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ILLUSTRIOUS

PG 2

BASEBALL PG 6

The

Silhouette

VOL. 17, NO. 14 APRIL 12, 2012

EGC3MEDIA.COM

GARDEN CITY COMMUNITY COLLEGE

GUEST COLUMNIST PG 5

U.S. Under Secretary of Education speaks at Swender inauguration EDITOR’S NOTE: To read these news updates in there entirety, visit our website at egc3media.com.

Brian Nelson packs up items in his office at the Arts Center on Main, Saturday, which was his last day as the Gallery Manager. He will officially begin as executive director of the Friends of Lee Richardson Zoo in early May.

ANGIE HAFLICH angela.haflich@student.gcccks.edu

JESUS LOZOYA | SILHOUETTE

FOLRZ selects Nelson as executive director

GCCC graduate displays passion, commitment for the community ANGIE HAFLICH angela.hafllich@student.gcccks.edu

By all accounts, GCCC graduate Brian Nelson, is one of those people you can always count on. ose who have worked with him also say that he is extremely passionate about Garden City. Recently, Nelson, who is currently the gallery manager at the Arts Center on Main, was named as the replacement for current Executive Director of Friends of Lee Richardson Zoo (FOLRZ), Mary Palmer. Palmer said that Nelson’s experience with non-profit organizations along with his enthusiasm, will be a tremendous asset to the fundraising organization for Lee Richardson Zoo. “We’re just really excited with his energy and enthusiasm. He has some great ideas and yet he understands how to temper his

enthusiasm with wisdom…,” Palmer said. Nelson has been the gallery manager for the Arts Center since April of 2011, and a board member of the Finney County Preservation Alliance since January 2011. He has been an outspoken advocate of maintaining the Windsor Hotel as an historic landmark, voting against selling the Windsor to GC Windsor Developers, LLC, as a board member of the FCPA. He has also served as exhibits curator at the Finney County Historical Museum. “He brings a variety of different hats to the position,” Palmer said. e FOLRZ is a non-profit organization that raises money for Lee Richardson Zoo. Nelson attended GCCC beginning in the fall of 2004, graduating with an associate’s degree in arts in the spring of 2007. Journalism Instructor and Adviser Laura Guy, said that while attending GCCC, Nelson served as the editor of the Breakaway Magazine. “e primary reason I knew I could count on Brian is because he is extremely conscientious and passionate about

anything that he takes on. Brian is the kind of person who gives 110 percent,” she said. After graduating from GCCC, Nelson received a bachelor’s degree in arts from Southwest College in Winfield. Upon his graduation from there in 2010, Guy said that she asked him to be her substitute while she was on maternity leave because she knew he would run the department and she wouldn’t have to worry about anything. Guy also said that Nelson is extremely passionate about Garden City, exhibited by the fact that he returned here after graduation. “He could go anywhere else and he could do anything else but Brian chose to come back to Garden City and the community will reap the benefits. He will be an extremely effective goodwill ambassador for one of Garden City’s premier attractions...I don’t think anyone can question his commitment to the community and his desire to make it attractive, not only to the people who live here, but also those who visit,” she said. Mary Regan, Director of the Finney

After serving as the sixth president of Garden City Community College for the past year, Dr. Herbert Swender’s official inauguration was held on April 3, in the DPAC gymnasium. It is the first such inauguration held at GCCC. U.S. Department of Education Under Secretary Dr. Martha J. Kanter was the honored speaker at the event. Kanter oversees policies, programs and activities in postsecondary education, adult and career-technical education, federal student aid and five White House education initiatives, including the Direct Student Loan Program, which was implemented under her leadership. In an interview prior to the event, Kanter said that government needs to be more cognizant of who it serves in rural America. “...the government needs to understand how things happen here in a rural community, what kind of education you’re providing,” she said. “...I looked at…the automotive program, your training fire science and police, nursing. You’ve got a great pipeline to the university and a great pipeline to the workforce. e country needs to understand what’s happening across America.” Dr. Kermit McMurry, vice chancellor of Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, who is responsible for managing various student preparation programs mandated by the Oklahoma Legislature and Oklahoma State Regents, also spoke at the event, addressing the challenges that community colleges presently face. Terri Worf, Chair of GCCC’s Board of Trustees, then administered the investiture oath to Dr. Swender, who pledged to honor the college’s tradition, further its mission and promote multicultural education. Swender was selected in a unanimous vote, Feb., 2011 by the six-member GCCC Board of Trustees, after serving 10 years in Borger as president of Frank Phillips College.

