horse and wagon carrying buckets of feed. Judy said she still can remember riding on the back of the hay wagon as a girl. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the early years, they raised their own feed. That was a tremendous job. They raised their own hay and grain. They didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a budget big enough to buy everything,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The men worked by the hours, and my father was salaried, so he did most of the irrigating because they probably couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like overtime. So they had to do that after hours. ... But it was the life he loved.â&#x20AC;?

The zoo family The same year Judyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s father was named zoo and park superintendent, Tommy the Lion was born and quickly became a part of the Owens household. The young cub not only shared the dinner table and a spot on the family room carpet, photographers from Life, the iconic magazine, came to document the fam-

Courtesy photo

Brad Nading/Telegram

The adult reticulated giraffe leans down to nuzzle the younger exhibit mate to keep it from running around the exhibit at Lee Richardson Zoo in October 2011.

Go to www.GCTelegram. com to see video and a slideshow with this story.

Brad Nading/Telegram

Mary Palmer, center, executive director of Friends of Lee Richardson Zoo, announces grants received for the Cat Canyon project in September 2011 in front of the Cats of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exhibits. ily â&#x20AC;&#x201D; feline included â&#x20AC;&#x201D; in their December 1951 issue. Judyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother, Mary, ran the Big Pool in Garden City for 16 years, around the same time her father headed the zoo operations, and it was common for the entire family to pitch in to care for, clean and put the babies from the zoo to sleep. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was totally a family thing,â&#x20AC;? Judy said, adding that she and her sister, Janice, older by four years, would take their turns watching, feeding and caring for the cubs, fawns and other newborns indoors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had a little porch off our kitchen thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still there today. At that time, that was the animal sanctuary. If we raised baby deer or antelope, Daddy would fill it with prairie hay, and they would stay out in that. ... And on Sunday, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d let people come and view (them) from outside.â&#x20AC;? Perhaps the most trying rehabilitation for the entire Owens family came in late 1957, when a polar cub they named Klondike was born on Thanksgiving Day. The newborn needed around the clock care, and Judy said she, her parents and her sister took turns feeding and

watching the fragile cub. The daughter of the zoo superintendent said she can remember the old Timex watch display case they had put together with a heating pad and water inside for moisture to keep the cub alive and fed it goatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s milk and vitamins to gain its strength. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were fourth in the nation at that time for longevity in raising a polar,â&#x20AC;? she said, adding that the bear didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t survive more than a couple months. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the facilities like ... the larger zoos, and even today we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. ... For a little zoo in Garden City, Kansas, it was an amazing feat.â&#x20AC;?

have made the zoo its present-day attraction,â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;a showplace of Kansas.â&#x20AC;? Owens was instrumental in getting reticulated giraffes to Garden City, and the giraffe barn today is named after the former zoo figurehead. The zoo today attracts not only locals and southwest Kansans but visitors not only from the opposite end of the state but from surrounding states, as well. This year, in fact, marks the zooâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 85th anniversary since it first opened its gates, a historic milestone that few communities this size can claim, and zoo officials are marking the occa-

Judy Belknap, Garden City, is the daughter of Claude Owens, who served as superintendent of Lee Richardson Zoo from 1951 to 1970. She still lives at the 309 S. Seventh St. home where her father often brought home polar bear cubs and baby lions to care for. sion by holding birthday activities for the young â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and for the young at heart â&#x20AC;&#x201D; during each season of the year. Kathy Sexson, who has been zoo director since 2003, said her predecessor, Dan Baffa, was also instrumental in bringing the zoo up to what it is today. Baffa, she said, is responsible for much of the beautiful landscaping and greenery throughout the park, and under his leadership, the zoo began earning national accreditations that it still holds today. Between keeping up to date on accreditations every five years and with the future expansion projects down the road â&#x20AC;&#x201D; for example, Cat Canyon, and an expanded elephant yard â&#x20AC;&#x201D; there is much to look forward to before the zoo hits its centennial, Sexson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think (the zoo founders) would be pleasantly surprised and proud to

know ... how far weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve come with what they started,â&#x20AC;? Sexson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Conservation has taken on a whole new meaning and life. I think theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be really happy with how it has evolved. The zoo is and has always been an important component of life in Garden City.â&#x20AC;? For Judy and her family, the zoo inside Finnup Park has played an indispensable role in their lives. From her zookeeper father, she learned to love and care for animals, just one of the many values she passes on to her growing family today. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think in learning to love an animal, it makes you a person that is so forgiving and so cautious, and I think it even made me a better parent,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My children love animals, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been our life. ... They give you 100 percent where people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always. Your animals give back more than you ever give them.â&#x20AC;?

An Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association ÂŽ Registered mark of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association

A Garden City attraction In Owensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 25th year of service, The Garden City Telegram published a frontpage article about the zoo directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s service. The Dec. 7, 1957, article outlines the â&#x20AC;&#x153;lionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shareâ&#x20AC;? of the work completed by Owens and his â&#x20AC;&#x153;equally efficient wife, Mary, (who) have spared no time in giving the extra hours that

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Kathy Sexson, director of Lee Richardson Zoo, is showing off a hedgehog in this 1993 photograph.

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SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

What’s up

Listing of southwest Kansas events published each Saturday. Calendar listings are published free of charge. Submit information by 5 p.m. Wednesday to: Garden City Telegram, 310 N. Seventh St., Garden City, KS 67846, or call 276-6862, ext. 242, or toll-free at (800) 475-8600. Include a brief description of the event, a contact person and a phone number.

Special Events TODAY, FEB. 11 Pizza and Movie Night: Featuring “The Secrets of Jonathan Sperry,” 6:30 p.m. at Church of the Brethren, 505 N. Eighth St. The movie, popcorn and beverages are free; donations will be taken for the pizza. Valentine’s party: Entertainment and refreshments from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at Garden Valley Retirement Village, 1505 E. Spruce St., featuring toe-tappin’ music by Billy and Loretta Whitfield of Syracuse, and Dale and Merlene Hester of LaVerne, Okla., plus a magical performance by Kenne Whitson, magician and escape artist. The public is encouraged to attend at no charge. For more information, call 275-5036 or 275-9651 and ask for Ruby. Chili and Soup Supper: The Pierceville Federated Church youth group’s fundraiser will feature chili with all the fixin’s, homemade desserts and a silent auction, beginning at 5 p.m. at Plymell School, 11 miles south of Garden City. Monies will go to help youth attend a Christian winter youth retreat. SUNDAY, FEB. 12 “Love Struck” Bridal Show: Featuring wedding and prom dresses, fashion wear, photography, wedding cakes, catering, live models, gifts, accessories, DJs and more, plus more than $1,000 in prizes, 1 to 4 p.m. at the Clarion Inn, 1911 E. Kansas Ave. Free admission. MONDAY, FEB. 13 Steps to Startup free workshop: For people interested in starting small businesses, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Student and Community Services Center at Garden City Community College, 801 Campus Drive. For registration and information, call 276-9632.

Family Literacy Night and Book Fair: 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the gymnasium of Edith Scheuerman Elementary School, 1901 Wilcox St., beginning with a barbecue sandwich supper. TUESDAY, FEB. 14 Musical variety program: Featuring “The Classic Three” directed by Gary Fuller, 7 p.m. at Garden Valley Retirement Village, 1505 E. Spruce St. The public is encouraged to attend at no charge. Singing Valentines: Offered by the Garden City High School Modern Show Choir from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Cost is $25. To place orders, call the music department at 805-8179 or email mbaldwin@gckschools.com. Musical program: Country music featuring Guy Penrod, 7:30 p.m. in Clifford Hope Auditorium at Garden City High School, 1412 N. Main St. This is a performance in the Southwest Kansas Live On Stage concert season. Season tickets are $55 for adults, $35 for students and $135 for a family package. For more information, call 275-1667 or visit www.swks-liveonstage.org. Musical program: Featuring fourth-grade students, 6:30 p.m. at Florence Wilson Elementary School, 1709 Labrador St. “Pink Night”: Highlighting cancer awareness and supporting the Garden City High School basketball team, which will have games beginning at 4 p.m. at the school, 1412 N. Main St. The event will include a drawing, an auction, and recognition of cancer survivors and victims. To acknowledge a survivor, a fighter, or honor a loved one’s memory, call 805-8000 or email Kupton@ gckschools.com. All proceeds will be donated to local cancer research centers. Brown Bag Series: “The Santa Fe Trail Is Alive And

Area public meetings These meetings are open to the public under Kansas law. Portions of the meetings may be closed to the public, but only under specific exemptions cited in Kansas law. MONDAY, FEB. 13 FINNEY COUNTY — Finney County Commission: 8:30 a.m. in the commission meeting room at the County Administrative Building, 311 N. Ninth St., Garden City. DIGHTON — Dighton City Council: 5:30 p.m. in the council meeting room at Dighton City Hall, 147 E. Long St. SYRACUSE — Syracuse City Council: 5 p.m. MST in the council meeting room at Syracuse City Hall, 109 N. Main St. HASKELL COUNTY — Haskell County Commission: 9 a.m. in the commission meeting room at the

1008 N. 6th • $99,000

the Garden City Telegram Well,” presented by Jim Sherer, noon to 1 p.m. in the meeting room of the Finney County Historical Museum, 403 S. Fourth St. For more information, call 272-3664. WEDNESDAY, FEB. 15 Dance: Featuring “The Blue Notes,” 7:30 p.m. at the Senior Center of Finney County, 907 N. 10th St. Open to the public. THURSDAY, FEB. 16 “Almost Maine”: Garden City Community College Drama Department presentation, 6:15 p.m. in the auditorium of the Pauline Joyce Fine Arts Building on campus, 801 Campus Drive. Reservations are required by calling 276-9540. Admission is $20 for singles and $35 for couples and includes a chicken cordon bleu dinner and dessert. Performances also scheduled for Feb. 17, 18 and 19. Third Thursday: Various activities from 5 to 8 p.m. in downtown Garden City. SATURDAY, FEB. 18 Finney County Spelling Bee: 9 a.m. in Clifford Hope Auditorium at Garden City High School, 1412 N. Main St. Legislative Coffee: Featuring area legislators speaking about the latest issues in state government, 10 a.m. in the Endowment Room of the Beth Tedrow Student Center at Garden City Community College, 801 Campus Drive. SUNDAY, FEB. 19 Singles dance: Featuring “The Blue Notes” from 7 to 10:30 p.m. at the Eagles Lodge, U.S. Highway 83 and Mary Street. Sponsored by Garden City Singles, the dance is open to the public. People attending must be age 21 or older.

Organizations SATURDAY, FEB. 18 Finney County Genealogical Society: 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the Hutchinson Room at the Finney County Public Library, 605 E. Walnut St. Visitors welcome.

Health Department Hours at the Finney County Health Department,

919 Zerr Road, are 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Friday hours are 8 a.m. to noon. For more information, call the health department at 272-3600.

Becker’s Bridge

Senior Center The following events are scheduled at the Senior Center of Finney County, 907 N. 10th St., unless otherwise noted. Anyone 55 years of age or older is welcome to participate. Open pool: 1 to 4 p.m. today. Duplicate bridge: 2 p.m. Sunday. Dominoes and open pool: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Lunch: Served at noon Monday through Friday. Walking: 8:30 a.m. Monday. Humdinger Band practice: 12:30 p.m. Monday. Double pinochle: 12:30 p.m. Monday. Upbeats Band practice: 3 p.m. Monday. Zumba: 5:30 p.m. Monday. Duplicate bridge: 7 p.m. Monday. Gentle exercises: 11 a.m. Tuesday. Pitch: 12:30 p.m. Tuesday. Bridge: 1:15 p.m. Tuesday. FCCA: 3:30 p.m. Tuesday. Line dancing: 8:30 a.m. Wednesday. Meals on Wheels Committee: 9 a.m. Wednesday. Legal aid: 10 a.m. Wednesday. Library outreach: 11 a.m. Wednesday. Library check-in/out: 11 a.m. Wednesday. Pinochle: 12:30 p.m. Wednesday. Life Writing: 1 p.m. Wednesday. Dance: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday featuring “The Blue Notes.” TOPS: 9 a.m. Thursday. Art class: 10 a.m. Thursday. Gentle exercises: 11 a.m. Thursday. Ambassador Singers: 1 p.m. Thursday. Line dancing: 8:30 a.m. Friday. STEPS: 10 a.m. Friday. Bridge: 12:45 p.m. Friday. Meals on Wheels is available by calling 272-3620; Mini-bus, 272-3626; Senior Center, 272-3620.

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county courthouse, 300 S. Inman St., Sublette. GARDEN CITY — Golf Advisory Board: 7 p.m. at the Buffalo Dunes Clubhouse, 5685 S. U.S. Highway 83. TUESDAY, FEB. 14 GARDEN CITY — Drainage District No. 2: 8 a.m. in the first-floor meeting room at the Finney County Administrative Center, 311 N. Ninth St. GARDEN CITY — Drainage District No. 1: 9:30 a.m. in the firstfloor meeting room at the Finney County Administrative Center, 311 N. Ninth St. HAMILTON COUNTY — Hamilton County Commission: 8:30 a.m. MST in the commission meeting room at the county courthouse, 219 Main St., Syracuse. GARDEN CITY — Board of Zoning: 9 a.m. in the commission

chamber on the second floor of the City Administrative Center, 301 N. Eighth St., as needed. HOLCOMB — Board of Zoning: 5:30 p.m. in the council chamber at the Holcomb city offices, 200 N. Lynch St., as needed.

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Saturday.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 15 GRAY COUNTY — Gray County Commission: 9 a.m. in the county courthouse, 300 S. Main St., Cimarron. FINNEY COUNTY — Board of Zoning: 9 a.m. in the commission chamber on the second floor of the City Administrative Center, 301 N. Eighth St., as needed. THURSDAY, FEB. 16 FINNEY COUNTY — Planning Commission: 9 a.m. in the commission chamber on the second floor of the City Administrative Center, 301 N. Eighth St.

The Cryptoquip is a substitution cipher in which one letter stands for another. If you think that X equals O, it will be O throughout the puzzle. Single letters, short words and words using any apostrophe give you clues to locating vowels.

Consider putting excess furniture and belongings in storage. Now is the time to clean out the garage and basement and sell or give away items you no longer need.

Solution is by trial and error. © 2011 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

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SATURDAY EVENING 6:00

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By Dave Green

2012 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

B4

6:30

BROADCAST CHANNELS

FEBRUARY 11, 2012 7:00

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Love-Raymond Grey’s Anatomy (s) (cc) House “Birthmarks” (s) (cc) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Family Guy (cc) Family Guy (cc) Futurama (cc) Futurama (cc) 3 KMTW-MNT Seinfeld (s) (cc) Kansas News Big Bang Theory Alcatraz “Cal Sweeney” (s) (cc) New Girl (s) (cc) 30 Rock (s) (cc) 4 KSAS-FOX Two and Half Men Big Bang Theory America’s Most Wanted: Crimes of Passion Special Edition (N) (s) (cc) Catch It Kansas M*A*S*H (cc) M*A*S*H (cc) M*A*S*H (cc) M*A*S*H (cc) Eyewitness M*A*S*H (cc) Without a Trace “Claus and Effect” TMZ (N) (s) (cc) 5 KSCW-CW Whacked Out Best Pillow Ever! Engagement Mike & Molly (s) CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (s) 48 Hours Mystery (s) (cc) News Crew M*A*S*H (cc) M*A*S*H (cc) 6 KBSD-CBS News Keeping Up As Time Goes By The Lawrence Welk Show Underground Red Green Show Austin City Limits “Jimmy Cliff” (s) Live From the Artists Den “Adele” 7 KDCK-PBS Anne of Green Gables (cc) Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (s) KSN News at 10p Saturday Night Live (N) (s) (cc) News (N) Wheel of Fortune Smash “Pilot” (s) (cc) The Firm “Chapter Seven” (N) (cc) 11 KSNG-NBC Be My Valentine, Charlie Brown Cougar Town (s) Cougar Town (s) Cougar Town (s) (cc) News Law & Order “The Fertile Fields” (s) Stargate Atlantis 13 KUPK-ABC KAKE News at Six Kake News CABLE CHANNELS America’s Funniest Home Videos (s) America’s Funniest Home Videos (s) America’s Funniest Home Videos (s) America’s Funniest Home Videos (s) 30 Rock (s) (cc) Scrubs (s) (cc) Scrubs (s) (cc) It’s Always Sunny 9 WGN-A Lucha Libre-CMLL Fútbol de la Liga Mexicana Fútbol de la Liga Mexicana: Torneo de Clausura 2012: Atlante vs. Toluca. Una Hora en Alerta 10 GALA ¡Q’Viva! The Chosen (SS) Sábado Gigante (N) (SS) Encanto Águila Noticiero Desmadrugados (SS) 15 UNI Movie: ›› He’s Just Not That Into You (2009) (Ben Affleck, Jennifer Aniston) (cc) Movie: ››› Sex and the City (2008) (Sarah Jessica Parker) (cc) (5:09) Movie: ›› The Wedding Planner (2001) (cc) 28 USA Movie: ››› The Hangover (2009, Comedy) (Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms) (cc) Tokyo Drift Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Movie: ››› The Hangover (2009) (Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms) (cc) 29 TBS Leverage “The 15 Minutes Job” Leverage “The Van Gogh Job” (cc) Lord of the Rings: The Return Movie: ››‡ Watchmen (2009) (Billy Crudup) A masked vigilante probes the murder of a fellow superhero. (cc) 30 TNT How I Met/Mother How I Met/Mother Two and Half Men Two and Half Men Two and Half Men Two and Half Men Louie Louie The League The League (5:00) Movie: ›‡ When in Rome 31 FX College Basketball College GameDay (N) (Live) (cc) College Basketball: Kentucky at Vanderbilt. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) (cc) SportsCenter (N) (Live) (cc) 32 ESPN College Basketball: Alabama at LSU. (N) (Live) College Basketball: Xavier at Temple. (N) (Live) NHRA Drag Racing: O’Reilly Auto Parts Winternationals, Qualifying. (N) 33 ESPN2 Women’s College Basketball The Best of Pride UFC Ultimate Knockouts Women’s College Basketball: USC at California. (N) (Live) 34 FSN Love & Hip Hop “Reality Check” (s) Basketball Wives (s) Movie: ›› Dangerous Minds (1995) (Michelle Pfeiffer, George Dzundza) (s) Movie: ››› Menace II Society (1993) (Tyrin Turner, Jada Pinkett) (s) 35 VH1 Pelicula: ››‡ The Transporter 2 (2005) (s) (SS) Titulares Tel Cámara Loca (s) Decisiones Extremas (s) (SS) (5:30) Pelicula: ››› Las Crónicas de Narnia: El León, La Bruja y El Ropero (2005) (s) (SS) 37 TELE Movie: ››‡ A Lot Like Love (2005) (Ashton Kutcher) (Premiere) (cc) Did You Hear About the Morgans? (5:00) Movie: ›› Rumor Has It... (cc) Movie: ›‡ Did You Hear About the Morgans? (2009) (Hugh Grant) (cc) 38 LIFE House Hunters Hunters Int’l Candice Tells All Dear Genevieve Color Splash (N) Interiors Inc (N) House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l Color Splash Interiors Inc (cc) 39 HGTV Worst Cooks in America Worst Cooks in America Worst Cooks in America Worst Cooks in America Iron Chef America “Flay vs. Black” Worst Cooks in America 40 FOOD Parking Wars Parking Wars Parking Wars Parking Wars Parking Wars (N) Parking Wars (N) Exterminator Exterminator Exterminator Exterminator Parking Wars Parking Wars 41 A&E Hogs Gone Wild “Hungry Hogs” (s) Hogs Gone Wild “Monster Quest” (s) Beast Tracker “Swamp Monsters” Beast Tracker “Pacific Predator” (N) Beast Tracker “Swamp Monsters” Beast Tracker “Pacific Predator” (s) 42 DISC 20/20 on TLC “Burning Bed” (cc) 20/20 on TLC “Hidden Identity” (cc) 20/20 on TLC “Kelley Cannon” (cc) 20/20 on TLC “Murderous Love” (s) 20/20 on TLC “Hidden Identity” (cc) 20/20 on TLC “Kelley Cannon” (cc) 43 TLC Movie: ›››‡ Seven (1995) (Brad Pitt) (Premiere) A killer dispatches his victims via the Seven Deadly Sins. (s) Movie: ››› Ocean’s Eleven (2001) (George Clooney, Matt Damon) (s) (4:30) Movie: ››‡ Payback (1999) 44 SPIKE Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb Jessie (s) (cc) Jessie (s) (cc) Austin & Ally (s) Austin & Ally (s) Shake It Up! (cc) Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb Movie: ›››‡ The Lion King (1994) (s) (G) (cc) 45 DISN Victorious (cc) Victorious (cc) Victorious (N) (s) How to Rock (N) Victorious (cc) iCarly (s) (cc) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Friends (s) (cc) Friends (s) (cc) Friends (s) (cc) Friends (s) (cc) 46 NICK Movie: ››‡ Notting Hill (1999) (Julia Roberts, Hugh Grant) (5:00) Movie: ›› Stepmom (1998, Drama) (Julia Roberts) Movie: ››› Pretty Woman (1990, Romance-Comedy) (Richard Gere, Julia Roberts) 47 FAM Home Improve. Home Improve. Home Improve. Home Improve. Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens 48 TVLD Top Shot “Season 3 Finale” (cc) American Pickers (cc) American Pickers “Motor City” (cc) American Pickers “Hobo Jack” (cc) American Pickers “Psychic Pickings” American Pickers (cc) 49 HIST Movie: Jules Verne’s The Mysterious Island (2012) (Gina Holden) (Premiere) Movie: ››› The Lost Future (2010) (Sean Bean, Corey Sevier) (cc) Movie: Triassic Attack (2010) (Steven Brand, Raoul Trujillo) (cc) 50 SYFY Movie: ›››› The Apartment (1960) (Jack Lemmon, Shirley MacLaine) (cc) Movie: Three Days of the Condor (4:30) Movie: The Best of Everything Movie: ››› Wait Until Dark (1967) (Audrey Hepburn, Alan Arkin) (cc) 54 TCM The Walking Dead “Guts” (cc) The Walking Dead (cc) The Walking Dead “Vatos” (cc) The Walking Dead (5:00) Movie: ›› Christine (1983) (R) The Walking Dead “Days Gone Bye” (cc) 55 AMC Pit Bulls and Parolees (s) (cc) Pit Bulls and Parolees (s) Pit Bulls and Parolees (N) (s) Pit Bulls and Parolees (N) (s) Street Dogs of South Central (N) (s) 56 ANPL ››› The Brothers (cc) Movie: 35 & Ticking (2011) (Nicole Ari Parker, Tamala Jones) (Premiere) (cc) Movie: ›› Phat Girlz (2006, Comedy) (Mo’Nique) Two large women look for love. (cc) (5:00) Movie: 57 BET Movie: ›› Employee of the Month (2006, Comedy) (Dane Cook, Jessica Simpson) (cc) Movie: ›‡ My Best Friend’s Girl Movie: ››‡ Shallow Hal (2001, Romance-Comedy) (Gwyneth Paltrow, Jack Black) (cc) 58 COM Kourtney and Kim Kourtney and Kim The Soup Chelsea Lately Movie: ››› Thank You for Smoking (5:00) The Voice (cc) Kourtney & Kim Take New York Kourtney & Kim Take New York 59 E! The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills Housewives/OC Movie: ››› Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984) (Harrison Ford) (Premiere) (cc) Movie: ››› Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom 61 BRAVO God, Devil & Bob King of the Hill (s) King of the Hill (s) Family Guy (cc) The Boondocks The Boondocks Bleach (N) Fullmetal Alch. Movie: ›››› Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988, Comedy) (Bob Hoskins) 63 TOON (4:00) Movie: ››› The Parent Trap Movie: Cupid (2012) (Joely Fisher, Jamie Kennedy) (Premiere) (cc) Movie: Cupid (2012, Romance-Comedy) (Joely Fisher, Jamie Kennedy) (cc) The Golden Girls The Golden Girls 217 HALL PREMIUM CHANNELS HBO MAX SHOW

(5:15) Movie: ››‡ Just Wright (PG) Movie: ›‡ Something Borrowed (2011) (Ginnifer Goodwin) (PG-13) (cc) Luck “Pilot” (s) (cc) Luck (s) (cc) On Freddie Roach Something Bo Movie: ››‡ Paul (2011) (Simon Pegg) (R) (cc) Movie: Bikini Jones and the Temple of Eros (2010) (NR) (4:15) The Town Movie: ›››‡ Boogie Nights (1997) (Mark Wahlberg) A porn star’s ego leads to his downfall. Movie: ›› The Mechanic (2011) (Jason Statham) (R) Movie: ››› Blue Valentine (2010) (Ryan Gosling) iTV. (s) (R) (cc) Shameless (cc) Lars and Girl Movie: ›‡ Next Day Air (2009) (Donald Faison) (R)


THE Garden City Telegram

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

FUNKY WINKERBEAN

PEANUTS

ZITS DILBERT

HI & LOIS FOR BETTER OR WORSE

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

BEETLE BAILEY

BABY BLUES

BLONDIE

GARFIELD PICKLES

BC

Try your hand at • Sudoku • Battleships • Pic-A-Pics • Kakuro and many more.

SATURDAY February 11, 2012 HAPPY BIRTHDAY The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH You feel pressure building with someone you respect and look up to. This person seems to have continuously changing demands. Catch up on an older person’s news and clear out any pending responsibilities. Make late-afternoon plans. Tonight: So many invitations. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HH Complete a project -- personal or otherwise -- that you have had on the back burner. You feel that you can make plans for a long-deserved getaway once you are done. For now, join friends and/or family at a gathering. Tonight: Make it stress-free. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Someone might rain on your parade, but certainly not for long. You understand the issue and might try to resolve it -- if the other party is ready. Plan on spending the day with a loved one, indulging him or her in one of his or her favorite pastimes. Tonight: And the party goes on. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Stay centered, even if you find others highly critical and difficult. You might wonder why you are putting up with this behavior. That is an excellent question! Be where you want to be with the people you would like to be with. Tonight: Throw a spontaneous get-together. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You might be far more wordy than you realize. You could be processing a lot without realizing it. Focus on each person, each conversation. In the long run, the results will only be better. Avoid a control game at all costs. Tonight: At a favorite spot. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH You could be exhausted by everything that is going on with a friend or loved one. Pull back some and take better care of yourself. Whether this might be going on a playful adventure, getting a massage or anything else that might please you makes no difference. Tonight: Remain nonreactive.

DAY IN THE STARS

BIZARRO

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Jacquelline Bigar King Features

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH You beam, and others respond. Your ability to sort through a problem -- probably impacting your home life -- could make a big difference. Listen to a friend and what really might be motivating him or her. Willingly revise your plans. Tonight: All smiles. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You might want to distance yourself from the source of a control game or problem. You don’t need to see eye to eye with this person. You simply need to not play. Your honesty and self-discipline will pay off for you. Tonight: Do for you. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Maintain a high profile when it comes to your money and how you spend it. Someone might try to coerce you into spending more than you want or heading in a different direction. You know what you want. Follow through on just that. Tonight: Where the crowds are. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH You might be causing yourself more problems than need be, especially if you are trying to make sure your message is heard. Remember that you cannot change anyone. The best plan would be to accept the person as he or she is. Tonight: A must appearance. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You don’t need to share what you might be thinking with a special person. In fact, it might be a total mistake to do just that. Stay present with this individual. Share more of your authentic self. A trip could be planned for the near future. Tonight: Try a new place or different cuisine. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH You are emotional, but you are also quite capable of relating effectively, if you so choose. A friend might mean well but cannot help but complicate an existing matter. Try to keep your interactions with this person simple, for both of your sakes! Tonight: Add more romance into your life.

THE LOCKHORNS

CROSSWORD

B5


B6

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

the Garden City Telegram

A clear path for Being overweight but still healthy the shower head

Dear Heloise: A few months ago, while helping my dad with some things in the house, we could not figure out how to get calcium deposits off the shower head in his bathroom. The water was barely flowing. He dismantled the shower head and soaked it in a bowl of vinegar. Within 30 minutes, it was perfectly clean and void of any blockage. My mother, who always used vinegar, and Heloise knew what they were doing! Our water is full of calcium and leaves showers and sinks spotted! I had tried expensive bathroom and tile cleaners. Nothing succeeded until I started pouring straight vinegar over the calcium buildup. (Heloise here: Do not pour on real marble.) Vinegar has become my cleaner of choice. I just wanted to thank you. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sherry in New Braunfels, Texas Sherry, thank you for sharing how super vinegar is. Vinegar certainly is a workhorse around the home, and it is one of my favorite go-to cleaners! I

have compiled a collection filled with money-saving and â&#x20AC;&#x153;greenâ&#x20AC;? vinegar hints. If you would like to receive one, please send $5 and a long, self-addressed, stamped (65 cents) envelope to: Heloise/Vinegar, P.O. Box 795001, San Antonio, TX 78279-5001. Fresh cola stains should come out of most washable fabrics after being sponged with white vinegar. Launder as usual. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Heloise

Pet pal

DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I have serious doubts about judging weight and health. Everyone talks about the obesity epidemic, but no one speaks for those of us who are overweight by accepted standards but are still in good shape. I am 33. Since grade school, I have exercised hard â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and still do. I lift weights and run long distances and do both regularly. I am 5 feet, 8 inches tall and weigh 185 pounds. My BMI is 28, which puts me in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;overweightâ&#x20AC;? category. I am quite muscular, and my waist is 31 inches. I have the same build as my father and grandfather. My grandfather is 79 and still works his 80acre farm. What do you say

Dear Readers: Cathy in Madison, Maine, sent us a picture of Duckie, her 130-pound mixedbreed dog, crashed out on the couch next to Zelda, a tortoise-colored cat. They look like best buddies! To see Duckie and Zelda, visit www.Heloise.com and click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pets.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Heloise

much of the body weight is fat and how much is muscle and bone) than is weight obtained by stepping on a scale, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not perfect. Heavily muscled individuals come out as being overweight when their weight has no bearing on health or longevity. If people want to calculate their BMI, divide weight in pounds by height in inches squared, and multiply that number by 703. Those proficient with metric measurements, divide weight in kilograms by height in meters squared. Normal values lie

between 18.5 and 24.9. Waist measurement is another reliable criterion of health. For men, the waist should be less than 40 inches (102 cm), and for women less than 35 inches (89 cm). Abdominal fat has a greater negative impact on health than fat in other places. Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but he will incorporate them in his column whenever possible. Readers may write him or request an order form of available health newsletters at P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. Readers may also order health newsletters from www.rbmamall. com.

  1  

Send a money-saving or timesaving hint to Heloise, P.O. Box 795000, San Antonio, TX 78279-5000, or you can fax it to (210) HELOISE or email it to Heloise@Heloise.com.

(JWFUIFNUIFIPUUFTUHJGUTUIBUSVOPO"NFSJDBnT-BSHFTU  .PTU3FMJBCMF)JHI4QFFE8JSFMFTT/FUXPSL

Mom concerned about estate DEAR ANNIE: I am 90 years old and am concerned that after I die my kids will squabble over my things. So I would like to work it out before that happens. I have a daughter who lives in another state and two wonderful daughtersin-law who live nearby. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Doraâ&#x20AC;? and my oldest son have helped me the most. When my husband was still living, they arranged a reverse mortgage on our house by making us a loan from their personal funds. When my husband became feeble, Dora began doing my grocery shopping. Every Sunday, she brings a nice dinner, and my son does any needed repairs around the house. She always brings me a gift on Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day and on my birthday. I already have given Dora two nice heirlooms, and I know she would like to have my motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sterling silver. My daughter will get the antique wall clock, and my other daughter-in-law gets the china closet. How do I divide the rest of the stuff ? Should I give Dora the sterling now? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Old in Indiana Dear Indiana: Please speak to an estate planner or, at the very least, a lawyer who can handle your will. As tempting as it is to give more to Dora than the others, it could create all sorts of resentments later. The division of your estate should be relatively equal, but you can make special gifts of pieces of jewelry or sentimental items. If you think your children will behave themselves, it can help to discuss this with all of them in advance, ask-

about this? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; D.R. I agree with you. The Mayo Clinic did a study comparing overweight but highly fit people to people with normal weight but low fitness. The overweight but highly fit had a lower risk of dying. If overweight people have normal cholesterol, normal blood pressure and normal blood sugar, their overall health isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t impacted by their weight. They are, however, in the distinct minority. As for BMI, body mass index, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a better criterion of body composition (how

ANNIEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MAILBOX

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KATHY MITCHELL MARCY SUGAR

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ing each child to select one item that they would like to have. And yes, you can give it to them while you are around to see them enjoy it. DEAR ANNIE: Am I the only person who is disappointed by generic email Christmas and birthday cards? They seem so impersonal, and I do not appreciate receiving such cold greetings. One longtime friend has resorted to this, in spite of the fact that I always mail her an old-fashioned, hand-signed card. How can I get her to stop sending me email cards without hurting her feelings? Would it be rude to return the greeting to her? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m an old-fashioned person who was raised during the age of smoke signals and find that life used to be much simpler and warmer. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Over-Seventy Attitude Dear Attitude: We agree that email cards are less personal than handwritten notes, but it does take a certain amount of effort to select the right one from hundreds of possibilities, so try to give your friend credit for that. And many people have stopped sending cards altogether, which is a shame. Please accept these cards in the spirit in which they were sent â&#x20AC;&#x201D; that is, to convey good wishes to you.



  





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*Our Surcharges (incl. Fed. Univ. Svc. of 17.9% of interstate & intâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l telecom charges (varies quarterly), 16¢ Regulatory & 99¢ Administrative/line/mo. & others by area) are not taxes (details: 1-888-684-1888); govâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t taxes & our surcharges could add 7% â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 41% to your bill. Activation fee/line: $35. IMPORTANT CONSUMER INFORMATION: Subject to Cust. Agmt, Calling Plan, rebate form & credit approval. Up to $350 early termination fee/line & addâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l charges for extra minutes, data sent/received & device capabilities. Offers & coverage, varying by svc, not available everywhere; see vzw.com. Limited-time offer. Restocking fee may apply. Rebate debit card takes up to 6 wks & expires in 12 months. Addâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l CA eWaste fee may apply. LTE is a trademark of ETSI. 4G LTE is available in 195 cities in the U.S. DROID is a trademark of Lucasfilm Ltd. and its related companies. Used under license. Double your data applies to data paks 2 GB or higher. In those areas in which Verizon Wireless is eligible to receive support from the universal service fund, Verizon Wireless must meet all reasonable requests for service. Unresolved questions concerning service availability can be directed to the Kansas Corporation Commission Office of Public Affairs and Consumer Protection at 800-662-0027. Š 2012 Verizon Wireless. KVLVD

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The 2012

On The House

Sunday, February 12th, 1pm - 4 pm, at the Clarion Inn in Garden City

Bridal SHOW

By the Carey Bros.

The Garden City

Telegram

E WE

Ewe Specialties, LLC & Perfect Occasions

HOMES Brought to you by:

Classifieds begin on page C3

Home Safe Home

When all is said and done your family is more important than “All the money in China.” As such, it is incumbent upon each and every one of us to do our best to insure that our home is a safe place in which to live. It is so easy and inexpensive to remove danger from our family’s path. Here are several tips that can prove to be invaluable to you and yours. Draw a line through the ones you have already completed – and then work on what’s left: • Set your water heater at 120 degrees Fahrenheit to prevent burns. • Install at least one smoke alarm on every level of your home and inside all sleeping areas. • Install at least one Carbon Monoxide Alarm near each sleeping area. • Keep gas appliances properly adjusted and serviced. • Have a trained professional inspect, clean and tune-up your home’s central heating system and repair leaks or other problems. • Fireplaces and woodstoves should also be inspected each year and cleaned or repaired as needed. • Maintain all exterior steps and walkways. Patch cracks, repair uneven surfaces on walkways and remove hoses and other trip hazards. • Mark the edges of steps with reflective tape or consider a ramp. Make sure handrails are available and secured properly. • Keep emergency numbers handy – 911 is easy to remember, but calling directly for an ambulance can save time and possibly a life. • All the rooms in your home should be simply arranged and clean with wide uncluttered walk spaces: 4No piles of books or paper on the floor to slip on or trip over. 4No loose throw rugs - they are a trip hazard especially on tile, vinyl or hardwood. 4If you do have an area carpet it should be taped to the floor. 4If you have wall to wall carpet make sure it has a low pile so as not to make it difficult to move your feet. 4Keep all floors wax-free to avoid slipping. 4Place electrical, phone, and computer cords along walls where they will not trip anyone. To avoid the risk of fire, do not run the wires under carpeting. 4Protect sharp table corners with rounded pads. Replace glass tables with solid furniture that has rounded edges (no sharp corners). This is a section of a three part series. Watch for more house safety in the upcoming weeks.

Real Estate Open Houses C3

THE GARDEN CITY TELEGRAM

SATURDAY, February 4, 2012

1601 E. Harding $147,900

1988 Chmelka $120,000

1704 Belmont $137,500

305 W. Thompson $112,900

310 N. 12th St. $108,000

2105 N. 3rd St. $104,000

ROLLING HILLS RD

CR

WELDON RD

ES

TV

IE

VICKI DOWNEY 620.521.0160 yourrealtor@gcnet.com

1610 Summit $88,500

506 Prospect $80,000

MARIO REYES 620.640.5222 mreyes11_16@hotmail.com

SUSAN CARMICHAEL 620.260.7369 scarmichael@gcnet.com

1906 St. John $80,000

901 N. 11th St. $79,900

SKIP GARNER 620.521.8181 jgarner@gcnet.com

4080 E. Lamonte Pl. $70,000

1327 Summit $69,000

Sunday, February 12, 2012

1. 206 N. 12th...................................................2:00-3:00...................................Tom Chappel

IN

D

DR

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501 Santa Fe $60,950

OPEN HOUSES

WATER HOLE DR

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1308 E. Laurel $72,900

TERRIA JUDGE 620.271.2129 Terria@TerriaJudge.com

JOEY KELCH 620.640.5732 joeykelch@gmail.com

MISSY BAIER 620.287.5000 missy.baier@gcnet.com

E LAKEVI

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W LAKEVIEW DR

DONNA

TOWNS RIVERVIEW SOUTH

TOWNS RIVERVIEW

308 Florence Ave. $95,000 BETH BRUNO 620.271.1128 bclabough@gcnet.com

RACEWAY RD

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TOWNS BLVD LAKE DR

SANDY KELLER 620.272.1969 sandykeller@gcnet.com

JUDY GARNER 620.521.1515 jgarner@gcnet.com

GARDEN CITY ALLEN DR

1720 B St. $115,000

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RD

OLD POST RD

TOWNS RIVERVIEW

ESTES

HOLCOMB

2. 1901 Grandview East, Southwind.......1:30-2:45..............................Darlene Gibson 3. 1510 Mikes Dr.............................................2:00-3:30....................................Judy Nusser

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RIDGEWOOD DR SYNDEE

OLDWEILER DRIVE

4. 519 N. 9th.....................................................2:00-3:00...................................Linda Adams

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5. 1910 Crestway...........................................2:00-3:00...............................Kathie Maestas 1

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SOUTHWIND

MAPLE

6. 603 E. Johnson..........................................1:00-2:00........................................Suzi Fuller

SANTA FE

LOOKING FOR A NEW HOME? GO TO www.gardencitymls.com


C10

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

the Garden City Telegram (PUBLISHED IN THE GARDEN CITY TELEGRAM ON THIS 11TH DAY OF FEBRUARY, 2012)

RESOLUTION NO. 10-2012 cont. 126. Nursery - Any land used to raise trees, shrubs, flowers and other plants for sale or for transporting. 127. Nursing or Convalescent Home - An institution or agency licensed by the State for the reception, board, care or treatment of five (5) or more unrelated individuals, but not including group boarding homes for minors or group homes for adults. 128. Open Space - Usable open space designed and intended for the use of all residents or a residential development, including space dedicated to the public. 129. Outdoor Storage - The storage of goods and materials outside of any building or structure, but not including storage of a temporary or emergency nature. 130. Overlay District - A district which acts in conjunction with the underlying zoning district or districts. 131. Owner - Any person, group of persons, firm or firms, corporation or corporations, or any other legal entity having legal title to or sufficient propriety interest in a tract of land. 132. Package Liquor Store - An establishment in which alcoholic beverages are sold for consumption off the premises. 133. Parking Space - An area surfaced with all-weather surfacing, for the purpose of storing one parked automobile. For the purpose of this Zoning Regulation, one parking space shall have a minimum width of nine (9’) feet and a minimum length of twenty (20) feet. In computing off-street parking, additional space shall be required, off-street, for access drives to each parking space. 134. Parking Lot - An area, paving being a private parking area, street or alley, used for parking of motor vehicles and available for public or semipublic use. 135. Pasturage or Pasture - Shall be defined as land or a plot of land used for the grazing, feeding and the confinement of livestock. 136. Person - A person shall be understood in its broadest legal sense, including person, partnership, firm, company, corporation or another organized or unorganized group of person acting together. 137. Planning Commission - The Holcomb-Garden City-Finney County Area Planning Commission. 138. Professional Office - Any building used by one or more persons engaged in the practice of law, architecture, engineering, medicine, real estate, insurance or other similar business. 139. Preschool - A non-residential facility which provides learning experiences for children who have not attained the age of eligibility to enter kindergarten and who are thirty (30) months of age or older; conducts sessions not exceeding three (3) hours per session; which does not enroll any child more than one session per day; and which does not serve a meal. 140. Public Utility - Any business the purpose of which is to furnish to the general public: a. Telephone Service b. Telegraph Service c. Electricity d. Natural Gas e. Water f. Transportation of Persons and Property g. Solid Waste Disposal h. Wastewater Treatment Plant i. Any other business so affecting the public interest as to be subject to the supervision or regulation by any agency of the State. j. Community closed circuit telecast. 141. Recreational Vehicle (R-V) - A vehicular-type unit built on or for use on a chassis and designed as living quarters, both permanent and temporary, for recreational, camping or travel use, and which has its own motive power, or is mounted on, or which can be drawn by another vehicle. The term recreational vehicle shall include, but not be limited to, motor homes, travel trailers, camper trailers, pickup truck campers, hauling trailers, and camper buses. 142. Recreational Vehicle Park - A lot, tract or parcel of land designed for occupancy by recreational vehicles for temporary or transient living purposes, including the use of camping spaces for tents. 143. Residential Center - A non-secure facility licenses by the State of Kansas providing residential care for more than ten (10) persons unrelated to the operator (s). 144. Residential Design Manufactured Home - A manufactured home on a permanent foundation which has a minimum dimension of twenty-two (22) feet in body width, a pitched roof, and siding and roofing materials which are customarily used on site-built homes. 145. Restaurant - A public eating establishment in which the primary function is the preparation and serving of the food on the premises. 146. Riding Stables - Structures in which saddle horses are kept, maintained and/or boarded, and in connection with which saddle horses may be rented to the general public or made available to members of a private club. Exercise rings shall be considered uses accessory to the use of the premises for a riding stable. 147. Right-of-Way - A strip of land dedicated to the public or private interest, which is intended for use as an alley, crosswalk, court, place, road, thoroughfare, or utility easement. 148. Rooming House - Any dwelling in which more than three persons either individually or as families are housed or lodge for hire, with or without meals. 149. Rural Residential - A lot of more than ten (10) but less than forty (40) acres in size created for the purpose of providing a residential building site, notwithstanding the accessory agricultural use of some or all of said lot either prior to or after the construction of the residential dwelling. 150. Sanitary Landfill - A disposal site in which the method of disposing of solid waste and/or industrial solid waste is by landfill, dump or pit and which has a solid waste disposal permit issued under K.S.A. 65-3401 et seq. and amendments thereto. 151. School - Any public or private elementary, junior high, high school, college, university, post-graduate, technical or vocational school, offering courses in general educational instruction. 152. Service Station - Any building or premise used for the purpose of dispensing, sale, or offering for sale at retail of any automobile fuels, or oils, when the dispensing, sale or offering for sale is incidental to the conduct of a public garage, the premises are classified as public garage. 153. Setback - The minimum horizontal distance between the property line and the building line. a. Front Yard - is determined from the fact of the building excluding steps, unenclosed porches, and eave overhang. b. Rear Yard - is determined from the face of the building excluding steps, unenclosed porches and eave overhang. c. Side Yard - shall be determined from the eave overhang. 154. Sidewalk - A hard surfaced walk for pedestrians at the side of a street. All sidewalks will be constructed as specified by the building inspector and/or county engineer’s office. 155. Sign - A sign shall include any sign, billboard or other device which shall display or include any letter, word, mode, banner, flag, pennant, insignia device or representation used as, or which is in the nature of an advertisement or announcement or which directs attention to an object, project, place, activity, person, institution, organization or business, but shall not include any display of official notice or flag, pennant, emblem or insignia or any nation or group of nations of any state, city or political unit, or of any political, educational, charitable, philanthropic civic, professional, religious or like campaign, drive, movement or event. a. Sign, Advertising - A sign which directs the attention of public to any goods, merchandise, property, real or personal, business service entertainment or amusement conducted, produced, bought or sold, furnished, offered or dealt at the location or elsewhere than on the

premises where such sign is located or to which it is affixed or erected. b. Sign, Banner - A temporary sign composed of lightweight material, either enclosed or not enclosed in a rigid frame, secured or mounted so as to allow movement of the sign caused by movement of the atmosphere. These signs may never be located across public right-ofway. c. Sign, Banjo - An advertising or business ground sign which is constructed in such a manner to form an inverted “V” or tent like shape, hinged or not hinged at the top, and each angular face held at an appropriate distance by supporting member. d. Sign, Bulletin Board - A sign that indicates the name of an institution or organization on whose premises it is located and which contains the name or names of persons connected with it, and announcements of persons, events, or activities occurring at the institution. e. Sign, Building - A sign which directs attention to a business or profession conducted, or to a commodity or service sold, offered, manufactured, or an entertainment offered on the premises where the sign is located or to which it is affixed. f. Sign, Construction - A temporary sign indicating the names of architects, engineers, landscape architects, contractors and similar artisans involved in the design and construction of a structure or project only during the construction period and only on the premises on which the construction is taking place. g. Sign, Directional - Any sign which serves solely to designate the location or direction of any place or area. h. Sign, Free-Standing - Any sign that is standing on or erected into the ground. Such signs are usually, but not necessarily, supported from the ground by one (1) or more poles or posts or similar uprights, with or without braces. Any sign which is mounted into the ground, but has the supports passing through any portion of the roof of a building of structure, shall be considered to be a roof sign. i. Sign, Projecting - Any sign attached to a building or structural wall and extending horizontally outward from such wall more than twelve (12) inches. j. Sign, Public Service Information - Any sign intended primarily to promote items of general interest to the community such as time, temperature, date, atmospheric conditions, news, traffic control, etc. k. Sign, Business - A sign which directs attention to a business or profession conducted or to products, services or entertainment sold or offered upon the premises where such sign is located, or to which it is affixed. A “For Sale” or “For Rent” sign relating to the property on which it is displayed shall be deemed a business sign. l. Sign, Illuminated - Any illuminated sign on which the artificial light, or designed to reflect such light deriving from any source which is intended to cause such light or reflection. m. Sign, Flashing - Any illuminated sign on which the artificial light is not maintained stationary, or constant in intensity and color at all times where such is used. For the purpose of this Zoning Regulation, any revolving illuminated sign shall be considered a flashing sign. n. Sign, Computer Generated - Any message signs may be approved via Conditional Use Permit contingent upon the impact of movement that would not materially or practically tend to create a traffic hazard. o. Sign, Animated - Any sign, or any portion thereof, which is set in motion by any force. p. Sign, Billboard - Any board or panel greater than sixty-four (64) square feet in area which is erected, constructed or maintained for the purpose of displaying outdoor advertising by means of painted letters, posters, pictures and pictorial or reading matter, either illuminated for non-illuminated, when such sign is supported by uprights or braces placed upon the ground. q. “Sign Overlay Zone” adjacent to major intersections where high speed highways would predicate taller signage due to the density of development. The “Sign Overlay Zone” is an area depicted where signs will be granted a maximum sign height of thirty (30’) feet within five-hundred (500’) feet of the intersection public right-of-way unless otherwise designated. The placement of signage shall meet all other requirements in Regulation, State and Federal Law to be placed. (Resolution No. 26-96, 6/10/96) 156. Stockyard, Commercial - A penned enclosure, or structure, where livestock are maintained temporarily for the purpose of slaughtering, marketing or shipping. 157. Story - That portion of a building, other than a basement, or cellar, included between the surface of any floor and the surface of the floor next above it or, if there be no floor above it, then the space between the floor and the ceiling next above it. 158. Street - An easement or right-of-way, other than al alley, which provides principal access to adjacent properties. 159. Street Classification a. Arterial - A street or road which provides for through traffic movement and around areas and across a city, with direct access to abutting property; subject to necessary control of entrances, exits and curb uses. b. Collector - A street or road which provides for traffic movement between arterials and local streets, with direct access to abutting property. c. Local - A street or road which provides for direct access to abutting land, and for local traffic movement whether in business, industrial or residential areas. 160. Street or Road Line - A dividing line between a lot, tract or parcel of land and the contiguous street or road. 161. Structure - Anything constructed or erected, the use of which requires permanent location on the ground or attached to something having a permanent location on the ground, but not including fences. 162. Structural Alterations - Any change in the supporting members of a building, such as, bearing walls or partitions, columns, beams or girders, or any complete rebuilding of the roof or the exterior walls. For the purpose of this Zoning Regulation, the following shall not be considered structural alterations: a. Attachment of new front where structural supports are not changed and it does not encroach beyond building line. b. Addition of fire escapes where structural supports are not materially changed. c. Minor repair or replacement of non-structural members. 163. Suburban Residential - A lot equal to or greater than one (1) acre but less than ten 10) acres in size created for the purpose of providing a residential building site, notwithstanding the accessory agricultural use of some or all of said lot either prior to or after the construction of the residential dwelling. 164. Tavern/Class A Club/Class B Club/Private Club/Night Club/Fraternal Lodge/Drinking Establishment/Lodge – Any establishment that meets at least one of the following: a. Any establishment whose primary function is the sale and on-site consumption of cereal malt beverages or alcoholic liquor. b. Any establishment whose sale of cereal malt beverages or alcoholic liquor accounts for more than fifty (50) percent of its gross receipts in sales. c. A premises which is owned or leased by a corporation, partnership, business trust, or association and which is operated thereby as a bona fide nonprofit social, fraternal or war veterans’ club, for the exclusive use of the corporate stockholders, partners, trust beneficiaries, associates, members, and their families and guests accompanying them. d. A premises which may be open to the general public, where alco-

ORDINANCE NO. 2537-2012

Shoe repair and shoe shine shops. Shoe stores. Sporting and athletic goods stores. Tailor shops employing five or less persons. Theaters (in-door only). Tire repair shops. Toy stores. Travel bureaus. Undertaking establishments. Used furniture, when entire stock is stored within the building. Utility company offices. Wallpaper stores and shops. Variety stores and shops. Watch repair shops. Wholesale establishments. Accessory uses customarily incidental to the above uses. Tattoo and Massage Facilities licensed with the Kansas Department of Cosmetology. (Ord.#2432-2009, 02/02/09) Mobile Vendors licensed with a City of Garden City Local or Non-Local itinerant Business License. See Article 22 for other requirements.

