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Remembering River Page 10

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WED., MAY 4, 2011 VOL. 78 • NO. 37 • 2 SECTIONS •

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Ellsworth teacher to face Harsdorf in recall election

Summit meeting

Watch our e-edition each week for stories and photos that don’t make our print edition. Go to www.the-leader.net to subscribe

Concealed-carry course draws considerable interest

Your opinion?

What were your feelings/thoughts when you heard bin Laden had been killed? 1. It took too long. 2. Time for celebration!! 3. Closure, not celebratory 4. Skeptical 5. Proud 6. None of the above Go to our online poll at www.the-leader.net (Weekly results on page 8)

More classes, including advanced courses coming this summer PAGE 21

Liquor license denied

New BL board addresses TIF vacancies, millpond liability PAGE 11

Deaths

New districts

ALSO INSIDE

• Historic structure vandal busted PAGE 4 • Duffy on bin Laden death PAGE 2 • Weather calms wildfire season PAGE 3 • Greenhouse groundbreaking PAGE 5 • Board asks for extension PAGE 5 • GHS gets $2,500 science award PAGE 6

Britta’s legacy See SPORTS

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The electronic edge!

Shelly Moore announces PAGE 2

Proposed redistricting of Polk County to go to board later this month PAGE 4

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Wisconsin Interstate Park Naturalist Julie Fox led students on a hike to the summit of Summit Trail in the park at St. Croix Falls last Friday, April 29, to help them understand the geological formation of the river and its use as a highway during the days of logging and trading, as well as the area’s preservation as a National Park in the early 1900s. The presentation was part of an Earth Day/Arbor Day field trip for sixth-grade students from local public schools. See more photos on page 31. - Photo submitted

On schedule

The new $10 million United Pioneer Home facility should be ready by summer’s end

by Mary Stirrat Leader staff writer LUCK — Construction of United Pioneer Home’s new $10 million facility is proceeding on schedule, said nursing home Administrator Dan Valentine, with an anticipated move-in either late September or early October. “Everything is going so smooth,” said Valentine. “This project is very blessed.” From the main entrance, with its wraparound porch, to the names given to different areas of the building, comfort and homeyness are evident. Valentine and others have tracked the progress with photos and video, and several short videos have been posted on YouTube.

United Pioneer Home Administrator Dan Valentine, left, with project superintendent Carl Brooks, outside the new facility. - Photos by Mary Stirrat

When opened, the new facility will consist of a 50-bed skilled nursing facility and 16-bed assisted-living area. The two will be joined by

See On schedule, page 4

• Shirley R. Sandquist • Irene M. Erickson • Lauri Oscar Mustonen • Edna M. Anderson • Irene E. Peper • Mildred Elizabeth Spurrell • Violet Irene (Peterson) Luke • Deborah S. (Everson) Dahlby • Vincent C. Johnson • Lloyd John Huberty • Harold Albert Bradshaw Jr Obituaries on page 22-23B

INSIDE

Briefly 3A Letters to the editor 9A Sports 15-20A Outdoors 21A Town Talk 6-8B Coming Events Back of B Currents feature 1B Behind the Signpost 5B Letters from Home 3B Cold Turkey 3B Just for Laughs 3B River Road Ramblings 4B Obituaries 22-23B Students of the Week 27B Focus on the Family 24B Church directory 25B Copyright © 2011 Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association Frederic, Wisconsin

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Free showing of “Ana’s Playground”

FREDERIC- The awardwinning film “Ana’s Playground” will be shown at the Frederic Public Library on Thursday, May 12, at 7 p.m. The free program begins with viewing the film, followed by discussion facilitated by Fred Grimm. The short film was shot in Minneapolis. It avoids political or regional stereotypes as it folows a rag tag group of children at play in a war-torn neighborhood when danger strikes in the form of a sniper. The film is an allegory about the moment when a child is forced to choose between ideology and humanity while living and playing in a dangerous war environment. The showing is sonsored by the Friends of the Frederic Library in partnership with Frederic Arts. “Ana’s Playground” was short-listed for a 2011 Academy Award nomination. - - submitted

First one to the bottom wins

OSCEOLA - More than 500 rubber ducks purchased by area ticket holders will be poured into Osceola Creek and will race over Cascade Falls as part of the inaugural “Duckathlon” duck race. The Osceola Lions Club and Osceola Public Library are cosponsoring the fundraising race as part of the Rhubarb Days festival on Saturday, June 4, from 4 to 7 p.m. Individual, numbered ducks are currently being sold at area businesses in advance of the event. The ducks sold will be placed in Osceola Creek upstream from Mill Pond Park and released simultaneously. The first duck to pass through the pond, cross under Hwy. 35 and reach a finish line stretched below the waterfalls will win a $500 grand prize. The ducks entered in the race will be eligible for a number of other prizes as well, which have been donated by downtown businesses. The event is the brainchild of Osceola Lions Club members Nathan Deprey, Earl Mork and Kyle Weaver, who saw the duck race as an opportunity to build an event around Osceola’s most prominent geological feature, Cascade Falls – a feature that is, in fact, a key component to the village’s founding. Funds raised by the Duckathlon will benefit the Lions ongoing community projects. Ducks are being sold at the Osceola Public Library, Osceola Cleaners and PY’s Bar and Grill for $5 each or 5 for $20. For more information call the library at 715-294-2310 or Kyle at 317-965-3578. - submitted

New season begins at sculpture park

Leader

FRANCONIA, Minn. - You can see it happening, even with the long winter still fresh in our memories: the artists and staff at Franconia Sculpture Park waited no longer than it takes for the snow to melt to begin creating new work and engaging the more intrepid tour groups. Visitors walk through the park, taking in the huge and occasionally mind-boggling sculptures as they enjoy the warm sun and migrating birds passing overhead. By the end of May, the park will again be transformed by nature and the addition of the year’s first new works of art. For schedules go to www.franconia.org, or call the park office at 651-257-6668. You can also e-mail info@franconia.org. - with submitted information

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It will be Shelly vs. Sheila in July 12 recall election

by Gary King Leader editor RIVER FALLS – Ellsworth teacher Shelly Moore has announced her candidacy in Wisconsin’s 10th Senate District recall election against incumbent Sheila Harsdorf. The election is scheduled for Tuesday, July 12. (See stories, page 3). Moore made her announcement on Tuesday, May 3, National Teachers Day, at a press conference held at the Lakefront Park bandshell in River Falls. “I’m pledging to fight for the people of northwestern Wisconsin and stand up to the extreme agenda in Madison that strips away worker rights and guts priorities like education,” Moore said in a released statement. “Sheila Harsdorf’s decision to walk lockstep with the radical plans of Scott Walker that hurt working and middle-class families is way out of touch with the values of northwestern Wisconsin.” Moore said that instead of consensus and common ground,

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Shelly Moore - Special photo

Harsdorf and her allies “prefer divisive, extreme policies.” “I have always believed that in Northwest Wisconsin, there is no problem so big that it can’t be solved over hotdish in the church basement, over cards in the ice shanty or over curds at the fair. This is the time to unify under a common cause to find solutions.” Moore has been teaching English and drama in the Ellsworth School District for 15 years. She received a layoff notice from the Ellsworth School District in early January. She describes herself as a third-generation Wisconsin teacher and a fourth-generation union member and said in her statement that just as her rela-

tives dedicated their lives to this area through public service, she is running for state Senate to continue that tradition of service to northwestern Wisconsin. She promises to restore accountable leadership and ensure the voices of the people of Northwest Wisconsin are heard. Moore grew up in the Beloit and Woodruff areas. She earned her master’s degree in English education from UW-River Falls and her bachelor’s degree in English, political science and theater arts from UW-Stevens Point. Moore was one of six finalists interviewed by Democratic Party officials in a search for a candidate to run against Harsdorf. Approximately 24,000 signatures were gathered over the past few months by opponents of Gov. Walker’s budget proposal which sharply curtailed collective bargaining rights for some public employees, including teachers. Those signatures were filed with the Government Accountability Board in Madison last week. Harsdorf is one of six Republican senators facing recall elections. Democratic state senators have also been targeted for recall. - with information from Moore campaign and hudsonwi.patch.com

Duffy comments on death of bin Laden

WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Congressman Sean Duffy, 7th District, issued the following statement about the death of Osama bin Laden: “The daring and successful mission carried out by our Special Forces Navy SEALs yesterday to kill Osama bin Laden could’ve been right out of an action film. The celebrations and the pride Americans feel today in their military, CIA and government for capturing the world’s most wanted terrorist are appropriate and justified. “I am humbled and deeply grateful for the opportunity to have spent time with our troops in Afghanistan who have served on the front lines in harm’s way for nearly a decade now. Their service and sacrifice truly represents the very best of American honor and valor. It is the tireless efforts of all of our military personnel and intelligence agencies that led to yesterday’s great news. It’s important to remember that while bin Laden is dead, alQaida is not. Our enemies will surely attempt to retaliate. Nonetheless, this is a significant victory that not only brings one

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Ellsworth teacher to face Harsdorf

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Congressman Sean Duffy is currently returning from a congressional delegation trip to Afghanistan where he met with top American military and civilian leaders. - Special photo

of our greatest enemies to justice, but also reminds terrorists, wherever they may be, that the United States will not relent in pursuit of them. “It is fitting, at this moment, to remember those who perished on 9/11 and those who have sacrificed their lives in the defense

of freedom. I had the honor of attending a memorial service in Kabul for the eight Americans killed at Kabul airport last week as well as participating in the Angel Flight of an Appleton native killed in Afghanistan. I was deeply moved and humbled to be part of these events. I will always keep their families and all military families in my thoughts and prayers. “As our troops continue to keep us safe, it is comforting to know that the mastermind of 9/11 will never be able to harm us again.” Duffy is currently returning from a congressional delegation trip to Afghanistan where he met with top American military and civilian leaders, including General David Petraeus and Ambassador Karl Eikenberry, as well as local Afghan leaders. During his visit, Duffy was also briefed by Special Forces soldiers and commanders responsible for carrying out missions like the one that successfully killed bin Laden in Pakistan. - from the office of Congressman Duffy

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• Briefly •

MADISON – Gov. Scott Walker announced that Wisconsin will provide specialized wildland firefighting equipment and trained fire personnel to Texas to assist in suppressing wildfires that have burned over 1.5 million acres there in recent weeks. A formal request for fire suppression resources came to the Division of Forestry from Texas on April 28. “Requests such as this come as a great compliment to our fire control program,” said Walker. “When we see our neighbors in need of immediate fire suppression assistance, it is only natural for us to provide what resources we can, and the partnerships we’ve built with various fire programs allow us to do just that.” Wisconsin will provide assistance to Texas in the form of four bulldozers that pull unique plows designed and fabricated in Wisconsin. The tracked dozers and plows are used to construct fire lines at the flanks of a fire to prevent wider spread of the fire or to protect high-value property at risk from an advancing fire. An additional heavy dozer will also be sent to Texas for an initial period of 14 days. If fires persist beyond the initial assignment, additional personnel may be rotated in to continue the operation. - from the DNR ••• MADISON – Once a year a special time is set aside for the remembrance of those we cannot thank enough all year long: Wisconsin law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty and their families. This year’s ceremony will be held at the North Hamilton Street entrance to the state Capitol at noon on Friday, May 6. This year two names will be added to the memorial at the ceremony. Deputy Kory Dahlvig from the Vilas County Sheriff’s Office, who was killed on April 25, 2010, from injuries he sustained in a vehicle crash while responding to a call, and Deputy William Cooper from the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, who died on Feb. 8, 1992, when he was shot and killed while intervening in a domestic disturbance. - submitted ••• SIREN - The public sirens throughout Burnett County will be tested from April through October on the first Monday of the month at 1 p.m. “Please note that this is a routine test to ensure preparedness,” said Burnett County Emergency Management Director Bobbi Sichta. - with submitted information ••• STATEWIDE - Gov. Scott Walker has designated May as Motorcycle Awareness and Safety Month in Wisconsin. In his proclamation Walker states, “Motorcyclists have the right by law to the safe enjoyment of their vehicles, including the full and equal use of the roadway without encroachment by other vehicles whether it be on city streets or rural and urban highways.” With soaring gas prices, motorcycles are increasingly being used for basic transportation as well as recreation. More than 491,000 Wisconsin residents have motorcycle licenses or permits, and more than 333,000 motorcycles are registered in the state, according to the Wisconsin Department of Transportation. On average for the last five years, traffic crashes annually have killed nearly 100 motorcyclists and injured approximately 2,500. Most of these deaths and injuries could be prevented if motorists would share the road and motorcyclists were well-trained and always rode within their limitations.” To save lives and reduce injuries from crashes, the Wisconsin Motorcycle Safety Program has provided rider training through the state technical colleges for 29 years and has graduated more than 140,000 riders in that time. This year, the Wisconsin Motorcycle Safety Program has expanded its courses and will offer comprehensive training for riders at all levels of experience from beginner to advanced. For information about rider training courses and locations, visit the WisDOT Web site. - from WisDOT ••• CORRECTIONS: Town of Bone Lake clerk Darrell Frandsen was incorrectly identified in a Wednesday, April 20, edition photo. The Leader regrets the error. ••• A change of name within the past year caught us unaware in the Wednesday, April 27, issue. The board of director has authorized the change of name from the Burnett County Restorative Justice Response to Restorative Justice of Northwest Wisconsin. As program Director Lisa Johnson explained, the change was to “reflect the expanding scope of service (the organization) provides to other communities.” Johnson also said that the change was a “move to help detach public perception that (they are) a government entity.” Our apologies for not catching this. - Nancy Jappe

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Weather helped create a mild wildfire season

