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Be the change you wish to see in the world. -Mohandas Gandhi

annual report 2011- 2012


from the director I

invite you to read our first annual report for the School of Social Transformation—where faculty, staff and students are addressing some of the most compelling issues of our times. Through our many programs and degrees we are preparing students to be productive citizens of the world, capable of analyzing complex problems and developing solutions. We are globally engaged and over the last year have had seven Fulbrights Scholars—some joining the school and some leaving for other parts of the world. We had a visiting scholar in gender studies from China, faculty exchanges with Cameroon, and hosted a highly successful conference on the politics and conflict in the Sudan. We bring back what we learn from the global and connect it to the local in our annual Local to Global Teach-in. The scholarship we publish covers just about every region of the world. Our students, faculty and alumni are socially embedded in their local communities and are actively involved in solving a wide range of problems covering immigration, sex trafficking, school bullying, domestic violence prevention, homelessness, educational equity, sustainability and economic development, and creating NGOs, websites and justice campaigns to advocate for a more just, equitable society. They are asking big questions, including: What does it mean to be human? How can we change society and protect the environment so that humans and their organizations can grow and flourish?

Director, Mary Margaret Fonow Heads of faculty Arna Alex Bontemps, African and African American Studies Georganne Scheiner Gillis,Women and Gender Studies Kathryn Nakagawa, Asian Pacific American Studies Mary Romero, Justice and Social Inquiry Communications specialist, Maureen Roen Design intern, Gregg Clawson Principal photography Thomas Story, Laura Segall, Ashley Lowery 2

ASU School of Social Transformation


table of contents news stories

Film festival tackles environmental rights n Maid in the U.S.A.: Romero’s body of scholarship is focus of Rutgers conference n On the track of ‘global jihad,’ Gallab studies rise of Islamist movements n Regents’ professor Kitch discusses women’s rights, race, reproduction n Professor unveils new resource for social entrepreneurs n Ms. Magazine taps faculty for online teaching expertise n School introduces certificates in Social Transformation n Cultural conservation: keeping languages alive n “América’s Home” debuts at Local to Global Justice Teach-In n Unchained: alum launches nonprofit to fight sex trafficking n Lawyer, doctoral grad works for underserved, vulnerable families n Homeless in the heat: grad examines lethal situation n Traffic patterns n Quick facts

lectures & events

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Noted constitutional scholar presents John P. Frank Memorial Lecture n Lecture series addresses civil rights n Zheng encourages others to 'be the change' n Sudan in the world n Addressing domestic violence in Asian and South Asian communities n Community discussion on “The Help”: the book, the film, the controversy n African and African American Studies roundtable n Andrew Ross discusses sustainability and social justice n ‘Women’s Power and Possibilities’ with Gloria Feldt n Multiple voices, multiple histories

media mentions

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Improving college completion rates for Native students n No Child Left Behind disappoints in Indian country n Nation’s Chinatowns are fading, professor says n Gallab book is focal point for global discussion on Sudan

honors & awards

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2012 SST Awards and Appreciation Event n Lauderdale named outstanding doctoral mentor n Adelman is Phoenix MLK honoree n Artiles awarded top AERA research honor n Fonow invited to Bellagio conference n McCarty earns NEH honor and Santa Fe residency n Yoo lauded for outstanding scholarship on race and ethnicity n Staff members capture grants and scholarships

funded research

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Funded projects of School of Social Transformation faculty n Fulbright connections

publications

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news stories

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Film festival tackles

environmental rights

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f the 6 billion people on earth, 1.1 billion do not have access to safe, clean drinking water. And while the average American uses 150 gallons of water per day, those in developing countries cannot find five. Who owns water? Who gets to make decisions about who has access to water? These were some of the issues addressed by the documentary “Flow: For Love of Water,” one of nine films featured at the second annual ASU Human Rights Film Festival, which ran April 20-22 on ASU’s Tempe campus. Coinciding this year with Earth Day, the festival’s Sunday lineup focused on environmental rights. “The film questions the very nature of water and our relation to it,” says Irena Salina, the film’s director, who builds a case against the growing privatization of the world’s dwindling fresh water supply by focusing on politics, pollution, human rights, and water’s emergence as a $425 billion industry. “It shows how local action can challenge giant corporations, and how the privatization of water has jeopardized the way of life for entire populations. “It was inspiring to learn that the most effective way to implement change around water issues, both here in the U.S.A. and abroad, are individual, community-based initiatives.” A post-film discussion about “Flow” was led by LaDawn Haglund, associate professor of justice and social inquiry in the School of Social Transformation and a fellow in human rights and sustainability in ASU’s Lincoln Center for Applied Ethics. Haglund’s research

analyzes the social and political dimensions of sustainability, particularly the human right to water. She recently returned from a Fulbright Research Fellowship in Brazil, where she studied courts as mechanisms for adjudicating the human rights to water and environmental protection. The festival closed out with a film produced by a student workshop led by assistant professor Aaron Golub in ASU’s School of Sustainability. “Overcoming EcoApartheid: Community Action for Environmental Justice in South Phoenix” documents a community’s efforts to create visions and strategies for justice and sustainability, tackling issues of health, environmental justice, urban history and segregation, food security and neighborhood organizing. Joining Golub as film discussants were Steve Brittle, president of Don’t Waste Arizona, and Darren Chapman, director of the Tigermountain Foundation. The other seven films rounding out the festival lineup were “Miss Landmine,” “Education Under Fire,” “Granito,” “The Truth that Wasn’t There,” “The Dark Side of Chocolate,” “The Invisibles,” and “Stop Kony.” This year’s festival was sponsored by Human Rights at ASU, the School of Social Transformation, the Graduate Professional Student Association at ASU, the Center for Law and Global Affairs in ASU’s Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, and Amnesty International Tempe. n

150

Number of gallons of water the average American uses per day

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“...the most effective way to implement change around water issues, both here in the U.S.A. and abroad, are individual, community-based initiatives.” — filmmaker Irena Salina

The movie “Flow” was screened on Earth Day, April 22, as part of the second annual ASU Human Rights Film Festival.

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news stories

Maid in the U.S.A.

Romero’s body of scholarship is focus of Rutgers conference

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omestic service was work that many of the women I knew growing up chose to do, so it was part of my everyday reality,” explains ASU’s Mary Romero, a professor and faculty head of justice and social inquiry in ASU’s School of Social Transformation. “Later, when I had my own place, I considered housework something you did before company came over.” Romero says the jarring recognition that domestic service and housework might be a serious research interest came as a young assistant professor, when she observed troubling dynamics in the employee-employer relationship while staying with a family in El Paso who hired a young live-in maid. “There is nothing intrinsically demeaning about domestic labor,” Romero emphasizes, “but I recognized the potential for oppression in what is often an invisible sector of the economy where work is often done by those who are already economically vulnerable. “I began to wonder professionally about the Chicanas employed as domestics who I had known throughout my own life,” she says. “How vulnerable were they to exploitation, racism and sexism? Did their day work status and U.S. citizenship provide protection against degradation and humiliation? How did they go about establishing labor arrangements within a society that marked them as racial and cultural inferiors? How did they attempt to negotiate social interactions and informal labor arrangements with employers and their families?” In the early 1980s Romero set about trying to answer some of these questions, interviewing and studying a cohort of 25 Chicana women – all born and raised in the United States – who had moved to metropolitan Denver with their families from rural areas of Colorado and New Mexico and had taken on work in domestic service at some point. Ranging in age from 29 to 68, their tenure in private household work ranged from five months to 30 years.

Thirty years of scholarship by ASU professor Mary Romero was the organizing focus for a conference at Rutgers-Newark on April 12 titled “Maid in the U.S.A.: Domestic Labor and Organizing.” The event commemorated the 20th anniversary of the publication of Romero’s groundbreaking ethnographic study of Chicana domestic workers, “Maid in the U.S.A.,” as momentum builds nationally for domestic workers’ rights. 8

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The book resulting from this research, “Maid in the U.S.A.,” was published in 1992. It broke new ground not only for its novel subject – Latina household workers – but for its originality in combining historical scholarship and ethnography with race, class and gender analysis. Routledge published a 10th anniversary edition of the book in 2002 with an updated introduction by Romero. In April, Romero’s body of scholarship on household workers was the organizing focus of a conference at Rutgers-Newark titled “Maid in the U.S.A.: Domestic Labor and Organizing.” The event commemorated the 20th anniversary of the publication of “Maid in the U.S.A.” as well as Romero’s continued research in this area, including her 2011 book “The Maid’s Daughter: Living Inside and Outside the American Dream.” Romero keynoted the day-long event coordinated by Rutgers-Newark’s Center for Migration and the Global City. The conference joined students, historians, sociologists and activists from Domestic Workers United and the National Domestic Workers Alliance in exploring the history of domestic work, the contemporary state of domestic organizing, as well as expanding rights and improving conditions for domestic workers in New Jersey. She also conducted two graduate seminars – in American Studies and in the Department of Arts, Culture and Media – and a workshop for participants in an NSF Advance grant. “Given the momentum of domestic worker organizing nationally and the passage of the Domestic Workers Bill of Rights in New York in 2010, it seemed like a fortuitous moment to revisit Romero’s groundbreaking work,” explains Shana Russell, American Studies Fellow in the Center for Migration and the Global City. “It was really important to the center that the conference be a dialogue between scholars, activists and students,” Russell says. “Our hope is that this diverse group of participants can use Romero’s work to better understand the experiences of domestic workers and to continue the conversation about domestic worker rights both inside and outside the classroom. “The contemporary state of domestic work is a great place to begin to understand the relationships between issues of race, gender and labor. At the same time, we hope academics feel a sense of responsibility to the communities that serve as the subjects of our scholarship.”

Russell adds: “Mary Romero’s work is so unique in its ability to give readers insight into the significance of domestic workers to any community. We were honored that she came to share her work with us.” n

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news stories

On the track of 'global jihad' Gallab studies rise of Islamist movements

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n September 11, 2001, the term “global jihad” burst upon the public consciousness. For Adbullahi Gallab, who began documenting the rise of Islamism in the 1980s as a journalist in his native Sudan, it was a term that was all too familiar. Gallab is now an assistant professor of African and African American studies and religious studies in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and a member of the faculty advisory committee of the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict. But in 1989 he was on a Humphrey Fellowship in Boston when the Islamist government of al-Bashir consolidated its power in Sudan. Unable to return home, Gallab was able to stay in the United States where he began a much more extensive research program about the development of Islamist and violent jihadist movements in Africa and the Middle East, work that resulted in two recent books, with a third one on the way.

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“At the time I began these studies as a doctoral student in the 1990s, the term global jihad wasn’t well known; Osama bin Laden wasn’t well known,” Gallab says. “Now, the field has become increasingly important because it has so much more to do with our lives.” His books, “The First Islamic Republic: Development and Disintegration of Islamism in the Sudan” and “A Civil Society Deferred: the Tertiary Grip of Violence in the Sudan,” which focus on Sudan as a case study, address profound issues for understanding the local and global interactions and transformations of political Islam and the political uses of violence. Gallab’s field work in the Sudan and his extensive travels across the Middle East and Africa have given him a deep and rich knowledge of the cultures and trends that make up that part of the Muslim world. It is this rich knowledge that informs his research and makes him such a popular teacher among students.


Abdullahi Gallab, assistant professor of African and African American studies and religious studies, was part of a panel discussion organized by the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict marking the tenth anniversary of 9/11. He teaches courses that introduce students to Africa, the social and political history of Islamic societies in Africa, and Islam and global politics. In spring 2012 he taught “Different Voices within Contemporary Islamic Discourse” and “American Islam.” Haneen Odeh, a global studies major who is now in graduate school, says “Different Voices” was a great course because it covered a range of intellectual and political thought, including that of Islamists, Sufis and traditional scholars. “I learned how Islam is used in political and religious aspects of society and it was applicable because we studied current events like the Egyptian revolution,” Odeh says. Other courses Gallab teaches include “Islam and Islamic Societies in Africa: A Social and Political History,” “Islam and World Affairs,” and “Introduction to Africa.” Gallab is also known as an exceptional mentor for students in the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict’s Undergraduate Research Fellows program. In fall 2010, two students in the program assisted Gallab with research for another project, “Signposts in the Track of Global Jihad,” which addresses the inner and outer forms of actions of global jihadists, including figures like Aymen al-Zawahri, al-Qaeda, and Osama bin Laden. Jenny Reich, a junior majoring in religious studies, worked with Gallab on the project and calls him one of her favorite professors at ASU. Reich said he helped her grow as a writer and scholar, giving her substantive work as a fellow and developing her research skills. “He inspired me to pursue Middle Eastern studies further, and I am currently learning Arabic to enhance my understanding of the field of Islamic studies because of my experiences under his mentorship,” Reich says. “I feel very privileged to have worked with a professor as supportive, knowledgeable, and engaging as Dr. Gallab.”