(Published in the Garden City Telegram on the 11th day of February 2012)

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE ZONING REGULATIONS FOR THE CITY OF GARDEN CITY, KANSAS; ADOPTING NEW ZONING REGULATIONS TO REGULATE TEMPORARY AND ACCESSORY USES; AMENDING THE PERMITTED AND CONDITIONAL USES OF ARTICLES 15 “C-2” GENERAL COMMERCIAL AND 16 “C-3” CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICTS; AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 2528-2011; REPEALING CURRENT ZONING REGULATION SECTION 15.020, 15.030, 16.020, AND 16.030; ALL TO THE CODE OF ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF GARDEN CITY, KANSAS. BE IT ORDAINED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF GARDEN CITY, KANSAS: SECTION 1. Section 15.020 of the Zoning Regulations for the City of Garden City, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 15.020 PERMITTED USES. The following uses and structures, and no others, are permitted in the “C-2”, General Commercial District: Antique shops and stores providing all merchandise is enclosed in a buildings. Apparel and accessory stores. Armories. Art and art supply stores. Auditorium and similar places of public assembly. Auto supply stores. Banks and other savings and lending institutions. Barber and beauty shops. Bicycle shops. Books and stationary stores. Boarding and Lodging Houses. Bowling alleys and recreation buildings. Business and technical schools and schools for photography, music, and dancing. Business machine repair, sales, and services. Candy and ice cream stores. Car Rental Establishments. Carpenter and cabinet shops employing five or less persons. Cigar and tobacco stores. Clothing and costume rental. Commercial recreation uses (including golf driving ranges and driving tees. Convenience store (Ord. #1687, 2/10/88) Custom dressmaking, furrier, millinery, and tailor shops employing five or less persons. Delicatessens and catering establishments. Department stores. Drug stores. Dry goods and notion stores. Dry cleaning and laundry establishments (non-industrial/commercial). Electric repair shops (household appliances). Electric and telephone substations. Field crops, nurseries, tree, crops, and truck gardens. Fire stations, police stations, and jails. Fix-it shops (radio and TV repair). Florist and gift shops. Furniture and home furnishing stores. Garage storage (public and private). Golf courses (including miniature golf and driving tees). Government administration buildings. Grocery stores (including retail meat markets and produce, stores). Hardware stores. Hobby, stamp and coin shops. Hotels and motels. Household appliance stores. Interior decorator’s shops. Jewelry and metal craft stores. Key shops and locksmiths. Leather goods and luggage stores. Libraries and museums. Mail order catalog stores. Medical and dental offices and clinics. Medical and orthopedic equipment stores. Meeting halls and auditoriums. Messenger or telegraph service stations. Music instruments sales and repair shops. Music studios, radio, and TV stores. Newspaper offices. Newsstands. Offices and office buildings. Office supply and office equipment stores. Optician and optometrist shops. Package liquor stores. Paint stores. Parks and recreation areas. Pawn shops. Pet shops. Photographic equipment and supply stores. Photographic studios. Post office and court buildings. Picture frame shops, Plumbing and heating, shops employing five or less persons. Printing and publishing houses (including newspaper). Public and parochial schools (elementary through high school). Restaurants and tea rooms (including drive-ins). Self-service laundries. Service stations. Sewing machine stores. Sheet metal shops employing five or less persons.

SECTION 2. Section 15.030 of the Zoning Regulations for the City of Garden City, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 15.030 CONDITIONAL USES. The following uses and structures may be permitted only after they have been reviewed and approved as required by Article 29. Mini storage/rental storage buildings. Licensed Day Care Home, Group Day Care Home or Child Care Center. Auto repair shops, but not including auto body and fender work or auto painting. Automobile sales and service with an accessory use of auto body and fender work and/or auto painting, all outside storage relating to the accessory use shall be shielded with a solid fence. (Ord. #2245, 08/26/03). Automobile parking lots and storage garages (public and private). (Ord. #1850, 6/20/94). Parking lots and garages (commercial, public and private). (Ord. #1850, 6 20/94). Private clubs, fraternities, sorties, and lodges. (Ord. #1850, 6/20/94). Taverns. (Ord. #1850, 6/20/94). Used car lots. (Ord. #1850, 6/20/94). Vehicle Washes, automatic or manual. (Ord. #2009, 4/22/97). Towers. (Ord. # 2074, 10/27/98) Frozen Food Lockers under 30,000 square feet SECTION 4. Section 16.020 of the Zoning Regulations for the City of Garden City, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 16.020 PERMITTED USES. The following uses and structures, and no others, are permitted in the “C-3” District. Amusement places. Antique shops, providing all merchandise be enclosed in or building. Apparel and accessory stores. Artist studios and art shops. Apartments above ground floor level. Automobile supply accessory stores. Auditorium. Bakery and pastry shops (retail only). Banks and other savings and lending institutions. Barber shops, beauty shops, chiropody, massage, or similar personal service shops. Bicycle shops (sales and repair). Boarding and Lodging Houses. Books and stationery stores or shops. Business or commercial schools, including dancing and music academies. Business machine repair, sales, and services. Cigar and tobacco stores. Clothing and costume rental. Commercial recreation uses. Convenience store. (Ord. #1687, 2/10/88) Custom dressmaking, millinery, tailoring and similar trades. Delicatessens and catering establishments. Department stores. Drug stores. Dry goods and notion shops. Dry cleaning establishments. Electric repair shops. Fire stations, police stations, and other public buildings. Fix-it, radio or television repair shops. Florist or gift shops. Furniture and home furnishing shops and stores. Garages for storage of motor vehicles. Government administration buildings. Grocery, fruit, and vegetable stores. Hardware stores

holic liquor by the individual drink is sold. e. A premises operated for profit by a corporation, partnership or individual, to which members of such club may resort for consumption of food or any beverage and for entertainment. 165. Townhouse - Means one single-family townhouse residential unit which may be joined together with at least one additional single-family townhouse residence by a common wall or walls, and/or roof, and/or foundation: Provided, however, that in any event, the term “townhouse” shall not mean a condominium as defined in K.S.A. 58-3102. 166. Tract - An area or parcel of land other than a lot of record described and recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Finney County as a single parcel of land under individual ownership. 167. Trailer - Any structure used for living, sleeping, business or storage purposes, having no foundation other than wheels, blocks, skids, jacks, horses, or skirting and which has been, or reasonably may be, equipped with wheels or other devices for transporting the structure from place to place, whether by motor power or other means. The term “Trailer” shall include recreational vehicles. 168. Trailer Park - Means a tract of land containing sites for the overnight or short term parking of two or more camping trailers. Camping trailers may be parked in a campground or camper park provided such camp area is in conformance with the codes and Regulations of Finney County. 169. Trailer, Advertising - A trailer, as defined above, but carrying, or having attached thereto, a sign, billboard, or other medial for advertising purposes, such advertising being the prime purpose and use of the trailer. 170. Trailer, Camping - A trailer, as defined above, and equipped with an enclosure for sleeping while on vacation or other trips of short duration. Such camping trailers may also contain cooking, bath, and sanitary equipment. Size and furnishing of such camping trailers may vary widely, but in no case shall they be considered structures for residential use of a temporary or permanent nature, for purposes of this Zoning Regulation. 171. Trailer, Hauling - A trailer, as defined above, and designed and normally used for over-the-road transporting of belongings, equipment, merchandise, livestock, and other objects , but not equipped for human habitation. 172. Use - The specific purpose for which land or a building is used. 173. Usable Open Space - Land or water which is free of buildings, structures and/or other substantial improvements and which is readily accessible by the public or residents of a residential development. Usable open space does not include streets, alleys, off-street parking or loading areas, roofs, or slopes in excess of 50 percent. 174. Yard - A required open space, other than a court, unoccupied and unobstructed by any structure or portion of a structure from the general ground level of the graded lot upward; however, that fences, walls, poles, posts and other customary yard accessories, ornaments and furniture may be permitted in any yard, subject to height limitations and requirements limiting obstruction of visibility. 175. Yard, Front - A yard extending across the full width of the lot, the depth of which is the least distance between the lot line or road easement or right-of-way line and the front building line. 176. Yard, Rear - A yard extending across the full width of the lot between the rear building line and the rear lot line, the depth of which is the least distance between the rear lot line and the rear building line. 177. Yard, Side - A yard between the side building line and the side line of the lot and extending from the front yard to the rear yard and being the least distance between the side lot line and the side building line. 178. Zone or District - A section of the zoning area for which uniform regulations governing the use, height, area, size and intensity of use of buildings, land and open space about buildings are herein established. 179. Zoning Administrator - The person or persons authorized and empowered by the Governing Body to administer the requirements of these Regulations. 180. Zoning Use Permit - The intent of the ZUP is to provide an administrative permitting process that assures notification to the local government in areas where there is a need to know what is going on at the site but not so severe as to require a Conditional Use Permit through the Board of Zoning Appeals (BZA). The administrative cost shall be $15.00 for the permit, to cover processing and notification to affected agencies. (Resolution No. 27-96, 6/10/96) SECTION IV: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Article 5, Section 5.030; 9 shall read as follows: 9. Hobby Car Collecting, on lots of five (5) to forty (40) acres the maximum inoperable vehicles permitted for hobby car collecting shall be fifteen (15) unless otherwise determined by the Board of Zoning Appeals. SECTION V: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Article 5.5, Section 5.530; 9 shall read as follows: 9. Hobby Car Collecting, on lots of five (5) to forty (40) acres maximum inoperable vehicles permitted for hobby car collecting shall be fifteen (15) unless otherwise determined by the Board of Zoning Appeals. On lots between two (2) and five (5) acres the maximum inoperable vehicles permitted for hobby car collecting shall be ten (10). SECTION VI: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Article 6, Section 6.030; 7 shall read as follows: 7. Hobby Car Collecting, on lots between two (2) and five (5) acres the maximum inoperable vehicles permitted for hobby car collecting shall be ten (10). SECTION VII: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Article 7, Section 7.030; 7 shall read as follows: 7. Hobby Car Collecting, on lots of two (2) acres or less the maximum inoperable vehicles permitted for hobby car collecting shall be five (5). SECTION VIII: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Article 8, Section 8.030; 8 shall read as follows: 8. Hobby Car Collecting, on lots of two (2) acres or less the maximum inoperable vehicles permitted for hobby car collecting shall be five (5). SECTION IX: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Article 9, Section 9.030; 7 shall read as follows: 7. Hobby Car Collecting, on lots of two (2) acres or less the maximum inoperable vehicles permitted for hobby car collecting shall be five (5). SECTION X: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Article 10, Section 10.030; 6 shall read as follows: 6. Hobby Car Collecting, on lots of two (2) acres or less the maximum inoperable vehicles permitted for hobby car collecting shall be five (5). SECTION XI: Further Amendment. That the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, adopted by Resolution No. 43-96, on file with the County Clerk of Finney County, Kansas, as previously existing and amended, be and the same, is hereby amended and rewritten as contained herein. SECTION XII: Effective Date: This Resolution shall take effect and be in force from and after its publication in the official County newspaper. PASSED AND APPROVED by the Board of County Commissioners, Finney County, Kansas on this 6th day of February, 2012. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF FINNEY COUNTY, KANSAS Don Doll, CHAIRMAN Dave Jones, COMMISSIONER Larry Jones, COMMISSIONER Clifford A. Mayo, COMMISSIONER ATTEST: Roman Halbur, COMMISSIONER 212960 Elsa Ulrich, COUNTY CLERK

and shops. Hobby shops. Hotels and motels. Household appliance stores. Interior decorator shops. Jewelry and metal craft stores and shops. Laundries and launderettes. Leather goods and luggage stores. Libraries and museums. Lock and key shops. Mail order catalogue stores. Medical and dental clinics. Medical and orthopedic equipment stores. Meeting halls and auditoriums. Messenger and telegraph service stations. Milk and milk products distribution stations. Music and music instrument stores and studios. Newspaper offices. Newsstands. Newsprint, job printing, and printing supplies stores. Offices and office buildings. Office supply and equipment stores. Pet shops. Photographic equipment and supply stores. Photographic studios. Post office and court buildings. Picture frame shops. Package liquor stores. Parking lots and garages (commercial, public and private). Paint stores. Pawn shops. Plumbing, heating, and air conditioning shops when the entire operation is conducted entirely within the building. Prescription shops. Private clubs fraternities, sororities, and lodges. Public and private parking lots for temporary storage of automobiles. Radio and TV stores. Radio and television studios. Railway, taxi, and bus passenger stations. Restaurants and tea rooms. Sporting goods stores. Service stations (gas and oil). Shoe stores and repair shops. Tailor shops. Taverns. Theaters. Toy shops. Travel bureaus. Utility company offices. Stores and shops, for the conduct of retail business, similar to the uses enumerated above. SECTION 5. Section 16.030 of the Zoning Regulations for the City of Garden City, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 16.030 CONDITIONAL USES. The following uses and structures may be permitted only after they have been reviewed and approved as required by Article 29. Towers. (Ord. # 2074, 10/27/98) Garages and auto repair shops, but not including auto body and fender work and auto painting. SECTION 6. The Zoning Regulations for the City of Garden City, Kansas, Sections 15.020, 15.030, 16.020, and 16.030, as previously existing, is hereby repealed, to be replaced as specified in this ordinance. SECTION 7. Ordinance No. 2528-2011, subject to the amendment set forth herein, shall remain in full force and effect. SECTION 8. This ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its publication in the Garden City Telegram, the official city newspaper. APPROVED AND PASSED by the Governing Body of the City of Garden City, Kansas, this 17th day of January, 2012. _________________________________ JOHN DOLL, Mayor ATTEST: _________________________________ CELYN N. HURTADO, Acting City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: _________________________________ RANDALL D. GRISELL City Counselor 213020


C2

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

the Garden City Telegram

Ask a Designer: Let your home do your wooing By Melissa Rayworth For The Associated Press

Could a few changes to your living space help you land the perfect mate? Good decorating canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t guarantee happy romance, of course. But if a new date finds your home appealing, he or she is more likely to spend time there â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which means spending time with you. And if your home expresses your personality, you and your date can discover more quickly whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re compatible. Fortunately, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not expensive to make your space more date-friendly, says interior designer Betsy Burnham. The goal isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t to redecorate; youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re simply presenting your home at its best. With Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day approaching, Burnham and interior designers Brian Patrick Flynn of decordemon.com and Kyle Schuneman of Live Well Designs share advice on making a new dateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s visit a successful one. CLEAN UP â&#x20AC;&#x153;The obvious things really are worth saying here: Cleanliness is

free, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s appreciated,â&#x20AC;? Burnham says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Do all the dishes before the person arrives. Scrub the sinks. Clean out the fridge. If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to do your laundry, get a couple of beautiful baskets and throw your laundry in there.â&#x20AC;? Schuneman suggests walking through your home as if you were a stranger, assessing it room by room to see what needs cleaning up or adjusting. What is outdated and isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you anymore? What might give the wrong impression? Every room matters. Even if your guest wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be entering your bedroom, they may glimpse it on the way to the bathroom. So make your bed, and consider what the room says about you. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When single people are getting to know one another, you can really tell a lot about who they are from their more private quarters,â&#x20AC;? Flynn says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I often use prints in bedrooms, either on the walls behind a bed or near the bed, in the form of wallpaper or fabric. Someone with more traditional prints may be a bit more oldfashioned and reserved,

whereas someone with bold geometric prints may be much more daring.â&#x20AC;? FEED ALL FIVE SENSES Schuneman, who wrote â&#x20AC;&#x153;The First Apartment Book,â&#x20AC;? due out in August from Random House, says many of his younger clients focus on the visual without considering the sounds, scents and feel of their living space. People often think decorating â&#x20AC;&#x153;is just about paint on the walls,â&#x20AC;? he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really about creating an experience.â&#x20AC;? Soft textures will make a chair or sofa more inviting, and a fluffy rug can delight guests who will be taking off their shoes. Candles or fresh flowers can make the scent of a room more appealing, whether the fragrance is crisp and energizing or soothing. And music isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the only way to set a mood or banish silence, Schuneman says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maybe itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the crackling of a fireplaceâ&#x20AC;? that helps create a good atmosphere. LIGHT CAREFULLY Burnham likes to light rooms with table

lamps or floor lamps when guests visit. If you must use overhead lights, she advises dimming them to avoid glare. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People want to feel that they look their best, and you want your things to look as good as they can,â&#x20AC;? Burnham says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Overhead lights flatter no one.â&#x20AC;? LAYER ON THE STYLE â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just like a great person has many layers to their personality, a well-layered room speaks volumes,â&#x20AC;? Flynn says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In my own living room, I layered texture everywhere, including grasscloth on the walls, a linen print on the draperies, a nubby tweed on the upholstery, and a thick charcoal wool shag.â&#x20AC;? Guests, he says, are â&#x20AC;&#x153;instantly drawn to the space, and end up staying for hours on end just relaxing and unwinding.â&#x20AC;? One option for bachelors: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been upholstering guysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; walls with pinstripe suit fabric,â&#x20AC;? Flynn says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It packs sex appeal, and can remain should their gal pal become their spouse in the future.â&#x20AC;? INFUSE YOUR

PERSONALITY Burnham suggests decorating your main living area with items that reveal something about your personality or experiences. Arrange a stack of your favorite books on a coffee table. If you play an instrument, consider displaying it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re out of the room, these things tell your date something about you,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a jumping-off point for conversation.â&#x20AC;? Schuneman encourages clients to decorate with items collected during their travels, either from exotic places or closer to home. CREATE A LOUNGE SPACE â&#x20AC;&#x153;Since the kitchen is where most guests seem to feel the most comfortable, I like to turn small kitchens into more intimate, lounge-like gathering spaces, where conversation and flirtation is encouraged,â&#x20AC;? Flynn says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In a small condo, I covered all of its walls with $8-per-square-foot glossy black penny rounds (tiles), and added three chrome-and-crystal pendants,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then I brought in barstools upholstered in a

red-and-white chinoiserie fabric, which had a bit of a Vegas feel, but still had enough traditional flair to remain classic.â&#x20AC;? ADD FRESH TOUCHES All three designers suggest adding just a few new details to energize your space. For minimal expense, you can brighten your sofa with new throw pillows or add fresh hand towels to the bathroom, Burnham says. Scout around for sales and buy a beautiful, oversize bowl to display fresh fruit in your kitchen, or a new vase for flowers. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll come on too strong, she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Men, it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gone completely off the deep end for someone if you buy fresh flowers. It just means youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re making an effort.â&#x20AC;? This advice applies to anyone. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been married a long time,â&#x20AC;? Schuneman says, making an effort with your living space before a special evening can have a huge impact. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Adding that spice, that â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Oh, wow, you did something special,â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;goes a long way.â&#x20AC;?

cal conditions with those in the average home in winter. Yes, indoor temperatures might hover at around 70, although many of us let the temperature drop at night. A bigger problem is humidity, which typically is less than 40 percent indoors in winter. Frequently misting the plant, standing the pot in a saucer of pebbles and water, and clustering it close to other plants all help to bring the humidity up. Chocolate naturally grows as an understory tree, and even under cultivation is grown in shade. So providing sufficient light does not present much of a problem in growing a potted plant indoors. The plant wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tolerate a dark room, though. Direct your Valentine to set the plant at a sunny window, which in midwinter in more northerly latitudes receives about the same amount of light as a shaded tree near the equator. As winter progresses and the northern sun loops higher in the sky, the plant needs to be pulled back from the window to keep the leaves from burning. An indoor chocolate plant appreciates an annual vacation to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;tropics.â&#x20AC;? Give it something close by moving it outdoors in dappled shade each summer to bask in buoyant air and high humidity.

SEED HARVEST IS ONLY THE BEGINNING So much for growing chocolate; what about eating it? With good growing conditions, footballshaped pods a half-foot to a foot long will pop right out of the trunk or stems within about five years for a seed-grown plant, a couple of years for a nursery-bought plant. But this is not a fruit to pluck right off the tree and chomp on. First, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the hard

shell. Second, the seeds â&#x20AC;&#x201D; called cacao beans at this point â&#x20AC;&#x201D; taste like â&#x20AC;&#x153;chocolateâ&#x20AC;? only after some processing. Cacao beans are converted to cocoa, then chocolate, by first letting the slimy covering ferment as the beans are piled together and kept warm for about a week. After a few more days of drying, the chocolatey flavor starts to emerge. Next, the seeds are roasted at about 270 degrees Fahrenheit for

several hours. Finally, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re ground up and treated with alkali to remove bitterness. Defatted and powdered, you have â&#x20AC;&#x153;cocoaâ&#x20AC;?; with some fat, sweetener, and other ingredients such as milk, you have various kinds of â&#x20AC;&#x153;chocolate.â&#x20AC;? A TASTE OF HISTORY Use of chocolate goes back to the Mayans, who considered it a gift from their god of air, Quetzalcoatl. The Spanish were the first Europeans to

get hold of chocolate pods and, 50 years later, figured out what to do with them. After harvest begins, you might want to snuggle up with your Valentine and sip hot chocolate from this 16th century Spanish recipe: Combine 50 cacao beans with a chili pepper pod, a quarter pound of sugar, and some anise, rose blossoms, cinnamon, almonds and hazelnuts. Grind to a paste, add a cup of boiling water, and serve hot and steamy. Sweet.

Chocolateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a challenge for gardening Valentines By Lee Reich For The Associated Press

If chocolateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the thing for your sweetie on Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day, why give plain old candy when you can give a chocolate plant (Theobroma cacao)? THE CHALLENGE OF CHOCOLATE Growing chocolate from seed is difficult. Fresh, they are covered with what looks like a cottony mass that keeps them properly moist for sprouting. The covering is slimy, though, and starts to rot away as soon as the seeds are out of the pods. Still, you might want to give the seeds as a gardening challenge, perhaps nestled in a gift box on some moist, real cotton. To sprout, the seeds need warmth and welldrained soil. Fresh seeds are available online at Montosgardens.com and Organicfarm.net. A chocolate plant thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up and growing makes a more dramatic gift than a few seeds snuggled in cotton. (Plants are widely available online.) But caring for an already growing chocolate plant is still a challenge. Chocolate is native to the tropical lowlands of Central and South America within 20 degrees on either side of the equator. There, neither the temperature nor the humidity ever drops much below about 70. Contrast such tropi-

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First National Bank of Holcomb No Origination or Application Fees Required Financing Based on 90% of $100,000 Loans

Garden City State Bank 620-271-9700

First Time Home Buyer Programs Available Conventional 97% FHA Bond 97% Financing Based on 100% of $100,000 Loans

Golden Plains Credit Union 620-276-8175

No Originiation or Application Fees First Time Home Buyer & USDA Guaranteed Rural Housing Loan Programs. Loans Serviced Locally Financing Based on 95% of $100,000 Loans

Certificates of Deposit Landmark National Bank 620-275-2166

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TermFHA/VA FirstRate APY* Time Home Buyer Programs Available Loans Services Locally Under Program Improved .75 Rates! Rates Subject to Change 13 MonthNew .75 Financing Based on 90% of $100,000 Loans 15 MonthFirst National 1.00Bank of1.00 Garden City 620-276-6971 17 Month 1.10 1.11 Special financing programs available. loans serviced locally. 23 MonthSome 1.25 1.26 Conv/FHA/VA & First time Home Buyer Programs Available

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State Farm Bank Minimum deposit $500.00 Rates effective November 2, 2011 877-734-2265

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Personalized local banking Western State Bank with people you know.â&#x20AC;? 3.000 15 yr. fixed www.gardencitystatebank.com 620-275-2292 3.875 30 yr. fixed Conventional loans locally FHA/VA/RD 1910 Eserviced Mary Street Financing Based on 100% of $100,000 Loans 620-271-9700 Rates effective as of 2-9-12 â&#x20AC;˘ All rates subject to change 208483 Member FDIC 212835

210799


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SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

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01&/)064&4 See More Real Estate Listings C5 C10

TODAYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NEW ADS

OPEN SUNDAY 603 Labrador #5, Garden City, KS 67846 chappeltom@yahoo.com

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Sunday, FEBRUARY 12 â&#x20AC;˘ 2:00 - 3:00 pm

519 N. 9th - 2:00-3:00

Vibrant historical home! A must see!

206 N. 12th

620-275-8955

501 N. Main. â&#x20AC;˘ Garden City, KS

MOVE IN READY!!!

Needed: Real Estate Sales Associates, Bi-lingual preferred

Linda Adams, Broker 620-521-0566 Jeff Dunlap, Agent 620-290-1559

212998

Tom Chappel, Supervising Broker

620.271.4938

The Real Estate Shoppe, Inc.

212978

www.gccoldwellbanker.com se habla espanol

423 N. Main, Garden City â&#x20AC;˘ 276-3525

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SUNDAY, February 12, 2012 1910 Crestway â&#x20AC;˘ 2:00-3:00 p.m.

(SBOEWJFX&BTU4065)8*/%t1.

'"/5"45*$0110356/*5:is available on this STUNNING 2-STORY, overlooking SOUTHWIND LAKES & GOLF COURSE! 4 BD/3 1/2 BTHS, Daylite Bsmt, SPLIT STAIRCASE ENTRY, Spacious KITCHEN open to GREATRM. OWNER IS GIVING ANOTHER PRICE REDUCTION, PRICE NOW -- $369,000 WAY BELOW CERTIFIED APPRAISAL of $466,000 TALK TO: Darlene Gibson, ABR,GRI, 620-272-4332, gibson@gcnet.com

HUGE PRICE REDUCTION TO $229,750!!! ONE OF THE MOST UNIQUE HOMES IN GARDEN CITY! Located on 1+ acre, this great home is all one level, 3 bdrms & office, 2-1/2 baths, formal dining & breakfast nook. Sprinkler system, in-ground pool, stone exterior & tile roof. 25â&#x20AC;&#x2122; x 32â&#x20AC;&#x2122; shop. Kathie Maestas 620-271-4777 212994

.JLFT%SJWFt1. )6(4 ,*44&4-07&-&55&34DBO"-- happen @ this address! NO crowding. FOUR levels of living. 3+1+office/3 baths. LOTS of wood & laminate flooring. REMARKABLE mainfloor Greatrm./beamed ceiling, fireplace, & new carpeting. HUGE laundry. COVERED patio/HOT TUB. Valentines live FOREVER. $199,000 Judy Nusser, CRB,CRS,ABR,GRI, 620-275-7421 ext 202 212999

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1:00 -2:00 pm 603 E. Johnson â&#x20AC;˘ Suzi Fuller, Hostess To view our listings online, please visit www.arcrealestate.com or www.gardencitymls.com 212992

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Jon Fort ............ 272-1341 Tami Hunter ...... 276-4966 Jim Howard ...... 272-6736 Leah Morris....... 272-3965

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Telecom Technician Sunflower Electric Power Corporation is seeking a highly motivated individual to fill the position of Telecom Technician at our Garden City location. This individual will install, test, inspect, calibrate, and repair electronic equipment including telephones, recorders, remote terminals, microwaves, and computers. Two years post high school technical certification in an accredited electronics technology program or a related field and two years practical electronic equipment installation and maintenance experience, or equivalent combination of education and experience. Excellent wages and benefit package. Background check & drug test required. For complete job description and to apply, go to www.sunflower. net and click â&#x20AC;&#x153;careersâ&#x20AC;?. EOE M/F/D/V

212996

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Maxine Atkinson271-4048

Darrin Addison . 338-0894 Suzi Fuller ......... 290-0358 Barb Larson...... 290-3892

Classified: A Bargain Hunters Paradise Call The Garden City Telegram 275-8500

The Finney County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office is accepting applications for full-time

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Qualifications: At least 19 years of age, high school diploma or GED, verifiable work experience, correctable vision to 20/20 with no color blindness, height and weight must be proportionate, and must possess a valid Kansas drivers license. No felony or serious misdemeanor convictions allowed. Serious traffic violations may also disqualify applicant. Pre-employment test, Pre-employment Drug Screen, physical and psychological exams are required. Primary Responsibilities: Supervise prisoners in a direct supervision setting, maintains discipline, enforces rules and regulations, and may be called upon to use the necessary force for control purposes. Receives, assigns and transports new prisoners to housing assignments, issues bedding, clothing, supplies and assists with food service. Inspects and searches prisoners and their quarters. Transports prisoners to and from various activities. Prepares and presents written and oral reports as required. Other duties as assigned. Computer proficiency is required. Shift work with 12 hour work schedule. Salary: From $13.25 to $21.72 per hour depending on previous experience and qualifications. Benefits: Paid vacation and holidays. Blue Cross/Blue Shield Health and Dental Plans. Excellent opportunity for advancement to other law enforcement and jail positions. All testing will be conducted at the Finney County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office. Contact Gaye at 620272-3700 for further information. Apply in person or e-mail at: FINNEY COUNTY SHERIFFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OFFICE 304 N. 9th Garden City, Kansas 67846

212975

FAX 620-272-3777 admaide@ficolec.org Equal Opportunity Employer

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Armstrong Custom Cattle Service LLC is interviewing for cattle handlers, processors and computer sorting technicians in the Garden City area. Part, 3/4 time and seasonal full time opportunities are available.Ladies encouraged to apply. Early morning start time. 620-355-1483. Equal Opportunity Employer.

IMMEDIATE OPENING for Dishwasher. Apply in person at Golden Dragon Restaurant, 1106 Campus Dr.

BASKIN-ROBBINS ICE Cream Immediate opening, part time, evening/ weekends. Contact manager, corner of Fleming & Fulton St. Garden City (620) 275-9794.

Autos 2003 CHEVY Cavalier. 103k, runs good. $1600 OBO. (620) 937-0660.

Residential Rentals 212 DAVIS #9 downstairs $400 / $250 Call 620-276-6884 between h o u r s 7:30am to 4:30pm!

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RED GREEN LIVE Experience this hilarious one-man show. Sat., May 19th, 7pm, Wichita Orpheum Theatre. For tickets call 316-755-7328 or purchase online at www.selectaseat.com. www.redgreen.com

FOUND: SMALL Brown Fluffy â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pekingese/ Mix?â&#x20AC;? Dog. 3rd & Hamline, Garden City. Call (785) 462-2486

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Public Services EMMANUEL UNION Free clothing Available Mon - Wed - Fri 8am-6pm, 509 Chesterfield DR. All donations / non-perishable items gratefully accepted (620) 275-2961

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GARDEN CITY 12 x 12 Al-Anon Family Groups (For families and friends of alcoholics/addicts) Thursday @ 7:00 pm. 116 Chestnut (A.A. Hall)

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV cerWE ARE all created to t i f i e d . ! Call serve.! Come and join 888-220-3977 the Volunteer Team at www.CenturaOnline.co St Catherine Hospital m and enjoy giving back. For more information Help Wanted call 272-2522. Armstrong Custom Cattle Service LLC is interEducation & Training viewing for cattle hanAIRLINES ARE HIR- dlers, processors and ING - Train for hands computer sorting techon Aviation Mainte- nicians in the Garden nance Career. FAA ap- City area. Part, 3/4 time proved program. Finan- and seasonal full time cial aid if qualified - opportunities are availHousing a v a i l a b l e able.Ladies encourCALL Aviation Institute aged to apply. Early of M a i n t e n a n c e morning start time. 888-248-7449. 620-355-1483. Equal ALLIED HEALTH ca- Opportunity Employer. reer training - Attend BASKIN-ROBBINS ICE college 100% online. Cream Immediate Job placement assisopening, part time, evetance. Computer availning/ weekends. Conable. Financial Aid if tact manager, corner of qualified. SCHEV certiFleming & Fulton St. fied. Call 800-481-9409 Garden City (620) www.CenturaOnline.co 275-9794. m Deliver ATT&T phoneADVERTISE books in Garden City and surrounding areas. HERE Payment issued within Call (620) 275-8500 72 hrs. 877-628-8883 to place your ClassiIs it Junk? Or is it fied ad in the Retro Cool? Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Garden City Telethink about it - Place an ad with us today! gram.

(Published in the Garden City Telegram February 11, 2012.) RESOLUTION NO. 4-2012 A RESOLUTION RELATING TO THE ZONING OF A PARCEL OF LAND IN FINNEY COUNTY, KANSAS FROM â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aâ&#x20AC;? AGRICULTURAL DISTRICT TO â&#x20AC;&#x153;R-Râ&#x20AC;? RURAL RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT; ZONING PARTS OF SAID COUNTY AND AMENDING THE DISTRICT ZONING MAP ADOPTED BY RESOLUTIONS NO. 40-95 OF THE FINNEY COUNTY ZONING REGULATION. BE IT ORDAINED by the Board of County Commissioners, Finney County, Kansas: SECTION I: Statement of Purpose. It is the purpose of this Resolution to amend the approved Zoning Map of Finney County, Kansas, adopted by Resolution No. 40-95: SECTION II: Identified Area of Amendment. The boundaries of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;R-Râ&#x20AC;? Rural Residential District are hereby amended to include the following described real property: Lot 1, Block 1 of Rome Addition, Finney County, KS located in the NW/4 of Section 36, T22S, R34W of the 6th P.M., more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Northwest corner of said Section 36 being a found concrete mass, origin unknown; thence South 88Âş 28! 48â&#x20AC;? East on the North line of said Section 36 a distance of 430.00 feet to a set 1/2â&#x20AC;? R-bar, Parks cap (typical); thence South 01Âş 31! 12â&#x20AC;? West a distance of 334.00 feet to a set 1/2â&#x20AC;? R-bar; thence Southwesterly on a non-tangent curve to the left having a delta angle of 24Âş 10! 21â&#x20AC;?, a radius of 1352.00 feet, an arc length of 570.39 feet, a chord length of 566.17 feet and a chord bearing of South 37Âş 11! 52â&#x20AC;? West to a set 1/2â&#x20AC;? R-bar; thence North 88Âş 32!14â&#x20AC;? West a distance of 99.00 feet to a set 1/2â&#x20AC;? R-bar; thence North 01Âş 27! 46â&#x20AC;? East on the West line of said Section 36 a distance of 794.00 feet to the point of beginning, containing an area of 5.8 acres, more or less. SECTION III: Further Amendment. That the District Zoning Map referred to in Article 3, Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, adopted by Resolution No. 40-95, on file with the County Clerk of Finney County, Kansas, as previously existing and amended, be and the same, is hereby repealed if inconsistent with the amendments set forth herein. SECTION IV: Effective Date: This Resolution shall take effect and be in force from and after its publication in the official County newspaper.

(Published in the Garden City Telegram February 11, 2012.) RESOLUTION NO. 3-2012 A RESOLUTION RELATING TO THE ZONING OF A PARCEL OF LAND IN FINNEY COUNTY, KANSAS FROM â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aâ&#x20AC;? AGRICULTURAL DISTRICT TO â&#x20AC;&#x153;I1-I2â&#x20AC;? LIGHT TO MEDIUM INDUSTRIAL DISTRICT AND â&#x20AC;&#x153;S-Eâ&#x20AC;? SUBURBAN ESTATES; ZONING PARTS OF SAID COUNTY AND AMENDING THE DISTRICT ZONING MAP ADOPTED BY RESOLUTIONS NO. 40-95 OF THE FINNEY COUNTY ZONING REGULATION. BE IT ORDAINED by the Board of County Commissioners, Finney County, Kansas: SECTION I: Statement of Purpose. It is the purpose of this Resolution to amend the approved Zoning Map of Finney County, Kansas, adopted by Resolution No. 40-95: SECTION II: Identified Area of Amendment. The boundaries of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;I1-I2â&#x20AC;? Light to Medium Industrial District are hereby amended to include the following described real property: Lot 1, Block 1 of GSPF Addition to Finney County, KS located in the NE/4 of Section 12, T24S, R34W of the 6th P.M. in Finney County, Kansas A parcel of land located in the Northeast quarter of Section 12, Township 24 South, Range 34 West of the 6th P.M., in Finney County, Kansas, being further described as follows; Commencing at the Northeast corner of Section 12, T24S, R34W, thence S89°32!39â&#x20AC;?W on the North line of the Northeast quarter for a distance of 826.50 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence S00°01!58â&#x20AC;?W for a distance of 729.42 feet to a found 1/2â&#x20AC;? rebar on the Northerly right of way line of the A.T.&S.F. Railroad; thence N76°46!31â&#x20AC;?W on said right of way line for a distance of 256.60 feet to a found 1/2" rebar: thence N76°47!00â&#x20AC;?W on said right of way line for a distance of 439.57 feet; thence N01°02!39â&#x20AC;?E for a distance of 565.00 feet to a point on the North line of the Northeast quarter; thence N89°32!39â&#x20AC;?E on said North line for a distance of 667.87 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 10.005 acres of land including the county road right of way. SECTION III: Identified Area of Amendment. The boundaries of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;S-Eâ&#x20AC;? Suburban Estates District are hereby amended to include the following described real property: Lot 2, Block 1 of GSPF Addition to Finney County, KS located in the NE/4 of Section 12, T24S, R34W of the 6th P.M. in Finney County, Kansas SECTION IV: Further Amendment. That the District Zoning Map referred to in Article 3, Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, adopted by Resolution No. 40-95, on file with the County Clerk of Finney County, Kansas, as previously existing and amended, be and the same, is hereby repealed if inconsistent with the amendments set forth herein. SECTION V: Effective Date: This Resolution shall take effect and be in force from and after its publication in the official County newspaper.

PASSED AND APPROVED by the Board of County Commissioners, Finney County, Kansas on this 6th day of February, 2012. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF FINNEY COUNTY, KANSAS Don Doll, CHAIRMAN Dave Jones, COMMISSIONER Larry Jones, COMMISSIONER Clifford A. Mayo, COMMISSIONER Roman Halbur, COMMISSIONER ATTEST: Elsa Ulrich, COUNTY CLERK 212955

PASSED AND APPROVED by the Board of County Commissioners, Finney County, Kansas on this 6th day of February, 2012. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF FINNEY COUNTY, KANSAS Don Doll, CHAIRMAN Dave Jones, COMMISSIONER Larry Jones, COMMISSIONER Clifford A. Mayo, COMMISSIONER Roman Halbur, COMMISSIONER ATTEST: Elsa Ulrich, COUNTY CLERK 212954

Lost: small heart diamond necklace on 2/7 possibly at REC. 620-640-5656.

Let this space work for BIG HEADLINES you! Place and employGET THE JOB DONE! ment ad to find the right Advertise the right way in the classifieds. person.


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SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Blueknight Energy Partners, L.P. is hiring full-time Field Service Drivers in Guymon, OK, Elkhart, KS, Ulysses, KS and Liberal, KS. We offer full benefits (with majority of premium cost paid by employer), sick and vacation pay; Company paid STD, Life Ins., 401K Match $1 for $1 up to 5%, plus profit sharing plan. (EOE). Apply online at www.bkep.com/ careers.

EXPERIENCED TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED Must have CDL class A license, good MVR, 2 years experience, and pass drug test. Local hauling, home every night. Call 275-7601 212947

CNAs & RNs Nurse Link Staffing is looking for CNAs and RNs to work part time per diem. Must have CPR and RNs must have ACLS. One year experience preferred in hospital or nursing home environment.

the Garden City Telegram Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

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Help Wanted

F/T COOK, experience required. Pay comensurate with experience. Apply in person at the cafeteria at GCCC

AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENT Operator: 20 temporary positions. 3/20/12-12/20/12 Harvesting of forage crops all major crop activities. Operating, servicing maintaining farm equipment- Must haul farm tractors to field with a semi tractor trailer, includes loading and unloading. Operate tractors with Degelman blades which are used for pushing, packing forage crops for animal consumption. 6 months exp. High School Degree, CDL license required 40 hr/wk, $11.61 p/hr or $2000 p/m plus R & B, free housing. 3/4 Work period guaranteed. Tools & Equip. Provided. Transportation to and from place of recruitment will be paid upon completion of 50% of work contract. Job location is at, Bill Harmon Farms, Garden City, KS. Apply for this job at Kansas Workforce Center 2308 First Ave. Dodge City, KS. with J/O # 8623319 or nearest state employment office with copy of this ad.

Help Wanted Office help needed to start immediately, Seasonal help with the possibility of working into a Fulltime Position with Benefits, Please Apply or Pickup Application at: United Suppliers Inc. 19405 East Hyway 50 Cimarron Ks. 67835 Phone 1-800-822-5425

Need part-time help 20 to 25 hours a week.! Submit resume at Peoples State Bank, 122 W. Laurel, Garden City.! (620)276-2224

Wanted: HHA, CNA To assist people in their homes with daily living needs, things like shopping, cooking, cleaning, etc. Experience is preferred, but not required. Interested applicants mail resume to 606 N. Main St., Garden City, KS 67846 or request an application at family.ministries@ymail.c om. Family Ministries, Inc.  Providing family supports when the family just can't be there.

FARM EQUIPMENT Operator / Irrigator. Immediate opening. Experience with center pivot irrigation and John Deere Autosteer expected. CDL and expeCall (620) 417-5679. rience with cattle a EOE 213028 plus. Benefits / housing DENTAL ASSISTANT provided. Send resume/ Busy Dental Office references to Lear seeking r e l i a b l e , Farms INC, 4280 E. hard-working, self-moti- Lear Rd, Garden City, vated individual to join KS 67846. a friendly team.! Bilingual, experience not FORD SERVICE technecessary. Send re- nician wanted.! Prior sumes to Dental Asso- experience preferred.! ciates, 1133 E. Kansas Davis Motors, Inc. Ave., Garden City Syracuse. Call Mark ! Davis 620-384-7361. Experienced Stylist Needed. Shear Heaven Beauty Salon, 911 N. 9th, Garden City. (620) 275-4470.

Part-Time Animal Shelter Clerk The Garden City Police Department is accepting applications for a Part-Time Animal Shelter Clerk position at the Garden City/Finney County Animal Shelter. The hours required for this position will be Tuesday – Saturday from noon until 6:00. POSITION REQUIREMENTS: Must be 18 years of age; a minimum of one year secretarial experience or other equivalent experience; possess excellent computer & telephone skills with the ability to multi-task; light bookkeeping desirable; bilingual proficiency preferred, but not required; excellent public relations skills required. Typing and clerical test required. STARTING SALARY RANGE: $10.35 to $15.91 DOQ.

FULL TIME position for a diversified farm/ranch operation with irrigation in SW Kansas.! Needs to be experienced and mechanically inclined to operate and repair farm mach., irrigation motors, and sprinklers.! Have or be able to attain a chemigation applicator permit and a CDL licence.! Non smoking environment.! Fax resume and references to 620-276-4135 or call 620-276-4004. Shop The Classifieds!

CALL TODAY Sold tomorrow! (620) 275-8500

IMMEDIATE OPENING for Dishwasher. Apply in person at Golden Dragon Restaurant, 1106 Campus Dr.

KUGLER FERTILIZER is seeking individual for seasonal full time help at Ulysess, KS plant. Experience in liquid ferilizer and mechanical knowledge helpful. apply to: Kugler Oil Company, 795 South road Records Clerk, Haskell H, Uylsses, KS 67880 Co. Sheriff!s Office. Applicants should have Lone Star Milk knowledge of computTransport – Ulysses ers, including Quickcurrently s e e k i n g books and Microsoft . Full-Time OTR Drivers. Applications may be Health, Dental and Life pickup up at 300 W. InInsurance available. man, PO Box 853, SubMust pass DOT drug lette, KS 67877 or by screen & physical. calling (620) 675-2289. Class A CDL with The Haskell County Tanker Endorsement Sheriff!s Office is an required. Contact An- EOE. gela Kier at 940-378-2520 Ext. 255. www.gctelegram.com

Experienced Drivers Needed

A completed City application is required.

• •

Apply at the City Administrative Center, 301 N. 8th Street, Garden City, KS or online www.garden-city.org. Applications will be accepted until February 20th, 2012. Interviews will be conducted on February 22nd, 2012. E.O.E. 213010 Classifieds do the work!

is accepting applications for the following positions:

KINSHIP WORKER Provide direct in-home services to resource families. Hours may involve some evening & weekend. Requires HS Diploma/GED, 2 yrs exp working w/ children & families, at least 21 yrs of age, have valid driver’s license, reliable transportation & clear MVR/KBI. Bilingual preferred.

580-747-6068

www.MineralMarketing.com

212848

212948

Career Shopping? Don!t Miss a day of The Telegram Classifieds!

PRN - RN/LPN

LLC

We are looking for experienced and dedicated professionals to assume these key positions on our nursing team. We offer an excellent starting wage, advancement opportunities, and much more!

Stop by and fill out an application today or fax your resume in confidence to (620) 275-6582. Garden Valley Retirement Village 1505 East Spruce Garden City, KS 67846 EOE 212758

How to write an ad...

THAT WORKS!

Call Today To Place Your Ad!

When placing a Classified ad, include all of these elements for a message that sells!

3 Start the ad with the item, service or job you are advertising.

3 Use large type, white space, borders or graphics-anything that will make your ad stand out. 3 To get the maximum exposure, run your ad for seven days. There are new readers everyday. 3 Use only standard abbreviations to avoid confusion. 3 Most important, call 620-276-6862 x 501 to place your ad.

140524

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Your

STOP for all your

MARKETING

SOCIAL WORKER LBSW, LMSW, LPC, LMFT Provide Case Management to children & families in Foster Care Reintegration. Requires one of above licenses, a clear MVR/ KBI, exp working with children & 212703 families, dependable transportation & at least 21 yrs. of age.

SFCS offers an excellent benefit package & competitive wages. Apply online at www.st-francis.org. EOE

Freddy’s Frozen Custard is seeking fun and energetic Restaurant Managers who can match our level of passion for excellence and guest service. Please send resumes to econtizano@ jrimanagement.net

3 Always include the price of the item.

213009

CALL US TO LEASE OR SELL YOUR OIL & GAS MINERALS

HELP US HELP YOU! Advertise in the classifieds.

WE ARE GROWING!

