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R E A LTOR

CAPITAL AREA

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Women in Real Estate Insights on Working in the Industry – page 8 Women’s Council of REALTORS® Empowerment, Education, and More – page 12 GCAAR Brings Back Recognition Awards – page 18

Official publication for the Greater Capital Area Association of REALTORS ®

SPRING 2019


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R E ALTOR

CAPITAL AREA

®

Women in Real Estate – p. 8

spring 2019

WCR Women Leaders – p. 14

Award Winners – p. 18

REALTOR® Toolbox - p. 46

features

in every issue

8

Women in Real Estate:

4

Ask the President

Insights on Working in the Industry

6

Don’t Let This Happen to You

Women’s Council of REALTORS ®

7

Membership Corner

25

RPAC

26

Public Policy

29

Bright MLS

33

NAR Director’s Report

Mold and Its Effect on Real Estate

34

Legal Hotline

REALTOR ® Fest Is Coming July 8

36

Coaches’ Corner

38

Economic Outlook

40

Education Schedule

42

Welcome New Members!

46

REALTOR ® Toolbox

48

Design Trends

51

The Back Porch

12

Empowerment, Education, and More 17

Association News

18

GCAAR Brings Back Recognition Awards

28

Agent Spotlight

37

From the GCAAR Classroom:

50


board of directors

President Koki Adasi

President-Elect Danai Mattison Sky

Secretary Jan Brito

Treasurer Frank Snodgrass

Immediate Past President Tom Daley

Chief Executive Officer Edward Krauze

Directors

Avi Adler Harrison Beacher Thom Brockett Lee Goldstein Jody Goren Brandon Green Gwen Henderson

Justin Levitch Andres Serafini Ellie Shorb Christopher Suranna Kirsten Williams

R E A LTOR

CAPITAL AREA

®

Managing Editor Bobette Banks

Advertising Representative Arlene Braithwaite

Design & Layout Carla Conway, Uncommon Design 4 CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019

ask the president

Q:

What challenge(s) do you foresee with the increased demand for digital transactions? A challenge I foresee with the increased demand for digital transactions is security. Brokers, agents, and affiliates will need to continue taking measures to protect data privacy and defend against things like wire fraud. The increased demand for digital transactions will likely increase the speed at which clients want to complete a transaction. This will require REALTORS® to be more creative in the ways they deliver information to consumers to ensure they understand everything they’re signing in the homebuying or selling process.

What is the path to leadership at GCAAR? Does it begin at the committee level? How did you begin your leadership path? I believe there are many paths to leadership at GCAAR. It often begins at the committee level with volunteers learning more about the association and ways they can have an impact. It sometimes begins at a GCAAR event that someone attends (annual holiday party and installation, CE class, happy hour event, REALTOR® Fest, Rebuilding Together®, etc.) The key is having the desire to serve GCAAR members in some capacity no matter how small or trivial it may seem. I began my leadership path by first serving on the Community Service Committee, GCAAR Cares. Community service has always been a part of my life, so this seemed like an easy way to get involved with the association. Being a newer and younger member, I was asked to serve on the Rookie Society which later became the Young Professionals Network (YPN). After a few years of being involved, it seemed natural to step up to the Board of Directors. The path I took, which started with my desire to get involved with community service, has served me well.


R E ALTOR

CAPITAL AREA

®

Capital Area REALTOR® Volume 6, Issue 2 Spring 2019 (USPS 017-467) is published five times a year by the Greater Capital Area Association of REALTORS® (GCAAR) 15201 Diamondback Drive, Suite 100, Rockville, MD 20850-3779. Periodicals postage paid at Gaithersburg, MD and additional mailing offices. Member subscriptions account for $10 of each member’s annual dues. Annual subscriptions are available to non-members for $25. Subscription inquiries may be sent to Capital Area REALTOR® at the above address. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Capital Area REALTOR®, ATTN: GCAAR, 15201 Diamondback Drive, Suite 100, Rockville, MD 20850-3779. The Greater Capital Area Association of REALTORS® makes no warranties and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of the information contained herein. The opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the officers, directors, or staff of the Greater Capital Area Association of REALTORS®. The Greater Capital Area Association of REALTORS® accepts submissions of articles and photographs and the items become the property of the Greater Capital Area Association of REALTORS®. The publisher reserves the right of full editorial authority and to decline publication of any article not deemed proper. Deadline for submissions, including camera-ready advertising, is the first of the month prior to publication. Reprint with permission only. Reprints may be obtained by contacting the Greater Capital Area Association of REALTORS® at 301.590.2000; via fax at 301.590.2248; or send an email to bbanks@gcaar.com. REALTOR® is a registered collective membership mark that identifies and may be used only by real estate professionals who are members of the National Association of REALTORS® and subscribe to its Code of Ethics. Copyright© 2019 by the Greater Capital Area Association of REALTORS®. All rights reserved.

STAY IN TOUCH

CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019 5


don’t let this happen to you! Submitted by Sandy Rosengarden, Executive VP, Century 21 Redwood Realty Playing Fast and Loose with the Facts Will Land You in Time-out! Have you ever had a client who was so picky, so rigid, so inflexible that it was almost impossible to satisfy him or her? Did you ever think, “Wow, if I stopped paying attention to every silly little instruction, it would be so much easier to get this transaction done! In fact, it would actually be in the client’s best interest!” Oops! You’ve just gone down a slippery slope that quickly leads to violating the fiduciary responsibility that’s usually listed first: OBEDIENCE. Furthermore, the National Association of REALTORS® Code of Ethics Article 2 states in part: “REALTORS® shall avoid exaggeration, misrepresentation, or concealment of pertinent facts relating to the property or the transaction.” You may convince yourself that not following your client’s instructions or that making a “minor” alteration to a document is okay as long as it helps achieve the result you believe is desired. But think again and ponder the sad tale of REALTOR® Shawn Shortcut from Case #2-16.

questionable credit histories, he felt that Trouble was a good risk despite the dings on his credit report. REALTOR® Shortcut therefore edited his copy of the credit report to remove the references to past-due accounts. Tenant Tommy Trouble paid his first month’s rent and a security deposit equal to one month’s rent and moved in.

REALTOR® Shortcut, a property manager, had an agreement to manage Ralph Rigid’s 24-unit apartment building. During the course of their negotiations, Mr. Rigid repeatedly emphasized that REALTOR® Shortcut was expected to use great care in screening the credit histories of potential tenants.

Early the following month, our hapless REALTOR®, Shawn Shortcut, noted that he had not received Trouble’s rent check. He called Trouble only to learn that his phone had been disconnected. Visiting the unit and getting no response after knocking, he let himself into the apartment to discover that Trouble was gone, but he had left a whole lot of trouble behind. Damage to the unit was extensive. Further investigation found that Tenant Trouble had left the state with no forwarding address. Unfortunately, there was so much damage to the unit that it could not be covered by the security deposit.

Several months later, REALTOR® Shortcut received an application from prospective Tenant Tommy Trouble. Trouble’s credit history was generally satisfactory, but indicated that he was several months in arrears on various store credit accounts. REALTOR® Shortcut was anxious to rent the unit and, even though he recognized that his management agreement with Landlord Rigid precluded renting to individuals with

Upon learning of the situation, Landlord Ralph Rigid instructed his attorney, Thad Thorough, to try to locate Trouble. Attorney Thorough asked REALTOR® Shortcut for the complete Trouble file. In reviewing the documents, Thorough noted that the credit report appeared to have been altered. He ordered a new report and found the discrepancies. The attorney reported this to his client, Ralph Rigid, who promptly filed a complaint alleging that Article 2

6 CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019

had been violated. At the hearing, REALTOR® Shortcut admitted he’d altered the report but defended his action, saying the credit report was generally satisfactory and that Ralph Rigid’s unbending insistence on unblemished credit histories made it needlessly difficult to find tenants, which, ultimately, was not in Landlord Rigid’s best interests. Not surprisingly, members of the Hearing Panel concluded that REALTOR® Shortcut’s defense was unfounded and that in altering the credit report he had knowingly misrepresented a pertinent fact in order to circumvent specific instructions from his principal. Therefore, Shawn Shortcut was found to have violated Article 2. But, in addition to violating Article 2, REALTOR® Shortcut had also violated his fiduciary duty of obedience. It’s important to remember that, even if an action that circumvents a client’s instructions doesn’t violate the Code of Ethics in itself, it is still an offense against your duties as an agent. Read the full case here: www.https://bit.ly/2stB3Eu

Don’t Let This Happen to You!


membership corner REALTOR® Emeritus Qualifications Changing REALTOR® Emeritus, a special membership status honoring those who have maintained REALTOR® membership for 40 years or more, will require one year of service at the national level starting in 2020. Previously, members could also qualify with one year of service at the local or state level. The last year REALTORS® with one year of only state or local service will qualify is 2019. Deadlines to apply for Emeritus status in 2019 are April 2 and October 2; however, GCAAR requires its information a week before those dates. For more information, see the Emeritus page on www.gcaar.com, (bit.ly/2CGx4aH) or contact Jackie Morgan at jmorgan@gcaar.com.

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Women in Real Estate

Here at GCAAR, women are making their mark in the real estate industry, both as REALTORS® and in industries that directly support real estate. Let’s take a look at a few.

Holly Worthington Compass

How long have you been in the industry? I got my real estate license in January 1984 and sold real estate in Washington, DC, and Montgomery County for nine years before becoming the manager of the office I worked in. I got licensed in Virginia later on. What made you get into the business? I had been helping to run a small private downtown school for inner-city kids, which I loved. After four years doing that, I realized I couldn’t stay in the nonprofit world and ever afford to travel, which I love doing. So I went to work for an architect doing accounting and setting up their computer systems. After a year, I knew that the desk job was not for me, so I got my real estate license and made $16K in six months part time when I was making $21K a year at the desk job. So I quit the desk job! My father and his father and his father going back five generations were DC real estate brokers, but they weren’t around to give me [any] tips, so I guess this is genetic! Have you faced any challenges as a woman in real estate? Somewhat. I have definitely encoun-

8 CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019

tered people who were most likely thinking “Shut up, Little Missy!” Upper management in companies in the past definitely did not favor an outspoken well-informed woman, while men seem to be favored for that strength. I find that it is the emotional insecurity of a leader that drives this type of fearful thinking about women. It definitely depended on the specific person making the decisions regarding promotions, so I have not encountered this industry-wide.

Karen Eaton

What do enjoy most about working in real estate? I love helping my agents make a difference in the lives of their clients. I love helping my agents fulfill their potential in their own personal way. I love helping my agents have a better life, and I love solving giant problems while protecting our clients and my agents. Plus, agents are hilarious to work with! I enjoy their emotional insight and humor! We have so much fun at work!

How long have you been in the industry? Eleven years.

What advice can you give to someone starting out in real estate? This job is hard work. Learn everything you can! Know the contract. Learn the market. Be mentored by a pro—a great team leader or trainer. Market consistently to the people you know in a way that is meaningful to them by giving them helpful insights into the business and how it works. Learn how to provide value to people who come to open houses so they will want to work with you. Always focus on the person you are in a conversation with and think later, “Did I help that person?” Learning how to insightfully help others is the gift of this job. It will improve your life if you pay attention to the cues.

RLAH Real Estate

What made you get into the business? I have always loved looking at houses, and being a people person, this is a perfect career choice for me. Have you faced any challenges as a woman in real estate? My gender has not had any impact on my career. What advice can you give to someone as a service provider supporting the real estate industry? Customer service is the top priority for me. I believe agents are always looking for a core group of vendors that they can rely on, and this will in turn generate referral business for them. What advice can you give to someone starting out in real estate? You must be consistent, set your plan, and stick with it. Don’t expect immediate results because what you do today will pay off six to 12 months from now. The best advice I ever got when I started out was to remember that the house is not sold until you are at the settlement table with a check in your hand.