This year Gallab, with a seed grant from the Institute for Humanities Research, embarked upon a new and ambitious project titled “Islamism in the Crucible of Immigration.” Over the summer, Gallab spent a week in Greeley, Colo., the place where Sayyid Qutb, a key ideologue of the Muslim Brotherhood, lived in 1948 and developed his worldview in opposition to Western and American culture. In Greeley, Gallab had the opportunity to meet and interview people who knew Qutb then, and examine documents available at the University of Northern Colorado. Gallab says his interest in the subject is “an attempt to understand, through the study of the grand affair that immigration offers, how certain individuals and sometimes groups…drift toward Islamism.” Immigration, observes Gallab, often creates tensions and polarities contrary to the melting pot view that assumes immigrants assimilate into the dominant culture. He is particularly interested in following the multiple flows of Muslim immigrants, including guest workers, refugees, labor migrants and asylum seekers as they moved from their home countries to other parts of the Muslim world as well as to the West. “In each one of these host countries, whether Muslimmajority or Western, immigrants were locked in by cultural, political, racial, or religious arrangements. Irrespective of these barriers, however, other opportunities opened up for them,” Gallab says. “In some cases, it was better employment, in others, it was encounters with Islamists from other parts of the world.” n — Nesima Aberra, Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict 2011 - 2012 Annual Report

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Regents' Professor Kitch discusses

women's rights, race, reproduction T hroughout history, women have faced intense discrimination – from a lack of legal rights and very little independence from their husbands, to being thought to have inferior brains. In many societies, women have long been viewed as less than fully human. American society has come a long way in recognizing and protecting women’s humanity and human rights. However, women will always be fundamentally different than men because of their ability to bear children. We are reminded of this by current political debates concerning abortion and contraception, which some have called a “war on women.” What are the roots of gender inequality? How have the challenges faced by women changed over time? Sally Kitch, an ASU Regents’ Professor of Women and Gender Studies, has spent many years exploring the reasons why the world sees men and women so differently. To find answers, she has explored questions ranging from the gendered origins of race to American utopian communities. The intersection of race and gender

Kitch, who is also the director of ASU’s Institute for Humanities Research, covered 300 years of history tracing the connection between gender and race in her book, “The Specter of Sex: Gendered Foundations of Racial Formation in the United States” (State University of New York Press, 2009). She discovered that gender inequities have been central to societies for centuries, but race is a very modern idea. “One thing we know about race is that it doesn’t exist. It’s not a biological category,” Kitch says. Some believe that 12

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groups of people who share similar physiological characteristics constitute races, but race is really a system imposed by historical, cultural and political processes, Kitch says. Genetically speaking, a black and white person may have more in common than two people of the same race. How, then, did race become so significant? European explorers of the sixteenth century noticed differences like skin color when they encountered natives of other continents, but they were even more interested in the unfamiliar sexual and reproductive practices of other cultures, Kitch says. “The Europeans thought that cultures in which men and women weren’t that different in terms of their behavior or appearance were uncivilized,” Kitch says. Marriage customs, sexual practices, and even whether or not women experienced pain during childbirth (it was considered more civilized to feel pain) were all important distinctions used to disparage certain groups and, eventually, define races. “That gave me the insight that racial characteristics really evolved on the basis of comparative gender characteristics,” Kitch says. “My work provides the backstory of the concept of intersectionality by showing how race and gender judgments evolved together and influenced one another.” Differences in gender behavior also served as Europeans’ justification for using slavery to further their own economic interests. “When Europeans began to enslave Africans, they didn’t start with their skin color to explain why,” Kitch says. Instead, they used observations on sexual behavior and religious practices to decide the African culture was inferior.


A history of discrimination

To understand how gender continued to influence race over time, Kitch traced five racial groups in the U.S. from the Colonial period to the mid-20th century – American Indians, African-Americans, Latinos, Asian-Americans and European whites. After exploring the roots of racial formation, she focused on the categories of bodies, blood and citizenship, finding evidence that gender and sex were foundations of racial judgment throughout the centuries. For example, before race meant anything more than a person’s geographic location, European settlers in Virginia made distinctions between English and African women based on the work they did. The work done by African women was considered labor and was taxable by her employer, while work done by English women was considered domestic (and therefore more civilized) and could not be taxed. “It disadvantaged one group over the other, but it was entirely arbitrary because both groups of women did all kinds of work,” Kitch says. These kinds of distinctions provided a foundation for the belief that Africans were culturally inferior and should be enslaved. Gender distinctions were also involved in the process of granting U.S. citizenship. While American women achieved the right to vote in 1920, their citizenship was still vested in a father or husband until 1934. Up until then, a woman would lose her citizenship if she married a man from another country. “If you had offspring outside of the U.S. with a nonAmerican husband, your children wouldn’t have been seen as American because a woman couldn’t transfer her citizenship to her children,” Kitch says. Perhaps one of the most powerful factors affecting women’s social power and status, however, is their ability to bear children. “For some reason, societies have decided that there’s something inherently inferior about having a female body and producing offspring,” Kitch says. Utopian solutions

Throughout history, and especially in the 19th century, the U.S. witnessed the formation of several “utopian” communities that attempted to overcome gender inequality. Kitch has written three books on the subject of utopianism and gender, including “Higher Ground: From Utopianism to Realism in American Feminist Thought and Theory” (University of Chicago Press, 2000). She wanted to explore whether these communal societies could achieve gender neutrality, and what that would look like. “What I discovered was that the only communities that managed to achieve gender equity of any kind were

celibate societies in which sex and reproduction were just taken out of the equation,” Kitch says. One such community was the Shakers, a religious group that came to the United States from England. Officially called the United Society of Believers in Christ’s Second Appearing, they advocated for gender equality more than a century-and-a-half before American women were granted the right to vote. “Reproduction, as these people rightly saw, was a way that women were kept subordinated and kept from achieving other things in their lives. So they would prohibit sex and raise children collectively,” Kitch says. The community often took in orphaned and homeless children in lieu of bearing their own. Modern challenges

While the Shakers and other experimental utopian communities lost traction over the years, their ideas about women’s freedoms and social status eventually caught on. Today, women vote, own property, have custody rights, and pursue careers. However, holding down a high-powered job usually involves sacrifices to family life. A recent “State of the World’s Mothers” report by the Save the Children foundation found that maternity leave policies in the U.S. are among the least generous in the developed world. Unlike families in other first-world countries such as France, which provides free 24-hour childcare for working parents, Americans receive little support in caring for their children. Because women still shoulder the majority of child-rearing responsibilities, they are most affected by these policies. “We do see women empowered, but when we start studying who these women are and what their lives have been like, you discover that marriage and family and highpowered careers are still extremely difficult to navigate,” Kitch says. In addition, political debates over access to family planning services are raising fears that women in the U.S. may face increased obstacles to balancing work and family. An example of this is the Blunt Amendment, which was narrowly defeated in the U.S. Senate, but would have allowed any employer or health insurance company to deny coverage for contraception. “We’ve been reminded again recently about how sex and reproduction work in terms of social status in the United States,” Kitch says. “It certainly feels right now like we’re back to the place where some men in power are willing and eager to make decisions about women’s bodies and reproductive rights, without women’s consent or participation. It’s coming out in some pretty aggressive ways.” n — Allie Nicodemo, Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development

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Professor unveils new resource for social entrepreneurs Professor Vanna Gonzales, second from left, with students Vivian Figueroa, Hannah Meyer, and Nick Friend

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cross the United States, municipalities large and small once pinned their hopes for new jobs on luring a big company’s manufacturing operation to their community. But in today’s global economy and highly automated production environment, entrepreneurship offers a more promising, more sustainable path to job growth – and that includes innovative enterprises in the social economy, such as food and farming cooperatives, non-profit service agencies, and re-use and fair trade retail stores. On Sept. 22, a new Web resource designed especially for blooming social entrepreneurs and changemakers in the American Southwest celebrated its formal launch. SocialeconomyAZ.org is spearheaded by Vanna Gonzales, assistant professor of justice and social inquiry in the School of Social Transformation. “The changing economic atmosphere has led to a cultural shift in how we think about social and economic development,” Gonzales says. “These changes are paving the way for a new socially responsible and sustainable business model. Social Economy AZ aims to nurture that new model by con-

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necting local consumers, entrepreneurs, and business owners to a wealth of information and to each other, and to advance research and teaching in areas that connect social entrepreneurship to social justice, community development and economic sustainability.” On the site, businesses at various stages of development can find links to legal and financial assistance as well as information to help cultivate a startup. Professors looking to learn about social enterprise theory or developing service-learning courses will find resources as well. Students and community members interested in supporting the Arizona economy, or even just finding an organization to get involved with on the weekends, will discover a growing directory and map of Arizona’s social economy. The site also offers plenty of opportunities for networking and sharing news and ideas. In spring 2012, Gonzales, who has long been interested in the capacity of governance and non-profits to promote social and economic justice, taught an innovative social enterprise course that gives students an overview of the literature on social enterprises and


A community-supported agricultural cooperative of the International Rescue Committee (above) and Roosevelt Row Community Development Corporation were the enterprises students worked with on business development efforts as part of Gonzales’s course in social enterprise.

cooperatives and then sends them into the community to develop social innovation projects for organizations in the Phoenix area. Student teams worked on projects with the International Rescue Committee Gardens and the Roosevelt Row Community Development Corporation. The transdisciplinary course was funded as part of the 2010-2011 ASU Pathways to Entrepreneurship Grant Program; Gonzales and colleague Nancy Jurik, professor of justice and social inquiry, served as coprincipal investigators on the project. Observes Gonzales: “As writer and global economy guru Thomas Friedman said recently in an NPR interview about his new book, ‘That Used to Be Us,’ the days of having a 50,000-worker factory move to your city are over. What we need are 50,000 people – 1,000 of whom are starting jobs for 10 people, 50 creating jobs for 100, 100 hiring 30. Everybody needs to be starting something.” n

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news stories

Ms. Magazine taps faculty

for online teaching expertise

“In our classes we create a community of learners.” — Michelle McGibbney Vlahoulis

As early adopters of Ms. Magazine's digital material for the classroom, women and gender studies faculty members Georganne Scheiner Gillis (pictured above) and Michelle McGibbney Vlahoulis were invited to lead a workshop at Ms. headquarters in February on using technology in women and gender studies courses.

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ecognized for developing successful online programs in women’s studies, Georganne Scheiner Gillis, associate professor and faculty head of women and gender studies, and Michelle McGibbney Vlahoulis, lecturer, led an intensive workshop for Ms. Magazine on “Teaching Women’s Studies Online” at the magazine’s editorial offices in Los Angeles in February. The workshop attracted about 30 participants from women and gender studies programs from around the country. Gillis and Vlahoulis focused on how to develop challenging and interactive syllabi, engage students with feminist digital resources, and use technology for successful student outcomes. Ms. was originally published beginning in 1978 as a nonprofit through the Ms. Foundation for Education and Communication, explains Scheiner Gillis. From 1987 to 2001 it was run as a for-profit advertising-free magazine. In 2001 the Feminist Majority Foundation assumed ownership. Today the magazine operations are located in the Los Angeles offices of the Feminist Majority. “About five years ago, in an effort to generate revenue and reach a new generation of readers, the magazine began a digital edition for the classroom,” Scheiner Gills says. “ASU’s Women and Gender Studies Program piloted the original Ms. in the Classroom and along the way we suggested a number of innovations that were in turn adopted by the magazine. “At the workshop Michelle and I talked about the ways in which we had integrated the magazine into our survey courses (both hybrid and online) as well as some upper division classes and shared some of the positive feedback we’ve had from students,” she observes. “One thing we tried to focus on was the online learning environment as a site of feminist pedagogy. We emphasized that the technology is not as important as the pedagogy. That is, instructors first must decide on the pedagogical framework and then bring the technology into that framework.” “In our classes we create a community of learners, which is an important part of feminist pedagogy,” continues Michelle McGibbney Vlahoulis. “We use technology as a way to really engage our students, using a variety of online exercises, podcasts and interactive media — and we give them the ability to work in smaller, more intimate groups that they wouldn’t be able to do in our large classroom settings.” n


School introduces certificates in Social Transformation “In a world faced with tremendous challenges, we know that creative approaches are needed to find new answers to old questions.” -Mary Margaret Fonow