3 Provide as much information as you can. The more information, the better response.

Good MVR Required • Drug Test Required Physically able to climb ladder and Operate truck crane There will be both short and long hauls. Home weekends.

Palmer MFG & Tank, Inc. offers competitive benefits that include health insurance, life & disability insurance, paid vacation and holiday time, along with a matching 401K plan. Candidates that are looking for a successful career with a growing company should stop by the main office and fill out an application M-F from 8am to 5pm or email your resume to khernandez@pmtank.com . We are located at 2814 W Jones Ave. Garden City, KS 67846. Palmer MFG & Tank, Inc. is an equal opportunity employer and will consider all eligible candidates.

209270

COMPLIANCE TECH Assures compliance with contractual and documentation requirements by assisting with client case tracking, monitoring and distribution of information for compliance and monitoring/assisting with implementation of performance improvement strategies. Requires HS diploma/GED, at least 21 yrs of age, clear MVR, KBI & CANIS & detail oriented.

• •

PETROLEUM EQUIPMENT SERVICE TECH & INSTALLER – Install/ Service mechanical and electronic fueling system components, pumps & meters. Basic computer skills & knowledge of electricity helpful. Installation duties include light construction & plumbing. Pre-employment drug screen & testing. Call (620) 275-7403 to set up a personal interview. Mail resume to: P. B. Hoidale Co., P.O. Box 1324, Garden City, KS 67846

Help Wanted

Advertising & Marketing

213030

GraphicDesign MarketingConsulting LogoDesign StrategicPlanning DirectMail BrochuresandOther MarketingMaterial Print. WritingEditing Web. Websites Marketing Solution. in southwest kansas SocialMedia

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ROBIN PHELAN 620.276.6862 ext. 225 rphelan@gctelegram.com

TIFFANY BRYANT 620.276.6862 ext. 218 tbryant@gctelegram.com

MYCA BUNCH 620.276.6862 ext. 219 mbunch@gctelegram.com

NATE COLCHER 620.276.6862 ext. 217 ncolcher@gctelegram.com

The Garden City Telegram 310 N. Seventh St. Garden City, KS www.GCTelegram.com 800.475.7600


Garden City Telegram

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

POLICE OFFICER the city of Ulysses is seeking conscientious, motivated applicants for the position of Police Officer. Position requirements: High School diploma, Valid Kansas Drivers License, No felony or serious misdemeanor convictions, Residency within the City of Ulysses within 30 day sof employment, Kansas Law Enforcement Training Certificate preferred but not required. The Ulysses Police Department is a modern, well equipped agency that services a population of approx. 6000. Entry level income in approx. $34,000 per year with paid insurance, paid holidays as well as other benefits. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. Applications can be picked up at City Hall or online at www.cityofulysses.com. Applications will be taken until February 24, 2012 @ 5pm. The City of Ulysses is an equal opportunity employer.

Pride Ag Resources Hanston, KS Has an immediate opening for a self motivated individual. This individual will be working as a Customer Applicator for Hanston fertilizer department. Must be 21 years of age, able to work well with people, lift heavy objects and a clean driving record. CDL is required and Hazmat certification preferred. Prior experience operating a dry and spray fertilizer applicator is also preferred, however we are willing to train the right applicant. Pride Ag Resources is a drug free work place and offers competitive wages, BCBS, dental, 401K, paid vacation and retirement. Interested individuals need to call Don at (620) 623-2115 or (620) 357-5654 or send res u m e t o HR@prideag.com

Pride Ag Resources Howell, KS Has an immediate opening for a self motivated individual. Must be 21 years of age, able to work well with people, lift heavy objects and a clean driving record. CDL is a plus. Individual will be working in the elevator, filing NH3 tanks and working with seed. Pride Ag Resources is a drug free work place and offers competitive wages, BCBS, dental, 401K, paid vacation and retirement. Interested individuals need to call Mike at (620) 227-2683 or (620) 338-2642 or send res u m e t o HR@prideag.com

Drivers

Help Wanted

TRUCK DRIVER Garden City Farm Equipment is looking for an experienced truck driver. Successful candidate must be at least 24 years old with 2 years of verifiable experience, possess CDL, clean driving record with no vehicular homicides on MVR, must be able to pass drug screening. We haul farm machinery and other over width loads. Will be away 1 or 2 nights a week. We offer top wages, 401k, BC/ BS, PTO and a fun, paced work environment. Bring resume to fill out applications at 2506 West Jones, Garden City, Kansas

Help Wanted

NEED CDL Drivers A or B with 2 yrs recent commercial experience to transfer motor homes, straight trucks, tractors, and buses. www.mamotransportation.com 1-800-501-3783

Help Wanted

Mechanic

MECHANIC

Must have professional mechanical experience, own tools and valid driver!s license. Will train in alignments. Apply in person 8am-5pm at Robinson Alignment, TRUCK D R I V E R 130 Stevens Ave., GarNeeded: Must have 2 den City. Years experience CDL Office class A license, a clean FULL-TIME OFFICE MVR and pass drug test. Local hauling, ASSOCIATE NEEDED: home every night. Call Computer skills necessary. Apply in person 271-2271 ask for Rick. or mail resume to: An addition to the fam- Credit Bureau Services. ily on the way? Check 1135 College Dr., Suite L, Garden City, KS out our van and SUV 67846. classifieds.

"YOU GOT the drive, We have the Direction" OTR Drivers APU Equipped Pre-Pass EZ-pass Pets/passen- 212574 ger policy. Newer EXP. FLATBED Drivequipment. 100% NO ers:! Regional opportuDid you know that post- touch. 1-800-528-7825 nities now open with ing signs on utility poles plenty of freight & great COMPANY LOOKING and street signs, in pay! 800-277-0212 or street right-of-ways, or for Drivers with CDL primeinc.com call 620-214-2931 other public property is LOCAL DRIVER: Spanish Interpreter: prohibited in Garden TRUCK DRIVER. Class Experienced Spanish City. All such signs will A CDL with HazMat en- Class A CDL, Line haul or CD driver. legal and medical inter- be removed without no- dorsement. Good drivFull time positions. preter. Must have flexi- tice! Your cooperation ing record. Home weekPrice Truck Line, ble schedule. (888) is greatly appreciated. ends. Competitive pay. 867-4182 The City of Garden City 401K and Health Bene- 240 N. Industrial Drive, Garden City, KS. Ordinance No. 1858 fits. Days (620) Bring more shoppers to 275-6536, Nights (620) Check out the goods Call (620) 275-8500 your garage sale. Place 272-1326, Anytime everyday in the Teleto place your Classi- 272-6397 your garage sale ad in gram Classifieds! fied ad in the The Telegram, Garden City Tele620-275-8500. gram.

C5

Miscellaneous for Sale

Trinidad Drilling, LP currently has an opening in Accounts Payable. The responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following: Position requires a broad knowledge of accounts payable practices and procedures, also works with internal sources to ensure proper reporting of payable data. Qualifications: Relevant experience. Exceptional advanced Excel and data entry skills required. Strong accounting, research, and analytical skills. Self-motivated and proactive. Ability to work independently and as part of a team. Strong computer skills. Strong interpersonal communication, and partnering skills. Ability to work in a fast-paced, challenging environment. This position offers exceptional wages and benefits. Please send resume to: Jolene Russell Trinidad Drilling, LP 3728 West Jones Ave. Garden City, Ks. 67846 213004

Child Care LICENSED DAYCARE has openings for ages 6 months & older. l 620-287-0637.

..A SIMPLE, free marketplace for mineral rights. Do you own Mineral Rights? Our service allows you to post your land online to receive bids for NO COST! www.goreoxford.com

BUNK BED SET: Unique design with lots of options. Set Up as a traditional twin bunk bed set or as a twin bunk with full size bed or 2 separate twin beds. Solid well-made wood with light maple finish. See @ Bargains Plus Consignment, 308 N. 7th, Garden City. Tuesday - Saturday 10am-4pm Commerical QUALITY @ BARGAIN prices! Various Office desks See @ Bargains Plus Consignment, 308 N. 7th, Garden City. Tuesday Saturday 10am-4pm www.gctbargains.com

Get Professional Real Estate Service ... Let A REALTOR Serve Your Needs!

ELECTRICAL APPRENTICESHIP OPPORTUNITY APPLICATIONS TAKEN AT ONE OF THE FOLLOWING WORK FORCE CENTERS MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 150 N. Main.    2318 W. Central Ave. Wichita, Ks El Dorado, KS

Seeking qualified applicants for the following full time positions:

WICHITA ELECTRICAL JATC offers a four-year electrical apprenticeship – Work for Electrical Contractor and attend related classes one day every other week – Starting wage $14.12 + benefits – Age 17 or older - High School Grad or GED with a year of Algebra I (Official Copy of Transcript-required) - Aptitude Test - Valid Driver’s License and Birth Certificate - Be physically fit and free from drugs - Application fee $25 Money Order only, payable at time of application.     Contact (316) 264-9231 or www.wejatc.org for further information.          EOE 212689

FT Swing Bed Coordinator FT RN Pharmacy Manager FT or PT Physical Therapy Assistant Executive Services Coordinator

FINANCE MANAGER

(Administrative Assistant)

Network Specialist

Offering full benefit package. New facility.

Please contact Human Resources for an application at (620) 356-6073 or (620) 356-6043 or email lgee@bwmgch.com EEO Employer

212727

Service Directory Call the Classified Department to Advertise. 620-276-6862 ext. 501

Will clean your house or business. Garden City (620) 276-0643

Painting/ Wallcovering PROFESSIONAL House Painting and Handyman Service. (620) 276-9290.

3 generations of family experience in SW KS

Call (620) 521-9691

Lawn Care

JLC Construction

At your service!

Concrete

Find it here in the service directory

• Patios • Sidewalks • Driveways

We Can Replace Your Cracked Concrete

Low Prices • Free Estimates

(620) 640-7636

36819

NAIRN SEWER CLEANING SERVICE 620-499-9273

Handyman r1PQDPSO$FJMJOH 3FNPWBM r6QUP%BUF5FYUVSF r&YUSFNF)BOE 5FYUVSFT r8BUFS%BNBHF3FQBJST r*OUFSJPS1BJOUJOH 43652

Specialized Services

The Classifieds: Get it here

The Garden City Telegram

Apply online at www.rescare.com and select careers.

212900

Classifieds Work!

t3FTJEFOUJBM t$PNNFSDJBM t*OEVTUSJBM

Professional Sales & Service State Licensed & Fully Insured NAFED Certified

gcfire@cox.net Garden City

620-275-1646

HOMEOWNERS MARKETPLACE

Call Sharynn to list your home in the Homeowners Marketplace. We have a special “Priced to sell” package for you! Call 276-6862 ext. 202 or 1-800-475-8600.

Summit, ResCare is an EOE employer

Utilization Review, Employee Health Nurse Infection Control Coordinator and Discharge Planner

33622

Troy Hawker, Owner Operator

GARDEN CITY FIRE &SAFETY

4 Bdrm, 3 Bath, Many updates, Move in ready!, $208,000. 640-1498 (c); 260-9168 (h)

271-0478 • (cell) 640-1605

Employee will be responsible for the delivery of patient care that promotes safety and well-being of all patients. Plans, directs, coordinates and evaluates patients charts for Utilization Review and Discharge Planning. Management of the Coumadin and Swing Bed patients. Management of the Infection Control program bridging educational needs of Health System staff. Must be a Kansas Licensed Registered Nurse and will report directly to the Chief Nursing Officer. EOE

ASPHALT PAVING House Driveways Seal Coating Overlays & Patching Crack Repair Parking Lots Rubberized Material Used Concrete Parking Lot Crack Fill 4BUJTGBDUJPO(VBSBOUFFEr4FSWJOH48,BOTBT Owner, Allen Murk Call 719-336-4307 or 719-688-1314 212313

212707

To obtain more information on this and other excellent job opportunities, contact: Human Resource Director PO Box 937, Elkhart, KS 67950 Ph: 620-697-5250 Email: hro@mchswecare.com Website: www.mchswecare.com

Adams Land & Cattle Co. in Broken Bow, NE. is looking for quality individuals for the following career opportunities: Heavy Equipment Operators Farming Assistant Special Projects Supervisor Processing Assistant Feeding Assistant

Pen Checker Mill Technician Cattle Distribution Assistant Lot Maintenance Assistant Mechanic

ALCC offers a competitive wage/salary and benefits package with a Company match 401(k). If you are looking for a career with growth potential, you should consider Adams Land & Cattle Co. Visit our web site at www.adamslandandcattle.com for job listings and description of duties. An interested individual can print an application from the website or submit a resume on-line. Adams Land & Cattle Co. P.O. Box 485 Broken Bow, NE 68822 Phone: (308) 872-6494 E-mail: employment@adamslandandcattle.com Website: www.adamslandandcattle.com Equal Opportunity Employer

Drug & Alcohol Free Workplace

E-Verif y® is a r egister ed trademar k of t he U. S. D epart ment of H omeland Sec urit y

212857

Submit Ads Online

www.gctelegramads.com

Free Estimates Licensed & Insured Workers Compensation

28090

1910 Zipper St.

MORTON COUNTY HEALTH SYSTEM • Tree Service • Snow Removal • Firewood

212655

Summitt ResCare is seeking a finance manager. This position will provide oversight of the finance and accounting activities such as budget management, purchasing function, asset management. Must have a minimum of two years progressive experience in finance including: Accounts receivable and payable, budget preparation and oversight , financial statements, cost reporting and excellent computer skills. Responsible for manager cost control systems an establishing and monitoring financial targets for the service site. Billing of all home care services, including private pay and Medicare billing. Overall oversight of the business office functions. A minimum of two years work experience in the accounting field required. Must have experience billing in a healthcare environment. Medicare billing experience a plus. Must have a high school diploma, bachelors degree preferred. Minimum age required is 18. Ability to communicate (verbal and written) with all levels of personnel internal and external to the company. Capable of working responsibly with confidential information. Must e able to work a s part of a team. Must meet all agency requirements for pre-employment as required by ResCare and / or State regulations.


C6

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

Miscellaneous for Sale FIREWOOD ProCut Tree Service Pickup Load/Free Del $120 Mixed HdWd. $100 Elm. Call (620) 640-1605

Household Items

GREAT DEALS on living room sofas, chairs, lamps, tables, TVs and more! Stop by Bargains Plus Consignment, 308 N. 7th, Garden City. Tuesday - Saturday 10am-4pm WHEELCHAIR, GOOD condition, $350 OBO. (620) 272-0256. Are you Experienced? Find Your Perfect Job in The Telegram Classifieds.

Sporting Equipment

the Garden City Telegram Pets

Farmers Wants

GUN SHOW FEB. FREE! CATS. Nice, 11-12 SAT. 9-5 & SUN. spayed, shots up to 9-3 MANHATTAN! NA- date, declawed, (620) TIONAL GUARD AR- 640-8485. MORY (721 LEVEE DR) BUY-SELL-TRADE Purebed Labs ready to go on Feb 7. 4 brown, 3 INFO: (563) 927-8176 black 620-805-1170 or Musical Instruments 620-290-2603. IT'S NOT too late to find the keys to their Spl it out; get btr reslts. Did you get that? heart. Enjoy special pricing on grand, digital, What we!re saying is... and vertical pianos durSpell it out! And get ing our Valentine's sale! better results with your 800-950-3774 - Piad! Ads with fewer abano4u.com breviations are easier Bargain Blowout to read. GIVE AWAY - Wood pallets. Pick up on the Classifieds do the east side of The Telework! gram, 310 N. 7th, Garden City. Shop The Classifieds!

(Published in the Garden City Telegram February 11, 2012.) RESOLUTION NO. 8-2012 A RESOLUTION RELATING TO AMENDING THE ZONING REGULATIONS FOR FINNEY COUNTY, KANSAS; ADOPTING NEW ZONING REGULATIONS TO REGULATE NON-CONFORMING USES; AMENDING ZONING REGULATION SECTIONS 22.070, 22.080, 22.090 AND 22.100; REPEALING CURRENT ZONING REGULATIONS SECTIONS 22.070, 22.080, 22.090 AND 22.100 ADOPTED BY RESOLUTIONS NO. 43-96 OF THE FINNEY COUNTY ZONING REGULATION. BE IT ORDAINED by the Board of County Commissioners, Finney County, Kansas: SECTION I: Statement of Purpose. It is the purpose of this Resolution to amend the approved Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, adopted by Resolution No. 43.96 adopting new Zoning Regulations to regulate Non-Conforming Uses; amending Zoning Regulation sections 22.070, 22.080, 22.090 and 22.100; repealing current Zoning Regulations sections 22.070, 22.080, 22.090 and 22.100. SECTION II: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 22.070 of the Finney County Zoning Regulations is hereby amended to read as follows: 22.070 NONCONFORMING USES - DEFINITION. Any lot or structure lawfully occupied by a use at the time of the effective date of this Zoning Regulation or amendments hereto, which does not conform to the regulations of the district in which it is situated. SECTION III: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 22.080 of the Finney County Zoning Regulations is hereby amended to read as follows: 22.080 NONCONFORMING USES PERMITTED TO CONTINUE. Nonconforming uses as defined herein may be permitted to continue, provided that no structural alterations except those required by law or resolution are made therein, and that the nonconforming use is not discontinued or abandoned for a period of one year, and was: 1. Legally established at the time of the adoption of the County Zoning Regulation; 2. Legally established at the time an amendment was made to the County Zoning Regulation so as to transfer the land to a more restricted district, as the case may be; or 3. Legally established prior to the adoption of the current County Zoning Regulations and amendments thereto. SECTION IV: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 21.090 of the Finney County Zoning Regulations is hereby amended to read as follows: 22.090 NONCONFORMING USES TO BE DISCONTINUED. No building which has been damaged by any casualty, act of God, or public enemy, to the extent of more than fifty percent (50%) of the fair market value, shall be restored, except in conformity with all Zoning and County Regulations. Should there be a question as to the structural value, the same shall be determined by three (3) appraisers, one of whom shall be selected by the Governing Body, one by the owner and a third by the two so appointed and the decision of the appraisers or a majority of them shall be final and conclusive and binding upon all concerned for the purpose of determining whether the damaged property may be restored. The cost of such appraisal shall be paid by the property owner. SECTION V. Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 22.100 of the Finney County Zoning Regulations is hereby amended to read as follows: 22.100 MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR. 1. Routine maintenance and repair may be permitted unless the property is deemed or declared to be unsafe by the Building Official. Such repairs shall not be construed to mean major remodeling, restoration or replacement. Such repairs will not usually extend the life of the structure and will not exceed $2,500 or 10% of the total appraised value by the Finney County Appraiser whichever is greater, nor increase the degree of nonconformance. 2. Remodeling may be permitted for residential structures by the Planning and Community Development Director or his/her designee as long as it does not increase the degree of nonconformance; and/or conforms with all applicable County Codes and Regulations. Remodeling may be permitted for commercial and industrial uses by Conditional Use Permit only after authorized by the Board of Zoning Appeals in accordance with Article 29. 3. Residential use accessory building(s) may be permitted with the approval of the Zoning Administrator or his designee. Permitting an accessory building does not grant a non-conforming status of use to said accessory building(s). SECTION VI. The Finney County Zoning Regulations, Sections 21.070, 21.080, 21.090, and 21.100, as previously existing, are hereby repealed, to be replaced as specified in this resolution. SECTION VII: Further Amendment. That the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, adopted by Resolution No. 43-96, on file with the County Clerk of Finney County, Kansas, as previously existing and amended, be and the same, is hereby amended and rewritten as contained herein. SECTION VIII: Effective Date: This Resolution shall take effect and be in force from and after its publication in the official County newspaper. PASSED AND APPROVED by the Board of County Commissioners, Finney County, Kansas on this 6th day of February, 2012. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF FINNEY COUNTY, KANSAS Don Doll, CHAIRMAN Dave Jones, COMMISSIONER Larry Jones, COMMISSIONER Clifford A. Mayo, COMMISSIONER Roman Halbur, COMMISSIONER ATTEST: Elsa Ulrich, COUNTY CLERK 212958

FARMERS HELPING Farmers needs 6,8,or 10 inch aluminum irrigation pipe in good usable condition. Also need connections. Paying over scrap price and will pick up. Would consider pvc. 505-469-6666

Classifieds Work! Call today (620) 275-8500

Full-time Farm Assistant position on innovative, growing Southwest Kansas farm. Interest in irrigated crop production and reliable work ethic required. Salary and benefits.

Seeds, Feeds

Autos

Autos

SHOP

Please contact

Brookover Land Ent.,

PO Box 917, Garden City, KS 67846 e-mail danp@brookover.com or call 620-277-6589 212973

CRANE OPERATOR A qualified crane driver operates and controls a crane to transfer heavy objects (tanks) from one place to another. PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES: â&#x20AC;˘ Ability to communicate well with others in order to understand what is required when moving a tank from one place to another. Follow instructions and interpret hand signals correctly when operating the crane. Attention to details and aware of their surroundings. â&#x20AC;˘ Knowledge of safety regulations concerning a crane. Weight limits and how to maintain the crane. â&#x20AC;˘ Need to be careful and attentive. Cautious with heights and able to work in a fast passed environment. â&#x20AC;˘ Being aware to each loads capacity and weather conditions, ensure that cranes are ready to use by checking controls, and gauges. REQUIRED SKILLS, KNOWLEDGE AND TRAINING: Ability to plan in detail, have organizational skills; Effective communication skills; Ability to organize, lead, motivate, and care for all personnel involved; Ability to thrive in a constantly changing chaotic environment and consistently meet tight timelines; Have good eyesight and good hand eye co-ordination; High School Diploma/GED; 3-5 yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; experience; Ability to perform other related duties as needed. BENEFITS: Palmer MFG & Tank, Inc. offers competitive benefits that include health insurance, life & disability insurance, paid vacation and holiday time, along with a matching 401K plan. Candidates that are looking for a successful career with a growing company should stop by the main office and fill out an application M-F from 8am to 5pm or email your resume to khernandez@pmtank.com . We are located at 2814 W Jones Ave. Garden City, KS 67846. Palmer MFG & Tank, Inc. is an equal opportunity employer and will consider all eligible candidates. 213046

(Published in The Garden City Telegram Saturday , February 11, 2012) BEFORE THE STATE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF KANSAS Before Commissioners: Mark Sievers, Chairman, Thomas E. Wright, Ward Loyd In the Matter of the Applicant of Edison Operating Company, LLC for the assignment of an allowable and for a well location exception for its Parr #1-23 well in the Kansas Hugoton Field in Finney County, Kansas. DKT. No. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12-CONS-209-CWLE License No. 34434 CONSERVATION DIVISION NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO: ALL OIL AND GAS PRODUCERS, UNLEASED MINERAL INTEREST OWNERS, LANDOWNERS, AND ALL PERSONS WHOMSOEVER CONCERNED: You, and each of you, are hereby notified that Edison Operating Company, LLC has filed an Application for the granting of a well location exception and for the assignment of an allowable for its Parr #1-23 well located in the Hugoton Gas Field, which is located 400 feet from the South line (400â&#x20AC;&#x2122; FSL) and 400 feet from the West line (400â&#x20AC;&#x2122; FWL) of Section 23, Township 26 South, Range 32 West, Finney County, Kansas. The unitized acreage attributed to this well consists of all of Section 23 (640 net mineral acres). Any persons who object or protest to such Application shall be required to file their objections or complaints with the State Corporation Commission of the State of Kansas within fifteen (15) days from the date of this publication. If a protest is not timely filed with the Commission, the Application will be determined administratively by the Commission and may thereby be granted without hearing or further notice to any interested party. The objections or complaint shall state the reason why the proposed location exception, as contained in the Application, will violate correlative rights or cause waste. Objections or complaints shall be mailed to the Kansas Corporation Commission, Conservation Division, 130 South Market, Suite 2078, Wichita, Kansas, 67202, with a copy to the applicantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s address listed below. All parties in any way interested or concerned shall take notice of the foregoing and govern themselves accordingly. Edison Operating Company, LLC 1223 N. Rock Road, Bldg. I-100 Wichita, Kansas 67206 (316)201-1744 44107

SUVs & Vans

BIG ROUND BALES, 2000 Mercury Sable. Selling your vehicle? 2000 GMC Savana full Low nitrates, 7% pro- 158k miles. $1500 OBO Did you know parking size conversion van, tein. (620) 335-5593. 620-937-0625. your vehicle on city handicap with wheel streets, right-of-ways chairlift, in great shape. Autos 2003 CHEVY Cavalier. and other public prop- 68,520 miles. Asking 1969 CHEVY Chevelle. 103k, runs good. $1600 erty is prohibited in $14,000. 620-277-2043 4 door, 307 engine, OBO. (620) 937-0660. Garden City? The City 2003 Ford Expedition, runs. Body & interior in 2010 Red Chevy HHR of Garden City ordi- 4WD, Pearl Red, 103k good condition. $2500 Keyless entry, remote nance No 86-2 (88) miles, very good condiOBO. (620) 277-2647 start, 30,000 miles. states in part â&#x20AC;&#x153;No per- tion. 620-276-6013. O B O son shall park a vehicle 1996 CAMARO SS. $ 1 3 , 8 0 0 upon any roadway for 2004 DODGE Caravan Loaded! T-tops, very 620-640-6200. the principal purpose 78,000 miles, 1 owner, good condition. $7500. of: (a) Displaying such power locks, doors and (620) 276-6691, vehicle for sale (b) seats, CD player. 277-0727, 640-2970 Washing, greasing or $6800 OBO. (620) 1998 CHEVY medium THE CLASSIrepairing such vehicle 276-6252 duty truck, gas engine, except repairs necessiFIEDS 5 w/ 2 sp. axle, 60 ba. tated by an emer- 2005 Chevy Equinox YOU WILL FIND fiberglass water tank, 3â&#x20AC;? gencyâ&#x20AC;?. Violations of LT, all wheel drive, IT HERE! Boyd pump. Truck runs this ordinance May re- leather seats, 90,000 great, excellent for wasult in a $40 fine and miles. Book value $12,300 asking price is tering cattle. $10,000. court costs. HELP US HELP YOU! $10,000 OBO. Located in Ulysses, 620- 356-1206. Advertise in the classifieds. FIND WHAT YOU ARE 620-202-1710 LOOKING FOR IN THE www.gctelegram.com CLASSIFIEDS!

CORPORATE TRAINER Golden Plains Credit Union is currently seeking a qualified individual to fill a full time position as a Corporate Trainer. Responsibilities include: Improving overall employee effectiveness and job performance through individual and group training techniques and programs. Qualified candidate must have a college degree as well as experience in the financial industry. Join a stable growing financial institution that been in existence since 1951. Send cover letter and resume to Vice President, Human Resources, Golden Plains Credit Union, 1714 E. Kansas AVE., Garden City, KS 67846. Equal Opportunity Employer 212931

AUCTION

4BUVSEBZ 'FC tBN

Location: 4-H Building in Garden City, Ks. located on the Finney Co. Fairgrounds Furniture & Appliances Piano - Table & Chairs Sectional Divan - 2 Swivel Rockers - Hide-a-bed Double Bed - Chest of Drawers - 6 Pc. Wicker Set w/ cushions - Wicker Bistro Set - Desk w/ Chair - 2 Tall Curio Cabinets (show cases) - End Tables - Small Desk Refrigerator - Microwave - Wine Cooler Guns - Coins Fishing Rods - .22 Cal. Osthiem 6 shot Revolver - .22 Osthiem 6 shot Rev. 22 mag. cylinder - Ruger .30 Auto 7.62 x 39 - Swedish 6.5 x 55 Rifle w/ scope - Winchester Mod. .94 30/30 w/ peep sight - Ruger 10/22 (new) Springfield 03A3 - 30/06 w/ scope - Winchester mod. 94 - 44 mag. (new), Mossberg Defender 12 ga. pump - Springfield 03A3 30/06 long rifle - Puma Mod. 9444 mag. oct. barrel (new) - Lots Ammo - Loading Equipment - bullet cases - Fishing Rods & Equipment - Coins (Misc. & Mexican) Antique & Collectible Arrowheads - Fossils - Deer Horns - Knives (WWII & antique) - Lots of WWII Books - Confederate Books - Small Antique Kitchen Cabinet - Precious Moments - Denim Days - Thomas Kinkaid Music Box - Collector Plates - Old Salt & Pepper Sets (30 +) Shop & Yard Transit & Tripod - Saws - Air Tanks (port.) - Folding Carpenters Sawhorses - Lots Hand Tools & Power Tools - 8â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ladder - Truck Tool Box - Garden & Lawn Tools - Bird Bath - Park Bench - Large Ceramic Flower Pots (yard) - Porch Bench Miscellaneous Treadmill - Rainbow Vacuum - Sewing Machines - Lots of Dishes & Glassware - China Painting Things - Record Player & Speakers Corningware - Coca Cola Pitcher - Cook Books - Books (Star Trek & Perry Mason) - Linens - Doilies - Bedding - New Crocheted Baby Afghans - 4 Wood Chairs Porcelain Wash Pan - Lots Miscellaneous Not Listed Unified School Dist. 457 (the following items belong to the School Dist.) Chairs; Desks; File Cabinets; Kitchen Equipment; Laminators; Magazine Rack; Metal Cabinet; Microwave; Milk Coolers; Office Furniture; Overhead Projectors; Paper Cutter; Partitions; Pegboard; Piano; Planer; Student Desks; Tables; TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s; Weight Equipment Vehicles (The following vehicles belong to LoanMax) â&#x20AC;&#x153;01 Dodge Ram; â&#x20AC;&#x153;00 Ford Winstar; â&#x20AC;&#x153;00 GMC Jimmy;â&#x20AC;&#x153;99 Dodge Intrepid; â&#x20AC;&#x153;96 Cadillac

OWNERS: Frank & Nita McDaniel Visit us on the Web: www.larryjohnstonauction.com

Phone: 620-276-6397

213029

ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER Full time position with an excellent benefit package. Fast paced, high energy department requires candidate with strong organizational and computer skills.

Typical Duties/Responsibilities: â&#x20AC;˘ Accounts Payable/Receivable â&#x20AC;˘ Close and Balance Drawer â&#x20AC;˘ Assisting with Computer Data â&#x20AC;˘ Management of the front desk â&#x20AC;˘ Other duties as assigned Send resume to: lwhitehurst@gctelegram.com or mail to

Liz Whitehurst, Business Manager The Garden City Telegram P.O. Box 958 Garden City, KS 67846 No Telephone Calls Please

213042

(Published in the Garden City Telegram on the 11th day of February, 2012) ORDINANCE NO. 2538 - 2012 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE ZONING REGULATIONS FOR THE CITY OF GARDEN CITY, KANSAS; ADOPTING NEW ZONING REGULATIONS TO DEFINE AND REGULATE PERMITTED ACCESSORY USES; AMENDING ZONING REGULATION SECTION 21.020; AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 2528-2011; REPEALING ZONING REGULATION SECTION 21.020; ALL TO THE CODE OF ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF GARDEN CITY, KANSAS. BE IT ORDAINED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF GARDEN CITY, KANSAS: SECTION 1. Section 21.020 of the Zoning Regulations for the City of Garden City, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 21.020 ACCESSORY USES PERMITTED. Accessory uses and structures may be permitted in any zoning district provided such uses or structures conform to the definition in Section 21.010. Permitted accessory uses and structures include but are not limited to the following: Buildings such as garages, carports, bath houses, gardening sheds, recreation rooms, and similar structures which are customarily used in conjunction with aid incidental to a principle use or structure. Children's playhouses provided they shall be in keeping with the principle structure. Swimming pools. Storage of materials used for construction of a building, including the contractor's temporary office, provided that such use is on the building site or immediately adjacent thereto, and provided further that such use shall be permitted only during the construction period and thirty (30) days thereafter. Barbecue stoves, flagpoles, fences, walls, trellises, statuary, arbors, gazebos, and green houses. Fallout/storm shelters provided that they shall not be used for any other purpose. Off-street parking and loading in conformance with Article 24. Signs as permitted by Article 23. Satellite TV reception dish located in side or rear yards only. Uses incidental to permitted hotels or motels such as clubs, gift shops, restaurants, etc. In R-1 and R-2 Districts: Mother-in-Law/Guest Houses to be detached and subordinate in area and height to the main house. In R-1, R-2, R-3, R-C, MHP, and MHS Districts: the keeping of fowl and pigeons shall be permitted as follows: Keeping of Fowl - It shall be unlawful to own or keep fowl, other than permitted fowl, within the city. The maximum total number of permitted fowl allowed to be owned or kept on an individual lot is one (1) animal (fowl) per five hundred (500) square feet of lot size, rounded down, but in no event shall the total number of permitted fowl on any lot exceed six (6). Definitions: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fowlâ&#x20AC;? shall mean those domestic birds commonly kept for the production of meat, eggs or feathers. This shall include chickens, ducks, turkeys, geese, swans, pea fowl, and guinea fowl, ostriches and emus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Permitted fowlâ&#x20AC;? shall mean ducks and female chickens. Coops, Roosts, and Laying Boxes In addition to the other requirements of this chapter that specify standards applicable to the keeping of animals, any person who owns chickens or ducks shall provide a coop or other similar shelter and adequate laying boxes, and roosts for the chickens or ducks. Such shelter shall be screened or walled in a manner that allows the chickens or ducks to be reasonably protected from predators. The coop shall be a minimum of three square feet in size per chicken or duck if the birds have a fenced outdoor run, or 10 square feet per chicken or duck if the birds do not have a fenced outdoor run. A minimum of one square foot of laying box space shall be provided per three (3) chickens. Each laying box will contain adequate clean bedding material such as hay or other similar soft material. One 8â&#x20AC;? or larger roost is required per chicken. Ducks do not require roosts. Coops shall be constructed in a manner that is consistent with the requirements of the city!s Supplemental Development Standards for Accessory Structures in Articles 21 and 22 of the city Zoning Regulations. No coop shall be located closer than five (5) feet from any neighboring property line. In the event that a mobile coop is utilized, the coop shall be kept in compliance with all city ordinances that apply to the outdoor storage of property. A coop shall be kept in a clean and sanitary condition to prevent the unreasonable accumulation of waste or any other noxious substances, noxious odors or the presence of vermin. Keeping of Pigeons â&#x20AC;&#x201C; It shall be unlawful to own or keep pigeons, other than permitted pigeons, within the city. The maximum total number of pigeons allowed to be owned or kept on an individual lot is five (5) pigeons per five hundred (500) square feet of lot size, rounded down, but in no event shall the total number of pigeons on any lot exceed seventy (70). Definitions: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pigeonâ&#x20AC;? shall mean a member of the Columbidea Family of birds that include "racing!, "fancy!, and "sporting! pigeons. Lofts Any person who owns pigeons shall provide a loft or other similar shelter designed according to a commercially available plan. Such shelter shall be screened or walled in a manner that allows the pigeons to be reasonably protected from predators. The loft shall be a minimum of one (1) square foot in size per pigeon. That portion of the pigeon loft designated as the fly pen shall be constructed so that it faces the residence of the owner. Lofts shall be constructed in a manner that is consistent with the requirements of the City!s Supplemental Development Standards for Accessory Structures defined in Articles 21 and 22 of the city Zoning Regulations. No loft shall be located closer than five (5) feet from any neighboring property line. A loft shall be kept in a clean and sanitary condition to prevent the unreasonable accumulation of waste or any other noxious substance, noxious odors or the presence of vermin. Pigeons shall be confined to a loft at all times except when released for necessary exercise, training or racing flights, with no more than fifty percent (50%) of an owner!s pigeons to be released at any one (1) time. Exercising, training or racing flights shall not be undertaken during the hours of 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. from June to September so as to not disturb the yard use and enjoyment of abutting neighbors. SECTION 5. Section 21.020 of the Zoning Regulations for the City of Garden City, Kansas, as previously existing, is hereby repealed, to be replaced as specified in this ordinance. SECTION 6. Ordinance No. 2528-2011, subject to the amendments set forth herein, shall remain in full force and effect. SECTION 7. This ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its publication in the Garden City Telegram, the official city newspaper. APPROVED AND PASSED by the Governing Body of the City of Garden City, Kansas, this 7th day of February, 2012. JOHN DOLL, Mayor ATTEST: CELYN N. HURTADO, Acting City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: RANDALL D. GRISELL City Counselor 213021


Garden City Telegram

ON

I CT

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012 SUVs & Vans

20TH ANNUAL

WESTERN KANSAS

AU CONSIGNMENT AUCTION

FARM EQUIPMENT

INDUSTRIAL / CONSTRUCTION EQUIP SHOP - TRUCKS - IRRIGATION - BOATS - RV’S GARDEN CITY, KANSAS MON./ TUES./ WED. FEB. 13- 14 - 15, 9:AM CT (BLIZZARD date: Fri. / Sat. / Sun. – FEB. 17 - 18 - 19, 9:AM) TRACTORS: ‘02 JD 790 utility tractor, 169 hrs – ‘90 JD 4955, Cab, loaded – ‘86 JD 855 utility tractor, 754 hrs, 72” Mid-Mower – ‘80 555 Versatile, 3837hrs – ‘68 IHC 856 w/GB 800 loader w/Grapple – ‘65 IHC 606 w/ IHC hyd. loader – ‘65 JD 3020 RC Dies. - Hyd. loader, for Case 700 - JD loader QA forks - 2 doz.+ used tractor tires/tubes/wheels - ANTIQUE TRACTORS, ETC.: ‘40’s Farmall H, restored, w/5’ mower – ‘49 Ford 8N – ‘67 AC D21 Series II Wheatland, Fresh restoration - IHC Farmall A , complete - Case 701B, restorable - Antique Horse Equip./ etc: - grain wagon – buggy - wagon wheels - IHC 1 cyl. eng. - 4 Mod. A wheels - 2 steel thrashing machine wheels buck rake - COMBINES - GRAIN CARTS - HARVEST EQUIP.: ‘95 Case/IH 2188, 3500 hrs, w/1030 header - JD 650 Grain Cart – ‘04 Easy Trails 500 bu. Grain Cart - JD 400 Grain Cart - A&L 600 Bu. grain cart – ‘07 Macdon 35’ FD 70 draper header – ‘06 AGCO 3000 12-30 Cornhead - 2 JD 853A Row Heads – ‘99 Case/ IH 1083 corn header – ‘88 JD 843 Cornhead - JD 912 pickup head - Dirks Welding 5th wheel 48’ combine trlr – SB Semi 5th wheel 25.5’ combine trlr – ‘97 Kent Combine trlr, 12’x30’ – ‘97 A-frame combine trlr, 12’x30’ - Case header trlr – ‘03 Cimarron CM30HTB header trlr - SB adj. length header trlr - UFT header trlr – Combine tires, parts & repairs - INDUSTRIAL EQUIP.: ‘99 Case 821 wheel loader, slick – ‘88 L-70 Volvo wheel loader, slick, no bucket - White 46A packe, towable – ‘86 Cat. 613 - 13 yrd earth mover, field ready - Hancock 292B 12 yrd earth mover Hancock 292 11 yrd earth mover - Case 580 Loader/ Backhoe - Bobcat 943 Die. Skid loader - Cat 246 Skid steer - 7’ 3 yrd dirt mover - Midland 6 1/2’ dirt scraper - Malsam dbl belt terracer - McKee 720 3pt Snowblower - Midmark 321 4x4 trencher - NEW SKID STEER ATTACHMENTS: 5 hyd. posthole diggers, 3 brush grapple buckets, 2 grapple buckets - Rock Bucket Grapple – 2 Material buckets - 2 receiver plates - Grapple attachment - 2 Regular Plates - 2 Solid Plates – 2 48” pallet forks - Set over tire steel tracks – used 5’ pallet forks - 2 lots plywood concrete forms - TRUCKS: ‘96 IHC 930 sa semi w/sleeper – ‘94 Chev 25 Step Van – ‘91 Mack E 3180, 2000 gal. tank, pump – ‘91 IHC Fuel Trk, 5 comp/2300 gallon – ‘90 IHC 9300 16 ton fertilizer box – ‘86 IHC 1954, 10 ton dry fert. tender – ‘81 KW c/o ts semi – ‘81 Chev C70 ts grain trk – ‘80 Dodge 250 dump trk – ‘79 Chevy C70 Feed Trk, Harsh Mobile Mix, Scale – ‘76 Chevy C60 Feed Truck, BJM C900B Feeder Box, Scale – ‘76 Chev C65 ta grain trk, not running – ‘75 Ford LN750 sa tractor, - ‘75 Ford LN700 ta Grain Trk – ‘75 Dodge D600 grain trk – ‘72 Ford F600 feed trk, Oswalt 280 Ensilbox – ‘69 GMC 6500 TS grain trk – ‘65 IHC 1700 w/20’ hyd tilt flat winch bed – ‘64 Ford F600 Grain trk – ‘63 Ford F600 Grain trk – (2)’59 Chev Viking grain trks – ‘57 IHC Wench Trk – ‘54 Ford F6 trk, - - Truck parts/Tires: 20’ Field Queen grain/silage bed - Semi headache rack - Wench bed – 2 Wet kits - 150+ good truck tires - -PICKUPS - SUV’s: 35 pickups & flatbed from ‘10 to ‘74, see web site for detailed list – take off beds & flat beds etc. - TRAILERS: ‘08 Muaer 36’ grain trlr – ‘04 Wilson Pace Setter, 43’ grain trlr – ‘99 Jantz 30’ ta dove tail flatbed – ‘98 Transcraft 48’ s/a drop deck, 7’ exten. – ‘96 Timpte 42’ grain trlr – ‘95 Wilson 42’ grain trlr – ‘94 Timpte 42’ grain trlr – ‘88 Wilson 42’ Convertible grain trlr – ‘87 Timpte 42’ SH grain trlr – ‘86 Wilson ADL700 47’ alum. cattle trlr – ‘86 Timpte SH 42’ grain trlr – ‘79 Wilson 42’ grain trlr – ‘74 Alloy 40’ grain trlr - 26.5’ SB Drop-deck sprayer nurse semi-trailer, 2 - 1500 gal. poly tanks - 30’ G/N stock trailer - 24’ dove tail HD trlr - SB 32’ g/n 3 axle stock trlr – ‘80 Hale 2 Horse Trlr – ‘70 SB 4 horse g/n stock trlr - 20’ semi gravel trlr, w/dolly - 21’ Redi Haul 3 axle dove tail backhoe trlr - 23.5’ dove tail trlr – ‘75 Jantz custom round bale trlr - 16’ flatbed utility trlr – other small trailers - HAY EQUIP.: ‘07 NH HW325 swather, 18’ HS Haybine head – ‘02 JD 4890 swather, 16’ head - 25’ NH HB25 drapper header – ‘95 NH 2550 SP Swather, 18’ header - JD 510 rnd baler - Gehl 1450 rnd baler - Vermeer 1400 bale retriever trlr - NH 144 inverter - Buffalo bale retriever trlr - NEW sb rnd bale trlr - Gopher Getter - IMPLEMENTS: Sweeps & Discs - Planter & Drills - Cultivators & Toolbars - Field Conditioners & Chisels - Mowers, Shredders & Rotovators Blades, Scrappers, Plows, Misc. – see scottauction. com for complete list - IRRIGATION ENGINES & EQUIPMENT – PIPE & fittings – sprinkler tires – pivot tanks – 10 ATV’S - PWC’s - TOPPERS – 3 GOLF CARTS – RV’s - GARDEN TRACTORS & MOWERS – SPRAYERS ; ‘05 Raptor/Miller sprayer, 850 gal., 90’ boom – ‘96 Spray Coupe 220 – ‘97 Best Way 750 gal. spray rig – ‘88 Spray Coupe 220 - 15,000 gal upright fib/glass tank – lots other spray rigs & tanks - GRAIN BIN TO BE MOVED: 2 Columbian 2500 bu. bins near Kindall, KS – see website for info. - 500 bu. upright bin – 3 drive over auger pits - grain augers - 100’ lots LIVESTOCK EQUIP. – New continuous fencing & panels - FUEL TANKS - SHOP EQUIP. – tools & misc. - 100’s MISC. ITEMS to numerous to mention. 100’S MORE ITEMS CONSIGNED BY SALE TIME CONSIGNMENTS WELCOME until WED., FEB. 8th. Loading equip. sight. For info. on consigning = Scott Auction. 620-276-8282 or 800-466-8214, E-MAIL auction@scottauction.com, Fax 1-620-277-2044. TERMS: CASH, Checks w/Positive ID. - 1% BUYERS FEE ON ALL SALES - 3 AUCTION RINGS WILL BE SELLING AT MOST TIMES - ALL ITEMS TO BE REMOVED BY 3/4/12 – LOADING ASSISTANCE UNTIL SAT., 2/25/12. LUNCH SERVED - NO WARRANTIES EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, ANNOUNCEMENTS TAKE PRECEDENCE - BUYERS ARE RESPONSIBLE TO DETERMINE CONDITION OF ITEMS PRIOR TO BIDDING. FOR COMPLETE UPDATED LISTING & PICTURES SEE - “www.scottauction.com”

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SCOTT AUCTION

2005 Yukon SLT, 2002 FORD Ranger ONLY 80,000 miles, pickup, 6cylinder, 5 leather , 3rd row seat, speed new tire, runs new brakes, good tires. good. (620) 287-0258 $16,750. 620-271-8661 2007 Ford XLT 150, 4 Pickups & Trucks door pickup. New 1986 CHEVY pickup. brakes. Super clean, This $1900 OBO; 2-HORSE metallic gray. enclosed trailer, $1200 truck is priced to sell OBO; 1992 FORD full 9,850 620-277-2462(H) size van, Non-working. or 620-272-7147(C) Make Offer. (620) 2007 Silverado LT 3500 290-5432 HD Duramax diesel, excellent condition. LoClassifieds Work! cated in Garden City. www.gctbargains.com $25000. 620-640-7967.

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Publish Date Deadline Time \ Date Monday 4pm Thursday Tuesday 4pm Friday Wednesday 4pm Monday Thursday 4pm Tuesday Friday 9am Wednesday Saturday 10am Thursday Saturday & Sunday are not working days. Lengthy notices may require additional working time. Please be advised: The Garden City Telegram is published daily Monday - Saturday; except for the following observed holidays: New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King Jr, Birthday, President’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Columbus Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day. Holidays will advance deadlines one day. Submit copy and letters of instruction via email to legalnotices@ gctelegram.com. Additionally, legal notices may be hand delivered to our office or mailed to Legal Advertising, Garden City Telegram, 310 N. 7th, PO Box 958, Garden City, KS 67846.

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2010 TOYOTA Tacoma. Reg cab, 2WD, 4 cyl., 5 speed, 7k miles, warranty. $15,000. .(785) 628-8726.

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2001 30! Dutchman Supreme. Sleeps 4, generator, pulls easy, Great condition. $8000. (620) 375-2379, (620) 874-1606.