Kendra Wright

Weichert REALTORS®

How long have you been in the industry? I began my professional real estate career in the DC market nearly 20 years ago. I’ve been a homeowner in the DC Metro area just under 30 years, and I was informally advising people (free of charge) on real estate investments, staging, and cost-versus-value renovations for as long as I can remember prior to earning my license and making it a full-time career. What made you get into the business? My work prior to real estate was assisting families and children with social justice issues. One determinant of success which was consistent across all the families I worked with was the stability of their home. Our home, however we define it, no matter how simple or

Wanda Farrar

Metropolitan Living Realty Group

How long have you been in the industry? I started my real estate career in 1995. What made you get into the business? I purchased my first property in 1994 and wanted to share [the] experience with everyone that I knew. Have you faced any challenges as a woman in real estate?

luxurious, is our launching pad to life. Across the board for everyone, how we approach each day and how well we do is largely determined by our home life. I wanted to help as many people as possible realize a safe and stable “life launching pad” through their home. I consider my job of being entrusted to help families find and realize their home an honor. Have you faced any challenges as a woman in real estate? The real estate industry seems to have the same challenges as most industries. Though, traditionally, real estate sales associates have been primarily women, most of the senior leadership positions have traditionally been held by men, and pay is disparate for men and women fulfilling the same role. I am very fortunate to work for a company that recognizes and rewards all positive contributors to the company based on experience, knowledge, and hard work. What do enjoy most about working in real estate? I most value the trust my agents put into me to help them build a successful business and reach their individual real estate career goals, as well as the trust our clients put into us to help them achieve that ever-important “life launching pad” of home. Every day, I am thankful for these opportunities my

Since real estate is primarily about results, I have not perceived challenges to be based on gender. Most of my fellow real estate professionals have been great; however, there have been issues surrounding respecting boundaries and reviewing information provided for properties. I have experienced personal challenges with competing priorities, dealing with distractions, and assembling the right support team. It gets better until something happens and you have to start all over again. Flexibility, reasonable goals, and focus [are] key. What advice can you give to someone starting out in real estate? I believe post-licensing training is vital, such as the Graduate REALTOR® Institute program. As well as finding that mentor that will selflessly share their knowledge and experiences with you being mindful that they can learn

agents and our clients give to me. I am helping both groups find and build a “home” that determines their success. It is very rewarding and feels great! What advice can you give to someone as a service provider supporting the real estate industry? It’s a long-term relationship, not a single transaction. If you focus on helping REALTORS® solve their clients’ problems and fulfill their clients’ needs, the business will come. Always keep your clients (REALTORS® and their clients) front and center. What advice can you give to someone starting out in real estate? The same as my advice to service providers plus the real estate industry is hard work. It is not the business to get into if you are simply looking for flexibility or easy money. To be successful, you need to be in the business for the right reason: to help people. Focus on the relationships with your clients; listen; keep their interests first and foremost at all times; and fulfill whatever real estate need they have. You cannot be an expert on everything, but you can be a resource that connects them to the best experts available when you continue to learn every day and listen to what they need and want. You will be an expert on them—that’s what counts!

from you as well because things are always changing. Mastering the basics and staying abreast of industry shifts are both important.

Martha Liriano

Weichert REALTORS®

How long have you been in the industry? Since 2003, licensed since 2008. Have you faced any challenges as a woman in real estate? CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019 9


Women in Real Estate: Affiliates Continued from previous page

Martha Liriano

Stephanie Brewer

Managing Attorney, Classic Settlements

Weichert REALTORS® Have you faced any challenges as a woman in real estate? My gender has not had any impact on my career. What advice can you give to someone as a service provider supporting the real estate industry? Absolutely! Being young in this industry makes it hard to gain respect, so initially getting the experience was the hardest because of the “baby face.” However, being a woman in residential real estate is not as tough as in commercial real estate, which is still a male-dominated industry. I can remember having to stand my ground in initial conversations with commercial brokers, then after the first minutes of questions/comments, they would quickly sense they were not talking to a rookie. How do you balance work and family? A schedule—LOL! One has to remain organized and keep all tallies in place from school events, to sport activities, to client appointments, to customer appointments, to seminars and industry events. What do enjoy most about working in real estate? The constant change of always having to face a new task—each client’s situation is unique. Helping a family set a goal and seeing them achieve it, the smile from ear to ear—especially from those who are still in disbelief on achieving the American Dream— these are the things that get me out of bed every morning. I’ve always had a passion for helping others. There is always something new to learn and adjust to in real estate.

10 CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019

How long have you been in the industry? I’ve been in the industry for years. What do you do? As a settlement attorney, I oversee all closing services needed to complete a real estate sale or purchase. I am responsible for closing the transaction in accordance with the contract of sale, the lender’s loan closing instructions and state and federal laws. I review the contract and chain of title, resolve any issues, answer legal questions, and of course conduct a quick and smooth settlement. I also teach CE classes on real estate topics like contracts and ethics, and host Lunch & Learns. What made you choose real estate as a profession? I find it rewarding to help someone get a home - whether it’s their first one or the 10th. I want to be sure that one of the largest transactions of their lives is completed properly, legally and with as little stress to the clients as possible. The experience of getting to the settlement table can be complicated - I am there to make it as stress free as possible. It’s very rewarding handing a new homeowner their keys and knowing I made sure the transaction was done properly. Have you faced any challenges as a woman in real estate? Although these situations may arise from time to time, for the most part I am very lucky and respected by

my clients. I am able to win clients over with my legal knowledge and ability to manage and implement this knowledge in difficult situations. As far as other challenges, as the mother of a nine-month old baby, my husband and I constantly have to balance work with family, especially during the busy real estate season. It’s a give and take. What do you like most about working in real estate? I enjoy the interaction with clients. Legal work is paper driven, but I get to do the face-to-face with my agents and sellers which makes it an enjoyable experience. I really like working with agents, helping them with questions, and educating them on various topics. All of these things help make for a better settlement. What advice can you give to someone as a service provider supporting the real estate industry? In my work I find that it’s important to have a nice personality, however, you need to be stern when you have to be. There is a balance between meeting your clients’ needs and getting them to settlement. You have to walk the fine line between the two.

Hillary Cochin

Main Street Home Loans

How long have you been in the industry? I have been in the business for five years. I entered the industry right after graduating from college.


54

The typical REALTOR® is a 54-year-old white female who attended college and is a homeowner.

Continued from previous page

Hillary Cochin

Main Street Home Loans What challenges have you faced as a woman in real estate? The real estate industry is traditionally a male-dominated field. While I feel that has changed in residential sales, it is still very much the case in home financing. There is an even larger gender disparity throughout upper-level management. Because of this, as women, we often find it takes longer to be given similar opportunities. We also experience communication differences and sometimes conflicting values that can affect our day-to-day efforts. However, I do feel that being a woman in real estate can also be used to our advantage in providing unparalleled service to our clients and partners. What do you like most about working in the mortgage/real estate industry? I love everything about working in the mortgage industry. We are given the opportunity to change lives daily and help people accomplish their goals, both personal and financial. We grow true friendships because of our job and have the freedom to build and operate our business the way we feel best fits our personal strengths and our clients’ needs. Every day is an adventure, and I could not imagine doing anything else for a career. What advice can you give to someone as a service provider supporting the real estate industry? If you are a service provider, avoid getting bogged down in the day-to-day difficulties and stresses that likely will come with your job. We are all in this together, and we all serve a common purpose: to provide an exceptional service to our clients with the goal that their real estate decisions will serve them and their families for years to come. Always give more than you expect to receive, and trust that your personal career will flourish as a result.

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Women in Real Estate: Affiliates

63 percent of all REALTORS are female, and the median age of all REALTORS is 54.

Pro Tec Inspection Services

L-R: Heather Dice, Lexy Krause, Michelle Hopkin. How long have you been in the industry? We will be celebrating our 33rd anniversary this year! ProTec was started in 1986. What made you start ProTec? Honestly, my husband dragged me into the business kicking and screaming in 2009 because he needed someone reliable to answer the phones. After that, the fast-paced environment and the opportunity for growth had me hooked. My husband learned quite quickly that I was the new boss. What do you all like most about working in real estate? I really love the diversity of the people that we work with and our vital role in the real estate transaction. There is a deep satisfaction that comes with bringing peace of mind to homebuyers during one of the most exciting and stressful times of their lives. We’ve all been in their shoes. At the end of each day, I go home knowing we supported 30 families in making one of the biggest decisions of their lives. Have you faced any challenges as a woman-owned business? Bringing a woman’s perspective to the table in a male-dominated industry is probably what has helped ProTec overcome the typical challenges that most home inspection companies face. The highest-performing teams are those made up of people with contrasting yet complementary strengths—that’s us. Being woman-owned and primarily woman-led has proven to be a real asset in helping our company stand apart from the crowd. What advice can you give to someone as a service provider supporting the real estate industry? We always strive to hire employees who have a servant’s heart. Our people truly care and will go above and beyond for each and every client. Focus on building a great team with integrity, and the rest will fall into place. What advice can you give to someone starting out in real estate or starting their own business? Surround yourself with people who are smarter than you. Find a mentor who can expand your outlook. Don’t spend too much time recreating the wheel; follow those around you who are already successful.

CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019 11


women in real estate

Greater Capital Area: Valuable Resources, Networking, and Much More

Enlightenment! Empowerment! Success! If you haven’t been to a Women’s Council of REALTORS® meeting yet, you’re missing out. The Women’s Council of REALTORS® (WCR) is the twelfth largest U.S. women’s professional organization and has one of the most successful communication networks in the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) family. There are more than 80 local networks across the country. Membership includes real estate professionals and related industry vendors who support the objectives of WCR and are interested in serving the industry, the community, and fellow REALTORS®. The WCR stands for professional excellence, whether you are cultivating business opportunities or acquiring new skills for leadership and life success. Men are welcome!

Women’s Council members are highly successful; they are professional REALTORS® and business leaders in the communities they serve. They earn more than two times than the average REALTOR® and have been in business 25% longer than the average REALTOR®. They have a referral mindset and generate an average of 50% of real estate business from referrals. They have a referral network of more than 12,000 REALTORS® nationwide. The WCR’s Greater Capital Area network was chartered in January 1990. This local network has members in Montgomery County and the District of Columbia. The network prides itself on bringing its members current and relevant information to help them grow their everyday business.

The Women’s Council of REALTORS ® has a referral network of more than 12,000 REALTORS ® nationwide.

12 CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019


GOALS FOR 2019 • Introduce new REALTORS® to WCR. • Collaborate with other GCAAR Affiliate groups. • Bring WCR programs and events to DC audience (starting with the Women in Leadership event in DC). • Bring more diversity to the WCR to include varied backgrounds, cultures, and languages. • Increase membership and strategic partners.

Why become a member? • Leadership development opportunities • Timely and cutting-edge education programs • Personal growth • Increased income • Nationwide referral network

WCR Members Are Business Leaders

62% 18% 17% 10%

members report being leaders in their local community of NAR committe slots are held by WCR members of NAR Board of Directors hold membership in WCR of local or state REALTORS® Association presidents hold membership in WCR

• eConnect newsletter—technology trends, leadership, and more

WCR Members Proudly Invest in the Industry

Upcoming Events • May 16–18 NAR, Legislative Meetings, Washington, DC • June 12 Happy Hour, Silver Spring • August 14 Shrimp Boil Fundraiser, Silver Spring • September 10 Education Event, Rockville • November 13 Members and Sponsors Appreciation, Rockville

74% 331

WCR participation rate in RPAC is the highest in the REALTOR® family President’s Circle members who are WCR members (nearly one-third of all NAR members)

WCR is a proud contributor and founding member of the REALTOR® Party Corporate Ally Program.

HOW TO JOIN For more information, visit the WCR Greater Capital Area’s page at https://bit.ly/2D8cRe2

The twelfth largest U.S. women’s professional organization and has one of the most successful communication networks in the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) family.

“ The secret of change is to focus all of your energy not on fighting the old, but on building the new.