Recall elections July 12

MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 3

BURNETT/POLK COUNTIES - The cold, snow and rain this spring has created problems for many farmers and impatience among those of us longing for warm, sunny days, but it’s helped keep down the number of wildfires usually occurring this time of year. “It’s (weather) been a blessing in that respect,” noted DNR Fire Warden Renae Paulson at Webster. “The fire season has been very mild, thankfully.” Paulson said the Cumberland area, which includes Burnett, Washburn and parts of Barron and Polk counties, has

seen about 20 fires so far this spring. “Normally, we’d have two or three times that many at this point in the season,” she said. “I don’t think any of them have been larger than 10 acres.” The serious portion of the wildfire season here usually winds down in May, when things begin to green up. Persons are asked to check the DNR’s Web site for daily reports on burning permit requirements. A link to the site can be found at the Leader’s Web site at www.the-leader.net. - Gary King

Four legislative recalls in Wisconsin history

Two involved current senators

by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer STATEWIDE – Wisconsin has had four legislative recall elections in the past. Two of those four recalls involved persons who are involved in the current recall efforts. The past recalls were against two Democrats and two Republicans. Two of the prior recalls removed the incumbents. The first recall, in 1932, was against Sen. Otto Mueller, a Republican from Wausau. He survived a September recall getting 14,160 votes to his Democratic opponent’s 8,541 votes. Mueller served in the Wisconsin Senate from 1927 to 1933 and 1939 to 1941. A jeweler and businessman, he lived to be 98 years old. This is the second recall election for Sen. Jim Holperin, a Democrat. As an assemblyman, he faced a recall in 1990. The issue at that time was spearfishing and tribal treaty rights. Holperin won a

recall primary by 9,534 to 4,370 and went on to keep his seat against a Republican challenger by 10,495 votes to 6,707. The first recall that was successful in removing a person from office was in 1996. Republican Sen. George Petak upset some voters with his vote to support funding for a Milwaukee baseball stadium. Petak survived a recall primary election 14,147 to 5,174 but was defeated by Democrat Kimberly Plache in the general election. The vote was 21,045 to 19,318. The other successful recall removed Democratic Sen. Gary George from office in 2003. George was facing ethical charges at the time. Spencer Coggs defeated George in the recall primary 4,538 to 2,477. There was no Republican candidate, and Coggs was elected unopposed in the general recall election. A recall was filed against Coggs this spring, but the required signatures were not collected, and Coggs will not face a recall this summer.

Friends of Harsdorf: Petition signatures show outside influence

NORTHWEST WISCONSIN - A look at those gathering signatures to recall state Sen. Sheila Harsdorf reveals some startling information about just who was involved in the recall effort, according to a group called Friends of Sheila Harsdorf. “The connection of outside special interest groups to the recall has been welldocumented in the past, and a review of submitted petitions only confirms the funding and organizational ties,” states a news release issued Tuesday, May 3, by the group. The review of the petitions found that many were submitted with no circulator at all or without complete addresses, and hundreds of people signed illegally because they lived outside the district, the release states. Additionally, almost 200 people signed two or three times. “Circulators from New York and Michigan catch the eye, but the real story is the huge number of people from outside the 10th Senate District involved in the effort,” stated the group. “One-third of those who signed their names as petition circulators do not even live in Harsdorf’s district. Clearly, the outside special interests feel they should help make the decision about who should represent us.” The group claims a breakdown of the numbers “highlights the substantial influence of outside interests” in the recall: • More activists from Eau Claire circulated petitions to replace Harsdorf than from Hudson, • More recallers made the trip up from the Madison area than came from New Richmond, • More circulators from Chippewa Falls came out to recall Harsdorf than from Osceola and Prescott combined, and • More Minnesotans worked on the

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recall than circulators from Baldwin, Ellsworth, Frederic, Glenwood City and Roberts put together. “Put it all together and the picture becomes clear, special interests were able to marshal their resources and with paid assistance were able to obtain the signatures of 12.3 percent of the district population.- from Friends of Sheila Harsdorf

by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer FREDERIC – The deadline for completing recall petitions for most of the 16 Wisconsin senators facing recall has expired. To date, petitions were submitted for the recall of nine senators, including 10th District Sen. Sheila Harsdorf. If the petitions are verified by the Wisconsin Government Accountability Board, the recall elections will be held on Tuesday, July 12. A primary in any of the races would move that general election to Tuesday, Aug. 9. Recall drives were registered in late February and early March against all 16 senators elected in 2008, eight from each party. Petitioners had 60 days to collect signatures equal to 25 percent of the vote for governor in the last election in each district. For the 10th District, that amounted to 15,744 signatures on petitions. Once the petitions are submitted to the GAB, the GAB has 31 days to verify the petitions and call an election. With so many recalls, the GAB was granted extra time to complete its work. The GAB has said it wants to hold the recall elections on the same day to ease the process. In a recall election, the current senator is automatically on the ballot. Other candidates need to register their candidacy and circulate nomination papers as they would in a regular election. The filing period is for four weeks after the recall is certified and the election is called. If more than one candidate files for either party, there is a primary election. The petition drives were probably successful for the recall of nine senators, six Republicans and three Democrats. The Republican senators facing recall are Harsdorf, Robert Cowles, Alberta Darling, Luther Olsen, Randy Hopper and Dan Kapanke. The three Democratic senators are Jim Holperin, Robert Wirch and Dave Hansen. The required signatures were not collected for five recalls, Democrats Lena Taylor, Spencer Coggs and Fred Risser, and Republicans Glenn Grothman and Mary Lazich. Wednesday, May 4, is the deadline for petitions to recall Democrat Mark Miller. Petitioners have until Monday, May 16, to collect the recall signatures for Democrat Julie Lassa.

Laura Jensen, vice president of patient services, and Carolyn Ward, president of SCRMC Volunteer Partners, are shown with the Kathy Nesgoda Employee of the Month plaque. - Photo submitted

Kathy Nesgoda Scholarship created

ST. CROIX FALLS - On Nov. 12, 2010, St. Croix Regional Medical Center lost one of its employees in a traffic accident. Kathy (Bell) Nesgoda was a registered nurse at SCRMC for 32 years and had worked in almost every department in the hospital. Nesgoda touched many, many lives as a mentor, teacher, friend, caregiver, wife, mother and grandmother. She was a kind, patient and happy person and would never say an unkind word about anyone. Her positive caring attitude was one of her strongest suits. As Nesgoda did during life, she will again touch many lives through the creation of the Kathy Nesgoda Schol-

arship Fund. A fundraiser sponsored by her many friends at SCRMC was held on Feb. 17. The funds raised from that benefit have been entrusted to the St. Croix Regional Medical Center Volunteer Partners to administer. Two first-time $1,000 scholarships were awarded from this fund to Jessica Martell and Sarah Knauber, students who are pursuing a nursing career. In the future, these funds are designated to second-year students in the nursing program. The SCRMC Volunteer Partners are honored to be a part of Nesgoda’s legacy. - from SCRMC


PAGE 4 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

On schedule/

from page 1

an administrative area that includes offices, laundry, therapy, hair salon and chapel. The design for the skilled nursing facility features two “neighborhoods,” called Butternut Place and Harmony House. Within each are two “households,” with living rooms and fireplaces, dining rooms and wellness centers for exercise and therapy. Butternut Place and Harmony House are mirror images of each other with a “Main Street” hallway between. The Main Street extends through the administrative area and into the assisted living facility, which will be named Lawson Manor after the historic name for that area of Luck. Both neighborhoods and the assisted living center are built around an outside courtyard, with resident rooms around the outside providing plenty of natural light in all areas of the building. Each of the rooms, including the four double rooms on The kitchen and dining area in the 16-bed assisted-living center features the corners, have private bathrooms natural light and openness. - Photos by Mary Stirrat with plenty of space for maneuvering. “It’s designed for today’s nursinghome residents,” said Valentine. The current home was built in the 1950s, he noted, when wheelchairs, walkers, electronic devices and other items were not so common. Groundbreaking for the project was just last September, so the $10 million project will be completed in about one year.

RIGHT: A worker on stilts prepares to do some mudding in the assistedliving area of the new facility. The area consists of 16 private rooms, each with a bathroom. It is being built to accommodate a 16-room addition in the future.

This area will be the therapy room at United Pioneer Home’s new facility.

Called Lawson Manor, the assisted-living facility at United Pioneer Home’s new building is constructed as a triangle with a courtyard in the middle. The design allows abundant natural lighting, easy walking and convenience for residents, said UPH Administrator Dan Valentine.

Plan will affect 2012 election

New Polk districts go to county board

by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – A proposed redistricting of the Polk County Board will go to the May meeting of the county board. The organizational committee approve the plan at its meeting Tuesday, May 3. The plan adjusts the boundaries of the 23 county board districts to make them more equal in population using the 2010 census numbers. The tentative plan, when approved by the full board, will be reviewed

by the public and by the municipal governments. A final plan must be adopted by next fall and will be in effect for the April 2012 county board election. Under the proposed plan, there are no boundary changes for three of the present districts, slight changes for 12 districts and more major changes for eight districts. Most of the boundary changes occur in the southwest and southern parts of the county. A district in Garfield, the present District 16, moves more to the west. Most of Black Brook would now be in one district. The Town of Osceola saw the largest growth in population, and the districts in that town will now be smaller in size.

In the north, Frederic and West Sweden decreased in population. To correct for that, all of West Sweden will now be in one district together with Frederic. That triggers changes to the districts in the northeast corner of the county. The new District One would keep Clam Falls and Lorain, lose Bone Lake and add McKinley and Johnstown. Bone Lake and Georgetown plus a corner of the Town of Milltown would now be a district. Under the proposed lines only two incumbents would be in the same district, and only one district would have no incumbent board member. The possible contest would be in the new Black Brook

district, home to Supervisors Russ Arcand and Larry Voelker. The open seat would be centered in Garfield. The organizational committee approved the plan, one of three options under discussion, after a short discussion. In was noted that the plan, option B, offered the closest population numbers to the ideal district size of 1,922 residents and divided municipal boundaries the least. A map of the proposed district lines and population totals for the new districts will be in a future edition of the Leader.

by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – A 19-year-old Wyoming , Minn., man is facing charges of criminal damage to property and disorderly conduct for allegedly damaging a historic structure on the National Historic Registry at Interstate State Park in St. Croix Falls. Kyle Phillips is accused of climbing to the roof of the fabled Horizon Rock Shelter and tearing off several cedar shake shingles and throwing them below for

fun, where a Wisconsin DNR conservation officer was below him, witnessing the whole affair. Phillips is also accused of throwing small rocks down at cars below. According to the police report, the officer was on a routine foot patrol in the late afternoon on Friday, April 29, when he heard a commotion, laughter and a loud snap from near the shelter, which is quite high up above the roadway, and requires a tenuous, 80-foot trek up stone steps and a trail. The officer said he saw three individu-

als and Phillips on the roof of the shelter, with one of the females using her camera phone to take video of Phillips as he threw the broken-off shakes from atop the structure, which came crashing down below. The officer also noted seeing golfballsized rocks being rained down upon the trail, just missing several vehicles traveling below. The DNR warden confronted the four individuals, and placed them under his custody, arresting Phillips and transporting him to the Polk County Jail in Balsam

Lake. He also seized the woman’s camera phone as evidence. Phillips is facing a felony charge of criminal damage to state-owned land, as well as misdemeanor disorderly conduct. No other charges have been filed against the others in the group. He was released on a $500 signature bond, and has a preliminary hearing set for May 23 before Judge Benjamin Proctor in Polk County Circuit Court.

to do. West drove out of the ditch and past the witnesses. A branch was sticking out from West’s vehicle from when it was in the ditch, and as West drove by, it struck one of the witnesses. The witnesses called 911 and followed West’s vehicle south on CTH E. They said West drove “from ditch to ditch, all over the road.” At the intersection of CTH E and 305th

Avenue, the witnesses used their vehicle to box in West’s vehicle and took the keys away from her. Police then arrived on the scene. West admitted she was drunk. She was not able to perform field sobriety tests due to extreme impairment as well as a recent leg surgery. West was given a Breathalyzer, which registered .295 and was arrested. She reportedly told the officer several times that

she got drunk because it was the anniversary of her husband’s death. Other OWI arrests this week included: • Patricia Michaelson, 62, Milltown, on Saturday, April 30, first offense; • Tomas Laboda, 24, Luck, on Saturday, May 1, first offense. — with information from the Polk County Sheriff’s Dept.