see NELSON pg. 2

Lucky 13, going once, going twice, sold Endowment association sets up for its 34th annual scholarship auction ZOE ROTH zroth1926@student.gcccks.edu

The GCCC Endowment Association will present a special celebrity guest, Cassie Rupp, at its 34th annual auction, on Friday. Rupp is a GCCC graduate and scholarship recipient, KU graduate, model, correspondent, spokesperson and CMT reality star. She will be signing autographs and drawing the ‘Lucky 13’ automobile giveaway finalists. One winning bidder will also enjoy his or her own private lunch with Cassie. Science Instructor and Endowment Board Member Terry Lee, unloads one of the items to be auctioned off at the 34th annual Endowment Auction, which begins Friday at 6:30 p.m. at the Finney County Exhibition Building. HARLEY TORRES | GC3 MEDIA

Admission is $25 per person and tickets are only sold in advance. Tickets should be purchased by Friday afternoon, since tickets will not be sold at the door. As of Tuesday, tickets to win the 2012 GMC Terrain were getting low, according to Barb Wells, office assistant for the Endowment Association. The drawing of the vehicle will conclude the auction. e winner does not have to be present to win. Tickets can be purchased in the endowment association office, Keller Leopold Insurance, Kinney Glass, Goldworks, Skeeter’s Body Shop and Western Motor. For tickets or table reservations call 620-276-9578. e doors open at 6:00 p.m. at the Finney County Exhibition Building. e 300-item silent auction will begin at 6:30 p.m. and the 100-item live auction will begin at 7:30 p.m.

For news updates and reports visit egc3media.com

FACES to know JAY BRADLEY, JR Wichita, Kan. Involvement: Basketball Hobbies: Music, hanging out with friends, eating, playing basketball Food: Fried Chicken Movie: “The Lion King” & “National Security” Color: Blue, Red, Black Music: Gospel, R&B, Hip-Hop, Rap Interesting fact: I just want to be successful Someone who inspires you: My dad Do you know someone you think everyone else should know? Email your recommendation to silhouette@gcccks. edu and watch for that person to be featured.


2 | NEWS BUSTER BRIEFS

SILHOUETTE | APRIL 12, 2012

Students learn about impact of choices

Artists interpret poetry

Drama Department kicks off “Man of La Mancha” Ticket sales have opened for the GCCC spring musical, “Man of La Mancha.” Showtimes for the musical will be 7:30 p.m. April 26, 27 and 28, plus 2:30 p.m. April 29, in the auditorium of the Pauline Joyce Fine Arts Building. Written by Joe Darion and Mitch Leigh, the production will be directed at GCCC by Phil Hoke, with a Southwest Kansas cast of students and community members. Admission is $10 per person, or $8 for students or senior citizens. Tickets are available in the fine arts office, and one hour before each show. e number to call for reservations is 620-276-9540.

Fifth annual Ride for the Future coming up The Department of Public Safety will conduct the Fifth Annual Ride for the Future April 28, with stops in Scott City, Tribune and Syracuse along the 170mile route. Local emergency responders, area police, fire and emergency personnel will be at stops throughout the ride, serving as hosts. Proceeds generated by the ride will fund endowment association scholarships for students in the Public Safety Department, including; Criminal Justice, Fire Science and Emergency Medical Ser vices Technology programs. e ride will begin with check-in from 9 to 10:30 a.m. at Bible Christian Church, 1501 Mary St. e cost is $30 for one driver and $50 for one driver with one passenger . Registration packets are available at www. team-t.org or 620-2769629.

SECURITY LOG

Campus security personnel provide assistance unlocking vehicles, escorts for students and college personnel, jump starts for cars and engraving of personal property. Campus security can be contacted by calling 620.272-6828.

EDITOR’S NOTE: To view the campus security log, visit our website at egc3media.com.