— Socrates CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019 13


Women in Leadership – Women’s Council of REALTORS® Meeting FEBRUARY 13, 2019

At the Women’s Council of REALTORS®’ Women in Leadership event on February 13, attendees heard from Danai Mattison Sky, 2019 GCAAR PresidentElect and Sales Manager at Long & Foster; Dianah Shaw, 2019 District of Columbia Association of REALTORS® (DCAR) President and Broker/Owner of POWER Consulting & Real Estate; Kymber Lovett-Menkiti, 2019 DCAR President-Elect and Regional Director, MD/DC Region, Keller Williams; and Kimberly Galvin, owner of Abode Settlement Group, LLC. The event was moderated by Martha Liriano, President-Elect of the Women’s Council of REALTORS®. Here are some of the highlights and questions that the panel answered during the lively and informative discussion.

How did you get started in real estate? Danai Mattison Sky • Is a second-generation REALTOR®; didn’t think she would get into the real estate business

• Started helping out in a real estate office doing admin work at 14 • Got her real estate license her junior year in college • After college, started working as manager of condo sales at the Mayhood Company

• Moved into the sales manager position and sold $20 million in volume in her first year

Kimberly Galvin • Chose title insurance as a second career—was a schoolteacher • Got her title insurance license when her kids were about to go to high school • Started introducing herself to title companies— worked parttime at first • Joined a title company and took them from 10 to 75 settlements in one year (check) • Decided she wanted to work for her basement 14 CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019

Kymber Lovett-Menkiti • Started as a part-time agent—real estate is her second career • Earned an MSW in social work and law and social policy • Sold a 21-unit condo building as her first project in 2007; learned fast in a market that was shifting from a sellers’ to buyers’ market • Led the Menkiti Group sales team for 12 years with over $1 billion in sales volume before transitioning into regional leadership with Keller Williams

Dianah Shaw • Real estate is her third career—from corporate marketing to nonprofit work to real estate

• Started working for a Century 21 in Brooklyn and received excellent training • Relocated to DC in 2000 but did not activate her license until she purchased her home

• Founded POWER (People Organized With Economic Resources) Consulting and Real Estate, a small brokerage, with two agents plus herself

What have been some of the challenges you faced? Danai Being the young one—having to prove that you know what you’re doing. You overcome that by being the best you can be…establishing and maintaining relationships…by jumping in and falling forward. Kymber Get comfortable with the idea of failure—failing forward. Be willing to fail and push through those failures. One thing I’m constantly asking is, “How can I make sure I am lifting others—especially women—as my business continues to grow?”


What have been some of the challenges you faced? Dianah Having balance in your life—real estate is hard work, and you have to be on top of your game to be successful—from the writing of the contract to the settlement table. Take the time to be who you are spiritually. For me, volunteerism is important; also finding “me time.” Also, it’s not about the volume for me; it’s about the service we offer our clients.

What are some the changes you’ve seen in the business environment? Kimberly TRID (TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosure) changes. Title companies can no longer adjust or make changes to the settlement sheet—it all has to be done by the lender. That was a major paradigm shift for the industry. Danai Marketing has changed quite a bit. It’s all about the data. We have to adjust continually to stay on top of the changes. Also, I can’t stress enough the importance of the relationship. What’s your personal brand? You have to sell the lifestyle your clients are looking for—be the neighborhood expert. Kymber Harnessing the digital footprint. You have to look at your ROI for the things you’re doing. What you were doing a few years ago may not work now or may not make sense financially to continue doing. You have to constantly adjust—find your niche; what’s unique to you.

How do you balance work and family? Kymber Having had three boys in five years, organization is key! I make a calendar for the year where I plug in all of the important dates (vacations, kids’ activities, dates nights, etc.) so I can make time for my family. You have to be fierce about your schedule. Don’t let others dictate the schedule for you. Tell them, “I can meet with you on [this date] between the hours of 2 and 5 p.m.” If you want to be successful, you have to put in the time—know where you want to be and reverse engineer what it will take to get there. Get an accountability partner. Use your natural/native places to grow your business (schools, book clubs, PTA meetings, etc.)

Kimberly You must be accessible—take phone calls on the weekend, but around your schedule. It’s okay to do life stuff—that’s why we work for ourselves. Spend time with family; you can never get that time back. Balance is so important; be flexible with yourself.

WCR Panel L-R: Kimberly Galvin, Dianah Shaw, Linda Kibunja, Kymber Lovett-Menkiti, and Danai Mattison Sky.

Dianah Be self-motivated and have a plan. Know what motivates you, but put the money in perspective. A misconception is that agents make a lot of money, but keep in mind that being in the real estate business costs money.

What are some of challenges in the real estate industry right now? Kymber Everything is evolving quickly. You have to embrace technology instead of seeing it as a disrupter. Learn and understand how to use data. Always reinforce the value you bring to your clients. Dianah The growth of the DC market has been tremendous. DC clients are more sophisticated, but they still need an experienced REALTOR® to guide them through the process. Millennials need to understand that they may not be able to afford property in a hot neighborhood right away, but they should be looking to home ownership as an opportunity to build wealth. CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019 15


Women in Leadership Women’s Council of REALTORS® Meeting FEBRUARY 13, 2019

2019 Board of Governors, Women’s Council of REALTORS®, Greater Capital Area L-R: Deborah Davidson, Secretary; Evelyn Clark, Treasurer; Linda Kibunja, President; and Martha Liriano, President-Elect.

16 CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019

L-R: Scott Reiter, DCAR CEO; Dianah Shaw, 2019 DCAR President; Linda Kibunja, 2019 WCR President; Kate Gordon, GCAAR Chief Operating Officer; Ed Krauze, GCAAR Chief Executive Officer.


association news YPN Kicks Off Spring With Packed Happy Hour Event

GCAAR’s YPN (Young Professionals Network) welcomed spring with a packed happy hour event at Owen’s Ordinary on March 28. YPN filled three booths with cleaning supplies to benefit the Montgomery County Coalition for the Homeless. Make plans now to attend their next event – the GCAAR/NVAR Boat Ride on May 15. Details coming soon!

IN MEMORIAM GCAAR Announces Passing of Board Member Patrick “Pat” Weed Former GCAAR Board member Patrick “Pat” Weed passed away on March 20. Pat, owner of Patrick Realty Company, was an active GCAAR member and real estate broker with over 50 years of experience. At GCAAR, he was a member of the Forms, Grievance, and Public Policy Committees, served on the GCAAR Board of Directors (2014-2017), and was the 2012 GCAAR REALTOR® of the Year. CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019 17


GCAAR happenings GCAAR Brings Back

Recognition Awards It was a star-studded morning full of accolades as GCAAR brought back its Recognition Awards on March 4 at the Bethesda North Marriott. The event was hosted by former Fox 5 news anchor and REALTOR® Will Thomas. Team and individual awards were given in three categories: Gold, Silver, and Bronze. The awards were based on sales volume between January and December 2018.

Congratulations to our award winners!

18 CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019


Individual Award Winners

GOLD Total of at least

$10,000,000

in volume or at least

40 transactions

Katrina Schymik Abjornson Theo Adamstein Christina Allocca Jake Anderson Mike Aubrey Thais Austin Nader Bagheri Christy Bakaly Sunita Bali Jill Balow Jacqueline Band-Olinger Mehrnaz Bazargan Kira Epstein Begal Lydia Benson Anthony Bolling Avery Boyce James Brown Katherine Buckley Taylor Carney Yiqun Cen Joaquin Cerritos Linda Chaletzky Russell Chandler Pierre Chauvet Eunice Chu Judy Kogod Colwell Jim Connolly Joan Cromwell Brian Cusick Delilah Dane Catherine Davila Lauren Davis Samuel Davis David DeSantis Johnny Diaz Philip DiRuggiero Kellyann Dorfman David Ehrenberg Mark Ellington Carlos Evans Jessica Evans Peter Ferguson Katherine Fester-Bankey

MaryAnne Fiorita James Firkster Christine Fischer Maura Fitzgerald Greg Ford Buffy Foster Jonathan Fox Jeffrey Ganz Cheryl Garner-Shaw Adam Gelb Toni Ghazi Kimberly Gibson Dara Gilman Michael Gonzalez Andrew Goodman Todd Harris Steven Henry Lynn Holland Katri Hunter Mandy Hursen Vincent Hurteau Maya Hyman Nancy Itteliag Keith James Susan Jaquet Robert Jenets Cari Jordan Gitika Kaul Mandy Kaur Donna Kerr Bryan Kerrigan Robert Kerxton Antonia Ketabchi Anne Killeen James Kim Susan Kim Maria Kolick Jack Kort Rina Kunk Cheryl Kurss Traudel Lange Amanda Lasko Cheryl Leahy Cecelia Leake Yvonne Lee Brianna Leone Martha Liriano

Daniel Llerena Brian Lumpkin Johnny Mammano Wayne Mann Nancy Mannino Michael Marriott Richard Martinez Matthew Maury Laura McCaffrey Hunter McFadden Samuel Medvene Dino Milanese John Monen Michael Moore Lee Murphy Barbara Nalls Stuart Naranch Nadia Nejaime Lynda O’Dea Guiying (Jenny) Pan Kris Paolini Andrew Pariser David Park Donna Pfeiffer Philip Piantone Kevin Poist John Pruski Maxwell Rabin John Radcliffe Melissa (Missy) Raffa Michael Rankin Kyle Richards Lenore Rubino Jared Russell Kathleen Ryan Dominique Rychlik Lavina Samtani Stacey Sauter J. Corey Savelson Jill Schwartz Saji Sebastian Joseph Seriki Ellie Shorb David Shotwell Lyndsi Sitcov Kate Slawta Holly Smith

Erin Sobanski Robert Spicer Marco Stilli Marjorie Dick Stuart Phil Sturm Stacey Styslinger Rima Tannous Jonathan Taylor Rex Thomas Roby Thompson Lynne Tucker Janice Valois Susan Van Nostrand Denise Warner Joshua Waxman Dare Johnson Wenzler Kathy Whalen Leslie White Hans Wydler John Young Shuang (Shannon) Zhao

SILVER

Total of at least

$5,000,000

in volume or at least

20 transactions

David Abramson Akinremi Akinsanya Andy Alderice Joanna Argenio LouAnn Armstrong Karen Berlin Stacy Berman Ericka Black Anh Boesch Kelly Bohi Regina Branco Evelyn Branic Kevin Brunell Joe Buffington Allison Carle continued on next page CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019 19


SILVER

Individual Award Winners

Total of at least

$5,000,000

in volume or at least

20 transactions

Diana Carrasco Rabih Chamas Lina Cirales-McAuliffe Lindsay Clark Ellen Cohen Kat Conley Luis Cordero Meg Crowlie Steven Cummings Topher Cushman Jay Dahill Tom Daley Thomas Doyle Daniel DuBois Ted Duncan Tammy Durbin Carol Eickert Erik Evans Susan Fagan Akin Faldoun Alfonso Flores Brooke Fox Scott Frost Anna Ganev Kelly Garrett Dorie Glass Malicka Gnon Bob Graves Sherri Anne Green Jacqueline Grenning Bradley Griffin Christopher Hager Angie Hashempour Carolyn Hurwitz Benjamin Kaufmann Carol Kennedy Kathi Kershaw Goher Khan Lisa LaCourse Richard Lee Thomas Lee Rachel Levey Todd Litchfield 20 CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019

Linda Lizzio Lance Macon Laurinda Massey Marie McCormack Patricia McKenna Marlena McWilliams Andres Morejon Jack Nix Jesse Oakley William Ortega Shaunte Parker Becky Plesset Jami Rankin Jonathan Reff Patricia Rhyne-Kirsch Bruce Robinson Shawanda Robinson Alex Saenger Richard Saunders Timothy Savoy Michael Shapiro F. Hill Slowinski Bruce Small Thomas Spier LeiYana Stevenson Denise Szczur Amy Tang Tracy Tkac Gabriela Vasco Simone Velvel Denise Verburg David Wagner Marci Wasserman Bruce Werber Jeff Wheatley Jay Yu