Historic structure vandal busted at park

Block drunk driver from continuing dangerous driving

POLK COUNTY - Anita West, 65, was arrested and charged with OWI, sixth offense, on Friday, April 29, after going in the ditch on CTH EE near CTH E. Passersby saw West in the ditch. They knew her and pulled over to decide what

Witnesses stop drunk driver


New Centuria board asks for an extension

MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 5

Board vacancy, health insurance quandary addressed at special meeting

by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer CENTURIA – The newly assembled Centuria Village Board took the reins at a special meeting on Monday, April 25, where new Trustees Phil Nehring, Rod Peterson and Stan Swiontek made their debut, while incumbent Trustee Dave Markert slid into the village president role from the recent election. Markert’s move into the president’s chair left a vacancy, to which he appointed outgoing Trustee Steve Sylvester to fill the remainder of his term. The board approved several committee assignment changes, while also approving the continuance of the Web committee, which also had several vacancies filled, two of which by village employee Karen Edgell and Nehring. The meeting was also called into question by incumbent Trustee Ryan Davison, who questioned the need for a special meeting, citing a section of the village code that stated the organizational meeting was to be held either on the third Tuesday in April or at the regular monthly meeting in May. Markert said they can call

special meetings “as needed,” and decided to address the board orientation and organization at the special meeting. The board passed several changes to the village Web site, including removing some employee information - such as the health insurance policy information and benefits info - and discontinuing the former village domain, as they have a new official site. The agenda also included addressing the controversial ongoing issue of how to deal with village employee health insurance, and specifically the since-halted payment in lieu of health insurance quandary that was the final salvo passed by the last board. Markert was an outspoken advocate for keeping the system intact, at least until the current budgetary cycle is complete, in spite of warnings from state officials that they cannot practice reimbursement in lieu of coverage while under the state health insurance contract. Continuing the practice risked overall village health insurance coverage. The previous board halted the practice at the April meeting, but left the door open for allowing village employees a way to opt in to the system, midstream. However, the item was not on the April agenda, and no action could be taken. There was much discussion on the issue and how to deal with it, with the board passing a motion to send a certified letter

to the Department of Employee Trust Funds stating that the village will discontinue paying the employees a premium reimbursement effective, but that they would like to restart the practice until Jan. 1, 2012, when the new village budget goes into effect. The motion passed with Davison as the only one opposed to the action. Markert will draft a letter. However, the issue is murky at best, as the village received a letter in late February warning them they had 60 days to “take action” to stop the practice or risk possible legal action and/or dropped coverage, which could cost the village thousands of dollars. That letter came from Gary Fox of the state of Wisconsin Department of Employee Trust Funds, who noted that the village has been under contract with the state public employers health group insurance program since October 1989 and that the contract specifically stated that they may not make cash payouts. Fox told them they had to stop the practice immediately, “... you are hereby given notice to cease the practice of paying cash in lieu of health insurance participation. You have 60 days to change your policy and present evidence of that change to the department.” Until several days ago, the village Web site outlined the practice on health insur-

ance policy, “... The Village will offer health insurance policies negotiated by the State for employees of local units of government, and will pay toward the cost as follows: 100 percent single person coverage, or $390 in lieu of single person coverage if the employee does not take health insurance because they are under their spouse’s family policy (for which documentation must be provided), and 100 percent of the lowest cost family policy offered by the State in Polk County. The Village will provide per-tax payment of all eligible insurance taken by each employee under the provisions of the section 125 Premium-only plan.” Markert had contested last month that the board only had to act on the policy, which they did, but not stop it completely. In effect, that is what they are asking the state to let them resume, since their budgets were already set when the practice was halted. Whether or not the employee trust fund agency will allow the village to go out of compliance for another seven months remains to be seen. The board will meet again on Friday, May 13, for their regular meeting, but it is unclear if they will have an answer that soon from Fox on the payment in lieu of coverage issue.

New greenhouse opens in Milltown

Jobs for disabled adults, plants for public

by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer MILLTOWN – A state-of-the-art greenhouse and retail store had its grand opening Tuesday, May 3, in Milltown. The Endeavors greenhouse sells plants, flowers and wild bird products while providing employment and job skills for adults living with disabilities. The store and greenhouse, located in the Milltown industrial park south of Hwy. 35, is open seven days a week year-round. The Endeavors store grows and sells plants and flowers according to the seasons. It now offers vegetables and flowers for spring/summer planting. In addition, it sells the wild bird seed and related products that it continues to sell at its center in Balsam Lake. All the products are the work of the clients of Endeavors. The new greenhouse is the result of federal stimulus dollars at work, said Diana Manning at the opening. Manning, executive director of Endeavors Adult Development Center, said she started seeking funds for the project over two years ago. The goal was to create a space that could provide skills training and employment for more of the community individuals with disabilities while generating money to cover the operating and training expenses.

A large gathering of officials, local, state and federal, joined with Endeavors staff and workers for the opening of the greenhouse. The new facility was built with federal stimulus money. – Photos by Gregg Westigard

Manning said the recession has hurt the Endeavors clients. Endeavors has contracted with local employers for its work product program to provide crews for packaging, assembly, mailing and other services. But employment cutbacks have resulted in less jobs and skills training for

The Endeavors greenhouse grows the plants for sale at the shop and provides jobs for adults living with disabilities.

its clients. The new greenhouse provides an alternative program. There are many partners in the project. The village of Milltown provided the 5.74 acres of land in the industrial park. Milltown Village President Lou Ann White said the village has provided land to new businesses to bring jobs and revenue to the village. Funding, grants and a loan, was obtained through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (stimulus

funds). The funds were obtained through the Wisconsin Department of Commerce and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development Program. In addition, there were grants from the Otto Bremer Foundation, the Focus on Energy program and Polk-Burnett Electric Co-op’s Roundup program. The total project budget, including the land value, is over $1 million, Manning says.

The Endeavors greenhouse is on Industrial Drive in Milltown.


Quiet meeting in Dresser

PAGE 6 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

by Tammi Milberg Leader Staff Reporter DRESSER – A relatively quiet meeting was held Monday, May 2, in Dresser by the village trustees. Items on the agenda were quickly acted upon and lightly discussed. One of those agenda items was to confirm the committee appointments for 2011-2012 made by village President Rick Flandrena. Flandrena noted he contacted all of the committee members and did not hear from anyone regarding changes or removal from committees, so the appointments for this year will stay the same as last year. The motion to confirm the committee appointments carried with all in favor. In other business, the board looked at bids that were opened earlier in the day for 2011 road maintenance for chip seal-

ing. The low bid came from Scott Construction. The board members discussed the bid and made a motion to accept the bid with the condition that the aggregate be a direct purchase, and the bidder accepts that condition. That motion carried with a roll call vote. The board deferred updating the Polk County Hazard Mitigation Plan and the Dresser Emergency Plan to the public welfare committee to work on along with the fire department if they are interested in helping out. The board reviewed a schedule of license applications that will be considered for approval at the June board meeting. No action was taken at this time. The board approved a reduction in rental fees for the village hall as per a request from the workforce Resource in Balsam Lake who plans on holding a job fair

Wednesday and Thursday, June 15-16, at the village hall. The original rental fee for the hall is $400, and there is a cleaning fee of $75. The board agreed to reduce the rental fee to $100 and include the cleaning fee charge of $75 for the job fair stating that the job fair will benefit the area. The motion carried to make the reduced rate offer to the Workforce Resource with all voting in favor. The board declined a request for giving a donation to the St. Croix Falls High School Senior Graduation Party. Board member Jim Rochford Jr. stated that he felt the requests for donations should go to the private sector and that there are plenty of businesses that would likely contribute. No action was taken. The board was updated that their property insurance renewal price had gone

down from the previous year. There was a question by board member Greg Andrie if the village is keeping up with dropping values in property and asked the clerk to look into it with the insurance company. Police Officer Ryan Haass reported that there was an increase in citations for the last month. He also noted the budget will be used for new squad car tires that were supposed to go on the vehicle for winter, but were unavailable and recently installed this spring. He added that the light bar for the squad car needs new lights at a cost of $60 per light, and there are five that need replacing. The next regular meeting is Monday, June 6, at 6:30 p.m.

Grantsburg High School awarded $2,500 Science Education Award

Grantsburg High School was awarded the 2011 Science Education Award from Alion Science and Technology Corp. on Tuesday, May 3. GHS science teachers, Jennie Storby and Matt Berg, and GHS Principal Stan Marczak accepted the award from Alion Science and Technology Corp.’s chief scientist, Eric Peterson, and project engineer, Melissa Anderson. – Photo by Priscilla Bauer

science and technology programs. Peterson said many communities suffer from “small-town brain drains” as their youth leave to seek technology jobs in other areas. “Alion wants to show high school students there are opportunities for them in their own communities.” Alion Science and Technology Corp., an employee-owned technology solutions company with offices worldwide, has an office in Grantsburg. Alion was formed in December 2002 when approximately 1,600 employees of the IIT Research Institute, founded in 1936, purchased substantially all of the assets of IITRI creating a 100-percent Employee Stock Ownership Plan-owned company. The company delivers technical expertise and operational support to the Department of Defense, civilian government agencies and commercial customers with an excellent reputation for being a highly technical and imaginative resource for Army aviation and missile platform designs.

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by Priscilla Bauer Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – Grantsburg High School Principal Stan Marczak and the school’s two science teachers, Matt Berg and Jennie Storby, accepted the 2011 Science Education Award from Alion Science and Technology Corp.’s chief scientist, Eric Peterson, and project engineer, Melissa Anderson, on Tuesday, May 3, at the high school. While the grant may be used to improve programs in any academic area, Marczak said the $2,500 grant will be used to purchase needed items in the science area. In a written congratulation to Marczak and the school, Alion’s chief operating officer and executive vice president, Stacy Mendler, expressed Alion’s dedication to building stronger communities in areas were the company does business or has offices. According to Mendler, Alion has always been a strong supporter of science, technology, engineering and math education programs and provides grants annually to schools nationwide to help improve their

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A party of bluebirds

MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 7

The Ole Randall family has made assembling bluebird houses a tradition

by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – There appears to be no official name for a collective group of bluebirds, which is unfortunate. A group of bluejays is called a scold, but bluebirds seem to have no such creative fun, with only a band or even a party of bluebirds being the most common usage. But watching their homes being assembled by a member of the Randall clan might reinforce or support the party-ofbluebirds term. The Randalls turn helping a kid assemble a bluebird house into a Zenlike process of care. They all know the routine, and keep their grins as they use the jigs, blocks and assemble the various pieces like they’ve been doing it all their life which they most likely have been doing. “Yeah, I’ve been doing it for 11 years at Sportsman’s Show,” stated Ole Randall of Luck, who added later that he’s actually been building bluebird houses for much, much longer. Under Randall’s guidance, he has been creating thousands of little wooden apartments for bluebirds and their kin for over a quarter century. And every year, Randall uses donated wood, handmade templates and many dozens of hours to make the parts for at least 300 more birdhouses for the annual Polk County Sportsman’s Show. Randall and his wife, Judy, and their adult children, Brian, Bruce and his wife Nancy, and even Randall’s grandkids help the assembly efforts. Even a potential future in-law takes part, as Elizabeth Knapp admits, noting she is the “only non-Randall” involved, “at least for the time being ... I’m working on it.” In spite of blustery, cold weather, the last of the 300 Randall bluebird houses for 2011

Bluebird homes No. 298, 299 and 300. Pictured (L to R): Brandon Hostrup, Devin Saenz and Cody Aamold show off the bluebird homes the Randall family helped them build at the Polk County Sportshow on Sunday, May 1. – Photos by Greg Marsten were put together in the waning moments of the Sportshow on Sunday, May 1. “Not bad for just two days,” Randall said as the final houses get the finishing touches by kids at the show. He creates the critical pieces throughout the winter, using donated wood and templates he’s made, and even creating a jig for where to drill out holes, so kids can basically just tack the little nails in around the blocks that act like a cobbler’s shoe form, allowing the houses to be framed up by another Randall family member, who then helps a local kid finish the little house with a few well-placed nails. “I hope we’ve helped the bluebird population!” Randall jokes with a huge grin, as he watches houses number 297 through 300 come together. Randall has made the bluebird house into something his family can put together in their sleep. “I’ve gotten pretty good at it, that’s for sure!” states Eric Randall, Ole’s grandson. He is forming house 299 around one of his grandfather’s assembly block templates for Cody Aamold of Luck, getting it so

Sam Negus, 7, of Scandia, Minn. shows off his focus as he attempts to build a bluebird house at the Sportshow. Nancy Randall lends some assistance to the build.

Aamold only needs to bang a couple of nails in to make it complete, with a Randall using a screw gun for the final touch of an access door. “That’s for cleaning it out,” Eric tells the Luck youngster, explaining that he only needs to use a Phillips screwdriver to open the door. “Hey, that’s cool,” Aamold said as he pins the final finishing nail, and Eric screws the door shut. Aamold and friends discuss where they plan on placing their houses, even suggesting they might paint them up a little. “Remember, they’re used to nesting in trees,” Randall reminds them, gently suggesting they might want to keep the paint to a minimum, or at least paint them to look like a tree. He keeps his grin and offers a little wink to show it was just a suggestion. Randall even gave some of the kids a little bluebird primer, explaining that to draw the sought-after thrushes, the houses are best placed near the edge a of large, open field or meadow, but admitting that it will draw attention from at least some bird, if not a bluebird. The Randall bluebird house effort is part of a national trend to reverse previous de-

Ole Randall of Luck has been building bluebird homes for over a quarter century, and for over a decade has created the components for 300 homes annually for kids to assemble at the Polk County Sportshow.

clines in bluebird populations, first noticed in the 1970s. Efforts to reduce that trend for one of the only native American thrushes are reportedly starting to truly pay off, as they compete for nesting space with starlings and sparrows. “I’d like to think we’ve helped a few birds over the years,” Randall said with that big, infectious grin. Doing the easy math, it seems a true understatement, as Randall and crew have moved that recovery effort as much as anyone, helping kids and a few adults build at least 3,300 birdhouses in over a decade at the Polk County Sportshow - with the club’s moniker stamped prominently on the front of each house as proof. “It’s fun for the kids to help them make something,” Randall said, “it also keeps me busy ... but really, we do it all for the sportsman’s club!” A party of bluebirds, it is.

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PAGE 8 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

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• Words from the editor •

• Joe Heller •

We‘re part of it

From San Francisco to Boston, words about Osama bin Laden’s death were appearing in 72-point type this week. In New York City the Post’s front page blared “Got him! Vengeance at last - U.S. nails the bast***” and the Daily News headline gave this message: “Rot in H***!” We’re assuming New Yorkers like less subtlety and more bluntness. And bin Laden was known to be the mastermind of the 9/11 terrorist attack in that city, although that unimaginable event transcended geography. “Where’s your story on the Web site?” someone asked us - and it’s difficult to explain how redundant it would be for a small weekly to delve into an international story already inundating every corner of the world. But we were curious enough to ask for local reaction on our Facebook page. One reader posted comments that served to remind us that although we’re a small community somewhere in the middle of North America, - we’re hardly isolated from world news. Sharon Pilsner wrote that she was friends with one of the victims of 9/11 – Dean Mattson. “We were in the Class of ‘62 at Luck School, and Dean was a friend to all,” she wrote. Mattson was at work at the Pentagon on the morning of 9-11. And others will remember that 38-year-old Tom Burnett Jr. was among those on Flight 93 who stormed hijackers in the cockpit of the plane. A Bloomington, Minn. native, he and his father had been to their cabin in Burnett County just a few days before 9/11. Those local connections make our world smaller - and the news a bit more real and meaningful. It’s a wake-up call telling us that we’re not just spectators, watching the news from afar.