SAVE THE DATE Today, Apr 12: Rodeo at Southwestern Oklahoma State 9:30 p.m.-12 a.m. SGA BowlMania at Hard Rock Lanes Apr 13: Rodeo at Southwestern Oklahoma State 6 p.m. 34th Annual GCCC Endowment Association Scholarship Auction Apr 14: Rodeo at Southwestern Oklahoma State Apr 19: 11-2 p.m. SGA Earth Day Celebration & Tobacco Free Campus Event 4 p.m. Intramural 3-on-3 Basketball Tourney (BTSC) Apr 20: Rodeo at Ft. Hayes State Apr 21: Rodeo at Ft. Hayes State Apr 22: Rodeo at Ft. Hayes State Apr 23: Fall Enrollment begins Apr 24: 7:30 p.m. Student Activities Pool Tournament (BTSC) Apr 26: Rodeo at Panhandle State 7:30 p.m. “Man of La Mancha” (JOYC Auditorium) Apr 27: Rodeo at Panhandle State 7:30 p.m. “Man of La Mancha” (JOYC Auditorium) Apr 28: Rodeo at Panhandle State 7:30 p.m. “Man of La Mancha” (JOYC Auditorium)

SYNTHIA PRESTON sprest1361@student.gcccks.edu

The “Illustrious: Artists Respond to Poets” exhibition in Mercer Gallery, featuring two- and three-dimensional works by Kansas artists in interpretation of written works by Kansas poets. The exhibition includes a public reception and poetry reading, 5 p.m. April 14 at the gallery and adjacent fine arts auditorium. The gallery is located in the west wing of the Pauline Joyce Fine Arts Building with viewing hours of 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Monday through Friday and 10 a.m.-2 p.m. on Saturdays. The show will run through April 28. JESUS LOZOYA | SILHOUETTE

Early enrollment begins April 21 ZOE ROTH zroth1926@student.gcccks.edu

GCCC will soon be starting early enrollment days. ere are five opportunities for early fall semester enrollment, and students have the chance to win a scholarship while attending one of the enrollment dates. The purpose of this early enrollment is to give assistance to 2012 high school graduates and others that are planning to attend classes at the college. Students will be able to complete all enrollment steps in a single day by attending one of these sessions. Staff and faculty come together to focus specifically on helping students get enrolled and prepared for the fall semester. “ese special days give students the chance to enroll early, beat the rush and get plenty of individual attention,” Nikki Geier, GCCC admissions director, said. Enrollment dates are April 21, 23, and 26, and again on June 4 and July 9. Additional enrollment days may take place, including an express session for Finney County residents. Reservations are required at 620-2769608 or 1-800-658-1696. “Each session is limited, so it’s

important to make reservations as soon as possible,” Jayre Lee, GCCC assistant admissions director, said. “Also, those who attend should remember to bring a copy of their high school transcript, plus any college transcripts they might have.” Each enrollment day will start with check-in at 8 a.m. and will be followed by a welcome message. en, students will begin individual entrance assessment testing so they can enroll in classes that fit their needs. Students will have an open lunch break and when they return they will be able to enroll in courses they have chosen, and meet with individual faculty advisors to work out their schedules for the semester. e afternoon portion will include a scholarship drawing for two $250 scholarships and students must be present to win. Each enrollment day schedule will conclude by approximately 3 p.m. Students will familiarize themselves with the campus and choose classes that best fit their degree. e students will also get specific questions answered without the having to wait in long lines at registration in the fall. Parents are welcome to join and they will get the chance to tour the

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campus with their sons or daughters. ese opportunities are available to people of all ages, but they are mainly aimed to help first-time students that plan on attending full-time. “We’re really looking forward to the enrollment days,” Lee said. “It’s an exciting time, and it’s a great way for new students to get signed up and get everything taken care of.”

NELSON continued from pg. 1 County Historical Museum, where Nelson has worked as an exhibits curator for the past five years, shares Guy’s impression of Nelson’s commitment to the community. “Brian is…a hard-working individual, and a person who is very interested in Garden City and the zoo,” she said. Nelson’s commitment to whatever task he is given was readily apparent when he said that he will stay on at

the Arts Center, until a replacement for that position is found. “I’ll be training someone at the Arts Center...even if I’m not on payroll. I’m going to make sure the person is trained, just so the organization doesn’t have that major setback where the person that comes in doesn’t know what they’re doing.” He said that the decision to leave the Arts Center was not an easy one. “I enjoyed my time at the Arts

Center and will miss it. I wish the new person the best,” he said.

