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Guam Contractors’ Association

CONSTRUCTION NEWS BULLETIN

Feature Stories: Mechanics-Fleet Service & Phonebook Round Up

Vol.51 Issue 03 MARCH 2010


CONTENTS CONTENTS

8

P resident’s Message C ommittee Update: Labor Affairs

C ommitte Update:

13

C onstruction Headline:

14

G reen Space F eature Story:

16 18 21 22 27 28 31

PTAC

Fleet Services

31

CH N E EBthe Bench H o rd ? T C Around D e UN to Cut th O R A I t Ti m e

P hoto Highlights C onstruction Headline:

Cementon Micronesia

S mall Business T ech Ed N ew Members A round the Bench

t Flee ily o of eir fam n tiac Lim ting th ave bee nce wre en opera rs and h n for 2 a L o d a e o an have b st 10 ye ssociati tiac Lim Guam r the la actors A ., n A. 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bat er bat rk e ore hte getH wei back ation. sten anager impact tery batte drivers, o -ion ARCe same ry is th n be m th w fa m to lig acto| rsMto w ca at, Li n w and -ion bat ss an o th applic scre like scre roduct atte hetel ncy th ries ca re. NiCd contr16tool for the b perators Li drills s, rdle ys C o ta o te tion nior p iversal ica. “As for co like f the gy in less, n ly, sa e expec n bat ars or m . se the rs, u h Amer d, uses ations ete, o he ener weighs Final lat, se -io lif ye rt drive “T it plic concr nce s at tools ger gies. Li three nths of u n se ap va ay lo drill/ Hilti No ,� w to al in mo up to . as ad ture nolo becau ctive.� lition less u tech ntly for six to 18 y is ns cord Chetelat emo with ology h gressed holes e fu rs to d d ro prod er ie n ctivit ig is th se effic il within tech have p diamet ood an gy contracto tool rodu ilti des logy, says increa w fa r p nolo H can tools g large of ply saws.� n tech me for cordless chno tool to g system erato t when p te ee ry b O g n ti ts n ry a atte at. “It’s drilli g shee procatin atte e whole d geari perated fron have ide n b emo fore Li-ion b el -o in ols ble in w h this r an tery “Li-io es Chet and d battery.� rs th cutt with reci la er to hig with enginee e moto -ion bat arge — y to h pow are avai rade ch finis e cord a Li-ion work tl Th d ed -g th h Hilti ctivity. w its Li ork per d direc ring allow u , perat ades an dustrial V — w cut ped wit u re ry-o sten In ec 36 prod ncy allo ce more transfer uieter d less uip eq Batte ble for d ltages. 14V to y drill, fa ood, ie q d u is gy effic to prod r t an kl ol is la f vo ries — to quic ls, like w low ener the to less hea able fo avai d rt e o tools s more al rs ia mfo n an rang ity batte ntracto f mater ltages n duce ency o mea plicatio to pro more co capac ssional co variety igher vo er frequ ap , and aking it h the H a ation profe d cut metal. d for hig m an and oper on — se lt u o ti e b e a ete to b vibra concr ss tools voltag the le more a task, cord itions. the h that complis cond e is nsid ds to ac ow d The actor nee contr

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be referenced if calculaLast month’s tool was a hacksaw. It could be found on 23,would the tions for a hydraulic excavator lift capacities were to be performed? second page of Crane Crituqe, in the crane illustration. Question #4: ASME B30.5 1968 is

the last edition that OSHA incorporates into 1926.550. True or False Question #5: OSHA 1926.550 and ASME B30.5 applies to cranes with a minimum capacity of how many tons?

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2 | MARCH2010

CONSTRUCTION NEWS BULLETIN

We will discuss the answers to these questions in next month’s edition of GCA Construction News Bulletin, please be sure not to miss it. Please e-mail any comments, questions, or specific topics you would like to see addressed in this column to certs@ite.net and we will certainly attempt to accommodate your requests. Dave Barnhouse resides in Yigo and has been involved with operations, maintenance, operator training, and/or inspections,of cranes since 1969. He is a Certified Environmental Trainer, CHST, NCCCO certified crane operator and practical examiner for all types of mobile cranes and the only OSHA accredited crane inspector on Guam.

CONSTRUCTION NEWS BULLETIN

FEBRUARY2010 | 23

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Guam Contractor’s Association (GCA) in conjunction with AdzTech and Public Relations, Inc. publishes the Construction News Bulletin (CNB) monthly. Reproduction of materials appearing in this publication is strictly forbidden without written permission by GCA. While we always strive for accuracy, we will from time to time overlook mistakes. In order to help us improve the quality and accuracy of this publication, we ask that you take the time to look at the information provided and notify GCA of any corrections as needed. Opinions and editorial content of this publication may not necessarily be those of the publisher, staff, GCA members, GCA Board of Directors and advertisers. For more information about advertising in the GCA Construction News Bulletin contact the advertising department at (671) 477-1239/2239 or email at adztech@teleguam.net. Distributed to GCA members or can be obtained by stopping by the Guam Contractors’ Association office located at 718 N. Marine Corps Drive, Suite 203, East West Business Center, Upper Tumon, Guam. To find out more about how you can become a GCA member contact Ann Marie Pelobello, Office Manager, Guam Contractors’ Association at (671)647-4840/41, or fax (671) 647-4866 or email to gca@teleguam.net. Postmaster. Send address changes to Guam Contractors’ Association, located at 718 N. Marine Drive Corps Suite 203, East West Business Center, Upper Tumon, Guam.

THETEAM PUBLISHER: James Martinez

EDITOR: Adztech

SALES & MARKETING DIRECTOR: Geri Leon Guerrero

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Jac Perry - Guzman John Robertson Ed C. Cruz Chris Unpingco Amber Reed Tricee P. Limtiaco

AD SALES: Marc Mendiola CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Christopher Estioca GRAPHIC ARTIST: Geri Leon Guerrero Christopher “Taco” Rowland PHOTOGRAPHERS: Adztech Valerie Ann Mendiola

6 | MARCH2010

CONSTRUCTION NEWS BULLETIN

THETEAM

GCA STAFF: Ann Marie Pelobello Chantel Torres-Cruz Francine Arceo COVER:

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COMMITTEEUPDATE COMMITTEEUPDATE

Military, Government and Labor Relations Committee Update (March ‘10)