Another storm story ... but it’s ours

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• Where to write • President Barack Obama 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Washington, D.C. 20500 www.whitehouse.gov/contact/ Gov. Scott Walker Wisconsin State Capitol Madison, WI 53707 transition@wisconsin.gov

Congressman Sean Duffy (7th District) 1208 Longworth House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 202-225-3365

U.S. Sen. Herb Kohl 330 Hart Senate Office Bldg. Washington, D.C. 20510 715-832-8492 senator_kohl@kohl.senate.gov

Rep. Erik Severson (28th District) Room 6 North State Capitol Madison, WI 53708 608-267-2365 • 888-529-0028 FAX: 608-282-3628 rep.Severson@legis.state.wi.us Rep. Roger RIvard (75th District) State Capitol Room 307 North P.O. Box 8952, Madison, WI 608-266-2519 • 888-534-0075 rep.rivard@legis.wi.gov U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson 2 Russell Courtyard Washington, D.C. 20510 202-224-5323

Sen. Robert Jauch (25th District) Room 415 South, State Capitol P.O. Box 7882, Madison, WI 53707 Sen.Jauch@legis.state.wi.us Sen. Sheila Harsdorf (10th District) State Capitol, P.O. Box 7882 Madison, WI 53707 608-266-7745 • 715-232-1390 Toll-free - 800-862-1092 sen.harsdorf@legis.state.wi.us

Rep. Nick Milroy (73rd District) Room 8 North, State Capitol P.O. Box 8953, Madison 53708 rep.milroy@legis.state.wi.us

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T H E

Sunflowers sprouted up everywhere in the torn-up path of the June 18, 2001 tornado that devastated a good portion of southern Burnett County. It’s a point not overlooked by organizers of a special event to mark the 10th anniversary of the F-3 tornado, titled “A day of change - a day of thanksgiving.” They’ve chosen the sunflower as the centerpiece of a logo that includes an outline of Burnett County encircled by the names of the towns affected by the storms. Details of the June 18 event will be forthcoming in future issues of the Leader. Organizers have rightly chosen to focus on the human element - the triumphant spirits of individuals and overwhelming generosity that made it possible to rebuild lives, homes and communities in the wake of that horrific Monday evening. “Thank God for these people ...” was the title of a story that the Leader published just a week following the tornado. “I’ve been crying all day,” Allene Peterson was quoted as saying. “Not for my loss, but for these people. Thank God for them.” A crew of workers had been working all morning to help Allene and her husband clear away debris from their home which was sitting isolated at the end of a halfmile-long driveway in the Town of Dewey, not far from where three people lost their lives. The Red Cross, the DNR, the St. Croix Tribe, neighbors and other volunteers - including a crew of volunteers from Maxwell Heating and Plumbing in Luck - were there to help. In the minutes and hours after the tornado struck, the small village of Siren was lit only by lights from emergency vehicles, flashlights and portable lights powered by generators. The village was closed down to traffic by authorities and those who were there stepped carefully over downed power lines while searching for people trapped in homes. If that scene wasn’t surreal enough, you can imagine the picture in the rural areas of Burnett County that evening. It didn’t take until daylight for help to arrive in many cases. One of the more powerful moments came when a group of teenagers paused briefly in a parking lot in Siren to pose for a group photo before heading out on their next search-and-rescue effort. Less than 90 minutes had elapsed since the tornado had struck, and they had traveled from Herzl Camp north of Webster to Siren, chain saws and shovels at the ready, hoping to find someone to help. That’s the spirit that carried through the following year - and for years after that as people rebuilt their lives with thenelp first from family, friends and neighbors, then from bigger entities such as the Red Cross and government grants. The Leader is publishing a special section in June - not just to remind readers of the devastation, as we’ve been seeing so many similar events in recent weeks – but to also remind us of how far the community in southern Burnett County has come and how it got through it all with grace, spirit - and yeah, even humor at times. This is our storm story - and everyone is hoping the stories we’ve been seeing in the news lately can eventually claim a recovery similar to our’s. If you have a story or photograph to share about the 2001 tornado, please e-mail us at the-leader@centurytel.net by June 1. Editorials by Gary King

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Leader encourages readers to submit letters to the editor. All letters may be edited for length, clarity, grammatical accuracy and stylistic consistency. Letters more than 400 words in length may be returned to the writer for editing. Submitted letters should include the writer’s full name, address, daytime phone number and e-mail address (if available). E-mailed letters are preferred. Letters may be sent to the-leader@centurytel.net or mailed to Inter-County Leader, Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837.

I N T E R - C O U N T Y

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• Letters to the editor • Conservation alone won’t do it

Get used to high gas prices. Until we get an administration that recognizes that this great country runs on oil and not wind, solar and other “green” energy, high oil prices are here to stay. The Obama administration could be keeping the price of gasoline high to promote the green-energy agenda. President Obama said he wants to put the coal industry out of business and has put moratoriums on drilling for oil and wants us to drive electric vehicles. Try pulling your boat, camper or load of firewood with your electric car. Recently Obama “urged” OPEC to increase the supply of oil. Now really, do you think urging will get the job done? Obama also is supporting Brazil with our tax dollars for oil production. Does Obama think urging OPEC and supporting Brazil’s oil production will bring down oil prices by increasing supply? Wouldn’t you think our own increase in production would do the same? It has been said we have more untapped oil than the Middle East does. Conservation will not power our country, our vehicles, generate electricity, heat our homes or power our factories. When fuel prices reach a level we cannot afford, Obama will succeed in selling us his green alternative. As far as global goes, I have many carbon credits I will sell you because you are going to need them with all the wood burning that is going to take place to keep warm even during this global warming. Mark Pettis Hertel

Need versus greed

Listening to Assemblyman Seversen at the St. Croix Falls City Hall, it became obvious to most of us that he has no concept of what it takes to represent our community. “Who do you really work for?” was the question left unanswered. The obligatory town hall he conducted was punctuated by evasion, denial and a complete and total disregard for the livelihoods at stake under the governor’s budget proposal. When directly asked about his position on selling public utilities, his response was that he was studying the issue. He already voted for the bill! When asked what he suggested we do about the $53,000 cut in local government aid normally allocated to the city, his first response was, “How about the street department?” When told that they had already spent it all plowing snow, he suggested, “Then how about next year’s budget?” When confronted with the fact that police and fire budgets are off limits, he responded, “We’re working on that.” So in order to save a few extra bucks in our wallets, we had better pray for a better winter than we just suffered through. And if he and his cronies abolish the budget protection for fire and police, we will just have to give up some of our safety and security. “Why should I tell you how I think?” he said. Because we need to know if you truly represent us or are just another lackey for the extremists newly in power. So far it doesn’t look good, but we will be watching you vote by vote. Al Kruger St. Croix Falls

Infl fla ammatory

The Wednesday, April 27, edition of the Inter-County Leader published an announcement of the candidacy of Pat Kreitlow for the 7th District U.S. Representative seat. The article consisted of a brief introduction and then quoted extensively from Kreitlow’s literature. This copy contains obvious misstatements and dangerous overstatements designed to inflame emotions. Isn’t printing quoted copy from the campaign a bit like giving free advertisement? Surely as someone with a Bachelor of Arts in journalism, Kreitlow should know better than to say that a vote is one to

MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 9

“blow up Medicare” and that his opponent “wants to give seniors a lame coupon and a shove back into the health insurance shark tank” and that he wishes to “turn back this new war on the middle class.” This kind of inflammatory language, laced with killing metaphors, could cause the near riots such as those we have observed in Madison and the shooting in Arizona where six died and 13 were left wounded. Enough already, can’t we all just get along? Cletus J. Tauer Luck

Are we like frogs?

The frog in the pan of cold water (or unawareness of change). Old untrue fable, however, good for an analogy. If you place a frog in a pan of hot water, it will jump to safety. However, if you place a frog in a pan of cool water and gradually turn up the heat underneath it, the frog will perish as it fails to perceive the danger from the slowly heating water. The heat is taxes, fees and regulations on us. If we also drain the water out of the pan at the same time, as the heat is going up, death occurs sooner. The water is our freedoms. Are freedoms being taken away? Are we going to be like the frog? What is freedom? Tune in next week. A croaking frog in Trade Lake. Rich Hess Trade Lake

More union coersion

I can no longer sit on the sideline and read all the pro-union rubbish that appeared in the Wednesday, April 27, Leader condemning duly elected Sen. Harsdorf and our other senators in Wisconsin which are doing the job they were elected to do. Obviously this flurry of trashy letters is an organized national union propaganda campaign that is part of the greedy national union movement that isn’t interested in paying off but adding to Wisconsin’s debt left by Walker’s predecessor. State employee unions only purpose today is to support the nation’s union mafia and their goon squads that have been prowling all over our capital making themselves as obnoxious as possible. Also, with Wisconsin education dropping to ninth place in the world since the union came to power, it is high time to get rid of them! Who are they to tell us how much salary and benefits we can afford to pay anyone, and we need to reward those teachers that are doing a good job and fire those that aren’t. I have been involved with federal unions managing eight field offices in the eastern half of Michigan with a total of approximately 75 employees which were all unionized, so I do know quite a lot about federal unions. Although I was the thirdlevel supervisor, I was the only one that could take significant disciplinary action. Although they were all union members, not a single union man came to the rescue of any employee. The federal unions are of absolutely no value because they have nothing to bargain for. In too many cases the radical unions came into a field office, and after giving them a hardline speech, they were afraid not to join the union. I witnessed a case where a federal union goon squad came to organize one of our FAA sector offices, and the one technician that would not join the union was harassed to the point he committed suicide. Now in addition to the huge debt Gov. Doyle left behind, unions are imposing millions of additional debt on recall elections, court cases and recounting the Supreme Court judge vote. Hopefully, Gov. Walker will lay off enough incompetent troublemaker teachers to pay for all the additional expenses they forced on us. If the teachers are professional as they claim, they would be a nonunion professional organization working to improve our education system rather than signing on to the union’s multicultural program. Being ninth place in the world we have to make some drastic changes now. Perhaps they should take note of the fact that

professional engineers and other professional groups are nonunion and concentrate on the betterment of their profession. Sam Jones Siren

Response

In Mr. Kleiss’ recent letter to the editor, he stated that Walker is further reducing salaries and benefits of the teachers. Not so. He is only asking teachers to pay a small portion of their benefits. Most Wisconsin taxpayers pay into their own benefit package and have been quite generous to also pay into the teachers benefit package as well. Also, Walker will allow teachers the option of being a union member or not. Those who choose not to will save a substantial amount of salary by not having to pay union dues. He stated that teachers have been hit hard by budgets. Everyone has been hit hard by budgets, and everyone has had to make financial adjustments. Kleiss states that one cannot think teachers are overpaid. Nobody has said that, however, teachers are paid well for 180 days of work. I cannot think of any teachers living substandard due to low salary and benefits as with some folks in the surrounding counties. Some in our local districts make in the $50,000 salary range with another $30,000 in benefits. He states he is worried we won’t have teachers in the future and students will have to be taught via a monitor. Walker’s goal is to put the best teachers in the classroom. Under tenure that is not always the case, and a poor teacher unable to properly do his or her job will hurt Kleiss’ search for quality engineering students. If Kleiss hires an engineer who turns out to be less capable than what he thought, will he terminate that engineer or is that engineer protected by tenure? Kleiss states that Sheila’s Harsdorf’s solution will hurt the business climate. On the contrary, status quo hurts the business climate. High taxes, reckless spending and not dealing with the deficit will hurt the business climate. In states where there are no teachers union, students perform well, teachers are paid well and have good benefits, and many get bonuses. School boards have many more options to present to teachers if there is no union representative telling them what they can or cannot do. If the local school districts were to offer teachers a very good package, the union rep from some other town has the power to veto it. Does this make sense? And, as to Harsdorf ignoring her constituents, that is very debatable. The election last fall, and the Prosser election, shows the voters and taxpayers of Wisconsin favor more freedoms for teachers and local boards, and a Legislature and governor that will act responsibly and work to get Wisconsin’s fiscal situation back into a pro-business, pro-resident state. As our current president is proud of saying “Elections have consequences.” Richard Hartung Dresser

Do you hear me now?