BRONZE

Total of at least

$3,000,000

in volume or at least

12 transactions

Lorielle Akintunde

Elena Arevalo Sharee Body Marilyn Chmielewski Colleen Corbey Samantha Damato Kharye Dunlap Andrew Eisel Page Eisinger Sofia Ellis Stephanie Erhueh Karen Friedman Darsheika Giles Valerie Greene Gerry Gretschel Don Guthrie Karla Gutierrez Brook Hellie Olga Hernandez Trian Johnson Barbara King Deborah Lancaster Paola Lazo Mark McFadden Maurice McKinney Chemaye Nickens-Smith Rose Ogbonna Maggie O’Reilly Gloria Owens German Paraud Felipe Perez Daniel Sadoun Cindy Sinanan Jane Slatter Tad Stewart Lewis Temple Eboneese Thompson Rebecca Williams


Team Award Winners GOLD Total of at least

$30,000,000

in volume or at least

120 transactions

Arrow Group Atlas Group Banner Team Barbara Ciment Group Bediz Group Capital Estate Group Cara Pearlman Group Carmen Fontecilla Group Carolyn Homes Chauvin House Team Corey Burr Czuba Group Dana Global Advantage Dana Rice Group Denny & Leyla Team District Property Group Donovan Wye Group Elaine Koch Group Eng Garcia Grant & Company Erich Cabe Team Ferris Levin Collaborative Finnell Lee Homes Fulcrum Properties Group Gailey & Gray HRL Partners Heller Coley Reed Homes with Casey Jay Barry Group Jeanne Phil Meg Team Jennifer Smira Team Joel Nelson Group Ken Abramowitz Group Kevin Grolig Home Team Kirsten & Frank Mandy & David Team

Margie Halem Team McCormick Gregory Meg & Alison Team MG Residential Murtagh Properties Mynor & Associates Robert & Tyler Ron Sitrin Team Ross Residential Russell Firestone Sabelhaus Team Samer Kuraishi Group Speicher Group Tamara Kucik Team Team Koki The Babbington Team The Bowers Group The Friedson Group The Lahey Group The K Team The P&rtners The Reishman Group The Rockwell Group The Sky Group Thrive Team Tom Buerger Team Umanzor & Associates

SILVER

BRONZE

Total of at least

Total of at least

in volume or at least

in volume or at least

$20,000,000

80 transactions

Alex Stefan Group Berger Sandler Bulka/Peters Residential Harrison Beacher Group Jennifer Chow Group Metro DC Houses Team Seth Turner Group The Abrams Group The Green Team The Navigate Group

$10,000,000

40 transactions

Cahill Tully Crossland Cochran Team Emmett Homes Mank & Olin Melinda Hines Team Pettie Tubbs Edwards Rhonda Mortensen Team The Roberts Team The Wiesenfelder Group

CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019 21


Recognition Awards Ceremony Highlights

22 CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019


Recognition Awards Ceremony Highlights

CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019 23


Recognition Awards Ceremony Highlights

24 CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019


Realtor Party ®

Platinum “R” GCAAR Dale Ross Golden “R” Bonnie Casper Ed Krauze Carole Maclure Frank Pietranton, Jr. Bonnie Roberts-Burke Christopher Suranna Holly Worthington Crystal “R” Jamie Coley Fred Kendrick Mike Moran Paragon Title & Escrow Scott Reiter Sterling “R”

Koki Adasi Avi Adler Wendy Banner Stacey Barton Fred Bates Harrison Beacher Jan Brito

Thank You to Our 2019 Major and Large RPAC Investors Sterling “R” Charles Burger Carol Calomiris Catherine Czuba Tom Daley Samuel Dweck Lynette Flavin David Getson Scott Goldberg Brandon Green Harold Huggins Keith James Franklin Jamison Colin Johnson Angela Jones Justin Levitch Kymber Lovett-Menkiti Peg Mancuso Dale Mattison Shelly Murray Marjorie Rosner Andres Serafini Dianah Shaw Jason Sherman Ellie Shorb Danai Mattison Sky Brenda Small

Natalee Snider

Sterling “R”

Nancy Itteilag Robert Jenets Billy Kinberg Melissa Lango Cheryl Leahy Linda Lizzio Peter Locker KT Maclure Hank May Thomas Muldoon Barbara Nalls Katalin Peter John Peters Jean Poitevien John Pruski CJ Radar Michael Rankin Matthew Rogers Joseph Sabelhaus Dana Scanlon Daniel Schuler Jill Schwartz P. Joy Siegel JD Teitelman Juan Umanzor, Jr. JohnYoung

Frank Snodgrass Marty Stanton Kirsten Williams Edward Wood Capital Club ($250-$999) Sunita Bali David Bediz Zachary Bodine Russell Brazil Thom Brockett Jamica Browne Nathan Carnes Eunice Chu Lindsay Clark Lori Connor Lauren Davis Joe Detrick Anthony DeVol Greg Ford Michael Fowler Jeffrey Ganz Katherine Gordon Todd Greenbaum Jacqueline Grenning Gwen Henderson

*As of April 4, 2019

Why I Invest in RPAC – Wendy Banner The Banner Team, Long & Foster Real Estate

The REALTORS® Political Action Committee (RPAC) represents the real estate industry’s interests and works diligently for the betterment of our industry and the clients we represent. Smart growth, environmental issues, and protecting property rights are its focus. It is important to not just support RPAC monetarily, but to help with their Calls for Action and stay aware of the issues as they fight the battles for our protection daily.

Make the investment today! Invest online at: www.gcaar.com CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019 25


public policy Montgomery County and Maryland An Economic Look Ahead The real estate industry is an integral part of the local economy. County Executive Marc Elrich recognized the importance of our industry by inviting GCAAR to the 20th Annual Montgomery County Business Advisory Panel to discuss the economic climate of our region. By reviewing local, state, and national indicators—such as wage growth and employment data—the advisory panel members help the county government shape future economic policies. Panel members include senior government staffers and county business leaders from organizations such as GCAAR. Among the topics of conversation were the impact of the federal government shutdown and the county’s shifting demographics. While the economic outlook of Montgomery County and the State of Maryland is optimistic, GCAAR firmly believes that government leaders need to address certain issues. With rumors of interest rate hikes on the horizon and a possible end to the current economic upswing, local economic growth will need to be continuously fostered. GCAAR is proud to help our local elected officials uphold the health of our local economy, and we look forward to continuing to work with them to build a stronger business climate.

Have a question or an advocacy issue on your radar? Email us at mdlegislative@gcaar.com.

26 CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019


public policy District of Columbia Improving the City’s Regulatory Structure For years, GCAAR has heard the number of obstacles DC REALTORS® face when they interact with the District’s Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs (DCRA). Throughout the past three years, the agency has undergone a number of major structural changes, including the appointment of new leadership. Now, the District of Columbia Association of REALTORS® (DCAR) has increased its advocacy presence at DCRA. REALTORS® have recently participated in a number of government-sponsored roundtables and public oversight hearings to voice their greatest concerns.

Here is what REALTORS® want to see improve: • Permitting. The permitting process must continue to be streamlined. Online options, self-serve stations, and one-stop shopping are ways permitting can be more efficient.

• Inspections. Consistency is the name of the game. When working with inspectors, REALTORS® want to see a consistent approach to decision making. • Customer Service. It is important that the public receive answers to their questions and guidance in a timely fashion. Even if the resolution is not the perfect outcome, being able to speak to some one who is knowledgeable about the process is key. Both DCAR at the state level and GCAAR at the local level will continue to be engaged in moving DCRA toward a brighter future. It is critical for our members to have government entities they can trust as they foster the dream of homeownership for DC residents. Have questions? Want to see further improvements at DCRA? Email advocacy@dcrealtors.org.

• Business Licensing. It should be simple for small housing providers to get a Basic Business License or a Certificate of Occupancy. The forms have improved and become shorter—this is a welcome change.

CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019 27


Agent Spotlight MEET CYNTHIA PRESS Resilience, Determination, and a Commitment to Helping Others When I arrived in the Washington, DC, area in 2008, I started over. After serving as the sales and marketing director for several large-scale luxury developments in Florida, I knew that it would be an uphill climb to begin again without knowing anyone in this competitive market. However, with my two-year-old daughter in tow, I moved to Potomac, Maryland; brushed myself off; and created a plan. While my career in real estate had been successful for 15 years, my experience was solely working in real estate development. I lacked connections in DC, and many of my Florida developer friends had gone bankrupt. General real estate was my only option. But working in an office was not for me. I’m best when roaming. I was determined to make a life for us that included a strong commitment to helping others. Since making Potomac my home, I have learned some valuable lessons about the human spirit and what we are made of. The result of which is who I am today: the broker/owner of Irongate Realty in DC, Maryland, Virginia, and Florida (with affiliate agents in New York). HELPING OTHERS

While assisting a client in Tampa last spring, I removed hundreds of boxes of clothing, shoes, and other household items from a house of a hoarder. With the help of a friend, we located a family shelter and delivered the boxes, which the residents and staff received joyously. We spoke with the residents at the shelter, and it was clear that we were making a difference in these people’s lives. The response healed me and resonated so much that I searched out a similar shelter in Rockville. After touring Stepping Stones Shelter, I worked with the director to make a short-term plan for my involvement. I quickly stepped up my role and joined the board of directors. The relationship is very meaningful to my life, as I walked very closely to being in that position following the market crash during 2006–2008. It’s why I am living here and why I’ve worked so hard to build myself. Any amount of assistance and hope that I can provide helps me heal. Having a meaningful connection to a community increases our lives in every way. I’ve tried to find charities and causes that are deeply connected to my core values and experiences. I want to give back to those who shaped me. FOR MORE INFORMATION on Stepping Stones Shelter, please visit their website at http://steppingstonesshelter.org/ or email cynthia@irongateassociates.com.

HAVE A STORY YOU WOULD LIKE TO SHARE? Send it to: communications@gcaar.com.

28 CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019


B R I G HT U P DAT E

Bright’s Listing Performance Reports gives you new information to share when your clients are trying to determine how their property is performing with local buyers.

Three Ways to Use the Listing Performance Reports with Sellers Even if statistics aren’t your favorite thing to dive into, these reports offer some key information that can help in conversations with your sellers, including: • How many competitive listings went active, were closed, or pending • How many showing appointments occurred before a competitive listing went under contract • How many times someone marked your listing as a favorite in the Client Portal compared to the number of times a competitive listing was marked as a favorite • How many times your listing was sent in direct email, as well as auto email • And much more! Here are three ways to use these reports with sellers: 1. Discuss potential changes to the listing or property.

Maybe prior to listing your seller’s home you discussed some upgrades that might make it more appealing to local buyers. They preferred to wait and see. After a few weeks it’s clear to you that the upgrades are going to be needed. Bring the Listing Performance Report to that meeting and show the activity on their property compared to other competitive properties in the area. Explain how your proposed changes could generate more interest and potentially help sell the home faster. 2. Explain how many showings they should expect before an offer.

It’s the question on everyone’s mind - how long before this home sells? While you can’t promise an exact number, the Appointments before Contract section of the Listing Performance Report, can provide some insight into the general activity they can expect to see prior to receiving that offer. 3. Show the benefit of a price reduction.

You’ve discussed a price reduction and your sellers decided it was the right decision. With the Listing Performance Reports you can show them the tangible benefit of that reduction in price. Generate the report 1-2 weeks after your price reduction. Compare the number of sent email prior to and after the price was changed. You will likely see a spike in sent email, which means the property was shown to a brand new set of buyers as a direct result of the change. Section of the report you’d rather not share? You can uncheck any section of the Listing Performance Report, so that only the ones you want to share are available when you print the report.

t

You can find the Listing Performance Report on brightmls.com under Market Research.