Guam Election Season

Election season is already upon us and we as citizens are tasked with deciding who will be our next elected leaders. This time around, it includes filling the offices of governor, the attorney general, the public auditor as well as fifteen senators. We did not do such a good job two years ago so we need to take responsibility to get it right this time. Those of us in the business community have a special responsibility to provide leadership through the election process. If we don’t, who will? To start with, we need to encourage the best candidates to get in the race. There are well qualified candidates within the community – some occupying current positions in government, some from the business sector and some from neither but with good common sense and leadership skills. Guam as a community is facing a once in a life time opportunity to develop its full potential. This is based on the economic boost that will come with the military buildup. Those that want to argue against this development need to explain what alternatives might be out there. Realistically, there are none. Our island neighbors should be so lucky. The opportunities that can evolve from the massive engineering and construction program and increased economic activity to follow is mind boggling. That is, if we do not allow our government to squander the opportunity. To ensure that does not happen, we need the best of the best of our island leaders to be at the helm

8 MARCH2010

By John M Robertson

over the next two and four year terms of country. While I was there, the government office. was concerned about security and transitioned from a foreign military force to a A few of our greatest challenges are well military made up of its own citizens. The known: The office of the governor and mem- comparison to Guam is limited only to bers of the legislature cannot seem to attitudes. The oil wealth made it possible for cooperate. Whereas the governor is elected the Kuwait government to provide a good to run the government, the legislature is too life style for their citizens while Guam has no often in a micromanaging role; sometimes to such wealth in natural resources to afford the extent it is next to impossible for the such life styles. Yet that is the trend for governor to manage the business of govern- government service on Guam where most in ment. The role of a legislature is to approve the private sector believe that too many the budget, to approve the appointment people enjoy generous benefits of governindividuals to key positions in government ment employment without doing very and to pass laws for the benefit of the much. That is not to say that there are not people. Second, elected officials seem to some very fine hard working individuals in regard government employees as their government here. primary constituency while relying largely on businesses to fund their campaigns. In Governance: Over the last decade and that connection, elected officials tend to longer, the Government of Guam has disregard efficiencies in government and borrowed heavily to meet ongoing operatinstead go for filling as many positions as ing expenses including payment for generpossible in what can be described as patron- ous benefits to retirees from government age jobs or political appointees. service. This provides clear indication that the government is in a non-sustainable This article should perhaps bring out only position in relation to its finances. It appears the positive aspects of our beautiful island that most of the budget and spending goes community but that would miss an impor- toward salaries for a bloated bureaucracy tant point. For Guam to attain its full poten- with little set aside for paying vendors and tial, change in leadership and change in almost nothing for needed capital improvesome attitudes is essential. For many ment projects. There are laws that make it citizens, the status quo is just not good impossible to terminate non-performing enough. Nothing extraordinary can be employees except for the most serious achieved by denying our short comings and dereliction of duty or criminal activity. The ignoring history. Some examples follow: Department of Revenue and Taxation admits it does not collect all the taxes due and Guam as a Social Welfare and Dependant blames insufficient staffing as the reason. I State: It appears to me, based on eleven am aware of only one case of tax fraud being years residency that Guam has to too great initiated in the last eleven years. Yet, the an extent become a social welfare and department announced a few years ago that dependant state. Kuwait, when I lived there, it had sent personnel off-island for training presented itself as a social welfare state for by the FBI for that very purpose. During his its citizens and this was obvious. Basic low first term in office, Governor Felix P Camacho cost housing was provided free to all citizens and his then Lt Governor began a process of that needed it. Utilities including power, consolidation of government departments water, wastewater and telephone were all from more than fifty down to twelve departfree to Kuwaiti’s. Education including study ment heads and cabinet members. After a abroad was similarly free of cost. This number of hearings and the drafting of only fostered a lack of incentive toward work a few bills, the effort was abandoned when it other than in government positions and in became clear that the legislature would not top management private sector positions. go along. Meanwhile, various agencies have All work was done by third country nationals overlapping responsibilities where a single or TCN’s. At that time and perhaps now, agency could do more at less cost. Kuwaiti’s were the minority in their own

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COMMITTEEUPDATE COMMITTEEUPDATE

Opportunities Lost: The business community attempted in the early 2000’s to have various functions privatized. The Guam Telephone Authority was privatized with beneficial result for all concerned. The effort to have Guam seaport terminal operations privatized cleared the legislature then stalled when the workers objected and officials backed down. The effort to have the Guam Waterworks Authority operations privatized through a concession agreement failed because of stiff opposition from workers and members of the community. This agency was close to being taken over by a court appointed receiver at the time because of failure to comply with a consent decree. However, under the Consolidated Commission on Utilities, operations did improve and eventually conformed to requirements of the consent decree but this could have been accomplished faster and at less cost to the citizens of Guam had the public-private partnership gone through. The landfill operation was taken over by a court appointed receiver because of failure to comply with another consent decree. After this takeover, some members of the legislature supported the development of a different landfill by a developer with no

experience in that specialization. Some members of the legislature even initiated legal action against the federal judge to halt the action but eventually had to back down. The public school system has been and continues to be in dire straits since the military withdrew support in 1997. The Legislature took control away from the Governor and gave it to an elected School Board that has proved to be a failed experiment. After several years of ineffectiveness, the same school board format is in place and education is below standard. It is well recognized that an overhaul is needed in the Guam government procurement processes. Yet, years go by and the Legislature takes no action to rectify that situation. Regardless the comments about a dysfunctional government on Guam, it must be said that there are many dedicated and effective persons, especially at the senior level, that keep governmental functions going in the right direction in spite of the obvious dead wood.

and wastewater systems were built initially by the military to serve its needs as well as those of the citizenry. The military built public schools in earlier times with most still in use today by the Guam Department of Education. The OICC Public Works Center offered apprenticeship training to the local workforce as did the Guam Shipyard and many of those trainees now form the backbone of the workforce on Guam. Other islands of the western Pacific have not been as well treated by the federal government as Guam and their economies are far less advanced with some having practically no economic activity worthy of a measurable gross domestic product.

Back to the main point: All of us in the business community need to take the upcoming election seriously. First, we must encourage the right candidates to run for elected office. Second, we must support the right candidates financially. Third, we must strive toward getting out all the Democrat and Republican voters that share our Guam Past Dependence on the Military: concerns for both the primary and the The military has to some extent contributed general election. to the dependency from outside by the local government. The roads, power grid, water


