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Guangbin Zhen

portfolio April 2014 gz2204@columbia.edu


Bank of Post-Life

Brooklyn, New York Columbia University Core Studio II Bank of Post-Life aims to help the neighborhood explore the concept of death and after-life condition. The clients of the bank sign up for a “checking-out� account, and at the moment of death they will receive full service of funeral rites and deposit their bodies as bone ash, or cryopreserved, or have themselves shipped to the cemetery. The affiliated anti-ageing research center offers them the opportunity to stake on future technology to reanimate themselves. It is an ideal space for people from different religious backgrounds to unify their notions of what post-life would be.

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13 13 12

16

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15 10

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11 15 15

4

4

15

3 2 16 1

6 5

7 8 9

6 1. customer reception 2. meeting room 3. temporary file storage 4. bathroom 5. large storage 6. archive floors 7. lobby 8. bone ash floor communal area 9. public elevator entrance 10.elevator access to chapels 11.ramp access to research floor 12.vitrification/medical center 13.bridge access to crematorium and cryonics center 14.crematorium 15.funeral rite chapels 15.structural outline 16.anti-ageing research institute

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4 8

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16


passage connecting the crematorium and chapels, a space of “reflection�

anti-ageing research center


connecting bridge

interior of the liquid nitrogen production silo

crematorium

overall program distribution

cryonics institute

funeral rites chapel

bone ash hall

elevator access to chapels

customer archive

customer center

anti-ageing research institute


evolution from concept models shows the intricate linear process within a loop circulation, weaving the spirit of post-life together


Upper West Side Natatorium Manhattan, New York Columbia University Core Studio I

This project intends to bring back the ecosystem which used to dominate Manhattan Penisula. Learning from the purification water process of the wetland with the help of various aquatic plants, the natatorium contains a similar system to remove the pollutants from the used water in the swimming pool. The used water in the pool that needs to be changed will be pumped up to elevated ponds or directed to the ground ponds with reeds, water lilies etc. After sometime, the water will be filtered by the plants and sand, and then will be redirected back to the pool. These treatment ponds provide an opportunity for the visitors to learn more about botany and ecology, and more importantly the historic environment of Manhattan. Formally, the building are composed of hexagon cells that resemble some plant cells seen under microscope. The swimming pool is given a central focus, so that everyone can have a visual response with the pool while they tour around the building.

North River Water Pollution Control designed capacity: 170 million gallons/day actual capacity: 150 million gallons/day year of operation: 1986 population served: 588,772 plant staff: 109

B

site

D

A

C

E

North River Treatment Plant Service Area treatment plant and capacity CSO (combined sewage overflow) direction of grey water flow

plant name F

capacity

A Wards Island

275

B

Hunts Point

200

C Bowery Bay

150

D Tallman Island

80

E

Newtown Creek

310

F

Red Hook

60


diagram of filtering system

conceptual collages of the site being flooded


roof with oculus

plant cell organization

facilities pond

reception pool

pond

auditorium

structural concept pond

program organization

facilities pond

reception

pond pool pond

auditorium

pond

pond

scaling

filtering tower with treatment ponds

facilities pond

reception

pond pool pond pond

auditorium

distorting

pond

education center

facilities

auditorium

pond

second floor

reception

pond

pool

pond auditorium

pond exploding

valley mountain

reception

changing rooms

folding first floor cafĂŠ

swimming pool

ramp

ground treatment ponds (outdoor access)


playground

men’s room

reception male changing room

men’s room

lady’s room

lady’s room

female changing room

deducation center

open to below treatment ponds coach’s lounge

reception area

treatment ponds

swimming pool

entrance

open to below

auditorium

café

treatment ponds

10

20 ft

first floor plan

N

0

Columbus Avenue

0

10

20 ft

second floor plan


treatment ponds

education center

reception area

coach’s lounge

entry walkway natatorium

connected to city water supply

mechanical room

filtered water pipe

drainage pipe

water pump


iceland 133g/person/day north korea 58g/person/day

Engaging the process of food production, Fowl Exchange is a social paradigm in the Sahelian area in Agadez, Niger, a gathering center for the Tuareg nomads. The Tuaregs have had serious conflicts with each other and their government due to limited access to basic nutrition –especially protein sources. Inspired by the noble soup kitchens organized by Raoul Wallenberg, this project uses the simple chicken, (along with a few other fowl), as agents of social and nutritional revival. Fowl Exchange harvests both solar power and natural rain to supply a series of constructed grounds upon which the Tuareg care for their fowl in a civic farming environment. Far less costly than camels and able to provide quick value both in terms of meat and eggs (also for trade), the chicken facilitates the re-inscription of one’s home territory as the Promised Land you knew it to be.