Have feedback to share? Send a message to communications@gcaar.com CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019 29


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WELCOMES BRUCE STERN

Managing Attorney—Maryland Bruce has been a practicing attorney for 28 years. He is a graduate of the University of California, Los Angeles and Boston University School of Law. For the last 17 years, he has been the owner of a real estate settlement company based in Montgomery County. He personally has conducted nearly 7,000 real estate closings in Maryland, DC, and Virginia and he has extensive experience in the real estate industry. He is excited to join the Cardinal Title team and looks forward to working with all of you and handling your Maryland closings!

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30 CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — March/April 2019


NAR Director’s Report Danai Mattison Sky 2019 President-Elect

National Association of REALTORS® Launches “That’s Who We R” Campaign The REALTOR® Code of Ethics was the inspiration for the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) powerful new “That’s Who We R®” campaign, which launched at the end of February.

We’re REALTORS®

The campaign aims to reinforce the value of REALTORS® as advocates for property owners, engaged community members, and trusted advisors with in-depth knowledge of the industry.

We’re real people

“‘That’s Who We R®’ reinforces that partnering with a REALTOR® delivers the peace of mind that can only come from working with a real person who is committed to their clients’ futures and neighborhoods just as much as they are, said 2019 NAR President John Smaby. “Our story is a century in the making, as we began to set NAR members apart from the rest by establishing a Code of Ethics in 1913. This code is as relevant now as it was 100 years ago; it’s our pledge of honesty, integrity, professionalism, and community service as a true partner for buying or selling a home or property.”

from neighborhoods,

making a difference everywhere— to our nation’s capital. That’s Who We R®.

“That’s Who We R®” serves as a reminder of what NAR has always stood for, while signaling where the organization is heading. For REALTORS®, the campaign is a rallying cry that instills pride in their everyday actions. For consumers, it’s an education about the REALTOR® difference. It features compelling stories about humans helping humans find homes and property, build communities, and turn business dreams into realities. I encourage all NAR members to come together, share their own stories, and spread the word…because “That’s Who We R!’”

View the TV spot at https://www.nar.realtor./

NAR.REALTOR

CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019 33


legal hotline

By Chris Darby, Tom Muldoon, and John Nalls of Counselors Title, LLC, and Pardo & Drazin, LLC, General Counsel

QUESTION: For Montgomery County sales, the estimated

tax bill must be included in the disclosure packet. The jurisdictional addendum mentions that this “can” be obtained at a website, but Bright MLS also links to another version of this document. Can we use the one that is linked via Bright MLS? It does contain all the same info and more.

ANSWER: In an attempt to ensure that home purchasers in Montgomery County understand how much they may be required to pay in real property taxes, the County Council enacted legislation effective April 1, 2008 that “any written or electronically transmitted material that the Seller produces or distributes in connection with the advertisement for sale of a specific residential real property located in the County must disclose the estimated full-year tax that a Buyer would be obligated to pay in the next full tax year after the property is transferred….” The figure to be disclosed must include all State and County property taxes and any other non-tax fee or charge included in the consolidated tax bill. The estimate must be updated (1) each July 1 when the new annual tax bills are issued, and (2) by January 31 if the property is in the third year of its three-year assessment cycle to reflect the revised assessment by the State Department of Assessments and Taxation. This law does not apply 34 CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019

to the municipalities of Barnesville, Kensington, Poolesville, and Rockville. To assist its customers, Bright MLS made three changes to all Montgomery County public records full displays and printouts: (1) Bright MLS has added a new label for the Assessment section, which states: “Tax Fiscal Year 2008 Estimated property tax and other non-tax charges in the first full fiscal year of ownership”; (2) The “Total Taxes” label has been replaced with “Total Est. Charges”; and (3) The “Assessed Value” label has been replaced with “Phase-in Value.” The new tax amounts autofill for all new listings as of April 1, 2008. Section 40-12C of the County Code requires only that the seller provide accurate information, so using the Bright MLS version would be okay, as long as that information is accurate. However, Section 40-12C(e) also provides: “A seller or the seller’s agent is not liable for any incorrect information disclosed under this Section if the seller relied in good faith on a method approved or recommended by the County to estimate the information.” In light of this language and to insulate yourself and your seller from liability, I would suggest that you obtain the information directly from the County, which can be done by


accessing the approved County website at www.montgomerycountymd.gov/estimatedtax.

Revenue Code (“Exchange”) are advised to consult an exchange professional.

QUESTION: My clients had their family lawyer friend

Buyer may elect to treat this purchase as part of an Exchange. Seller agrees to cooperate with Buyer in the execution of documents necessary to facilitate the Exchange provided Seller incurs no additional liability, cost or expense. Seller grants permission to assign this Contract to an exchange intermediary.

prepare a power of attorney (POA) for them selling their home in DC, and I want to make sure it will work.

ANSWER: While many POAs may be sufficient to allow parties to contract for the sale of real estate, District of Columbia Code is specific about the requirements of a POA for the transfer of real estate and recordability of documents incident thereto. DC CODE § 42–101. No acknowledgment of deed by attorney. (a) A general or specific power of attorney executed by a person authorizing an attorney-in-fact to sell, grant, or release any interest in real property shall be executed in the same manner as a deed and shall be recorded with or prior to the deed executed pursuant to the power of attorney. If the power of attorney is recorded prior to the deed executed pursuant to the power of attorney, the deed being executed pursuant to the power of attorney shall include a recording date and instrument number reference of where the original recorded power of attorney is located in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds for the District of Columbia. All powers of attorney executed in accordance with this section shall contain on the top of the front page, in bold and capital letters, the following words: “THIS POWER OF ATTORNEY AUTHORIZES THE PERSON NAMED BELOW AS MY ATTORNEY-INFACT TO DO ONE OR MORE OF THE FOLLOWING: TO SELL, LEASE, GRANT, ENCUMBER, RELEASE, OR OTHERWISE CONVEY ANY INTEREST IN MY REAL PROPERTY AND TO EXECUTE DEEDS AND ALL OTHER INSTRUMENTS ON MY BEHALF, UNLESS THIS POWER OF ATTORNEY IS OTHERWISE LIMITED HEREIN TO SPECIFIC REAL PROPERTY.”

Seller may elect to treat this sale as part of an Exchange. Buyer agrees to cooperate with Seller in the execution of documents necessary to facilitate the Exchange provided Buyer incurs no additional liability, cost or expense. Buyer grants permission to assign this Contract to an exchange intermediary.

QUESTION: Hi, I’m a GCAAR member looking for updated information for the Tenant Opportunity to Purchase Act (TOPA) requirements in a multifamily transaction. I’m working on a multifamily transaction (three units) and can’t find the TOPA forms I was using up until last year. I represent the buyer. Have forms, requirements, and procedures for the waiver forms changed since a couple of years ago?

ANSWER: The law and the forms have not changed recently in the two- or more-unit arena. The 2018 amendments apply to single-family rental units, single-family rental units with an accessory dwelling unit, and single rental accommodations in a condominium, cooperative, or homeowners’ association. GCAAR provides reference to the DC forms, which can be found at https://dhcd.dc.gov/page/rental-conversion-andsale-forms. We recommend contacting your settlement attorney so that you can review the specific insurer requirements that will be required in order to provide for TOPA compliance.

QUESTION: Do we have standard language for the sale

of a home in Montgomery County in which the Seller’s proceeds will go toward a 1031? Can you provide?

ANSWER: Paragraph 11 of Addendum of Clause B provides

Disclaimer: The answers provided here are the opinions of the authors, are for informational purposes, and are only for GCAAR members. Neither Counselors

the language necessary language to include in the contract for a tax-deferred exchange.

Title, LLC, nor Pardo & Drazin, LLC is providing legal advice, but rather providing

11. 1031 EXCHANGE: Parties wishing to participate in a tax deferred exchange under Section 1031 of the Internal

own counsel for their specific questions. Answers may have been edited for

a general statement of law. No lawyer/client relationship is – or will be – established as a result of this material. Readers are encouraged to retain their formatting purposes.

CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019 35


COACHES’ CORNER When Friends Work With Someone Else What do you do when your friend decides to work with another agent and then asks you for advice? One of the most difficult pieces of news to swallow is when a friend tells you they are in the process of buying a house and have decided not to work with you. It’s like a punch in the stomach, and we’ve all been there. We all know that our friends and family often will decide not to work with us because: • They don’t want to mix business with family or friendship. • They don’t want us to know how much or how little money they make. • They don’t want us to know about their finances. It could be for a variety of reasons that make sense only to them. They don’t understand that as REALTORS®, we don’t have to know their income or credit score. All we need is a preapproval letter from a reputable lender. So instead of giving us an opportunity to present how we actually conduct the homebuying or home selling process, they choose to go with another agent. Then to add insult to injury, when their transaction begins to go south, they call us with questions and ask for our advice.

How are you supposed to respond? Naturally, you want to help them and answer their questions because they are your friend or family member. Plus, REALTORS® love troubleshooting. That’s what we do day in and day out. We are problem solvers. But unfortunately for them, you can’t help them. For whatever reason, they have decided to work with another agent, and therefore, you cannot help them. According to the National Association of REALTORS® Code of Ethics, it would be considered interfering with the transaction because your friend or family member is being represented by another agent. You must tactfully 36 CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019

When friends decide to go with another agent— tell them to discuss the matter with their agent. tell them to discuss the matter with their agent. You’ll want to say more and even tell them that’s why they should have worked with you. Don’t. After the transaction is over, they will still be your friend, and friendship supersedes business every time. CANDY MILES-CROCKER “The Real-Life

REALTOR®,“ coaches, mentors, and trains new and experienced real estate agents to transform their business by mastering her proven systems for success. She is a firm believer in managing expectations and her goal is to elevate the perception of real estate agents among the general public through education so every client has an amazing real estate experience. Candy’s unique training methods have shown agents what it takes to be successful! Inman News selected Candy as one of the Top 25 Real Estate Coaches in 2016. Learn more at www.RLRETraining.com.


from the GCAAR classroom

In addition to impacting our buildings, mold can impact our health. The primary impact mold has on health is as an allergen and asthma trigger. It can also potentially harm those with compromised immune systems. Certain species are known to have toxigenic qualities and can cause serious health concerns in otherwise healthy individuals. Regardless of whether an individual is allergic or susceptible to mold, it’s generally not advisable to occupy a space with elevated levels of mold present over long periods of time.

Mold and Its Effect on Real Estate You finally did it: You found your buyers the absolute perfect home, and they love it. The offer was accepted, and now you’re at the property with the buyers for the home inspection. Everything is going well until the inspector spots it. The flashlight comes out. Photos are taken. The inspector tells your buyers, “There’s some discoloration here that’s indicative of possible mold being present.” And your nightmare begins. When an inspector finds mold in a home, it can stop an otherwise smooth real estate transaction in its tracks. In some cases, the buyers walk away entirely, leaving the seller and their agent to deal with the problem. When the buyer remains interested, the situation can very often become contentious. It doesn’t have to be this way! As a REALTOR®, understanding mold and how to handle it can be the difference between a transaction that goes to settlement and one that falls apart. In the GCAAR class Mold and

Its Effect on Real Estate, agents learn: • What mold is, where it comes from, and how it impacts our buildings and our health • How to recognize red flags for mold in a home, and what to do if they are present • What some common fears are about mold—and how to mitigate those fears for your clients • Steps to successfully handle a mold issue from either side of the transaction • Tools to communicate with buyers and sellers • How to reduce your liability as an agent through under standing remediation options and costs • How to read and write con tingency language when mold is present Mold—it’s everywhere Mold is naturally occurring and can be found literally everywhere on Earth. Mold spores go airborne as part of the reproduction process,

Go to the Class & Events Calendar at www.gcaar.com to sign up.

and those spores get into our homes through normal use and airflow. Every home has mold. The question, then, isn’t whether there is mold in a home, but whether the mold is, or was, growing in the home. When the source of mold is indoors rather than outdoors, action often needs to be taken. WHY is mold a problem? When mold is present in a home beyond what is considered normal fungal ecology, it should be remediated. Left unchecked, mold growth can cause the materials we use to build our homes to deteriorate. Mold uses natural materials such as drywall, wood, and others as a food source. Over time, this can result in degradation of the materials and can increase the overall scope of work and cost necessary to complete remediation.