COMMITTEEUPDATE

Recent catastrophes in Indonesia, Haiti and Chile remind those of us that reside on Guam of the vulnerabilities we face with regard to natural phenomena. The island of Guam is situated close to the “Pacific Ring of Fire” along with Indonesia and Chile where earthquakes occur frequently. Guam is also within the region sometimes referred to as “Typhoon Alley”. Typhoons and earthquakes on Guam have not created devastation equal to Haiti or areas affected by Hurricane Katrina due to the adoption and enforcement of superior building codes and planning during the period of rebuilding that followed World War 2. For that, we have Guam’s military engineers to thank. Navy Seabees cleared the road to Cabras Island while super typhoon Pongsona was still raging, allowing fire fighters access to the Mobile tank farm that was ablaze. There are lessons to be learned from the aftermath of the Haiti and Chile seismic events that should not go unheeded by both military and civilian engineers as well as construction contractors. Haiti (adapted from various sources): On Tuesday, January 12, 2010 at 21:53:10 UTC a 7.0 magnitude earthquake struck Haiti at a depth of 8.1 miles, the strongest since 1770. The epicenter was located 15 miles WSW of Port-Au-Prince, 1,125 km (700 miles) southeast of Miami, Florida. As of January 21st, there had been 33 aftershocks, ranging from 4.2 to 5.9 magnitude strength. According to official estimates updated to February 23rd, and reported by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, 222,517 people were killed, 300,000 injured, 1.1 million displaced, 97,294 houses destroyed and 188,383 damaged in the Port-au-Prince area and in much of southern Haiti. At least 4 people people killed by a local tsunami in the Petit Paradis area near Leogane. The tsunami had recorded wave heights (peak-to-trough) of 12 cm at Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic and 2 cm at Christiansted, US Virgin Islands. The earthquake occurred in the boundary region separating the Caribbean plate and the North America plate. This plate boundary is dominated by left-lateral strike slip motion and compression, and accommodates about 20 mm/y slip, with the Caribbean plate moving eastward with respect to the North America plate.

The U.S. military and Coast Guard were among the first foreign responders. NAVFAC and the Army Corps of Engineers provided engineering teams to assess the extent of damage. The airport was reopened within hours and the U.S. Air Force was handed operational responsibility by the local government. U.S. Air Force Air Traffic Controllers operated first from the cockpit of a cargo aircraft until a Mobile Air Traffic Control facility could be flown in and set up. Among the individuals first on the ground were engineers who, among other tasks, have been charged with inspecting transportation structures. Members of the U.S. Navy Seabees, the Naval Facilities Engineering Command, the U.S. Army Dive Engineers contributed to the ongoing effort to restore normalcy and begin the process of recovery. In addition, the team trained Haitian engineers on building assessment, to ensure Haitian citizens are living in structurally-sound buildings. The primary goal was to get people back in their homes. The second part of the mission is training the local Haitian engineers through a technology transfer. The absence of a proper building code in Haiti and an enforcement mechanism made the disaster far worse than it might otherwise have been. The American Society of Civil Engineers is pressing for such codes to be implemented. The fear is that the need for quick reconstruction will outpace the need for implementing standards that should be followed to avoid a future disaster. The earthquakes that destroyed Port-auPrince created liquefaction and subsequent subsidence that made the port structures unsafe thus crippling the seaport. The access road to the docks buckled, and slabs of concrete rose six feet above grade. Derrick cranes were thrown into the harbor. The seawall on some slips crumbled, and quayside areas slumped sideways into the harbor, carrying shipping containers into the water. The main pier on the northern end of the port was completely destroyed, with the cranes in the water, and the terminal collapsed. The south pier was severely damaged. U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates announced on 20 January 2010 the dispatch of a port clearance ship with cranes to help the port become operational again. On 27 January 2010, it was discovered that the south pier was more damaged than initially appeared, and could not be used safely. The

port is being used by military landing craft of the type used in amphibious warfare for a seaborne invasion. A month later, the port had ramped up to handle container traffic around 600 containers a day (250 containers more than normal), despite still having infrastructure damage. The functioning of the port allows increased aid shipments arriving in-country. The Haiti disaster created a need not only for engineers but others from the military services. Army paratroopers and members of the Marine Corps participated in force protection and other duties. This mission was made most difficult because of the absence of a functional government. Haiti, the poorest country in the region, has a very troubled history. It was a French colony where agriculture abounded based on slave labor. The workers overcame their masters in combat and a government was formed by a ruling class that imposed rampant corruption based on fear and intimidation. True democracy has never been given a fair chance where rulers for the most part had interest only in self enrichment. The Dominican Republic, that shares the island of Hispaniola with Haiti, has fared much better. The absence of a proper building code in Haiti and an enforcement mechanism made the disaster far worse than it might otherwise have been. The American Society of Civil Engineers is pressing for such codes to be implemented. The fear is that the need for quick reconstruction will outpace the need for implementing standards that should be followed to avoid a future disaster. Four days after the 7.0 magnitude earthquake shocked the Caribbean nation, USNS Comfort set sail for Port-au-Prince to provide medical care and lifesaving aid to victims of one of the worst disasters to hit Haiti in 200 years. The Haitian Minister of Health visited the hospital ship USNS Comfort (T-AH 20) at anchor March 4 to express his gratitude for the extraordinary efforts of the crew in response to the earthquake. "The United States answered the call very early," said Minister of Health Dr. Alex Larsen. "The United States came to help us, and we don't know how to really thank you." While aboard the Comfort, Larsen toured the casualty receiving area and the extensive operating suite whose surgeons conducted 843 surgeries in just over five weeks. Since arriving in Haiti, Comfort's team provided critical care for 871 patients and saved countless lives through timely medical

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MARCH2010 | 11


COMMITTEEUPDATE evacuations and treatment that would have been otherwise unavailable. More than 1,200 Sailors, civilian mariners and nongovernmental volunteers from Comfort have helped provide aid during Operation Unified Response, a USAID-led multinational relief effort in conjunction with the government of Haiti to begin the steps toward recovery from January's catastrophe. To date military forces attached to the Joint Task Force in Haiti have provided just over 2.6 million bottles of water, 2.2 million meals, and 149,000 pounds of medical supplies. Chile (adapted from ENR 03/03/2010 and other sources): The most powerful earthquake to strike Chile in a generation may have left hundreds dead and the South American nation’s infrastructure in tatters, yet the fact the destruction was not far worse is being cited as a testament to Chile’s application of improved building codes and decades of efforts to prepare. The magnitude-8.8 seismic event occurred early in the morning of Feb. 27, offshore from the Maule Region. It is the strongest quake to rock Chile since a magnitude-9.5 quake in 1960the most powerful seismic event ever measured. According to the Chilean government, on March 2 the death toll from the new quake stood at 723. More than 500,000 homes have been seriously damaged or destroyed, and more than 2 million people have been directly affected. Transportation and communications systems were brought to a complete standstill, and more than 1.5 million people were without power in the quake’s immediate aftermath. It triggered a tsunami warning for the entire Pacific Rim affecting Hawaii, Guam, Japan and Russia in the North Pacific and Tahiti, New Zealand and Australia in the South Pacific. Although it caused evacuations in Hawaii and Japan, there was no significant damage in the western Pacific. There was loss of life and substantial damage along the Chile coast and islands caused by tsunamis created by the main earthquake as well as aftershocks. The seismic event took place along the boundary between the Nazca and South American tectonic plates at a location where they converge at a rate of eighty millimeters (about three inches) a year. This earthquake was characterized by a thrust-faulting focal mechanism, caused by the subduction of the Nazca plate beneath the South American. Chile has been at a convergent plate boundary that generates megathrust earthquakes