My op-ed byline writings have been published with some frequency on these pages since I took up residence in northern Polk County, Town of Clam Falls, some 12 years ago. Then, a homeless veteran awaiting service-related Veterans Administration disability benefits, I sought refuge here on the east shore of Somers Lake asking only for acceptance, peace and understanding. I found myself in a 1950s socio-cultural-political time warp fraught with clannishness, prejudice, outmoded thinking and regressive politics. As might be anticipated, I’ve had feedback over the years from readers, some positive, some negative. I listen closely to all, but mostly to those critical of my offerings. Over these 76 years, I’ve learned, sometimes the hard way, to experience, evaluate and gain from criticism. Thus, the following: As this is written, I’m unable, with any

C O O P E R A T I V E - O W N E D

reasonable right and facility, to safely gain access to my home on 85th Street. Maintenance of the road is a township responsibility and has been a major problem since I came here. The road, despite continuing complaints from others and myself to every level of authority, remains, at this writing, practically impassable. The sheriff has declared that emergency vehicles can still get through, anything short of that there’s no assurance for those of us who must use the road – proceed at one’s own risk. I strongly urge anyone who questions or challenges this allegation to drive the road and confront me if what I report is in error or exaggeration. What I cite here is representative of so many other dysfunctional conditions that prevail in the Town of Clam Falls and which have been the subject of preceding commentaries. I pay my property taxes on time. While I have no deep pockets, I strive to maintain my home and property with due diligence, this while being surrounded by others who obviously have little pride in their holdings. I try to set an example and have been ridiculed for so doing. The community apathy, the intellectual incompetence, ignorance and cynical good-oldboy thugishness of those who officiate in the Town of Clam Falls are notorious throughout the area. The majority of the locals voted for the radical conservatives now attempting to run the show in Madison who are eliminating critical infrastructure and municipal funding. So, lest these words be confusing or less than clear, I put it as simply and directly as I can: Fix the darn road, fix it permanently and fix it now! Bradley Ayers Clam Falls

It’s time

Lurid colors, people screaming, great big capital letters! Here we go again, reading the weekly brochures intended to frighten us to pieces. (One can afford expensive mailers with $50,000 a year in farm subsidies ... or, are friends of very wealthy backers from Wisconsin, Florida or Kansas, for that matter). The proclamation: Taxes are going up up up! Welcome to the world of Sheila Harsdorf, the darling of western Wisconsin who is now the voice of Scott Walker. Sen. Harsdorf has watched the success of her party’s scare tactics. She saw how successfully affordable health care became, “they’re going to pull the plug on gramma.” She may never have dreamed that she would stoop to this, but power is seductive. Didn’t even the devil well know this when he tossed out the third temptation to Christ in the desert? Two recent letters educated us all by regurgitating her rhetoric. Wednesday, April 20 - I wonder how many actually looked up the page she referred to (DOA Budget in Brief, page 52). Obviously, the letter writers have their opinions, and they are not going to get messed up with facts. But, just in case there are a few folks in our part of Wisconsin who are waking up and smelling the coffee, try this on for size. The scare tactic she proposes is that cities and counties will raise property taxes an average of $736 to cover the loss of local government aid. The chart depicts a red line that is reputedly the historical levy limits imposed by Gov. Walker himself. Not even a possibility. But it is true that counties and cities could break the levy limits, but with serious fines resulting. They would be penalized the following year equal to the amount of the excess tax collected. Nobody is proposing that at any level, nor will they, but just the mere idea that it “could” happen makes a winning scare tactic. All she has to do is convince you to spread the word, keep repeating $736 and very soon, you, who simply can’t believe that your much-loved politician would lead you astray, are repeating her words as fact ... at the hairdresser, at the coffee shop, at the tavern, in the newspaper. Face it, neighbors. Harsdorf, after years of public service, is not serving us well. It’s time to recall Sheila Harsdorf. Marilyn Brissett-Kruger St. Croix Falls

N E W S P A P E R


Remembering River

PAGE 10 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

May 7 event supports bereaved parents and local causes

by Mary Stirrat Leader staff writer MILLTOWN — This past Saturday, April 30, was River Daniel Wheeler’s second birthday, and his parents are celebrating in a big way this coming Saturday, May 7. The second-annual River’s Run and Ride Rally will be held at the Milltown Community Center, complete with a petting zoo and kids games, and numerous door prizes and silent auction items. There will also be Bingo, a bake sale, a Cribbage tournament and, of course, the 5K and 10K races for bikers and runners. Like all parents, Ben and Deanna Wheeler wish to honor their little boy on his special day, but they must do it in a different way than most. They have to do it without him. River Daniel died May 6, 2009, taken by sudden infant death syndrome at just 6 days old. His parents established the Rally to keep his memory alive while raising money to help other families who have suffered through the death of a child. ••• With the guidance of a board of directors, funds raised by River’s Run and Ride Rally are divided between River’s Community Uplift Program, Faith’s Lodge and The Compassionate Friends. The idea, said the Wheelers, is to give back to the people and organizations that helped them and their family after the loss of River. River’s Uplift Program helps individuals and organizations in the community in which River would have grown up. In the past six months or so, River’s Uplift Program has contributed gas money to help Unity students visit Milltown’s sister city in Indiana and donated a new bike as a raffle prize for the Spring for SIDS benefit in Grantsburg earlier this month. In addition, four iPods, with iTune gift cards, were donated to Operation Christmas for teenagers, a contribution was made to Milltown’s Kids Night Out, and donations were made to four local benefits. “We’ve also decided to be one of the sponsors for an organization called Ella’s Halo,” said Deanna Wheeler. “They work to make families time in NICU more comfortable.” Ella’s Halo was started in memory of a little girl born premature, and works with neonatal intensive care units in the Twin Cities area to provide books, blankets and CD and DVD players to improve the stay in these units. Faith’s Lodge and The Compassionate Friends are the other two recipients of funds raised through River’s Run and Ride Rally. Both were of great support to the Wheelers as they worked through the grief of River’s death. Located just north of Webster, Faith’s Lodge, as its Web site says, is “a place where parents and families facing the serious illness or death of a child can retreat to reflect on the past, renew strength for the present, and build hope for the future. In its North Woods setting, Faith’s Lodge provides a peaceful escape for families to refresh their minds and spirits while spending time with others who understand what they are experiencing.” Ben and Deanna spent a week at Faith’s Lodge, connecting with other couples that had lost their infant children. Some of the money raised through River’s Run and Ride Rally are used to sponsor others for a stay at Faith’s Lodge, and so far three families have benefited, through this sponsorship, from the hope and inspiration the lodge offers. The Wheelers now volunteer at Faith’s Lodge, serving dinner once a month to the families and couples staying there. A recently received grant from Polk Burnett Electric Cooperative helps defray the cost of the meals. The Compassionate Friends is a nationwide organization that “exists to provide friendship, understanding, and hope to those going through the natural grieving process” that occurs when a child dies.

River Daniel Wheeler died May 6, 2009, but parents Ben and Deanna keep his name and memory alive through an annual event in Milltown that raises money to benefit local causes as well as organizations that help bereaved parents. The 2011 River’s Run and Ride Rally will be this Saturday, May 7, at the Milltown Community Center. – Photo submitted The Wheelers began attending support group meetings held by area chapters, saying, “We felt safe, and the fact that we were sitting in a room full of people who knew exactly how we felt was very comforting.” But the closest chapters were in Clear Lake, Hudson, and Maplewood, Minn., and Ben and Deanna eventually started a chapter in Milltown to help people in this area who are grieving the loss of a child. The Northwoods Chapter of The Compassionate Friends now meets the third Tuesday of each month at Milltown Lutheran Church beginning at 7 p.m. There are no expectations on those who attend, said the Wheelers. People are free to come and participate - or not participate - only as much as they are comfortable. ••• Since River’s death, Ben and Deanna have given birth to another son, Asher, who just turned 13 months old. “We are teaching him about his big brother,” said Ben. As they actively parent young Asher, they continue to seek ways to parent River. The May 7 fundraiser, and the many people and organizations that benefit from it, is a major way they do this. “This gives us a way to keep creating memories of River,” said Deanna. “His scrapbook will have pictures of the River’s Park, the skate park built in his memory, from his first birthday, and pictures of a petting zoo from his second birthday party.” The petting zoo is thanks to Jeanne Alling, high school agriculture teacher at Unity School. Alling is one of numerous people who are making the event possible, said the Wheelers. This year there are sponsors for the event, they said, for which they are very grateful. Schaffer Manufacturing, Creature Works Labs, Kristin Martin Graphic Designer, and Kix Photography are full sponsors, joined by partial sponsors Four Seasons Wood Products, Milltown Community Club, and B&L Caskets and Custom Wood Products. There are more than 70 prizes that will be given away as door prizes, or in a silent auction or raffle. These include everything from gift certificates, merchandise, tools, books and home decorations to autographed Packer and Viking items. There are passes to the Duluth Aquarium and Wild Mountain, rounds of golf, tickets to see Alice Peacock at Festival Theater, and a massage and lunch at Majestic Falls Spa.

The grand opening of River’s Park in Milltown was held last year during the first-annual River’s Run and Ride Rally. The skate park is named after River Wheeler, who died in early May 2009 of sudden infant death syndrome. – Photo submitted

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Ben and Deanna Wheeler with 13-month-old Asher. – Photo courtesy of Kix Photo

Two grand prize items will be raffled separately at the rally, with only 52 tickets sold for each. One prize is two nights at the Firelight Inn, a bed and breakfast in Duluth, including breakfast, a $30 gift certificate at Grandma’s, and a $50 gift certificate for a Vista Fleet harbor cruise. The other prize is two nights at Barker’s Island Inn, with four passes to each of three Superior public museums and a $25 gift certificate to Applebees. The museums that are included are Fairlawn Mansion and Museum, the Old Firehouse and Police Museum, and the SS Meteor. ••• A full list of prizes, along with donation information and online registration for the run and ride race can be found at www.riversrally.org. Also online is a link to make a donation to River’s Run and Ride Rally. The organization is now a 501(c)(3) taxexempt organization, so all contributions are tax-deductible. Registration for the race begins at 8 a.m. Saturday morning, as does a freewill offering breakfast, silent auction bidding, and a bake sale. The race begins at 8:30 a.m. at the community center. Awards will be presented at 10:15 a.m., and first-place winners in the 10K bike race, the 10K run, the 5K bike race, and the 5K run will each receive a cash prize. Bingo will begin at 9 a.m. and raffles will begin at 9:30 a.m. Raffles will be drawn hourly, and prizes will be organized according to which hour they will be drawn. Lunch, for a freewill offering, begins at 11 a.m., along with a Cribbage tournament, the petting zoo, kids games, and “Fair Hair.” The event ends at 3 p.m. ••• Contact information for River’s Run and Ride Rally can be found at www.riversrally.org, or by calling 715-5530212. Information on The Compassionate Friends can be found at www.compassionatefriends.org. For information on the Northwoods Chapter, call Deanna at 715-553-1152 or e-mail her at deanna@riversrally.org. Information on Faith’s Lodge can be found at www.faithslodge.org.

Lioness Club hears CRA speaker

Renee Nanez (R) was welcomed by Marilyn Lemieux (L), president of the Siren Lioness Club at the April meeting of the Lionesses. Nanez, a Burnett County Outreach advocate for the Community Referral Agency, spoke about the horrors of domestic, sexual, elder and child abuse in Burnett and surrounding counties. The meeting was well attended by Lioness members and refreshments were served. - Photo submitted


Balsam Lake Board denies liquor license

MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 11

New board addresses TIF vacancies, millpond liability

A VERY SPECIAL THANK-YOU TO

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from their DNR liaison, which noted that they may have to address dam reclassification beyond the current standards. Balsam Lake Rehabilitation District President Howard Sein said that DNR worst-case scenario “was probably a stretch,” that the village has had “several 500-year floods” in recent years, which they qualified as an 8-inch rainfall in a 24-hour period. “Estimating 1,000-year flood, where do we fit Noah’s Ark in the millpond?” he joked. The issue may be quite serious if the village is forced to upgrade the dam to a much more stringent standard, and while there have been some studies showing that several feet of culvert expansion would not adversely affect the issue, the issue of dam reclassification is taken quite seriously by the DNR, especially since the recently noted Lake Dalton draining after a dam breech. Voltz wondered about village liability on the dam, and while the issue is far from

Returning Balsam Lake Village Board Trustees (L to R) Geno D’Agostino, Mike Voltz and newcomer Josh Hallberg were sworn in by village clerk Lori Duncan prior to the Monday, May 2, busy board meeting.

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Trustee Caroline Rediske asked that the issue be addressed with the formation of a full committee to either advertise, seek or come up with a solution to the vacancies, which reportedly cost the village over $6,000 per month in interest and payments, totaling nearly $240,000 paid so far by village taxpayers. Chamber of Commerce President Chris Nelson was vehement that the village address the issue fast, stating that the village still owes almost $800,000. “I really hope you take this seriously,” Nelson said. “It’s to the point now where we really need to be doing something,” stated Reed, who volunteered to be on the newly formed industrial park committee, which is meant to address the TIF vacancy. Trustee Mike Voltz also agreed to be on the new committee, as did new Trustee Josh Hallberg. There was quite a bit of discussion on whether they wanted just any business in the spaces, such as a storage facility, or did they have to be “job producing” businesses. Village President Guy Williams said they have had some interest in the past, but mainly it fizzled out as “pipe dreams” or that they had better offers of free land from other municipalities. “I’m worried that we’re just spinning our wheels,” Voltz said. The TIF committee will be on the June agenda. • There was much discussion on how to go about the proposed CTH I culvert expansion, which would allow boat traffic into the millpond. However, further concerns have been raised as to whether the culvert expansion or bridge replacement would force the village to upgrade the dam downstream, to address the so-called “1,000-year flood.” The village received a letter raising the possibility

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In other board action : • There was quite a bit of discussion on how to deal with the village’s Tax Incremental District vacancies in TIF No. 3.