Check this story and more at egc3media.com

On April 4, GCCC served as the host site for the 2012 Southwest Kansas Student Leadership Academy. The event is held by the Southwest Plains Regional Service Center to provide middle and high school students an opportunity to seek information on leadership, personal development, and college planning and career options. e theme for the event was “IMPACT - changing the world as only you can.” e key speaker was Kyle Baker, program coordinator for the Institute for Excellence and Ethics. He talked to the students on how each person could make a unique impact and make a difference. “I remember what it is like to be a middle or high school student,” Baker said. According to Baker, he thinks when we give all people, especially young people the opportunity to reflect and think deeply of what they want to do and really put it in their control, they will take the opportunity to do that. During his session, Baker gave a homework assignment to do. e assignment was to write a complete sentence explaining what he or she wanted their impact to be, now, and in the future. ere were six students who did the homework: Erin Perry, 8th grader, Hugoton, Wyatt Schmidt, 7th grader, Tribune, Ana Bailon, 9th grader, Cimarron, Kristan Crawford, 8th grader, Hugoton, Ty Torson, 9th grader, and Jessica Hanson, 8th grader, Ulysses. The middle school students’ sessions included Education-Smedication, Boys are Awesome-Girls Rock, Relationships and Drama, Tech-Knowledge-Y, Pushing Your Limits and How High School Works. Nina Hollingsworth, El k h a r t Hi g h S c h o o l , was one part of a group on the Tech-Knowledge-Y sessions. is group was to inform the students about technology and how it has growth overtime and how it is going to keep growing. e students watched a video about Facebook. “It talked about how if Facebook was a country it would be the third largest,” Hollingsworth said. Ho l l i n g s w o r t h s a i d the main message was to inform the students to be more aware of what they share on Facebook, who they are friends with, and simply being more aware of everything going on around them. ere were 254 students representing 14 school districts, according to Jayre Lee, assistant director of admissions.

Find pictures of the event and more @ eGC3media.com


SILHOUETTE | APRIL 12, 2012

EARTH DAY 2012

SPECIAL SECTION

PAGE | 3

ON-CAMPUS OBSERVATION, APRIL 19

Reduce, Reuse & Recycle Area recycling locations CITY OF GARDEN CITY RECYCLE TRAILER LOCATIONS: Westlake Hardware Parking Lot (1210 Fleming St.) Garden City Auto Parts - NAPA (1402 Buffalo Jones) Pershing Manor (Third St. & Kansas Ave) Esquivel Soccer Field (Mary St. & Pearly Jane Ave) Ron’s Market (106 N. Jones, Holcomb, Kansas)

CAMPUS RECYCLING LOCATIONS: In front of the academic building In front of Saffell Library West side of the BTSC

Reuse Ideas · Bring your own bags to the store. · Sell or donate items you don’t need. · Use cloth napkins or towels. · Buy refillable containers. · Use durable, reusable picnic items instead of throwaway. · Purchase refillable pens and pencils. · Maintain and repair durable products. · Reuse jars, containers and boxes. · Try to borrow an item instead of buying it. · Use durable coffee mugs. · Refill bottles. · Donate books, magazines, household items and surplus equipment.

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT SPONSORED BY SGA, SAC & GC3 MEDIA


PAGE | 4

SPECIAL SECTION

SILHOUETTE | APRIL 12, 2012

A Pack goes a long way If you stop smoking, you can put a down payment on me, with the money you saved

A pack of Cigarettes in Kansas costs an average of $6. Smokers smoke an average of 15 Cigarettes a day

40

They $ smoke

Per month

You can buy me in

7 months

Have the spring break of your life. if you stop smoking, in a year, you could save more than

$450

Smoking FACTS

Cigarette smoke contains over 4,800 chemicals About 8.6 million people in the U.S. have at least one serious illness caused by smoking Among current smokers, chronic lung disease accounts for 73 percent of smoking-related conditions The list of diseases caused by smoking includes chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, including chronic bronchitis and emphysema, coro-

nary heart disease, stroke, abdominal aortic aneurysm, acute myeloid leukemia, cataract, pneumonia, periodontitis, and bladder, esophageal, laryngeal, lung, oral, throat, cervical, kidney, stomach, and pancreatic cancers. Smoking is also a major factor in a variety of other conditions and disorders, including slowed healing of wounds, infertility, and peptic ulcer disease Smokers die significantly earlier than non-smokers: 13.2 years for men and 14.5 years for women

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Student Government Association


OPINION | 5

SILHOUETTE | APRIL 12, 2012

Quote of the day “You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.” --Mae West

Bad joke of the day Why did the skeleton play the piano? Because he didn’t have any organs!