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SU undergraduate and graduate student changemakers in any field now have the opportunity to complete certificate programs in social transformation – and began taking courses toward the program in January 2012. The School of Social Transformation has designed these new 15-unit certificates to prepare leaders and innovators skilled in using interdisciplinary approaches to address social issues and create proposals for change. The certificates can be combined with any major or degree program at ASU or can be picked up as a credential by non-degree-seeking students. And undergraduates pursuing BIS (bachelor of independent study) degrees may now choose social transformation as one of their concentration areas. “In a world faced with tremendous challenges, we know that creative approaches are needed to find new answers to old questions,” says Mary Margaret Fonow, director of the School of Social Transformation. “Students today are passionate about ‘being the change’ when they recognize injustices and situations where they have the ideas and talents to make a difference. By understanding the successes and challenges of historical movements for change and working in applied settings, students in these certificate programs will be challenged to seek new and innovative solutions to pressing challenges.” In spring 2012, Fonow team-taught the new foundation course for the graduate certificate in social transformation with Professor Daniel Schugurensky, “Foundations of Social Change.” A new foundations course for the undergraduate certificate will be offered

for the first time in fall 2012, but students were able to begin taking elective courses in the spring 2012 semester, many of which fulfill general studies requirements. Students in the certificate will study local and global mobilization, including movements related to civil rights, labor, democracy, global justice, and gender equality, and will learn how traditionally marginalized communities have achieved institutional, political, cultural, and economic change. The graduate certificate will emphasize theory and research, while the undergraduate emphasizes application, with students completing a hands-on capstone experience. The new certificates draw on the transdisciplinary strengths of the nation’s first School of Social Transformation – which brings together scholars in African and African American studies; Asian Pacific American studies; culture, society and education; justice and social inquiry; and women and gender studies – and brings in faculty from across ASU whose research and teaching address social change, transformational knowledge, and community engagement. Already approved for the certificates, for example, are elective courses beyond the School of Social Transformation – in history, religion, sociology, transborder studies, communications, non-profit leadership and management, theatre, music history, English, American Indian studies, and urban and metropolitan studies. “Like our certificates in human rights and in economic justice, these have a very applied focus and are especially relevant for students interested in social innovation and social entrepreneurship,” Fonow said. “Our aim is to help students make a real difference in their communities.” n 2011 - 2012 Annual Report

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Cultural conservation: L

anguages have a history of being lost in the United

States. Through the process of cultural assimilation, many immigrants settle here and lose linguistic ties to their home countries in a few generations. Historically, this was a commonplace, even deliberate process for many European settlers. It is a fundamentally different matter, however, when Native Americans begin to lose their languages. This is their place of origin, the stronghold of cultural and linguistic identity. When a language ceases to be spoken in its homeland, it is at risk of vanishing forever. To prevent that from happening, ASU’s Center for Indian Education (CIE) is working with Southwest tribes to document and revitalize the languages of indigenous people. One partnership is with the Fort Mojave Indian Tribe, who reside along the Colorado River, straddling the tri-state area of Needles, Calif., Mohave Valley, Ariz., and Laughlin, Nev. Natalie Diaz, coordinator of the Fort Mojave Language Recovery Program, has been recording and transcribing the Mojave language for three years. In 2009, she contacted the CIE, which sponsored a Mojave language summit at ASU. This led to a collaborative CIE-Fort Mojave National Science Foundation grant to aid in the language recovery efforts. “Our main focus right now, because we have so few speakers, is documentation,” says Diaz. “We’re trying our best to get as much as we can documented with audio and visual recordings.” Part of the program is dedicated to retaining the Mojave bird songs, which are traditionally songs of celebration. The songs are also part of a larger oral tradition that communicates values and carry lessons of cultural importance to Mojave people, says Teresa McCarty, co-director of the CIE. One aim of the grant is to document and rebuild the song cycle, which has become less defined with the erosion of the Mojave language. Along with the cultural significance the songs hold, they also contain unique aspects of the Mojave language. “The bird songs are sung in Mojave, so you’re documenting and transcribing it in Mojave into English so you have a record of them,” says Larisa Warhol, associate research professor at CIE. “But there’s also special ‘song words’ that are only used in songs. They’re Mojave words, but they’re unique to when you sing.” Documenting these songs is vital because there is only one remaining fluent bird singer, 84-year-old

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Hubert McCord. An equally important player in the songs’ documentation is 76-year-old Delphina Yrigoyen, a fluent speaker and one of the last hapuk – a female who sings along with the main singer. Though these two are the leaders of the song project, they are joined by a group of 20 other Mojave elders who contribute by discussing their experience with and practice of singing the songs. The program has organized a group of teenage males to learn the songs from McCord, a traditionally male practice. Tyrone Thomas Jr., McCord’s great-grandson; Jesse Alvarado and Rueben Schaffer are part of that group. However, in order to effectively pass along the songs, the program has deviated slightly from the traditional way of teaching them. Historically, those learning the songs would already be fluent in Mojave. Instead of simply listening to and singing the songs, the current generation of singers also requires context and analysis of the songs and the language used. “They’re hearing it, they’re singing it, but we’ve added that third prong, which is the explanation of it,” says Diaz. “When are we supposed to sing this song? What are the words and phrases we’re hearing? What do those things mean?” The shift away from the traditional learning methods is a necessity, not a preference for Western educational practices. With so few remaining fluent speakers, Mojave elders realize the importance of retaining the language at all costs, putting aside personal aversion to nontraditional learning methods, like audio or visual recording. “We’re fortunate to have a very forward-thinking group of elders,” says Diaz. “Recording is very uncomfortable for them, but they’ve put the needs of the community and the survival of the language over their own comforts. They have a much deeper understanding of what will be lost.” Hesitation to embrace Western practices is understandable, as some Mojave elders lived through traumatic federal Indian boarding schools, which were established to educate Native populations to the standards of European Americans. Students were stripped of their cultural identity, dressed in European attire and punished for speaking their native tongue. “One explicit goal of the whole boarding school experience was to inculcate in the students Anglo-European notions of the alleged inferiority of their heritage language and culture and the superiority of English,” says McCarty. “It is always difficult to bring in non-community members, especially with a topic as sensitive and emotional as the fight to retain our language. For our elders to be able to open up to the ASU team and to include them in our language com-


keeping languages alive munity is a testament both to the group of hard-working and respectful people we found at ASU and to the urgency our elders feel,” says Diaz. The program’s overall goal is not to simply relegate Mojave to a classroom. The program seeks to bring it to the same level of prominence as English in people’s lives. “We want to let young people to be able to write it, to text in it, to Facebook in it,” says Diaz. “There’s so much that’s carried in a language, in a word, a phrase. And there’s so many values and lessons that are carried in the language that English cannot hold. The main goal is to not only speak and think in it, but to begin to live by it.” In that sense, the recovery of their heritage language is also an attempt to renew aspects of the Mojave culture that have waned. This is mirrored in Mojave language and stories, where birds do not “sing,” but “cry.” According to tradition, birds were once human. Now, they cry for the life they once had, just as Mojave today mourn the loss of tradition but work to restore it. “This speaks directly to what we are fighting to preserve and revitalize, which is our Mojave identity,” says Diaz. “The language is the purest expression of ‘Mojaveness’ since it holds the keys to the way we think and feel, as well as the experiences and struggles of the Mojave who lived before us.” That ideological shift is not without challenges, as McCarty sees language revitalization as part of a healing process as well, where communities examine the history of oppression that has led to the need to recover a language. “It’s a challenge that we at ASU can be allies in, but it’s really the communities themselves that take the task on and that’s what they’re doing at Fort Mojave,” McCarty adds. “It’s a huge effort people make to repatriate or recover a language. It’s not something you do in a few weeks or months or even a few years. It’s a generational process.” Currently the Fort Mojave program and the CIE are working to build the foundation for a larger grant from the NSF’s Documenting Endangered Languages program. n — Pete Zrioka, Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development

“We want to let young people to be able to write it, to text in it, to Facebook in it...There’s so much that’s carried in a language, in a word, a phrase...so many values and lessons that are carried in the language that English cannot hold. The main goal is to not only speak and think in it, but to begin to live by it.” — Natalie Diaz 2011 - 2012 Annual Report

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“América’s Home” debuts at

“N

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ot everything of value is for sale” is one of the enduring messages of a new film by H.L.T. Quan and C.A. Griffith, award-winning filmmakers and ASU professors, that premiered at the kick-off event for ASU’s 11th annual Local to Global Justice Teach-in, held Feb. 24-26. Each spring ASU’s Local to Global Justice Teach-in offers a festival-like forum for sharing knowledge about social justice, human rights and sustainability issues. The kick-off on ASU’s Tempe campus included music by Native American artists “Artificial Red,” the film screening, and a Q&A session with Quan and Griffith. Quan is an assistant professor of justice and social inquiry in the School of Social Transformation, and Griffith is an associate professor in the School of Theatre and Film in the Herberger Institute. They are co-founders of QUAD Productions, a nonprofit media collective focused on the research, development and production of film and video projects that support and effect progressive social consciousness. Together they produce short and feature-length social justice themed documentaries and provide media training to progressive community organizations.


Local to Global Justice Teach-in At left, ASU professors C.A. Griffith and H.L.T. Quan, and a street view of the gentrifying San Juan neighborhood where América Sorrentini-Blaut, right, fought developers in her quest to preserve Casa Sofia. América’s transformation of her family home into a cultural center is the subject of the latest documentary by Quan and Griffith.

Quan and Griffith’s newest documentary, “América’s Home,” is about gentrification, displacement and popular resistance. It is the story of América Sorrentini-Blaut, a feisty Puerto Rican woman in her 70s, living on a fixed income in Chicago, who struggles to restore her mother’s home in the rapidly gentrifying Santurce neighborhood of San Juan, Puerto Rico. Aided by a group of her contemporaries, she and these “retired” construction workers and artisans painstakingly restore the house and transform it into Casa Sofia, a cultural center named in honor of América’s mother. When developers offer her $2 million to bulldoze Casa Sofia to build exclusive condos, she refuses. The film is a narrative and metaphor about pushing back to gentrification and unbridled development, and creating spaces for community organizing and art. The documentary, completed in summer 2011, was filmed over a four-year period in 12 different communities, from Chicago’s Lincoln Park to a number of historic neighborhoods in San Juan. Quan says the roots for the film go back even further. “I came to know América (Meca) Sorrentini-Blaut from my previous work as a faculty member of the Urban Studies Program in Chicago (Associated Colleges of the Midwest) and my research on popular resistance in Chicago,” says Quan. “From that research and community involvement, I learned that Meca was a major figure in the city’s politics and Puerto Rican community. “I subsequently assigned several of my students to conduct truncated oral histories of Meca’s life for a course on community research,” she says. “Several years later, I decided to conduct my own extended oral history on Meca. While in San Juan doing the oral history, I and

my co-director/producer C. A. Griffith interviewed a number of community activists and artists and decided that ‘América’s Home’ would be a compelling subject of a feature-length documentary.” This year the focus of the teach-in was “Dialogue for Healing and Renewal: of the Self, in the Community, for the World.” “We were thrilled that the filmmakers chose our event for their premiere,” says Beth Swadener, professor of justice and social inquiry in the School of Social Transformation and organizer of the annual Local to Global Justice Teachin. “The film addresses ways that activists can be supported against many odds, and the roles that community spaces play, which fit well with the theme of this year’s teach-in. We were also pleased that donations at the film showing benefitted both Local to Global Justice and UNIDOS – student activists from Tucson.” In addition to Friday’s film screening, the weekend festivities included Saturday’s keynoter Randall Amster, professor of peace studies at Prescott College; Sunday’s keynoters were the youth-led coalition UNIDOS and spoken word artist Karen Anzoategui. The entire slate of teach-in events were free and included workshops and discussions, plenary sessions, performances, vegan and vegetarian food, activities for children, yoga and meditation, art and music. n 2011 - 2012 Annual Report

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Unchained: W

hen it came time to choose a community internship project as part of her major in the School of Social Transformation, Jamie Roberts (class of 2011) approached Catholic Charities Community Services with the expectation that she might be assigned to an after-school program working with kids. When Roberts learned about Dignity House, a residential program for victims of sex trafficking, she was immediately drawn in. “Like many people, I thought sex trafficking was something that mostly happened in other parts of the world,” says Roberts, who majored in justice studies and combined minors in women and gender studies and political science. “I had no idea that Phoenix was near the top of the list nationally, and that some 300,000 kids in this country are at risk for being trafficked each year.” When Roberts graduated from ASU last May, she enthusiastically accepted a full-time professional position as a case manager with the Dignity program. Known nationally for its 360-degree outreach efforts and diversion programs for those arrested for prostitution and solicitation, Dignity boasts impressive success rates: 89 percent of those who complete their jail diversion program do not re-offend, and 93 percent who go through the year-long residential program at Dignity House break the cycle of prostitution for life. “As much as we’re able to do for our clients, it’s heartbreaking that by the time many victims are even eligible for Dignity House at age 18, they’ve already suffered years of emotional damage,” Roberts says. The average age of entry into prostitution is 12.8 nationally and between 13 and 15 in Phoenix. Recognizing that there was enormous unmet need for services and rehabilitation programs for sex trafficking’s youngest victims, Roberts and colleague Rachel Irby were moved to start their own nonprofit to fill this gap. “Unchained” is committed to using education to build recognition and awareness of this growing problem among youth and to offer hope for prevention. Roberts says her entrepreneurial efforts were emboldened by her work as a research assistant with Vanna Gonzales, a justice and social inquiry professor, during her junior year. Working with Gonzales, Roberts helped create socialeconomyaz.org. The expansive online resource