since the Paleozoic (500 million yeas ago). In historical times the Chilean coast has suffered many megathrust earthquakes along this plate boundary, including the strongest earthquake ever measured. Most recently, the boundary ruptures in 2007 in northern Chile. The segment of the fault zone which ruptured in this earthquake was estimated to be over 700 km (430 mi) long with slips of almost 10 meters. It lay immediately north of the 1,000 km (620 mi) segment which ruptured in the great earthquake of 1960. For decades, Chile has bolstered both its construction standards and emergency response plans to handle major seismic events. The country’s building codes are considered on par with regions in the U.S.such as California and the Pacific Northwest—that are similarly susceptible to earthquakes. Taller buildings, for example, feature frame construction designs to enhance stability. Buildings taller than eight stories feature a stiff, continuous system of structural walls that help control drift and dampen the worst effects of a temblor. The Chile earthquake provides another opportunity to study the effectiveness of seismiccode details and damage-mitigation efforts. The Oakland, Calif.-based Earthquake Engineering Research Institute has mobilized a multidisciplinary team to head to Chile to begin examinations. “This is especially fertile ground for researchers to find out how effective our own measures are [in] handling these kinds of events,” said EERI Executive Director Jay Berger. Despite the upbeat assessments, Chile faces a massive rebuilding job. Insured losses have been pegged at more than $2 billion, with total economic losses expected to exceed $15 billion, according to catastrophe-modeling firm AIR Worldwide. Santiago International Airport was closed because of damage to its terminal building. Normal services are not expected to resume for at least a week. The country’s main port of Valparaiso also was hard hit, but officials with port operator indicate the facility resisted the seismic event reasonably well. Several highways leading into the most affected areas were rendered impassible due to road and bridge damage, although many of the damaged structures, such as the highway bridge over the Bío-Bío River in Concepción that almost completely collapsed, were built before seismic standards were put in place.

The performance of Chile’s seismic construction codes and practices contrasts starkly with the Damage experienced in Haiti from the Jan. 12 earthquake there. That magnitude-7 quake, the epicenter of which was close to the surface under a densely populated urban area, killed more than 220,000 people and left more than one million homeless. While the Chile earthquake was more than 500 times more powerful than the one that struck Haiti, there were a number of critical differences between the two disasters, says Paul Caruso, a geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey in Golden, Colo. “In this case it may not be as much of the mechanism as the location of the epicenter and depth of the event itself,” he says. The earthquake in Haiti occurred at a depth of 13 km and struck almost precisely beneath the country’s largest populated area, the capitol of Port-au-Prince, while Chile’s quake was 35 km deep and centered offshore, more than 100 miles from the nearest major metropolitan area. But the most important difference between the two disasters was the degree of preparedness, officials say. Haiti’s penultimate major seismic event occurred almost two and a half centuries ago. In Chile, temblors are common, and many still remember the devastation wrought by the quake of 1960, which struck the same area as Saturday’s quake. That magnitude-9.5 quake claimed 1,655 lives and left more than two million people homeless. In the wake of that disaster, Chilean officials adopted numerous changes in construction practices and building codes to protect against seismic events. Concrete standards were elevated—a measure of particular importance in a country where the material is the predominant residential construction material. Those efforts were tested on March 3, 1985, when a magnitude-7.7 earthquake hit in the same region. It claimed 177 lives and caused more than $1 billion in damage. Much of the damage from that event occurred to buildings that had been constructed prior to the changes in construction practices. In Santiago, a number of the city’s churches and public buildings—including the city hall that was built in the 1950s—were severely damaged or collapsed completely. After the 1985 quake it was observed that most of the damage occurred to buildings with unreinforced masonry design and the code was updated to take account for that. Despite the devastation, the performance of the country’s newer buildings was seen as a success, and Chile continued to refine its

To join SAME Guam Post, logon to SAME.org and proceed to New Membership. 12 | MARCH2010

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CONSTRUCTIONHEADLINE CONSTRUCTIONHEADLINE

All About the

DUNS

With the number of federal contracts increasing as we get closer to the military buildup, more businesses are rushing to complete the necessary certifications to do business with the federal government. Of all the registrations, none is more important than the Central Contractor Registration, more commonly known as CCR. On paper, the application process is relatively simple. A business must first apply for and receive a DUNS number. From there they can access the CCR website at bpn.gov and apply to CCR. Unfortunately, many businesses are finding out the hard way that applying on CCR isn’t quite as easy as it should be. Perhaps the biggest reason for problems on CCR is the fact that Guam, as a U.S. Territory, is a bit of an anomaly. When you go to apply for a DUNS number, you can not apply on the DUNS’s U.S. site. Instead you will be directed to the Australia site because, for whatever reason DUNS does not consider Guam to be a part of the US. The DUNS application is fairly easy and once the one page application is complete, businesses should receive their DUNS number within 24 to 48 hours. As soon as they are assigned a DUNS number, a business can go to CCR and apply there.

Once you go to CCR, you will be asked some basic questions regarding your business. After completing the first initial section, CCR will ask you to verify the information you just entered against the information that DUNS has on file under your DUNS number. This is where the problems begin. Most people will notice that the information does not match and will logically select the option indicating “No the information does not match”. In this case, the correct response should be “Yes” even if the information does not match. If you select the “no” response, it will instruct you to contact DUNS and have them correct the information. When you do contact DUNS, they will inform you that they are aware that Guam IS a part of the US, but their system requires that it be input as its own country. At this time, there is no way that DUNS can change it to reflect Guam as a state, therefore there is little point in trying to correct it. If you decided to click the “YES” response even if they do not match, you are on the right track. By selecting “YES” it will allow you to continue with your CCR application. Once you get to the “General Information” portion of CCR, be sure to indicate that Guam is the State and that the U.S. is the country. Even though this may

By Chris Unpingco

contradict what is in CCR, it will enable you to continue and successfully complete your CCR application. If you list Guam as the country, CCR will consider your business a foreign business and as a foreign business you will not be able to list any SBA classifications that apply to your business. Additionally, CCR automatically assign U.S. businesses a CAGE code upon completion of their CCR application. If you have Guam listed as the country, it will require you to go online and figure out what your NCAGE code (a code assigned to foreign businesses) is, which is a huge pain. Unfortunately, due to the uniqueness of Guam’s situation, we are all subject to these types of “glitches” in many government programs. Luckily, Guam PTAC is a federally funded resource that can help you get through these types of pitfalls in addition to providing assistance with nearly any issues you may have related to government contracting. As PTAC is federally funded, all of our services are free and definitely worth taking advantage of. If you are thinking of applying for CCR or are in the process of applying, please contact a PTAC office today so that we can assist with whatever contracting issues you may have. Si Yu’us Ma’ase.