Reader Contributions Guest Column Guidelines

650 word limit Include: Author’s name, hometown (student); position (college employee). The Silhouette will not print guest columns that attack another columnist.

Letter Guidelines 200 word limit | Include: Author’s name, telephone number, hometown (student); title (college employee)

SILHOUETTE VOLUME 17, ISSUE 14 GARDEN CITY, KAN. ©2012 GC3 STUDENT MEDIA

John Collins Technical Bldg., room 1002 801 Campus Drive Garden City, KS 67846 620.275.3228 newsroom 620.276.0340 fax silhouette@gcccks.edu 620.276.9500 faculty adviser The Silhouette is a biweekly newspaper written, edited and designed by students at Garden City Community College, 801 Campus Drive, Garden City, KS 67846. Receipt of the first copy is paid through each student’s activity fees. Additional copies of The Silhouette are 25 cents each. Subscriptions can be purchased by contacting The Silhouette. Editorial content in this publication reflects the opinion of the writer and not necessarily those of the staff, students or college personnel. The Silhouette has adopted a code of advertising acceptability which applies to all advertising which it deems potentially harmful, misleading, inaccurate, fraudulent, doubtful or ambiguous representation and dishonest or unfair competitive statement. Inquiries about The Silhouette should be addressed to Laura York Guy, faculty adviser.

Rupp shares what it’s like to be back to ‘reality’ e first 24 years of my life were fairly average for a Kansas kid. I grew up in Dighton, Kan., spent two years at Garden City Community College earning an associate’s degree before transferring to the University of Kansas to earn my bachelor’s degree. en I left the state of Kansas. Along the way I acquired the ability to accept challenges with an open mind. And with that ability, I couldn’t foresee anything stopping me. I still didn’t know exactly what career I would have or what I wanted to accomplish, but I knew whatever it was it would be something unconventional. Walking across the stage with my diploma in Lawrence, Kan., was the end of the road of my ‘fairly average’ life. Something about Southern California was attractive to me, so without much of a plan or direction, I decisively packed up my car and started the 1,600-mile voyage down I-70 west. at was followed by a solid year of disorientation and a fairly chaotic mess of a life. en I received a phone call from someone who has since become incredibly important to me, the casting producer from Glassman Media. e phone call came on Aug. 22, my 25th birthday. He asked if I could essentially drop everything, read, sign and return a 70-plus page agreement, pack my bags for a five-week trip, and catch a flight to Mobile, Ala., on Aug. 27. Absolutely. I immediately made an executive decision without getting a second opinion or contemplating a single “what if.” I started preparing myself for the filming of season two of Sweet Home Alabama, CMT’s rendition of e Bachelor. I didn’t know whose love I would be vying for, whom I would be living with or fighting against… actually, I didn’t really know any of the facts. But that fine print didn’t matter. e experience did. The next several months were complete pandemonium--a whirlwind of filming, promoting, learning the ins and outs of the entertainment biz, traveling, being on national television, press interviews, etc. e show was a success, however,

Cassie Rupp (second from right), a 2007 GCCC graduate, is one of the 10 cast members on CMT’s newest reality show, “Southern Nights.” The series explores how they come of age as they live the true, authentic Southern fantasy -- good friends, beautiful starry nights, sleek nightclubs and charming (and sometimes rough and tumble) Southern bars. The show airs Saturdays at 9 p.m. on CMT.

it was over as just as quickly as it began. We filmed season two in September. e show began airing in October and concluded in December. Season three of Sweet 2007 GCCC alumni Home Alabama was a hit by the time it premiered in January. e excitement from my reality TV stretch died down quickly and it seemed that a normal life would likely be the next step. I had no regrets from the show – it gave me that eccentric story that I ultimately wanted out of life. It made me emotionally stronger, more honest and much more aware of my actions. Now, back to reality. In early February, I received a phone call in the midst of another quarter-life-crisis of figuring out how to adjust into the real world. Within a couple of minutes on the phone with the same casting producer I spoke to just five months prior, my prospective reality had changed completely. e reality calling my name was once again for CMT. By the second week of February, I’m in Savannah, Ga., living in a historical Guest Columnist CASSIE RUPP STAR OF CMT’S “SOUTHERN NIGHTS”