There was plenty on the docket to draw a crowd at the Balsam Lake Village Board meeting on Monday, May 2. – Photos by Greg Marsten

534644 25-26a 36-37L

by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – The Balsam Lake Village Board swor in their new trustee, Josh Hallberg, while also meeting for nearly three hours on Monday, May 2, as they addressed a bevy of issues that have surfaced in recent months, including whether to award a Reserve Class B liquor license to the Sip & Soak Bar and Grill at 701 Pearson Road. While the board denied the license, they did leave the door open for future reconsideration, and entertained numerous comments both for and against awarding the license. Several neighbors of the business noted that the location is part of a condominium development, and that they are limited by condo bylaws on certain issues, and that they might need to be addressed before the board reconsiders the action. Also at issue was whether they could place certain restrictions, such as hours, noise levels or even parking concerns if they choose to award the license, which is technically available. Several neighbors seemed to suggest that the license may affect property values and lead to more drunken conduct nearby, especially if they are advertising for more business by land, instead of by water. Issues of public urination, boisterousness and other concerns were common, while others noted that they already serve alcohol, just not hard liquor. Co-owner Nichole McKenzie said they wanted the additional liquor options so they could offer traditional cocktails, as well as beer and wine, and that they have been good business citizens, with no complaints since taking over the business early last year. “Wine, alcohol, booze, it’s all basically the same,” she said. Several neighbors and customers agreed, noting that lake tavern business foibles of the past are just that, from the past, that the Sip & Soak operation has proven their ability to control their customers. Regardless, the motion failed, and even those who voted against it offered to readdress the request as soon as next month, once they can get a few questions cleared up, such as the condo bylaw issues or possible additional village restrictions. “I just don’t want to see this as a future headache for us,” stated Trustee Jeff Reed.

concrete on dam reclassification, they agreed to study it further, with all parties involved. • The board directed the village attorney to address the issue of whether the village park attendant is technically a village employee, since they “split” camping and usage fees with the village. • The board approved four sites for directional signs, including at Hwy. 46 by the north boat landing, at the four corners by the county government complex, Main Street at CTH I and at Juneberry Park. An additional location was removed due to objections from several people who thought directional signs were not appropriate at the welcome sign on the village’s south side. • The board approved a 3-percent water rate increase, beginning this fall, per their auditors recommendations. • The public protection committee outlined several policy decisions and noted they have advertised for a police chief, after being without a police force for several months now. They also agreed to be a member in an organization that will help them craft their policies, using existing policies. • They voted to send a condemnation notice forward to the village attorney at 411 Main St., with a goal to eventually raze the structure, which as been vacant for several years and is falling apart. • There was some disagreement about whether a large sign in a pickup truck qualifies as free speech or if it is technically an off-site directional sign. There were some heated words about the issue, and while no action was taken, the issue may also go before the village attorney. • The chamber of commerce noted several plans for upcoming summer activities, including bands at the beach and movies on the beach using an inflatable screen. The activities will be part of the Fourth of July Freedom Fest weekend and includes canoe races, a car show, craft fair and more.


Insight quarterly report presented to Grantsburg School Board

PAGE 12 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

by Priscilla Bauer Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG - Insight School of Wisconsin Executive Director Karl Peterson presented ISWI’s quarterly report to the Grantsburg School Board at their Tuesday, April 26, meeting. Peterson began by telling the board of ISWI’s support of school and community events and organizations including History Day, Career Day, the Men of Tomorrow lunch, the Mayor’s Breakfast, Grantsburg Rotary and the Grantsburg Area Chamber. “We try to be involved in and support school and community activities as much as possible,” Peterson told the board. Peterson went on to report ISWI’s enrollment is currently at 380 full-time students. ISWI also has part-time students enrolled from Grantsburg, Luck, Siren and Hillsboro school districts. Next year, ISWI will add parttime students from the Sparta and Royal districts. Later, when asked to comment on how this year’s enrollment compared to the previous year, Peterson said enrollment was down this year but was hopeful next year it would increase. Peterson noted two state Senate bills, which if passed, could help to increase ISWI enrollment. A provision in Senate Bill 22 seeks to eliminate the enrollment cap of 5,250 for virtual charter schools. “We feel removal of the cap is important,” Peterson told the board. Senate Bill 2 would expand the open enrollment period. Peterson said the extension was very necessary to have families understand and have time to make decisions in the open enrollment process.

Peterson said he was excited to report on the increase in student reading test scores from 79 percent to 86 percent and the even more dramatic increase from 59 percent to 72 percent in math scores. Student participation remains high at 98 percent, Peterson told the board, with more than 75 percent of the students planning to attend post secondary schools. Peterson said currently open enrollment for the coming school year is at 1,300 but told the board those numbers would change since students are allowed to enroll in up to three schools and not all would be choosing ISWI. Peterson said plans for the ISWI prom and graduation have had to be modified due to the high cost of gasoline. “Parents are telling us they simply can’t afford to travel to these events.” Peterson said an open house in Eau Claire is being planned for those not able to make the Saturday, June 4, graduation ceremony in Madison. “It won’t be a graduation ceremony, but we will hand them their diploma and recognize their achievement,” said Peterson.

In other board business David Ahlquist and Cindy Jensen were sworn in as members of the Grantsburg School Board at the board’s meeting. Ahlquist and Jensen, both incumbents, were returned to the board in the April 5 election. John Dickinson, the new village pool manager, appeared before the board to express thanks for the $5,000 donation to the pool repair project. Members of the board will be attending a staff handbook-writing workshop. The handbook is intended to re-

place the collective bargaining agreement. The board heard updates on two construction projects, the unit ventilators replacement project at the elementary school and repair of the middle school sinkhole. Demolition of the heating pipes at the GES will be done on May 13, with salvage removal on Saturday, May 21. Substantial completion date for the project will be Thursday, June 30, with final completion set for Friday, Aug. 12. Bids for the repair of the middle school parking lot sinkhole were received. The board voted to accept the low bid of $4,200 from Wayne Lake Construction. The project will be completed as soon as possible. Jesse Byers, the district’s technology director/network administrator, presented bids for network core switches. Byers told the board the network hasn’t had any upgrades for several years, and the center or core of the network, where the servers are, is a good place to start. “The infrastructure is a good place to start upgrading,” Byers told the board. “The new equipment will give the capability to provide higher speeds.” Byers said the $15,470 cost of the upgrading equipment would come from designated technology funds and the district technology budget. Superintendent Burgin reminded the board providing funds to meet the growing technology demands would be a challenge in the future as the administration and board look at building “leaner and meaner” budgets in years to come. The board approved the resignation of Shana Josephson, the K-6 music education teacher.

All buttoned up for Big Gust Days

Button winners announced for Grantsburg’s June 3-5 community event

by Priscilla Bauer Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – Grantsburg Area Chamber Vice President Penny Nissen, of the Holiday store, announced the winners of the annual Big Gust Days button contest last week. First-place button design winner was Dianna Olson. Emily Virgilio, was the second-place winner, and Jessica Hoffman received honorable mention. Each contestant received gift cards from Holiday, Amoco/BP and the Grantsburg Country Store for their winning designs. Grantsburg High School art instructor Jeremy Tomczak coordinated the contest, which was open to all interested Grantsburg High School art students. The Grantsburg Area Chamber of Commerce, as a promotion for the annual community event, sponsors the contest. By buying buttons, event attendees receive free entry into the apple race and $1 off the demolition derby. Cash prizes of $100, $50 and $25 are also awarded in a drawing of button holders. Contestants for Miss Grantsburg have already started selling Big Gust buttons to earn points for the pageant competition. Buttons are also available at local businesses. Big Gust Days Events planned for this year include children’s activities by the Jolly H 4-H Club, a tractor pedal pull, the very popular Fiedler Ford car show, a motorcycle show, the Greater Grantsburg Garage Sales, the Miss Grantsburg Queen Pageant, the firemen’s pancake breakfast, the apple race at Memory Lake, an arts and craft fair, and the Carlyle Sherstad Run/Walk, which has

been changed to a 5K/10K this year. For a complete listing of all the Big Gust Days activities

and times go to grantsburgchamber.com

STATEWIDE - Gov. Scott Walker signed a proclamation this week designating May 1-7 as Municipal Clerks Week. The special week was initiated in 1969 by the International Institute of Municipal Clerks and is endorsed by all of its members throughout the United States, Canada and 15 other countries. In 1984 and in 1994, presidents Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton, respectively, signed a proclamation officially declaring Municipal Clerks Week the first full week of May and recognizing the essential role municipal clerks play in local government. The true worth of the municipal clerk and deputy clerk is often not realized,” said IIMC President Sharon K. Cassler, MMC, clerk of council in the city of Cambridge, Ohio. “But clerks perform some of the principal functions of the democratic process.”

“One of the most important responsibilities clerks administer is advising their municipality’s council of the legislative restrictions that apply to the ordinances and resolutions they wish to enact,” said Cassler. Municipal clerks and deputy clerks main functions are to serve as the council’s foundation. Other duties include, but are not limited to, preparing agendas, taking minutes, maintaining ordinance and resolutions files, keeping the municipality’s historical records, processing permits and serving as the clearinghouse for information about the local government. They also record the actions of the various commissions and committees appointed by the council. Many serve as financial officers or treasurers and, in small municipalities, may act as chief administrative officers. An-

other important responsibility is administering part or all of the local election functions. “The public often takes the administration of an election for granted,” stated Cassler. “In reality, it takes municipal clerks months to organize and prepare this key element in the democratic process which must be done correctly for the whole system to work.” One of local government’s oldest positions is the municipal clerk. Their duties have expanded over the years and, today, modern technology assists them with their increasing responsibilities. To stay abreast of new computer applications, records management and other relevant information, many municipal and deputy clerks return to the classroom to increase their knowledge of these issues, learn new material and sharpen old skills. - submitted

by Mike Simonson Wisconsin Public Radio STATEWIDE - An effort by Wisconsin to force tribal casinos to follow new regulations to sanction mixed martial arts events came close to forcing legal action against the state. Tribes objected to what they saw was interference with their sovereignty. The northern Wisconsin Lac du Flambeau band of Lake Superior Chippewa has held a dozen mixed martial arts fighting contests at its Lake of the Torches Casino over the past four years. The casino’s marketing director, Michael Broderick, says the combative combination of

boxing, wrestling, judo and kickboxing is a big draw for them. But they follow strict rules to sanction all fights through a national group called King of the Cage. “It’s not a fly-by-night operation,” says Broderick. “The concerns the secretary brought to the tribes are also our concerns too.” Wisconsin Department of Licensing and Regulation Secretary Dave Ross has held talks with the 11 state tribes to mend this fence. He says the state did not intend to step on tribal rights. “The tribes already have had an extensive amount of rules that they’ve written themselves and most of these either mirror state … or exceed state law.”

Broderick says the issue isn’t so much the state’s new mixed martial arts rules as it is tribal independence. “I think it’s coming together, but once again it has to be an understanding that the tribes have their inherent rights through tribal sovereignty to conduct economic activities on the reservation and to regulate their activities. And I think there were some misunderstandings by the state of Wisconsin.” The Oneida and Potawatomi bands have signed agreements with the state to share medical information of fighters. Lac du Flambeau says it will also share medical records but continue holding fighting contests.

Winners of the 2011 Big Gust Days button contest were announced last week at Grantsburg High School. The button design contest, open to all interested GHS art students, is sponsored by The Grantsburg Area Chamber of Commerce as a promotion for the annual community event to be held June 3-5. Shown (L to R) are: Grantsburg Area Chamber Vice President Penny Nissen, of Holiday store, second-place winner Emily Virgilio, Jessica Hoffman, honorable mention, and first-place button design winner Dianna Olson. Each contestant received gift cards from Holiday, Amoco/BP and the Grantsburg Country Store for their winning designs. - Special photo

May 1 - 7 is Municipal Clerks Week

State tries to sanction tribal mixed martial arts events


Youth leadership seminar

These three people, (L to R) Lisa Johnson, Tom Allen and Tom Kidd, were part of a youth leadership training session held at The Lodge at Crooked Lake, Siren, Tuesday, April 26. The training was sponsored by the Burnett County Adolescent AODA Prevention Coalition, a group dedicated to preventing youth substance abuse. Johnson, who is the program director for Restorative Justice of Northwest Wisconsin Inc., and Allen, who is from Chippewa Falls, presented a victim impact panel for the youth. Allen died and was revived three times following a drunken-driving crash. “Hopefully kids won’t have to go down this road and will learn and make choices now,” he said. Kidd, who is from Lifestyle Enhancement Services, Osseo, led the training designed to empower the teens with valuable life skills. – Photos by Nancy Jappe

American Red Cross graduating students

MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 13

The American Red Cross is proud to present the first graduating class of the nurse assistant training class. The Red Cross office located in Balsam Lake is now offering these classes on a regular basis. Their classes are licensed by the state of Wisconsin. Their classes are 120 hours in length, 75 hours of classroom and 45 hours of clinical. If you are interested in enrolling in their nurse assistant training program, call Terry Anderson at 715-485-3025. Shown back row (L to R): Melissa Kromrey, Alexis Kothlow, JerriAnne Twingstrom and instructor Laura van der Veken, bachelor’s in nursing, registered nurse. Front row: Jessica Derrick, Angela Hoisington and Andrea Henderson. Not pictured: Lori Bee and Amy Oswald. – Photo submitted

Blahauvietz, Lemieux presented awards at Lions Club district convention

Siren teacher Jessica Ebner questioned student Annie Li about why she was wearing a big paper clip. The answer: To remind myself to be a better leader and not to do drugs. During the youth empowerment training in Siren April 26, 43 students from the three Burnett County high schools, Frederic High School and Northwest Passage were urged to wear the paper clips as a symbol of their commitment to whatever they decide that commitment is. They were told that they have to be ready to stand up for their beliefs or else face the consequences.

For the past 20 years, Tom Kidd from Osseo has used his teacher experience to present leadership-training programs for youth. “It is my hope that these fine young men and women have come here today with open minds and hearts and will take away not only information but skills for their lives that can make them true leaders,” Kidd said. “I truly believe, when you talk to young folk, if you talk with them and not at them, respect them and give them what they need, they will take it and utilize it. I am here to give them practical life skills ... that will make them more powerful as personal human beings and at their schools and communities.”

Lion Past District Governor Larry Blahauvietz of the Siren Lions Club received a District Governor Appreciation Award for his service as Lions district cabinet secretary the past two years. The award was presented at the District 27-E1 Lions Convention held at St. Croix Falls on April 8-9. Presenting the award are International Director Judge Haynes Townsend (L) and District Gov. Steve Jensen (R). - Photos submitted

Siren Lioness Marilyn Lemieux received a Lions International Award for her service as district Lioness president the past two years. The award was presented at the recent District 27E1 Lions Convention held at St. Croix Falls on April 8-9 by Lions International Director Judge Haynes Townsend of Dalton, Ga., (L) and Lions District Gov. Steve Jensen of St. Croix Falls.