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alum launches

is a gold mine for those looking to launch nonprofits, cooperatives and sustainable businesses. “All the paperwork and legal forms can be overwhelming, but Vanna connected me to great resources,” Roberts says, “including an attorney who would do all our tax and incorporation forms for a flat fee, and it was at her urging that we applied for and got accepted into the Technical Assistance Partnership of Arizona, a part of St. Luke’s Health Initiative which helps incubate nonprofits.” Now only six months since its official launch in Phoenix, Unchained has presented nearly 30 awareness events at six university and college campuses around the country. The organization also has developed a mobile interactive “walk through” event that uses video and actors to give participants a first-hand look at how sex trafficking takes place, how society normalizes trafficking, and how trafficking affects those who become victims. Unchained is phasing in a fundraising campaign, to establish a juvenile residential safe house and treatment program. “In addition to educating young people, we want to reach out to teachers, to those working in law enforcement and social agencies, even in associated areas like the hotel industry, to teach them to recognize sex trafficking and make them aware of the resources available to get victims the full range of treatment they need,” Roberts says. “Runaway teens are running away from something – from domestic violence, or drug use in the family, or sexual abuse,” she emphasizes. “And within 48 hours of being on the streets, a third of runaways are contacted by pimps. Sending a minor back home, or to a foster home, or arresting or labeling someone as a prostitute or drug addict doesn’t address the complexities that led them to that life. But by getting these kids into appropriate therapeutic and healing programs, we can turn their lives around.” “Jamie is a fabulous example of the deep commitment and initiative that School of Social Transformation students bring to their lives and their careers,” says Mary Margaret Fonow, professor of women and gender studies and director of the school. “Recognizing they have the power to bring solutions to community challenges, they are determined to be the change – stepping forward as social innovators and changemakers.” n


nonprofit to fight sex trafficking

Jamie Roberts, center, discusses her new nonprofit and her work at Dignity House, with Vanna Gonzales (left), assistant professor of justice and social inquiry, and School of Social Transformation director Mary Margaret Fonow. Roberts worked with Gonzales as a research assistant her junior year, helping create socialeconomyaz.org, an online resource for social entrepreneurs.

“Like many people, I thought sex trafficking was something that mostly happened in other parts of the world.”

—Jamie Roberts 2011 - 2012 Annual Report

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Lawyer, doctoral grad works for

underserved, vulnerable families “I

am motivated and inspired by the people who struggle in life due to their vulnerabilities, such as immigrants with undocumented status,” says Francisco Alatorre, who graduated in December with a doctorate in justice and social inquiry. “I hope that one day they can gain legal status and emerge from the shadows.” A lawyer from Mexico, Francisco Alatorre came to Arizona State University in 1992 with a passion for social and human justice. His research, teaching and work for nonprofit organizations are infused with his belief in the value of every human life and advocacy for the poor, homeless and immigrant populations, particularly women and children. Alatorre received a master’s degree in justice studies from ASU in 1994, then returned in 2002 to begin his doctoral studies. He received a doctorate in justice and social inquiry in December from ASU’s School of Social Transformation in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The intervening years were filled with obstacles, including financial challenges and the aftereffects of a divorce, but Alatorre worked unceasingly and never lost sight of his goals for himself and the causes he believes in. Alatorre worked full-time throughout his studies, including as a research associate at ASU’s Southwest Interdisciplinary Research Center and at the Society of St.Vincent de Paul, where he managed nine different programs dealing with sensitive populations such as domestic violence victims, homeless, working poor, refugees and undocumented immigrant women. As a consultant for Chicanos por la Causa Inc., he helped create the Access to Care Summit for Hispanic Youth and co-wrote a grant to fund HIV/AIDS research

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within the Latino community. He was awarded a fellowship through the National Hispanic Science Network on Drug Abuse from the University of Houston for his work on prevention of drug abuse and delinquency among Hispanic youth. As a member of the committee “Voices of the Poor,” a political advisory arm of the Society of St.Vincent de Paul, Alatorre advocated for a just legal policy for undocumented immigrant women and their families, poor families and homeless people. As a result, he was awarded a travel fellowship to confer with congressional representatives in Washington, D.C. In 2010 he became a full time lecturer for ASU’s School of Criminology and Criminal Justice in the College of Public Programs, where he continues to work. Through teaching, he hopes to create an awareness of social realities in the world, so that students will develop empathy for those suffering injustice. Vulnerable women, children and families are of vital concern to Alatorre, and have led to extensive work with other nonprofit organizations. As a board member of “Release the Fear,” he worked with youth who have suffered through illegal trafficking and other traumatic experiences. With the Kino Border Initiative, he sought to protect and preserve the human dignity of undocumented immigrant women that have been deported to Mexico. Recently Alatorre designed and developed a program called HOPE/ESPERANZA which serves the legal, social and economic needs of immigrant women and their families in Maricopa County. Teaching and leadership have led to recognition and praise, including the Wakonse Teaching Fellowship and a


“Having the privilege of an advanced education, I am able to understand the challenges and concerns of a growing population in this country that is unable to be heard,” — Francisco Alatorre nomination by his students for ASU’s Teaching Excellence Award. He graduated from both years of the Graduate College’s Preparing Future Faculty (PFF) program as preparation for a future in teaching. In addition to academic achievements such as publications and conference presentations, Alatorre has received two professional leadership fellowships through the Center of Progressive Leadership and the Arts and Business Council of Greater Phoenix. For Alatorre, graduation was a cause for celebration as well as recognition of responsibility. “By having the privilege of an advanced education, I am able to understand the challenges and concerns of a growing population in this country that is unable to be heard,” he says. “I can raise my voice to help them. My goal is to keep participating in non-profits that implement policies and programs to help these people. By teaching I am creating awareness in others about what these people suffer. By researching and presenting my findings in professional conferences, I can reach people who have the power to change these injustices.” n — Michele St George, Graduate College

2011 - 2012 Annual Report

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Homeless in the heat:

grad examines lethal situation

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he hot summer months can be hard to face, especially if you don’t have air conditioning in your home. But what if you don’t have a home at all? More than 2,700 people live on the streets in Maricopa County, according to a 2010 count from local social service agencies. With summer temperatures in the triple digits and heat warnings issued regularly, the homeless population is at high risk for heat-related illnesses. For those of us who spend most of our time indoors, it can be hard to imagine being homeless in the heat. Recent ASU graduate Cory Sanchez interviewed 27 homeless people in Phoenix last summer as part of his master’s thesis for the School of Social Transformation in ASU’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Although the state health department is working to provide relief to these homeless people, Sanchez said there is still much to be done. Extreme heat can lead to extreme sweating, and with that loss of fluid comes dehydration. Heat exposure also can lead to hyperthermia, which occurs when the body becomes so dangerously hot that sweating cannot cool it down. Sanchez learned from those he interviewed that it’s not uncommon for homeless people to die from heat-related causes. “There’s a guy that died by the shelter over there, found him dead,” said one man interviewed by Sanchez, who wished to remain anonymous. “And another guy died in an alley over there.” The homeless population also has high rates of drug and alcohol abuse, which makes living in the heat even more dangerous for them. “It makes their body respond differently,” Sanchez said. “It increases their cravings and dependency. When they do use, whether it be alcohol or drugs, it makes it worse

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because they can’t recognize some of the physiological changes in their bodies.” Many of those facing addiction do not have access to health care, or are too afraid to seek help, making it nearly impossible for them to get clean. In addition, many homeless people suffer from mental illness. Those who can afford health care may be on medications that make them unable to sweat normally. “You have people out here that are on medications and have mental and physical ailments that are, for all practical purposes, not even supposed to be in the heat, let alone direct sunlight,” the man told Sanchez. “And that’s going to cause a lot of problems ... and it does.” Even those homeless people who, generally, are in good health must face the difficult task of finding shelter from the heat. The health department encourages everyone to stay in an air-conditioned place to protect themselves from the heat, but that’s not so easy for someone with no home and very little money. Aside from the public library, there are few indoor places where homeless people are allowed. “If you see the police, you leave, even if you’re not doing anything wrong,” says another homeless man with whom Sanchez spoke. “You know that they’re coming


“They’re taking a structural problem of homelessness – a lack of affordable housing, a lack of availability of treatment for chemical dependence – and they’re essentially putting a Band-Aid on it.” —Cory Sanchez ‘cause you’re homeless and you’re not supposed to be where you’re at.” Some people try to find shelter on public transportation. “They may get bus passes, or take a risk of getting on the bus or light rail without passes,” Sanchez said. Others look to homeless shelters, but these safe havens often have to close their doors during the hottest part of the day to clean and set up, according to Sanchez. Recognizing the need for relief, Maricopa County created a space for homeless people called the Human Services Campus. Located near the downtown Phoenix courthouse, the campus includes a food bank, health care center and a grassy area with ramadas that provide shade. Sanchez said many homeless people know about the campus and use its services, especially during the summer. The county also leads a summer campaign called the Extreme Heat Relief Network, for which Sanchez volunteers. “Through donations, they amass pallets upon pallets of bottled water,” Sanchez said.Volunteers and workers from non-profit agencies, churches and shelters set up “hydration stations” around the metropolitan area to distribute water to anyone in need. Some of the stations also

provide shade so people can escape the direct sunlight. Although the government and other agencies are working to keep homeless people alive throughout the summer, Sanchez said it’s important to get them off the streets long-term. “They’re taking a structural problem of homelessness – a lack of affordable housing, a lack of availability of treatment for chemical dependence – and they’re essentially putting a Band-Aid on it,” Sanchez said. “That’s going to help people, but it’s not really going to attack the root of the problem.” Sanchez recently presented his research at a meeting for the Coalition of Heat Relief Services, an initiative led by Valley of the Sun United Way. There, he was able to share his insights with public health and government officials. Everyone agreed that affordable housing and health care are two of the biggest concerns for the homeless population. However, Sanchez learned through his research that the problem is extremely complex. “Most people told me that you can’t simply house the homeless. The chronically homeless have gotten used to the streets and aren’t always able to function within the norms of society,” Sanchez said. One solution, he said, is to provide transitional housing – a supervised living community for homeless people to stay in until they are able to move on to more independent living. Providing water and shelter may combat the immediate threat of death from the heat, but Sanchez said he believes it also is possible to make a more lasting difference. n — Allie Nicodemo, Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development

2011 - 2012 Annual Report

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Traffic patterns I

f you want the truth, you go straight to the source. That approach, or a version of it, has served Gabriella Sanchez-Martinez (’02 B.S., ’05 M.A., ’11 Ph.D.) well in her study of drug and human smuggling. Currently a Fulbright Scholar at the Hebrew University in Israel, this recent graduate of the doctoral program in Justice and Social Inquiry looks at all aspects of the smuggling trade, traveling to regions to observe and talk with people and “most importantly, to learn from the smugglers themselves.” Yes, Sanchez-Martinez talks directly to the smugglers. “I’m an anthropologist,” she said when interviewed by Skype from Israel. “I’ve been very interested in internal dynamics of human smuggling, how guys get together, how they decide to go into business – the everyday dynamics within the group.” Before you ask, yes, she feels safe. “I get that question all the time,” she said laughing. “I think the media has been very efficient at disseminating this notion that drug and human smugglers are members of organized crime, that they go around kidnapping people and beheading them or just dumping their bodies in the desert.”