(SAME continued) seismic building-code provisions. There were substantial changes to the codes in 1993 and 1996 to reflect further improvements in anti-seismic design. The standards for concrete building construction were brought in line with American Concrete Institute standards. Still, adobe remains a popular building material among the poorest people of Chile, despite its notorious inability to handle seismic events. According to the government, the majority of homes destroyed in the Feb. 27 quake were adobe structures located in rural areas. Chile's president sent the army to help police attack looting on the day following the event and appealed for international help. President Michelle Bachelet announced sharply higher new death toll after a six-hour meeting with aides and emergency officials struggling to cope with one of the most powerful earthquakes in centuries. "We face a

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catastrophe of such unthinkable magnitude that it will require a giant effort" for Chile to recover, Bachelet told a news conference at the presidential palace, which itself suffered minor cracks. She said that a growing number of people were listed as missing and she signed a decree giving the military over security in the province of Concepcion, where looters have pillaged supermarkets, gas stations, pharmacies and banks. She at first turned down outside assistance then changed after understanding the scope of devastation. The president, who leaves office on March 11, said the country would accept some of the offers of aid that have poured in from around the world. She said the country needs field hospitals and temporary bridges, water purification plants and damage assessment experts - as well as rescuers to help relieve workers who have been laboring frantically for more than a day. Here again, the U.S military was one of the first to respond

with emergency supplies being flown in and other efforts in the planning stage. Here on Guam we are at the hub of various relief efforts by military engineers and other military units. The Navy, the Air Force and the National Guard deploy personnel on such missions on a regular basis from Guam. These services will be joined by Marine Corps and Army units in the near future. The USNS Mercy, sister ship to the USNS Comfort, makes a port visit to Apra Harbor almost every year en route to friendly nations in our region where “Mercy” missions offer the best medical services available to recipients and at no cost. Locally, various military commands from each of the military services have sister relationships with island villages. This provides opportunity for jointly participating in fiestas and in maintaining schools and other public facilities. Military personnel are a vital part of the social fabric while on Guam.

CONSTRUCTION NEWS BULLETIN

MARCH2010 | 13


GREEN SPACE

GREENSPACE

As the island continues to “go green,” a great recycling program that was begun in 2009 is continuing again this year with the GTA Phone Book Round Up. This is a contest among the island’s schools to collect old phone books for recycling and keep them out of the dump. The contest has been anxiously awaited by many schools this year and is being conducted from February 1 to March 30, 2010. It was highly successful last year with the participation of 25 schools and the collection of over 35,000 phone books. Although the contest has only recently begun, 26 schools have signed up thus far to participate, and almost 3,000 books have been picked up from two schools already. It has been estimated that there may be as many as a million phone books throughout the island, given the number of phone book providers and the number of copies normally printed. This is a excellent opportunity for businesses, government agencies and families to recycle their phone books, keep them out of the dump, and help schools raise money in the process. GTA is providing $7,650 in prizes for the schools that collect the greatest number of books. The prizes range from $3,000 to $200, with a tree planting ceremony also being conducted at the campus of the winning school. Last year, due to the economic downturn, the phone books were not recycled through Guam Transport & Warehouse, as had been originally planned, because they were unable to locate a buyer

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CONSTRUCTION NEWS BULLETIN

willing to pay the cost of shipping the recycled paper. Consequently, the 35,000 phone books were delivered to the Department of Agriculture and seven farmers who allowed us to throw them out in fallow areas of their farms where they will break down over time and provide organic matter to the soil. With the economy still struggling, the phone books will not be sent off island this year either. On behalf of the i recycle program, I am coordinating the collection of the phone books from the schools and their delivery to a designated site in Dededo. The Northern Soil & Water Conservation District assisted the program again this year by working with the Chamorro Land Trust to identify an appropriate site that will be used on a short-term basis to process the phone books for mulching. Their cooperation and assistance are greatly appreciated. Bill Curry, the owner of South Pacific Environmental, will be providing a tub grinder which will be used to grind up the books as they are collected from the schools and delivered to the site. During a test run with the tub grinder, it became apparent that grinding the books by themselves basically “gums up the works.” So tangan-tangan and other woody debris will be added to the tub grinder with the books to ensure effective grinding. The end product will then be available to farmers and others who would like to have the material for mulching. Arrangements will be made to have a backhoe available at certain days

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GREEN SPACE

GREENSPACE

and times, and anyone with a pickup truck will be able to come to the site and have their truck loaded up on the designated days. Announcements will be made via the Soil & Water Conservation Districts, the Farmers Cooperative Association of Guam, UOG Cooperative Extension, and on the “Where We Live Show” of the days and times the mulching material will be available for pickup. The tremendous service that is being provided by South Pacific Environmental to this program will provide easier access to more farmers and others interested in obtaining the mulch. Rather than adding to the carbon footprint of our island by shipping the books to a foreign port, the phone book and woody debris mulch will add organic matter to the soil where applied, and will also increase moisture retention, suppress weed growth, and ultimately improve soil structure and stabilization.

their students and faculty have aggressively collected. I urge all the members of the Guam Contractors Association to gather up all your old phone books and donate them to the school of your choice. Businesses can either deliver them directly to the school they have selected or they can call me at 483-9415 and we can arrange to deliver them directly to the processing site. An accurate count must be provided, and your designated school will be credited with that amount. Help reduce the amount of trash going into the dump, reduce the island’s carbon footprint, improve Guam’s soils, and help the schools raise money all at the same time. Truly a win-win-win-win program!