Why is mold a deal killer? Mold scares people. More and more often, we see stories in the news about mold causing people to get very sick or causing irreparable damage to a building. As is common, the stories covered in the media tend to be the extreme circumstances, and when combined with a general lack of additional information, people unfamiliar with mold develop a level of concern disproportionate to the actual situation. When mold is discovered during a real estate transaction, buyers tend to exaggerate the sense of danger, and both sides significantly overestimate of the cost of repairs. What is the solution? As a real estate agent, the best thing you can do is gain an understanding of the actual risks mold poses in a home and how to resolve the situation. Knowing more about mold will help you address and mitigate your clients’ fears and allow you to guide them toward the right next steps, and ultimately to the desired outcome—settlement. This article was written by Jenn Sherwood of Green Home Solutions of Maryland. She can be reached at jenn.sherwood@ greenhomesolutions.com. CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019 37


economic outlook & forecast By Nadia Evangelou, NAR Research

Women in Real Estate

Nationwide, women dominate the residential real estate market, but they compose a smaller share of the commercial market.

Women make up 63 percent of all REALTORS®, according to the 2018 National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) Member Profile Survey. There are few industries remaining today that have not seen a drastic change in the role that women play, though real estate is not one of those industries. Historically, women have been involved in real estate almost since its inception in 1794 and its establishment as a legitimate business in the 1840s. In real estate’s early days, women filled office and clerical roles, but by the 1880s, women were already moving into the roles of agents and brokers. Nationwide, women dominate the residential real estate market, but they compose a smaller share of the commercial market. NAR Research analyzed data by segmenting male and female responses to the questions regarding income, family structure, marital status, education, previous occupation, and other characteristics. The survey results include the following: • Females make up 63 percent of NAR’s membership, and those who work exclusively in residential real estate have a median gross income of $38,000 compared to $46,250 for men. Women tend to be younger and more likely to work part-time.

38 CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019


• Seventy percent of female members work exclu- sively in residential real estate, compared to 45% of male members. Fifteen percent of males work exclusively in commercial real estate, compared to only four percentof females. The top reasons that all specialists—male and female—do not yet pursue commercial real estate are a lack of knowledge of commercial real estate and not knowing how to break into the industry, according to another NAR Survey. • Moreover, 75 percent of female members reported that real estate is currently their only occupation, and 30 of them have been active as a real estate pro fessional for 16 or more years. In a typical work week, about half of them work 40 hours or more. • From a business activity perspective, the numbers are very similar between female and male resi- dential-only specialists. Females are slightly outperforming their male colleagues, although the business activity is very close. For instance, female members sell more expensive homes than male specialists—female agents have a median of eight sales transactions compared to seven for males. However, 18 percent of male specialists compared to 15 percent of female specialists had $5 million or more in annual sales trans action volume. Higher sales volume means higher commissions and, there fore, a higher overall income. This might be why men had a higher median gross income than women.

2017 Choosing a Career in Real Estate Survey: A Perspective on Gender, Race, and Ethnicity, National Association of REALTORS®

What makes real estate an attractive profession? Women and men choose to work in the real estate market for different reasons. Women choose the real estate industry for the flexible hours, their desire to help families, and their love of homes and homeownership. However, men reported an affinity for real estate, entrepreneurship, and a special interest in commercial real estate. Based on the NAR survey, flexibility appears to be more important for women than for men. Work-life balance seems to be one of the main priorities for women in real estate. Moreover, many female real estate agents get great satisfaction from knowing they helped people through major times in their lives. Purchasing a home is considered to be a major life event, and women especially feel that it is a very important part of people’s lives. Real estate agents get to help people through each stage in their lives—from a new couple buying their first house to a family buying a vacation home or a bachelor getting his ultimate bachelor pad—and truly be part of a community.

1

2017 Choosing a Career in Real Estate Survey: A Perspective on Gender, Race, and Ethnicity, National Association of REALTORS® 2

CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019 39


2019 EDUCATION SCHEDULE

may

May 1, 2019

Financing Issues/Update CEU: 3 hours MD, DC and VA (elective) Instructor: Bill Rozek & Thom Brockett Time: 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. May 1, 2019

Comparative Differences Between the GCAAR and Maryland REALTOR® Contract CEU: 1.5 hours MD and DC (elective) Instructor: James Savitz Time: 1:30 – 3:00 p.m. May 1, 2019

DC Legislative Update CEU: 3 hours DC (required) Instructor: Marty Stanton & Bonnie Roberts-Burke Time: 1:30 – 4:30 p.m. * DC Location (1615 New Hampshire Avenue, NW 3rd Floor) May 2, 2019

Maryland Fair Housing CEU: 1.5 hours MD (required) and DC (elective) Instructor: Jessica Chipoco Time: 8:00 – 9:30 a.m. May 2, 2019

Maryland Legislative Update CEU: 3 hours MD (required) and DC (elective) Instructor: Joy Siegel Time: 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. May 2, 2019

Maryland Code of Ethics and Predatory Lending CEU: 3 hours MD (required) and DC (elective) Instructor: Thom Brockett Time: 2:00 – 5:00 p.m. May 2, 2019

MREC Agency – Residential CEU: 3 hours MD (required) and DC (elective) Instructor: Roger Carp Time: 5:30 – 8:30 p.m. May 3, 2019

Maryland Legislative Update CEU: 3 hours MD (required) and DC (elective) Instructor: Tara Houston Time: 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. * DC Location (1615 New Hampshire Avenue, NW, 3rd Floor)

May 3, 2019

May 13, 2019

May 18, 2019

DC Legislative Update CEU: 3 hours DC (required) Instructor: Andrew DiPaola Time: 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

DC Legislative Update CEU: 3 hours DC (required) Instructor: Andrew DiPaola Time: 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. * DC Location (1615 New Hampshire Avenue, NW, 3rd Floor)

New Member Orientation CEU: No CE Instructor: Mary Chieppa Time: 8:30 – 10:00 a.m.

May 3, 2019

Maryland Fair Housing CEU: 1.5 hours MD (required) and DC (elective) Instructor: Tara Houston Time: 2:00 – 3:30 p.m. * DC Location (1615 New Hampshire Avenue, NW, 3rd Floor) May 6, 2019

VA Financing CEU: 3 hours MD and DC (elective) Instructor: Geetesh Kapoor Time: 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. May 6, 2019

New Member Orientation CEU: No CE Instructor: Mary Chieppa Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. * DC Location (1615 New Hampshire Avenue, NW, 3rd Floor) May 6, 2019

Maryland Code of Ethics and Predatory Lending CEU: 3 hours MD (required) and DC (elective) Instructor: Mary Chieppa Time: 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. * DC Location (1615 New Hampshire Avenue, NW 3rd Floor) May 6, 2019

Unclear Title CEU: 3 hours MD and DC (elective) Instructor: Marc Malakoff Time: 1:30 – 4:30 p.m. May 10, 2019

GCAAR @ NVAR: MREC Agency - Residential CEU: 3 hours MD (required) and DC (elective) Instructor: Thom Brockett Time: 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. * NVAR - Fairfax (8407 Pennell Street) May 10, 2019

GCAAR @ NVAR: Creating Value Through Renovation Loans CEU: 1.5 hours MD and DC (elective) Instructor: Shawn Barsness Time: 1:00 – 2:30 p.m. * NVAR - Fairfax (8407 Pennell Street) May 13, 2019

MREC Agency - Residential CEU: 3 hours MD (required) and DC (elective) Instructor: Thom Brockett Time: 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

40 CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019

May 13, 2019

MREC Required Supervision CEU: 3 hours MD (required for brokers; elective for salespeople) and DC (elective) Instructor: Thom Brockett Time: 1:30 – 4:30 p.m. May 13, 2019

DC Fair Housing CEU: 3 hours DC (required) Instructor: Sandra Stewart Time: 2:00 – 5:00 p.m. * DC Location (1615 New Hampshire Avenue, NW, 3rd Floor) May 15, 2019

GCAAR @ NVAR: GCAAR Sales Contract Update CEU: 3 hours MD and DC (elective) Instructor: Andrew DiPaola Time: 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. * NVAR- Fairfax (8407 Pennell Street) May 15, 2019

GCAAR @ NVAR: Maryland Fair Housing CEU: 1.5 hours MD (required) and DC (elective) Instructor: Jessica Chipoco Time: 1:30 – 3:00 p.m. * NVAR – Fairfax (8407 Pennell Street) May 16, 2019

Anatomy of a House CEU: 3 hours MD, DC and VA (elective) Instructor: Vimal Kapoor Time: 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. May 16, 2019

Buyer Beware: Foreclosed and Neglected Properties CEU: 3 hours MD and DC (elective) Instructor: Vimal Kapoor Time: 1:30 – 4:30 p.m. May 17, 2019

Maryland Code of Ethics and Predatory Lending CEU: 3 hours MD (required) and DC (required) Instructor: Al Monshower Time: 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. May 17, 2019

Maryland Fair Housing CEU; 1.5 hours MD (required) and DC (elective) Instructor: Al Monshower Time: 1:30 – 3:00 p.m.

May 18, 2019

Maryland Code of Ethics and Predatory Lending CEU: 3 hours MD (required) and DC (elective) Instructor: Mary Chieppa Time: 10:15 a.m. – 1:15 p.m. May 20, 2019

DC Fair Housing CEU: 3 hours DC (required) Instructor: Tara Houston Time: 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. May 20, 2019

GCAAR @ NVAR: Maryland Legislative Update CEU: 3 hours MD (required) and DC (elective) Instructor: Tim Sessing Time: 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. * NVAR – Fairfax (8407 Pennell Street) May 20, 2019

DC Ethics CEU: 3 hours DC (required) Instructor: Tara Houston Time: 1:30 – 4:30 p.m. May 20, 2019

GCAAR @ NVAR: Avoiding Settlement Pitfalls CEU: 1.5 hours MD and DC (elective) Instructor: Andrew DiPaola Time: 1:30 – 3:00 p.m. * NVAR - Fairfax (8407 Pennell Street) May 22, 2019

Most Common Mistakes that Delay Settlement CEU: 2 hours MD, DC and VA (elective) Instructor: Jacqueline Nguyen Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. May 23, 2019

DC Ethics CEU: 3 hours DC (required) Instructor: Jim Semeyn Time: 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. * DC Location (1615 New Hampshire Avenue, NW, 3rd Floor) May 23, 2019

New Member Orientation CEU: No CE Instructor: Mary Chieppa Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.


NOTE: All classes are held at GCAAR’s

2019 EDUCATION SCHEDULE May 23, 2019

June 3, 2019

Maryland Code of Ethics and Predatory Lending CEU: 3 hours MD (required) and DC (elective) Instructor: Mary Chieppa Time: 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.

GCAAR @ NVAR: Maryland Code of Ethics and Predatory Lending CEU: 3 hours MD (required) and DC (elective) Instructor: Mary Chieppa Time: 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. * NVAR – Fairfax (8407 Pennell Street)

May 23, 2019

Financing Issues/Update CEU: 3 hours MD, DC and VA (elective) Instructor: Jim Semeyn Time: 2:00 – 5:00 p.m. * DC Location (1615 New Hampshire Avenue, NW, 3rd Floor) May 23, 2019

Maryland Fair Housing CEU: 1.5 hours MD (required) and DC (elective) Instructor: Mary Chieppa Time: 4:30 – 6:00 p.m. May 29, 2019

Conventional/FHA/VA Primer for First Time Homebuyers CEU: 3 hours MD and DC (elective) Instructor: Jim Semeyn Time: 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. May 29, 2019

Overcoming Rising Interest Rates CEU: 3 hours MD and DC (elective) Instructor: Jim Semeyn Time: 1:30 – 4:30 p.m. May 30, 2019

FHA Financing CEU: 3 hours MD, DC and VA (elective) Instructor: Amy Goldstein Time: 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. May 30, 2019

1031 Exchanges and Updates CEU: 1.5 hours MD and DC (elective) and 1.0 hour VA (elective) Instructor: Bill Horan Time: 1:30 – 3:00 p.m. May 31, 2019

Financing Issues/ Update CEU: 3 hours MD, DC and VA (elective) Instructor: Brian Willingham Time: 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

june

June 3, 2019

Rockville office unless otherwise noted.