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That’s not the case, she said. “That would be against the most basic purpose of the market, which is to transport goods and people efficiently. This is especially (true) in the case of human smuggling – if you want to ensure a continued flow of customers, you have to treat them right.You can’t just go around yelling at people or taking their money and kidnapping them.” The information she’s gotten is so valuable that tips on smuggling involving Egypt and North Africa landed her in Israel, which she was told is a hotbed of activity. “That’s how I ended up here,” she said. “By a few smugglers’ recommendations.” She worked as an undergraduate for Maricopa County as a criminal investigator. She found ASU surprisingly open to helping her further her study. “I never thought my topic would be interesting,” she said.” But when I finished my undergrad (degree), I was just thrilled that anybody was interested in hearing about my stories on female drug traffickers. ASU gave me that platform. I can’t tell you how much support I got.” n

By Bill Goodykoontz, a Chandler-based freelance writer


7

4

1,000

undergraduate certificates

majors, minors, and certificate students

undergraduate degree programs

4

graduate degree programs

50 graduate students

4

graduate certificates

School of Social Transformation

55 faculty

Quick Facts

13 staff

12,000 students taught in our courses

$2.68 Million external grants awarded (July - May)

encompassing ... African and African American Studies Asian Pacific American Studies Justice and Social Inquiry Women and Gender Studies Center for Indian Education 2011 - 2012 Annual Report

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lectures & events

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Professor and Director, Mary Margaret Fonow, alumnus Luis Fernandez, Professor Merlyna Lim, and Professor Alex Bontemps — part of a panel on “Making Sense of Occupy Wall Street”

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2011 - 2012 Annual Report

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lectures & events

Noted constitutional scholar presents John P. Frank Memorial Lecture

“S

ome of the most contentious social and constitutional issues today – the constitutionality of Arizona’s SB 1070, of the individual mandate in the Affordable Care Act, and of prohibitions of marriage equality – are ultimately being fought over as issues of federalism,” says Erwin Chemerinsky, noted constitutional scholar and founding dean and Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of California, Irvine. “This is not unusual for the United States.” Chemerinsky continues: “Throughout American history, crucial questions constantly have been argued over in terms of states’ rights. This is because federalism arguments give opponents of progressive change a way to challenge it while not arguing the merits. But these challenges should be no more persuasive today than they were in opposing the abolition of slavery, the New Deal, or the end of segregation.” This topic was at the heart of Chemerinsky’s remarks on Feb. 20, when he presented ASU’s 13th annual John P. Frank Memorial Lecture, titled “States’ Rights in the 21st Century: Immigration, Health Care, and Gay Marriage.” Inspired by U.S. civil rights lawyers of the 1950s and 1960s and how they transformed society, Erwin Chemerinsky says he pursued a law career with the belief that law is the most powerful tool for social change – a belief he still holds today. A graduate of Harvard Law School, he served on the law faculties at DePaul, USC and Duke before joining the University of California, Irvine School of Law, in 2008, where he was determined to build from the ground up a law curriculum for the 21st century. Chemerinsky holds expertise in constitutional law, federal practice, civil rights and civil liberties, and appellate litigation. He has written seven books, most recently

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“The Conservative Assault on the Constitution” (Simon & Schuster, 2010), and nearly 200 law review articles. In addition, Chemerinsky writes regular columns for California Lawyer, Los Angeles Daily Journal and Trial Magazine, and is a frequent contributor to and commentator on legal issues for national and local media. He regularly argues criminal and civil appellate cases pro bono in the Supreme Court, federal courts of appeals, and state supreme courts. In his early career Chemerinsky served as a trial attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice and the Washington firm of Dobrovir, Oakes & Gebhardt. One of the signature lecture series in ASU’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the John P. Frank endowed lectures honor the memory of John P. Frank (1917-2002), a leader in the Arizona legal community and one of our nation’s great legal minds. Frank is recognized as part of the team that represented Ernesto Miranda before the U.S. Supreme Court in 1966 – the case in which the High Court ruled that suspects must be advised of their right to legal counsel. Frank wrote or delivered arguments for numerous First Amendment and desegregation cases and made important contributions to the historical brief for Brown v. Board of Education. He is remembered as well for his expertise in civil procedure and standards for judicial disqualification. A lawyer, constitutional scholar, historian, author and mentor, his opinion was sought by presidents and Supreme Court justices and he was influential in shaping public policy in Arizona and the nation. The series, which is sponsored by Justice and Social Inquiry in the School of Social Transformation, honors Frank’s lifelong commitments to justice, scholarship and law, and has been made possible through the generosity of Frank’s many friends and admirers as well as the Phoenix law firms of Lewis and Roca, which Frank joined in 1954, and Coppersmith Schermer & Brockelman. n


Lecture series addresses civil rights

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he Seeking Justice in Arizona lecture series kicked off on Sept. 15, when Phoenix attorney David C. Tierney addressed "Mississippi Civil Rights in the Mid-Sixties: Lessons for Today.” The annual lecture series, sponsored by Justice and Social Inquiry, brings the campus and community together to explore justice issues of national concern that have special importance to Arizona. Tierney, a partner in the firm of Sachs Tierney since 1974, practices primarily in commercial construction law and as a mediator/arbitrator. A former Peace Corps volunteer, he chairs the Restorative Justice Resources Council, is past chairman of the Alternative Dispute Resolution Section of the State Bar, and president of the Arizona Coalition for Tomorrow. October’s lecture featured Robin Reineke, a doctoral candidate and NSF Foundation Fellow in cultural anthropology at the University of Arizona. Reineke, who researches transnational migration, forensic human identification, and “race” and human variation, is working on a project with the Office of the Pima County Medical Examiner to identify the remains of 600 deceased individuals found in southern Arizona over the last decade. Her lecture was titled “When Just Practices Are Optional: The Decentralization of Identifying Migrant Remains.” On Nov. 16, the series concluded with a lecture by Rebecca Tsosie (Yaqui), professor and Willard H. Pedrick Distinguished Research Scholar in ASU's Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law, on "The Politics of Inclusion: Indigenous Peoples and American Citizenship." Tsosie has served as executive director of ASU's renowned Indian Legal Program since 1996 and has published widely on issues related to tribal sovereignty, environmental policy, and cultural rights – most recently about Native rights to genetic resources. n

Zheng encourages others to ‘be the change’

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ctivist, community organizer, and former prisoner Eddy Zheng spoke to the ASU community in October about his experiences and perspectives on youth, education, immigration, and the prison industrial complex—and his coming into political consciousness while reading ethnic studies texts behind bars. Zheng is a Chinese immigrant who spent 21 years of his life in prison for crimes he committed at the age of 16. Since his return to the free world, he has dedicated his life to serving the youth and communities of the greater Bay Area, where he is a project manager with the Community Youth Center of San Francisco. Zheng’s talk was the first of several events organized at ASU to celebrate National Ethnic Studies Week, October 1 - 7, coordinated in the school by Jeffrey Ow, lecturer in Asian Pacific American studies, and Wendy Cheng, assistant professor of justice and social inquiry and Asian Pacific American studies. n 2011 - 2012 Annual Report

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t was a historic moment in the history of the Sudan Studies Association when Arizona State University hosted the organization’s 31st annual conference in May 2012 — the first since the split of the Sudan into two countries. Organized to mark the birth of the two Sudans, this conference, with the theme “Sudan in the World,” turned out to be the most successful and well-attended in the association’s history. Participants reflected on recent work on the Sudan from antiquity to the present across many disciplines. The conference opened up new discussion, incited discourses and encouraged progressions for future research. “The Sudan is entering the 21st century in a very different form and substance than that which we have seen any time before,” notes Abdullahi Gallab, assistant professor of African and African American studies and local arrangements chair for the conference. “July 9, 2011, will go down in history not only as a momentous day for the newest state of South Sudan, but also as a significant signpost in the lives of millions of people in that state, in the greater Sudan, in Africa and in the world at large. Neither the issues of unity and separation are yet over nor are the consequences of past developments now settled. The complex past and current experiences of the Sudan are going to be a subject of study and investigations for years to come as we consider the possibility of arriving at a new, more refined understanding of the Sudan, its people, human experience, institutions of power and their entanglements with time, place and the world..” n

Addressing domestic violence in Asian and South Asian communities

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omestic violence remains a taboo phrase for most Asians and South Asians. In particular, Asian and South Asian immigrant communities ward off negative scrutiny and often fail to acknowledge domestic violence by remaining sheltered and closed. While this helps preserve tradition and culture, it also perpetuates many negatives, one of which is family violence. In the last 20 years, Asian and South Asian communities have formed organizations to help victims of domestic violence. Asian Pacific American studies in the School of Social Transformation co-sponsored a “Chai Chat” on February 9 to make more visible one such organization in the Phoenix area—Arizona South Asians for Safe Families—and offered information about what individuals can do to help address domestic violence. n

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Community discussion on “The Help”

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the book, the film, the controversy

n Friday evening, October 21, 2011, an audience of about 60 people from diverse generational, ethnic, racial, educational, religious and gendered backgrounds gathered at Changing Hands Bookstore in Tempe, Ariz., to discuss some of the controversial issues surrounding the box office hit "The Help," based on the bestselling novel of the same title by Kathryn Stockett. The book and the film have been criticized for troubling stereotypes of African American women as domestic workers and inaccurate portrayals of African American life in the Jim Crow-era American South. On the flip side, the book has also been celebrated for its fine storytelling style by a talented writer. Where do we draw the critical demarcations of ‘”accurate” historical representation and “inaccurate” artistic license for a feature film? Would a multi-cultural Southwest community have perspectives similar to those voiced in the national controversy? Or is the controversy located only in specific gendered, racial or regional communities? Are African Americans still more sensitive about the historical realities of having been the ever-present “help” against the backdrop of slavery and domestic servitude in the Big House? “These questions looking for some answers were part of my motivation to propose and host a community discussion on ‘The Help’ at Changing Hands,” says Angelita Reyes, professor of African and African American studies in the School of Social Transformation and professor of English, in ASU’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Reyes moderated the event, which included panelists Stanlie James, professor of African and African American studies; Pamela Howard, lecturer in speech and hearing sciences; Jonathan Young-Scaggs, ASU alumnus and community member; Kathi Hofferth, of Novel Ideas Book Club; and Joel Orona, independent scholar and consultant among Indigenous peoples. “My personal reaction to the book and film were contrary to some of the criticisms,” Reyes notes, “for I found both to be entertaining. The lively townhall-style discussion we enjoyed that evening reminds us about how powerful art can be,” she reflects. n

“The lively townhall-style discussion we enjoyed that evening reminds us about how powerful art can be.” —Angelita Reyes

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lectures & events

African and African American studies roundtable

Professors David Hinds, Abdullahi Gallab, Michael Mitchell, Desi Usman

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hree recent books by African and African American studies faculty members Desi Usman, associate professor, David Hinds, associate professor, and Abdullahi Gallab, assistant professor, served as the launch point for a roundtable titled “New Directions that Resonate on Old Themes,” held April 18. The event highlighted the program’s diversity of diaspora scholarship and explored the degree to which it embodies and reflects intersecting themes of contemporary relevance within and beyond the African Diaspora. Professors Usman, Hinds and Gallab talked about how they came to the subject of their books and discussed some of the continuing issues and concerns in African and African American studies scholarship that their research harkens back to. Michael Mitchell, associate professor in the School of Politics and Global Studies, moderated. n

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n October the School of Social Transformation hosted a luncheon discussion for the ASU community with Andrew Ross, professor of social and cultural analysis at New York University, about sustainability and social justice issues in Phoenix—the crux of his new book “Bird on Fire: Lessons from the World’s Least Sustainable City.” Drawing on his own extensive research in the metro Phoenix area, Ross shows that the key solutions are more social than technical in nature. “Marketing a green lifestyle to affluent residents will create showpiece sustainable enclaves,” he observes, “but may not alter the patterns of ‘eco-apartheid’ that afflict most large U.S. cities.” n

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omen and Gender Studies co-sponsored a book discussion and reception with author and social change agent Gloria Feldt on March 28. Feldt talked about her latest book, “Women’s Power and Possibilities: Implications for Women, Men and Relationships.” The past president of Planned Parenthood, Feldt has also authored “No Excuses: 9 Ways Women Can Change How We Think About Power” and in fall 2012 she will teach the course “Women, Power and Leadership” at ASU. n

Multiple Voices, Multiple Histories

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uring World War II, the United States built ten internment camps to incarcerate Japanese American citizens. The only two located on American Indian land were in the state of Arizona: the reservations of the Gila River Indian Community and the Colorado River Indian Tribes. The U.S. Army built makeshift barracks to house the thousands of suspected enemy aliens on their lands and a former Navajo Boarding School was used as a Citizen’s Isolation Center. On February 25, Karen Leong, associate professor of women and gender studies, was co-organizer of a symposium that explored the intersections of the Japanese American and American Indian experiences of internment in Arizona, with scholars from around the nation and from Japan who are doing research on this unique moment in U.S. history. The symposium coincided with a month of events marking of the State of Arizona’s centennial. n

Monument at Butte Camp, one of the sites of internment on the Gila River Indian Community

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media mentions

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Professor Merlyna Lim, third from left, with students from her Globalization and Sustainable Cities course. 2011 - 2012 Annual Report

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media mentions

Improving college completion rates for Native students

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ryan Brayboy, co-director of ASU’s Center for Indian Education and associate professor of justice and social inquiry in the School of Social Transformation, commented on some of the challenges American Indian/Alaska Native students face on college campuses, as part of a story on one California university’s efforts to bring Native students into language preservation projects and improve college graduation rates. “Getting students to feel more comfortable with an institution and see how their education can allow them to help their tribes will improve college completion rates,” said Brayboy, who is recognized nationally for his expertise in equity and diversity and his research on the experiences of American Indian students, staff and faculty on college campuses. “If students haven’t spent a lot of time on campus, they’re less likely to know how to navigate the institution,” he also noted. “Other challenges that American Indian college students face include a lack of role models, financing and academic preparation,” said Brayboy, a member of the Lumbee Nation. “American Indian students are more likely to graduate when they believe what they’ve gained can be used to benefit their communities.” The 2011 issue of Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, which annually ranks the top 100 degree producers in both undergraduate and graduate programs, recognized Arizona State University as sixth in the nation in Native American bachelor’s degree graduates and first in the nation in Native American doctoral graduates in all disciplines and in education specifically. n