mansion and getting to know nine roommates who would soon create the closest bond next to family. We were living it up, killing each other with brutal honesty, letting our guards down, partying, opening up, becoming enemies, then friends and sometimes lovers. We were creating a show to entertain and one that would be replicated. We knew that some would approve and many would not. We accepted our mistakes and owned up to the bad decisions. We braced ourselves for the negative criticism. We’ve felt the need to apologize for being ourselves. Southern Nights premiered the first weekend in April and it will be a long journey with stories to last a lifetime. I’m not proud of every mistake I inevitably made, but I am confident in my journey. So, what’s the point? Do I think everyone needs to move a couple thousand miles away or sign up for a reality show? Of course not. It’s not a life that most people would choose and it presents more challenges than one could ever fathom. is is not about the actions and the course of events in my life. It is not about reality TV or becoming a pseudo-celebrity. It is about living your life and finding the person who creates your reality. Don’t look too far.

The number 13 gets its bad reputation from religious events that happened in the Bible. In some European countries, people do not use the number 13 in addresses, instead they write 121/2.

Walking underneath a ladder has a quick recovery remedy—you only need to cross your fingers and make a wish. Historians say that a ladder leaning against the wall forms the symbol of the Holy Trinity of Christian religions.

Media partner

If you break a mirror, many believe that it leads to seven years of bad luck or could cause a death in the family. The Romans believed that the body renews itself after seven years.

Breakaway Magazine Feature magazine released three times during academic year. breakaway@gcccks.edu

Media associations

A black cat crossing your path is said to be bad luck, unless you return home immediately. The Egyptians believed that cats were a symbol of god and punished anyone who killed a cat.

CONTACT US GCCC John Collins Vocational Technical Bldg. 801 Campus Drive Garden City, KS 67846 Newsroom 620-275-3228 Fax 620-276-9523 silhouette@gcccks.edu www.egc3media.com

Jesus Lozoya jlozoy1340@student.gcccks.edu Angela Haflich angela.haflich@student.gcccks.edu

SOURCE mythany.com ILLUSTRATION istockphoto.com

Are you superstitious about Friday the 13th? Friday the 13th is just another day “Not really. However, I do believe that a lot of people go out of their way to make it seem like a superstitious date.” Caleb Martinez Pierceville

“No, I never really believed in that stuff.” Lupe Escobar Garden City

“Nope, I don’t have triskaidekaphobia” Angela Adler Garden City

“Yes and no because sometimes it can be a day of bad luck. But sometimes I just think it is another day.” Rosaura Martinez Garden City

“Not necessarily. I don’t think that I’ve ever had bad luck on Friday the 13th, but to me it’s just another day. ” Amanda Shadrick Garden City

“No, I am not superstitious about Friday the 13th. Cultural belief: Don’t point at a rainbow; otherwise you will get a wart on your finger.” Erika Martinez Garden City

Synthia Preston sprest1361@student.gcccks.edu Jaclyn Annis jaclyn.annis@student.gcccks.edu Melissa Hodgs mhodgs1312@student.gcccks.edu Zoe Roth zroth1926@student.gcccks.edu Kelsey Keosengphet kelsey.keosengphet.student.gcccks.edu

>> OUR VIEW

>> YOUR VIEW

Your View Policy Your View gives readers the opportunity to voice their opinions on issues concerning Garden City Community College. The opinions within do not necessarily reflect the attitudes of the Silhouette or Garden City Community College faculty, staff or administration. If you have an opinion to share, contact the Silhouette at 620-275-3228 or silhouette@gcccks.edu. Comments that are libelous or obscene in nature will not be printed.

Many believe that Friday the 13th is just unlucky. According to urbanlegends.about.com, the sixth day of the week (Friday) and the number 13 both have foreboding reputations said to date from ancient times. It seems their inevitable conjunction from one to three times a year (there will be three such occurrences in 2012, exactly 13 weeks apart) portends more misfortune than some credulous minds can bear. According to some sources, it’s the most widespread superstition in the United States today. Some people refuse to go to work on Friday the 13th; some won’t eat in restaurants; many wouldn’t think of setting a wedding on the date. “I think people are easily persuaded into thinking that Friday the 13th has bad luck, so they do weird things to prevent things from happening,” Freshman Lizette Reyes said. “I never really believed in that kind of stuff, even when I was a kid.” ere are also several myths surrounding the day. One is, if you cut your hair on Friday the 13th, someone in your family will die. Another myth is that if a child is born on Friday the 13th, the child will be unlucky for the rest of his or her life. As with anything, Friday the 13th’s power to bring bad luck is only as strong as one’s belief that it can. Just to be safe though, maybe it is best to call in sick that day and stay home. en again, if the day holds as much power as people believe it does, then it won’t matter where you are.