I am confident that the effort put forth by the participating schools this year is going to be tremendous. Astumbo Middle School has already collected over 3,000 books that are just waiting to be picked up, and many calls have been received from schools to arrange for pickup or delivery of the phone books

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FEATURESTORY

MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS PROVIDING INTEGRAL SERVICE

John A. Limtiaco and Lawrence Limtiaco of Fleet Services, Inc., Guam have been operating their family business on Guam for the last 10 years and have been members of the Guam Contractors Association for 2 years. Fleet Services Inc. provides several services to help businesses in many different industries to keep heavy equipment, medium and heavy trucks operational and efficient. This locally-owned company can provide complete engine overhauls, mobile onsite emergency repair, the delivery of 4,000 gallons of diesel and several other services. Fleet Services Inc. provides innumerable services in heavy equipment needs. Many of the experienced and knowledgeable trained technicians employed at Fleet Services, Inc. are Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Master Certified. “The National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) was established in 1972 to improve the quality of vehicle repair and service through the voluntary testing and certification of technicians and other automotive service professionals. ASE also encourages and assists in the development of automotive training programs,” Limtiaco explained. The company prides itself on not being limited in its services because of years of experience in electrical diagnostic. Fleet Services, Inc. is known for its customer service and ability to provide quick and reliable service in heavy equipment repair. Services include: Services include • Complete fleet vehicle maintenance services for single large trucks or entire fleet of vehicles. • Evening services basic or tailored to a specific vehicle or fleet of vehicles. • Onsite repairs. • Engine in frame and out of frame overhauls. • Transmission and drive train repairs and overhauls. • Differential repairs and overhauls. • Electrical and Electronic system diagnostic. • Exhaust system repairs. • Steering and Suspension repairs. • Chassis and Undercarriage repairs. • Welding services. • Body work and Paint services. • Onsite Generator and switchgear repair. • Onsite and In House diesel fuel delivery and sales. • Emergency vehicle recovery and towing services. 16 | MARCH2010

Among the many mechanical and maintenance projects Fleet Service, Inc. is involved in, one of the most notable is its contracting agreement with Gershman, Brickner & Bratton, Inc., (GBB). Fleet Services, Inc. is the maintenance contractor for the Guam Solid Waste Receivership, undertaken by GBB. According to the Guam Solid Waste Receivership website: “GBB is a national solid waste management consulting firm with extensive experience with solid waste collection, processing, recycling and disposal issues, including those specific to island communities. As Receiver, GBB’s objective is to work with Guam’s government, the Solid Waste Management Division, solid waste companies, the people of Guam and the U.S. military to establish a long-term, financially viable and sustainable waste management system for Guam.” “Fleet Services, Inc. is tasked with maintaining all of the Solid Waste Management Equipment for the receiver,” Limtiaco said.

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While the Fleet Services enterprise can expect to meet challenges because of its vast services, according to Limtiaco, “The biggest challenge we have had in the past year was restoring all of the Solid Waste Management equipment for the government of Guam.” The solid waste issues have been major concerns on Guam for decades and with the garbage trucks needing critical repairs, the task for Limtiaco and the Fleet Services family was daunting. “The project for solid waste involved restoring the entire solid waste management garbage trucks and heavy equipment back to full operating condition. Many of these vehicles were offline for up to 5 years in some cases and were worked on by different mechanics and shops that left the equipment in pieces with most of the electrical system looking like a bowl of spaghetti,” Limtiaco said. “Our team is lead by Lawrence Limtiaco who is the Shop Foreman and a Certified Master Mechanic. The rest of our mechanic staff have various ASE specialty certifications and are constantly preparing for testing for additional certifications.” “Our next challenge for the upcoming year will be to bring the Guam Fire Department ambulance fleet back to full operations,” he added.

Automobile, Collision Repair, Engine Machinist, Medium and Heavy Trucks, School Bus, Transit Bus and Truck Equipment is important to Guam. While there are automotive and other fleet repair shops on Guam that have mechanics that are ASE certified in certain areas, according to the ASE website Fleet Services is the only ASE Blue Seal recognized shop on Guam. The ASE Blue Seal recognition program identifies establishments with a large percentage of ASE-certified professionals. It is a recognition program for businesses striving to be the best, and willing to prove their commitment. To my knowledge Fleet Services is the only truck repair facility that has a Master Mechanic on staff that is fully certified in Heavy & Medium Trucks, Transit buses and school buses,” he explained. “ASE certification is a valuable yardstick by which to measure the knowledge and skills of individual technicians as well as the commitment to quality of the repair facility employing them. ASE certifies the technical competence of individual technicians, not repair facilities. Prior to taking ASE certification tests, many technicians attend training classes or study on their own in order to brush up on their knowledge. By passing difficult, national tests, ASE-certified technicians prove their technical competence to themselves, to their employers, and to their customers. Moreover, shop owners and managers who encourage their employees to become certified can be counted on to be concerned about the other aspects of their business,” Limtiaco continued.

Fleet Services has carved a niche in Guam as the only company who can provide vital repair and maintenance on fleet trucks and heavy equipment. “Our shop capability covers any type of commercial vehicle, construction and heavy equipment in need of maintenance and repair. Fleet Service is also the newest and only Commercial Vehicle Inspection Station with ASE certified mechanics conducting inspections,” Limtiaco said.

“In order to obtain certification, a mechanic must pass at least one specialty test and provide documentation of two years of relevant work experience. To maintain certification, those with ASE credentials must be retested every five years. In order to receive Master Certification a mechanic must take and pass the full scope of specialty test under specific designations such as Automobile, Collision Repair, Engine Machinist, Medium and Heavy Trucks, School Bus, Transit Bus, and Truck Equipment,” he said.

“The significance of ASE certification for

“Many of our mechanics have gone

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through formal training and have Associates Degrees in Auto Diesel Technology. Our company also sends its mechanic to continuing education programs in factory training from dealerships we represent as well as training at other manufacturers including those in engine and transmission manufacturing,” he added. Fleet Services, Inc. started in 2000 providing operations and maintenance service for the Guam Mass Transit. “Because of the lack of commitment from the government to invest in the transit system we exited this business in 2007 and focused our business efforts in the repair and maintenance of commercial transportation vehicles and heavy equipment,” Limtiaco said. This company is aware of the ever evolving state in this business and is one step ahead of the game. “As the years go by the number of commercial vehicles on Guam that are electronically controlled and require laptops or other electronic equipment to perform diagnostics will continue to increase. This continuing change will require an ever increasing need for repair shops with properly trained technician and proper tooling and diagnostic equipment. Fleet Services will be there to meet this service requirement,” Limtiaco concluded. With a team of determined experts and the commitment to provide quality service to its customers, Guam can expect this company to expand and continue to impress our island. With its commitment to excellence and its customers this innovative business, Guam will only anticipate its longevity and continued success.

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MARCH2010 | 17

FEATURESTORY

“Fleet Service is also the newly appointed maintenance contractor for the Guam Fire Department. In addition to work for the government we provide fleet maintenance for many commercial fleets including Pepsi, Mid Pac Liquor, Shell Petroleum, and many other commercial fleets in Guam,” he added.