canada 105g/person/day

kazakhstan 104g/person/day

china 89g/person/day

Fowl Exchange

Agadez area, Niger University of Michigan UG4

greece 118g/person/day

luxembourg 123g/person/day

mongolia 72g/person/day

US 114g/person/day

haiti 41g/person/day

israel 126g/person/day tunisia 93g/person/day UAE 104g/person/day mexico 92g/person/day

guatemala 57g/person/day

india 56g/person/day

venezuela 71g/person/day

bangladesh 49g/person/day nicaragua 62g/person/day mauritania 86g/person/day suriname 55g/person/day

thailand 57g/person/day

eritrea 47g/person/day

liberia 36g/person/day

brazil 84g/person/day

indonesia 56g/person/day

ecuador 57g/person/day democratic republic of congo 25g/person/day peru 67g/person/day australia 106g/person/day

bolivia 56g/person/day

mozambique 38g/person/day

less than 38 g/person/day 38 - 52 52 - 63 63 - 73 73 - 81 81 - 89

daily protein intake per capita

89 - 101 101 - 115 115 - 133

china 101 germany 7 japan 12

croatia 3

haiti 407

US 11 iraq 389

afghanistan175

iran 147

pakistan 267

algeria 139

iceland 7

mexico 149

russia 42

canada 1

honduras 468

india 319

guyana 306 yemen 438 mali 1291

burma 463 ehiopia 732 laos 663

nicaragua 254

sierra leon 875

democratic republic of congo 468 indonesia 262

australia 1

mozambique 547

brazil 135

peru 203

angola 1355 bolivia 394 argentina 69

less than 10 per 10,000 inhabitants 10 - 100 100 - 200 200 - 300 300 - 400 400 - 500 500 - 6000 600 - 700 700 - 800 800 - 1000 1000 - 1350

population suffering from protein-energy malnutrition

more than 1350


location of Agadez in Niger and precipitation of the area LIBYA

ALGERIA

AGADEZ

MALI

precipitation 0

N

I

G

E

R

mm/year

CHAD

100 Tahoua Tillaberi Zinder

capital: Niamey Maradi

250

Dosso

BURKINA FASO

NIGERIA BENIN

500 750

pepper

Agadez: desert with green

mixing chicken

city of Agadez and the river nearby as an ideal site for chicken husbandry

cutting

garlic

chickens carried by camels

serving

Tuareg people raising chicken

urban area of Agadez

the river supports natural lives in desert

ketchup flour

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00:05 00:11 00:18

00:25

00:32

00:58

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01:11

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11:10

11:41

15:33

21:02

conceptual drawing of cooking process showing cultural elements in this everyday activity

22:10

lean body

strong legs

wild African rooster

heavy breast

recessed legs

domestic standard American rooster

site analysis of Agadez


oasis formed by the river Tuareg nomad emmigrating direction

popular Tuareg settlement outside Agadez

toward the Sahara desert

city of Agadez

partial forest of Kirboubou

the Tuareg people near Agadez


Agadez is an ancient city founded by the Tuareg people as a trade center. Investigation into the city of Agadez in Niger shows the importance of a nearby river, which provides water for the residents as well as the Tuareg nomads who move around in the valley. In view of the convetion of the Tuareg people transporting their food source including fowls on top of their camels, I propose a farming structure raised above ground in order for the fowls to stay in a comfortable climate condition. Hundreds of these structures, or exchange points will be set up near the site for the Tuaregs to settle around, offering a place for gathering, cooking, keeping food source, and a centripedal force to link the community together. This aims to suggest a new urban typology for the nomadic groups.


section drawing showing a festive day in the community. The nobles are having a private feast. Some are praying, some are dancing, some are preparing food, and some are having guests at their own tents.


community Tikoubi population: 58 fowl numbers: 154

solar power panels

community Ayedaz population: 69 fowl numbers: 178 community Bourazeyg population: 114 fowl numbers: 294

gutter for rain collection

walk-on floors

cistern units

1.light allowable metal mesh 2.soil with plantation 3.filter fabric 4.moisture rentention 5.water feeding system 6.feed tray 7.egg collection tray 8.drip irrigation pipes

poultry farming units section

bamboo scaffolding

4 ft

communal/storage/pray/slaughter area

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5

7

poultry farming units 2

8 3 4 10 ft

community Makerbou population: 107 fowl numbers: 289

community Hamalil population: 74 fowl numbers: 145

steel structural base

community Petiki population: 82 fowl numbers: 142

community Kibaraz population: 85 fowl numbers: 183

0

project distribution around the site in Niger

1

concrete foundation

self-sustainable system of camel’s body

2 mi

structural components and section of a typical chicken unit


Harlem Park Public Bathroom Manhattan, New York Columbia University Core Studio I

Crime data in the area shows that many of the drug abuse and prostitution cases occurred in public bathrooms around the city. Public bathrooms are common places for crime because it is an enclosed and easy to find place, where the users are offered temporary territoriality and privacy. Territoriality and privacy are distinct conditions. For example, in the bus, each passenger with a seat has his territoriality but not privacy. This leads me to question the static states of territoriality and privacy in bathrooms. The diagrams study different conditions where there can be equal territoriality and equal privacy, no territoriality and no privacy, unequal territoriality and equal privacy. By introducing two doors fixed at ninety degrees, it is possible to introduce contingent territoriality and privacy. My design responds to the social awkwardness between the two users in the bathroom. The doors have round edges which look like walls. But they rotate and separate the functions in the bathroom while changing the spaces usable between the two users. The interior is kept simplest, and all the mechanical systems are hidden behind the plastic enclosure. But the outside is covered with glasses so the pipes and steel structures are visible from outside.

equal territoriality

no territoriality

unequal territoriality

equal territoriality

unequal territoriality

equal territoriality

contingent territoriality

equal privacy

no privacy

unequal privacy

equal privacy

equal privacy

equal privacy

contingent privacy

study of privacy and territoriality in bathroom

four different conditions of space controlled by rotating door


skylight

1. square tubing frame

vent

2. inner plastic wall

garbage bin

sink baby changing platform

3. ceiling with skilight

toilet

toilet tank

4. plumbing and ventilation

waste pipe

water pipe

5. roof and glass walls


diagram of piping system

water supply system sewage system

animated rendering of the use of bathroom


progress portfolio 2014