2011 YAMAHA TTR110 kids dirt bike. Like new and easy to learn on. $1500 OBO. Garden City, (785) 263-4525 after 4pm.

212 DAVIS #9 downstairs $400 / $250 Call 620-276-6884 between h o u r s 7:30am to 4:30pm!

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(Published in the Garden City Telegram February 11, 2012.) RESOLUTION NO. 7-2012 A RESOLUTION AMENDING THE ZONING REGULATIONS FOR FINNEY COUNTY, KANSAS; ADOPTING NEW ZONING REGULATIONS TO DEFINE AND REGULATE PERMITTED ACCESSORY USES; AMENDING ZONING REGULATION SECTION 21.020; AMENDING RESOLUTION NO. 43.96; BE IT ORDAINED by the Board of County Commissioners, Finney County, Kansas: SECTION I: Statement of Purpose. It is the purpose of this Resolution to amend the approved Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, adopted by Resolution No. 43.96 adopting new Zoning Regulations to define and regulate permitted accessory uses; SECTION II: Identified Area of Amendment. Section 22.020 of the Finney County Zoning Regulations shall read as follows: 22.020 ACCESSORY USES PERMITTED. Accessory uses and structures may be permitted in any zoning district provided such uses or structures conform to the definition in Section 21.010. Permitted accessory uses and structures include but are not limited to the following: 1. Buildings such as garages, carports, bath houses, gardening sheds, recreation rooms, and similar structures which are customarily used in conjunction with and incidental to a principle use or structure. 2. Children's playhouses provided they shall be in keeping with the principle structure. 3. Swimming pools. 4. Storage of materials used for construction of a building, including the contractor's temporary office, provided that such use is on the building site or immediately adjacent thereto, and provided further that such use shall be permitted only during the construction period and thirty (30) days thereafter. 5. Barbecue stoves, flagpoles, fences, walls, trellises, statuary, arbors, gazebos, and greenhouses. 6. Fallout shelters provided that they shall not be used for any other purpose. 7. Off-street parking and loading in conformance with Article 25. 8. Signs as permitted by Article 24. 9. Satellite TV reception dish located in side or rear yards only. 10. Uses incidental to permitted hotels or motels such as clubs, gift shops, restaurants, etc. 11. Storage of boat trailers, boats, campers, camp trailers and similar recreation equipment provided no part of such storage area is located within the vision clearance area. 12. In A, R-R, RSR, S-E, S-R, L-R, M-R, H-R, MHP, and MHS Districts: unless subdivision covenants or deed restrictions override these Regulations, the keeping of fowl and pigeons shall be permitted as follows: (a) Keeping of Fowl - It shall be unlawful to own or keep fowl, other than permitted fowl, within the County. The maximum total number of permitted fowl allowed to be owned or kept on an individual lot is one (1) animal (fowl) per five hundred (500) square feet of lot size, rounded down, but in no event shall the total number of permitted fowl on any lot exceed six (6). (i) Definitions: (1) “Fowl” shall mean those domestic birds commonly kept for the production of meat, eggs or feathers. This shall include chickens, ducks, turkeys, geese, swans, peafowl, and guinea fowl, ostriches and emus. (2) “Permitted fowl” shall mean ducks and female chickens. (ii) Coops, Roosts, and Laying Boxes (1) In addition to the other requirements of this chapter that specify standards applicable to the keeping of animals, any person who owns chickens or ducks shall provide a coop or other similar shelter and adequate laying boxes, and roosts for the chickens or ducks. Such shelter shall be screened or walled in a manner that allows the chickens or ducks to be reasonably protected from predators. (2) The coop shall be a minimum of three square feet in size per chicken or duck if the birds have a fenced outdoor run, or 10 square feet per chicken or duck if the birds do not have a fenced outdoor run. (3) A minimum of one square foot of laying box space shall be provided per three (3) chickens. Each laying box will contain adequate clean bedding material such as hay or other similar soft material. (4) One 8” or larger roost is required per chicken. Ducks do not require roosts. (5) Coops shall be constructed in a manner that is consistent with the requirements of the County?s Supplemental Development Standards for Accessory Structures in Articles 22 and 23 of the County Zoning Regulations. No coop shall be located closer than five (5) feet from any neighboring property line. (6) In the event that a mobile coop is utilized, the coop shall be kept in compliance with all County Resolutions that apply to the outdoor storage of property. (7) A coop shall be kept in a clean and sanitary condition to prevent the unreasonable accumulation of waste or any other noxious substances, noxious odors or the presence of vermin. (b) Keeping of Pigeons – It shall be unlawful to own or keep pigeons, other than permitted pigeons, within the County. The maximum total number of pigeons allowed to be owned or kept on an individual lot is five (5) pigeons per five hundred (500) square feet of lot size, rounded down, but in no event shall the total number of pigeons on any lot exceed seventy (70). (i) Definitions: (1) “Pigeon” shall mean a member of the Columbidea Family of birds that include „racing?, „fancy?, and „sporting? pigeons. (ii) Lofts (1) Any person who owns pigeons shall provide a loft or other similar shelter designed according to a commercially available plan. Such shelter shall be screened or walled in a manner that allows the pigeons to be reasonably protected from predators. (2) The loft shall be a minimum of one (1) square foot in size per pigeon. That portion of the pigeon loft designated as the fly pen shall be constructed so that it faces the residence of the owner. (3) Lofts shall be constructed in a manner that is consistent with the requirements of the County?s Supplemental Development Standards for Accessory Structures defined in Articles 22 and 23 of the County Zoning Regulations. No loft shall be located closer than five (5) feet from any neighboring property line. (4) A loft shall be kept in a clean and sanitary condition to prevent the unreasonable accumulation of waste or any other noxious substance, noxious odors or the presence of vermin. (5) Pigeons shall be confined to a loft at all times except when released for necessary exercise, training or racing flights, with no more than fifty percent (50%) of an owner?s pigeons to be released at any one (1) time. Exercising, training or racing flights shall not be undertaken during the hours of 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. from June to September so as to not disturb the yard use and enjoyment of abutting neighbors. SECTION III: Further Amendment. That the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, adopted by Resolution No. 43-96, on file with the County Clerk of Finney County, Kansas, as previously existing and amended, be and the same, is hereby amended and rewritten as contained herein. SECTION IV: Effective Date: This Resolution shall take effect and be in force from and after its publication in the official County newspaper. PASSED AND APPROVED by the Board of County Commissioners, Finney County, Kansas on this 6th day of February, 2012. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF FINNEY COUNTY, KANSAS Don Doll, CHAIRMAN Dave Jones, COMMISSIONER Larry Jones, COMMISSIONER Clifford A. Mayo, COMMISSIONER Roman Halbur, COMMISSIONER ATTEST: Elsa Ulrich, COUNTY CLERK 212957

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(Published in the Garden City Telegram on the 11th day of February, 2012) ORDINANCE NO. 2539-2012 AN ORDINANCE OF THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF GARDEN CITY,KANSAS, ESTABLISHING A RURAL HOUSING INCENTIVE DISTRICT WITHIN THE CITY AND ADOPTING A PLAN FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF HOUSING AND PUBLIC FACILITIES IN SUCH DISTRICT, AND MAKING CERTAIN FINDINGS IN CONJUNCTION THEREWITH (PRAIRIE TRAILS PARTNERS, LLC PROJECT)

WHEREAS, K.S.A. 12-5241 et seq. (the “Act”) authorizes any city incorporated in accordance with the laws of the State of Kansas (the “State”) with a population of less than 40,000 located in a county with a population of less than 60,000, to designate rural housing incentive districts within such city; and WHEREAS, prior to such designation the governing body of such city shall conduct a housing needs analysis to determine what, if any, housing needs exist within its community; and WHEREAS, after conducting such analysis, the governing body of such city may adopt a resolution making certain findings regarding the establishment of a rural housing incentive district and providing the legal description of property to be contained therein; and WHEREAS, after publishing such resolution, the governing body of such city shall send a copy thereof to the Secretary of Commerce of the State (the “Secretary”) requesting that the Secretary agree with the finding contained in such resolution; and WHEREAS, if the Secretary agrees with such findings, such city may proceed with the establishment of a rural housing incentive district within such city and adopt a plan for the development or redevelopment of housing and public facilities in the proposed district; and WHEREAS, the City of Garden City , Kansas ( the “City”) has an estimated population of 30,685, is located in Finney County, Kansas which has a population of 43,008 and therefore constitutes a city as said term is defined in this act; and WHEREAS, the Governing Body of the City has performed a Community Housing Assessment Team Report dated December 15, 2008 (CHAT), a copy of which is on file in the office of the City Clerk; and WHEREAS, THE Governing Body of the City has heretofore adopted Resolution No. 2442-2011 which made certain findings relating to the need for financial incentives relating to the construction of quality housing within the City, declared it advisable to establish a Rural Housing Incentive District pursuant to the Act and authorized the submission of such Resolution and a Housing Needs Analysis to the Kansas Department of Commerce in accordance with the provisions of the Act; and WHEREAS, the Secretary, pursuant to a letter dated December 12, 2011, authorized the City to proceed with the establishment of a Rural Housing Incentive District pursuant to the Act (the “District”); and WHEREAS, the City has caused to be prepared a plan for the development or redevelopment of housing and public facilities in the proposed District in accordance with the provisions of the Act (the “Plan”); and WHEREAS, the Plan includes: The legal description and map required by subsection (a) of K.S.A. 12-5244; The existing assessed valuation of the real estate in the proposed District, listing the land and improvement values separately; A list of the names and addresses of the owners of record of all real estate parcels within the proposed District; A description of the housing and public facilities project or projects that are proposed to be constructed or improved in the proposed District, and the location thereof; A listing of the names, addresses, and specific interest in real estate in the proposed District of the developers responsible for development of the housing and public facilities in the proposed District; The contractual assurances, if any, the Governing Body has received from such developer or developers, guaranteeing the financial feasibility of specific housing tax incentive projects in the proposed District; A comprehensive analysis of the feasibility of providing housing tax incentives in the proposed District as provided in the Act, set forth the boundaries of the proposed District, provided a summary of the proposed Plan, called a public hearing concerning the establishment of the proposed District for February 7, 2012, and provided for notice of such public hearing as provided in the Act; and WHEREAS, the Governing Body of the City has heretofore adopted Resolution No. 2448-2011 which made a finding that the City is considering the establishment of the proposed District and adopting the proposed Plan pursuant to the Act, set forth the boundaries of the proposed District, provides a summary of the proposed Plan, called a public hearing concerning the establishment of the proposed District for February 7, 2012, and provided for notice of such public hearing as provided in the Act: and WHEREAS, a public hearing was held on February 7, 2012, after due published and delivered notice in accordance with the provisions of the Act; and WHEREAS, upon and considering the information and public comments received at the public hearing, the Governing Body of the City hereby deems it advisable to make certain findings to establish the proposed District and to adopt the proposed Plan. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED by the Governing Body of the City of Garden City, Kansas, as follows: Section 1. Findings. The Governing Body hereby finds that due notice of the public hearing conducted February 7, 2012, was made in accordance with the provisions of the Act. Section 2. Creation of Rural Housing Incentive District. A Rural Housing Incentive District is hereby created within the City in accordance with the provisions of the Act, which shall consist of the following described real property in the Development, in the City of Garden City, Finney County, Kansas: A tract of land located in the Northeast Quarter (NE ?) of Section Five (S05), Township Twenty-four South (T24S), Range Thirty-two West (R32W) of the Sixth Principal Meridian (6th P.M.) in Finney County, Kansas, more particularly described as follow: Commencing at the southeast corner of said Quarter, thence on an assumed bearing of Nº00!00”E, along the east line of said Section, a distance of three hundred and no hundredths (300.00) feet and N90º00!00”W for a distance of thirty-five and no hundredths (35.00) feet to the point of beginning, said point of beginning being located on the west right-of-way boundary of Campus Drive. From the point of beginning, thence N89º13!00”W for a distance of four hundred eighty and no hundredths (480.00) feet, thence N00º00!00”E for a distance of six hundred seventy and no hundredths (670.00) feet, thence S89º13!00”E for a distance of four hundred eighty and no hundredths (480.00) feet to the west right-of-way boundary of Campus Drive, thence S00º00!00”W, along said right-of-way, for a distance of six hundred seventy and no hundredths (670.00) feet to the point of beginning, containing 7.38 acres. The boundaries of the District do not contain any property not referenced in Resolution No. 2448-2011, which provided notice of public hearing on the creation of the District and adoption of the Plan. Section 3. Approval of Development Plan. The Plan for the development or redevelopment of housing and public facilities in the District, as presented to the Governing Body this date, is hereby approved.. Section 4. Adverse Effect on Other Government Units. If, within thirty (30) days following the conclusion of the public hearing on February 7, 2012, any of the following occurs, the Governing Body shall take action to repeal this Ordinance: The Board of Education of U.S.D. No. 457 determines by resolution that the District will have an adverse effect on such school district; or The Board of County Commissioners of Finney County, Kansas, determines by resolution that the District will have an adverse effect on such county. The Board of Trustees Garden City Community College, determines by resolution that the District will have an adverse effect on such Community College. As of this date, the City has not received a copy of any such resolution and is not aware of the adoption of any such resolution by the governing body of Finney County, Unified School District No. 457, or Garden City Community College. Section 5. Reimbursement. The Act authorizes the City to reimburse the Developer for all or a portion of the costs of implementing the Plan through the use of property tax increments allocated to the City under the provisions of the Act. Section 6. Further Action. The Mayor, City Clerk and other officials and employees of the City, including the City Attorney, are hereby further authorized and directed to take such other actions as may be appropriate to accomplish the purposes of this Ordinance. Section 7. Effective Date. This Ordinance shall be effective upon its passage by the Governing Body of the City of Garden City, Kansas and publication one time in the official City newspaper. PASSED by the Governing Body of the City of Garden City, Kansas and signed by the Mayor on February 7, 2012. John Doll, Mayor ATTEST: Celyn Hurtado, City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: RANDALL D. GRISELL, City Counselor 213031


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SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

Residential Rentals Garden Grove Properties LLC Beautifully remodeled 1 bdrm apts. $439- $449 month (620) 272–9595 SELL YOUR CAR, BOAT or CYCLE Place an ad! 276-6862 x 1 Classifieds do the work!

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Real Estate

Farms, Land, Ranches

Mobile Homes

1940 Kensington Blvd. Maintenance free living at Southwind.! 4, 790 sq. foot detached townhome with 3 bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms on hole #3.! A cook's dream in a gourmet kitchen, open floor plan, walk-in wine cellar, plenty of room for entertaining and much more.! Call 620-640-2277 for your private showing.

For Sale: 265 acre grass west of Lakin $600 per acre. 660 acre grass north of Garden City $600 per acre. United Country Stutzman Realty & Auction Ulysses, KS. Jerry Stutzman-Broker 620-353-9411 www.stutzmanrealty.co m

1999 SHULT 16x80 2 bedroom, 2 bath mobile home. Large living & kitchen areas. Must be moved. Includes all skirting and front & rear steps. $22.000. (620) 272-4956.

Check out Hundreds of Homes for Sale - In Saturday!s Real Estate Weekly Section.

(Published in The Garden City Telegram Saturday, February 11, 18 and 25, 2012) IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF FINNEY COUNTY, KANSAS CIVIL DEPARTMENT Bank of America, N.A., Plaintiff  vs. Juan Bonilla aka Juan A Bonilla, Jane Doe, John Doe, Carla Toledo, and Kansas Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services, et al., Defendants Case No.    12CV17 Title to Real Estate Involved Pursuant to K.S.A. § 60 NOTICE OF SUIT STATE OF KANSAS to the above named Defendants and The Unknown Heirs, executors, devisees, trustees, creditors, and assigns of any deceased defendants; the unknown spouses of any defendants; the unknown officers, successors, trustees, creditors and assigns of any defendants that are existing, dissolved or dormant corporations; the unknown executors, administrators, devisees, trustees, creditors, successors and assigns of any defendants that are or were partners or in partnership; and the unknown guardians, conservators and trustees of any defendants that are minors or are under any legal disability and all other person who are or may be concerned: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Petition for Mortgage Foreclosure has been filed in the District Court of Finney County, Kansas by Bank of America, N.A., praying for foreclosure of certain real property legally described as follows: LOT TWO (2), BLOCK "C", WALLACE ADDITION TO THE CITY OF GARDEN CITY, FINNEY COUNTY, KANSAS. Tax ID #0282661301013003.00-0-00. for a judgment against defendants and any other interested parties and, unless otherwise served by personal or mail service of summons, the time in which you have to plead to the Petition for Foreclosure in the District Court of Finney County, Kansas will expire on March 26, 2012.  If you fail to plead, judgment and decree will be entered in due course upon the request of plaintiff. MILLSAP & SINGER, LLC Jennifer L. Michaels, #24256 jmichaels@msfirm.com Chad R. Doornink, #23536 cdoornink@msfirm.com Lindsey L. Craft, #23315  lcraft@msfirm.com Jeremy M. Hart, #20866  jhart@msfirm.com 11460 Tomahawk Creek Parkway, Ste 300 Leawood, KS  66211 (913) 339-9132; (913) 339-9045 (fax) ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF MILLSAP & SINGER, LLC AS ATTORNEYS FOR BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. 212939

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(Published in the Garden City Telegram February 11, 2012.) RESOLUTION NO. 6-2012 A RESOLUTION RELATING TO THE ZONING OF A PARCEL OF LAND IN FINNEY COUNTY, KANSAS FROM “L-R” LOW DENSITY RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT TO “S-E” SUBURBAN ESTATES RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT; ZONING PARTS OF SAID COUNTY AND AMENDING THE DISTRICT ZONING MAP ADOPTED BY RESOLUTIONS NO. 40-95 OF THE FINNEY COUNTY ZONING REGULATION. BE IT ORDAINED by the Board of County commissioners, Finney County, Kansas: SECTION I: Statement of Purpose. It is the purpose of this Resolution to amend the approved Zoning Map of Finney County, Kansas, adopted by Resolution No. 40-95: SECTION II: Identified Area of Amendment. The boundaries of the “S-E” Suburban Estates Residential District are hereby amended to include the following described real property: Tract C and Tract D of Towns Riverview Subdivision in Finney County, KS. SECTION III: Further Amendment. That the District Zoning Map referred to in Article 3, Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, adopted by Resolution No. 40-95, on file with the County Clerk of Finney County, Kansas, as previously existing and amended, be and the same, is hereby repealed if inconsistent with the amendments set forth herein. SECTION IV: Effective Date: This Resolution shall take effect and be in force from and after its publication in the official County newspaper. PASSED AND APPROVED by the Board of County Commissioners, Finney County, Kansas on this 6th day of February, 2012. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF FINNEY COUNTY, KANSAS Don Doll, CHAIRMAN Dave Jones, COMMISSIONER Larry Jones, COMMISSIONER Clifford A. Mayo, COMMISSIONER Roman Halbur, COMMISSIONER ATTEST: Elsa Ulrich, COUNTY CLERK 212956

(Published in The Garden City Telegram on the 11th day of February, 2012.) RESOLUTION NO. 2454-2012 A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE REMOVAL OF NUISANCE CONDITIONS FROM THE PROPERTY LISTED BELOW IN THE CITY OF GARDEN CITY, KANSAS, PURSUANT TO SECTION 38-139 OF THE CODE OF ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF GARDEN CITY, KANSAS. WHEREAS, the Governing Body of the City of Garden City has declared it unlawful for any person to maintain nuisance conditions on private property within the City of Garden City, and WHEREAS, the resident and/or owners of the private property at the address listed herein have been notified pursuant to Section 38-137 of the Environmental Code of Ordinances and have neither abated the nuisance conditions nor requested a hearing before the Governing Body. NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Governing Body of the City of Garden City, Kansas: SECTION 1. Ten (10) days after passage of this Resolution, and after notification of person in violation by one of the methods prescribed in Section 38-139, the Public Officer is hereby authorized to abate the following nuisance conditions: 1617 N. Eleventh–misc appliances, plastic containers, misc junk, trash, litter, & debris on property 514 Bancroft-misc appliances, misc junk, scrap lumber, scrap metal, misc furniture, trash, litter, & debris on property 2201 N. Main-misc appliances, misc junk, tires, scrap lumber, scrap metal, trash, litter, & debris on property 601 N. Third-couch, trash, litter, & debris o property SECTION 2. The abatement costs incurred by the City shall be charged against the lot or parcel of ground on which the nuisance is located. PASSED AND APPROVED by the Governing Body of the City of Garden City, Kansas, on this 7th day of February, 2012. John Doll, MAYOR ATTEST: Celyn N. Hurtado, ACTING CITY CLERK 213019

(Published in The Garden City Telegram on the 11th of February and 18th of February, 2012.) RESOLUTION NO. 2455-2012 A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE REMOVAL OF MOTOR VEHICLE NUISANCES FROM CERTAIN PROPERTIES IN THE CITY OF GARDEN CITY, KANSAS, PURSUANT TO SECTION 38-63 OF THE CODE OF ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF GARDEN CITY, KANSAS. WHEREAS, the Governing Body of the City of Garden City has declared it unlawful for any person to maintain a motor vehicle nuisance on private property within the City of Garden City, and WHEREAS, the resident and/or owners of the private property at the addresses listed herein have been notified pursuant to Section 38-63 of the Code of Ordinances and have neither abated the nuisance conditions nor requested a hearing before the Governing Body. NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Governing Body of the City of Garden City, Kansas: SECTION 1. Ten (10) days after passage of this Resolution the Public Officer is hereby authorized to abate the following motor vehicle nuisance conditions: 905 Howerton–Inoperable & unregistered vehicle stored on the alley right of way. Green VW Jetta tag #CO, 659 VKZ 2802 N. Main-Inoperable & unregistered vehicle parked in back of residence. Older blue thunderbird. SECTION 2. The abatement costs incurred by the City shall be charged against the lots or parcels of ground on which the motor vehicle nuisance is located. PASSED AND APPROVED by the Governing Body of the City of Garden City, Kansas, on this 7th day of February,2012. John Doll, MAYOR ATTEST: Celyn N. Hurtado, ACTING CITY CLERK 213018

(PUBLISHED IN THE GARDEN CITY TELEGRAM ON THIS 11TH DAY OF FEBRUARY, 2012)

RESOLUTION NO. 9-2012 A RESOLUTION RELATING TO AMENDING THE ZONING REGULATIONS OF FINNEY COUNTY, KANSAS; AMENDING ZONING REGULATIONS OF FINNEY COUNTY, KANSAS TO REGULATE LICENSED DAY CARE HOMES, GROUP DAY CARE HOMES AND CHILD CARE CENTERS; AMENDING ZONING REGULATION SECTIONS 2.030 (51), (52) AND (53), 5.020 (13), 5.030 (4), 5.520 (13), 5.530 (4), 6.020 (9), 6.030 (2), 7.020 (10), 7.030 (2), 8.020 (10), 8.030 (2), 9.020 (13), 9.030 (7), 10.020 (16), 10.030 (6), 11-A.020 (5), 11-B.020 (10), 11-B.030, 13.020 (6), 13.030 (1), 14.020 (6), 15.030 (7), 16.030 (9), 17.030 (9), 32.020 (13), AND 32.030 (4); REPEALING CURRENT ZONING REGULATIONS SECTIONS 2.030 (51), (52) AND (53), 5.020 (13), 5.030 (4), 5.520 (13), 5.530 (4), 6.020 (9), 6.030 (2), 7.020 (10), 7.030 (2), 8.020 (10), 8.030 (2), 9.020 (13), 9.030 (7), 10.020 (16), 10.030 (6), 11-A.020 (5), 11-B.020 (10), 11-B.030 (2), 13.020 (6), 13.030 (1), 14.020 (6), 15.030 (7), 16.030 (9), 17.030 (9), 32.020 (13), AND 32.030 (4); ADOPTED BY RESOLUTIONS NO. 43-96 THE ZONING REGULATION OF FINNEY COUNTY, KANSAS. BE IT ORDAINED by the Board of County Commissioners, Finney County, Kansas: SECTION I: Statement of Purpose. It is the purpose of this Resolution to amend the approved Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, adopted by Resolution No. 43.96 adopting new Zoning Regulations to regulate Licensed Day Care Homes, Group Day Care Homes and Child Care Centers; amending zoning regulation sections 2.030 (51), (52) and (53), 5.020 (13), 5.030 (4), 5.520 (13), 5.530 (4), 6.020 (9), 6.030 (2), 7.020 (10), 7.030 (2), 8.020 (10), 8.030 (2), 9.020 (13), 9.030 (7), 10.020 (16), 10.030 (6), 11-A.020 (5), 11-B.020 (10), 11B.030, 13.020 (6), 13.030 (1), 14.020 (6), 15.030 (7), 16.030 (9), 17.030 (9), 32.020 (13), and 32.030 (4). SECTION II: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 2.030 (51) (52) and (53) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 2.030 DEFINITIONS. For the purpose of this Zoning Regulations of Finney County, words or terms not herein defined shall have their ordinary and customary meaning in relation to the context and certain terms or words used herein shall be interpreted or defined as follows: 51. Licensed Day Care Home - means the premises in which care is provided for a maximum of ten (10) children under sixteen (16) years of age with limited number of children under kindergarten age in accordance with K.A.R. 28-4-114(e)(1). This total includes children less than eleven (11) years of age related to the provider; and which is licensed and regulated through the Finney County Health Department by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment. 52. Child Care Center - means a non-residential facility in which care and educational activities are provided for thirteen (13) or more children two (2) weeks to sixteen (16) years of age for more than three (3) hours and less than twenty-four (24) hours per day including day time, evening, and nighttime care, or which provides before and after school care for school-age children. A facility may have fewer than thirteen (13) children and be licensed as a center if the program and building meet child care center regulations. 53. Group Day Care Home - means the premises located in a single family dwelling unit where care is provided by two (2) providers, one of whom shall be a bona-fide resident of the, dwelling unit, in which care is provided for a maximum of twelve (12) children under sixteen (16) years of age with a limited number of children under kindergarten age in accordance with K.A.R. 28-4-114(f )(1). This total includes children under eleven (11) years of age related to the provider; and which is licensed and regulated through the Finney County Health Department by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment. SECTION III: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 5.020 (13) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 5.020 PERMITTED USES. The following uses and structures, and no others are permitted in the “R-R” Districts. 13. Licensed Day Care Homes. SECTION IV: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 5.030 (4) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 5.030 CONDITIONAL USES. The following uses and structures may be permitted only after they have been reviewed and approved as required by Article 29. 4. Group Day Care Homes or Child Care Centers licensed by the State, and preschools. SECTION V: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 5.520 (13) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 5.520 PERMITTED USES. The following uses and structures, and no others are permitted in the “R-SR” Districts. 13. Licensed Day Care Homes. SECTION VI: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 5.530 (4) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 5.530 CONDITIONAL USES. The following uses and structures may be permitted only after they have been reviewed and approved as required by Article 29. 4. Group Day Care Homes or Child Care Centers licensed by the State, and preschools. SECTION VII: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 6.020 (9) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 6. 020 PERMITTED USES. The following uses and structures, and no others, are permitted in the “S-E” District. 9. Licensed Day Care Homes. SECTION VIII: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 6.030 (2) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is

hereby amended to read as follows: 6.030 CONDITIONAL USES. The following uses and structures may be permitted only after they have been reviewed and approved as required by Article 29. 2. Group Day Care Homes or Child Care Centers licensed by the State, and preschools. SECTION IX: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 7.020 (10) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 7. 020 PERMITTED USES. The following uses and structures, and no others, are permitted in the “S-R” District. 10. Licensed Day Care Homes. SECTION X: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 7.030 (2) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 7.030 CONDITIONAL USES. The following uses and structures may be permitted only after they have been reviewed and approved as required by Article 29. 2. Group Day Care Homes or Child Care Centers licensed by the State, and preschools. SECTION XI: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 8.020 (10) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 8. 020 PERMITTED USES. The following uses and structures and no others, are permitted in the “L-R” District. 10. Licensed Day Care Homes. SECTION XII: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 8.030 (2) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 8.030 CONDITIONAL USES. The following uses and structures may be permitted only after they have been reviewed and approved as required by Article 29. 2. Group Day Care Homes or Child Care Centers licensed by the State, and preschools. SECTION XIII: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 9.020 (13) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 9.020 PERMITTED USES. The following uses and structures, and no others, are permitted in the “M-R” District. 13. Licensed Day Care Homes. SECTION XIV: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 9.030 (7) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 9.030 CONDITIONAL USES. The following uses and structures may be permitted only after they have been reviewed and approved as required by Article 29. 7. Group Day Care Homes or Child Care Centers licensed by the State and preschools. SECTION XV: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 10.020 (16) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 10.020 PERMITTED USES. The uses and structures, and no others, are permitted in the “H-R” District. 16. Licensed Day Care Homes. SECTION XVI: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 10.030 (6) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 10.030 CONDITIONAL USES. The following uses and structures may be permitted only after they have been reviewed and approved as required by Article 29. 6. Group Day Care Homes or Child Care Centers licensed by the State and preschools. SECTION XVII: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 11-A.020 (5) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 11-A.020 PERMITTED USES IN THE MHP DISTRICT. The following uses and structures and no others are permitted in the Manufactured Home Park District: 5. Licensed Day Care Homes, Group Day Care Homes or Child Care Centers licensed by the State, schools, and Preschools. SECTION XVIII: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 11-B.020 (10) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 11-B.020 PERMITTED USES IN THE MHS DISTRICT. The following uses and structures and no others are permitted in the “MHS” Manufactured Home Subdivision District: 10. Licensed Day Care Homes. SECTION XIX: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 11B.030 of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 11-B.030 CONDITIONAL USES. The following uses and structures may be permitted only after they have been reviewed and approved as required by Article 29. 1. Public libraries, museums or similar public buildings. 2. Group Day Care Homes or Child Care Centers licensed by the State and preschools. 3. Golf courses, miniature golf courses and driving ranges. 4. Community buildings, recreation fields, YMCA, and other similar uses as defined in these regulations. 5. Nursing Homes and Homes for the Aged approved and licensed by the State of Kansas.

6. Public utility uses, as follows, provided that the location is approved by the Planning Commission and provided that there is a landscape or screen plan. (a) Electric and telephone substations (b) Gas regulator stations (c) Police and Fire Stations (d) Water towers (e) Etc. 7. Home occupations. 8. Manufactured Homes of model years 1976 to 1985 at the discretion of the Board of Zoning Appeals. SECTION XX: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 13.020 (6) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 13.020 PERMITTED USES. The following uses and structures, and no others, are permitted in the “G-C” District: 6. Auditoriums and similar places of public assembly. SECTION XXI: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 13.030 (1) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 13.030 CONDITIONAL USES. The following uses and structures may be permitted only after they have been reviewed and approved as required by Article 29. 1. License Day Care Homes, Group Day Care Homes and Child Care Centers licensed by the State. SECTION XXII: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 14.020 (6) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 14.020 PERMITTED USES. The following uses and structures, and no others, are permitted in the “C-R” District: 6. Child Care Centers licensed by the State. SECTION XXIII: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 15.030 (7) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 15.030 CONDITIONAL USES. The following uses and structures may be permitted only after they have been reviewed and approved as required by Article 29. 7. Child Care Centers licensed by the State. SECTION XXIV: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 16.030 (9) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 16.030 CONDITIONAL USES. The following uses and structures may be permitted only after they have been reviewed and approved as required by Article 29. 9. Child Care Centers licensed by the State. SECTION XXV: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 17.030 (9) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 17.030 CONDITIONAL USES. The following uses and structures may be permitted only after they have been reviewed and approved as required by Article 29. 9. Child Care Centers licensed by the State. SECTION XXVI: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 32.020 (13) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 32.020 PERMITTED USES. The following uses and structures, and no others are permitted in the “R-RP” District. 13. Licensed Day Care Home. SECTION XXVI: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Section 32.030 (4) of the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 32.030 CONDITIONAL USES. The following uses and structures may be permitted only after they have been reviewed and approved as required by Article 29. 4. Group Day Care Homes or Child Care Centers licensed by the State, and preschools. SECTION XXVII. The Finney County Zoning Regulations, Sections 2.030 (51), (52) and (53), 5.020 (13), 5.030 (4), 5.520 (13), 5.530 (4), 6.020 (9), 6.030 (2), 7.020 (10), 7.030 (2), 8.020 (10), 8.030 (2), 9.020 (13), 9.030 (7), 10.020 (16), 10.030 (6), 11-A.020 (5), 11-B.020 (10), 11B.030, 13.020 (6), 13.030 (1), 14.020 (6), 15.030 (7), 16.030 (9), 17.030 (9), 32.020 (13), and 32.030 (4), as previously existing, are hereby repealed, to be replaced as specified in this resolution. SECTION XXVIII: Further Amendment. That the Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, adopted by Resolution No. 43-96, on file with the County Clerk of Finney County, Kansas, as previously existing and amended, be and the same, is hereby amended and rewritten as contained herein. SECTION XXIX: Effective Date: This Resolution shall take effect and be in force from and after its publication in the official County newspaper. PASSED AND APPROVED by the Board of County Commissioners, Finney County, Kansas on this 6th day of February, 2012. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF FINNEY COUNTY, KANSAS Don Doll, CHAIRMAN Dave Jones, COMMISSIONER Larry Jones, COMMISSIONER Clifford A. Mayo, COMMISSIONER ATTEST: Roman Halbur, COMMISSIONER Elsa Ulrich, COUNTY CLERK 212959


Garden City Telegram

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

C9

(PUBLISHED IN THE GARDEN CITY TELEGRAM ON THIS 11TH DAY OF FEBRUARY, 2012)

RESOLUTION NO. 10-2012 A RESOLUTION AMENDING THE ZONING REGULATIONS OF FINNEY COUNTY, KANSAS; ADOPTING NEW ZONING REGULATIONS TO REGULATE INOPERABLE VEHICLES AND DEFINE HOBBY CAR COLLECTING; AMENDING ZONING REGULATION ARTICLE 23 BY ADDING SECTION 23.140 AND AMENDING ARTICLES 2, 5, 5.5, 6, 7, 8, 9, AND 10 SECTIONS 2.030, 5.030, 5.530, 6.030, 7.030, 8.030, 9.030, AND 10.030 – CONDITIONAL USES; AMENDING RESOLUTION NO. 43.96 BE IT ORDAINED by the Board of County Commissioners, Finney County, Kansas: SECTION I: Statement of Purpose. It is the purpose of this Resolution to amend the approved Zoning Regulations of Finney County, Kansas, adopted by Resolution No. 43.96 adopting new Zoning Regulations to regulate inoperable vehicles; amending Zoning Regulation Article 23 by adding section 23.140 and amending Articles 2, 5, 5.5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 Sections 5.030, 6.030, 7.030, 8.030, 9.030, and 10.030 – Conditional Uses. SECTION II: Identified Area of Amendment. Section 23.140 of the Finney County Zoning Regulations shall read as follows: INOPERABLE VEHICLES. On any lot in the County under forty (40) acres in area, the number of unlicensed, untagged, or otherwise inoperable vehicles is not to exceed two (2), unless the lot is located in a Heavy Industrial District and the owner of such lot has a valid certificate of compliance issued by the Secretary of Transportation in accordance with K.S.A. 68-2205 and amendments thereto or the owner of the lot obtains a Conditional Use Permit for hobby car collecting as outlined in these regulations. This shall not apply to inoperable vehicles that are used for or in connection with agricultural activities located on Agriculture District lots of forty (40) or more acres. SECTION III: Identified Area of Amendment. The new Article 2, Section 2.030 shall read as follows: 1. Abutting - Adjoining or bordering. 2. Access - The right to cross between public and private property allowing pedestrians and vehicles to enter and leave property 3. Accessory Building. - A subordinate building or portion of the main building, located on the same lot, the use of which is clearly incidental to that of the main building or to the use of the land on which it is located. Customary accessory buildings include, but are not limited to, garages, carports, garden houses, small storage shed and children’s playhouses. 4. Accessory Use. - A subordinate use which serves an incidental function to that of the principal use of the premises. Customary accessory uses include, but are not limited to, tennis courts, swimming pools, air conditioners, barbecue grills and fireplaces 5. Administrative Officer - See Zoning Administrator. 6. Agricultural Purposes, Land Used For: The use of a tract of land for the production of plants, animals or horticultural products, including but not limited to: Forages; grains and feed crops; dairy animals and dairy products; beef cattle, sheep, swine and horses; bees and apiary products; trees and forest products; fruits, nuts and berries; vegetables; or nursery, floral, ornamental or greenhouse products. Land used for agricultural purposes shall not include the following: Lands which are used for recreational purposes; urban residential acreage’s; suburban residential acreage’s; rural residential home sites and yard plots whose primary function is for residential or recreational purposes even though such properties may produce or maintain some of the plants or animals listed herein except those formed under the “Parcel Plat” procedure involving the “Farmstead” or those whose lot formation was verified before this Regulation became effective as outlined under the Regulation. The operation or maintenance of greenhouses, nurseries or hydroponics farms operated at retail. Wholesale or retail sales as an accessory use unless the same are permitted by these Regulations. The operation or maintenance of a commercial stockyard or feedlot unless specifically authorized by a Conditional Use Permit only after they have been reviewed and approved as required by Article 29. The operation of an auction sales yard. The operation of horse training tracks unless specifically authorized by a conditional Use Permit through the Board of Zoning Appeals. The operation or maintenance of a Soils Regeneration Facility only after they have been reviewed and approved with a Conditional Use Permit as required by Article 29 and licensed by the State of Kansas The operation of Motocross areas/tracks unless specifically authorized by a Conditional Use Permit only after they have been reviewed and approved as required by Article 29. The operation of or maintenance of Open Pit Mining within Finney County unless specifically authorized by Conditional Use Permit only after they have been reviewed and approved as required by Article 29 and licensed by the State of Kansas. 7. Alley - A public or private thoroughfare which affords only a secondary means of access to property abutting thereon. 8. Alteration - A change or rearrangement in the structural parts of an existing building or structure. Enlargement, whether by extending a side, increasing the height, or the moving from one location or position to another, shall be considered as an alteration. 9. Amendment - The process of change or alteration to the Zoning Regulations in one of the following forms: a. A comprehensive revision or modification of the zoning text and/ or maps. b. A text change in the zoning requirements. c. The approval of a Conditional Use Permit as provided within these Regulations. d. A change in the maps, i.e., the zoning designation of a particular parcel or parcels. This form is also known as “rezoning.” 10. Animal Hospital or Clinic - An establishment where animals are admitted principally for examination, treatment, board or care by a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine. This does not include open kennels or runs. 11. Apartment - (See Dwelling, Multiple Family) 12. Applicant - The owner of a tract of land, or his duly designated representative, for which an amendment has been requested. Consent shall be required from the record owner of the premises if the applicant is other than the owner. 13. Auction Sales - A building and/or other structures, if any, arranged or designed to be used for the sale by auction of merchandise offered on consignment. 14. Automobile and Machinery Repair Shops - A building used for the repair of motor vehicles or machinery. This shall include, but not be limited to, body and paint shops, glass service shops and auto service centers. 15. Automotive Sales Area - An open area, other than a street, used for display or sale of new or used motor vehicles, and where no repair work is done except minor incidental repair of motor vehicles to be displayed and sold on the premises. 16. Automotive Service Station - Any building, structure or land used for the dispensing, sale or offering for sale at retail any motor vehicle fuels, oils, or accessories, including lubrication of motor vehicles and replacement or installation of minor parts and accessories, but not including tire recapping, major repair work such as motor replacement, body and fender repair or spray painting, provision of rental equipment, or open motor vehicle sales lots. 17. Automobile Wrecking and Salvage Yards - A lot, plot or parcel of land where three (3) or more motor vehicle, not in operating condition, are collected and/or stored for the purpose of processing parts for sale. 18. Board of Zoning Appeals - That board created herein which has the statutory authority to hear and determine appeals, exceptions and variances to these Regulations. 19. Boarding House - A building other than a hotel, where, for compensation and by pre-arrangement for definite periods, meals, or lodging and meals, are provided for three or more persons, but not exceeding twenty person. 20. Buildings - Any structure designed or intended for the support, enclosure, shelter or protection of persons, animals or property. When a structure is divided into separate parts by unpierced walls from the ground up, each part is deemed a separate building. 21. Building, Height - The vertical dimension measured from the average elevation of the finished lot grade at the front of the building to the highest point of the ceiling of the top story of a flat roof, to the deck line of a mansard roof; and to the average height between the plate and ridge of a gable, hip or gambrel roof. 22. Building, Line - A line established, in general, by plat or elsewhere in this resolution parallel to the front street line between which no building or portion thereof shall project except as otherwise provided in this resolution. 23. Building, Main/Principal - A building or structure in which is conducted the main or principal use of the lot or group of lots on which it is located. In any residential district, any dwelling shall be deemed to be a principal building on the plot on which it is located. 24. Building, Public - A publicly-owned building used or occupied for a public purpose. Public buildings include, but are not limited to: fire stations, police stations, auditoriums, gymnasiums, natatoriums, community halls, maintenance buildings, park shelters, jails or penal institutions, and schools. This shall include privately owned buildings used for the same public-type purposes. 25. Car Wash - An establishment having facilities designed or used exclusively for washing or cleaning motor vehicles, to include automatic car wash. 26. Cemetery - Land used for burial and dedicated for cemetery purposes, including columbariums, crematories, mausoleums, and mortuaries when operated in conjunction with and within the boundaries of such cemetery. 27. Channel - Shall mean the geographical area within the natural or artificial banks of a watercourse required conveying continuously or intermittently flowing water. 28. Church - An establishment, the principal purpose of which is religious worship, but which may include such accessory uses in the main structure or in separate buildings, as Sunday School rooms, assembly rooms, kitchen, recreational facilities and/or library. 29. Clinic, Dental or Medical - A building designed and used for the medical, dental or surgical diagnosis or treatment of patients under the care of doctors and/or nurses, with no overnight boarding. 30. Club - Buildings and facilities owned or operated by a corporation, association, person or persons for social, educational, or recreational purposes, but not primarily for profit which inures to any individual and not primarily to render a service which is customarily carried on as a business. 31. Club, Membership - Membership clubs, including private clubs, as

defined by K.S.A. 41-2601 et seq., and succeeding amendments, including but not limited to such clubs as the American legion, VFW, and the Elks. 32. Cluster, Housing - The site planning technique of grouping dwelling units around courts, parking areas, common open spaces and private drives as opposed to fronting all on a public street. 33. Common Open Space - An area of land, water or combination thereof, planned for active or passive recreation, but not including areas utilized for streets, alleys, driveways or private roads, off-street parking or loading areas, or required yards. The area of recreational activities such as swimming pools, tennis courts, shuffleboard courts, etc., may be included as common open space. 34. Comprehensive Plan - The currently adopted Finney County, Kansas, Comprehensive Plan and amendments thereto. 35. Conditional Use - A use of any building, structure or parcel of land that, by its nature, is perceived to require special care and attention in siting so as to assure compatibility with surrounding properties and uses. Conditional uses are allowed only after public notice, hearing and approval as prescribed in these Regulations and may have special conditions and safeguards attached to assure that the public interest is served. 36. Conditional Use Permit - A written document of certification issued by the Zoning Administrator permitting the construction, alteration or establishment of a Conditional Use. 37. Condominium - A building containing two (2) or more dwelling units which are designed and intended to be separately owned in fee under the Townhouse Ownership Act (K.S.A. 58-3710 et seq.) of the State of Kansas. 38. Construction/Demolition Landfill - A permitted solid waste disposal area used exclusively for the disposal on land of construction and/or demolition waste. 39. Construction/Demolition Waste - Waste building materials and rubble resulting from construction, remodeling, repair or demolition operations on houses, commercial buildings, other structures, pavements, curbing, bridges, and trees and brush; but not asbestos. 40. County - The Board of County Commissioners of Finney County, Kansas, or its delegated staff, boards or agencies. 41. County Attorney - The County Attorney, or such licensed attorney designated by the County Attorney, responsible for the prosecution of all violations of these Regulations in accordance with the provisions contained herein, and as established by law. 42. County Counselor - The County Counselor, or such licensed attorney designated by the County Counselor or Governing Body, to furnish legal assistance for the administration of these Regulations. 43. County Engineer - The County Engineer, or such licensed engineer designated by the County Engineer or Governing body, to provide engineering assistance in administering these and other Regulations governing areas of normal responsibilities assigned to the County Engineer. 44. Curb Level - The officially established grade of the curb in front of the mid-point of the lot. 45. Day Care Home, Licensed means the premises in which care is provided for a maximum of ten (10) children under sixteen (16) years of age with limited number of children under kindergarten age in accordance with K.A.R. 28-4-114(e)(1). This total includes children less than eleven (11) years of age related to the provider. 46. Child Care Center - means a non-residential facility in which care and educational activities are provided for thirteen (13) or more children two (2) weeks to sixteen (16) years of age for more than three (3) hours and less than twenty-four (24) hours per day including day time, evening, and nighttime care, or which provides before and after school care for school-age children. A facility may have fewer than thirteen (13) children and be licensed as a center if the program and building meet child care center regulations. 47. Day Care Home, Group - means the premises located in a single family dwelling unit where care is provided by two (2) providers, one of whom shall be a bona-fide resident of the, dwelling unit, in which care is provided for a maximum of twelve (12) children under sixteen (16) years of age with a limited number of children under kindergarten age in accordance with K.A.R. 28-4-114(f)(1). This total includes children under eleven (11) years of age related to the provider; and which is licensed and regulated through the Finney County Health Department by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment. 48. Distance - Horizontal distances unless otherwise designated. 49. District - A section or sections of the zoning jurisdiction for which the regulations governing permitted use of buildings and land, the height of buildings, the size of yards, and the intensity of use are uniform. 50. Dock (Loading) - A structure of which its height and primary purpose is to facilitate the loading and unloading of cargo and transportation vehicles. (See Article 23). 51. Dog: - Any canine species over one (1) year of age. 52. Drainage Course (Water Course) - Any natural depression, draw or ravine which directs and facilitates the flow of water. 53. Drive - A private right-of-way which affords principal means of vehicular access to or through a mobile home park, and which is owned and maintained by the owner or operator of the park. 54. Dwelling – A building that contains one or two dwelling units used, intended or designed to be used, rented, leased, let or hired out to be occupied for living purposes. 55. Dwelling, Single-Family - A building having accommodations for and occupied exclusive by one family. 56. Dwelling, Two-Family - A building having accommodations for and occupied exclusively by two families. 57. Dwelling, Multi-Family - A building having accommodations for and occupied by three or more families. 58. Dwelling Unit – A single unit providing complete, independent living facilities for one or more persons, including permanent provisions for living, sleeping, eating, cooking and sanitation. 59. Easement - A grant by a property owner to specific persons or to the public to use land for a specific purpose or purposes. Also, a right acquired by prescription. 60. Exception - An exception shall always mean the allowance of otherwise prohibited use within a given district, such use and conditions by which it may be permitted being clearly and specifically stated within this Zoning Regulation, and the allowance being granted by conditional use permit from the Board of Zoning Appeals. 61. Fabrication - That part of manufacturing which relates to stamping, cutting, or otherwise shaping processed materials into objects and may include the assembly of standard component parts, but does not include extracting, refining or other initial processing of basic raw materials. 62. Family - One or more persons related by blood or marriage or adoption, living together as a single housekeeping unit plus usual domestic servants; or a group of not more than four unrelated persons living together as a single housekeeping unit. 63. Feed Lot - The use of land for commercial dry lot, livestock feeding operations where any number of livestock or poultry are confined in a concentrated area for the distinct purpose of meat, milk or egg production, where the livestock or poultry are fed at the place of confinement and crop or foliage is not sustained in the area of confinement. Also included are any feeding endeavors which are operated on a contract basis. Not included in this definition are farm feeding operations which are an agricultural endeavor used for personal need, income supplement, and are a seasonal operation. Also not included are pasturing and grazing operations. 64. Fence - An un-roofing barrier or unroofed enclosing structure, including retaining walls. 65. Flood - A general and temporary condition of partial or complete inundation of normally dry land areas resulting from: (1) the overflow of inland or tidal waters, (2) the unusual and rapid accumulation or runoff or surface waters from any source. 66. Floodplain - That area of land subject to inundation of water as a result of what is commonly known as the 100-year flood. 67. Floodway - The channel of a river or other watercourse, and the adjacent portion of the floodplain that must be received in order to discharge the 100 year flood without cumulatively increasing the water surface elevation more than one (1) foot at any point assuming equal conveyance reduction outside the channel from the two (2) sides for the flood plain. 68. Floodway Fringe Area - The area of the floodplain, outside the flood way, that on an average is likely to be flooded once every one hundred (100) years (i.e., that has a one percent chance of flood occurrence in any one year). 69. Floor-Area - For computing off-street parking requirements, the floor area shall mean the gross area used or intended to be used by the owner or tenant for service to the public as customers, patrons or clients, including areas occupied by fixtures and equipment used for display It shall not include areas used principally for maintenance of the building, restrooms or utility rooms. 70. Foster Home - A facility licensed by the State of Kansas for the care of four (4) or less persons unrelated to the operator(s). 71. Foundation, Permanent - A site-built foundation, with or without basement, that meets or exceeds the foundation requirements of the Edition of the International Building Code (IBC) currently in effect by the County, and subsequent amendments thereto, that portion of which is incorporated by reference herein. 72. Front - The part or side of any building or structure facing the street or frontage road which is used as the basis for establishing the permanent address for the building or structure. 73. Frontage a. Street Frontage: All of the property on one side of a street between two intersection streets (crossing or terminating), measured along the line of the street; or if the street is dead-ended, then all of the property abutting on one side between an intersecting street and the dead-end of the street b. Lot Frontage: The distance for which the front boundary line of the lot and the right-of-way are coincident. 74. Garage - An accessory building designed or used for the storage of motor-driven vehicles owned and used by the occupant of the building to which it is an accessory. 75. Garage, Public - A building or portion thereof , other than a private or storage garage, designed or used for equipping, repairing, hiring, servicing, selling or storing motor-driven vehicles. 76. Garage, Storage - A building or portion thereof designed or used exclusively for housing four or more motor-driven vehicles, other than truck and commercial vehicles, pursuant to previous arrangement and not to transient, and at which no auto fuels are sold and no motor vehicles are equipped, repaired, hired or sold. 77. Governing Body - The Finney County Board of County Commissioners. 78. Grade - Grades for any building is the grade established by the