PHOTOHIGHLIGHTS PHOTOHIGHLIGHTS

Dump Truck Driving Skills Sponsored by: Hawaiian Rock Products 1st place: Glenn Angoco II – J.T. Angoco & Sons 2nd place: Ed Perez – J.T. Angoco & Sons 3rd place: Jesus Concepcion – J.T. Angoco & Sons Dump Truck Drags: 1st place: Jesus Concepcion – J.T. Angoco & Sons 2nd place: Ednie Cusing – JS & Sons 3rd place: Glenn Angco – J.T. Angoco & Sons Tractor/Trailer Truck Driving Skills 1st place: Phillip J.M. Meno – J.L. Baker & Sons Freightways 2nd place: Jerry Garrido – DGX Guam Ocean & Freight Forwarders 3rd place: Dave Meno – Dewitt Moving & Storage Tractor Drags: Sponsored by: J.T. Angoco & Sons 1st place: Elmo Santos – DGX Guam Ocean & Freight Forwarders 2nd place: Rufo Sebastian – Hawaiian Rock Products 3rd place: Phillip J.M. Meno – J.L. Baker & Sons Freightways

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PHOTOHIGHLIGHTS PHOTOHIGHLIGHTS

Truck Show & Shine Sponsored by: JS & Sons Peoples Choice Winner: Philips & Sons Mixer Truck Pull Sponsored by: Perez Bros Inc. Winner: Perez Bros Inc with the fastest time of 18 seconds Backhoe Competition: Sponsored by: Mid Pac Far East 1st place: Albert Saboy – Core Tech International – 1.34 seconds 2nd place: Daniel Bross – US Navy Seabees – 1.49 seconds 3rd place: Steve Chargualaf – Fence Masters – 1.52 seconds Excavator Competition: Sponsored by: Hawthorne Pacific 1st place: Albert Saboyo – Core Tech International – 1min 37.34second 2nd place: James Yee – International Consolidated Contractors – 2 min 23.03second 3rd place: Greg Dungca – Sumitomo Mitsui Construction Co – 2 min 24seconds Skid Steer Competition: Sponsored by: Pacific Rim Equipment Co. Winner: 1st place: Robert Kendall – US Navys Seabees – 1.35 2nd place: Mark Torres – Haul Pro – 1.39 3rd place: Steven Chargualaf – Fence Masters – 1.43 Forklift Competition: Sponsored by: Mid Pac Far East 1st place: Glenn Ungacta – Ambros Inc. – 1.51 2nd place: Bermance Boisk – Perez Bros. – 1.59 3rd place: Pius Saufmai – Ambros Inc. – 2.07 Carpentry Competition: Sponsored by: dck pacific guam, LLC Winner: Core Tech International Team 1 Edilberto Bacoy Alex Igdanes Noel Layug Electrical Competition: Sponsored by: Bishman Continental Services Winner Core Tech International Team 1 Genero Sorio Nelson Manalac Gerardo Ramos GCA Donates bikes for the kids: Winners: Janie Pangelinan Thomas Cruz

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CONSTRUCTIONHEADLINE CONSTRUCTIONHEADLINE

CEMENTON MICRONESIA BREAKS GROUND FOR ITS

BULK CEMENT TERMINAL On February 22, 2010, Cementon Micronesia, LLC and Port Authority of Guam, along with local and federal dignitaries, and dignitaries from the Asian region, celebrated the ground breaking of it’s state of the art bulk cement terminal adjacent to Golf Pier at the Port of Guam. With up to 26,000 metric tons of storage capacity provided through four separate silos and distributed through four efficient truck discharge lanes, Cementon Micronesia will have the ability to supply the island with various types of ASTM – grade cement and supplementary cementitious materials such as fly ash, slag powder etc…in order to meet all civilian and military requirements for these products. Cementon Micronesia’s cement terminal is a much-needed addition to the Port Authority’s current 10,000 metric ton cement capacity provided by the current bulk cement supplier’s sole silo. Various industry forums have previously identified the inadequate supply of bulk cement as one of the short falls that must be addressed to facilitate the pending military buildup. Cementon Micronesia’s cement terminal more than triples the total storage capacity presently available on Guam and will

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ensure that cement shortages on Guam are a thing of the past- a very welcomed development considering the increased cement supply required to support the pending military and civilian buildup. “We are pleased to be part of the solution to Guam’s need for reliable supply of cement. This modern bulk cement terminal is extremely important not only to the economic buildup of our island and our region, but also to the military’s plans to further secure the interests of our nation. We are proud to be associated with the Port Authority of Guam and the Guam business community,” said John Perez, Manager of Cementon Micronesia. This bulk cement terminal represents an important new phase in the direction of the Port Authority’s vision and of its master plan, and establishes a long-term relationship between the Port and Cementon Micronesia. The new bulk cement terminal is expected to become operational during the Third Quarter, 2010.

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By: Tricee Limtiaco

MARCH2010 | 21


SMALLBUSINESS SMALLBUSINESS

by Dave Barnhouse

UOG and YOU

PROFESS IONAL & I NTERNA TIONAL PRO GRA MS MARCH- A PRIL, 2010 SCHEDULE

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THE WINNING SOLUTION FOR ALL YOUR PROFESSIONAL NEEDS Tel: 735-2600-2 • Fax: 734-1233 • Email: pip@uguam.uog.edu VISIT OUR WEB SITE AT WWW .UOG.EDU/PIP OR CEPEDA@UGUAM .UOG.EDU

22 | MARCH2010

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TECHED techED

TECHED

// Author Bio // Ed C. Cruz has worked in the IT Industry for over 10 years. He has a bachelor’s degree in Information Technology and holds many technical certifications such as Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator, Microsoft Certified Professional, and Security+ to name a few. He is a lifelong learner, spending much of his free time conducting research on living efficiently.

Dear TechEd, Your article on building a website was very timely as my marketing team is currently in the process of planning and developing our company website. It is really taking some time, though, and I feel we need to rethink this approach. What are your thoughts? TeachEd Fan

Congratulations on taking the steps in establishing an online presence! This will greatly benefit your business by increasing awareness of your products and/or services to your future customers. This small investment will pay off in no time! Last month’s article gave a general idea of what it takes to get a business online. It starts with a catchy domain name, an adequate hosting account, and finding the right person or company to build it. It sounds as if you are having difficulties with the last step, which is pretty common. Your marketing team should be able to plan for the site design, layout, and gather and optimize your site content and overall message. It sounds like your marketing team is hitting a wall with the development of the website. Simply knowing some HTML code or having some knowledge of web development software is hardly sufficient enough in building your ideal website. It seems you don’t have the right person or company to build your to fulfill your website goals. Allow your marketing team to do what they do best, and leave the website development to the professionals. Besides, most of the work will have been completed by your marketwww.guamcontractors.org

ing department, in terms of design and layout, that all that will be needed is transitioning it all to the web. This will save with time and money. Find the right one You need a person or company that is experienced, efficient and effective in website design/development. Look for someone with a firm grasp on what it takes to start and finish a web project and look at their work/portfolio and ask to speak with their clients past and present. Find someone that is talented and can advise you. Solicit ideas on how to accomplish your website goals and see what they come up with. This should help in sensing how much experience they have. Take note of some of the websites you like as you may find the company that developed the site listed somewhere (check the bottom portion). This could be a start in finding the right person/company. Don’t use the neighbor’s kid who has “tricked” out his MySpace account because it will ultimately show. Don’t skimp with budget because you will get what you pay for. And since you are paying for this service, make sure your developer doesn’t use a pre-fabricated template downloaded from the internet. There is a good possibility that you and several other websites will have the same exact design.