No Child Left Behind disappoints in Indian country

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he policies of No Child Left Behind, with its emphasis on standardized testing and the use of a one-sizefits-all approach to education, has not served American Indian and Alaska Native children well – nor non-whites overall – reports a March 7 article published by Indian Country Today Media Network titled "No Child Left Behind Act: A Bust in Indian Country." The article notes the widening gap in test scores between 2003 and 2011 between Native children and white children in reading and math at the fourth-grade level and in math at the eighth-grade level. These results are not surprising, Indian Country Today reports, given that research shows that Native children learn best in culturally- and linguistically-relevant classrooms. The article quotes the 2011 policy brief published by Teresa McCarty, co-director of ASU's Center for Indian Education and the Alice Wiley Snell Professor of Education Policy Studies and applied linguistics in the School of Social Transformation. McCarty concluded "there is compelling empirical evidence that strong, additive, academically rigorous Native language and culture programs have salutary effects on both Native language and culture maintenance/revitalization and student achievement, as measured by multiple types of assessments.” n

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Nation’s Chinatowns are fading, professor says

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n major cities across the United States, from San Francisco and Los Angeles to New York and Washington, D.C., historical Chinatowns are fading as middle class immigrants seek affordable housing, better schools, high-tech jobs and other aspects of “the American Dream” offered in suburban areas. “The traditional Chinatown is changing, and in most cities it is no longer the residential, political and cultural center of Asian-American life that it once was,” said Wei Li, a professor in Arizona State University’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, in an Associated Press story that appeared in the Washington Post and on NPR’s news site in the days leading up to the celebration of the Lunar New Year, Jan. 23. Li, who is professor of Asian Pacific American studies in the School of Social Transformation and professor of geography in the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, also chairs the U.S. Census Bureau’s advisory committee on the Asian population. Her groundbreaking work on “ethnoburbs” is illuminating understanding of new forms of ethnic-majority communities in U.S. suburbs. In addition to appearing in the Washington Post, the story was picked up on NPR.org, by the San Francisco Chronicle, and Chinese language sites Worldjournal.com and Chineseworld.com. American Public Media also featured Professor Li in a January 23 “Marketplace Morning Report” segment titled “U.S. Chinatowns lose residents to suburbs” n

Gallab book is focal point for global discussion on Sudan

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frican Arguments Online, a moderated website hosted by the Royal African Society and the Social Science Research Council, is using ASU Professor Abdullahi Gallab’s new book “A Civil Society Deferred: The Tertiary Grip of Violence in the Sudan” as the launch point for an international discussion on the failure of Sudanese statehood. The first four reviews by scholars from the United States and England have been shared on the organizations’ joint site “African Arguments,” and in the special interest blog “Making Sense of Sudan,” the leading site for critical online debate and discussion about Sudan. Gallab is assistant professor of African and African American studies in the School of Social Transformation, with a shared appointment in religious studies in the School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies. He brings to his academic scholarship an on-the-ground perspective gained during years of work as a journalist in the Sudan. “A Civil Society Deferred,” published in August 2011 by University Press of Florida, chronicles the socio-political history and development of violence in the Sudan and explores how it has crippled the state, retarded the development of a national identity, and ravaged the social and material life of its citizens. It offers the first detailed case studies of the development of both a colonial and postcolonial Sudanese state and grounds the violence that grips the country within the conflict between imperial rule and a resisting civil society. n

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honors & awards

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Professor Vera Lopez, graduate director for the MS and PhD programs in Justice and Social Inquiry, presents awards at the SST Awards and Appreciation Event in April.

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honors & awards

2012 SST Awards and Appreciation Event S

tudents, faculty, staff, alumni and donors celebrated a year of achievements in the School of Social Transformation at the school's 2012 Awards and Appreciation Event on April 25 in the Memorial Union. Forty-eight students were recognized as scholarship or academic award recipients, two alumni were honored, and 17 faculty and staff members were presented with ASU service awards. african and african american studies awards Leanor Boulin Johnson Academic Achievement Award Briana Tyson African and African American Studies Book Scholarship Akosua Frampton asian pacific american studies awards ASU Asian Pacific American Community - Wu Scholars Scholarship Victorious Bennett, Bianca Benson, Billy Bui, Taihei Fukumoto, Destiny Huynh, Anthony Kelly, Quang Nguyen, Maricris Solema, Samson Szeto, and Paulette Winder Y.F. Wu Asian American and Pacific Islander Student Scholarships John Bolmeier, Amanda Dong, Mesann Huynh, Yijee Jeong, Branden Lau, Jimmy Nguyen, Hong-Huong Nguyen, Shemal Shukla, Melissa Tran, and Seiga Yanagisawa justice and social inquiry awards Arizona Constables Association Scholarship Samson Szeto Russell L. Duncan Memorial Scholarship Paige Carr, Shaylynn Veeder

Elora Diaz and Professor Mary Romero 44

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David Wayne Isom Memorial Scholarship Sammy DiCarlo, Cristian Rodriguez Norton Grant for Women’s Studies in Justice Studies Lauren Davis, Grace Gamez Norton-Ramsey Undergraduate Research Scholarship Lauren Sandground Lionel E. Rombach Scholarship Lindsey Gilman, Katherine Abbott Susan M. Schmidt Memorial Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Achievement Elora Diaz Outstanding Undergraduate Alumni Award for 2012 Jamie Roberts ‘11B.A. First Generation Justice Studies Undergraduate Alumni Scholarship in honor of alumna Jamie Roberts Victor Perez Outstanding Graduate Alumni Award for 2012 Phoebe Morgan ’90 M.S., ’95 Ph.D.

Sammy DiCarlo and family


Professor Kathy Nakagawa, Destiny Huynh (with certificate) and family, and Professor and Director Mary Margaret Fonow Briana Tyson and Professor Emerita Leanor Boulin Johnson

First Generation Justice Studies Graduate Alumni Scholarship in honor of alumna Phoebe Morgan Meghan McDowell Graduate College Completion Fellowships Reshawna Chapple, Sarah Flett Graduate College Dissertation Fellowship Heather Gough women and gender studies awards Margery Myers Rothschild Dissertation Research Fellowship Kate Harper Nita Heard Hardie Women and Gender Studies Fellowship Elena Frank

college of liberal arts and sciences awards Jean Chaudhuri Memorial Scholarship Vanessa Esplain Len and Rena Gordon “Spunky” Award Jaclyn Dairman Dean’s Medal Briana Tyson ASU service awards 5 Years - Stanlie James, Elizabeth Kozleski, Kimberly Scott, Melissa Weimer, and Hyung Chol (Brandon) Yoo. 10 Years - Arna “Alex” Bontemps, Deborah Henderson, Karen Kuo, Wei Li, Vera Lopez, Doris Provine, Angelita Reyes, Elizabeth Swadener, Michelle McGibbney Vlahoulis 15 Years - Kathryn Nakagawa 30 Years - Nancy Jurik, Pat Lauderdale

Graduate College Dissertation Fellowship Tiffany Lamoreaux Uta Monique Behrens Women’s Studies First Generation Scholarship Jaclyn Dairman The Feldt-Barbanell Scholarship for Feminist Leadership Kristin D’Souza Naomi Harwood Activism Award Thomas Siemsen Mary Rothschild Academic Excellence Award Kate Harper Susan Barber Outstanding Senior Award in Women and Gender Studies Allison Miller

Gloria Feldt, Alex Barbanell and Professor Georganne Scheiner Gillis 2011 - 2012 Annual Report

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honors & awards

Lauderdale named outstanding doctoral mentor

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t became clear early in my mentoring that it was important for me to be supportive, patient, and compassionate as I challenge students to go beyond their initial expectations,” says Pat Lauderdale, professor of justice and social inquiry, who was one of three ASU faculty members lauded by the Graduate College as outstanding doctoral mentor for 2011. In addition to being a highly respected scholar nationally and internationally, with 11 books and over 150 other publications, he is particularly sought as a mentor by students who are members of underrepresented minorities or international students. A doctoral student from China, now Dean of Peking Law School in Beijing, and a deaf student, now a professor at Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C., praise Pat Lauderdale’s mentorship for the inspiration and practical assistance that guided them through difficult challenges. “If it were not for Dr. Lauderdale, I would not have earned my Ph.D.,” asserts Barbara Gray, a Native American woman who is the Tribal Court Attorney/Administrator for the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe. As a professor of justice and the former director of the ASU Ph.D./J.D. program in Justice Studies, Law, and the Social Sciences, Lauderdale’s teaching and research interests include comparative law, indigenous jurisprudence, diversity, global indigenous struggles and international terrorism. He has been a National President of Phi Theta Kappa Honorary Society, a Fulbright Senior Specialist, and a Woodrow Wilson Scholar. He was recently appointed as a visiting scholar at the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity at Stanford University. n

Adelman is Phoenix MLK honoree

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“Our job is to help people on the ground understand how policy implementation matters.” -Madeline Adelman 46

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adelaine Adelman, associate professor of justice and social inquiry, was one of five individuals honored with a Living the Dream Award by the City of Phoenix for advancing civil rights through non-violent means. Adelman co-chairs the Phoenix chapter of the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN), which she helped found. GLSEN works with youth, teachers and school administrators to create awareness of the issues gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered students face and helps create school climates that support and value differences of all kinds. “Our job is to help people on the ground understand how policy implementation matters. Teachers care about teaching and learning,” Adelman said in the Arizona Republic story about the MLK honor. “If they intervene, they get more teaching done and more learning happens.” n


Artiles awarded top AERA research honor Professor Alfredo Artiles was presented with AERA's Palmer O. Johnson Award on April 15, for the highest quality scholarship across four of the organization's peer-reviewed journals.

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lfredo Artiles, a professor of culture, society and education in the School of Social Transformation, was one of 15 individuals to be honored for their scholarly achievements by the American Education Research Association (AERA) at the association’s annual meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia, April 13-17. Artiles received the Palmer O. Johnson Award. This award has been given by AERA since 1967 in recognition of the lifelong achievement of Palmer O. Johnson, a dedicated educator and pioneer in educational research and methodology. It represents the highest quality of academic scholarship published in one of four peer-reviewed AERA journals during the prior year: American Educational Research Journal, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, Educational Researcher, or Journal of Educational and Behavioral Statistics. Artiles’ was recognized for his article “Toward an Interdisciplinary Understanding of Educational Equity and Difference: The Case of the Racialization of Ability,” published in Educational Researcher in December 2011. The paper was based on the Wallace Distinguished Lecture that Artiles delivered at last spring’s AERA annual meeting. In the paper Artiles calls for interdisciplinary study of racial disparities in special education to contribute to a new generation of scholarship on educational (in)equity and the transformation of schools’ responses to difference. “Race, class, and ability differences have been historically intertwined, creating tensions and paradoxes in educational responses to race and ability differences,” writes Artiles. “For instance, people with disabilities benefitted from the momentum built by the civil rights victories of racial minority communities as federal policies gave them rights and entitlements under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. At the same time, concerns have been raised for some 40 years about the disproportionate identification of disabilities among some racial groups. The civil rights response for one group of individuals (i.e., special education) has become a potential source of inequities for another group (i.e., racial minority students) despite their shared historical roots and agenda for equity.” Artiles says 77 percent of students in special education in the United States fall into the subjective category of “struggling learners” – intellectual disability, learning disability, emotional disability – where the underlying assumptions about what constitutes “difference” often are invisible and fluid across cultures and contexts. Yet, these labels have distinct consequences for students’ lives and identities and schools’ responses. The American Educational Research Association is the national interdisciplinary research association for approximately 25,000 scholars who undertake research in education. Founded in 1916, AERA aims to advance knowledge about education, to encourage scholarly inquiry related to education, and to promote the use of research to improve education and serve the public good. On the faculty at ASU since 2004, Artiles is recognized as a thought leader in the fields of special education and educational equity. He co-directs the Equity Alliance at ASU with professor Elizabeth Kozleski and in May 2011 was appointed to the President’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanics. n

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honors & awards

Fonow invited to Bellagio conference Mary Margaret Fonow, professor of women and gender studies and director of the School of Social Transformation, was one of two invited participants from the United States to attend a prestigious Rockefeller Bellagio conference in northern Italy in September on “Women’s Studies North and South: Addressing Gender and Social Justice Issues.” Bellagio conferences, convening in the Rockefeller Foundation’s conference center on the serene shores of Lake Como, are renowned for establishing new connections across disciplines and geographies. Fonow also traveled to several Australian universities in summer 2011 to present invited seminars on her book “Making Feminist Politics: Transnational Alliances between Women and Labor.” n