county building inspector and/or county engineer’s office. 79. Greenhouse - A translucent enclosure used for the cultivation or protection of tender plants. 80. Group Home - Any dwelling occupied by not more than ten (10) persons, including eight (8) or fewer persons with a disability who need not be related by blood or marriage and not to exceed two (2) staff residents who need not be related by blood or marriage to each other or to the residents of the home, which dwelling is licensed by a regulatory agency of the State of Kansas and complies with K.S.A. 12-736. 81. Hauling Trailer - A light-duty utility trailer intended for residential use, including open-bed small trailers designed to be towed behind a car or truck. 82. Hard-surfaced - Roadways shall be constructed with an all-weather County Road standard for paved surfaces as approved by the County Engineer. 83. Hazardous Waste - Any waste meeting the definition of K.S.A. 653430 and amendments thereto. 84. Highway - A street designated as a highway by an appropriate local, state or federal agency. 85. Highway, Limited Access - A freeway or expressway providing for through traffic in respect to which owners or occupants of abutting property or lands and other persons have no legal right of access to or from the same, except at such points and in such manner as may be determined by the public authority having jurisdiction over such trafficway. 86. Hobby Car Collecting - A pursuit other than one’s regular occupation, engaged in especially for relaxation, which results in collecting, and may include the restoration of, automobiles. Such a collection shall be managed by the householder so as not to resemble an automobile wrecking or salvage yard or junkyard. If any of the collected automobiles is inoperable, it shall be kept completely enclosed within a garage, shed, or privacy fence 87. Home Occupation - The term “Home Occupation” shall mean any occupation conducted entirely within the dwelling unit or accessory building and carried on only by persons residing in the dwelling unit, which use is clearly incidental and secondary to the use of the dwelling for dwelling purposes and does not change the residential character thereof, and in connection with which there is no display nor stocking trade or commodities sold except those which are produced on the premises. 88. Hospital - A building or group of buildings having room facilities for one or more abiding patients, used for providing services for the inpatient medical and surgical care of sick or injured humans, and which may include related facilities such as laboratories, out-patient department, training facilities, central service facilities, and staff offices; provided, however, that such related facilities must be incidental and subordinate to the main use and must be an integral part of the hospital operation. 89. Hotel - A building used as an abiding place on a daily or weekly basis for transient persons who, for compensation, are lodged with or without meals, whether such establishments are designated as a hotel, inn, automobile court, motel, motor inn, motor lodge, tourist cabin, tourist unit or otherwise. 90. Industrial Park - A special or exclusive type of planned industrial are designated and equipped to accommodate a community of industries, providing than with all necessary facilities and services in attractive surroundings among compatible neighbors. Industrial parks may be promoted or sponsored by private developers, community organizations, or governmental organizations. 91. Institutional Home - A place where the specialized care of babies, children, pensioners or older people, and those under care for drug or alcohol abuse, is provided, except those for correctional or mental cases. An Institutional Home shall in no way be interpreted to mean a Day Care Center. 92. Intensity - The degree or level of concentration to which land is used for commercial, industrial or any other nonresidential purpose 93. Junk - Old or scrap copper, brass, rope, rags, batteries, paper, trash, rubber debris, waste, or junked, dismantled, or wrecked motor vehicles, or parts thereof, iron, steel and other old or scrap ferrous or nonferrous material. 94. Junkyard - An establishment which is maintained, operated, or used for storing, keeping, buying, or selling junk, or for the maintenance or operation of a motor vehicle graveyard. This term shall include salvage yards. 95. Kennel, Boarding - Any place, area, building or structure where dogs (including those under one year of age) are boarded, housed, cared for, fed or trained by other than the owner. 96. Kennel, Breeder - Any place, area, lot, building or structure where more than four dogs are kept for any purposes. 97. Laboratory, Medical - An establishment which provides bacteriological, biological, medical, x-ray, pathological and other similar analytical or diagnostic services. 98. Landscaping - The improvement of a lot, parcel or tract of land with grass, shrubs and/or trees. Landscaping may include pedestrian walks, flowerbeds, ornamental objects such as fountains, statuary and other similar natural and artificial objects designed and arranged to produce an aesthetically pleasing effect. 99. Laundry - An establishment where commercial laundry and dry cleaning work is undertaken. 100. Laundry, Self-Service - An establishment equipped with individual coin-operated washing, drying and/or dry cleaning machines. 101. Loading Space or Loading Berth - A space within the main building or on the same lot as the main building providing for the standing, loading, or unloading of motor vehicles. 102. Lodging House - A building or place where lodging is provided or which is equipped regularly to provide lodging, by pre-arrangement for definite periods, for compensation, for three or more persons in contradistinction to hotels open to transients. 103. Lot - A parcel of platted land occupied or intended for occupancy by one main building together with its accessory buildings, including the open spaces required by this Zoning Regulation. 104. Lot Area - The area of a horizontal place bounded by the front, side and rear lot lines, excluding any road right-of-way or road easements. 105. Lot, Corner - A lot abutting upon two or more streets at their intersection. 106. Lot Coverage - The percentage of a lot which, when viewed directly from above, would be covered by a structure or structures or any part thereof, excluding projecting roof eaves. 107. Lot, Depth Of - The mean horizontal distance between the front and rear lot lines. 108. Lot, Double Frontage - A lot having a frontage on two non-intersecting streets as distinguished from a corner lot. 109. Lot Line - Any line bounding a lot or separating one lot from another. 110. Lot of Record - A lot which is a part of a subdivision, the map of which has been recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Finney County, Kansas. 111. Manufacture - Any method of processing, developing, fabricating, assembling, either raw materials, semi-finished materials or parts into a semi-finished or finished product. 112. Manufactured Home Pad - That portion of the manufactured home lot on which the manufactured home unit, and any attached awning, is placed. 113. Manufactured Home Park - An area, parcel, tract, or plot of ground equipped as required for support of manufactured homes and used or intended to be used by two or more occupied manufactured homes provided the manufactured home spaces shall not be sold or offered for sale individually. The term “manufactured home park” does not include sale lots on which unoccupied manufactured homes. whether new or used, are parked for the purpose of storage, inspection or sale 114. Manufactured Home Park Permit - A written document of certification issued by the Building Official permitting the construction, alteration or extension of a Manufactured Home Park. 115. Manufactured Home, Residential-Design (RDMH) - A manufactured home on a permanent foundation which has (a) minimum dimensions of 22 body feet in width, (B) a pitched roof, and (C) siding and roofing materials which are customarily on site-built homes. 116. Manufactured Home Sales Area - An open space, other than a street, used for display or sale of new or used manufactured homes and where no repair work is done except minor incidental repair of manufactured homes to be displayed and sold on the premises. 117. Manufactured Home Skirting - The enclosing of the area between the manufactured home and the ground with a material designed to obscure from view the chassis of a manufactured home. 118. Manufactured Home Subdivisions - A subdivision developed for the purpose of selling individual lots on which mobile homes, manufactured homes or modular homes may be located. 119. Minimum Building Elevation - Shall mean the elevation to which uses regulated by this resolution are required to be elevated or flood proofed. This elevation would be equal to the elevation that could be reached by the 100 year flood if it occurred under the conditions existing at the time this resolution was passed, plus one foot to allow for encroachments permitted by the establishment of a floodway. 120. Motor Home - A portable dwelling designed and constructed as an integral part of a self-propelled vehicle used for recreation. 121. Motor Vehicle - A motorized vehicle with rubber tires for use on highways, including passenger cars, pick-ups and trucks. 122. Motor Vehicle Graveyard - Any establishment which is maintained, used, or operated for storing, keeping, buying, or selling three (3) or more wrecked, scrapped, ruined, dismantled or inoperative motor vehicles; provided, however, such term shall not include any location where motor vehicle bodies are placed along stream banks for purposes of bank stabilization and soil erosion control, if such placement conforms with guidelines established by the Chief Engineer of the Division of Water Resources of the State Board of Agriculture and has been permitted accordingly. 123. Multi-Family Land Use - The use of any lot or tract of land for twofamily residential and/or multi-family dwellings. 124. Non-Conforming Lot - An unimproved lot which does not comply with the lot size requirements for any permitted use in the district in which it is located. 125. Natural Obstruction - Shall mean artificial obstructions, such as any dam, wall, wharf, embankment, levee, dike, pile, abutment, excavation, channel rectification, bridge, conduit, building structure, wire, fence, rock, gravel, refuse, fill, or other related structures or mater in, along, across or projecting into any floodway which may impede, retard, change the direction of the flow of water, or increase the flood height, either in itself or by catching or collecting debris carried by such water, or that is placed where the natural flow of the water would carry the same downstream to the damage or detriment of either life or property.


Sports

Golf: Wi leads at Pebble Beach Pro-Am. PAGE D4

Area preps: Holcomb stuns SW Heights, Ulysses wins behind Britton. PAGE D5

THE GARDEN CITY TELEGRAM

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

GCTelegram.com/Sports

SWKPrepZone.com

Clawing one out

Buffs go to OT for 57-54 win over Panthers. By BRETT MARSHALL

bmarshall@gctelegram.com

The Garden City High School boys basketball team has had its share of close games this season — and its share of close losses. So when the Buffaloes and Great Bend found themselves in overtime on Friday night at The Garden, one wondered just how this game would be play out. Rather than suffering another disappointing setback, the Buffs this time found the right combination in the four-minute extra period and produced a 57-54 homecoming victory over the Panthers. “I think just being able to hang with it, we’ve been here before and we knew what we had to do,” said GCHS coach Jacy Holloway afterward. “We just made some good plays and it’s nice to finish a game. We had our chances to put it away in regulation, but we did a lot of good things in overtime.” The victory improves the Buffs to 7-10 overall and more importantly puts them at 4-1 in the Western Athletic Conference, just one game behind leader Dodge City, which is up next at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday at The Garden. “It might not quite be the Hatchet Game, but it’s pretty close for us,”

Holloway said of the upcoming game with the Red Demons. “We’ve given ourselves an opportunity to battle for the league lead and that’s all you can ask.” Holloway said the Buffaloes were much more effective on the defensive end in the second half, especially in overtime as they forced four Great Bend turnovers that led to six of the 12 points in the four-minute period. “They do a good job and we always have a tough battle,” Holloway said of the Panthers and coach Chris Battin. “They’re wellcoached, they don’t turn it over much. You’ve got to be smart against them. They rarely beat themselves.” The game would have ended in regulation had it not been for a buzzertying bank shot by Great Bend’s Ethan Henderson that knotted the score at 45. Battin had called timeout with 2.1 seconds left when his first option on offense didn’t work. His second one did. Henderson had been a thorn in the Buffs’ side all night, as he grabbed 10 boards for the Panthers. Jake Curran, scoreless in the first half, answered the bell in the second, finishing with 19 points and grabbing a season-high 12 rebounds to pace the Buffs. He was 10-of-15 at the free throw line and scored nine of the team’s 12 points in the extra period. “I think we just started to buckle down more on Brad Nading/Telegram defense and that created some of the turnovers,” Holloway said of the over- Garden City High School’s Tristan Nanninga, center, drives the lane for a See OT, Page D3

Lady Buffs fade near end, but beat Lady Panthers, 37-31. By BRETT MARSHALL

bmarshall@gctelegram.com

David Upton might be welladvised to consider purchasing a heart monitor when he is sitting on the bench coaching the Garden City High School Lady Buffaloes. Just about the time Upton thinks his team has put a game away, the Buffs seemingly do everything just to get the other team back into contention. That was never more evident on Friday night, and Homecoming to boot, in the Lady Buffs’ 37-31 victory over Great Bend in Western Athletic Conference action at The Garden. “We got about one and a half good quarters tonight, but it was enough,” Upton said after watching his team improve to

basket over Great Bend’s Chad Touslee, left, Matt Marshall and Connor Sell, right, Friday at The Garden.

4-1 in the WAC and 11-6 overall. “We just seem to fizzle out at some points in the game, and it’s as much about making mistakes as anything. We do a number of really good things and then we just get in a hurry and don’t pay attention.” After a first half that was close for much of the 16 minutes, with the Lady Buffs holding a 1715 lead, they put together their best quarter of the night in the third, owning a 13-0 dominating effort that had Upton pleased and the team comfortably ahead, 30-15. With five minutes remaining and still up by 14, 32-18, Great Bend then made its run at the Lady Buffs. The Lady Panthers scored 11 unanswered points to pull within three, 32-29, at the 2:15 mark before Taryn Tempel snapped the drought with a fastbreak layup with 2:01 to play. Great Bend’s Morgan Harwood countered with a bucket with 1:48 to go before three free throws in the final 1:30 by Garden iced the victory. In the first half, neither team

Lakin boys, girls beat Elkhart By KEVIN THOMPSON sports@gctelegram.com

LAKIN — On a night when a state title team was being honored, Lakin looked to use that symbiotic energy to its advantage. The girls maybe found some of that energy of the past as they came back to defeat Elkhart 45-42 in a Hi-Plains League game. Despite jumping out to a 15-9 lead after the first quarter, during which Elkhart had trouble finding the basket, the Lady Broncs saw that lead quickly disappear in the second. After going up 19-11 at the 6:50 mark, Lakin went over six minutes before scoring, during which time they saw the Lady Wildcats take a 24-21 lead into halftime. Lakin battled back in the second half in what became a seesaw battle the rest of the way. They chipped away at the Elkhart lead midway into the final period and tied it at 39-39 when Kara Simmons nailed a three with 2:28 to play. Elkhart could only manage three free throws the rest of the way while Lakin scored six more points in a variety of ways for the win. See Win, Page D3

Broncs honor ‘02 title team By KEVIN THOMPSON sports@gctelegram.com

but the turnover bug was biting both teams. The Lady Buffs had

Ten years ago, the Lakin High School boys basketball team accomplished something no other team before them nor since can claim. The Broncs put together a perfect, magical season to capture the state 3A title at the Hutchinson Sports Arena, capping a 26-0 run through the 2001-02 season and leaving an imprint on the memories of the Lakin community. Players and coaches were reunited and recognized between varsity games Friday night in the gym that opened in 2000 and on which they made school history just a year later with a state title. In its tournament run, Lakin defeated Oakley, Holcomb and Oberlin in sub-state. Averaging 66 points a game that season, in the state tournament they rolled over Wichita Collegiate 77-44 and Riley County 75-57 to reach the finals, where they defeated Beloit 54-50 for the crown. The four-point win was the closest anyone came to the Broncs all season since a 66-62 win over

See Lady Buffs, Page D3

See Honor, Page D3

Brad Nading/Telegram

Garden City High School’s Taryn Tempel, right, ties up Great Bend’s Hannah Hildebrand in the backcourt and forces a turnover on Friday at The Garden. could generate any consistency on offense. It wasn’t so much that the team’s defenses were effective,

D

McGruder, Kansas State ready for road matchup with Texas By ARNE GREEN

Special to The Telegram

Associated Press

Texas Tech forward Jaron Nash, left, and Kansas State center Jordan Henriquez chase a loose ball during the second half of aBig 12 conference game on Tuesday. Kansas State won and heads to Austin, Texas, for a matchup with the Longhorns today.

Rodney McGruder is making a habit of putting his best foot forward against Texas. Fortunately for the Kansas State Wildcats, that foot appears to be healing just in time. McGruder, slowed by an infected blister in home victories last Saturday over Texas A&M and Tuesday against Texas Tech, should be good to go when the Wildcats travel to Austin, Texas, for their second go-round with Texas at 1 p.m. today in the Frank Erwin Center. “He feels better, health-wise,” K-State coach Frank Martin said of McGruder, who scored a careerhigh 33 points in the Wildcats’ 84-80 victory over the Longhorns on Jan. 18. “He was awful from a health standpoint, how he felt in the Texas A&M game. “He felt better against Tech and he feels a lot better (Thursday).” By winning twice at Bramlage Coliseum, K-State improved to 17-6 overall and 6-5 in the Big 12. Texas (15-9, 5-6) also has won two in a row.

McGruder, who leads the Wildcats with 14.6 points a game, had just five on 1-for-9 shooting against Texas A&M, his lone single-digit scoring game in Big 12 play. He came back with 10 points in 23 minutes and made both of his 3-point attempts Tuesday as the Wildcats beat Texas Tech, 6546. “I have just been listening to Frank and the trainers,” McGruder said Thursday. “Frank has been trying to get me through it. “I just listen to advice from guys who know what they’re talking about. Previously, I have been in a lot of pain, but now it’s getting a lot better.” It’s hard to imagine McGruder being better than he was in the first meeting with Texas, when he went 11-of-17 from the field, including 4-of-6 from 3-point range, and grabbed eight rebounds. He also had 22 points against the Longhorns last year. “D.C. guys like Texas, I guess,” said K-State senior forward Jamar Samuels, another Washington, D.C., native, who battled foul trouble and still scored 14 points in

24 minutes the last time against the Longhorns. “I know Mike (Beasley) had at least 18-plus points a game against them when he was here. “Rodney is always well prepared against Texas and it really shows. I know that he is amped up for this game and everyone else is, too.” K-State has won three straight against Texas and four of the last five. Another big game from McGruder could go a long way toward extending the streak. “I hope it happens again,” Martin said. “There is nothing more I would like to see than him scoring somewhere between 22 and 33 points a game. That would be a god-send. “Rodney has been pretty consistent for us in his ability to score. He is really important to us.” In the first Texas game, KState also got 11 points each from Thomas Gipson and Will Spradling. J’Covan Brown had 22 points, but made just 8 of 28 shots for Texas, while Sheldon McClellan scored 19 off the bench and point guard Myck Kabongo added 14 points and 10 assists.


D2

Scoreboard

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

THE Garden City Telegram

Scores & More PROFESSIONAL National Basketball Association By The Associated Press EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Philadelphia 18 9 .667 — Boston 14 12 .538 3.5 New York 12 15 .444 6 Toronto 9 19 .321 9.5 New Jersey 8 20 .286 10.5 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 20 7 .741 — Atlanta 18 9 .667 2 Orlando 16 11 .593 4 Washington 5 22 .185 15 Charlotte 3 23 .115 16.5 Central Division W L Pct GB Chicago 23 6 .793 — Indiana 17 9 .654 4.5 Milwaukee 12 14 .462 9.5 Cleveland 10 15 .400 11 Detroit 8 20 .286 14.5 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 18 9 .667 — Dallas 16 11 .593 2 Houston 16 11 .593 2 Memphis 14 13 .519 4 New Orleans 4 23 .148 14 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 20 6 .769 — Portland 15 12 .556 5.5 Denver 15 12 .556 5.5 Utah 13 11 .542 6 Minnesota 13 14 .481 7.5 Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 16 8 .667 — L.A. Lakers 15 12 .556 2.5 Phoenix 11 15 .423 6 Golden State 9 14 .391 6.5 Sacramento 10 16 .385 7 ——— Friday’s Games Chicago 95, Charlotte 64 Toronto 86, Boston 74 Atlanta 89, Orlando 87, OT Miami 106, Washington 89 L.A. Clippers 78, Philadelphia 77 Milwaukee 113, Cleveland 112, OT Detroit 109, New Jersey 92 Portland 94, New Orleans 86 Dallas 104, Minnesota 97 Memphis 98, Indiana 92 New York 92, L.A. Lakers 85 Oklahoma City at Utah, night Saturday’s Games L.A. Clippers at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Denver at Indiana, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Cleveland, 6:30 p.m. New York at Minnesota, 7 p.m. San Antonio at New Jersey, 7 p.m. Portland at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Phoenix at Sacramento, 9 p.m. Sunday’s Games L.A. Lakers at Toronto, noon Chicago at Boston, 2:30 p.m. Washington at Detroit, 5 p.m. Miami at Atlanta, 6 p.m. Houston at Golden State, 8 p.m. Utah at Memphis, 8:30 p.m. COLLEGE MEN Big 12 Standings School Conf Overall Missouri 9-2 22-2 Kansas 9-2 19-5 Baylor 8-3 22-3 Iowa State 7-4 17-5 Kansas State 6-5 17-6 Texas 5-6 15-9 Oklahoma State 5-6 12-12 Oklahoma 3-8 13-10 Texas A&M 3-8 12-11 Texas Tech 0-11 7-16 ——— Tuesday’s Games Oklahoma State 69, Iowa State 67 Kansas State 65, Texas Tech 46 Wednesday’s Game Kansas 68, Baylor 54 Today’s Games Baylor at Missouri, 12:30 p.m. Kansas State at Texas, 1 p.m. Oklahoma State at Kansas, 3 p.m. Texas A&M at Iowa State, 3 p.m. Oklahoma at Texas Tech, 7 p.m. Monday’s Games Iowa State at Baylor, 6 p.m. Kansas at Kansas State, 8 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Texas A&M at Texas Tech, 6 p.m. Texas at Oklahoma, 7 p.m. Oklahoma State at Missouri, 8 p.m. ——— COLLEGE WOMEN Big 12 Standings School Conf Overall Baylor 11-0 24-0 Texas A&M 8-3 17-5 Oklahoma 7-4 15-7 Kansas 6-5 17-6 Kansas State 6-5 15-8 Oklahoma State 5-6 13-7 Iowa State 5-6 14-8 Texas Tech 5-7 17-7 Texas 3-6 13-8 Missouri 0-12 10-13 ——— Wednesday’s Games Iowa State 65, Missouri 52 Oklahoma State 53, Texas Tech 49 Kansas 85, Texas 61 Texas A&M 67, Kansas State 36 Today’s Games Missouri at Oklahoma, 2 p.m. Texas A&M at Baylor, 5 p.m. Oklahoma State at Texas, 7 p.m. Sunday’s Games Kansas at Kansas State, Noon Iowa State at Texas Tech, 1:30 p.m. Monday’s Game Connecticut at Oklahoma, 8 p.m. Tuesday’s Game Texas A&M at Missouri Wednesday’s Games Kansas at Iowa State, 7 p.m. Kansas State at Oklahoma, 7 p.m.

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On Tap

Today

Pro Soccer — 6:30 a.m., ESPN2, English Premier League, Manchester United vs. Liverpool. College Basketball — 10 a.m., ESPN2, Butler at Cleveland State; 11 a.m., ESPN, Louisville at West Virginia; 12 p.m., CBS, Connecticut at Syracuse; ESPN2, Arkansas-Little Rock at Middle Tennessee State; 12:30 p.m., FOX, Baylor at Missouri; CW, South Carolina at Arkansas; 1 p.m., ESPN, Kansas State at Texas; FSN, Utah at Arizona; 2 p.m., New Mexico State at Utah State; 3 p.m., FOX, Oklahoma State at Kansas; CW, Tennessee at Florida; ESPN, Maryland at Duke; FSN, California at UCLA; 4 p.m., ESPN2, Wichita State at Creighton; 5 p.m., ESPN, Michigan State at Ohio State; 6 p.m., ESPN2, Alabama at LSU; 8 p.m., ESPN, Kentucky at Vanderbilt; ESPN2, Xavier at Temple. Women’s College Basketball — 5 p.m., FSN, Texas A&M at Baylor. Pro Golf — 2 p.m., CBS, AT&T Pebble Beach National ProTexas Tech at Texas, 7 p.m. Baylor at Oklahoma State, 7 p.m. Sunday’s Games Kansas at Kansas State, Noon Iowa State at Texas Tech, 1:30 p.m. Monday’s Game Connecticut at Oklahoma, 8 p.m. Tuesday’s Game Texas A&M at Missouri Wednesday’s Games Kansas at Iowa State, 7 p.m. Kansas State at Oklahoma, 7 p.m. Texas Tech at Texas, 7 p.m. Baylor at Oklahoma State, 7 p.m. ——— JUNIOR COLLEGE Jayhawk Conference Men’s West Division Standings Con. All W L W L Seward County 8 2 20 4 Barton 7 3 21 3 Colby 6 3 18 5 Hutchinson 6 4 19 5 Cloud County 5 4 15 8 Garden City 5 5 17 7 Dodge City 3 7 15 9 Butler 2 7 8 15 Pratt 1 8 10 13 ——— Wednesday’s Games Hutchinson 71, Garden City 64, OT Cloud County 79, Pratt 57 Seward County 74, Colby 69 Barton 83, Dodge City 81 Today’s Games Barton at Garden City, 7:30 p.m. Pratt at Seward County, 8 p.m. Colby at Dodge City, 7:30 p.m. Hutchinson at Butler, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Garden City at Colby, 8 p.m. Dodge City at Pratt, 8 p.m. Seward County at Cloud County, 8 p.m. Butler at Barton, 8 p.m. ——— Women’s West Division Standings Con. All W L W L Hutchinson 10 0 23 0 Seward County 8 2 19 4 Cloud County 7 3 16 7 Garden City 6 4 14 10 Barton 5 5 15 9 Butler 3 6 14 9 Colby 3 6 7 16 Pratt 2 7 12 11 Dodge City 0 10 8 16 ——— Wednesday’s Games Hutchinson 84, Garden City 58 Cloud County 76, Pratt 63 Seward County 64, Colby 44. Barton 76, Dodge City 55 Today’s Games Barton at Garden City, 5:30 p.m. Pratt at Seward County, 6 p.m. Colby at Dodge City, 5:30 p.m. Huchinson at Butler, 5:30 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Garden City at Colby, 6 p.m. Dodge City at Pratt, 6 p.m. Seward County at Cloud County, 6 p.m. Butler at Barton, 6 p.m.

GOLF PGA-Pebble Beach Scores By The Associated Press Friday p-Pebble Beach Golf Links, 6,816 yards; Par 72 m-Monterey Peninsula CC, Shore Course, 6,838 yards; Par 70 s-Spyglass Hill Golf Club, 6,953 yards; Par 72 Pebble Beach, Calif. Purse: $6.4 million Second Round Charlie Wi 61m-69p — 130 Dustin Johnson 63p-72s — 135 Brian Gay 69s-65m — 134 Vijay Singh 68p-68s — 136 Danny Lee 63p-73s — 136 Padraig Harrington 68m-66p — 134 Brendon Todd 67p-69s — 136 Josh Teater 64m-71p — 135 Hunter Mahan 65m-70p — 135 Greg Owen 68s-67m — 135 Brian Harman 64p-73s — 137 Jason Kokrak 68m-67p — 135 Phil Mickelson 70s-65m — 135 Kevin Na 66s-69m — 135 Ken Duke 64p-73s — 137 Joseph Bramlett 66m-69p — 135 Ryan Moore 72s-64m — 136 Tiger Woods 68s-68m — 136 Richard H. Lee 65m-71p — 136 Ricky Barnes 70s-66m — 136 Robert Garrigus 68m-69p — 137 D.A. Points 72s-65m — 137 Jonas Blixt 70p-69s — 139 Rocco Mediate 71s-66m — 137 Roland Thatcher 71p-68s — 139 Jimmy Walker 69s-68m — 137 Bob Estes 67s-70m — 137 Roberto Castro 70m-68p — 138 Tommy Gainey 72s-66m — 138 Chez Reavie 68m-70p — 138 Aaron Baddeley 66m-72p — 138 Jim Furyk 69s-69m — 138 Spencer Levin 69m-69p — 138

Daniel Summerhays Mark D. Anderson Steven Bowditch Chris Stroud Pat Perez Geoff Ogilvy Kevin Stadler Alex Cejka D.J. Trahan Kevin Streelman Zach Johnson Arron Oberholser Nick Watney Bud Cauley Joe Ogilvie Russell Knox Troy Kelly Miguel Angel Carballo James Driscoll Bobby Gates Derek Lamely Sam Saunders Tim Petrovic Davis Love III Sean O’Hair Mathew Goggin Charley Hoffman Sang-Moon Bae Shane Bertsch George McNeill Bryce Molder Brendan Steele Martin Laird Chris Riley Hunter Haas Kevin Chappell Graham DeLaet Chris Couch Ian Poulter J.J. Henry Kyle Reifers John Mallinger Ryuji Imada Stuart Appleby Ryan Palmer Jason Bohn Matt Every Neal Lancaster Cameron Tringale Matt Bettencourt Troy Matteson Jeff Maggert Brett Wetterich Gary Christian Brian Davis Kris Blanks Nathan Green Will Claxton Billy Horschel Charlie Beljan Patrick Sheehan Tom Pernice Jr. Kevin Sutherland John Huh David Mathis Heath Slocum Matt McQuillan Harris English Blake Adams Steve Wheatcroft Kevin Tway Lee Janzen Kent Jones Scott Dunlap Dudley Hart Mike Weir Billy Hurley III Boo Weekley Tom Gillis Jarrod Lyle Kyle Thompson Matt Jones Nick O’Hern Woody Austin Bill Lunde Mitch Lowe Martin Flores Kevin Kisner John Peterson Garth Mulroy Rickie Fowler Zack Miller Rod Pampling J.B. Holmes Chris DiMarco Steve Flesch William McGirt Scott Langley Trevor Immelman Scott Stallings Rory Sabbatini Scott Brown Notah Begay III Marco Dawson Vaughn Taylor J.J. Killeen Garrett Willis Edward Loar David Duval Alexandre Rocha Ted Potter, Jr. Paul Goydos Sunghoon Kang Tim Herron Scott McCarron

Am, third round, from Pebble Beach, Calif. Rugby — 2:30 p.m., NBC, USA Sevens, from Las Vegas.

Sunday

Pro Hockey — 11:30 a.m., NBC, Washington Capitals at New York Rangers. College Basketball — 12 p.m., CBS, Illinois at Michigan; ESPN, St. John’s at Georgetown; 2 p.m., FSN, Bradley at Missouri State; 4:30 p.m., FSN, Washington at Oregon State; 6:30 p.m., FSN, Stanford at USC. Women’s College Basketball — 12 p.m., FSN, Kansas at Kansas State. Pro Basketball — 2:30 p.m., ABC, Chicago Bulls at Boston Celtics; 6 p.m., ESPN, Miami Heat at Atlanta Hawks; 8:30 p.m., Utah Jazz at Memphis Grizzlies. Pro Golf — 2 p.m., CBS, AT&T Pebble Beach National ProAm, final round, from Pebble Beach, Calif. Rugby — 3:30 p.m., NBC, USA Sevens, from Las Vegas.

65m-73p — 138 69p-71s — 140 71s-67m — 138 67m-72p — 139 67m-72p — 139 70m-69p — 139 69s-70m — 139 71p-70s — 141 70s-69m — 139 70m-69p — 139 67m-72p — 139 70s-69m — 139 66s-73m — 139 73s-66m — 139 68p-73s — 141 68s-71m — 139 71s-68m — 139 69m-71p — 140 73s-67m — 140 72p-70s — 142 74p-68s — 142 72m-68p — 140 70m-70p — 140 70s-70m — 140 68p-74s — 142 69m-71p — 140 67m-73p — 140 68s-73m — 141 68p-75s — 143 73p-70s — 143 67m-74p — 141 73p-70s — 143 70s-71m — 141 69m-72p — 141 72s-69m — 141 71s-70m — 141 66p-77s — 143 72p-71s — 143 69m-72p — 141 68m-73p — 141 69m-72p — 141 70s-71m — 141 67m-74p — 141 72p-71s — 143 72p-71s — 143 70p-73s — 143 68p-75s — 143 69m-73p — 142 71s-71m — 142 73s-69m — 142 71p-73s — 144 70m-72p — 142 70m-72p — 142 72s-70m — 142 70p-74s — 144 70m-72p — 142 66m-76p — 142 69m-73p — 142 70m-72p — 142 70p-74s — 144 72s-70m — 142 72s-70m — 142 70s-72m — 142 71s-71m — 142 70s-73m — 143 74p-71s — 145 73s-70m — 143 75s-68m ��� 143 74s-69m — 143 69p-76s — 145 72p-73s — 145 72s-71m — 143 71p-74s — 145 71p-74s — 145 70p-75s — 145 70m-73p — 143 70p-75s — 145 73m-71p — 144 74p-72s — 146 69m-75p — 144 72p-74s — 146 73s-71m — 144 73p-73s — 146 67m-77p — 144 73p-73s — 146 72m-72p — 144 73p-73s — 146 75m-70p — 145 70s-75m — 145 73p-74s — 147 69m-76p — 145 72p-75s — 147 68m-77p — 145 70m-75p — 145 73s-72m — 145 72p-75s — 147 69m-76p — 145 73p-74s — 147 73s-73m — 146 71s-75m — 146 69m-77p — 146 71p-77s — 148 77s-69m — 146 74p-74s — 148 75s-72m — 147 67m-80p — 147 77p-72s — 149 77s-70m — 147 73s-74m — 147 74p-76s — 150 77m-72p — 149 73p-78s — 151 75p-77s — 152 74p-78s — 152 74s-76m — 150

Colt Knost Paul Stankowski Daniel Chopra Arjun Atwal Tommy Biershenk Steve Jones Gavin Coles Steve Elkington

75m-75p — 150 76s-75m — 151 74m-77p — 151 74s-77m — 151 78p-75s — 153 77m-80p — 157 76p-83s — 159 73p — WD

HOCKEY National Hockey League By The Associated Press EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L OT Pts N.Y. Rangers 34 13 5 73 Philadelphia 31 16 7 69 New Jersey 31 19 4 66 Pittsburgh 30 19 5 65 N.Y. Islanders 22 23 8 52 Northeast Division W L OT Pts Boston 33 17 2 68 Ottawa 28 22 7 63 Toronto 28 21 6 62 Buffalo 24 24 6 54 Montreal 22 24 9 53 Southeast Division W L OT Pts Florida 25 17 11 61 Washington 28 21 5 61 Winnipeg 26 24 6 58 Tampa Bay 23 24 6 52 Carolina 20 25 11 51 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division W L OT Pts Detroit 37 17 2 76 St. Louis 32 14 7 71 Nashville 32 18 5 69 Chicago 29 18 7 65 Columbus 15 33 6 36 Northwest Division W L OT Pts Vancouver 34 15 5 73 Colorado 28 25 3 59 Minnesota 25 21 8 58 Calgary 25 22 8 58 Edmonton 21 28 5 47 Pacific Division W L OT Pts San Jose 29 16 6 64 Los Angeles 26 19 10 62 Phoenix 26 21 8 60 Dallas 28 23 3 59 Anaheim 21 24 9 51 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Friday’s Games Buffalo 3, Dallas 2, SO Detroit 2, Anaheim 1, SO Colorado 4, Carolina 3, OT Chicago at San Jose, night Saturday’s Games Nashville at Boston, night Florida at New Jersey, night Los Angeles at N.Y. Islanders, night N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, night Edmonton at Ottawa, 1 p.m. Winnipeg at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Montreal at Toronto, 6 p.m. Colorado at St. Louis, 7 p.m. Columbus at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Chicago at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m. Vancouver at Calgary, 9 p.m. Sunday’s Games Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 11:30 a.m. Florida at N.Y. Islanders, 2 p.m. Anaheim at Columbus, 5 p.m. Los Angeles at Dallas, 5 p.m. Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. San Jose at St. Louis, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Detroit, 6:30 p.m.

PREPS BASKETBALL Friday’s Scores Boys Garden City 57, Great Bend 54 (OT) Ulysses 68, Goodland 33 Ingalls 35, Spearville 33 Cimarron 55, Wichita County 53 (OT) Lakin 52, Elkhart 46 Meade 69, Minneola 52 Stanton County 50, Satanta 18 Syracuse 57, Sublette 55 Girls Garden City 37, Grat Bend 31 Holcomb 57, SW Heights 44 Hugoton 43, Scott City 35 Lakin 45, Elkhart 42 Meade 66, Minneola 40 Stanton County 47, Satanta 39 Sublette 44, Syracuse 28 Moscow 38, Rolla 25 Ulysses 66, Goodland 36 Ingalls 47, Spearville 44 By The Associated Press BOYS

Today College Men’s Basketball — 7:30 p.m., Barton at Garden City. College Women’s Basketball — 5:30 p.m., Barton at Garden City. Prep Boys Basketball — 8 p.m.,

Abilene 59, Wamego 48 Andale 51, Wellington 36 Andover 44, McPherson 43 Andover Central 57, GoddardEisenhower 43 Attica 57, Norwich 46 Baileyville-B&B 55, Centralia 49 Basehor-Linwood 70, KC Piper 39 Beloit 64, Russell 39 Berean Academy 32, Hutchinson Trinity 17 Bern 61, Washington County 50 Bishop Carroll 60, Wichita West 48 Bonner Springs 54, Mill Valley 45 Buhler 52, El Dorado 51, OT Burrton 40, Stafford 24 BV Northwest 58, Bishop Miege 46 BV West 51, Blue Valley Southwest 41 Cheney 73, Douglass 70 Clearwater 33, Circle 19 Concordia 52, Chapman 34 Conway Springs 71, Wichita Independent 37 Derby 58, Maize 57 DeSoto 51, Paola 32 Doniphan West 68, Horton 66 Emporia 72, Highland Park 56 Garden Plain 46, Belle Plaine 43 Hays-TMP-Marian 74, Quinter 33 Hesston 50, Nickerson 48, OT Hill City 73, Smith Center 58 Hoisington 54, Ellinwood 33 Holcomb 61, Southwestern Hts. 53 Holton 64, Jefferson West 53 Hutchinson 43, Wichita Campus 42 Inman 55, Moundridge 53 Jefferson North 62, Immaculata 53 Junction City 52, Shawnee Heights 42 KC Harmon 73, KC Wyandotte 60 KC Sumner 83, Atchison 32 LaCrosse 47, Central Plains 40 Lakeside 39, Thunder Ridge 34 Lansing 62, KC Turner 41 Lawrence 72, Olathe North 51 Liberal 52, Hays 40 Lincoln 43, Tescott 33 Lyons 56, Kingman 52 Manhattan 45, Topeka Seaman 34 Marion 62, Bennington 59 Natoma 56, Northern Valley 54 Nemaha Valley 62, Perry-Lecompton 28 Neodesha 59, Eureka 35 Newton 60, Salina South 46 Olathe Northwest 66, Olathe East 52 Olathe South 49, Lawrence Free State 44 Onaga 57, Axtell 45 Osage City 51, Olpe 47 Ottawa 63, Louisburg 26 Phillipsburg 68, Osborne 27 Pratt 61, Haven 38 Remington 42, Ell-Saline 40 Sabetha 43, Santa Fe Trail 37 Scott City 83, Hugoton 43 Sedgwick 62, Canton-Galva 30 Silver Lake 48, Rossville 38 SM East 49, SM Northwest 37 SM South 56, Leavenworth 53 SM West 66, SM North 59 Smoky Valley 56, Hillsboro 42 Southeast Saline 51, Minneapolis 36 Southern Coffey 55, Marmaton Valley 34 St. Thomas Aquinas 58, Blue Valley Stilwell 51 Tonganoxie 50, KC Bishop Ward 40 University Academy, Mo. 65, St. James Academy 47 Valley Center 53, Goddard 43 Washburn Rural 50, Topeka 48 Wichita East 69, Kapaun Mount Carmel 61 Wichita Heights 83, Wichita Northwest 61 Wichita North 67, Wichita South 54 Wichita Trinity 68, Chaparral 35 Wilson 71, Pike Valley 48 Word of Life 64, Macksville 52 Augusta 73, Winfield 69 GIRLS Andover Central 76, GoddardEisenhower 38 Atchison 60, KC Sumner 49 Atchison County 59, Troy 26 Beloit 51, Russell 34 Bennington 51, Marion 44, OT Berean Academy 62, Hutchinson Trinity 42 Bishop Carroll 77, Wichita West 24 Buhler 68, El Dorado 42 Burrton 55, Stafford 21 Central Heights 51, Anderson County 41

Deerfield at Lakin. Prep Girls Basketball — 6:30 p.m., Deerfield at Lakin. Prep Wrestling — 2 p.m., Great West Activities Conference meet, Holcomb.

Chase County 61, Wichita Home School 39 Circle 42, Clearwater 28 Concordia 41, Chapman 30 Conway Springs 43, Wichita Independent 26 Douglass 33, Cheney 30 Ell-Saline 43, Remington 42 Fairfield 42, Pretty Prairie 36 Frankfort 51, Blue Valley 46 Garden Plain 54, Belle Plaine 27 Green Co., Ky. 67, Sunrise Christian 57 Hanover 52, Valley Heights 50 Hays 64, Liberal 33 Hays-TMP-Marian 57, Quinter 34 Hesston 50, Nickerson 34 Highland Park 51, Emporia 50 Hillsboro 57, Smoky Valley 32 Hoisington 55, Ellinwood 26 Holcomb 57, Southwestern Hts. 44 Holton 54, Jefferson West 24 Hope 42, Little River 38, OT Hoxie 81, Oberlin-Decatur 18 Hugoton 43, Scott City 35 Hutchinson 70, Wichita Campus 40 Jackson Heights 52, McLouth 33 Junction City 33, Shawnee Heights 32 Kapaun Mount Carmel 65, Wichita East 48 Lebo 34, Burlingame 24 Lincoln 75, Tescott 16 Maize 65, Derby 53 Manhattan 40, Topeka Seaman 38 Marais des Cygnes Valley 55, Mission Valley 43 Marysville 47, Clay Center 36 McPherson 47, Andover 28 Medicine Lodge 45, Bluestem 38 Minneapolis 58, Southeast Saline 52, OT Moundridge 40, Inman 21 Natoma 41, Northern Valley 16 Nemaha Valley 39, Perry-Lecompton 25 Newton 48, Salina South 38 Norwich 61, Attica 24 Olpe 61, Osage City 26 Otis-Bison 41, Ness City 29 Pike Valley 50, Wilson 38 Pratt 40, Haven 38 Rawlins County 52, Norton 29 Republic County 50, Ellsworth 36 Sabetha 60, Santa Fe Trail 54 Sedgwick 46, Canton-Galva 23 Silver Lake 63, Rossville 46 Smith Center 79, Hill City 35 Southern Coffey 63, Marmaton Valley 25 St. John 60, Victoria 27 St. John’s Beloit 53, Chase 35 St. John’s Military 57, Wichita Northfield 42 Sublette 44, Syracuse 28 Thunder Ridge 46, Lakeside 22 Topeka 50, Washburn Rural 46 Topeka Hayden 41, Topeka West 40 Valley Center 38, Goddard 20 Wallace County 53, Triplains-Brewster 37 Wamego 50, Abilene 35 Washington County 65, Bern 43 Wellington 47, Andale 43 Wetmore 50, Clifton-Clyde 24 Wichita Heights 64, Wichita Northwest 23 Wichita South 37, Wichita North 26 Winfield 41, Augusta 30 Word of Life 65, Macksville 33 WRESTLING Thursday Hugoton 48, Ulysses 30 106—Zach Miller, U forfiet 113—Jason Perez, U forfeit 120—Luis Mendoza, U dec. Edgar Villa, 6-5. 126—Logan Livengood, H fall, Adrian Ochoa. 132—Zane Littell, H fall, Boomer Seabolt. 138—Genesis Martinez, H, forfeit. 145—Lawson Fiss, H fall, Juan Anguiano. 152—Razzy Morales, U dec. Patrick Weaver, 3-2. 160—Bradley Campbell, H fall, Charles Garnette. 170—Ty Haller, H, forfeit 182—Armando Sandoval, U, fall, Austin Harper. 195—Michael Salas, U forfeit. 220—Colton Lissolo, H, forfeit. 285—Alfredo Licon, H, fall Steven Degollado.

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THE Garden City Telegram

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

OT: Garden City boys win, 57-54 Continued from Page D1

time. “Being in the right spots creates those opportunities. Defending home court is big.” Holloway was less than thrilled with his team’s early defense when the Panthers were able to break free for four easy fastbreak layups in taking a 13-8 first-quarter lead. “We were just out there, we lost guys and didn’t know exactly where we were supposed to be,” Holloway said. “We talked about that at halftime and I think got it straightened out better.” The Buffs got strong efforts from a variety of players, but junior Bo Banner came up big, too, scoring 10 points and grabbing five rebounds. Junior Austin Terpstra duplicated those numbers, making 3-of-5 field goals and 4-of-6 at the line. Great Bend got a game-high 20 points from Jace Bowman, including four 3-pointers. The

Win: Lakin boys, girls both top Elkhart Continued from Page D1

Panthers’ long-range bombers were 7-of-15 for the game behind the arc. The Panthers, though, were only 5-of-12 at the free throw line. Both teams committed 14 turnovers in the game. Great Bend falls to 5-10 overall and 1-4 in the WAC. ———

Great Bend 13 8 13 11 9 — 54 Garden City 8 15 12 10 12 — 57 Great Bend (54) — Sell 2-6 0-0 5, Marshall 1-5 0-0 2, Touslee 6-10 1-1 13, Beck 0-1 0-0 0, Bowman 7-15 2-4 20, Henderson 3-5 1-5 7, Cain 2-4 0-0 6, Bayless 0-1 0-0 0, Warren 0-0 1-2 1. Totals 21-46 5-12 54. Garden City (57) — Riggs 0-0 0-0 0, Holguin 1-4 0-0 3, Nanninga 1-2 0-0 2, Coyle 0-0 0-0 0, Banner 4-8 0-0 10, Keller 0-0 0-0 0, Terpstra 3-5 4-6 10, Parr 1-1 0-0 2, Delgado 0-0 0-0 0, Curran 3-14 10-15 19, Taylor 1-6 1-2 3, Ensz 3-3 0-0 6. Totals 17-43 15-23 57. 3-point goals—Great Bend 7-15 (Sell 12, Marshall 0-2, Bowman 4-8, Cain 2-3), Garden City 6-14 (Holguin 1-1, Banner 2-2, Curran 3-11). Rebounds—Great Bend 30 (Henderson 10), Garden City 33 (Curran 12). Turnovers—Great Bend 14, Garden City 14. Fouls—Great Bend 17, Garden City 9. Fouled out—Great Bend (Sell, Henderson).

Brad Nading/Telegram

Garden City High School’s Jake Curran, left, pulls up for a shot past Great Bend’s Connor Sell Friday at The Garden.

Lady Buffs: GCHS girls beat Great Bend Continued from Page D1

nine turnovers in the opening half which was mirrored exactly by the Lady Panthers. Garden jumped off to an early 7-2 lead and Great Bend (2-15, 1-4) responded to tie it at 7 before Taryn Tempel’s driving layup with 3 seconds left in the first period made it 9-7. Then, it was Great Bend’s turn, getting 3point baskets from Regan

Unruh and McKenna Mauler to put the Lady Panthers on top, 15-11, midway through the second. Tempel then answered with a 3-point bucket from the right wing, and added a traditional 3-point play with 2:05 to go on another driving layup and a free throw. That made it 17-15 at the break. Tempel finished with a game-high 17 points and Kristen Heiman added 12 to pace the Lady Buffs.

Crosby scored nine points to lead Great Bend’s scoring. The turnovers mostly cancelled each other out, Great Bend with 22 and Garden City with 21. In the team’s earlier meeting in Great Bend, the Lady Buffs managed to survive a cold-shooting night to prevail, 45-41. ——— Great Bend 7 8 0 16 — 31 Garden City 9 8 13 7 — 37 Great Bend (31) — Schneider 0-4 0-0 0, Bayse 0-5 3-3 3, Henning 0-0 0-1 0, Hildebrand 0-0 0-0 0, Kel. Doll 0-0 0-0

0, Kutina 0-4 4-4 4, Unruh 1-1 0-0 3, Kay. Doll 0-2 0-0 0, Mauler 2-8 0-0 6, Steuder 1-1 0-3 2, Harwood 2-3 0-0 4, Crosby 4-7 0-0 9. Totals 10-35 7-11 31. Garden City (37) — McClelland 1-3 1-2 3, Curran 0-1 0-0 0, Heiman 4-12 4-5 12, Campbell 0-1 1-2 1, Brunson 1-2 0-0 2, Tempel 6-10 3-5 17, Miller 0-0 0-0 0, Heatwole 0-1 0-0 0, Bernbeck 0-3 2-4 2, Hinde 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 12-34 11-18 37. 3-point goals—Great Bend 4-12 (Schneider 0-1, Bayse 0-4, Unruh 1-1, Kay. Doll 0-1, Mauler 2-3, Crosby 1-2), Garden City 2-6 (Heiman 0-4, Tempel 2-2). Rebounds—Great Bend 22 (Kutina 7), Garden City 29 (Bernbeck 6). Turnovers—Great Bend 22, Garden City 21. Fouls—Great Bend 15, Garden City 12. Fouled out—none.