PAGE 14 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

•Area news at a glance •

Bananas reveal surprise SUPERIOR - Sheila Terry got more than just a bunch of bananas from her shopping trip to the Superior Wal-Mart on Tuesday, April 26. After taking them to her home in Hayward, her husband, Dan, went to pick one when a spider about 4 inches long fell out from the stem. “He yelled, ‘Oh my god!’ ” Sheila Terry said. “And then he killed it.” It turns out that spider may be one of the world’s most dangerous. The Terrys, both 53, took the spider to Larry Weber, a retired science teacher, member of the American Arachnological Society and author of numerous nature books, including “Spiders of the North Woods.” After looking at the insect under a microscope, Weber said he’s “90 percent sure” it’s a Brazilian wandering spider. “The only way you can say for sure is if you bring it to an expert in tropical spiders,” Weber said. If it is a Brazilian wandering spider, then the Terrys are lucky they didn’t get hurt by it. In addition to having extremely toxic venom, the spiders are aggressive and hunt their prey on the ground rather than catching them in webs, Weber said. “It is one of the world’s most dangerous spiders,” he said. In the aftermath of their fright, the Terrys want to get word to the public that this type of threat exists in the aisles of their grocery stores. And they’d like to know that a system exists to ensure their encounter was just a fluke. Their dealings with Wal-Mart so far have been frustrating, Sheila Terry said. After buying the bananas on Tuesday, a colder-than-normal day, she put the bag in her car and drove to Hayward with her dog, Phil. With the snow falling on Tuesday, she left the bag in the car for about an hour and a half without worrying the food would spoil. At home when the spider fell out of the banana stem, the Terrys said, it appeared lethargic. “Being in a cold car probably slowed it down,” Weber said. “If it had stayed indoors and warmed up, it could have become very aggressive.” Terry

The budget process is now in full swing. This month the Joint Finance Committee held four public hearings in different areas of the state. Additionally, they held hearings with each agency in order to fully understand the impact the governor’s proposal would have on each agency. JFC is currently in the process of voting on each of the agencies one by one. During this process, legislators can submit amendments and recommendation for the position they believe JFC should take on Gov. Walker’s proposal. In the Assembly alone, over 200 amendments have been proposed, which clearly indicates that there will be significant changes to the governor’s budget proposal. After my town hall meetings last week, one of the budget proposals stood out more than any other, removing the proposed exemption of phosphorus standards. It was made very clear at all three

wanted Wal-Mart to know about what she found in order to protect other shoppers. She called on Tuesday to report the problem, but said the store manager never called her back. When she called the manager again, Terry said she was told there was nothing they could do. “I told them I’m not looking for anything,” she said. “I’m looking for public awareness.” The manager hung up on her, Terry said. She went to the Duluth NBC news station, Northland’s News Center, which aired a story about the spider on Wednesday. That got Wal-Mart’s attention, which called Terry on Wednesday and took her statement about what happened. “They made me feel like they were doubting I bought the bananas,” she said. A WalMart spokesman told the News Tribune Friday evening that the company did inspect its store and distribution center and found no other spiders. “We believe this is an isolated and unusual incident,” said Wal-Mart spokesman Lorenzo Lopez. “We regret that the customer had an unpleasant experience and we’re glad no one was injured.” - Superior Telegram

Father accidentally shoots daughter BRAHAM, Minn. - An 11-year-old girl from Pine County remains in critical condition at a Minneapolis hospital this week, recovering from a gunshot to her head. Maddy Montanye was accidentally shot by her father late Thursday afternoon, April 21. “It’s a traumatic, tragic situation,” said her uncle, Jason Montanye. “She’s a strong-willed girl. We’re very optimistic things will work out.” The fifthgrader in the east-central Minnesota town of 1,700 was described by family and friends as an outdoors enthusiast who loved playing outside on her trampoline. “She’s a really sweet girl,” said friend Nikki Dodd, 13, of Buffalo, Minn. “She’s so nice to everybody.” Pine County Sheriff Robin Cole said Montanye’s father, Jesse, had brought the .22-caliber pistol inside the home when it discharged, strik-

Eric

Severson 28th District Assembly

town hall meetings that we want to protect our lakes and rivers here in the 28th District. The phosphorus issue was an area where I think most everybody at the town halls agreed. As such, I have put in an amendment to remove the phosphorus standard exemption from the budget. Not only is this a nonfiscal item in the budget, it would be detrimental to our local waterways. We use these lakes and rivers for recreation as well as fishing, and they are a major source of tourism dollars in our area. This is an important point that I will continue to stress to the JFC members as well as to my Assembly

ing Maddy, who was across the room. Several family members were in the home when the gun went off. It took 45 minutes to an hour before she was airlifted from her rural home to HCMC. The bullet “could have gone anywhere,” Cole said. “But it hit her.” Jason Montanye said a report that his brother was target shooting outside the home was a separate event that day from when he brought the gun inside. The gun had been malfunctioning, Jason Montanye said. “We’ve grown up around firearms,” he said. “We know the safety and we practice it.” Cole said the sheriff’s department is still investigating the accident and will refer its findings to the Pine County attorney’s office. It’s unclear until the investigation concludes whether charges will be filed, he added. “Obviously a young girl was severely injured. If there was negligence or something ... we’ll go from there,” he said. Cole said it’s been “some time” since an accidental shooting has occurred in Pine County. Statewide, about 300 to 400 unintentional firearm injuries have been reported by Minnesota hospitals each year, according to state Health Department data. The age group that most often falls victim is 10- to 19-year-olds. Richard Stock teaches firearm safety classes in the metro through the state Department of Natural Resources. When he hears of accidental shootings, “it almost always boils down to you’re not following the fundamentals of firearm safety,” he said. “Always know where your gun is pointing and always treat is like it’s loaded.” Jason Montanye said the family is focused on Maddy and appreciates the support from the community and others on their CaringBridge site. “You always hear about it [incidents like this]; it’s never supposed to happen to you,” he said. “We’re still optimistic about everything.” - Minneapolis Star-Tribune

Cost of recount approximately $20,000 BARRON COUNTY - Many municipalities have been warming up to new tech-

colleagues. While I am on the topic of water, I should mention that Assembly Bill 23, which prevents the Department of Natural Resources from requiring that our local communities put chlorine into our water, was passed by the Assembly Natural Resources Committee. This rule by the DNR was just another unfunded mandate on our local communities, who have repeatedly stressed to me the need for this rule to be repealed. People in these communities like the taste of their water and don’t want unnecessary chemicals being put into their water supply. This bill will not make any changes to current water safety standards, but it will put the decision on how to allocate limited resources back in the hands of our local communities. This bill already has bipartisan support and I am optimistic that we can continue to have bipartisan support for this bill when it comes up for

OMC groundbreaking

Some 200 people attended groundbreaking ceremonies at Osceola Medical Center, Monday, May 2. The medical center is beginning construction on an emergency department/urgent care addition and a separate fitness center facility on its campus in Osceola. In on the groundbreaking (L to R) were, Mattea Johnson, Wild River Fitness Wild Kats program; Lanette Johnson, Wild River Fitness; Roger Kumlien, OMC Board chair; Dan Goodier, Christian Community Homes of Osceola; Karen Elkin, Osceola Community Health Foundation chair; Dr. Rob Dybvig, Osceola Medical Center; Jeff Meyer, Osceola Medical Center; Doug Wynveen, Charter Fitness Center Board chair and The RiverBank; Mike Colaizy, Wild River Fitness; and Neil Soltis, village of Osceola. The project is the culmination of a five-year goal to bring together health, fitness and senior care in one location, according to Meyer. - Photo submitted

nology at the polls, such as electronic voting machines, but Barron County Clerk DeeAnn Cook said that the combination of updated equipment and strict rules from the state is going to make the recount for the state Supreme Court race a particularly painful one. Barron County has previously handled a number of recounts dealing with candidates vying for local positions in government, Cook said, but this will be Barron County’s first time participating in a statewide recount of this kind. The clerk expressed concern about the daunting task ahead. “(State officials) are requiring that we pay for the programming of the ballot reading machines,” she said. The machines require a special cartridge that is not currently available, however, so when Barron County’s recount got under way April 27 as mandated, ballots would have to be counted manually. “We’re in a real dilemma here. We’re being punished for having new equipment, is what it is.” The state-approved recount procedure is also being blamed for other troubles for local officials. For example, the requirements dictate that rolls of ballots must be cut apart into individual ballots, Cook said. Since touch-screen voting is very popular in this area, and each of those electronic votes generates a hardcopy printout on a roll, the recount process is likely to get bogged down. To help with the statewide recount, municipal clerks are being recruited to help man the effort, since they are familiar with voting equipment and forms. County departments are also being asked to provide any personnel they can to assist. Including the three canvassing board members, a group of about a dozen people were expected to tackle the recount together at the Barron County Government Center. Regardless of how the recount turns out, the process itself comes with a price tag, which will be the county’s burden to shoulder. Preliminary estimates place the cost at about $20,000. - Barron News-Shield a vote on the Assembly floor. I have heard a lot of questions lately about the status of the Supreme Court race and the recount effort. During the last week of April, counties began the difficult process of recounting ballots. After the initial canvass, Justice Prosser has a 7,316-vote margin. However, because the margin is less than 0.5 percent, Kloppenburg’s campaign was allowed to request a recount at the state’s expense. The Government Accountability Board has given all 72 counties until Monday, May 9, to complete their recount. As we continue through the budget process, please do not hesitate to contact me with your questions, comments, concerns or suggestions on any of the provisions in the budget proposal. You can reach me by phone toll-free 888-529-0028 or you can e-mail me at Rep.Severson@legis.wisconsin.gov.

Tickets for Citizen of Year Banquet must be purchased by Monday

FREDERIC - Frederic’s 2011 Citizen of the Year is Elvira Schmidt. A banquet to honor her and other honorees will be held Friday, May 13, at Hacker’s Lanes. Others chosen to be honored are Colleen Draxler as Volunteer of the Year and The Mud Hut as the Business of the Year. Tickets to the Frederic Citizen/Volunteer of the Year Banquet can be purchased at the Bremer Bank, U.S. Bank or at the Harlander-Tesch Dental Office in Frederic. Tickets need to be purchased in advance by Monday, May 9. Out-of-area residents may call to reserve tickets by calling Rebecca Harlander at 715-327-4836 prior to May 9. Cost of tickets is $13. Dinner begins at 6 p.m. with the program following. - with submitted information


SPRING SPORTS

MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 15

INTER COUNTY LEADER • INTER COUNTY LEADER • INTER COUNTY LEADER

F R E D E R I C • G R A N T S B U R G • L U C K • S T. C R O I X F A L L S • S I R E N • U N I T Y • W E B S T E R BASEBALL • BOYS GOLF • SOFTBALL • TRACK & FIELD

Luck native’s basketball prowess noted with rare Hall of Fame honor

by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer STEVENS POINT – As Luck native Britta Petersen goes though her final classes at UW-Stevens Point, just a few weeks before graduation, she continues to garner accolades and accomplishments for her basketball prowess, the latest being that her fabled jersey bearing “Point 25” will be on display in the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame’s “Ring of Honor” in Knoxville, Tenn. The rare honor is being called a reflection of her outstanding play in the 2010-11 season, and as a culmination of a storied career that started on a simple poured concrete pad beside the garage outside her Town of Laketown home over a decade ago. Petersen is the first Pointer to have her jersey in the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame since the display began in 1999, and she called it “a huge honor,” but being ever humble, Petersen said she was shocked by the jersey placement in the Ring of Honor. “I don’t know much about it really, “ Petersen said, stating that she was “surprised I got it, because I didn’t have the best stats in the world ... I didn’t score as many points as some of the other players.“ Petersen’s collegiate career closed with another stellar season, where she averaged a team-high 14.6 points per game and 5.2 rebounds per game. This season they had a Sweet 16 appearance, a 27-3 record and a seventh-place ranking in the final D3hoops.com top-25 poll. Petersen was also named a State Farm Coaches Association WBCA All-American, a thirdteam all-American by D3hoops.com, on top of being the Central Region Player of the Year, the Wisconsin Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Player of the Year, and was a first-team All-WIAC. But she is also humble about the outpouring unique awards she has received of late, but in the same breath, she seemed just as excited that one of her Pointer teammates, Andrea Flease, also received an honorable mention for one of the honors she received. “It’s the first time in our program’s history that two players have got all-American status on the same team,” she said. “I was super happy for her.” During her reign as a Pointer, Petersen helped lead them to an impressive 109-19 record, while also being a member of four WIAC Tournament Championship teams, three NCAA Sweet 16 appearances and one trip to the Elite Eight. Petersen ranks fourth, all-time, on the Pointers all-time scoring list with 1,511 career points while playing in 118 games, averaging 12.8 points and 5.0 rebounds per contest, but showing a rare scoring and rebounding consistency over the years that made her a steady force on a truly solid squad under longtime head coach Shirley Egner. “I was always comfortable in my game,” Petersen said. “And I guess I’ve been around enough to know how the season goes ... so I can be a consistent player, I guess.” She is not sure of how she and her semifamous jersey were selected for the prestigious Ring of Honor display, but she certainly isn’t complaining. She admitted that even though the jersey is up for a full

Britta’s legacy grows

Extra Points

Former Luck native and Stevens Point Hall of Famer Britta Petersen eyes the court during a game this season. – File photos by Greg Marsten year, it might be kind of hard for her to see as she graduates later this month, and then the next day leaves for a job with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game until October. “It’s an actual, ‘adult’ job!” she joked, mentioning she will be working with natural resources, controlled burns, vegetation control and monitoring, farming and conservation, duck banding and other projects, far out from much of civilization and not far from the Canadian border, all falling under her fields of study as a true double major in wildlife ecology and resource management. “It’s a real relief to just have that (job issue) out of the way,” she said. “I’m still getting applications back saying the position I applied for has already been filled, so I’m pretty happy to have a job.” The 5-11 Petersen remains as one of the premier local basketball players, and is still the all-time leading scorer for Luck, with over 1,400 points, a fact not lost on her former coach and mentor, Marty Messar. “Britta’s someone who has earned everything she’s received,” he said of the 2006 grad. “She was always working hard, in the gym, in the weight room, on the court, you name it, trying to improve. Messar revealed his desire to have some sort of similar jersey honor for her at Luck in the near future, possibly using one of her No. 23 Cardinal jerseys and celebrating not only her achievements at Luck, but her Pointer accolades and awards to boot. “She’s just an exceptional person,” Messar said. Petersen is quick to point out the support of her family and friends, who often made the sojourn to see her play, either at Stevens Point or at Pointer games against Eau Claire or River Falls. “That was a huge deal for me, really, even though I didn’t always seem to have the best games when I’d have a big crowd,” she said. “Having so many people there was really special.”