* DC Location (1615 New Hampshire Avenue, NW, 3rd Floor) June 10, 2019

Mortgage Basics CEU: 3 hours MD and DC (elective) Instructor: Billy Kinberg Time: 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. * DC Location (1615 New Hampshire Avenue, NW 3rd Floor)

GCAAR @ NVAR: Maryland Fair Housing CEU: 1.5 hours MD (required) and DC (elective) Instructor: Mary Chieppa Time: 1:30 – 3:00 p.m. * NVAR – Fairfax (8407 Pennell Street)

June 10, 2019

June 3, 2019

June 12, 2019

MREC Agency - Residential CEU: 3 hours MD (required) and DC (elective) Instructor: Al Monshower Time: 1:30 – 4:30 p.m.

Broker Manager Forum: Most Common Complaints Received by the Real Estate Commissions CEU: No CE Instructor: Michael Kasnic & Leon Lewis Time: 12:00 – 2:00 p.m.

June 4, 2019

New Member Orientation CEU: No CE Instructor: Dana Hollish Hill Time: 4:00 – 5:30 p.m. June 4, 2019

Maryland Code of Ethics and Predatory Lending CEU: 3 hours MD (required) and DC (elective) Instructor: Dana Hollish Hill Time: 5:45 – 8:45 p.m. June 5, 2019

Contract Basics CEU: 3 hours MD and DC (elective) Instructor: Andrew DiPaola Time: 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. June 5, 2019

Renovation Loan Options CEU: 3 hours MD, DC and VA (elective) Instructor: Geetesh Kapoor Time: 1:30 - 4:30 p.m. June 6, 2019

New Member Orientation CEU: No CE Instructor: Ned Rich Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. * DC Location (1615 New Hampshire Avenue, NW, 3rd Floor)

June 3, 2019

June 6, 2019

Maryland Legislative Update CEU: 3 hours MD (required) and DC (elective) Instructor: Al Monshower Time: 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Maryland Code of Ethics and Predatory Lending CEU: 3 hours MD (required) and DC (elective) Instructor: Ned Rich Time: 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Rental Property Management CEU: 3 hours MD, DC and VA (elective) Instructor: Jean Poitevien Time: 2:00 – 5:00 p.m. * DC Location (1615 New Hampshire Avenue, NW 3rd Floor)

June 17, 2019

Strategies in a Multiple Offer Market CEU: 1.5 hours MD and DC (elective) and 1.0 hour VA (elective) Instructor: Thom Brockett Time: 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. June 17, 2019

Contract Basics CEU: 3 hours MD and DC (elective) Instructor: Jason Sherman Time: 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. * DC Location (1615 New Hampshire Avenue, NW 3rd Floor) June 17, 2019

Homebuyer’s Guide to Indoor Air Quality CEU: 1.5 hours MD and DC (elective) Instructor: Kevin Barnaba Time: 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. June 17, 2019

Basics of Real Estate Bankruptcy CEU: 1.5 hours MD and DC (elective) and 1.0 hour VA (elective) Instructor: Tim Sessing Time: 1:30 – 3:00 p.m.

June 12, 2019

June 17, 2019

MREC Required Supervision CEU: 3 hours MD (required for brokers; elective for salespersons) and DC (elective) Instructor: Carole Maclure Time: 2:30 – 5:30 p.m.

Condo Financing CEU: 3 hours MD, DC and VA (elective) Instructor: Matthew Palmer Time: 2:00 – 5:00 p.m. * DC Location (1615 New Hampshire Avenue, NW, 3rd Floor)

June 13, 2019

June 17, 2019

Basement, Foundation and Crawl Space Issues CEU: 3 hours MD, DC and VA (elective) Instructor: Vimal Kapoor Time: 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Prepping Your Client for the Home Inspection CEU: 1.5 hours MD and DC (elective) Instructor: Dan Deist Time: 3:30 – 5:00 p.m.

June 13, 2019

Solving Sellers Issues CEU: 3 hours MD and DC (elective) Instructor: Colleen Smyth Time: 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Home Innovations and Trends CEU: 3 hours MD, DC and VA (elective) Instructor: Vimal Kapoor Time: 1:30 – 4:30 p.m. June 14, 2019

New Member Orientation CEU: No CE Instructor: Bob Pettis Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. June 14, 2019

Maryland Code of Ethics and Predatory Lending CEU: 3 hours MD (required) and DC (elective) Instructor: Bob Pettis Time: 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.

June 19, 2019

June 19, 2019

Negotiating the Best Contract CEU: 3 hours MD, DC and VA (elective) Instructor: Roger Carp Time: 1:30 – 4:30 p.m. June 20, 2019

Maryland REALTORS® Contract of Sale CEU: 3 hours MD and DC (elective) Instructor: Jim Savitz Time: 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

continued on page 43

CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019 41


Stay connected at www.gcaar.com WELCOME to the Greater Capital Area Association of REALTORS®

We are pleased that you have chosen to join our organization. GCAAR is your voice for real estate issues in DC and Montgomery County, MD. It offers venues for networking and allows you to connect with your peers and exchange best practices. We invite you to take full advantage of your benefits as a member.

NEW MEMBERS January Reyna Benavides Nunez Weichert REALTORS® Marissa Bailey Long & Foster Real Estate Carl Bell TriStar Realty Craig Bricker SunTrust Mortgage Howard Del Aguila Pearson Smith Realty Donna Delour RE/MAX Fine Living Ozgun Deniz The ONE Street Company Bryan Freeman Keller Williams Capital Properties Bridgette Hager Keller Williams Capital Properties Yohannes Haileyesus Keller Williams Capital Properties Teodora Ilieva edfin Corporation Jamal Kea TriStar Realty Gianna Manzella Cathie Gill Paul Maysak PNC Bank Randal Mintz Compass Sharmila Nadeem Keller Williams Capital Properties Stephen O’Connor SunTrust Mortgage

42 CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019

Louis Patierno PNC Bank

Robert Alexander Long & Foster Real Estate

John Burkinshaw Womack Pest Control

Tiffany Richards TriStar Realty

Ali Alibakhshi Chase Properties

Rachael Burnett McWilliams/Ballard

Thomas Saehler Monument Sotheby’s International

Michele Alston Exit Deluxe Realty

Josue Carela Northrop Realty

Richard Samit Fraser Forbes Co.

Alexandra Arnold Compass

Sandra Chacon Capital Area REALTORS® of DC

Asila Sayedi Allfirst Realty

Maria Arze Maxus Realty Group

Nicole Shirley Keller Williams Capital Properties

Jonathan Askarinam Redfin Corporation

Carlos Chaney Keller Williams Capital Properties Hung Chen Long & Foster Real Estate

Garo Simonian The ONE Street Company

David Aviles Long & Foster Real Estate

Ka Cheung Century 21 Trademark Realty

Ronald Singleton Exit Flagship Realty

Arash Azma Keller Williams Capital Properties Tracey Barnett Keller Williams Capital Properties Kimpoko Barry eXp Realty

Jonathan Coles United Real Estate Great Falls

John Smith Chatel Real Estate Andrea Taylor Keller Williams City Wide Realty Chanel Thomas Smart Realty Geoffrey Tinkham Coldwell Banker Residential Courtney Wood Bennett Realty Solutions

February Evelyn Abakah Jobin Real Estate

Ebony Bates Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices/ PenFed Demetrius Bellizaire Keller Williams Realty Tatyana Blackwell Blue Crab Real Estate Jonathan Blansfield Long & Foster Real Estate

Imani Abdul-Aziz Sourceone Realty

Ana Bogavac Real Living at Home

Mohammed Akhter Exit Flagship Realty

Kennan Bradley RE/MAX Town Center

Britta Alexander Coldwell Banker Residential

LaToya Brim Sourceone Realty

Amanda Coogle Keller Williams Capital Properties Emily Cornett Keller Williams Capital Properties Tamica Crawford KL Associates Spencer Cullen Envoy Mortgage James Dalpee Redfin Corporation Michael Dana Tower Hill Realty Nicolina Darling Keller Williams Realty Kerri Davis Exit Flagship Realty Jimmy Deras Let Me LLC Rocky Deterts Keller Williams Capital Properties


NEW MEMBERS Omar Howard RE/MAX Exclusive

Holly Madison KL Associates

Camilo Rodriguez Freedom Choice Realty

Shelly Hu Union Plus Realty

Christin Marshall Long & Foster Real Estate

Brett Rubin Long & Foster Real Estate

Margaret Hutto Keller Williams Capital Properties Esmaiel Jabbari Keller Williams Capital Properties Jacqueline Jackson TriStar Realty

John Martinich Pearson Smith Realty

Sheilla Saldana EJF Real Estate Services

Idean Marvastian Keller Williams Capital Properties Dakari McAdoo KL Associates

Anthony Salinas Washington Fine Properties

Martha Farmer TTR Sotheby's International Realty Dianne Fisher-Griffin Keller Williams Capital Properties Kirk Forman Monarch Mortgage

Noah Jacobs Compass

James McInerney Coldwell Banker Residential

Marie Sapalicio RE/MAX Excellence Realty

Corbin Jennings Real Living at Home

Chris Mereos Coldwell Banker Residential

Xiaojun Jie Metro Star Realty

Alicia Miller Redfin Corporation

Preston Smith Keller Williams Capital Properties John Stanley RE/MAX Realty Services

Nicholas Framarini Envoy Mortgage

Vinod Jolly Smart Realty

Mark Miller McWilliams/Ballard

Jennifer Stevens Long HMS Home Warranty

Pinkesh Gala Smart Realty

Graham Jones RE/MAX Elite Services

Shaun Miller Monarch Mortgage

Chris Gaginis Long & Foster Real Estate

Kari Kendrick Weichert REALTORS®

Brendon Mills Keller Williams City Wide Realty

Sean Garganio Real Living at Home

Thomas Kennedy Long & Foster Real Estate

Lowell Mitchell Long & Foster Real Estate

Shannon Stichman TTR Sotheby's International Realty Latrice Strader Keller Williams Capital Properties Martha Sullivan Keller Williams Realty #29

Ronnie Graye Realinvestors Real Estate Services Adrian Hairston City Properties 5

Barrington Keymist City Properties 5

Shayan Modarres Shayan Modarres

Stanya Taylor Coldwell Banker Residential

Christopher Kuchnicki Crossman & Co. Real Estate

Lyn Myles Coldwell Banker Residential

Melissa Haner Century 21 New Millennium

James Nastus Compass Ron Nocera HMS Home Warranty

Simon Timm Houwzer

Kevin O’Dell Keller Williams Capital Properties Adetayo Oshadiya Redfin Corporation

Sherman Toppin Sherman Toppin Real Estate

Donna Higgs RE/MAX Town Center

Joon Kum Keller Williams Capital Properties Zarema Kumukova Keller Williams Capital Properties Justin Lanciault Keller Williams Capital Properties David Lawson United Real Estate Great Falls

Nicole Terry TTR Sotheby’s International Realty Thomas Thykattimalayil TriStar Realty

Angelica Hines Bennett Realty Solutions

Kimberly Levine Greystone Realty

Luis Horqque Garces Century 21 Certified Realty Group

Kathy Ludunge RE/MAX PROS

Arthur Ott TTR Sotheby's International Realty David Pikovsky HMS Home Warranty

Rachel Horsey Bank of America

John Ma Optime Realty

Jose Quintana TriStar Realty

Shanice Dickens Keller Williams Capital Properties Stephanie Donne TTR Sotheby's International Realty Bobby Enoch SourceOne Real Estate Services Ulas Eralp Redfin Corporation Stephanie Ewers Real Estate Teams

Sandra Hawkes Long & Foster Real Estate Jade Henderson Exit Deluxe Realty

John Salzman Coldwell Banker Residential

Gabriel Valladolid W Realty Services Maria Velasquez NBI Realty David Vendt Allstate - The Dirk Agency continued on page 38

CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019 43


NEW MEMBERS

Since 1990 the Preferred Qualified Intermediary for 1031 Exchanges!