Honor: Broncs celebrate ‘02 boys title team Continued from Page D1

Scott City in the third game of that season. Coach Roger Reed, two assistant coaches, nine seniors and three juniors comprised the team now immortalized in Lakin lore. “All the pieces were there,” Reed said. “I felt for a couple of years that there was that potential with that team. We had good height, good size, good quickness, two excellent guards. If you were trying to hand pick a team, those were all the elements that you would want.” The pressure of going undefeated was there, he said, but sometime into the season he gave the team back some control in the locker room and gave up some of the strict rules he was used to doing. That seemed to keep the guys loose. As long as they worked hard on the court, he said, he gave them more autonomy off it. “I coached 30 years at the high school level, and I can honestly say I have never had as complete a team as that one with all the elements,” Reed said. After moving on to Andover and Andover Central, Reed said he coached a few more seasons, but now he’s just fine being a high school counselor in Circle. But he remembers well the great crowds from his Lakin days. Crowd support was great during that season, he added. It was always good, but that year it was especially hard to find a seat, even in Lakin’s

D3

much-larger newer gym. Senior Jarrod King had said 10 years ago in the school annual, “Coming into this year, there were very high expectations from everyone included in the program. Anything less than a state title is considered a failure.” Derek Ramos added, “When we were growing up we had a lot of hype. I remember when I was younger, everyone was telling me that if we stick to it, we would be the best team to come out of Lakin.” Team members honored included Quint Ana, Brady Fuller, King, Ramos, Cris Bird, Nate Woodrow, Bo Richardson, Nick Hall, Tyler Riedl (all seniors on that squad), Deven Hammerschmidt, Jess Holmes and Carlen Collins (juniors). Joining Reed were former coach Larry Dasenbrock and current girls coach Shawn Michaelis, who was in his second year at Lakin then. Dasenbrock’s sons Kyle and Kevin (currently a junior with the Broncs) were the ball boys. Jake Edgington, Sklyer McKinley and Michael Bowser were the student managers.

Game rewind Brady Fuller’s opening tip and a 7-0 run got Lakin off to a quick start. A Jarrod King 3-pointer gave them a 17-8 lead at one point before settling for a 19-12 lead at the end of the opening period. Lakin hit a snag in the second

period, going scoreless for the first 2:40, while Beloit cut the lead down to five. Ramos and Hammerschmidt scored the last seven points of the half and Lakin led 23-23 at the break. Beloit tied the game with an 8-3 run to open the second half. It was tied again at 48-48 with 3:10 left in the game. With the team rattled somewhat by the atmosphere and the pressure, Reed said he told the team “to calm down, keep their pose and show the character that got them here. With three minutes left, Fuller hit a three “from Yoder,” as television announcer Rick Thomaczek called it at the time. It was first eyeballed at 23 feet but later revised to 26. Fuller finished the Lakin scoring by hitting 1-of-2 free throws with 17 seconds left. Ramos grabbed a final rebound and threw to Fuller to run out the clock. Fuller told the Lakin Independent after the game, “Our crowd was a big key for us all year. When things would go good, they would be cheering, and even when things didn’t go so good their cheers would help motivate us to pull us through, as was the case tonight.” “This was the most mentally tough team I have ever coached,” Reed said after that game. “They all worked hard, not just the starters but the reserves. I can’t say enough about this bunch of men.”

Lakin shot just 17of-55 from the floor, but Elkhart was cold as well, shooting only 14-of48, and the Broncs won the battle of the boards 39-23. Simmons and Karlee Davidson led Lakin with eight points each, while Elkhart (8-9) was led by Lacy Bookstore with 10, all from the field. It just wasn’t the Wildcats’ night, though the effort was there, coach Lorrie Wright said. “We’ve been improving and working together well. Tonight I felt like we just couldn’t hit a basket. If we would have had just one person hot, it would have been a whole different story,” Wright said. Nineteen turnovers didn’t help the cause much, either, but Wright said that’s something they’ve dealt with all season. For Lakin coach Shawn Michaelis, this was another close but welcome win. “Our girls play hard from start to finish,” he said. “It comes down to making key plays, and they’ve been doing that better lately.” This win was a total team effort, he said, especially since nobody really had a hot hand. “We’ve been playing better here lately. You always want to be playing your best this close to substate. So far we’ve been taking steps in that direction. We just need to keep doing that,” Michaelis said. Lakin (7-10) hosts Deerfield tonight in the second annual Kearny County Shootout. ——— Elkhart 9 15 9 9 — 42 Lakin 15 6 11 13 — 45 Elkhart (42) — Kali Hoskinson 2 1-2 5, Fullerton 2 2-4 6, Bookstore 5 0-0 10, Brewer 0 8-10 8, White 1 0-0 2, Thomason 2 1-2 5, Strothman 2 2-2 6. Totals 14 14-20 42. Lakin (45) — Williams 0 3-4 3, Hill 3 0-2 7, Davidson 4 0-0 8, Haney 2 0-0 4, Simmons 3 1-2 8, Rogers 2 1-4 5, Watkins 1 2-2 4, Armstrong 1 0-2 2, Richter 1 2-2 4. Totals 17 9-18 45. 3-point goals — Elkhart 0, Lakin 2 (Hill 1, Simmons 1).

Boys ■ Lakin 52,

Elkhart 46 On the boys’ side, maybe a little halftime inspiration from the 2002 boys championship team ceremony got the Broncs on the right track as they overcame a six-point deficit to grab a 52-46 win over the Wildcats. Lakin took advantage of some poor shooting from the Wildcats in the third quarter (one early free throw and two late field goals) to pull to within two at that break. Then they outscored Elkhart 20-12 in the final

quarter to get the comeback win. Bryant Miller led the Lakin charge with 16 of his game-high 20 points in the second half, including three 3-pointers. Cole Parks led all scorers with 23 points, including 10 in the second to give Elkhart its lead. Alex Gomez added 11. Broncs coach Steve Davidson said a more intense defense and more aggressive offense in the second half turned things around for his team, especially in a game that had seven ties and 16 lead changes. “It was one of those games where you’re never comfortable, by any means. But I think we turned it up defensively and with rebounding in the second half.” Elkhart’s defense had his Broncs standing around too much in the first half, Davidson said, so they made adjustments at halftime. The adjustments seemed to work. Lakin also outrebounded a taller Elkhart team 32-22, 18 of those in the second half. In that critical third quarter meltdown by Elkhart, Davidson said all the Broncs had to do was step up the defensive intensity. “We were allowing them to get shots off easily in the first half, so we changed our intensity,” he said. “They were missing some easy shots, but hopefully it’s because we were attacking them more.” Khris Buckner said his team’s third-quarter shooting woes have been occurring the past few games and he’s not sure what the answer is. “When we’re on, we’re on. When we’re not, we miss a lot of baskets, especially underneath with a lot of ‘gimmes’ and put-backs,” he said. “That really hurts. We missed 12 or 14 tonight three feet or closer.” Despite the low shooting output (16-of-47), Buckner credits his team (8-9, 2-5) with playing hard the entire game. “But it’s the little things that we’re not doing, and Lakin did it. Give the credit to them,” he said. Lakin is now 7-10 (4-3 in league play) and will face Deerfield tonight in the second annual Kearny County Shootout. ——— Elkhart 12 17 5 12 — 46 Lakin 12 11 9 20 — 52 Elkhart (46) — Gomez 4 1-2 11, Coen 1 2-2 4, Parks 7 4-5 20, Winger 1 1-3 3, Harbour 2 0-0 5, Moreno 1 0-0 3. Totals 16 8-12 46. Lakin (52) — Shalberg 2 0-0 4, Miller 7 3-4 20, Davidson 2 2-2 6, Sauer 0 1-2 1, Kinnier 2 1-2 5, Chavez 2 1-1 5, Rosales 1 2-4 4, Armstrong 1 0-2 2, Geubelle 2 1-2 5. Totals 19 11-19 52. 3-point goals — Elkhart 6 (Gomez 2, Parks 2, Harbour 1, Moreno 1), Lakin 3 (Miller 3).

After loss, Murray St. must regroup quickly By COLIN FLY

AP Sports Writer

Murray State coach Steve Prohm wishes he could take back one thing he said following the ninth-ranked Racers’ first loss of the season. “We’re having an amazing run is what I would’ve loved to have said instead of ‘we had,”’ Prohm told The Associated Press on Friday. “We’re 23-1. We’re in first place in our conference. We’re ranked in the top 10 in the country in two different polls. “We’re in the top 50 in RPI. We’re having an amazing run, and we’ve got a lot more basketball to play.” Prohm said his challenge following Thursday night’s 72-68 loss to Tennessee State is to lift up his disappointed team quickly. The Racers play Austin Peay (9-17, 6-6 Ohio Valley Conference) on Saturday night. “The games come quick, so you’ve got to learn from it, get bet-

ter and be ready to play because you don’t want to bring one loss to make two,” Prohm said. “You want to get back on the winning track as soon as possible.” Murray State guard Jewuan Long said he felt Racers “let a lot of people down in life” after losing for the first time this season. “We enjoyed being undefeated, we enjoyed going into every game trying to get an extra win. We enjoyed the run,” Long said. “If anything, it’s just going to make us more hungry, more focused, and we’ll be ready to go by Saturday and every other game. “We don’t want to have this feeling again, so we want to do whatever it takes to not have this feeling.” Murray State can’t afford to have that feeling again, at least not too many times. The Racers need one more conference victory to clinch at least a tie for

first place. The OVC’s top two teams get automatic byes into the conference tournament semifinals. While Murray state has three wins over opponents in the RPI’s top 100, the school’s own RPI continues to fall due to a lack of quality opponents coming up. The Ohio Valley Conference hasn’t sent two teams to the tournament since 1987 even though the conference representative has won its first game in each of the last three seasons, including Murray State’s victory over Vanderbilt in 2010. Racers forward Ivan Aska isn’t too concerned. “In a way, (I’m) glad we lost ahead of time than way in the tournament or somewhere,” he said. After playing the Governors, Murray State (23-1, 11-1) travels to Southeast Missouri State on Wednesday before hosting No. 16 St. Mary’s on Saturday in the marquee BracketBuster game on national television.

They’ll continue to rely on point guard Isaiah Canaan, who scored 31 points against Tennessee State. The Racers built a 13-point second-half lead against the Tigers before it crumbled with poor play down the stretch and several mistakes in the final minute. Prohm said he’s disappointed they couldn’t close out the Tigers with a big lead, but that he expects his team to be ready to go beginning with a late afternoon practice Friday before facing the Governors Saturday night. “It’s an important game, because the undefeated streak is great, but our first goal is to win a conference championship. It was never to go undefeated,” Prohm said. “You just hate the fairy tale to end because of what it was doing to this community, the exposure for this university with just so many flocking to the great little town of Murray. “It was awesome.”

Associated Press

Murray State’s Latreze Mushatt covers his head with a towel and watches near the end of the second half of a loss to Tennessee State on Thursday.


D4

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

the Garden City Telegram

Wi opens up 3-shot lead at Pebble, Tiger sits six back PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. (AP) — On a day when sunshine gave way to a light rain, two things stayed the same Friday at the Pebble Beach National Pro-Am. Charlie Wi was still atop the leaderboard, and Tiger Woods didn’t hole enough putts to make up ground. Wi escaped most of the rain at Pebble Beach, where he holed a wedge from the 13th fairway for eagle and limited the damage to a bogey on his final hole for a 3-under 69 that allowed him to open a three-shot lead. Dustin Johnson was caught off guard by the rain in the worst way. He stood in the fourth fairway at Spyglass with a short-sleeve shirt, hands thrust in his pocket, as his caddie sent a friend running up the hill to the parking lot to retrieve his rain gear. His short game let him down, and the two-time Pebble champion had to settle for a 72 that put him three back. Padraig Harrington had a 66 at Pebble Beach and was among those tied for third. Harrington had five birdies in a six-hole stretch early in his round, the exception coming at the par-5 sixth. Woods, meanwhile, again looked poised to make a move over at Monterey Peninsula. He missed a 5-foot birdie putt on No. 9 and failed to make birdie on the par-5 10th when he pulled his second shot into the gallery. He had to settle for a 2-under 68, leaving him six behind. Along the way, he stung his wrist hitting out of a divot and said

Associated Press

Charlie Wi follows his shot off the 17th tee of the Pebble Beach Golf Links during the second round of the Pebble Beach National Pro-Am golf tournament on Friday in Pebble Beach, Calif. he had to pop it back into the joint. “No big deal,” he said. The bigger deal was putting. Woods took 33 putts on the Shore Course, which he attributed to leaving the ball in the wrong spot — mostly above the hole — and struggling with greens he felt were getting slightly more bumpy as a mist turned into a light rain. “It’s very close,” said Woods, playing this event for the first time in 10 years. “I got my ballstriking to where I feel very comfortable hitting the shots. I just need to make a couple of putts to get on a roll.” Phil Mickelson struggled in sunshine. In rain, he ran off five birdies for a 65 at Monterey

Peninsula that put him five shots behind. “I don’t know what happened, but I started to play a lot better and make some birdies,” said Mickelson, a threetime winner at Pebble. “In the perfect conditions, I struggled. But to play these golf courses in such great condition either way has been a lot of fun.” Wi was at 12-under 130 and now heads to Spyglass Hill, which has played slightly tougher than the other two courses. In these shifting conditions, Spyglass played about two shots harder than it did Thursday, while Pebble Beach and Monterey Peninsula were about one shot more difficult than the day before.

Only 56 players broke par, compared with 87 in the opening round. That would explain what was going through Wi’s mind when he set off at Pebble Beach, knowing the course gave up a pair of 63s in the opening round. It sure didn’t feel that easy. “I thought Pebble played really difficult today,” Wi said. “The greens were very firm, and the guys that shot 8 or 9 under out there, I was very surprised how well they played. Some of the pins were really tricky. I said, ‘Gosh, how did they shoot 9 under out there?’ And for me to shoot 3 under today, I was very pleased.” Wi figured it out toward the end of the way, as the light rain

swept over the peninsula. During the practice round, he hit a driver and a 9-iron on the ninth hole. It was his final hole Friday, and he hit a driver and a hybrid. That didn’t work out so well. He pulled his approach into a crevice of thick rough, chopped out over the green and only a good pitch to tapin range helped him avoid something worse than a bogey. Vijay Singh had a 68 at Spyglass Hill and Brian Gay had a 65 at Monterey Peninsula to join Harrington among those at 8-under par. Hunter Mahan, fresh off his one-week journey to the Middle East for the Qatar Masters, had a 70 at Pebble Beach and was in the group at 7-under par, along with Mickelson. Woods looked sharp at times, drilling a 5-iron to 7 feet for birdie on the opening hole, narrowly missing an 8-foot eagle attempt at No. 6 and making a second straight birdie on the par-3 seventh from about 15 feet. But he didn’t make up any ground, losing one shot to par compared with the leaders. Next up for Woods is Pebble Beach, where he usually plays his best. Woods still remembers the 63-64 weekend in 1997, when he finished one shot behind Mark O’Meara. Woods also had a 64 in the final round of 2000 to rally from five shots behind. He has three rounds of 64 or better on the fabled course during the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am. The last time he played Pebble Beach was the U.S. Open in 2010,

where he bogeyed five of his opening 10 holes to fall out of contention. His game was in disrepair at the time. It now is on an upward swing, and the putting is all that controls how quickly he gets back. “I’m hitting good putts,” Woods said. “I’m not displeased with my putting at all. I just didn’t hit the ball in the right spots to give myself the right looks. If we were putting smooth greens, it would be a totally different deal.” Johnson was tied for the lead with backto-back birdies to close out the back nine at Spyglass. He bogeyed the par-3 third from about 12 feet away just behind the green, then three-putted for bogey at the par-3 fifth. “I played really well yesterday. I played good today,” Johnson said. “I just (threw) away some shots. I hit some poor pitch shots, just really bad. They weren’t even pitch shots. They were dink chips, ones that you’re trying to hole. And I just hit them terrible.” Johnson will have a chance to make up ground Today at Monterey Peninsula, which has produced the lowest scores this week. Woods, meanwhile, settles in at Pebble Beach with the celebrity rotation, the day that CBS Sports typically spends as much time on the antics of actors and comedians as the golfers. That shouldn’t be a big distraction, though. Woods tees off early on the back nine, away from all the action.

Area boys: Ulysses crushes Goodland; Syracuse beats Sublette By The Telegram

■ Ulysses 68,

Goodland 33 At Ulysses, the Tigers exploded offensively at a pace that Goodland could not match and came away with a 68-33 victory Friday night in Great West Activities Conference action. Senior Kyle Zerr made his presence felt for Ulysses as he led all scorers with 23 points, including three 3-pointers. ——— Goodland 12 7 10 4 — 33 Ulysses 21 16 22 9 — 68 Goodland (33) ­ — Gag. Ihrig 1 2-2 5, Gan. Ihrig 1 6-7 8, Hillmer 4 0-0 9, Bellamy 2 3-5 7, Smith 1 2-2 4. Totals 9 13-16 33. Ulysses (68) — Degollado 1 0-0 3, Newell 2 2-2 7, Rodriguez 1 0-0 2, Porras 1 0-0 2, J. Mendoza 4 1-2 10, Kissell 6 0-0 12, Walters 1 0-0 3, Zerr 10 0-0 23, Jarnagin 1 0-0 2, Meierhoff 1 0-0 2, Annis 1 0-0 2. Totals 29 3-6 68. 3-point goals — Goodland 2 (Gag. Ihrig 1, Hillmer 1), Ulysses 7 (Degollado 1, Newell 1, J. Mendoza 1, Walters 1, Zerr 3).

■ Stanton County 50,

Satanta 18 At Satanta, Stanton County was in a groove from the first whistle and pulled away for a 5018 win over the Indians in Hi-Plains League action. Jacob Cron was the leading scorer with 11 points for Stanton County, which is now 106 on the year.

——— Stanton County 12 17 14 7 — 50 Satanta 2 6 4 6 — 18 Stanton County (50) — Logan 2 2-3 6, Holliday 3 0-0 9, Molina 2 0-0 5, Ellis 0 12 1, Cron 5 0-0 9, Trujillo 1 2-2 4, Sierra 4 0-0 8, Dominguez 1 2-4 4, Overturf 1 0-0 2. Totals 19 7-11 50. Satanta (18) — Mason 2 0-0 4, Miller 1 0-0 2, Leggett 2 0-0 4, Abernathy 2 0-0

4, Alvarado 1 0-0 2, Colantonio 1 0-0 2. Totals 9 0-0 18. 3-point goals­ — Stanton County 5 (Holliday 3, Molina 1, Cron 1), Satanta 0.

■ Syracuse 57,

Sublette 55 At Sublette, the Bulldogs used a fourthquarter comeback to grab a 57-55 victory from Sublette in Hi-Plains League action. The contest saw several lead changes and 15 3-point baskets. Kyle Dupree led Syracuse in scoring with 16 points, including three 3-pointers. The Bulldogs also got 15 points from Erik York, who sank four 3-pointers of his own, and 12 points from Gary Parks. Sublette’s Taylor Williamson finished with 17 points and Alex White ended with 16 points. ——— Syracuse 17 14 7 19 — 57 Sublette 14 10 18 13 — 55 Syracuse (57) — Howell 1 1-3 3, Parks 4 0-2 12, Barnes 0 2-2 2, Dupree 6 0-0 16, English 0 3-4 3, York 5 3-4 15, Romero 2 0-0 4, Coleman 1 0-0 2. Totals 19 9-15 57. Sublette (55) — Leverett 1 0-0 3, White 7 0-0 16, Rigel 2 0-2 4, Gesling 2 1-2 5, Williamson 7 3-5 17, Cearley 2 0-0 6, Line 1 0-0 2, Gonzalez 1 0-0 2. Totals 23 4-9 55. 3-point goals — Syracuse 10 (Parks 4, Dupree 4, York 2), Sublette 5 (Leverett 1, White 2, Line 1, Gonzalez 1).

■ Cimarron 55,

Wichita County 53 At Leoti, in an overtime thriller, the Cimarron Bluejays rallied from a seven-point halftime deficit to beat the Wichita County Indians 55-53 in HiPlains League action. Sophomore Randy

Allen scored 14 points to lead Cimarron, which is now 9-8 for the season. Wichita County, now 7-7 this season, got 22 points from Gabe Martinez. ——— Cimarron 9 10 16 10 10 — 55 Wichita County 15 11 11 8 8 — 53 Cimarron (55) — Franzitta 4 3-5 12, Ca. Fischer 3 2-5 8, Ch. Fischer 0 2-3 2, Boersma 4 2-2 10, Meis 1 0-2 2, Allen 7 0-3 14, Fairbank 1 1-1 3, Neuschafer 2 0-1 4. Totals 23 10-22 55. Wichita County (53) — Gallegos 1 0-0 2, Budde 6 4-8 16, Fletcher 1 0-1 2, G. Martinez 6 8-10 22, Kreutzer 3 3-4 10, Day 0 1-3 1. Totals 17 16-26 53. 3-point goals — Cimarron 1 (Franzitta 1), Wichita County 3 (G. Martinez 2, Kreutzer 1).

back in the fourth quarter to defeat South Central 6160 Friday night. Down by one after three periods, the Rebels used a 14-12 final period to get the narrow win. Trenton Holloway had 16 points to lead South Gray, and Tate Skinner added 11.

——— South Central 19 10 19 12 — 60 South Gray 16 17 14 14 — 61 South Central (60) — Jarnagin 26, Mounts 15, McCleary 6, Westrup 6, Underwood 6, Alexander 2. Total 60.

South Gray (61) — Holloway 16, Skinner 11, Watkins 9, Skidmore 9, Marens 8, Tyler 6, Clancy 2. Total 61.

■ Ingalls 35,

Spearville 33 At Ingalls, the Bulldogs hung on to defeat Spearville 35-33 for their third straight win. Ingalls did not allow a single point to Spearville in the first quarter of play, leading 11-0. Spearville whittled away at that lead the

rest of the game but fell just short. Both Zach Batman and Nathan Hale scored ten points to lead Ingalls, who is now 4-11 on the year. ——— Spearville 0 9 7 17 — 33 Ingalls 11 6 5 13 — 35 Spearville (33) — Gunkel 2 0-0 4, Heiland 4 5-7 14, Wright 0 1-2 1, Stein 1 0-0 2, Stein 2 8-10 12. Totals 9 1419 33. Ingalls (35) — Vanderree 2 1-2 7, Miuershaski 1 2-2 4, Batman 5 0-1 10, Irsik 0 2-4 2, Mahan 0 2-2 2, Hale 4 2-2 10. Totals 12 9-13 35.

■ Meade 69,

Minneola 52 At Meade, the undefeated season continued as the top-ranked Meade Buf faloes defeated Minneola 69-52. A 42-22 first half provided the cushion for the Buffaloes, now 16-0 on the season. Meade was led in scoring by Randy Friesen, who came up with 17 points. Gunner Cordes ended with 14 points, and Morgan Davis finished with 13 points. Minneola got 23 points from Brandy Shumate. ——— Minneola 11 11 19 11 — 52 Meade 21 20 10 18 — 69 Minneola (52) — Shumate 23, McClaren 4, Stewart 4, Britt 7, Patrick 6, Esplund 6. Meade (69) — Little 8, Hardaway 3, Cordes 14, Wiens 9, Davis 13, Friesen 17, Pfanenstiel 5. 3-point goals — Minneola 5 (Shumate 3, Britt 2), Meade 4 (Little 1, Cordes 1, Davis 1, Pfanenstiel 1).

■ South Gray 61,

South Central 60 At Montezuma, the South Gray Rebels came

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Hometown Sports

Area girls: Holcomb stuns Heights; Britton lifts Ulysses By The Telegram

â&#x2013;  Holcomb 57,

SW Heights 44 At Kismet, the visiting Holcomb Lady Longhorns handed the top-ranked and undefeated Lady Mustangs their first loss of the season, 57-44 Friday night. Holcomb had a big first half and fourth quarter, outscoring Southwestern Heights 43-24 in those three quarters. The Longhorns had three girls in double figures, led by Kyshia Prieto with 19. Karissa Pena had 14 and Taylor Deniston 11 in the big win. Sheree Ryan and Rebi Jacobs led Heights with 15 and 10 points, respectively, as the Lady Mustangsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; dream of an undefeated season came to an end. Both teams are in the same sub-state and could meet up again. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Holcomb 10 15 14 18 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 57 SW Heights 5 9 20 10 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 44 Holcomb (57) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Pfeifer 1 0-0 3, Prieto 6 7-9 19, Heydman 0 2-2 2, Mongeau 1 2-2 4, Deniston 5 1-2 11, Amos 2 0-0 4, Pena 7 0-0 14. Totals 22 12-15 57. SW Heights (44) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; LaPoint 0 1-2 1, Jacobs 3 3-6 10, Garinger 1 1-2 3, Couch 1 0-0 3, Coats 1 0-2 2, Loya 0 26 2, Ryan 7 1-4 15, Stout 3 2-4 8. Totals 16 10-26 44. 3-point goals â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Holcomb 1 (Pfeifer), SW Heights 2 (Jacobs 1, Couch 1).

â&#x2013;  Sublette 44,

Syracuse 28 At Sublette, the Lady Larks used consistent scoring to build a lead and then cruise past Syracuse 44-28 on Friday in Hi-Plains League action. Daryan Whaler had a big night for Sublette as she scored 18 points and was helped by Katelyn Marlinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 12 points to make up most of Subletteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scoring. Caitlyn Horton led the Lady Bulldogs with eight points in balanced Lady Bulldog scoring. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Syracuse 4 8 9 7 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 28 Sublette 13 8 14 9 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 44 Syracuse (28) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Perez 1 0-0 2, Rash 0 0-2 0, Norton 1 0-1 3, C. Horton 3 2-3 8, Wilson 1 0-0 3, Pollart 1 0-0 2, Platt 1 0-0 2, R. Horton 0 2-2 2, Baeza 1 4-6 6. Totals 9 8-14 28. Sublette (44) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Marlin 4 4-4 12, Aragon 0 1-3 1, Ornelas 2 3-6 7, Cooley 2 0-1 4, E. Whaler 1 0-0 2, D. Whaler 8 2-2 18. Totals 17 10-16 44. 3-point goals â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Syracuse 2 (Norton 1, Wilson 1), Sublette 0.

D5

THE GARDEN CITY TELEGRAM

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

Audrey Baker and Janessa Lowenthal led Scott City in double figures with 13 and 10 points, respectively. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Scott City 5 13 11 6 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 35 Hugoton 13 11 12 7 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 43 Scott City (35) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Hoeme 1 1-2 4, Wycoff 1 0-0 2, Nickel 1 4-6 6, Baker 4 2-4 13, Lowenthal 4 2-2 10. Totals 11 9-14 35. Hugoton (43) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Hoskinson 3 0-0 6, Parsons 1 4-7 7, Mueller 2 0-0 4, Kinser 3 0-1 6, Easton 2 1-3 5, Ramsey 4 1-2 9, Armendariz 3 0-3 6. Totals 18 6-16 43. 3-point goals â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Scott City 4 (Hoeme 1, Baker 3), Hugoton 1 (Parsons).

â&#x2013;  Ulysses 66,

Goodland 36 At Ulysses, the Lady Tigers had no trouble handling Goodland as Ulysses blew away the Cowgirls 66-36 Friday night. Kaylea Brittonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 33 points, including five 3-pointers, led to the huge Tiger win in a Great West Activities Conference game. Freshman Carolina Gallegos also helped do damage for Ulysses as she was also in double figures with 11 points. Ulysses hit nine 3â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the rout. Mâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Lynn Hinger was the only Cowgirl in double figures with 13 points as Goodland already trailed by 26-14 after the first quarter. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Goodland 12 7 9 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 36 Ulysses 26 11 20 9 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 66 Goodland (36) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bedore 0 2-4 2, Be. White 2 0-2 4, Br. White 2 0-0 5, Winston 1 0-0 2, Hinger 6 1-3 13, Mayer 3 1-2 8, Siruta 1 0-0 2. Totals 15 4-11 36. Ulysses (66) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gallegos 4 0-0 11, Westover 2 0-0 4, Bohl 2 0-2 4, Langley 2 1-2 5, Chavez 2 0-0 5, Davidson 2 0-0 4, Britton 14 0-0 33. Totals 28 1-4 66. 3-point goals â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Goodland 2 (Br. White 1, Mayer 1), Ulysses 9 (Gallegos 3, Chavez 1, Britton 5).

â&#x2013;  Meade 66,

Minneola 40 At Meade, the Lady Buffaloes used a 35-16 second half to blow out Minneola 66-40 Friday night. Minneola scored in double figures in just one quarter, while Meade scored at least 11 points in every period. Kinzie Friesen and Hannah Miller led Meade with 16 and 14 points, respectively. Meade also had help from Tarah Wiens with 11 points to help the Lady Buffaloes move to 10-6 on the season. Krista Walker led Minneola with 20 points.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Minneola 6 18 8 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 40 Meade 18 13 11 24 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 66 Minneola (40) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Wilczek 2, Schneweis 4, Minor 9, Walker 20, Harrington 5. Total 40. Meade (66) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Olvera 8, Wiens 11, Miller 14, Rudzik 4, DeVine 2, Cook 8, Friesen 16, Harshberger 1, Moshier 2. Total 66.

â&#x2013;  Ingalls 47,

Spearville 44 At Ingalls, the top ranked Lady Bulldogs had a big scare from Spearville Friday night but came away with a 47-44 win. Ingalls was lackluster early in the game and had to come back from six points down at halftime and outmanuever the Lady Lancers in the second half for a nailbiting win on homecoming night. Leading the Lady Bulldogsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; was Tara Whipple, who scored 13 of her game-high 25 points in the second half. Sarage Kistler led Spearville with 21 points but Spearville was outscored 26-17 in the second half to let a win slip away. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Spearville 15 12 8 9 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 44 Ingalls 11 10 12 14 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 47 Spearville (44) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; E. Slattery 1 0-0 2, Elizabeth Stein 1 0-0 2, Helfrich 2 0-0 4, Rabe 2 1-4 6, Kistler 6 7-8 21, Offerle 1 2-4 4, Elle Stein 2 1-5 5. Totals 15 11-21 44. Ingalls (47) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Droste 3 2-2 8, Estrada 1 0-0 3, Whipple 11 3-8 25, Galaviz 1 0-0 2, R. Wyatt 1 1-2 3, Bleumer 3 0-1 6. Totals 20 6-13 47. 3-point goals â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Spearville 3 (Rabe 1, Kistler 2), Ingalls 1 (Estrada).

GCRC Briefs Spring soccer registration Registration is open for spring soccer leagues with the Garden City Recreation Commission. The registration deadline is Thursday â&#x20AC;&#x201D; late registrations will be accepted, but players will be assigned as space permits. To register, visit the Garden City Recreation office at 310 N. Sixth St. Registrations include a signed liability release, ethics code pledge and $19 fee. The fee must be paid when registering, or when turning in a scholarship form. Teams play a six-game schedule on Saturdays and Sundays over a span of three to four weeks. Age groups

GCRC Scores

are based on playerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s age as of July 31, 2011. If interested in coaching or officiating, contact the GCRC office. For more information, contact Jared Rutti, sports director, at 276-1200.

place on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday nights. For more information, contact sports director Jared Rutti at 276-1200.

Spring volleyball leagues

softball

Information packets for menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spring volleyball league are available now at the GCRC office. The season will begin with a double-elimination tournament to place teams into divisions, followed by a 10-game regular season. The fee is $140 per team and registration deadline is March 12. Games will take

Co-ed adult Information packets on spring coed softball league are available now at the GCRC office. There is a $160 team fee, as well as a $10 player fee. Registration is due by March 12. The season spans eight games, beginning March 20. For more information, contact sports director Jared Rutti at 276-1200 or email him at jrutti@gardencity.org.

BASKETBALL Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Feb. 2 Wolfpack 46, Old Fashion Limo 33 Tim & Jerry Auto 42, Buffalo Mill Supply 40 Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Upper Feb. 1 El Rancho 68, Teeters 40 Purple Cobras 76, EB Tires 53 Monday Purple Cobras 92, Teeter 51

EB Tire 51, Bayer Crop Science 42 Brakey Farms 84, CCS 40 Wednesday El Rancho 68, EB Tires 65 Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lower Feb. 1 GCPU 67, A&C Rentals/Western 52 Monday El Con 53, Beastmode 42 Cracked Concept 54, Western 53 Golden Plains 74, Tatro 49 Wednesday

American Implement 53, Tatro 42 El Con 55, A&C Rentals/Western 44 5th and 6th Girls Feb. 4 Extreme 20, Shooting Stars 8 Runnin Rebels 11, Wildcats 8 Havoc 25, Jaguars 10 Sunday Runnin Rebels 22, Shooting Stars 10 Havoc 18, Wildcats 2 Extreme 13, Jaguars 3

Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Indoor Soccer Week 3 Alianza 10, Chivas 2 Athletico Madrio 12, GC United 1 Alianza 8, AAA Pawnshop 2 El Tri 8, GC Force 3 Limeno 5, Celaya 2 I Coleoterri 9, Unknown 4 Chivas 9, Soccer Studs 3 Athletico Balboa 5, The Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 3

Boys Basketball Week 2 5th & 6th Grade Jayhawks 36, Nemechek Construction 18 Celtics 26, Clippers 13 Bobcats 29, Garden City Thunder 13 Tha Beast 21, TEETER 16 Wildcats 20, Busters 8 St. Hawks 41, Foley Equipment 6 Tha Beast 31, Shooters 30

JR Audio 24, GC Lakers 23 3rd & 4th Grade: Week 2 Knoll Farms 26, Edith Scheuerman Lions 6 Jennie Barker Bobcats 20, Tornadoes 0 Longhorns 10, The Wolfpack 1 Reichmeier Farm, 11, Panthers 10 The Hurricanes 16, Champs 13 Edith Scheuerman Tigers 18, Rebels 2 Wolverines 13, Swish 6

YMCA Scores

â&#x2013;  Moscow 38,

Rolla 25 At Rolla, a 24-11 halftime advantage was enough breathing room for Moscow to slip by Rolla 38-25 Friday night. Kendra Haines led Moscow with 13 points in otherwise balanced scoring from the other Lady Wildcat players. Kaleigh Barrett led the Lady Pirates with 11 points with seven of them coming at the free throw line. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Moscow 13 11 3 11 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 38 Rolla 6 5 3 11 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 25 Moscow (38) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; M. Cecenas 2 4-8 8, Davidson 1 1-4 3, Haines 4 5-8 13, R. Cecenas 0 2-4 2, Dobie 0 2-3 2, Whitman 1 0-2 2, Clark 4 0-0 8. Totals 12 14-29 38. Rolla (25) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Howe 1 0-1 2, King 1 1-2 3, Reza 0 1-2 1, Clinesmith 1 0-0 2, Murray 2 2-2 6, Barrett 2 7-10 11. Totals 7 11-17 25. 3-point goals â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Moscow 0, Rolla 0.

Certificates of Deposit Term 13 Month 15 Month 17 Month 23 Month

Rate .75 1.00 1.10 1.25

Rates effective November 2, 2011

APY* .75 1.00 1.11 1.26 Minimum deposit $500.00

*Annual Percentage Yield Penalty will be imposed for early withdrawal.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Personalized local banking with people you know.â&#x20AC;? www.gardencitystatebank.com 1910 E Mary Street 620-271-9700 211982 Member FDIC

â&#x2013;  Stanton County 49,

Satanta 39 At Satanta, the fourth quarter was the difference as Stanton County broke away from a possible Satanta comeback, winning 49-39 in a HiPlains League game. After holding a onepoint lead at the end of the third, Stanton County used a 17-8 fourth quarter for the win. Jenna Black and Kristina Gerard paced the Lady Trojan squad with 14 and 12 points, respectively. Megan Long led all scorers for Satanta with 15 points while Jennifer Rehmke added 10 points. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Stanton County 10 11 11 17 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 49 Satanta 7 10 14 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 39 Stanton County (49) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Summers 4 0-1 8, Erskin 3 1-2 7, Daniels 1 1-2 3, Black 4 4-6 14, Gerard 6 0-2 12, McKinney 1 0-0 2, Steimel 1 1-1 3. Totals 20 7-14 49. Satanta (39) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Long 6 1-2 15, Boyett 1 0-2 2, Longoria 1 0-1 3, Rehmke 4 2-8 10, Young 2 0-0 4, Blair 2 1-3 5. Totals 16 4-16 39. 3-point goals â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Stanton County 2 (Black 2), Satanta 3 (Long 2, Longoria 1).

â&#x2013;  Hugoton 43,

Scott City 35 At Hugoton, the Lady Eagles had a consistent game overall and held off Scott City to win 4335 on Friday night in a Great West Activities Conference game. The win was the sixth straight for the Eagles. Miranda Ramsey led Hugoton with nine points as her fellow Lady Eagle players contributed even scoring as a team.

You have a choiceâ&#x20AC;Ś

GARDEN CITY DIAGNOSTICS

Open MRI 275-1864

Appointments by referral only.

Garden City Diagnostics Earns ACR Accreditation Garden City, KS â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Garden City Diagnostics, has been awarded a three-year term of accreditation in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the result of a recent review by the American College of Radiology (ACR). MRI is a noninvasive medical test that utilizes magnetic fields to produce anatomical images of internal body parts to help physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. The ACR gold seal of accreditation represents the highest level of image quality and patient safety. It is awarded only to facilities meeting ACR Practice Guidelines and Technical Standards after a peer-review evaluation by board-certified physicians and medical physicists who are experts in the field. Image quality, personnel qualifications, adequacy of facility equipment, quality control procedures, and quality assurance programs are assessed. The findings are reported to the ACR Committee on Accreditation, which subsequently provides the practice with a comprehensive report they can use for continuous practice improvement. The ACR is a national professional organization serving more than 34,000 diagnostic/interventional radiologists, radiation oncologists, nuclear medicine physicians, and medical physicists with programs focusing on the practice of medical imaging and radiation oncology and the delivery of comprehensive health care services.

At Garden City Diagnostics, we offer our patients:       

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If you tend to be claustrophobic or just need a little more space...an Open MRI may be right for you! You have a choice in Garden City! Ask your doctor for a referral to Garden City Diagnostics Today! GARDEN CITY DIAGNOSTICS

Open MRI 275-1864

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211457


D6

Stocks

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

Market Summary

New York Stock Exchange Name Last Chg Wkly A-B-C AES Corp 12.88 -.04 +8.8 AFLAC 48.33 -1.65 +11.7 AK Steel 8.16 -.58 -1.2 AT&T Inc 29.84 -.11 -1.3 AbtLab 55.11 +.11 -2.0 AberFitc 45.07 +4.56 -7.7 Accenture 56.96 -1.35 +7.0 AMD 7.05 -.03 +30.6 Aeropostl 17.17 +.53 +12.6 Aetna 45.70 +1.59 +8.3 Agilent 44.14 -1.14 +26.4 Agnico g 34.71 -1.71 -4.4 AlcatelLuc 2.19 +.24 +40.4 Alcoa 10.29 -.47 +19.0 Allstate 30.97 +.28 +13.0 AlphaNRs 21.04 -1.74 +3.0 AlpAlerMLP 16.79 +.09 +1.0 Altria 29.21 +.37 -1.5 AmBev 37.24 -.66 +3.2 AMovilL s 23.83 -.75 +5.4 AmAxle 12.09 -.59 +22.2 AEagleOut 13.77 -.26 -9.9 AEP 39.30 +.19 -4.9 AmExp 51.81 -.44 +9.8 AmIntlGrp 26.66 -.51 +14.9 AmTower u63.29 -.08 +5.5 Ameriprise 54.19 +.82 +9.2 AmeriBrgn 38.60 -.63 +3.8 Anadarko u87.04 +2.70 +14.0 AnalogDev 39.46 -.62 +10.3 Annaly 16.54 -.60 +3.6 Aon Corp 48.56 +.50 +3.8 Apache 105.13 +3.98 +16.1 AptInv 25.07 +.05 +9.4 ArcelorMit 22.20 +.46 +22.0 ArchCoal 14.39 -1.31 -.8 ArchDan 30.57 +1.02 +6.9 ArcosDor n 20.83 -1.87 +1.5 ArmourRsd 7.11 +.08 +.9 AssuredG 17.50 +1.04 +33.2 Avon 17.87 -.65 +2.3 BB&T Cp u29.33 +.21 +16.5 BHP BillLt 77.10 -5.05 +9.2 BP PLC 46.35 -.22 +8.4 BRFBrasil 19.83 -.33 +1.4 BakrHu 47.62 -3.38 -2.1 BcoBrades 18.16 -.43 +8.9 BcoSantSA 8.54 +.12 +13.6 BcoSBrasil 10.19 +.10 +25.1 BkofAm 8.07 +.23 +45.1 BkIreld rs 7.35 -.53 +73.3 BkNYMel 21.42 -.52 +7.6 Barclay 14.82 -.29 +34.8 Bar iPVix 27.87 +3.89 -21.6 BarrickG 48.15 -.92 +6.4 Baxter 56.84 -.20 +14.9 BeazerHm 3.63 +.03 +46.4 BerkH B 78.79 -1.21 +3.3 BestBuy 25.08 +1.22 +7.3 Blackstone 16.04 -.77 +14.5 BlockHR 16.80 -.40 +2.9 Boeing 74.95 -.95 +2.2 BostonSci 5.93 -.10 +11.0 Brandyw 11.39 +.21 +21.8 BrMySq 31.90 -.36 -9.5 BungeLt 63.48 +5.57 +11.0 CBL Asc 18.13 -.45 +15.5 CBRE Grp 17.87 -1.74 +17.4 CBS B u29.90 +.42 +10.2 CMS Eng 21.63 -.16 -2.0 CSX s 22.05 -1.12 +4.7 CVS Care u43.18 -.33 +5.9 CYS Invest 13.35 -.13 +1.6 CblvsNY s 14.82 +.30 +4.2 CabotOG s 33.57 +1.12 -11.5 Calpine 16.07 +.98 -1.6 Cameco g 23.13 -.63 +28.1 Cameron 56.50 +.67 +14.9 CdnNRs gs 37.66 -3.40 +.8 CapOne 48.28 -.97 +14.2 CapitlSrce 7.04 +.08 +5.1 CardnlHlth 41.88 -.17 +3.1 CareFusion 25.43 +.43 +.1 Carnival 31.05 -.95 -4.9 Caterpillar 111.75 -2.19 +23.3 Cemex 8.42 +.22 +56.2 Cemig pf u21.76 +1.23 +22.3 CenterPnt 18.91 +.03 -5.9 CntryLink 38.02 +.62 +2.2 ChesEng 22.13 -.18 -.7 Chevron 105.28 -.22 -1.1 Chicos 11.99 +.31 +7.6 Chimera 2.93 -.19 +16.7 Cigna 43.54 -.01 +3.7 Citigrp rs 32.93 -.62 +25.1 CliffsNRs 73.55 -1.57 +18.0 Coach u74.54 +1.95 +22.1 CobaltIEn u31.68 +10.84 +104.1 CocaCola 67.94 -.14 -2.9 CocaCE 27.43 -.06 +6.4 CollctvBrd 18.45 +1.80 +28.4 Comerica 30.14 +.06 +16.8 CmtyHlt 20.03 +.02 +14.8 CompSci 32.47 +4.40 +37.0 ComstkRs 12.27 +.52 -19.8 ConAgra 26.65 -.15 +.9 ConocPhil 72.25 +1.79 -.9 ConsolEngy 36.03 -1.64 -1.8 ConEd 59.13 +.31 -4.7 Corning 13.60 +.02 +4.8 CovantaH 16.07 +1.38 +17.4 CoventryH 31.18 +.16 +2.7 Covidien 51.70 -1.04 +14.9 CSVS2xVxS d19.05 +4.80 -40.4 CSVelIVSt s 8.08 -1.42 +24.1 CredSuiss 25.82 -2.14 +10.0 Cummins u120.30 +.21 +36.7 D-E-F DCT Indl 5.63 -.09 +10.0 DDR Corp 13.91 -.67 +14.3 DR Horton 14.33 -.29 +13.6 DanaHldg 15.26 -.50 +25.6 Danaher 51.53 -1.34 +9.5 Deere 87.55 -.85 +13.2 DeltaAir 10.89 -.41 +34.6 DenburyR 19.15 +.47 +26.8 DevonE 64.65 +1.19 +4.3 DxFnBull rs 88.09 -2.71 +35.8 DrSCBr rs 19.50 +1.16 -26.4 DirFnBr rs d26.67 +.74 -28.6 DrxEnBear d9.73 -.10 -14.0 DirxSCBull 59.17 -3.96 +32.0 DirxEnBull 52.98 +.30 +13.1 Discover u28.18 -.04 +17.4

Disney DomRescs DowChm DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty E-CDang EMC Cp EOG Res EQT Corp Eaton s ElPasoCp Elan EldorGld g EmersonEl EnCana g ENSCO EsteeLdr s ExcelM ExcoRes Exelon ExxonMbl FibriaCelu FstHorizon FirstEngy FordM ForestOil s FMCG Fusion-io n GMX Rs Gafisa SA GameStop Gannett Gap GenElec GenGrPrp GenMills GenMotors GenOn En Genworth Gerdau GlaxoSKln GoldFLtd Goldcrp g GoldmanS Goodyear GpTelevisa Guess GugSolar HCA Hld n HCP Inc Hallibrtn HarmonyG HartfdFn HltMgmt HealthNet Heckmann HeclaM Hertz Hess HewlettP HigherOne HollyFrt s HomeDp HonwllIntl HostHotls HovnanE Humana Huntsmn Hyperdyn ICICI Bk ING iShGold iSAstla iShBraz iSCan iShGer iSh HK iShJapn iShMex iSTaiwn iShSilver iShChina25 iSSP500 iShEMkts iShB20 T iS Eafe iShiBxHYB iSR1KG iShR2K iShREst ITW IngerRd IBM IntlGame IntPap Interpublic Invesco ItauUnibH IvanhM g JPMorgCh Jabil JanusCap Jefferies JohnJn JohnsnCtl JoyGlbl JnprNtwk KB Home KT Corp KV PhmA KeyEngy Keycorp KimbClk Kimco Kinross g KodiakO g Kohls Kraft Kroger LDK Solar LSI Corp LVSands LeapFrog LeggMason LeggPlat LennarA Level3 rs LillyEli Limited LincNat LinkedIn n

41.45 +1.45 +10.5 49.91 -.47 -6.0 34.00 -.18 +18.2 51.15 -.86 +11.7 23.22 -2.86 -4.1 21.48 +.08 -2.4 13.81 -.25 +14.6 6.88 -.19 +56.4 26.20 -.19 +21.6 111.83 +2.74 +13.5 49.01 -.92 -10.5 51.44 +.51 +18.2 u27.18 +.13 +2.3 12.85 -1.13 -6.5 13.47 -1.29 -1.8 52.20 -.26 +12.0 18.98 -.87 +2.4 55.80 +.15 +18.9 56.90 -.58 +1.3 1.89 +.35 +30.3 7.05 +.07 -32.5 39.84 +.12 -8.1 83.80 -.65 -1.1 9.05 +.20 +16.5 9.31 -.11 +16.4 42.65 -.88 -3.7 12.44 -.35 +15.6 13.38 +.30 -1.3 44.94 -1.54 +22.2 23.95 +1.67 -1.0 G-H-I 1.51 +.03 +20.8 5.78 -.20 +25.7 22.88 -.76 -5.2 14.61 -.30 +9.3 21.59 -.12 +16.4 18.88 -.14 +5.4 16.40 -.15 +12.4 39.09 -.76 -3.3 25.50 -.68 +25.8 2.25 +.09 -13.8 8.74 -.44 +33.4 10.35 -.27 +32.5 44.75 -.10 -1.9 16.47 -.03 +8.0 45.87 -1.74 +3.7 114.12 -3.41 +26.2 13.88 +.02 -2.0 19.79 -.22 -6.0 34.06 +2.24 +14.2 3.45 +.18 +39.7 27.83 +1.37 +26.3 u41.38 -.36 -.1 36.06 -.77 +4.5 12.90 +.49 +10.8 19.90 +.53 +22.5 6.84 +.06 -7.2 37.60 +1.12 +23.6 d4.70 -.42 -29.3 5.09 -.31 -2.7 14.69 +.20 +25.3 61.82 +1.44 +8.8 28.70 -.37 +11.4 15.29 -2.15 -17.1 33.60 +1.17 +43.6 u45.33 +.16 +7.8 59.33 -1.41 +9.2 16.68 -.23 +12.9 2.97 +.15 +104.8 85.74 -4.38 -2.1 13.38 -.47 +33.8 2.29 -.11 -6.5 37.24 -1.09 +40.9 8.54 -1.30 +19.1 16.77 -.05 +10.1 23.27 -.75 +8.5 67.39 -.88 +17.4 28.00 -.78 +5.3 22.14 -.29 +15.2 17.20 -.02 +11.2 9.63 -.04 +5.7 60.37 -.59 +12.3 13.20 -.05 +12.7 32.51 -.18 +20.7 38.93 -1.56 +11.6 134.88 -.16 +7.1 42.92 -.97 +13.1 116.99 +.42 -3.5 53.27 -.64 +7.6 90.25 -.47 +.9 u62.88 +.07 +8.8 81.27 -1.68 +10.2 60.75 -1.27 +6.9 55.71 +.11 +19.3 37.98 +.46 +24.6 192.42 -.47 +4.6 15.51 -.08 -9.8 31.85 ... +7.6 10.73 -.13 +10.3 24.10 +.22 +20.0 21.21 +.37 +14.3 16.42 -.62 -7.3 J-K-L 37.61 -.67 +13.1 u24.72 +.60 +25.7 8.65 +.07 +37.1 15.71 +.06 +14.3 64.60 -1.04 -1.5 32.95 -.67 +5.4 83.75 -11.96 +11.7 22.72 +.17 +11.3 11.71 +.90 +74.3 d14.22 -.98 -9.1 1.62 -1.04 +15.7 14.73 -.44 -4.8 7.94 -.30 +3.3 71.56 -.67 -2.7 18.39 -.51 +13.2 10.78 -.42 -5.4 8.88 +.22 -6.5 49.88 +.81 +1.1 38.58 -.30 +3.3 23.63 -.29 -2.4 6.34 +.68 +51.3 u8.33 +.22 +40.0 u51.59 -.32 +20.7 u6.69 +.69 +19.7 27.53 +.15 +14.5 21.36 -1.86 -7.3 u23.35 +.01 +18.8 21.15 +.91 +24.5 39.31 -.20 -5.4 44.96 +.70 +11.4 24.17 +.33 +24.4 89.96 +10.08 +42.8