McCarty earns NEH honor and Santa Fe residency Teresa McCarty, Alice Wiley Snell Professor of Education Policy Studies and co-director of the Center for Indian Education, was named National Endowment for the Humanities Resident Scholar for 2011-2012 at SAR, the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe, New Mexico. McCarty is working on a book manuscript on “Reclaiming the ‘Cultural Language’—Indigenous Youth and Language Continuance.” Drawing on interviews with 168 adults and 62 youth in fieldwork representing seven school sites and five Native American languages, she is looking at what influences youths’ language choices in particular sociolinguistic contexts, what turns young people toward or away from their heritage language, and how they negotiate a world in which their heritage language is deemed essential to an authentic Indigenous identity but a hindrance to social and economic mobility. By attending closely to youth voices, McCarty wants to advance our understanding of language loss and reclamation and offer fresh perspectives and resources on language planning to Indigenous communities working to protect and revitalize threatened mother tongues. n

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Yoo lauded for outstanding scholarship on race and ethnicity Brandon Yoo, who earned tenure and promotion to associate professor of Asian Pacific American studies in April, was recognized in August as the recipient of the American Psychological Association’s Section on Ethnic Racial Diversity award for Outstanding Contribution to Scholarship on Race and Ethnicity. His work is unraveling the “model minority” myth of Asian American students.Yoo’s research on the mental health of race-minority youth addresses questions such as: What are the structure, measurement, and psychological benefits of different cultural identities (e.g., racial, ethnic, etc.) for Asian Americans? When and how is cultural identity protective against culture-specific stressors such as racism? In June 2011,Yoo was also presented with the Asian American Psychological Association Early Career Award. n

Staff members capture grants & scholarships

Melissa Weimer, research advancement administrator in the School of Social Transformation, was honored with one of the two Research Advancement Training Scholarships awarded annually by ASU’s Office for Research and Sponsored Projects Administration. The scholarship covers professional development expenses up to $1,000 in recognition of Weimer’s commitment to be an essential resource to ASU faculty and staff in securing and successfully managing external funding for University research and sponsored activities. Kelly J. Bailey (at right), an academic success specialist in the School of Social Transformation, has been awarded the 2012 Academic Advising Research Support Grant from NACADA, the National Academic Advising Association. Along with two colleagues from the University of Florida, Bailey will be interviewing advisors across the United States to discover the potential differences in advising styles and theories utilized when working with Honors and other high-achieving student populations. She hopes this research will lead advisors to a better understanding of how to work with these students toward success throughout their undergraduate education experience. n 2011 - 2012 Annual Report

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funded research

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Three of the four May 2012 graduates of Project Mashchamtham, with Diane Humetewa, special advisor to the president for American Indian affairs at ASU (second from left).They are, from left, Roann Carmelo (Ft. McDowell Yavapai), Jessica Lake (Navajo Nation), and Justin Kershner (Colorado River Indian Tribes). 2011 - 2012 Annual Report

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funded research

Funded research projects of School of Social Transformation faculty Literacy, Language, and Culture Focus for Early Childhood Educators

Advancing Public Interest Media in Indonesia – Thinktank Project

Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families PI Beth Swadener Budget $748,357; project period 9/30/05 – 6/30/12

Ford Foundation PI Merlyna Lim Budget $200,000; project period 11/1/09 – 10/31/12

Personnel Development to Improve Services and Results for Children with Disabilities U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs PI Elizabeth Kozleski Budget $498,809; project period 8/1/07 – 7/31/12

REU Supplement: CompuGirls: A Culturally Relevant Technology Program for Girls National Science Foundation PI Kimberly Scott Budget $26,374; project period 12/23/09 – 8/31/12

Joint Learning Initiative on Children and Ethnic Diversity (JLICED) Queen’s University Belfast PI Beth Swadener Budget $73,948; project period 10/15/08 – 12/31/12

Reclaiming the Place of Learning: A comparative study of multilevel Indigenous schools in the Americas Comparative Border Studies (internal seed grant) PI Elizabeth Sumida Huaman Budget $5,000

Humanities Behind the Walls Institute for Humanities Research (internal seed grant) Co-PIs Alan Gomez, H.L.T. Quan, Michelle Tellez Budget: ~$12,000

National Science Foundation PI Doris Marie Provine Budget $258,677; project period 9/1/09 – 8/31/12

Join Up for Math Play (JUMP!) Program Maricopa Integrated Health System PI Kathryn Nakagawa Budget $7,091; project period 7/1/10 – 6/30/12

Special Education Leadership for School-wide Equity and Access U.S. Department of Education Co-PIs Elizabeth Kozleski, Alfredo Artiles Budget $799,411; project period 1/1/09 – 12/31/12

National Institute for Urban School Improvement Principal Leadership Academies Initiative PLAN U.S. Department of Education Co-PIs Elizabeth Kozleski, Alfredo Artiles Budget $1,211,566; project period 11/1/06 – 10/31/12

CompuGirls: A Culturally Relevant Technology Program for Girls National Science Foundation PI Kim Scott Budget $853,051; project period 9/15/08 – 8/31/12

School(ing) Girls: Localizing Transnational Gender Identities in Kenya’s Massailand

GES/RES Girls’ Cultural-Gendered Identities and Perceptions as Future Technologists: A Mixed-Method Research Project of Intersectionality

Institute for Humanities Research (internal seed grant) Co-PIs Heather Switzer, Larissa Warhol Budget: $12,000

National Science Foundation PI Kim Scott Budget $482,610; project period 1/1/12-12/31/14

Vera Lopez

Arizona Intersections: The Shared Histories of American Indians and Japanese Americans during World War II

CePoD – ASU Center for Population Dynamics (internal seed grant) Budget $4,974

Islamism in the Crucible of Immigration Institute for Social Science Research (seed grant) PI Abdullahi Gallab Budget $12,826

Project Mashchamtham” Native Early Childhood Education Teachers for Arizona’s Indian Children U.S. Department of Education PI Bryan Brayboy Budget $1,282,628; project period 7/1/09 – 6/30/13

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Local Policing in the Context of Immigration: Further Explorations Using a Mixed Methods Approach

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Charles Redd Center for Western Studies PI Karen Leong Budget $2,500; project period 8/15/11 – 6/30/12

IPS: Program Director, Law and Social Science Program National Science Foundation PI Marjorie Zatz Budget $215,314; project period 7/16/12 – 7/15/13 Arizona Four Corners Teacher Preparation Project US Department of Education PIs Bryan Brayboy, Teresa McCarty Budget $215,314; project period 7/16/12 - 7/15/13


Legal Mobilization and Intimate Partner Victimization National Science Foundation PI Alesha Durfee Budget $179,175; project period 3/15/12 - 2/28/14

Finding Her Master’s Voice: The Power of Collective Action Among Female Muslim Bloggers NSF Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering PI Merlyna Lim Budget $339,853; project period 9/1/11 - 8/31/14

Japanese American Internment in Arizona Oral History Website Dept. of the Interior, National Park Service PI Karen Leong Budget $18,635; project period 8/24/11 - 9/1/13

Documenting Critically Endangered Mojave Bird Songs in Authentic Cultural Contexts National Science Foundation PI Teresa McCarty Budget $30,000; project period 6/1/11 - 11/30/13

State of Black Arizona Project Arizona Community Foundation PI Kimberly Scott Budget $853,015; project period 9/5/08 - 8/31/12

CompuGirls Scale-Up National Science Foundation, ITEST Strategies Grant Kimberly Scott Budget $1,750,869; project period 5/15/12 - 4/30/17

Aloha Compadre: Transpacific Latina/o Migrations to the Hawaiian Islands Institute for Humanites Research (seed grant) PI Rudy Guevarra Jr. Budget ~$7,500; project period spring 2011-fall 2012

$2.68 Million Grants awarded July 1, 2011 - May 30, 2012

$5.49 Million Proposals submitted July 1, 2011 - May 30, 2012 2011 - 2012 Annual Report

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funded research

Fulbright connections 2011-2012 Gabriella E. Sanchez, a 2011 alumna of the justice studies doctoral program, spent this last academic year as a Fulbright scholar at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Sanchez is part of an international team of researchers conducting studies on minorities’ exposure to trauma, and indigenous and immigrant groups’ criminalization, while expanding her own work on national security practices. Aribidesi Usman, associate professor of African and African American studies, has been awarded a Fulbright scholar grant to Nigeria for the 2012-2013 academic year. Usman will conduct ethnographic and archaeological research in the Okun and Igala areas of northcentral Nigeria. He will also assist in developing curricula for a bachelor’s degree in history and cultural heritage for the Kwara State University, Malete-Nigeria. LaDawn Haglund, associate professor of justice and social inquiry and a fellow of human rights and sustainability in ASU’s Lincoln Center for Applied Ethics, spent the 2011-2012 academic year in Brazil on a Fulbright Research Fellowship, studying Brazilian courts as mechanisms for adjudicating the human right to water and implications for environment protection.

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Victoria Flavia Namuggala, a Fulbright student from Uganda, is joining the gender studies doctoral program in fall 2012. She holds a master’s in gender studies and her research interest is gendered experiences of children and adolescents re-integrating into society after civil war.


Gender studies doctoral student Sarah Suhail is a Fulbright student from Pakistan. Suhail, who holds a JD and has experience in advocating for transgender people in her home country, will be focusing her research on gender identity.

Marjorie Zatz, professor of justice and social inquiry, was in residence at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, for the month of March as a Fulbright Specialist, conducting a review of Australia’s largest undergraduate criminology program and consulting about ways to build interdisciplinary graduate training and a robust research culture. Zatz also presented the inaugural Monash Criminological Horizons Public Lecture: “Criminalization, Racialization, Victimization: The Future of Immigration Policy in a Rapidly Changing World.”

Larisa Warhol, associate research professor with the Center for Indian Education, is the recipient of a Fulbright U.S. Scholar award to spend a semester with the International Centre for Language Revitalization, housed within The National Mäori Language Institute at the Auckland University of Technology (AUT) in Aotearoa/New Zealand. Warhol will teach in the AUT’s master of arts in language revitalization specialization and research the center’s many digital and media resources, including a platform for language revitalization that can be customized for different cultures and endangered languages around the world. 2011 - 2012 Annual Report

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publications 2011-2012

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Editorships Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy co-editor: Jennifer A. Sandlin, associate professor of justice and social inquiry The Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy is dedicated to the study of curriculum theory, educational inquiry, and pedagogical praxis. This leading international journal brings together scholars from a variety of disciplines as a means to expand perspectives on educational phenomena, from schools and cultural institutions to sites and concerns beyond school and institutional boundaries. The journal publishes articles that explore historical, philosophical, gendered, sexual, racial, ethnic, linguistic, autobiographical, aesthetic, theological, and/or international curriculum concerns and issues. Journal of American Indian Education co-editors: Bryan Brayboy and Teresa L. McCarty, professors of justice and social inquiry and co-directors, Center for Indian Education The Journal of American Indian Education (JAIE) is a professional journal that publishes papers directly related to the education of American Indian/Alaska Natives. The journal also invites scholarship on educational issues pertaining to Native Peoples of the world, including First Nations (Aboriginal People of Canada), Native Hawaiian, Maori, Indigenous Peoples of Latin American and others. The goal of the Journal of American Indian Education is to improve Native Education through knowledge generation and transmission to classrooms and other educational settings. It encourages dialogue between researchers and teachers through research-based scholar and practitioner articles elucidating current innovations in the classroom. Founded at ASU in 1961 and published continuously since, the journal is refereed by Native educators and experts in various academic disciplines.

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Faculty Books

2011

Inclusive Education: Examining Equity on Five Continents Alfredo J. Artiles and Elizabeth B. Kozleski, professors of culture, society and education, with alumnus Federico Waitoller (co-editors) Harvard Education Press, 2011 Despite the impressive growth of inclusive education around the world, questions and considerations about equity have been neglected. This edited volume makes a major contribution to the field of inclusive education by analyzing equity concerns that have emerged from the implementation of inclusive education models in nine nations on five continents.

Making Globalization Work for Women: The Role of Social Rights and Trade Union Leadership Mary Margaret Fonow, director of the School of Social Transformation and professor of women and gender studies (co-editor) SUNY Press, 2011 This book explores the potential for trade unions to defend the socioeconomic rights of women in a global context. Looking at labor policies and interviews with people in unions and NGOs, the essays here diagnose the problems faced by women workers across the world and assess the progress that unions in various countries have made in responding to those problems. Some concerns addressed include the masculine culture of many unions and the challenges of female leadership within them, laissez-faire governance, and the limited success of organizations working on these issues globally. The book brings together in a fruitful conversation the work and ideas of feminists, unions, NGOs and other human rights workers.