6 | SPORTS

SILHOUETTE | APRIL 12, 2012

Busters go 3-1 against Colby

Sophomore outfielder, Mason Fischer slides in to home, in the game against Colby Community College on Saturday afternoon. The Busters went 3-1 on the weekend and will travel to Cloud County Community College on April 14-15 for a four-game series. First pitch is at 1 p.m.

Wolf’s time meets national standard in track SILHOUETTE NEWS

e Garden City Community College men’s and women’s track meet competed in their third meet of the spring when they traveled to the Enduro Classic at Friends University in Wichita. e small team once again had solid results in the distance events. e highlight of the meet was Michael Wolf meeting the national qualifying standard. Although he only placed fifth in the 5000-meter race, it was a very strong

field. Wolf’s time of 15:20 met the national qualifying standard meaning, that he will be able to compete in the NJCAA National Meet at South Plains Community College in May. On the women’s side, Kelsey Geschwentner was the only Buster to place in the top 10 of the meet. She finished second place in the 800-meter run. Geschwentner also placed 11th in the 5,000-meter run. On the men’s side, the Busters finally

got the event they were looking forward to running. This was the first meet that the 1,000-meter run was held. Carlos Ahkothe won the 1,000-meter MICHAEL and Chris Zirkle placed WOLF second in the event. The Busters next meet will be Friday at the K.T. Woodman Classic hosted by Wichita State University.

Marquez practices volleyball techniques even in off season

SYNTHIA PRESTON SILHOUETTE

Even though volleyball practice is over for the day, Ivone Marquez, Ulysses, practices bumping the ball, while she walks back to the dorms from the DPAC on April 4. Marquez played middle blocker last season and will return to the court with the Lady Busters, next season. The volleyball season starts in August.

SPRING ‘12

SPORTS SCHEDULE SOFTBALL APR. 13 NORTH PLATTE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, 3 AND 5 P.M. APR. 1415  COLBY COMMUNITY COLLEGE TOURNAMENT APR. 18  SEWARD COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE, 3 AND 5 P.M. APR. 20  DODGE CITY COMMUNITY COLLEGE, 3 AND 5 P.M.

BASEBALL APR. 1415 CLOUD COMMUNITY COLLEGE, 1 AND 3 P.M. APR. 2122 BUTLER COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE, 1 AND 3 P.M. APR. 25 CLARENDON COLLEGE, 3 P.M.

RODEO APR. 1214  SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY APR. 2022  FT. HAYS STATE UNIVERSITY APR. 2628  FT. HAYS STATE UNIVERSITY APR. 2628  PANHANDLE STATE UNIVERSITY, GUYMON, OKLA. JUN. 1016 COLLEGE NATIONAL FINALS RODEO, CASPER, WYO.

GOLF APR. 16 KJCCC DESIGNATED TOURNAMENT, LOCATION TBA APR. 2324 KJCCC DESIGNATED TOURNAMENT, SAND CREEK STATION APR. 30MAY 1 NJCAA DISTRICT III TOURNAMENT

TRACK AND FIELD

You’ve never eaten FOOD like this before!

APR. 13 K.T. WOODMAN CLASSICWSU APR. 18 TABOR COLLEGE INVITATIONAL, HILLSBORO APR. 27 FT. HAYS STATE UNIVERSITY OPEN, HAYS MAY 35 REGION VI CHAMPIONSHIPS, HUTCHINSON SEE COMPLETE SPRING SPORTS SCHEDULES AT

WWW.GOBRONCBUSTERS.COM/

Buffet Style Breakfast ..7a.m. – 9 a.m. Lunch ........11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. Dinner ......5 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Located at the BTSC 620.276.9607 foodservice@gcccks.edu

#

Your

information source

in Southwest Kansas.

Find us at www.gctelegram.com

Catering service available for on & off campus events, contact Stacey

FREE CRAZY BREAD Good with valid GCCC ID & GCHS ID Limit one per order | Valid through May 2012 LOCATION: 1810 E. Kansas Ave. Garden City, KS OPEN: 10:30 AM - 10 PM Sun-Thurs 10:30AM 11 PM Fri-Sat

CONTACT: 620-805-6990


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