21.74 ... +3.3 LloydBkg 2.13 -.01 +35.7 Safeway 42.78 +.27 +24.7 LockhdM u87.51 +2.92 +8.2 StJude 10.81 +.23 +10.9 LaPac 8.06 -.91 -.1 Saks Lowes 27.09 -.11 +6.7 Salesforce 128.44 +4.34 +26.6 LyonBas A u44.75 -.05 +37.7 SallyBty u22.92 +1.10 +8.5 M-N-0 SandRdge 7.46 +.24 -8.6 37.23 +.50 +1.9 MBIA 11.92 -.56 +2.8 Sanofi SaraLee 19.80 -.20 +4.7 MEMC 5.39 +.20 +36.8 MFA Fncl 7.46 +.02 +11.0 Schlmbrg 77.17 -1.49 +13.0 Schwab 12.18 -.57 +8.2 MGIC 4.35 +.03 +16.6 20.08 -.63 +16.7 MGM Rsts 14.63 +.26 +40.3 SealAir Macys 35.68 -.44 +10.9 SiderurNac 10.39 -.49 +27.0 MagHRes 6.21 -.11 +15.2 SilvWhtn g 35.56 -.40 +22.8 Manitowoc 16.21 +.55 +76.4 SilvrcpM g 7.16 -.93 +11.9 Manulife g 11.72 -.70 +10.4 SolarWinds u37.29 +2.63 +33.4 27.97 +.04 +61.9 MarathnO s 33.15 +.85 +13.3 Solutia MarathP n 44.08 +.10 +32.4 Sothebys 37.73 +.14 +32.2 SouthnCo 44.61 +.31 -3.6 MktVGold 54.49 -1.95 +5.9 MV OilSv n u128.98 -.46 +12.3 SthnCopper 33.69 -1.54 +11.6 SwstAirl 9.62 -.42 +12.4 MktVRus 30.71 -1.17 +15.2 MktVJrGld 27.96 -1.66 +13.2 SwstnEngy 33.59 +2.30 +5.2 MarIntA 35.72 -.41 +22.5 SpectraEn 30.78 +.50 +.1 2.29 -.03 -2.1 MarshM u32.04 -.49 +1.3 SprintNex 37.05 -.83 +10.6 Masco 12.72 -.20 +21.4 SP Matls SP HlthC 35.81 -.41 +3.2 McDrmInt 13.24 -.41 +15.0 32.61 +.13 +.4 McDnlds 99.47 -.54 -.9 SP CnSt McMoRn 13.57 +.79 -6.7 SP Consum u42.31 +.05 +8.4 73.04 +.27 +5.7 Mechel 10.68 -1.69 +25.6 SP Engy MedcoHlth 60.82 -2.79 +8.8 SPDR Fncl 14.57 -.17 +12.0 SP Inds 36.97 -.29 +9.5 Medtrnic 39.73 -.47 +3.9 u28.03 +.32 +10.1 Merck 37.91 -.46 +.6 SP Tech SP Util 34.80 -.03 -3.3 Meritor 7.57 +.08 +42.3 u4.55 +.39 +43.1 MetLife 36.89 -.74 +18.3 StdPac MetroPCS 9.81 +.37 +13.0 StarwdHtl 55.67 -1.05 +16.1 40.66 -1.91 +.9 MobileTele 16.91 -.11 +15.2 StateStr Molycorp 26.68 -3.09 +11.3 Statoil ASA 27.10 +1.15 +5.8 StillwtrM 13.36 -1.01 +27.7 Monsanto 77.34 -4.81 +10.4 53.54 -2.07 +7.7 MonstrWw 7.22 -.08 -9.0 Stryker Moodys 38.44 -.06 +14.1 Suncor gs 33.80 -1.29 +17.2 u39.21 +.71 +14.9 MorgStan 19.66 -.65 +29.9 Sunoco 4.03 +.59 +82.4 Mosaic 54.42 -2.99 +7.9 Suntech 22.03 -.25 +24.5 MotrlaSolu 47.40 +.27 +2.4 SunTrst MotrlaMob u39.45 +.48 +1.7 SupEnrgy 28.57 -1.67 +.5 6.77 -.21 -16.6 NCR Corp u21.14 +2.16 +28.4 Supvalu 1.92 +.04 +36.2 NYSE Eur 28.94 +1.45 +10.9 Synovus 29.31 -1.59 -.1 Nabors 18.98 -.46 +9.5 Sysco 10.87 +.22 +5.3 NBGrce rs 3.44 -.01 +73.7 TCF Fncl u34.36 +.02 +6.5 NOilVarco 82.66 +.52 +21.6 TJX s NY CmtyB 12.48 -.21 +.9 TaiwSemi 13.84 -.21 +7.2 NewellRub 18.88 +.16 +16.9 TalismE g 12.31 -.17 -3.5 52.43 +.29 +2.4 NewfldExp 38.18 -.11 +1.2 Target NewmtM 59.62 -1.39 -.6 TataMotors 25.80 +.10 +52.7 Nexen g 18.40 +.36 +15.7 TeckRes g 40.19 -3.49 +14.2 4.06 -.54 +15.3 NiSource 23.06 +.05 -3.1 TeekayTnk NobleCorp 38.95 +2.18 +28.9 TelefBrasil 27.67 +.25 +1.2 17.21 -.49 +.1 NobleEn u101.15 -1.81 +7.2 TelefEsp NokiaCp 4.96 -.16 +2.9 TempleInld u31.99 +.11 +.9 5.72 -.25 +11.5 NorflkSo 71.53 -2.08 -1.8 TenetHlth Novartis 55.89 +.17 -2.2 Teradata u62.06 +5.22 +27.9 16.50 -.53 +21.1 Nucor 44.47 -.94 +12.4 Teradyn 22.47 -.34 +66.3 OasisPet 29.29 -2.62 +.7 Terex 27.76 +2.35 +18.8 OcciPet 102.70 +.07 +9.6 Tesoro 26.96 +.93 +45.8 OfficeDpt 2.99 -.07 +39.1 Textron ThermoFis 55.52 -.77 +23.5 OfficeMax 5.62 -.05 +23.8 3M Co 87.14 -.59 +6.6 P-Q-R PG&E Cp 41.25 -.17 +.1 TimeWarn u37.52 -.67 +3.8 23.31 -.54 +14.2 PHH Corp 14.47 +1.73 +35.2 TollBros 53.65 -.57 +5.0 PNC 59.67 -2.53 +3.5 Total SA Transocn 50.21 +1.01 +30.8 PPL Corp 28.45 +.91 -3.3 59.38 -.74 +.4 Pandora n 13.37 -.44 +33.6 Travelers TrinaSolar 10.15 +1.98 +51.9 PatriotCoal 8.38 -.65 -1.1 PeabdyE 35.77 -2.13 +8.0 TwoHrbInv 9.89 -.06 +7.0 49.25 -1.61 +5.4 PennWst g 21.10 -1.11 +6.6 TycoIntl 18.92 -.46 -8.3 Penney u42.44 +1.38 +20.7 Tyson 13.90 -.77 +17.5 PepsiCo 63.95 -2.71 -3.6 UBS AG UDR 25.38 -1.08 +1.1 PetrbrsA 27.45 -1.27 +16.9 8.85 -.79 +74.6 Petrobras 29.57 -1.64 +19.0 US Airwy 1.32 -.36 +15.8 Pfizer 21.05 -.15 -2.7 USEC 13.99 -1.17 +37.7 PhilipMor u80.44 +3.82 +2.5 USG PioNtrl u109.17 +4.78 +22.0 UltraPt g d23.59 -.50 -20.4 PitnyBw 18.50 -.79 -.2 UnionPac 111.63 -4.48 +5.4 23.75 -1.22 +25.9 PlainsEx u42.54 +3.63 +15.8 UtdContl 2.59 -.12 +21.0 Potash s 44.70 -2.23 +8.3 UtdMicro UPS B u76.69 -.01 +4.8 PS USDBull 22.06 +.03 -1.8 PrecDrill 11.29 +.37 +10.0 US Bancrp u29.01 -.19 +7.2 US NGs rs 5.27 -.06 -18.4 PrinFncl 26.21 -1.29 +6.5 38.02 +.43 -.2 ProLogis 33.07 -.09 +15.7 US OilFd 29.40 -2.80 +11.1 ProShtS&P d37.69 +.01 -6.7 USSteel 83.50 +2.45 +14.2 PrUShS&P d16.77 +.01 -13.1 UtdTech ProUltQQQ u101.70 +1.34 +24.8 UtdhlthGp 53.32 +2.01 +5.2 PrUShQQQ rs d35.84 -.54 -20.6 UnumGrp 22.44 -1.35 +6.5 V-W-X-Y-Z ProUltSP 53.03 -.12 +14.3 25.75 -.86 +20.0 ProUShL20 19.11 -.14 +5.8 Vale SA Vale SA pf 24.84 -.63 +20.6 ProUSSP500 d10.67 +.05 -18.7 24.81 +.18 +17.9 PrUltSP500 s 73.50 -.23 +22.2 ValeroE ProUSSlv rs d10.33 +.06 -34.9 VangEmg 43.28 -.93 +13.3 45.67 -.58 +28.6 ProUltSlv s 59.73 -.72 +43.4 VeriFone ProUShEuro 19.55 -.07 -3.9 VerizonCm 37.69 -.15 -6.1 u113.90 +6.87 +12.2 ProctGam 63.88 +1.11 -4.2 Visa ProgrssEn 54.62 +.06 -2.5 VishayInt 12.98 +.24 +44.4 Vonage 3.07 +.46 +25.3 ProgsvCp 21.44 +.09 +9.9 Prudentl 59.00 -.87 +17.7 WPX En n 17.54 +1.09 -3.5 10.33 +1.30 +31.8 PSEG 30.51 +.24 -7.6 Wabash 61.90 -.13 +3.6 PulteGrp u8.79 +.49 +39.3 WalMart 34.54 +.89 +4.5 QEP Res 30.39 +.65 +3.7 Walgrn WalterEn 70.51 -5.70 +16.4 QksilvRes 5.22 -.09 -22.2 Rackspace u48.51 +1.32 +12.8 WsteMInc 35.21 -.16 +7.6 RadianGrp 3.39 +.33 +44.9 WeathfIntl 17.79 +.39 +21.5 RadioShk 7.60 +.21 -21.7 WellPoint 64.17 -.90 -3.1 RLauren u172.60 +16.63 +25.0 WellsFargo 30.26 -.37 +9.8 38.57 -.01 +24.6 RangeRs 62.82 +3.62 +1.4 WDigital Raytheon 49.53 +.56 +2.4 WstnRefin 18.37 +.54 +38.2 RegalEnt 12.57 -.13 +5.3 WstnUnion 17.58 -2.15 -3.7 RegionsFn 5.67 +.03 +31.9 Weyerhsr 20.02 -1.28 +7.2 70.04 +1.38 +47.6 ReneSola 2.96 +.56 +93.5 Whrlpl Renren n 5.20 -.02 +46.5 WhitingPt s 50.89 +1.39 +9.0 29.06 -.64 +7.8 RepubSvc 30.15 +.11 +9.4 WmsCos 20.18 -.40 +29.4 ReynAmer 39.74 -.01 -4.1 WT India RioTinto 59.33 -3.37 +21.3 Wyndham u44.15 +2.67 +16.7 19.27 -1.75 -2.5 RiteAid u1.54 +.04 +22.2 XL Grp 26.50 -.02 -4.1 Roundys n ud10.22 ... +13.6 XcelEngy 7.92 -.04 -.5 RylCarb 30.87 +.28 +24.6 Xerox YPF Soc 34.32 +2.12 -1.0 RoyDShllA 72.05 -.43 -1.4 Yamana g 16.30 -.85 +11.0 S-T-U 5.34 +1.01 +40.5 SAIC 12.63 -.27 +2.8 YingliGrn 21.31 -2.87 +36.0 SpdrDJIA u127.85 -.52 +4.9 Youku SpdrGold 167.14 -.50 +10.0 YumBrnds u64.74 +.90 +9.7 60.84 -1.67 +13.9 S&P500ETF 134.36 -.18 +7.1 Zimmer SpdrHome 19.96 -.34 +16.7 SpdrS&PBk 21.90 -.27 +10.4 SpdrLehHY 39.47 -.02 +2.7 SpdrS&P RB 26.52 -.68 +8.6 SpdrRetl u57.28 +.38 +9.0 SpdrOGEx 57.42 +1.51 +9.0 SpdrMetM 53.25 -3.52 +8.7

THE GARDEN CITY TELEGRAM

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Indexes 52-Week High Low 12,924.71 5,627.85 467.64 8,718.25 2,490.51 2,930.68 1,370.58 14,562.01 868.57

10,404.49 3,950.66 381.99 6,414.89 1,941.99 2,298.89 1,074.77 11,208.42 601.71

Name

Daily Wkly Wkly YTD Net Chg Net Chg %Chg %Chg

Last

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite AMEX Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

9 309 293 257

12,801.23 5,254.14 450.45 7,992.05 2,417.99 2,903.88 1,342.64 14,186.29 813.33

-61.00 -114.79 -.91 -68.38 +.18 -1.78 -2.26 -45.52 -17.78

-.47 -2.14 -.20 -.85 +.01 -.06 -.17 -.32 -2.14

+4.78 +4.67 -3.06 +6.89 +6.13 +11.47 +6.76 +7.55 +9.77

+4.30 +.36 +8.98 -4.57 +6.69 +3.36 +1.01 +.57 -1.07

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Mickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Message Of The Month: Monthly Income

W h he ncreased cos o v ng are you com or ab e w h your mon h y ncome? T red o he re urn you are see ng rom CD s and Sav ngs? O her op ons o make up your mon h y ncome are ava ab e S op by or a v s or ca me oday we w exp ore hose op ons oge her

3.29 +.28 +12.3 8.70 +.41 +4.6 6.38 +.12 -7.0 5.00 +.41 +130.2 84.20 -1.16 +1.1 28.35 -.23 +28.6 19.98 -.44 +35.3 24.93 -.27 +6.5 40.43 -1.18 +2.0 4.77 -.24 +1.9 d.11 -.07 -59.5 18.06 +.14 +7.5 3.64 -.56 +65.5 D-E-F DeckrsOut 83.86 -2.80 +11.0 Dell Inc u17.75 +.09 +21.3 Dndreon 14.05 -.12 +84.9 Dentsply 37.68 -.56 +7.7 DiamndF lf d23.52 -14.13 -27.1 DirecTV A 45.51 -.18 +6.4 DiscCm A 44.79 +.13 +9.3 DishNetwk 28.50 -.41 +.1 DonlleyRR 12.44 +.53 -13.8 DryShips 3.00 +.60 +50.0 Dunkin n 28.03 -.73 +12.2 E-Trade 9.21 +.02 +15.7 eBay 33.03 +.08 +8.9 EagleBulk 1.70 +.34 +80.5 EstWstBcp 22.05 -.47 +11.6 ElectArts d17.42 -1.82 -15.4 EndoPhrm 35.20 -1.43 +1.9 EngyConv 1.35 +.20 +568.3 EngyXXI u37.60 +2.35 +17.9 EntropCom 7.10 +.58 +38.8 Equinix u128.48 +4.29 +26.7 EricsnTel 9.58 +.07 -5.4 Exelixis 6.14 -.17 +29.7 ExideTc 3.03 -.71 +15.2 Expedia s 33.54 -.68 +15.6 ExpdIntl 43.03 -1.53 +5.1 ExpScripts 50.17 -1.91 +12.3 ExtrmNet 3.37 +.06 +15.4 F5 Netwks 124.01 -.76 +16.9 FLIR Sys 24.90 -1.67 -.7 Fastenal s u48.42 +.12 +11.0 FifthStFin 10.29 ... +7.5 FifthThird 13.35 -.25 +4.9 Finisar 21.98 +.39 +31.2 FstNiagara 9.54 -.29 +10.5 FstSolar 43.91 -1.25 +30.1 Fiserv 64.23 -1.65 +9.3 Flextrn 6.97 -.18 +23.1 FocusMda 23.47 -.68 +20.4 FormFac 5.28 -.02 +4.3 Fortinet s 25.58 +.20 +17.3 Fossil Inc 100.49 +.30 +26.6 FosterWhl 23.29 -.69 +21.7 FriendFd h 2.29 +1.00 +205.3 FrontierCm 4.04 -.47 -21.6 FuelCell 1.21 +.20 +38.8 FultonFncl 9.51 -.26 -3.1 G-H-I GT AdvTc 9.48 +.05 +30.9 Gentex 25.71 -.93 -13.1 GeronCp 2.00 -.08 +34.8 GileadSci u53.75 -.95 +31.3 GluMobile 4.18 +.18 +33.1 Google 605.91 +9.58 -6.2 GreenMtC 62.85 -3.36 +40.1 GrifolsSA n 6.70 -.22 +21.2 Groupon n 21.03 -3.40 +1.9 HalconR rs u11.97 +.51 +27.5 Halozyme 11.14 -.37 +17.1 HanwhaSol 2.20 +.35 +123.8 Hasbro 36.84 +.98 +15.5 HercOffsh 5.12 +.38 +15.3 HimaxTch 1.61 +.09 +60.8 Hologic 20.70 -.40 +18.2 HudsCity 7.02 -.18 +12.2 HumGen 9.51 -.65 +28.7 HuntJB u52.31 +.94 +16.1 HuntBnk 5.91 +.01 +7.6 IAC Inter 45.05 -.75 +5.8 IPG Photon 55.44 +1.19 +63.7 iRobot 25.27 -11.74 -15.3 iSh ACWI 45.44 -.46 +7.8 iShNsdqBio u118.88 -1.76 +13.9 IdenixPh 10.92 -.76 +46.7 Illumina 53.89 +2.05 +76.8 ImpaxLabs 21.93 -.38 +8.7 ImperlSgr 6.71 +3.25 +88.0 Incyte 16.96 -.70 +13.0 Infinera 7.85 -.53 +25.0 Informat 46.38 +.73 +25.6 Infosys 55.71 -1.38 +8.4 IntgDv 6.68 +.01 +22.3 Intel 26.70 -.05 +10.1 InterDig 36.87 -2.97 -15.4 InterMune 14.50 -1.50 +15.1 Intersil 11.15 -.02 +6.8 Intuit 56.68 -1.79 +7.8 IronwdPh 15.35 +.37 +28.2 J-K-L

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2.05 +.32 +53.0 13.94 +1.55 +33.5 6.38 -.58 -7.8 u48.30 +.29 +25.0 5.86 -.37 +12.7 11.85 -.19 +40.2 49.41 -2.57 +2.4 11.23 -.40 +21.4 42.33 -1.86 +14.3 6.81 -.20 +14.6 9.09 -.37 -2.2 u48.55 +1.29 +18.3 18.16 +.02 +12.0 49.55 -.02 +27.3 3.98 +.52 +34.5 25.47 -.83 -.9 33.58 -.85 +11.8 35.67 -.88 -5.9 u65.33 +.75 +40.0 M-N-0 Magma 7.16 -.01 -.3 MAKO Srg 32.89 -2.98 +30.5 MannKd 2.33 +.16 -6.8 MarvellT 16.05 -.59 +15.9 Mattel u32.17 +.64 +15.9 Mattson u3.15 +.28 +128.3 MaximIntg 27.19 -.55 +4.4 MediCo u20.75 -1.15 +11.3 Medivation u67.94 -6.00 +47.3 MelcoCrwn 11.53 -.55 +19.9 Microchp 36.69 -1.73 +.2 Micromet 10.95 +.02 +52.3 MicronT 7.91 -.05 +25.7 Microsoft u30.50 +.26 +17.5 Micrvisn h .54 +.10 +50.0 MisnNEn h 1.35 +.39 -40.5 Momenta 15.27 -1.29 -12.2 Motricity 1.55 +.27 +72.2 Mylan 22.80 +.36 +6.2 NETgear 37.35 -5.83 +11.3 NII Hldg 22.86 -.10 +7.3 NPS Phm 7.41 -.58 +12.4 NXP Semi 21.63 -1.12 +40.7 NasdOMX 26.00 +.93 +6.1 NektarTh 6.84 -.33 +22.3 NetLogicM 49.75 -.05 +.4 NetApp 39.69 -.67 +9.4 Netflix 123.93 -2.50 +78.9 Netlist u3.74 +.31 +49.0 NeurogX h d.58 -.47 -29.4 NewsCpA 19.18 -.11 +7.5 NewsCpB u19.85 -.11 +9.2 NorTrst 43.63 -.46 +10.0 Novlus 47.10 -1.89 +14.1 NuanceCm u26.50 -2.93 +5.3 NutriSyst 11.25 -.28 -13.0 Nvidia 15.90 +.08 +14.7 NxStageMd 21.02 +1.91 +18.2 OCharleys u10.05 +3.13 +83.1 OReillyAu 83.45 +.62 +4.4 Oclaro 4.89 +.09 +73.4 OmniVisn 15.49 -.28 +26.6 OnSmcnd 9.39 +.15 +21.6 Oncothyr 8.40 +.49 +10.8 OnyxPh 41.78 -.85 -4.9 OpenTable 44.37 -7.63 +13.4 OpntTch 30.85 -6.51 -15.9 Oracle 28.50 -.62 +11.1 Orexigen 3.03 +.27 +88.2 P-Q-R PDL Bio 6.39 -.09 +3.1 PMC Sra 6.94 +.09 +26.0 PSS Wrld 24.14 -1.72 -.2 Paccar 43.27 -.98 +15.5 PanASlv 24.00 -.02 +10.0 PaneraBrd u151.78 -3.18 +7.3 ParamTch u27.09 +1.15 +48.4 PattUTI 17.98 -.55 -10.0 Paychex 31.31 -.64 +4.0 PeopUtdF 12.50 -.09 -2.7 PerfectWld 11.72 -.48 +11.9 Perrigo 93.31 -.35 -4.1 PetSmart 53.61 -.16 +4.5 Polycom s 20.81 +.03 +27.7 Popular 1.68 -.07 +20.9 Power-One 5.35 +.07 +36.8 PwShs QQQ u62.48 +.43 +11.9 PriceTR 59.14 -.16 +3.8 priceline 545.04 -1.94 +16.5 PrUPShQQQ d13.90 -.32 -29.4 PrUltPQQQ s u94.72 +1.89 +39.3 ProspctCap 10.82 +.17 +16.5 QIAGEN 15.15 -.76 +9.7 Qlogic 17.29 -.35 +15.2 Qualcom u61.73 +.67 +12.9 QuantFu h 1.12 +.07 +53.4 Questcor 35.00 -1.61 -15.8 RF MicD 5.11 -.30 -5.4 Rambus 7.86 +.30 +4.1 Regenrn u102.08 +5.22 +84.2 RschMotn 15.44 -1.44 +6.5 RexEnergy 10.28 +.13 -30.4 RiverbedT 27.67 +1.76 +17.7 RossStrs s 51.95 +.19 +9.3

Rovi Corp

33.06 -1.81 +34.5 S-T-U SBA Com 45.19 -.38 +5.2 SLM Cp 15.88 -.11 +18.5 STEC 10.12 -.08 +17.8 SalixPhm 48.18 -1.34 +.7 SanDisk 46.44 -1.11 -5.6 Sapient 13.00 -.74 +3.2 SavientPh 2.17 -.10 -2.9 SeagateT u26.20 -.22 +59.7 SearsHldgs 47.57 +3.04 +49.7 SeattGen 18.60 -.94 +11.2 SelCmfrt u28.68 +1.64 +32.2 Sequenom 4.59 -.33 +3.1 SvcSourc n 16.64 -.96 +6.1 Shire 104.91 +5.21 +1.0 Shutterfly 27.01 -1.01 +18.7 SigmaAld 69.52 -1.25 +11.3 SilicGrIn d9.89 -4.54 -13.7 SilicnImg 5.51 -.35 +17.2 SilicnMotn 18.84 -4.36 -8.0 Slcnware 5.51 +.04 +26.4 SilvStd g 16.56 -1.02 +19.8 Sina 65.14 -9.86 +25.3 SinoClnEn 1.42 +.07 +42.0 SiriusXM 2.15 ... +17.9 Sky-mobi 4.90 +.97 +60.7 SkywksSol 23.46 -.22 +44.6 SmithWes 5.16 -.16 +18.3 SmithMicro 2.50 +.60 +121.2 SodaStrm 41.19 +.74 +26.0 Sohu.cm 50.93 -12.12 +1.9 SonicCorp 7.78 +.25 +15.6 Sonus 2.64 -.10 +9.8 SpectPh 14.10 -.25 -3.6 Spreadtrm 16.43 -1.79 -21.3 Staples 14.76 -.01 +6.3 StarScient 3.35 +.19 +53.7 Starbucks u48.82 +.50 +6.1 StlDynam 15.46 -1.02 +17.6 SunPower 8.03 +.10 +28.9 SusqBnc 9.32 -.31 +11.2 Symantec 17.78 +.16 +13.6 Synacor n ud5.25 ... ... Synchron u34.20 -1.50 +13.2 Synopsys u30.06 +.43 +10.5 vjTBS IntA d.13 -.09 -15.2 TD Ameritr 17.01 -.46 +8.7 THQ h .58 +.05 -23.7 TTM Tch 12.34 -1.20 +12.6 TakeTwo 15.80 -.40 +16.6 Taleo A u45.66 +7.41 +18.0 Tellabs 3.83 -.04 -5.2 TeslaMot 31.10 -.05 +8.9 TevaPhrm 44.16 -1.55 +9.4 TexInst 33.36 -.57 +14.6 Thoratec 34.19 +3.53 +1.9 TibcoSft 27.89 -.10 +16.6 TiVo Inc 11.96 +.73 +33.3 TractSupp u83.08 +1.87 +18.4 TrimbleN 51.35 +.52 +18.3 TripAdv n 30.04 -5.34 +19.2 TriQuint 6.20 -.51 +27.2 TrueRelig u26.61 -9.57 -23.0 USA Tech h 1.05 -.01 -6.3 UltaSalon u80.84 +2.73 +24.5 UtdOnln 5.58 -.19 +2.6 UrbanOut 27.00 -.69 -2.0 V-W-X-Y-Z ValVis A 1.73 +.13 -8.0 ValueClick u19.64 +1.22 +20.6 VanIntCpB 84.33 ... +2.4 VeecoInst 28.36 +1.19 +36.3 Verisign 36.61 -.43 +2.5 VertxPh 36.13 -.65 +8.8 ViacomB 49.22 +.86 +8.4 Vical 3.22 -.42 -27.0 VirgnMda h 25.30 +.96 +18.3 ViroPhrm 30.61 +.28 +11.8 Vivus u12.35 -.13 +26.6 Vodafone 27.40 -.47 -2.2 WarnerCh 16.42 -.12 +8.5 Wendys Co 5.21 +.38 -2.8 WstptInn g 42.20 +2.71 +27.0 WholeFd u81.62 +5.37 +17.3 Windstrm 12.37 +.07 +5.3 Winn-Dixie 9.45 -.01 +.7 Wynn 113.20 -1.78 +2.5 XOMA 1.53 +.19 +33.0 Xilinx 36.33 -.60 +13.3 Yahoo 16.14 +.22 +.1 Yandex n 21.27 -.55 +8.0 Zagg 10.23 -.16 +44.7 Zalicus 1.12 +.02 -7.4 ZionBcp 18.37 +.34 +12.8 Zoltek 12.49 -.62 +63.9 Zynga n 13.33 -.06 +41.7

Name Last Chg W kly

Mick Hunter

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American Stock Exchange

F nanc a Consu tant 1807 E Mary St Ste #2 Garden C ty KS 67846 620-271-0008 S

A-B-C ACI Wwde 35.47 +.36 +23.8 ASML Hld 45.25 -.30 +8.3 ATP O&G 6.69 +.19 -9.1 AVI Bio h 1.11 +.11 +49.0 Abiomed u23.22 +2.24 +25.7 Accuray 7.02 +.77 +66.0 Achillion 9.90 -1.84 +29.9 AcmePkt 32.54 -1.15 +5.3 ActivePw h .93 -.03 +41.1 ActivsBliz 12.33 +.05 ... AdobeSy 32.21 +.36 +13.9 AEterna g 1.64 -.19 +6.5 Affymax u10.47 +.10 +58.4 Affymetrix 4.65 -.49 +13.7 AkamaiT 38.43 +4.79 +19.1 Akorn u12.48 +.39 +12.2 Alexion s u83.45 +4.57 +16.7 AlignTech u26.02 +.59 +9.7 Alkermes 17.98 -1.17 +3.6 AllscriptH 20.28 +.17 +7.1 AlteraCp lf 40.10 -.75 +8.1 Amarin 8.40 -.39 +12.1 Amazon 185.54 -2.14 +7.2 ACapAgy 30.20 +.50 +7.5 AmCapLtd 8.69 +.18 +29.1 AmSupr 5.11 -.67 +38.5 Amgen 67.36 -1.92 +4.9 AmkorT lf 6.26 +.19 +43.6 Amylin 17.17 +.07 +50.9 Ancestry 30.96 -2.13 +34.8 A123 Sys 2.03 -.31 +25.8 ApolloGrp 54.05 +1.64 +.3 ApolloInv 7.03 -.97 +9.2 Apple Inc u493.42 +33.74 +21.8 ApldMatl 12.95 +.16 +20.9 ArenaPhm 1.94 +.07 +3.7 AresCap 16.22 -.01 +5.0 AriadP u14.66 -.83 +19.6 Ariba Inc 29.58 +.36 +5.3 ArmHld 26.88 -1.00 -2.9 ArrayBio 2.66 -.35 +23.1 Arris 11.95 -.22 +10.4 ArubaNet 23.57 -.29 +27.3 AscentSol h .83 +.02 +112.8 AsscdBanc 12.67 -.41 +13.4 AstexPhm 2.04 -.77 +7.9 Atmel 9.78 -.59 +20.7 Autodesk 37.53 -.32 +23.7 AutoData 54.01 -1.50 ... AvagoTch 34.49 -.64 +19.5 AvanirPhm 2.93 -.38 +42.9 AvidTch 11.27 +.82 +32.1 AvisBudg 14.95 +.09 +39.5 Axcelis 1.70 -.10 +27.8 BE Aero u45.78 -.20 +18.3 BGC Ptrs 6.80 +.06 +14.5 BMC Sft 39.25 +1.24 +19.7 Baidu 136.59 +2.06 +17.3 BedBath 58.98 -4.17 +1.7 BiogenIdc 118.14 -3.74 +7.4 BioMarin u37.21 -.32 +8.2 BioMimetic 2.13 +.07 -25.3 BioSante h .85 +.11 +69.5 BreitBurn 18.80 -.26 -1.4 Brightpnt 10.00 -.40 -7.1 Broadcom 37.00 -.68 +26.0 BroadVisn 36.52 +2.38 +233.8 BrcdeCm 5.80 -.11 +11.8 BrooksAuto 12.06 +1.06 +17.4 BuffaloWW u85.72 +15.42 +27.0 CA Inc u26.72 +.43 +32.2 CBOE 28.07 +1.53 +8.5 CH Robins 63.50 -.92 -9.0 CME Grp 291.59 +18.16 +19.7 Cadence u11.77 +.04 +13.2 Caesars n ud14.24 ... -7.5 CdnSolar 4.23 +.49 +59.0 CapFedFn 11.70 -.03 +1.3 CpstnTrb h 1.27 -.04 +9.1 CareerEd 11.03 -.54 +38.4 Carrizo 23.85 +.35 -9.5 Cavium 33.12 +.23 +16.5 Celgene 71.74 -1.47 +6.1 CentEuro 5.56 +.16 +27.1 CentAl 10.58 -.40 +24.3 Cerner s 69.27 +6.18 +13.1 Changyou 25.45 -3.64 +10.4 ChrmSh u5.33 +.13 +8.7 ChkPoint 57.29 -1.82 +9.0 CienaCorp 16.24 +.78 +34.2 CinnFin u34.45 +1.03 +13.1 Cirrus 20.67 -.28 +30.4 Cisco 19.90 -.20 +10.4 CitrixSys 71.46 +2.68 +17.7 CleanEngy 16.28 +.41 +30.7 Clearwire 2.08 +.27 +7.2 CognizTech 70.08 -3.27 +9.0 Coinstar u56.40 +6.75 +23.6 ColdwtrCrk 1.04 +.09 -11.9 ColumLabs .78 -.03 -68.6 Comcast u27.18 +.03 +14.6 Comc spcl u26.09 +.13 +10.7

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F NRA S PC

212650

AbdAsPac 7.53 -.08 +2.7 DejourE g AdeonaPh u2.71 +.41 +115.1 DenisnM g Adventrx .72 +.04 +21.2 DocuSec AlexcoR g 7.18 -.42 +5.4 EV LtdDur AlldNevG 34.07 -1.59 +12.5 ElephTalk AmApparel .75 +.01 +3.5 EntGaming AntaresP 2.59 -.09 +17.7 ExeterR gs Aurizon g 5.26 -.25 +6.7 FrkStPrp AvalnRare 2.99 -.35 +26.2 GamGldNR Banro g 4.69 -.36 +26.8 GascoEngy BarcUBS36 43.25 -.22 +2.4 GenMoly BarcGSOil 25.08 +.30 -.2 GoldenMin BrigusG g 1.01 -.13 +4.7 GoldStr g BritATob u98.35 +2.28 +3.7 GranTrra g CAMAC En .86 -.09 -14.9 GrtBasG g CardiumTh .37 -.01 +27.1 GtPanSilv g CelSci .40 +.06 +37.9 GreenHntr CFCda g 22.52 -.47 +14.8 Hemisphrx CheniereEn u13.93 +1.09 +60.3 ImpOil gs CheniereE 21.14 +.70 +17.3 IndiaGC ChinNEPet 2.63 +.31 +28.3 InovioPhm ChinaShen 1.63 -.14 +29.4 IntTower g ClaudeR g 1.36 -.14 +3.0 KeeganR g ComstkMn 1.95 +.11 +6.0 LadThalFn CrSuiHiY 3.11 -.07 +8.0 LkShrGld g Crosshr g .61 +.10 +74.3 LongweiPI

.41 -.07 -20.6 1.86 +.09 +48.8 5.02 +1.18 +96.9 15.67 +.01 +2.9 2.47 -.13 -6.8 .27 +.02 +20.0 3.57 -.06 +36.8 10.16 -.43 +2.1 16.16 -.18 +14.5 .21 -.00 -7.1 3.64 -.44 +17.8 8.96 -1.42 +54.2 1.98 -.05 +20.0 5.66 -.29 +17.9 .97 -.21 +6.5 2.45 -.23 +25.6 u1.69 +.36 +94.3 .37 +.02 +89.7 47.13 -.51 +6.0 .28 +.02 -3.1 .66 -.01 +54.4 5.03 -.15 +15.4 4.50 -.24 +17.5 2.06 -.19 -16.9 1.52 +.09 +20.6 1.45 -.05 +11.5

LucasEngy MadCatz g MdwGold g Minefnd g NavideaBio NeoStem NBRESec Nevsun g NewEnSys NwGold g NA Pall g NthnO&G NovaGld g ParaG&S PhrmAth PionDrill PlatGpMet PolyMet g Protalix Quepasa QuestRM g RareEle g ReavesUtl Rentech Richmnt g Rubicon g

2.39 .57 1.90 14.91 3.20 .68 4.10 d4.00 .90 11.56 2.61 23.09 8.48 2.49 1.57 9.29 1.13 1.15 6.40 4.77 2.97 6.32 25.89 1.78 11.70 3.80

+.03 +3.5 -.07 +11.8 -.11 -10.0 ... +40.7 +.16 +22.1 +.01 +34.3 -.05 +9.3 -2.46 -27.7 +.15 +50.0 -.44 +14.7 -.30 +2.4 -2.16 -3.7 -.67 ... -.26 +16.4 -.05 +23.6 -.28 -4.0 -.04 +29.9 -.22 +10.6 +.27 +29.8 +.13 +43.7 -.38 +35.0 -1.47 +94.5 -1.04 -.5 -.05 +35.9 -.28 +8.7 -.51 +.5

SamsO&G 2.08 -.13 +6.7 SeabGld g 21.56 -1.34 +33.8 TanzRy g 3.23 -.17 +34.6 Taseko 3.74 -.05 +37.0 Tengsco .86 -.06 +20.6 TrnsatlPet 1.26 -.17 -3.8 TriValley .16 -.02 +12.7 TriangPet 7.29 +.08 +22.1 US Geoth .46 +.11 +27.8 Ur-Energy 1.16 -.09 +35.0 Uranerz 2.55 -.39 +40.1 UraniumEn 3.82 -.20 +24.8 VantageDrl 1.23 -.07 +6.0 VirnetX 24.65 +.05 -1.3 VistaGold 3.58 -.17 +16.6 VoyagerOG 2.88 +.08 +12.1 Vringo 1.43 -.33 +44.4 WalterInv 21.50 +1.00 +4.8 WFAdvInco u10.48 -.31 +2.9 WizzardSft .18 +.01 +39.5 XPO Log rs 13.52 +2.00 +9.5 YM Bio g 2.29 -.04 +39.6

Mutual Funds m AQR Funds: DivArb I n 11.00 AllianceBern A: GloblBdA r 8.43 HighIncoA p 8.95 Allianz Admin MMS: NFJSmCpVl t 29.49 Allianz Fds Instl: NFJDivVal 12.16 SmCpVl n 30.99 Allianz Funds A: NFJDivVal t 12.06 SmCpV A 29.53 Alpine Funds: TaxOptInco 10.05 AmanaGrth n 25.92 AmanaInco n 32.82 Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 20.15 SmCapInst 21.01 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.13 Ameri Century 1st: Growth 27.18 Amer Century Adv: EqtyIncA p 7.50 Amer Century Inv: DivBond n 11.06 DivBond 11.06 EqGroInv n 23.05 EqInco 7.50 GNMAI 11.25 GrowthI 26.95 HeritageI 21.86 InfAdjBond 12.95 IntTF 11.61 MdCapVal 12.46 SelectI 42.54 Ultra n 25.11 ValueInv 5.97 American Funds A: AmcapFA p 20.54 AmMutlA p 26.86 BalA p 19.14 BondFdA p 12.68 CapInBldA p 50.35 CapWGrA p 34.43 CapWldA p 21.05 EupacA p 38.36 FundInvA p 37.92 GlblBalA 25.36 GovtA p 14.40 GwthFdA p 31.57 HI TrstA p 11.00 HiIncMuniA 14.51 IncoFdA p 17.22 IntBdA p 13.69 IntlGrIncA p 28.84 InvCoAA p 28.87 LtdTEBdA p 16.29 NwEconA p 26.43 NewPerA p 28.46 NewWorldA 50.89 STBFA p 10.10 SmCpWA p 37.43 TaxExA p 12.81 WshMutA p 29.52 American Funds B: BalanB p 19.06 CapInBldB p 50.36 CapWGrB t 34.24 GrowthB t 30.62 IncomeB p 17.09 Arbitrage Funds: Arbitrage I n 13.19 Ariel Investments: Ariel n 47.52 Artio Global Funds: GlbHiIncI r 9.61 IntlEqI r 24.80 IntlEqA 24.22 IntlEqII I r 10.45 TotRet I 13.73 Artisan Funds: Intl 21.71 IntlInstl 21.83 IntlValu r 26.73 MidCap 37.88 MidCapVal 21.11 SmCapVal 16.32 Aston Funds: FairMidCpN 32.58 M&CGroN 23.84 BBH Funds: BdMktN 10.33 BNY Mellon Funds:

W +.04 ... -.01 -.30 -.03 -.32 -.04 -.30 ... -.14 -.27 -.05 -.33 -.05 -.01 -.06 +.01 +.01 -.02 -.06 ... -.01 -.03 +.02 -.01 -.13 +.33 -.01 -.04 -.07 -.12 -.05 ... -.13 -.23 -.07 -.35 -.22 -.12 -.01 -.05 ... +.02 -.08 -.01 -.29 -.13 ... -.20 -.25 -.14 ... -.05 ... -.10 -.06 -.14 -.23 -.05 -.08 +.04 -.88 ... -.27 -.27 -.11 +.01 -.16 -.16 -.30 +.19 -.10 -.19 -.24 -.07 +.01

BondFund 13.50 EmgMkts 10.21 NatlIntMuni 13.88 Baird Funds: AggBdInst 10.76 Baron Fds Instl: Growth 54.48 Baron Funds: Asset n 48.93 Growth 54.10 SmallCap 24.91 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.91 DivMun 14.90 NYMun 14.66 TxMgdIntl 13.71 IntlPort 13.63 EmgMkts 28.18 Berwyn Funds: Income 13.33 BlackRock A: BasValA p 26.26 CapAppr p 22.80 EqtyDivid 18.88 GlbAlA r 19.26 HiYdInvA 7.69 InflProBdA 11.76 NatMuniA 10.80 BlackRock B&C: EquityDivC 18.48 GlobAlC t 17.94 BlackRock Instl: InflProtBd 11.89 US Opps 36.44 BasValI 26.42 CoreBond 9.51 EquityDiv 18.92 GlbAlloc r 19.35 HiYldBond 7.69 NatlMuni 10.80 BrownSmCoIns 47.59 Buffalo Funds: SmallCap 27.55 CGM Funds: FocusFd n 29.62 Realty n 28.92 CRM Funds: MidCapValI 28.65 Calamos Funds: Gr&IncC t 33.11 Grth&IncA p 33.00 GrowthA p 51.51 GrowthC t 46.24 Growth I 56.48 Calvert Invest: ShDurIncA t 16.04 SocEqA p 36.24 Cohen & Steers: InsltRlty n 41.91 RltyShrs n 64.60 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 29.83 DivEqInc A 10.12 DivrBd 5.10 DiviIncoA 14.06 DivOpptyA 8.37 LgCorQA p 6.15 SelLgCpGr t 13.36 TxExA p 13.97 SelComm A 47.28 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 30.87 AcornIntl Z 38.00 AcornUSA 30.41 Bond 9.54 DiviIncomeZ 14.07 IntmBdZ n 9.36 IntmTEBd n 10.93 LgCapGr 13.49 LgCapIdxZ 25.97 MarsGrPrZ 22.15 MidCpIdxZ 11.71 MdCpVal p 13.79 STIncoZ 9.92 STMunZ 10.56 SmlCapIdxZ n 17.87 ValRestr n 48.86 CG Cap Mkt Fds: LgGrw 15.70 Credit Suisse Comm: CommRet t 8.44 DFA Funds: IntlCoreEq n 10.17 USCoreEq1 n 11.66 USCoreEq2 n 11.51 DWS Invest A: MgdMuni p 9.33

+.03 -.11 -.01 +.04 -.33 -.22 -.33 -.31 +.02 -.02 -.01 -.16 -.16 -.36 -.06 -.20 +.05 -.06 -.12 ... +.03 -.01 -.06 -.11 +.04 +.01 -.20 +.02 -.06 -.12 ... -.01 -1.54 -.47 -.33 -.90 -.23 -.22 -.22 -.19 -.18 -.21 +.03 +.04 -.93 -1.46 -.27 -.02 +.01 -.05 -.03 +.04 +.06 -.01 +.10 -.29 -.17 -.34 +.01 -.05 +.01 -.01 +.06 -.03 -.06 -.08 -.13 ... ... -.42 -.36 +.12 -.04 -.11 -.05 -.07 -.01

StrGovSecA 9.00 DWS Invest S: GNMA S 15.70 GroIncS 17.36 MgdMuni S 9.34 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 34.85 Davis Funds C: NYVen C 33.62 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 35.21 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.23 Dimensional Fds: EmMkCrEq n 19.93 EmgMktVal 30.79 IntSmVa n 15.40 LargeCo 10.58 STExtQual nx 10.85 STMuniBd nx 10.34 TAUSCorEq2 9.36 USVectrEq n 11.22 USLgVa n 20.82 USLgVa3 n 15.94 US Micro n 14.52 US TgdVal 16.84 US Small n 22.54 US SmVal 25.69 IntlSmCo n 15.40 GlbEqInst 13.40 EmgMktSCp n 20.84 EmgMkt n 26.91 Fixd nx 10.32 ST Govt n 10.82 IntGvFxIn n 12.95 IntVa n 16.05 InflProSecs 12.44 Glb5FxInc 11.03 LrgCapInt n 18.26 TM USTgtV 22.15 TM IntlValue 13.21 TMMktwdeV 15.62 TMUSEq 14.49 2YGlFxd n 10.10 DFARlEst n 24.66 Dodge&Cox: Balanced n 72.43 GblStock 8.40 IncomeFd 13.61 Intl Stk 31.88 Stock 110.61 DoubleLine Funds: CoreFxdInc I 11.08 TRBd I 11.17 TRBd N p 11.17 Dreyfus: Aprec 42.53 DreyMid r 28.44 Drey500In t 36.75 MunBd r 11.72 NY Tax nr 15.44 DreihsAcInc 10.51 EVPTxMEmI 46.31 Eaton Vance A: GblMacAbR p 10.01 FloatRate 9.27 IncBosA 5.79 LgCpVal 18.09 NatlMunInc 9.93 Strat Income Cl A 8.10 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 8.96 GblMacAbR 10.00 IncBost 5.79 LgCapVal 18.14 ParStEmMkt 14.30 EdgwdGInst n 12.96 FMI Funds: LargeCap p 16.21 FPA Funds: NewInc 10.68 FPACres n 28.00 Fairholme 27.07 Federated A: KaufmA p 5.20 MuniUltshA 10.05 TtlRtBd p 11.41 Federated Funds: TtlRtnBdSvc 11.41 Federated Instl: KaufmanR 5.20 MunULA p 10.05 TotRetBond 11.41 StaValDivIS 4.77 Fidelity Advisor A: FltRateA r 9.81 FF2030A p 12.14 MidCpIIA p 17.62

... +.02 -.01 -.01 -.38 -.37 -.38 +.02 -.16 -.22 -.09 -.02 -.01 -.01 -.06 -.12 -.03 -.02 -.34 -.20 -.43 -.42 -.10 -.10 +.10 -.38 -.01 -.01 +.01 -.27 +.03 +.01 -.23 -.26 -.20 -.04 -.03 ... -.53 -.24 -.08 +.04 -.37 -.58 +.03 +.03 +.04 +.19 -.20 -.04 -.01 +.01 +.04 -.51 -.02 +.01 ... -.12 -.02 -.02 +.01 -.02 ... -.12 -.16 +.12 -.14 ... -.12 -.02 -.03 ... +.01 +.01 -.03 ... +.01 -.01 +.01 -.03 +.01