Making Feminist Politics: Transnational Alliances between Women and Labor Mary Margaret Fonow, director of the School of Social Transformation and professor of women and gender studies (co-editor) University of Illinois Press, 2011 The timely book examines the intersections of feminism, labor politics, and global studies to reveal how women are transforming labor unions. Situating specific case studies within broad feminist topics, the authors demonstrate how unions around the world are expanding their emphasis on contractual details to empowerment and family and feminist issues. By connecting the diversity of women's experiences around the world — both inside and outside the home — and highlighting the innovative ways women workers attain their common goals, "Making Feminist Politics" lays the groundwork for recognition of the total individual in the future of feminist politics within global union movements. 58

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A Civil Society Deferred: The Tertiary Grip of Violence in the Sudan Abdullahi Gallab, assistant professor of African American studies and religious studies University Press of Florida, 2011 Abdullahi Gallab chronicles the socio-political history and development of violence in the Sudan and explores how it has crippled the state, retarded the development of a national identity, and ravaged the social and material life of its citizens. The book offers the first detailed case studies of the development of both a colonial and postcolonial Sudanese state and grounds the violence that grips the country within the conflict between imperial rule and a resisting civil society.

A Political Analysis of Deviance, third edition Pat Lauderdale, professor of justice and social inquiry (editor) de Sitter Publications, 2011 Is the leader of a loose-knit band of hit-and-run killers of British soldiers a terrorist? Or is he a revolutionary hero or freedom fighter? What is your view of George Washington? or Nat Turner, who executed Virginia slave owners and their families? Is the Jewish "terrorist" in Palestine significantly different from the Palestinian "terrorist" in Israel? How do we proceed to answer such questions? With an updated introduction, this third edition of Lauderdale's classic study of deviance and diversity as politics challenges scholars to resist treating "deviants" as "objects captured in a zoo," and instead to examine the political processes and practices that maintain, create, and change the definitions of "terrorism" as an act of deviance, social control, moral entrepreneurship, politics, or coercion, or understand it in a particular time and place as a social problem.

Ethnography and Language Policy Teresa McCarty, Alice Wiley Snell Professor of Education Policy and applied linguistics Routledge, 2011 Using case studies and reflective commentaries by leading scholars in the field, this book addresses the impacts of globalization, diaspora, and transmigration on language practices and policies; language endangerment, revitalization, and maintenance; instructional policies; literacy and biliteracy; language and ethnic/national identity; and the ethical tensions in conducting critical ethnographic language policy research. “Ethnography and Language Policy� extends previous work in the field, tapping into leading-edge interdisciplinary scholarship, and charting new directions. Recognizing that language policy is not about language per se, but rather about power relations that structure social-linguistic hierarchies, the authors seek to expand policy discourses in ways that foster social justice for all.

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Indigenous Languages Across the Generations—Strengthening Families and Communities Eunice Romero-Little and Teresa McCarty with student Ran Chen (co-editors) ASU Center for Indian Education, 2011 This 21-chapter volume grew out of the 16th annual Stabilizing Indigenous Languages Symposium held at ASU in 2009. Included are keynote addresses by K. Laina Wong, Lily Wong Fillmore, Renee Grounds, and Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o, as well as case examples from Africa, Aotearoa/New Zealand, Canada, Latin America, Russia, and the United States. Together, the chapters provide a treasure trove of lessons for "strengthening families and communities" through language revitalization.

Interdisciplinarity and Social Justice: Revisioning Academic Accountability Mary Romero, head of faculty and professor of justice and social inquiry (co-editor) SUNY Press, 2011 In the 1960s and 1970s, activists who focused on the academy as a key site for fostering social change began by querying the assumptions of the traditional disciplines and transforming their curricula, putting into place women's and ethnic studies programs that changed both the subject and methods of scholarship. The pattern of scholars and activists joining forces to open fields of research and teaching continued in subsequent decades, and recent additions, including critical race studies, queer studies, cultural studies, and postcolonial studies, take as their epistemological foundation the inherently political nature of all knowledge production. “Interdisciplinarity and Social Justice” seizes this opportune moment in the history of interdisciplinary fields to review their effects on our intellectual and political landscape, to evaluate their ability to deliver promised social benefits, and to consider their futures. The essays collected in this volume examine how effectively interdisciplinary fields have achieved their goals of intellectual and social change, and consider the challenges they now face inside and outside the academy.

The Maid's Daughter: Living Inside and Outside the American Dream Mary Romero, head of faculty and professor of justice and social inquiry New York University Press, 2011 Based on more than 20 years of ethnographic research, this book brings to life the story of "Olivia," who grows up as the Mexican American daughter of a live-in domestic worker in an Anglo family in an affluent Los Angeles community. Romero explores this complex story about belonging, identity, and resistance, illustrating Olivia's challenge to establish her sense of identity, and the patterns of inclusion and exclusion in her life. The book points to the hidden costs of paid domestic labor that are transferred to the families of private household workers and nannies, and shows how everyday routines serve to maintain forms of privilege, passing them from one generation to another. 60

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State of Black Arizona Volume II Kimberly A. Scott, associate professor of women and gender studies (editor) Avery Publishing Solutions, 2011 Modeled after the National Urban League's State Of Black America, the State of Black Arizona brings to light some of the bigger issues facing Arizona's Black population, with ideas for solving these concerns. Its annual publications reflect the data collection of the research team and are designed to inform policy makers and promote growth in the Arizona region.

Research in Urban Educational Settings: Lessons Learned and Implications for Future Practice Kimberly A. Scott, associate professor of women and gender studies (co-editor) Information Age Publishing, 2011 What are the critically important issues a researcher should consider when working with urban schools? What should be a researcher's commitment to the urban communities in which they do research? How can a researcher develop a trusting, collaborative relationship – with urban educators, administrators, students, parents, and community members – in an environment justifiably distrustful of outsiders? In this collection authors share lessons learned about power, privilege, and their meanings as they pertain to conducting research in and with urban settings, providing practical accounts of what has and has not worked in conducting both short-term and longitudinal research in urban educational institutions and communities.

Paulo Freire Daniel Schugurensky, professor of justice and social inquiry Continuum International Publishing Group, 2011 An introduction to the life, the work, and the ideas of progressive educator and public intellectual Paullo Freire, this book also discusses other people’s reactions to his ideas and the influence of his work. It closes by addressing the relevance of Freire’s ideas for today’s world and explores his legacy for 21st century education.

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Faculty Books

2012

Postsecondary Education for American Indian and Alaska Natives: Higher Education for Nation Building and Self-Determination Bryan McKinley Jones Brayboy, associate professor of justice and social inquiry; co-director, Center for Indian Education (co-editor) Jossey-Bass, 2012 After decades of national, state, and institutional initiatives to increase access to higher education, the college pipeline for American Indian and Alaska Native students remains largely unaddressed. As a result, little is known and even less is understood about the critical issues, conditions, and postsecondary transitions of this diverse group of students. Framed around the concept of tribal nation building, this monograph reviews the research on higher education for Indigenous peoples in the United States. The book offers faculty, staff, students, researchers, and policymakers a concise yet comprehensive analysis of what is currently known about postsecondary education among Indigenous students, Native communities, and tribal nations. It also offers an overview of the concept of tribal nation building, and suggests that future research, policy, and practice center the ideas of nation building, sovereignty, Indigenous knowledge systems, and culturally responsive schooling.

A People's Guide to Los Angeles Wendy Cheng, assistant professor of Asian Pacific American studies and justice and social inquiry (co-author) University of California Press, 2012 Not your typical tourist's guide, “A People's Guide to Los Angeles” documents 115 little-known sites in the City of Angels where struggles related to race, class, gender, and sexuality have occurred. Dividing the city into six regions—North Los Angeles, the Eastside and San Gabriel Valley, South Los Angeles, Long Beach and the Harbor, the Westside, and the San Fernando Valley—the guide shows how power operates in the shaping of places, and how it remains embedded in the landscape. The authors include nearby sites of interest and favorite neighborhood restaurants related to each site and offer suggestions at the end of the collection for several thematic tours.

Becoming Mexipino: Multiethnic Identities and Communities in San Diego Rudy P. Guevarra Jr., assistant professor of Asian Pacific American studies Rutgers University Press, 2012 What does it mean to be a multi-ethnic American? Rudy Guevarra traces the historical ties and cultural bonds that led Mexican and Filipino ethnic groups on the Pacific West Coast to form close interethnic relationships and communities. Using archival sources, oral histories, newspapers, and personal collections and photographs, Guevarra analyzes how the two groups coalesced to build a world of their own and Mexipino children have forged a new identity for themselves. 62

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Immigrant Geographies of North American Cities Wei Lei, professor of Asian Pacific American studies and geography (co-editor) Oxford University Press, 2012 Most chapters in this unique text are written by both an American and a Canadian scholar, drawn from among the top scholars in both countries who compare and contrast immigrant experiences in the Unites States with those in Canada. Part I examines the history of immigration in both countries. Part II examines the imprint of immigration on North American cities and suburbs by looking at the barriers and opportunities immigrants face in accessing housing and quality health care, achieving socioeconomic and economic parity with the native-born population, and improving rates of political incorporation. Part II also looks at the settlement patterns of newly arrived immigrants, compares current patterns to historical trends, and evaluates the role that gender plays in forming these patterns. Part III examines the specific patterns of immigration for four non-European immigrant groups.

The Yoruba Frontier: A Regional History of Community Formation, Experience, and Changes in West Africa Aribidesi Usman, associate professor of African and African American studies Carolina Academic Press, 2012 Understanding the past to shape the future is at the heart of Aribidesi Usman's book “The Yoruba Frontier: A Regional History of Community Formation, Experience, and Changes in West Africa.� The work engages archaeology, history, ethnohistory, ethnography, archival sources, and rich oral traditions to understand issues of frontier, politics, ethnicity and class that have shaped modern-day relationships in Africa and beyond. Yorubaland is historically a frontier zone, an area inhabited by ethnically diverse communities, and Usman has been documenting Yoruba frontier experience and the dynamic relationships among these groups in the past.

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publications

Dissertations and master’s theses Rosalee Gonzalez (left), a doctoral student in Justice and Social Inquiry, accepts the Ed Pastor Graduate Award from ASU senior vice president and secretary Christine Wilkinson on May 5. The award was one of two given at ASU’s Hispanic Convocation, where Gonzalez also delivered remarks on behalf of the 2012 graduating students.

C

ongratulations to our students (and their chairs!) who have defended dissertations, master’s theses and applied projects this spring and summer:


Dissertation defenses Reshawna Chapple,“Being a Deaf Woman in College Is Hard; Being Black Just Adds: Understanding the Complexities of Intersecting the Margins,” Chair: Mary Romero Gabriel Ferreyra-Orozco, “Challenges, Inertia and Corruption in the Mexican Federal Judiciary,” Chair: Doris Marie Provine Rosalee Gonzalez,
“The Globalization of Indigenous Women’s Social Movements and the United Nations System (1992-2012),” Chair: Mary Margaret Fonow Nicholas Natividad,
“The Mythmaking of Kings and Capitalists: Sovereignty, Economy and Human Rights along the U.S.-Mexico Border,” Co-chairs: Pat Lauderdale and H.L.T. Quan Sheruni Ratnabalasuriar,
“Forging Paths through Hostile Territory: Intersections of Women’s Identities Pursuing Post-Secondary Computing Education,” Chair: Mary Romero 64

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Jane Ross,
“First Comes Love, Then Marriage, Then a Baby Carriage?” Chair: John Johnson Kyrsten Sinema,
“Who Must Die: The State of Exception in Rwanda,” Chair: John Johnson
 Denisse Roca-Servat, “Unveiling Water (in) Justice in Arequipa: A Case Study of the Mining Industry in Urban Space,” Chair: Bob Bolin

Master’s theses defenses Margo Traywick
“Capital Sentencing in Maricopa County: Like Getting Struck by Lightning?” Chair: Doris Marie Provine


Applied master’s project defenses Amy Ciciora, Chair: Gray Cavender Ariel Collins, Chair: Wendy Cheng Deseure Deberry, Chair: Nancy Jurik Angela Gonzalez, Chair: Gray Cavender Sierra Smith, Chair: Nancy Jurik Erica Spiro, Chair: Doris Marie Provine



African & African American Studies (BA) Asian Pacific American Studies (BA) Justice Studies (BA and BS) Women and Gender Studies (BA)

undergrad certificates Economic Justice Human Rights Social Transformation Socio-Legal Studies Women and Gender Studies Asian Pacific American Studies African and African American Studies

grad degrees Gender Studies (PhD) Justice Studies (PhD and joint JD/PhD) Justice Studies (MS) Social and Cultural Pedagogy (MA)

grad certificates African and African Diaspora Studies Gender Studies Socio-Economic Justice Social Transformation

degrees and certificates

undergrad degrees

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how to we educate in a rapidly changing world? how do we create a sustainable way of life? how do we lead healthier, more fulfilling lives? how do we understand the past, and present, for the sake of the future? how do we defend and extend human rights? how do we focus technology to produce meaningful change? how do we promote economic opportunity and security? how do we build strong, vibrant communities?

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You can help us be the change! School of Social Transformation College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Arizona State University West Hall 205 | P.O. Box 874902 Tempe, AZ 85287-4902 Phone: 480-965-4096 | Fax: 480-965-2357 sst.asu.edu

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