Your Preferred Local Qualified Intermediary for 1031 Exchanges Contact us for free consultations & information Bill Horan, CES® bill@1031.us

Certified Exchange Specialist®

7400 Heritage Village Plaza #102 Gainesville, VA 20155 800-795-0769 www.1031.us

Sreekrishna Vinjamoori Keller Williams Capital Properties Marcellus Waddill MW Real Estate Services William White Sourceone Realty Rasanjali Wickrema Brian Logan Real Estate Robin Wolfson Peek Properties Guozhen Xiao Long & Foster Real Estate Yurly Yakusha Keller Williams Capital Properties

March

Aarik Arora Keller Williams Capital Properties Temitope Akojie Keller Williams Preferred Properties Abdul Anwar Capital Amerian Realty Caroline Awonusi Bennett Realty Solutions Damon Azizinamini Weichert REALTORS® Theodore Badger Samson Properties Janina Freerks Keller Williams Capital Properties Karen Greenzaid Century 21 New Millennium Alexes Haggins RE/MAX Fine Living Tammie Henderson Coldwell Banker Residential Tosha Huff Fathom Realty Annette Jaundoo Long & Foster Real Estate William Jefferson Move 4 Free Realty

44 CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019

Joy Johnson Haven Firm Edward Kao Grand Elm Sidra Khan eXp Realty Chiehping Lai BMI Allen Laine Keller Williams Capital Properties Kevin Lee Compass Tiffany Lewis Golston Real Estate Carlos Menendez Weichert REALTORS® Julie Michon Weichert REALTORS® Alison Morgan Compass Heather Norwich Pier Associates Real Estate Maxwell Onyenwe Century 21 Redwood Realty Vernon Pritchett Keller Williams Capital Properties Karen Ranallo Weichert REALTORS® Daniel Riordan Tower Hill Realty Morteza Samadian Heymann Realty Victoria Santos Long & Foster Real Estate Glenda Wheeler Allen Law Office Glenda M. Wheeler Amie Wiseley Long & Foster Real Estate Wubet Yohannes KW Metro Center *As of March 11, 2019


2019 EDUCATION SCHEDULE continued from page 37 June 20, 2019

June 21, 2019

June 24, 2019

Maryland Property Conditions Disclosure CEU: 3 hours MD and DC (elective) Instructor: Lee-Anne Rodriguez Time: 1:30 – 4:30 p.m.

GCAAR @ NVAR: Comparative Difference Between the GCAAR and Maryland REALTORS® Contracts CEU: 1.5 hours MD and DC (elective) Instructor: Thom Brockett Time: 1:00 – 2:30 p.m. * NVAR – Fairfax (8407 Pennell Street)

Financing Issues/Update CEU: 3 hours MD, DC and VA (elective) Instructor: Jim Semeyn Time: 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. * DC Location (1615 New Hampshire Avenue, NW, 3rd Floor)

June 21, 2019

GCAAR @ NVAR: MREC Agency - Residential CEU: 3 hours MD (required) and DC (elective) Instructor: Thom Brockett Time: 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. * NVAR – Fairfax (8407 Pennell Street)

June 24, 2019

Understanding Credit CEU: 3 hours MD and DC (elective) Instructor: Jim Semeyn Time: 2:00 – 5:00 p.m. * DC Location (1615 New Hampshire Avenue, NW, 3rd Floor)

july July 8, 2019

REALTOR® Fest CEU: MD, DC and VA (required and elective) Time: 6:00 a.m. – 12:00 a.m. * Bethesda North Marriott (5701 Marinelli Road)

Michael J. Bramnick, Esquire Mike is an experienced litigator regularly handling real estate disputes in Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia between residential buyers, sellers, real estate brokers, and agents, including matters involving:

v Real estate contract disputes and breach of contract claims v Buyer or seller refusing to close on a transaction v Disputes involving the release of an earnest money deposit v Commission and fee disputes v Homeowner/contractor disputes v Mechanic’s liens v General civil litigation

Mike has been repeatedly recognized by Super Lawyer Magazine as a “Rising Star” in the area of civil litigation.

Bramnick Law, LLC 4520 East West Hwy • Suite 700 Bethesda, MD 20814

BramnickLegal.com Phone: 301.547.3647 • Fax: 301.951.8631 Email: MBramnick@BramnickLegal.com

CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019 45


Rosemary

can help you focus and work smarter.

®

REALTOR Toolbox

Eight Houseplants That Are Good For You

46 CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019

JUST IN TIME FOR SPRING OPEN HOUSES AND YOUR HOME TOO, HERE ARE SOME PLANTS THAT HELP PURIFY THE AIR WHILE MAKING ANY HOME SMELL FRESH AND CLEAN.


Four Plants That Smell Nice

Devil’s Ivy also known as Pothos, can cleanse the air of toxic fumes like glue and paint.

Mother-in-Law Tongue turns carbon monoxide into oxygen.

This article is courtesy of NAR’s HouseLogic and reprinted with permission.

LEARN MORE www.houselogic.com

Peace Lily

can reduce those annoying “new” odors from upholstery and carpet.

Chrysanthemum Mums tackle one of the toughest toxins: cigarette smoke. CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019 47


design trends TRADITIONAL STYLE WITH A TWIST

Casual Formality In historic homes, proper dining rooms were an integral part of the design. Today's homes don't always need a formal room, but a dining space (or two) are still a necessity. This open floor plan kitchen has an updated sensibility by encompassing both the breakfast nook and a more tailored dining area. Traditional furniture in deep woods renders a richness to the mostly gray and white space. – Sheila Mayden Photo by WE Stuido Photography

Make an Entrance

Photo by Jonathan Rachman

This entry with its classic white architectural details — flanking Corinthian columns and bay window surrounded by elaborate window moldings — pairs beautifully with the baby blue siding. A brilliant blue front door punches up the color scheme, whereas overhead gold address numbers paint an Old English script to the transom window. A hanging lantern lights up the doorstep to welcome friends into this San Francisco townhouse. – Jonathan Rachman

Relaxed Grandeur Soft neutrals and whites set a serene scene for this heart of the home. Architectural details, like the beadboard ceiling and glass upper cabinets, create a timeless quality to the room, while a bubble chandelier and gradient mosaic tile backsplash convey a modern aesthetic. Curvy ends on the kitchen island are an unexpected and gentle touch. – Anne Michaelsen 48 CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019

Photo by Mark Lohman

Stick with the classics — Timeless spaces show how to nod to the past while staying oh so current. Source: www.hgtv.com – Traditional Style With a Twist Article by: Chelsey Bowen


Work with a REALTOR® to help you find more HOME DÉCOR TRE NDS.

Photo by Cory Holland

Photo by Paige Rumore Photography

Chic Sophistication

All-Embracing Design

Damask wallpaper, crystal cabinet knobs and rich mahogany cabinets all combine for an exquisite bathroom retreat. Yet, pearly tiles in soft shades of gray and white and tiny spherical pendants lights establish notes of contemporary style. — Harmony Weihs

The traditional stage is set for this dining room with picture frame moldings, dentil crown molding and parquet flooring. Though a golden damask wallpaper is chosen to cover the ceiling, the nod to classic style stops there and takes a turn for the eclectic. Leopard-printed curtains soften the window, an enticing bubble chandelier hangs above the whitewashed dining table and a three-dimensional sideboard showcases a surprising texture. — Lori Paranjape

Grab a Seat The trestle table is surrounded by a diverse mix of chairs: floral red upholstered seats, Queen Anne-styled chairs and an open bench with Greek-key detail. Overhead, a linear candelabra lights up the space with metallic gleam and the coffered ceiling is the definition of character-adding architecture. — Purple Cherry Architects Photo by David Burroughs Photography

CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019 49


Save the Date

REALTOR® Fest is Monday, July 8!

REALTOR® Fest, GCAAR’s annual education summit and trade show, is coming July 8. Get ready for a day of continuing education and professional development guaranteed to equip you with tools for success.

The GCAAR Cares Community Service Committee needs items for its ninth annual REALTOR® Fest Silent Auction!

Bethesda North Marriott More details coming soon.

You can drop off your items at either our Rockville or DC offices.

We are looking for the following items*: • Adventurous outings • Date nights • Tickets to entertainment events • Highly sought-after items (designer purses, jewelry, and hotel stays)

*We will not be accepting used items, unless they are rare or valuable.

QUESTIONS? Contact Felicia Nordeen at fnordeen@gcaar.com.

50 CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019


BACKPorch TRIVIA FINDS FACTS

Is the thing you sit on in your living room called a 'sofa' or a 'couch?'

Sofa vs. Couch Explained In the course of history, mankind has been faced with a handful of debates so contentious as to risk tearing apart the fabric of society. Do aliens really exist? What color was that dress? Is the thing you sit on in your living room called a sofa or a couch? Luckily, that last question does, in fact, have a definitive answer. Which is: a sofa. Not a couch. Period. Why? According to Merriam-Webster, a “sofa” is defined as "a long upholstered seat usually with arms and a back and often convertible into a bed.” ”Couch,” on the other hand, is simultaneously ”an article of fsurniture for sitting or reclining,’ "a couch on which a patient reclines when undergoing psychoanalysis’ and ”the den of an animal (such as an otter).” So one of these words refers specifically to an upholstered seat, while the other might likewise be an article of furniture — or where you spend an hour at the shrink, or perhaps the home of an otter. You decide what's more appealing.

Then there’s the fact that the word "couch” just sounds weird. It’s like saying slacks instead of pants or purse instead of handbag. Sure, people will know what you're talking about, but they'll probably think you're a little off. In a recent and not-entirely-scientific poll, a full 100 percent of experts — in this case, interior designers — agreed that "sofa" is the preferred nomenclature. For many of them, the mere mention of a “couch” was met with horror. “It sounds like something covered in plastic at your grandma’s house,” said Courtney McLeod, of Right Meets Left Interior Design. “Couch rhymes with slouch!” proclaimed Timothy Brown. Per Charleston’s Michael Mitchell and Tyler Hill, ”’Couch’ sounds less expensive, whereas ’sofa’ is elegant and reserved.”

Laura Gregory, president of North Carolina–based upholstery company O. Henry House, felt similarly. "Couch is always more low-end,” she said. “It’s kind of a joke at our house — even my kids will correct people when they say couch!” Andrew Howard suggested that steps be taken to ensure the proper use of ”sofa,” stating, ”You should not be a designer if you say 'couch,' and I feel strongly about it.” And for Scot Meacham Wood, the debate isn’t even a debate at all: “There’s nothing to have an opinion about—it’s a sofa. Stop. The end.”

So there you have it. It’s a sofa, not a couch. Unless it’s a love seat. Or a settee. Or a banquette. But we’ll leave that for another day. Emma Bazilian Senior Articles Editor, House Beautiful Reprinted with permission. CAPITAL AREA REALTOR ® — Spring 2019 51


Profile for GCAAR

Capital Area REALTOR® Spring 2019  

This issue features women in real estate and highlights from the GCAAR Recognition Awards.

Capital Area REALTOR® Spring 2019  

This issue features women in real estate and highlights from the GCAAR Recognition Awards.

Profile for gcaar