NwInsghts p 21.25 SmallCapA p 23.59 StrInA e 12.31 TotalBdA r 11.02 Fidelity Advisor C: NwInsghts tn 20.13 StratIncC nte 12.28 Fidelity Advisor I: FltRateI n 9.80 NewInsightI 21.52 SmallCapI 24.88 StrInI e 12.45 Fidelity Advisor T: NwInsghts p 20.96 StrInT e 12.31 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 n 13.71 FF2010K 12.67 FF2015 n 11.46 FF2015K 12.72 FF2020 n 13.83 FF2020A 12.07 FF2020K 13.11 FF2025 n 11.49 FF2025A 11.60 FF2025K 13.22 FF2030 n 13.67 FF2030K 13.36 FF2035 n 11.31 FF2035K 13.43 FF2040 n 7.89 FF2040K 13.47 FF2045 n 9.33 FF2045K 13.60 FF2050 n 9.19 FF2050K 13.62 IncomeFd n 11.51 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.14 AMgr50 n 15.82 AMgr70 nr 16.55 AMgr20 nr 13.05 Balanc 19.20 BalancedK 19.19 BlueChipGr 47.09 BluChpGrK 47.13 CA Mun n 12.65 Canada n 52.28 CapApp n 27.46 CapDevelO 11.17 CapInco nr 9.09 ChinaReg r 28.48 Contra n 72.81 ContraK 72.77 CnvSec 25.28 DisEq n 23.13 DiscEqF 23.10 DiverIntl n 27.73 DiversIntK r 27.69 DivStkO n 15.98 DivGth n 28.98 Emerg Asia r 28.15 EmrgMkt n 22.79 EqutInc n 43.60 EQII n 18.25 EqIncK 43.59 Export n 22.20 FidelFd 33.43 FltRateHi r 9.80 FourInOne n 27.73 GNMA n 11.87 GovtInc n 10.75 GroCo n 91.14 GroInc 19.50 GrowCoF 91.06 GrowthCoK 91.07 GrStrat nr 20.66 HighInc rn 8.95 Indepndnce n 24.65 InProBnd 12.98 IntBd n 10.96 IntmMuni n 10.56 IntlDisc n 29.77 InvGrBd n 11.76 InvGB n 7.78 LgCapVal n 10.82 LatAm n 54.63 LevCoStock 28.76 LowPr rn 39.18 LowPriStkK r 39.15 Magellan n 69.03 MagellanK 68.96 MA Muni n 12.59 MidCap n 29.25 MidCapK r 29.24 MuniInc n 13.26 NewMkt nre 16.22 NewMill n 31.23 NY Mun n 13.51 OTC 61.35 OTC K 61.74 100Index 9.40

+.05 -.17 -.02 ... +.04 -.02 +.01 +.06 -.18 -.02 +.04 -.01 -.02 -.02 -.02 -.02 -.03 -.03 -.02 -.02 -.03 -.02 -.03 -.02 -.03 -.04 -.02 -.04 -.03 -.04 -.02 -.04 -.01 ... -.03 -.04 -.01 +.01 ... +.05 +.05 -.01 -1.14 +.01 +.01 +.01 -.12 +.21 +.21 -.12 +.02 +.02 -.29 -.29 -.02 -.12 -.27 -.32 -.20 -.08 -.20 +.03 -.04 +.01 -.11 +.01 -.01 +.25 -.05 +.25 +.25 -.31 +.01 -.08 +.02 ... ... -.35 ... +.01 -.02 -.80 -.12 -.08 -.09 +.01 +.01 ... -.14 -.14 ... -.08 -.03 -.01 -.44 -.44 +.01

Ovrsea n 29.44 -.36 Puritan 18.78 ... PuritanK 18.77 -.01 RealEInc r 10.73 -.01 RealEst n 29.64 -.62 SrAllSecEqF 12.14 ... SCmdtyStrt n 9.22 -.04 SCmdtyStrF n 9.24 -.04 SrsEmrgMkt 16.30 -.18 SrEmgMktF 16.33 -.18 SrsIntGrw 11.02 -.08 SerIntlGrF 11.03 -.08 SrsIntVal 8.54 -.10 SerIntlValF 8.55 -.10 SrsInvGrdF 11.76 ... ShtIntMu n 10.87 ... STBF n 8.53 -.01 SmCapDisc n 21.97 -.42 SmallCapS nr 18.47 -.26 SmCapValu r 15.25 -.29 StkSlcACap n 26.70 -.08 StkSelSmCap 19.68 -.31 StratDivInc 11.55 -.05 StratInc ne 11.02 -.02 TaxFreeB r 11.42 ... TotalBond n 11.02 +.01 USBI n 11.82 ... Value n 70.04 -.39 Fidelity Selects: Biotech n 99.74 -2.31 Energy n 54.36 +.12 Gold rn 45.50 -1.50 Health n 131.44 -2.07 NatRes rn 35.02 -.05 Softwr n 87.17 +.56 Tech n 98.25 +.63 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMktIndInv 39.37 -.41 500IdxInv n 47.59 -.06 500Idx I 47.60 -.06 IntlIndxInv 32.18 -.30 TotMkIdxF r 38.92 -.11 TotMktIndInv 38.91 -.12 USBond I 11.82 ... Fidelity Spart Adv: ExtMktAdv r 39.37 -.41 500IdxAdv 47.60 -.05 IntlAdv r 32.18 -.30 TotlMktAdv r 38.91 -.12 USBond I 11.82 ... First Eagle: GlobalA 47.75 -.09 OverseasA 21.67 +.03 SoGenGold p 31.14 -.64 Forum Funds: AbsolStratI r 10.99 +.03 Frank/Temp Frnk A: AdjUS p 8.86 ... BalInv p 41.98 -.47 CalInsA p 12.60 -.01 CalTFrA p 7.30 ... FedInterm p 12.38 -.02 FedTxFrA p 12.42 ... FlexCapGrA 48.79 +.16 FoundFAl p 10.48 -.06 GoldPrM A 39.73 -2.07 GrowthA p 48.74 -.01 HY TFA p 10.56 -.01 HiIncoA 2.00 +.01 IncoSerA p 2.15 -.01 InsTFA p 12.35 -.02 NY TFA p 12.02 ... RisDivA p 36.16 -.28 SMCpGrA 37.57 -.03 StratInc p 10.46 ... TotlRtnA p 10.24 ... USGovA p 6.91 +.01 UtilitiesA p 13.13 -.02 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv n 13.15 -.05 HY TF Adv 10.60 ... IncomeAdv 2.14 ... TGlbTRAdv 13.05 -.04 USGovAdv p 6.93 +.01 Frank/Temp Frnk C: FoundFAl p 10.34 -.05 IncomeC t 2.17 -.01 StratIncC p 10.46 ... USGovC t 6.87 +.01 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.93 -.07 Frank/Temp Temp A: DevMktA p 23.47 -.28 ForeignA p 6.47 -.08 GlBondA p 13.18 -.06 GrowthA p 17.74 -.20 WorldA p 15.01 -.17 Frank/Temp Tmp Adv: GrthAv 17.73 -.20

Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.21 -.06 Franklin Templ: TgtModA p 14.36 -.04 GE Elfun S&S: S&S Income n 11.78 +.02 TaxEx 12.20 -.01 Trusts n 44.14 -.30 US Eqty n 42.33 -.11 GE Instl Funds: IntlEq n 10.27 -.09 GE Investments: TRFd3 p 16.56 -.08 GMO Trust: USTreas x 25.00 ... GMO Trust II: EmergMkt r 11.68 -.23 GMO Trust III: CHIE 21.61 -.09 IntlIntrVal 20.05 -.18 Quality 22.92 +.09 GMO Trust IV: EmerMkt 11.62 -.22 IntlGrEq 22.19 -.15 IntlIntrVal 20.03 -.17 Quality 22.93 +.08 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 11.63 -.22 IntlCoreEq 26.91 -.23 Quality 22.92 +.08 StrFixInco 16.36 -.04 Gabelli Funds: Asset 50.71 -.40 EqInc p 21.51 -.16 SmCapG n 34.43 -.50 Gateway Funds: GatewayA 26.75 -.05 Goldman Sachs A: MidCapVA p 36.32 -.19 Goldman Sachs Inst: CoreFxc 10.39 +.01 GrthOppt 24.54 +.04 HiYield 7.10 ... HYMuni n 8.80 ... MidCapVal 36.57 -.19 SD Gov 10.25 -.01 ShrtDurTF n 10.66 +.01 SmCapVal 44.22 -.89 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.48 +.01 CapAppInst n 41.04 +.27 HiYBdInst r 10.91 +.02 IntlInv t 57.75 -.75 IntlAdmin p 57.90 -.75 Intl nr 58.28 -.76 Harding Loevner: EmgMkts r 47.29 -.25 Hartford Fds A: CapAppA p 32.37 -.38 DivGthA p 19.88 -.13 FltRateA px 8.78 +.01 MidCapA p 19.65 -.09 Hartford Fds C: CapAppC t 28.70 -.34 FltRateC tx 8.77 +.01 Hartford Fds I: DivGthI n 19.82 -.13 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI n 32.38 -.37 FltRateI x 8.79 +.01 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 41.55 -.31 Div&Grwth 20.40 -.13 Advisers 20.36 -.06 Stock 42.91 -.21 IntlOpp 11.66 -.15 TotalRetBd 11.79 +.05 Heartland Fds: ValPlusInv p 29.68 -.86 Henderson Glbl Fds: IntlOppA p 19.70 +.08 Hussman Funds: StrTotRet r 12.40 ... StrGrowth 11.92 -.05 IVA Funds: Intl I r 15.45 -.12 WorldwideA t 16.13 -.12 WorldwideC t 16.03 -.12 Worldwide I r 16.13 -.11 Invesco Fds Instl: IntlGrow 27.22 -.18 Invesco Funds A: BalRiskA 12.23 -.07 Chart p 17.26 -.05 CmstkA 16.44 -.07

Constl p 23.57 DevMkt p 31.64 DivrsDiv p 12.41 EqtyIncA 8.71 GrIncA p 19.53 HYMuA 9.67 IntlGrow 26.88 MidCpCEq p 22.93 MuniInA 13.67 RealEst p 24.29 Invesco Funds P: SummitP p 12.45 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 24.16 AssetStrA p 24.88 AssetStrI r 25.09 GlNatRsA p 19.14 GlNatResI t 19.60 HighIncoA p 8.22 JPMorgan A Class: Core Bond A 11.93 Inv Bal p 12.60 InvCon p 11.47 InvGr&InA p 13.26 MdCpVal p 24.84 JPMorgan C Class: CoreBond pn 11.98 JP Morgan Instl: MidCapVal n 25.22 JPMorgan R Cl: CoreBond n 11.93 MtgBacked 11.51 ShtDurBond 10.99 JPMorgan Select: MdCpValu 25.02 USEquity n 10.75 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBond n 11.92 HighYld 7.87 IntmdTFBd n 11.38 IntlValSel 12.09 IntrdAmer 24.68 LgCapGr 23.47 ShtDurBdSel 10.99 TxAwRRet n 10.52 USLCCrPls n 21.53 Janus S Shrs: Forty 34.11 Janus T Shrs: BalancedT n 26.04 Grw&IncT n 32.62 Janus T 29.87 OverseasT r 38.67 PerkMCVal T 21.65 ResearchT n 30.82 ShTmBdT 3.08 Twenty T 56.91 Jensen Funds: QualGrowth I 28.10 QualityGrthJ 28.08 John Hancock A: StrIncA p 6.60 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggress 12.25 LSBalance 12.96 LS Conserv 13.03 LSGrowth 12.84 LS Moder 12.83 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 25.55 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 19.26 Lazard Open: EmgMktOp p 19.71 Legg Mason A: CBEqBldrA 13.75 CBAggGr p 121.35 CBAppr p 14.60 CBFdAllCV A 13.53 WAMgMuA p 16.74 Legg Mason C: CMValTr p 40.25 Longleaf Partners: Partners 29.39 Intl n 13.24 SmCap 26.74 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.57 StrInc C 15.10 LSBondR 14.51 StrIncA 15.02 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdA p 12.35 InvGrBdC p 12.25 InvGrBdY 12.35 Lord Abbett A:

-.04 -.28 -.12 -.04 -.12 +.01 -.18 -.08 -.01 -.51 -.07 -.10 -.10 -.11 -.25 -.25 +.03 +.03 -.02 -.01 -.04 -.16 +.02 -.16 +.03 +.03 ... -.16 -.02 +.03 +.02 -.01 -.20 -.12 +.06 ... ... -.07 -.08 +.01 -.02 +.02 -.40 -.17 -.08 ... -.17 -.17 -.17 ... -.06 -.03 ... -.04 -.01 -.27 -.16 -.17 -.05 ... ... -.11 -.01 -.22 +.13 -.02 +.27 +.02 +.01 +.02 +.01 +.03 +.02 +.03

IntrTaxFr 10.81 -.01 AffiliatdA p 11.39 -.06 FundlEq 13.05 -.11 BondDebA p 7.91 +.01 ShDurIncoA p 4.59 ... MidCapA p 17.05 -.13 RsSmCpA 32.89 -.68 TaxFrA p 11.05 ... Lord Abbett C: BdDbC p 7.93 +.01 ShDurIncoC t 4.62 ... Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.59 ... Lord Abbett I: SmCapVal 34.88 -.72 MFS Funds A: IntlDiverA 13.10 -.11 MITA 20.21 +.01 MIGA 16.65 -.05 EmGrA 45.13 +.09 IntlValA 24.68 -.07 ModAllA 13.81 -.03 MuHiA t 7.88 ... RschA 26.40 ... TotRA 14.60 -.01 UtilA 17.28 +.04 ValueA 23.85 -.06 MFS Funds I: ResrchBdI n 10.81 +.02 ReInT 14.79 -.18 ValueI 23.96 -.06 MFS Funds Instl: IntlEqty n 17.36 -.22 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBdA 5.93 +.02 LgCpGrA p 7.55 +.04 MainStay Funds I: ICAP SelEq 36.47 -.21 Mairs & Power: Growth n 76.75 -.90 Managers Funds: Bond n 26.68 +.13 Manning&Napier Fds: WorldOppA n 7.31 -.03 Matthews Asian: AsiaDivInv r 13.39 +.06 AsianG&IInv 16.09 -.08 China Inv 23.77 -.05 PacTigerInv 22.20 -.12 MergerFd n 15.66 +.01 Meridian Funds: Growth 45.26 -.35 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.52 +.02 TotalRetBondI 10.52 +.02 MontagGr I 23.94 -.07 MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI n 13.16 -.13 MCapGrI n 36.76 ... MCapGrP p 35.46 +.03 Munder Funds Y: MdCpCGrY n 30.62 -.28 Mutual Series: BeaconZ 12.49 -.01 GblDiscovA 28.56 -.08 GlbDiscC 28.34 -.08 GlbDiscZ 28.92 -.07 QuestZ 17.04 +.01 SharesZ 21.09 -.07 Nationwide Instl: S&P500Instl n 11.19 -.01 Neuberger&Berm Fds: Genesis n 34.77 -.60 GenesInstl 48.82 -.85 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis n 50.66 -.88 Nicholas Group: Nichol n 46.69 -.44 Northern Funds: BondIdx 10.94 +.01 EmgMEqIdx 11.62 -.18 FixIn n 10.53 +.02 HiYFxInc n 7.25 +.01 IntTaxEx n 10.84 -.01 IntlEqIdx r 9.67 -.10 MMEmMkt r 18.39 -.22 MMIntlEq r 9.02 -.10 SmlCapVal n 16.21 -.38 StockIdx n 16.66 -.02 Nuveen Cl A: HYldMuBd p 15.74 +.01 Nuveen Cl R: IntmDurMuBd 9.28 -.01 HYMuniBd 15.74 +.02 TWValOpp 32.91 -.33

Nuveen Cl Y: RealEst 20.28 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.42 GlobalI r 22.18 Intl I r 18.52 IntlSmCp r 13.28 Oakmark 45.39 Select 30.70 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.18 GlbSMdCap 14.79 LgCapStrat 9.59 RealReturn 9.74 Oppenheimer A: AMTFrMuA 6.75 CapAppA p 46.55 CapIncA p 8.78 DevMktA p 32.67 EqIncA p 24.26 GlobalA p 58.24 GblAllocA 14.64 GlblOppA 30.19 GblStrIncoA 4.20 Gold p 37.54 IntlBdA p 6.38 IntGrow p 27.81 LtdTrmMu 14.89 MnStFdA 34.50 MnStSCpA p 22.01 RisingDivA 16.79 SenFltRtA 8.21 Oppenheimer C&M: DevMktC t 31.40 GblStrIncoC 4.19 IntlBondC 6.36 SenFltRtC 8.22 Oppenheimer Roch: LtdNYA p 3.37 LtdNYC t 3.36 RoNtMuC t 7.11 RoMu A p 16.47 RcNtlMuA 7.13 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 32.30 IntlBdY 6.38 IntlGrowY 27.64 ValueY 22.32 Osterweis Funds: StratIncome 11.57 PIMCO Admin PIMS: RelRetAd p 12.02 ShtTmAd p 9.76 TotRetAd n 11.11 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AllAssetAut r 10.67 AllAsset 12.16 CommodRR 6.88 DiverInco 11.57 EmgMktCur 10.44 EmMktsBd 11.50 FltgInc r 8.54 FrgnBdUnd r 11.00 FrgnBd n 10.63 HiYld n 9.26 InvGradeCp 10.61 LowDur n 10.41 ModDur n 10.76 RERRStg r 5.19 RealReturn 11.69 RealRetInstl 12.02 ShortT 9.76 TotRet n 11.11 TR II n 10.75 TRIII n 9.77 PIMCO Funds A: AllAstAuth t 10.60 All Asset p 12.06 CommodRR p 6.74 LowDurA 10.41 RealRetA p 12.02 TotRtA 11.11 PIMCO Funds C: AllAstAut t 10.49 AllAssetC t 11.91 RealRetC p 12.02 TotRtC t 11.11 PIMCO Funds D: LowDurat p 10.41 RealRtn p 12.02 TotlRtn p 11.11 PIMCO Funds P: AstAllAuthP 10.66 EmgLocalP 10.82 RealRtnP 12.02 TotRtnP 11.11 Parnassus Funds: EqtyInco n 27.49

-.44 -.10 +.06 -.10 +.13 -.10 -.02 +.01 -.07 -.03 -.14 ... +.15 +.01 -.51 -.17 -.55 -.10 -.62 -.01 -1.52 -.04 -.27 ... +.03 -.23 -.05 +.01 -.48 -.01 -.04 +.01 ... ... +.01 +.01 +.01 -.49 -.04 -.26 -.16 +.02 +.02 ... +.01 -.02 -.02 -.03 +.02 -.09 +.01 ... -.09 -.01 ... +.01 -.01 +.02 -.10 +.04 +.02 ... +.01 -.01 +.01 -.03 -.02 -.03 -.01 +.02 +.01 -.03 -.03 +.02 +.01 -.01 +.02 +.01 -.02 -.09 +.02 +.01 -.16

Pax World: Balanced 23.08 Perm Port Funds: Permanent 48.97 Pioneer Funds A: CullenVal 18.02 HighYldA p 10.04 PionFdA p 41.16 StratIncA p 10.91 ValueA p 11.48 Pioneer Funds C: PioneerFdY 41.32 Pioneer Fds Y: CullenVal Y 18.06 GlbHiYld 9.78 StratIncY p 10.91 Price Funds Adv: EqtyInc n 24.61 Growth pn 34.84 HiYld n 6.69 R2020A p 16.91 R2030Adv np 17.77 Price Funds: Balance n 20.09 BlueChipG n 42.63 CapApr n 21.83 DivGro n 24.65 EmMktB n 13.19 EmMktS n 31.84 EqInc n 24.67 EqIdx n 36.23 GNM n 10.12 Growth n 35.20 HlthSci n 36.51 HiYld n 6.71 InstlCpGr n 17.89 InstHiYld n 9.46 InstlFltRt n 10.06 MCEqGr n 29.43 IntlBd n 9.96 IntlDis n 41.59 IntlGr&Inc n 12.45 IntStk n 13.54 LatAm n 45.07 MdTxFr n 10.92 MediaTl n 51.72 MidCap n 57.61 MCapVal n 23.13 NewAm n 34.54 N Asia n 15.36 NewEra n 45.95 NwHrzn n 34.30 NewInco n 9.74 OverSea SF n 7.91 PSBal n 19.88 RealAssets r 11.26 RealEst n 19.77 R2010 n 15.82 R2015 12.29 Retire2020 n 17.01 R2025 12.46 R2030 n 17.89 R2035 n 12.65 R2040 n 18.01 R2045 n 11.99 Ret Income n 13.48 SciTch n 29.92 ST Bd n 4.84 SmCapStk n 34.38 SmCapVal n 37.45 SpecGr 18.42 SpecIn n 12.61 SumMuInt n 11.86 TxFree n 10.35 TxFrHY n 11.28 TxFrSI n 5.71 Value n 24.44 Primecap Odyssey : Growth r 16.28 Principal Inv: BdMtgInstl 10.79 DivIntlInst 9.55 HighYldA p 7.61 HiYld In 10.50 LgLGI In 9.78 LgCV1 In 11.06 LgGrIn 8.56 LgCpIndxI 9.40 LgCValIn 9.92 LfTm2020In 11.99 LT2030In 11.84 LT2040In 11.99 PreSecs In 9.81 RealEstSecI 18.52 SAMBalA 13.20 Prudential Fds A: MidCpGrA 30.39 NatResA 51.22 STCorpBdA 11.50 UtilityA 11.01

-.11 -.30 -.11 -.06 -.39 +.02 -.05 -.39 -.11 +.01 +.02 -.11 +.20 +.01 -.07 -.08 -.05 +.26 +.02 -.17 +.01 -.56 -.11 -.05 ... +.21 -.43 +.01 +.05 +.01 ... -.13 -.07 +.11 -.10 -.18 -.87 ... +.26 -.24 -.17 -.10 -.07 -.35 -.44 +.01 -.07 -.05 -.25 -.38 -.05 -.04 -.06 -.05 -.08 -.06 -.09 -.06 -.03 +.01 ... -.50 -.93 -.09 -.01 -.01 -.01 +.01 +.01 -.14 -.25 +.02 -.12 ... +.03 ... -.03 +.03 -.01 -.06 -.04 -.06 -.07 +.04 -.47 -.05 +.01 -.34 +.01 ...

Prudential Fds Z&I: MidCapGrZ 31.52 SmallCoZ 22.65 Putnam Funds A: CATxA p 8.16 DvrInA p 7.53 EqInA p 16.14 GrInA p 13.82 MultiCpGr 53.85 VoyA p 22.55 RS Funds: RSNatRes np 37.00 RidgeWorth Funds: GScUltShBdI 10.11 HighYldI 9.67 LgCpValEqI 13.28 MdCValEqI 10.76 Royce Funds: LowPrSkSvc r 16.12 PennMuI rn 11.77 PremierI nr 20.32 SpeclEqInv r 21.51 TotRetI r 13.56 ValPlusSvc 13.51 Russell Funds S: GlobEq 8.76 IntlDevMkt 28.95 StratBd 11.06 USCoreEq 29.05 SEI Portfolios: CoreFxInA n 11.22 HiYld n 7.33 IntlEqA n 7.99 LgCGroA n 23.77 LgCValA n 17.07 TaxMgdLC 13.01 SSgA Funds: EmgMkt 20.28 Schwab Funds: CoreEqty 17.99 DivEqtySel 13.99 FunUSLInst r 10.07 IntlSS r 15.80 1000Inv r 37.99 S&P Sel n 20.93 SmCapSel 20.88 TSM Sel r 24.34 Scout Funds: Intl 30.63 Selected Funds: AmerShsD 42.27 AmShsS p 42.29 Sequoia n 152.85 Sit Funds: US Gov n 11.31 Sound Shore: SoundShore n 32.72 St FarmAssoc: Gwth n 54.49 Sun Capital Adv: IbbotsBalSv p 12.12 TCW Funds: EmMktInc 8.63 TotlRetBdI 9.82 TCW Funds N: TotRtBdN p 10.15 TFS Funds: MktNeutral r 14.74 TIAA-CREF Funds: BdIdxInst 10.83 BondInst 10.61 EqIdxInst 10.23 IntlEqIInst 15.22 LgCVl Inst 13.23 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 18.32 Third Avenue Fds: REValInst r 23.04 ValueInst 45.56 Thornburg Fds C: IntValuC t 24.51 Thornburg Fds: IntlValA p 26.11 IncBuildA t 18.48 IncBuildC p 18.48 IntlValue I 26.70 LtdMunA p 14.62 LtTMuniI 14.63 ValueI 33.50 Thrivent Fds A: LgCapStock 22.67 MuniBd 11.73 Tocqueville Fds: Delafield 30.61 Gold t 77.38

+.02 -.41 ... +.02 -.10 -.06 -.13 ... -.10 -.01 ... -.07 -.06 -.34 -.23 -.39 -.27 -.19 -.25 -.06 -.32 +.03 -.08 +.02 ... -.08 +.19 -.06 +.02 -.27 ... -.06 -.04 -.18 -.06 -.03 -.46 -.08 -.26 -.42 -.42 -1.28 +.03 -.19 -.36 -.04 +.03 +.05 +.05 -.08 +.01 +.02 -.03 -.17 -.04 -.20 -.08 -.37 -.23 -.24 -.13 -.13 -.24 -.01 ... -.08 ... -.01 -.31 -2.74

Touchstone Family: SandsCapGrI 16.43 Transamerica C: AsAlModGr t 11.95 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 22.80 USAA Group: CornstStr n 22.14 HYldInco n 8.31 IncStk n 12.98 Income n 13.21 IntTerBd n 10.56 Intl n 23.53 PrecMM 33.20 S&P Idx n 20.14 S&P Rewrd 20.15 ShtTBnd n 9.18 TxEIT n 13.56 TxELT n 13.56 TxESh n 10.83 VALIC : MidCapIdx 20.50 StockIndex 24.95 Van Eck Funds: GlHardA 48.42 Vanguard Admiral: AssetAdml n 56.17 BalAdml n 22.84 CAITAdm n 11.61 CALTAdm 11.73 CpOpAdl n 73.99 EM Adm nr 35.98 Energy n 120.18 EqIncAdml 47.55 EuropAdml 56.05 ExplAdml 73.65 ExntdAdm n 43.68 500Adml n 123.87 GNMA Adm n 11.08 GroIncAdm 46.26 GrwthAdml n 34.69 HlthCare n 55.97 HiYldCp n 5.85 InflProAd n 28.16 ITBondAdml 11.87 ITsryAdml n 11.71 IntlGrAdml 57.48 ITAdml n 14.26 ITCoAdmrl 10.17 LtdTrmAdm 11.21 LTGrAdml 10.41 LTsryAdml 12.97 LT Adml n 11.57 MCpAdml n 98.12 MorgAdm 60.01 MuHYAdml n 10.96 NJLTAd n 12.18 NYLTAd m 11.60 PrmCap r 68.79 PacifAdml 63.21 PALTAdm n 11.58 REITAdml r 87.83 STsryAdml 10.79 STBdAdml n 10.64 ShtTrmAdm 15.95 STFedAdm 10.87 STIGrAdm 10.74 SmlCapAdml n 36.75 TxMCap r 67.13 TxMGrInc r 60.25 TtlBdAdml n 11.03 TotStkAdm n 33.73 ValueAdml n 21.67 WellslAdm n 56.78 WelltnAdm n 56.53 WindsorAdm n 47.11 WdsrIIAdm 48.69 TaxMgdSC r 29.77 Vanguard Fds: AssetA n 25.06 CapOpp n 32.04 Convt n 12.81 DivAppInv n 22.73 DividendGro 15.98 Energy 64.01 EqInc n 22.68 Explorer n 79.16 GNMA n 11.08 GlobEq n 17.43 GroInc n 28.33 HYCorp n 5.85 HlthCare n 132.65 InflaPro n 14.33 IntlExplr n 14.35 IntlGr 18.07 IntlVal n 29.09 ITI Grade 10.17 ITTsry n 11.71 LIFECon n 16.80 LIFEGro n 22.52 LIFEInc n 14.43

+.31 -.03 +.08 -.07 +.02 ... +.03 +.02 -.23 -1.33 -.03 -.02 ... ... ... ... -.14 -.03 -.51 -.16 -.03 ... ... -.71 -.55 -.46 -.22 -.68 -.77 -.45 -.15 ... +.12 +.05 -.26 +.01 +.05 ... -.02 -.92 -.01 +.01 +.01 +.08 +.03 -.01 -.19 +.08 ... -.01 -.01 -.67 -.61 -.01 -1.91 -.01 -.01 ... -.01 ... -.59 -.14 -.08 ... -.10 -.09 -.01 -.22 -.26 -.15 -.69 -.07 -.30 -.03 -.12 -.11 -.25 -.11 -.82 ... -.15 +.07 +.01 -.61 +.02 -.07 -.29 -.38 +.01 -.02 -.04 -.11 -.01

LIFEMod n 20.15 LTInGrade n 10.41 LTTsry n 12.97 MidCapGro 20.76 Morgan n 19.36 MuHY n 10.96 MuInt n 14.26 MuLtd n 11.21 MuShrt n 15.95 PrecMtlsMin r 21.54 PrmCpCore rn 14.33 Prmcp r 66.31 SelValu r 19.84 STAR n 19.88 STIGrade 10.74 STFed n 10.87 STTsry n 10.79 StratEq n 20.29 TgtRet2005 12.33 TgtRetInc 11.88 TgtRet2010 23.36 TgtRet2015 12.91 TgtRet2020 22.89 TgtRet2025 13.02 TgRet2030 22.32 TgtRet2035 13.42 TgtRe2040 22.04 TgtRet2050 n 21.94 TgtRe2045 n 13.84 USGro n 20.18 Wellsly n 23.43 Welltn n 32.73 Wndsr n 13.96 WndsII n 27.43 Vanguard Idx Fds: DevMkInPl nr 94.95 EmMkInPl nr 91.03 ExtMkt I n 107.79 MidCpIstPl n 106.89 SmCapInPl n 106.06 TotIntAdm nr 23.94 TotIntlInst nr 95.73 TotIntlIP nr 95.74 TotIntSig nr 28.72 500 n 123.85 Balanced n 22.84 DevMkt n 9.19 EMkt n 27.39 Extend n 43.67 Growth n 34.69 ITBond n 11.87 LTBond n 13.82 MidCap 21.62 REIT r 20.58 SmCap n 36.72 SmlCpGrow 23.74 SmlCapVal 16.49 STBond n 10.64 TotBond n 11.03 TotlIntl n 14.31 TotStk n 33.72 Value n 21.67 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst n 22.84 DevMktInst n 9.11 EmMktInst n 27.37 ExtIn n 43.67 FTAllWldI r 85.18 GrowthInstl 34.69 InfProtInst n 11.47 InstIdx n 123.06 InsPl n 123.07 InstTStIdx n 30.52 InstTStPlus 30.53 MidCapInstl n 21.67 REITInst r 13.59 STIGrInst 10.74 SmCpIn n 36.74 SmlCapGrI n 23.78 TBIst n 11.03 TSInst n 33.73 ValueInstl n 21.67 Vanguard Signal: ExtMktSgl n 37.53 500Sgl n 102.32 GroSig n 32.12 ITBdSig n 11.87 MidCapIdx n 30.97 STBdIdx n 10.64 SmCapSig n 33.11 TotalBdSgl n 11.03 TotStkSgnl n 32.55 ValueSig n 22.55 Vantagepoint Fds: EqtyInc n 8.87 Growth n 9.05 MPLgTmGr n 21.67 MPTradGrth n 22.72 Victory Funds: DvsStkA 15.59 Virtus Funds:

-.07 +.08 +.03 -.05 +.03 ... -.01 +.01 ... -1.06 -.14 -.64 -.06 -.05 ... -.01 -.01 -.17 -.03 -.01 -.06 -.04 -.09 -.06 -.11 -.07 -.11 -.11 -.07 +.20 -.01 -.13 -.08 -.09 -1.08 -1.40 -1.12 -.21 -1.72 -.29 -1.18 -1.19 -.35 -.16 -.03 -.10 -.42 -.45 +.05 ... +.07 -.05 -.45 -.60 -.36 -.28 -.01 ... -.18 -.10 -.08 -.03 -.11 -.42 -.46 -1.16 +.05 +.02 -.16 -.15 -.09 -.08 -.05 -.30 ... -.60 -.36 ... -.10 -.08 -.39 -.13 +.05 ... -.06 -.01 -.53 ... -.10 -.09 ... ... -.08 -.06 -.08

EmgMktI 9.43 Virtus Funds A: MulSStA p 4.83 WM Blair Fds Inst: IntlGrwth 13.60 WM Blair Mtl Fds: IntlGrowthI r 20.95 Waddell & Reed Adv: AssetS p 9.43 Bond 6.53 CoreInvA 6.11 NwCcptA p 10.02 ScTechA 10.11 Wasatch: IncEqty 14.06 SmCapGrth 41.40 Wells Fargo Adv A: AstAllA p 12.34 Wells Fargo Adv Ad: AssetAll 12.41 Wells Fargo Adv C: AstAllC t 11.90 Wells Fargo Adv : GrowthInv n 37.88 STMunInv n 10.00 SCapValInv p 33.22 Wells Fargo Ad Ins: TRBdS 12.95 DJTar2020I 14.36 Growth 40.84 UlStMuInc 4.82 Wells Fargo Admin: Growth 39.78 Wells Fargo Instl: UltSTMuA 4.82 Westcore: PlusBd 11.11 Western Asset: CrPlusBdF1 p 11.26 CorePlus I 11.27 Core I 12.00 Wintergreen t 14.66 Yacktman Funds: Fund p 18.24 Focused 19.46

-.02 ... -.07 -.11 -.04 ... -.01 -.09 +.10 -.06 -.59 -.02 -.03 -.03 +.19 ... -.37 +.01 -.05 +.20 ... +.20 ... +.02 +.02 +.03 +.03 -.20 -.17 -.15


THE Garden City Telegram

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

D7

Business Briefs Exhibitors sought for airshow The Kansas Department of Commerce and the Greater Wichita Economic Development Coalition will sponsor the “Kansas Pavilion” during the Farnborough International Airshow, which is set for July 9 to 15 in Farnborough, England. The pavilion will give Kansas aviation-related businesses a chance to showcase their products and services at one of the world’s largest aerospace shows. “This is a major event in the aviation world,” Kansas Commerce Secretary Pat George said. “The pavilion will offer exhibitors a unique and cost-effective way to explore global business opportunities. There are tremendous opportunities for companies to enter or expand into foreign markets.” The Farnborough exhibition will attract more than 120,000 industry visitors. Deals worth $47 billion were announced at the last show in 2010. Kansas exported more than $10.6 billion worth of goods and services for 2011 (through November), one of the highest annual levels on record for the state. The number one export product for Kansas was aircraft and parts. “Our export activity is increasing substantially, especially in the aviation sector, and it’s really helping Kansas recover from the recession,” George said. “We want the highest level of participation possible at Farnborough.” Participation in the Kansas Pavilion includes: • Individual exhibit space for participating private sector partners. • Use of private and open conference/meeting facilities and the U.S. Exhibitors’ Lounge. • Pre-show, on-site and post-show assistance, including market research, setting business appointments, follow-up meetings and export counseling. • Special assistance, as needed, for on-site support provided by Department trade staff. The deadline to apply to exhibit is March 1. The department’s application form is available online at KansasCommerce. com/trade under “Farnborough Airshow 2012.” Applications should be mailed, faxed or emailed to: Larry Childs, Kansas Department of Commerce Trade Division, 1000 SW Jackson St., Suite 100, Topeka, KS 66612; lchilds@kansascommerce. com; or faxed to (785) 2963490. For more information, contact Childs at (785) 296-6273 or Tammy Nolan, Greater Wichita Economic Development Coalition, (316) 268-1128, tnolan@ gwedc.org.

Black Hills Energy upgrading meters Black Hills Energy will deliver more efficient service to southwest Kansas by expanding its Automated Meter Reading system to 33,000 of the company’s natural gas customers in the area. There is no direct charge to the customer for the AMR upgrade. Black Hills representa-

tives currently are equipping meters in Garden City, Liberal and 10 other towns in the region with a small transmitter to efficiently and effectively send monthly meter readings to a passing company vehicle using harmless radio waves. The contractors will upgrade service to Dodge City next, with the project scheduled for completion in May. “We are making significant investments in our Kansas natural gas system to automate the meter reading process,” southwest Kansas gas operations manager Lon Meyer said. “This technology increases operational efficiencies and improves the service that we provide to our customers. With AMR, utility workers no longer need access to a customer’s property each month to read the meters. Locked gates and protective pets no longer block the path to an accurate reading, which translates to an accurate monthly statement.” Transmitter installation does not require a service interruption in most cases. About 650 of the 33,000 meters must be exchanged, requiring a brief service interruption and indoor access to relight pilots on gas appliances, water heaters and furnaces. Those customers will receive a letter describing the appointment process. The project’s scope makes it practical to again have utility contractor Kore Services complete the installations. “Kore demands the same dedication to safety and customer service of its employees as we do,” Meyer said. Kore employees wear a “BHE Contractor” safety vest and carry identification provided by Black Hills. Their vehicles will carry “Contractor For Black Hills Energy” signs. The company previously introduced the more efficient service to 65,000 Black Hills customers in Lawrence and Wichita. With completion of the southwest Kansas project, virtually all 110,000 Black Hills Energy-Kansas Gas customers in 56 Kansas communities will benefit from the more efficient, accurate meter reading that AMR provides. Outside Garden City and Liberal, installers have been or will be visiting Copeland, Elkhart, Fowler, Hugoton, Meade, Moscow, Plains, Rolla, Satanta and Sublette. Customers with questions can call Black Hills Energy’s 24-hour Customer Service Center toll-free at (888) 890-5554. Information also is available at www.blackhillsenergy.com/customers/amr.

The Garden City Area Chamber of Commerce will host a chamber breakfast at 7:30 a.m. Wednesday at Wheat Lands Restaurant and Convention Center, 1404 E. Fulton St. Call 276-3264 or email chamber@gcnet.com to RSVP.

Ribbon cutting approaching Join the Garden City Area Chamber of

Sunday, February 12th, 2012 11:00am to 3:00pm

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Date set for statewide job fair KANSASWORKS, Kansas Economic Development Alliance, and Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve are hosting the annual statewide job fair from 2:30 to 6:30 p.m. April 24 at United Wireless Arena in Dodge City. The event, which is free, will be open exclusively to military personnel and veterans at 2:30 p.m. and to the general public at 3:30 p.m. A variety of industries are being encouraged to attend including, healthcare, energy, bioscience, manufacturing, agriculture and more. Booth space is available for employers interested in connecting with qualified job seekers from the region. Registration for employers is $100 and may be done online at KANSASWORKS.com. Registration fee includes one eight-foot table, two chairs, wireless Internet capability, refreshments and two meals. The KANSASWORKS mobile center will be onsite to help with résumé preparation and online job applications. For more information or additional information, contact Phyllis LaShell at (785) 577-4610 or email plashell@kansasworks.com.

KIUL donates to Salvation Army For the last two years, KIUL Radio has provided 36 hours of continuous commercial-free music over Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Both years, the station has taken a portion of the sponsorship revenue generated from the promotion and donated it back to a local charity. The station recently presented a $500 check to Captain Craig Lurtz of Garden City’s Salvation Army on behalf of AM 1240 KIUL, AM 1340 KGGS and Steckline Communications. Last year’s recipient was the Emmaus House.

Wheatfields shopper wins $500 Lexi Billinger never guessed that her trip home to Garden City would end with winning a $500 wardrobe from downtown Garden City’s Wheatfields On Main. Wheatfields On Main participated in the company-sponsored $500 wardrobe giveaway by Conrad C held throughout the United States and Canada. Entries for a chance to win are made online with a special entry number found on each Conrad C garment or from free cards given away throughout the fall season. With over 200 entries to give away, Wheatfields On Main had a laptop set up for people to enter to win during the ‘Girls Night Out’ event and continued to hand out entries up to the day last the contest in December. While Christmas shopping with her family at Wheatfields On Main, Billinger, her mother, Lee Ann Shrader, and grandmother, Patsy Haga, all were given entries. After returning to work in Kansas City, Billinger received a phone message from Quebec, Canada, announcing her as a winner. Of the 10 names listed on the company’s website, Billinger is the only winner in the state of Kansas. She also was one of only four winners in the United States; all other winners resided in Canada. Shonda Collins, owner of Wheatfields On Main, knew it was a long shot to have a winner from all the stores in Canada and the United States. “I kept encouraging people to enter the contest. I knew someone would win and it might as well be someone from Garden City, Kansas.”

ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT ST. DOMINIC SCHOOL

and industry that may have environmental impacts to soil, water and air. KDHE staff also provide technical and compliance assistance to business and the public. “I look forward to continuing to serve Kansans in the southwest district,” Glave said. “The work we do has a direct impact on this region of the state.” Glave grew up in Texas, and received his bachelor’s degree from St. Edward’s University in Austin. Prior to joining KDHE, his work experience was in livestock production and farm management with Carroll’s Foods of Virginia and with Seaboard Foods in Kansas. He also is currently serving as a school board member on USD 217 Board of Education in Rolla.

Delgado nabs McDonald’s award Garden City is home to one of the nation’s top McDonald’s restaurant managers. Berenice Delgado recently received the Ray Kroc Award, an annual performance-based award that recognizes the top performing McDonald’s restaurant managers in the country. Named after McDonald’s Corporation founder Ray Kroc, the award was established in 1999 to honor hardworking restaurant managers — those who make Kroc’s vision of excellence come to life in restaurants and for customers each day. A select 140 managers were chosen this year to receive the Ray Kroc Award, an honor that comes with a cash prize, a Ray Kroc award trophy,

ring and pin, and a trip to Chicago for an awards gala hosted by McDonald’s USA President, Jan Fields. “This is a great accomplishment in my career with McDonald’s,” said Ray Kroc Award winner and Garden City McDonald’s Store Manager Berenice Delgado. “I know I couldn’t have done it without my management team, crew and everyone who supports me.” Delgado joined McDonald’s as a crew member in December 2002. After working as a shift manager and assistant manager, she was promoted to store manager at the Garden City McDonald’s on Kansas Avenue in 2007. She was instrumental in the rebuild of the Kansas Avenue restaurant and was awarded McDonald’s Manager of the Year in 2009 and 2010. Delgado actively supports her community by hosting McTeacher’s Nights for local schools, RMHC fundraisers, and other local events at her restaurant. “It is an honor to have Berenice win the Ray Kroc Award, as she is one of only two to receive it in the state of Kansas this year,” said Garden City McDonald’s Owner/ Operator Ed Milligan. McDonald’s owner/ operators and/or regional staff nominate restaurant managers for the Ray Kroc Award to recognize their hard work, dedication and commitment to McDonald’s. From there, a selection committee of representatives from McDonald’s Operations, Training and Human Resources select the top 1 percent of McDonald’s restaurant managers for the Ray Kroc Award.

Glave earns KDHE promotion The Kansas Department of Health and Environment has promoted Erich Glave to District Environmental Administrator in the Southwest District Office in Dodge City. Glave has been with KDHE’s district operations since 2007, working as an inspector in the livestock waste management program. Activities within the district office include conducting compliance inspections of business

Courtesy photo

Left to right: Juan Delgado, Berenice Delgado and Martha Delgado stand in the lobby of McDonald’s.

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Chamber breakfast set for Wednesday

St. Dominic Parish Spaghetti Dinner

$ 00

Commerce Ambassadors as they celebrate the grand opening of Super Pollo, with owners Guadalupe and Rodrigo Rubi, at 2 p.m. Feb. 24. Super Pollo is located at 3225 Prairie Ave., on U.S. Highway 50 across from Bonanza BioEnergy.

Courtesy photo

Open Your Home to aWaiting Child

Captain Craig Lurtz of The Salvation Army is presented a check by Rick Everett, general manager of KIUL/KGGS, and Jared Martin, sales manager of KIUL/KGGS.

NOTICE TO BIDDERS Sealed bids for two construction projects for the City of Garden City, Kansas will be received until 10:00 a.m., February 29, 2012, in the City Engineer’s Office at the City Administrative Center, 301 N. 8th St., Garden City, Kansas. The bids will be opened and publicly read aloud at this time. Bids received after this time will be returned unopened. Project #1: Sprayground Improvements at the swimming pool Project #2: Rehabilitation of the Zoo Lift Station The proposed contract documents may be obtained from the City Engineer’s Office of the City of Garden City, Kansas, and are also available electronically, contact scottrell@garden-city.org for details. Each bid shall be accompanied by a bid bond, or a certified cashier’s check in the amount of five percent (5%) of the total bid. No bidder may withdraw his bid for at least thirty (30) days after the scheduled closing time for the receipt of bids. The City reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to waive informalities, and to accept the bid deemed to be in the best interest of the public. 212759

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D8

Business

SATURDAY, February 11, 2012

THE GARDEN CITY TELEGRAM

Obama call for manufacturing revival a tough goal WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama is making a strong electionyear push for an economic revival “built on American manufacturing.” But he faces an uphill slog, with little consensus even within his own party on how to do it. For decades, the United States has gradually shifted from creating goods to providing services. Fifty years ago, a third of U.S. jobs were in manufacturing. Now they account for just 9 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. A manufacturing renaissance is being preached from the White House, on the GOP campaign trail and in Super Bowl commercials. Economists suggest plans to help boost manufacturing jobs may make more political sense than economic sense. Obama’s prescription for a manufacturing comeback will be fleshed out in the new budget he submits on Monday. He is proposing tax incentives to companies that move their overseas operations back to the United States, along with tax penalties for those that don’t, more training and additional education. But few of his ideas are likely to be enacted in this highly-charged election year. Since the recession offi-

Associated Press

President Barack Obama speaks in the East Room of the White House in Washington on Jan. 13. Obama is making a strong election-year push for an economic revival “built on American manufacturing.” But he faces an uphill slog, with little consensus even within his own party on how to do it. cially ended nearly 2 1/2 years ago, manufacturing production has increased 15 percent, helped by the replacement of aging equipment and software and strong demand from foreign markets. But Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke told Congress this week that the rebound might not last: “More recently, the pace of growth in busi-

ness investment has slowed, likely reflecting concerns about both the domestic outlook and developments in Europe.” There are political overtones to Obama’s State of the Union appeal for “an economy that’s built to last, an economy built on American manufacturing.” Polls show support for the president has slipped in Rust

Belt battleground states he won in 2008. Helping manufacturers recover is also being talked up by Republican presidential contenders, who all blame Obama’s policies for contributing to the decline. Former Sen. Rick Santorum wants to eliminate the U.S. corporate tax completely for manufacturers, saying it would help put “men and women in this country who built this country back to work.” Mitt Romney’s get-tough rhetoric on China appears to be winning attention from workers and former workers in industries that have lost jobs to China. The former Massachusetts governor promises “to make America a more attractive place for manufacturers to invest.” Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich says we “badly need to rebuild our manufacturing base,” promoting job creation in the defense, energy and space industries. This heavy attention on manufacturing may be misplaced, economists suggest. “The vast majority of jobs in the future are going to be created in the service sector, not the manufacturing sector,” said Nigel Gault, chief U.S. economist for the consulting firm IHS Global

Insight. He said he thought it was “a bit misleading” to focus so much on manufacturing. Obama’s plan would: • Prevent U.S. companies from deducting moving expenses when they shift production overseas, while offering a 20 percent moving-expense tax credit for businesses returning to the U.S. • Establish a new trade enforcement unit. • Modify a tax credit for domestic production to make it apply more narrowly to manufacturing. • Extend $5 billion in new tax credits for clean-energy companies. • Reduce the nominal maximum 35 percent corporate tax, most likely taking it down to the high 20s. He also may propose a minimum tax on overseas profits. Obama also has called for a minimum 30 percent tax rate on annual incomes of more than $1 million. Business interests claim it could harm small and medium-sized manufacturers who file tax returns as individuals. Obama’s sharp focus on reviving manufacturing isn’t shared by all Democrats. “Let’s not fool ourselves. We’re not going to have the kind of manufacturing-

based economy we had 30 or 40 years ago,” says Robert Reich, labor secretary under President Bill Clinton. And Christina Romer, who headed the president’s Council of Economic Advisers from 2009-10, says it is wrong to suggest that producing “real things” is more important than “services.” “American consumers value health care and haircuts as much as washing machines and hair dryers. Our earnings from exporting architectural plans for a building in Shanghai are as real as those from exporting cars to Canada,” she wrote. Jay Timmons, president of the National Association of Manufacturers, said his organization agrees with Obama in part, that “manufacturers are poised for a renaissance.” “The good news is everybody is talking about manufacturing today. Even on the Super Bowl, you saw ad after ad referring to the promise and the potential of manufacturing in America,” he said. The bad news? It is still “20 percent more expensive to manufacture in the United States than it is anywhere else in the world,” Timmons said. Obama supporters argue his proposals would help make U.S. factories more competitive.

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GCTelegram February 11 2012