lem were to occur. Discuss and negotiate the contract with terms agreeable by both parties. Allow your developer to be the expert and be open to the advice when it comes to timelines, budget, and expectations. Good luck! Finding the right developer could be a lengthy process. Don’t settle for someone that may be able to assist. Find your perfect fit and you should be well on your way to a great relationship and a successful web project. If all goes well, make sure you have options for website maintenance with the same developer. Good developers are hard to come by, so when you find a good one – keep them close! You never know when you or an acquaintance will need them again. Please keep in touch on how this experience turns out for you. I will do a follow up and share your story with my loyal readers. I look forward to your success!

TechEd would like to hear from you! Have a question relating to technology? Have an interesting story to tell? Need some help or advice? Send an email to teched@leaddesign.com. Your question may just get published! I look forward to hearing from all of you.

Get it in writing Draw up a contract and scope of work with a list of your expectations. Get a feel for how long it will take and what resources will be needed. Be specific and detailed so there is no confusion if a probCONSTRUCTION NEWS BULLETIN

MARCH2010 | 27


NEWMEMBERS NEWMEMBERS

March 2010 New Members: Contractor: Samson Electric, Inc. P.O. Box 8710 Tamuning, GU 96931-8710 GCA Contact: Darrell Needham Email: dn@sei-ak.com Ph: (671) 486-7360 Fax: (671) 646-7362 Description: Electrical Contractor Pacific Surface Masters PMB 307 Ste 101 1270 N. Marine Corps Dr. Tamuning, GU 96913 GCA Contact: Carlo Leon Guerrero Email: carlo@pacificsurfacemasters.com Ph: (671) 688-4809 Fax: (671) 472-4809 Description: Tile & Grout Cleaning – Hard Surface Restoration Bell, Rosenberg & Hughes LLP 1300 Clay Street Suite 1000 Oakland, CA 94612 GCA Contact: Carol Watson Email: ckw@brhlaw.com Ph: (510) 832-8585 Fax: (510) 839-6925 Description: Construction Attorneys

About J. M. Waller Associates, Inc. JMWA is a Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business specializing in environmental, facilities, and logistics consulting and HOW HIGH DO YOU WANT TO GO? JMWA’s corporate headquarSCISSORS FROM 15’ TO 43’, BOOMS FROM management. 30’isTO 126’!!! ters located in Fairfax, VA, with major program offices in Atlanta, GA, San Antonio, CALL US TODAY! TX, and Kailua, HI. For additional information, visit www.jmwaller.com.

EAST-WEST RENTAL CENTER 958 N. MARINE CORPS DRIVE, UPPER TUMON PHONE: 646-1463 * FAX: 649-9069 WWW.EASTWESTRENTAL.COM


AROUNDTHEBENCH AROUNDTHEBENCH

Is It Time to Cut the Cord?

Contractors realizing the benefits of Li-ion battery technolog Cordless power tools have always been attractive to contractors because they offer independence from fixed power supplies, significant savings on damaged cords, reduced safety risks when operating in elevated and wet conditions, as well as improved mobility when working on lifts, ladders, and scaffolds. “The first adopters used rechargeable, battery-operated tools, such as cordless screwdrivers, for small, low-intensity applications, like screw fastening” says Robert Chetelat, senior product manager of cordless drill/drivers, universal drills and impact tools with Hilti North America. “As Li-ion battery technology has advanced, uses for cordless tools have progressed to applications like drilling large diameter holes in concrete, cutting sheets of plywood and demolition work with reciprocating saws.” Battery-operated power tools have been available for decades and are available in wide range of voltages. Industrial-grade high capacity batteries — 14V to 36V — allow professional contractors to quickly drill, fasten, bolt and cut a variety of materials, like wood, concrete and metal. Higher voltages allow cordless tools to be used for higher frequency conditions. The downside is that the more voltage a contractor needs to accomplish a task, the

heavier the cordless tool can get. “This is where Li-ion battery technology offers a huge advantage over competing batteries,” says Chetelat. Li-ion batteries are generally much lighter than other types of rechargeable batteries because the cells are constructed out of lightweight lithium. According to Chetelat, the weight of the tool has always been the one of the biggest issue for contractors when switching from corded to cordless power tools when attempting to do more and cord less. Li-ion battery technology saves up to two pounds off the total weight of the tool, and that makes a big difference to operators. “The transition to lighter weight Li-ion batteries enables contractors to get two times the capacity out of the tool for the same weight,” says Chetelat. “The energy in the battery is the same, but because it weighs less, operators can be more productive.” Operator productivity is always at the forefront when Hilti designs cordless tools with Li-ion battery technology, says Chetelat. Hilti engineers the whole tool to increase productivity. The motor and gearing system efficiency allow its Li-ion battery-operated tools to produce more work per charge — this means more energy is transferred directly to the application and the tool is quieter during operation, and to produce less heat and less vibration — making it more comfortable for

the contractor to operate the tool for extended periods of time. And, says Chetelat, the advantages of Li-ion battery technology don’t stop there. All Li-ion batteries are built with onboard computers that are designed to manage the battery’s power supply. At Hilti, the computer technology in its Li-ion batteries is known as Cordless Power Care (CPC) and controls the battery’s power through individual cell management. “Individual cell management ensures that the charge is getting to the cells that need it most,” says Chetelat. “It also redirects the power to prevent cells from becoming over used. This minimizes the risk of deep discharging, and ruining, a Li-ion battery.” A state of charge indicator on Hilti Li-ion batteries always lets contractors know how much energy remains, avoiding the waste of time back and forth from the charger to the application. Finally, says Chetelat, Li-ion batteries have a longer life expectancy than other battery technologies. Li-ion batteries can work efficiently for up to three years or more. NiCd can fail within six to 18 months of use. “Li-ion battery technology is the future,” finishes Chetelat. “It’s time for contractors to cut the cord and demo a cordless tool equipped with a Li-ion battery.”

HILTI’S GRAND OPENING

www.guamcontractors.org

CONSTRUCTION NEWS BULLETIN

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GCA Construction News Bulletin March 2010  

Guam Contractors' Assn. Monthly Construction News Bulletin is Guam's official construction news publication.

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