Britta Petersen of Luck shakes hands with teammates after one of several wins throughout what will be one of her most storied years with the Stevens Point Basketball team. She was known for hanging out with friends and fans after games, encouraging them to get involved, as well, and said trips to see collegiate-level basketball are one of the things that motivated her as a kid, playing on that Laketown court her parents, Paul and Maggie, had beside the garage. “Our whole family has always been involved,” she said, noting the exceptional support and friendly competition between the Petersen clan, who have a storied history of basketball success in boys and girls play, as well as in coaching and even in recent alumni games for the Luck Winter Carnival, where an all-Petersen team is always a favorite. “They’ve been waiting for me to finish here, so we can have an all-Petersen team!” she said, also admitting that she’ll miss playing hoops for a spell, and hopes to stay involved “in one way or another,” either through pickup games, coaching, family games or at her eventual permanent home. “It’s going to be tough to play for a while, I’ll be jumping around a lot with my job,” she admitted, but stating that basketball will always be in her blood. “It’s always been there, to help me when I’m not feeling the greatest, especially here at college,” she said, adding that one of the best benefits of playing basketball has been the family she has developed around the sport, especially at Stevens Point. “Not only do I get to play this great sport, but I get this huge family out of playing the sport,” which she called a “huge positive” from her family at home and her family at school, which oftentimes collide. “It’s been something I can always rely on, especially here at school ... it’s been pretty good to me.” Petersen’s jersey will be on display for one year, starting this month, at the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame. Currently, there are over 100 jerseys hanging in the Ring of Honor, including high school and college all-Americans from the 2009-2010 season. She laughed when asked if she had to dry clean her jersey for the display, insisting that her coach will take care of all of that. “It’s a pretty cool honor for sure,” she said sheepishly. “But yeah, the more I think about it, I guess I’d like to get down there to get my picture with it.”

••• MUNCIE, Ind. – The NCAA Division 1 Ball State men’s volleyball team finished the season with a 19-11 overall record behind team leader, Anders Nelson, a former St. Croix Falls standout athlete. The senior Nelson completed his season with high honors recently, as he was named to the 2011 American Volleyball Coaches Association All-American Second Team. He was also a runner-up for the “Off the Block” Blocker of the Year award. Nelson is the first Ball State men’s volleyball athlete to receive All-AmeriAnders Nelson can status since 2007, and came off of a career-best finish. He had an NCAA best 35 solo blocks, and 109 block assists. His season high was a total of 10 blocks during a game back in February, and earlier in January, he recorded a careerbest five solo blocks during a fivegame victory of Sacred Heart. He was also the only player to start all 30 Cardinal matches this season. Nelson also recorded 2.23 kills per game, and had career season highs of 75 digs and 13 aces. His 396 career total of blocks ranks 13th in the program’s history, and eighth overall in program history with his 329 career block-assists. The program began in 1962. ••• BEMIDJI, Minn. – The Winona State Warriors softball team is getting ready for the NSIC tournament this Thursday, May 5, when they take on Minnesota State. The Mavericks have beaten the Warriors in three out of four contests, but the Warriors enter the tournament with momentum, as they won their final two games of the season against Bemidji State. During that sweep, former Grantsburg athlete Mollie Bjelland hit 6 for 9 with eight RBIs. During game two of the doubleheader, former Pirate, and Warrior freshman, Michelle Lund, picked up the win after pitching all seven innings. Lund allowed five hits, five runs and had five strikouts, while walking only two batters. The Warriors enter the tournament with a 34-9 overall record, and are 18-6 in the NSIC. ••• LEADER LAND – The Frederic at Luck baseball game on Thursday, May 5, can be heard on 104.9 FM beginning at 5 p.m. The Osceola at Amery baseball game is being broadcast on 1260 AM on Friday, May 6, beginning at 5 p.m. The Luck at Unity baseball game on Monday, May 9, can be heard on 104.9 FM beginning at 4 p.m. The Unity at Rice Lake baseball game begins at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, May 10, and can be heard on 104.9 FM. ••• LEADER LAND – Local sports tidbits to share? Please contact the Leader by 4:30 p.m. on Mondays to go in Extra Points. – Marty Seeger ••• LEADER LAND – Leader Sports strives to follow the college careers of area athletes. If you know of an athlete who will be playing collegiate sports in 2011 and hasn’t been mentioned, send us an e-mail or call and we’ll take it from there. – Marty Seeger

SPORTS RESULTS DEADLINES: WEDNESDAY - MONDAY: 1 p.m. the following business day. TUESDAY: 7 a.m. on Wednesday. Missed deadlines mean no coverage that week! S P O R T S N E W S O R S C O R E S T O R E P O R T ? • P H O N E : 7 1 5 - 3 2 7 - 4 2 3 6 • FA X : 7 1 5 - 3 2 7 - 4 1 1 7 • E - M A I L : m s e e g e r @ c e n t u r y t e l . n e t


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Golfers finally seeing time on the links

Conference meet already three weeks away

West Lakeland Conference Golf Meet Tuesday, May 3 at Grantsburg Team Scores

School Unity Grantsburg St. Croix Falls Frederic Luck Siren (2 golfers DQ)

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer FREDERIC – With temperatures in the mid to upper 30s on Monday, May 2, golfers were again met with less-thanideal conditions at the Frederic Golf Course. While it didn’t seem to faze the kids much, as some were donning Tshirts, others were dressed a bit more appropriately with stocking caps and gloves. “This has been horrible,” said Unity coach Larry Stencil, who had his varsity team at just their second conference meet of the season. While that doesn’t seem so

Individual Scores

West Lakeland Conference Golf Meet Monday, May 2 at Frederic Team Scores

School Unity Grantsburg St. Croix Falls Siren Frederic Luck

Total 165 180 180 196 209 209

Individual Scores

Golfer Reed Sorenson Brandon Stencil Jon Radke Alex Mikl Kyle Chapman Luke Bollant Jake Bengtson Chris Hopp Ben Davis Taylor Sempf Jake Langevin Jake Swenson Roger Steen BJ Fenning Ben Bengtson Dayton Rivera Justin Decorah Lars Thoreson Nate Dorrance Mitch Geisness Jordan Bazey Kyle Johnson Daniel Larson Drew Fontainelle Jared Emery Nick Rognrud Taylor Renberg Charlie Lindberg Luke Christensen Casey Ekholm

School Points AllConf. Unity 37 30 Unity 38 28 Grantsburg 41 26 St. Croix Falls 42 24 St. Croix Falls 43 22 Siren 43 22 Unity 43 22 Frederic 44 16 Grantsburg 44 16 St. Croix Falls 44 16 Grantsburg 45 10 Siren 45 10 Luck 47 6 Luck 47 6 Unity 47 6 Frederic 49 Siren 49 Grantsburg 50 Unity 50 St. Croix Falls 51 Luck 52 Grantsburg 53 Frederic 56 St. Croix Falls 58 Siren 59 Frederic 60 Siren 61 Frederic 63 Luck 63 Luck 70 -

Total 160 180 188 224 235 164

Despite some pretty tough golfing conditions it didn’t seem to faze very many team members on the Frederic Golf Course on Monday, May 2. – Photos by Marty Seeger

bad, the conference invite is just three weeks away, which won’t give teams much time to compete, but they’ll be doing a lot of golfing between now and then. Many teams are expected to be golfing at various meets and invites three to four times each week. Fortunately, everyone is in the same boat, and the Eagles again finished on top Monday with a team score of 165 for first place. Reed Sorensen shot a 37 and Brandon Stencil came in a close second with a 38. They were the two-best scores of the evening. “We adjusted the lineup to give a couple of players varsity experience,” Stencil said. “I was quite pleased with our effort despite the wind and cold. Reed Sorensen and Brandon Stencil finished one and two for the second consecutive conference match. It is really important that Brandon is pushing Reed. This friendly competitiveness will make both of them much bet-

The season is finally getting under way as this golfer proves in Frederic on Monday. ter players. I am hoping that I can find a couple of more that can elevate their game to join those two.” Jake Bengtson and Ben Bengtson and Nate Dorrance rounded out the rest of the team scores with 43, 47 and 50 respectively. St. Croix Falls and Grantsburg placed second overall with a score of 180, with Alex Mikl leading the Saints with a 43. Jon Radke finished with a 41 to lead Grantsburg. Siren took the third spot with a score of 196. Luke Bollant led the Dragons with a 43. Frederic and Luck finished with team scores of 209. Chris Hopp led Frederic with a 44, and Roger Steen and B.J. Fenning each scored 47. Grantsburg conference meet GRANTSBURG – Temperatures improved for area boys golfers on Tuesday, May 3, as Unity finished a strong 20 strokes ahead of their competition with a team score of 160 at Siren National Golf Course. The course was set very difficult, the tees were back and the pins were set in tough positions. The boys did a really nice job,” said Eagles coach Larry Stencil. “One of our goals is to develop the bottom part of our lineup. Very pleased with our effort.”

Golfer Kyle Sorenson Reed Sorenson Evan Lunda Luke Bollant Jake Langevin Erik Nelson Kyle Johnson Alex Mikl Taylor Sempf Lars Thoreson Brandon Stencil Chris Hopp Jon Radke Dayton Rivera Ben Davis Mitch Geisness Kyle Chapman Jordan Bazey Brenden Fenning Drew Fontainelle Luke Christianson Jared Emery Nick Rongvud Taylor Renberg Charlie Lindberg Casey Ekholm Daniel Larson Justin Decorah Jake Swenson

School Points All-Conf. Unity 37 30 Unity 40 28 Unity 40 28 Siren 41 24 Grantsburg 42 22 Unity 43 20 Grantsburg 44 18 St. Croix Falls 44 18 St. Croix Falls 45 14 Grantsburg 46 12 Unity 46 12 Frederic 48 10 Grantsburg 48 10 Frederic 49 6 Grantsburg 49 6 St. Croix Falls 49 6 St. Croix Falls 50 Luck 54 Luck 55 St. Croix Falls 55 Luck 59 Siren 59 Frederic 61 Siren 64 Frederic 66 Luck 67 Frederic 73 Siren DQ Siren DQ -

Kyle Sorensen was the medal winner on the day, and led the Eagles with a 37 for first place overall. He was followed by Reed Sorensen and Evan Lunda who both carded a 40. The Pirates came in second overall with a score of 180. Jake Langevin led the team with a 42. St. Croix Falls finished with a 188 with Alex Mikl leading with a 44. The Siren Dragons finished with just three recordable scores as Luke Bollant led them with a 41. Frederic scored a team total of 224, with Chris Hopp leading with a 48, and Dayton Rivera not far behind with a 48. The Luck Cardinals ended up with a 235, and Jordan Bazey led the team with a 54. The Webster Tigers also competed, but have started the season in the JV rounds to gain more experience before entering varsity play.

Luck boys use big inning to down S/W

Luck 13, Siren/Webster 5

by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer LUCK – In spite of a strong outing on the mound from Siren/Webster starter Tadd Oachs, the Luck Cardinals came from behind and used a big fourth inning to get the victory, 13-5, in a generally close contest on Monday, May 2, at Luck. Siren/Webster was ahead early, 2-1, and kept their lead with some strong defense, including a sharp play at the plate that got them out of a jam. Siren/Webster even had a nice highlight when their ninth batter, Graham Hall, belted a Conn Johnson fastball into deep left field with a runner on, giving them a 41 lead. But Luck’s bats are deadly, even in freezing cold weather, and they responded in the midinnings with a string of hits and heads-up baserunning that gave them a long, eight-run inning and a lead they never gave up, eventually stretching it to 13-5 in the final. Luck had several batters with strong plate performances, including Logan Hacker, Brandon Holdt and Tony Aguado, who all garnered a pair of hits each. Johnson got the win, and Oachs was tagged for the loss in the conference contest, which improved the Cardinals to 3-4, and 3-6 overall. Siren/Webster falls to 1-4 in conference play, and 1-7 overall.

Luck's Tony Agaudo (left) tries to beat out an infield grounder, but is thrown out at first by Siren/Webster. – Photos by Greg Marsten

Siren/Webster starter Tadd Oachs had a solid game on the mound, but ran into a troublesome fourth inning in his squad's 13-5 loss on Monday, May 2, at Luck.


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Saints boys, Frederic girls take Webster Invite

Frederic, Luck, Webster and Grantsburg compete in Amery

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer WEBSTER – The ice-cold temperatures didn’t keep some of the local track teams from competing on Monday, May 2, in Webster, and it didn’t seem to stop the St. Croix Falls boys or the Frederic girls from coming out on top. Starting with the Saints, the boys finished first in six events, including the 100 and 400-meter dash, which was won by Jace Marek with times of 11.39 and 53.44 respectively. Garret Radinzel took the 200meter dash with a time of 23.51, and Rashaud Kelash placed first in the 1,600meter run with a time of 4:52.63. Kelash also finished first in the 3,200-meter run with a time of 10:27.14. Kelash also competed in the 4x800-meter relay along with Ryan Nussbaum, Rob Foss and Chris Eisin to win that event with a time of 9:11.34. As for the Frederic boys, they took second place overall and had a handful of first-place finishes. Josiah Lund took first in the 800-meter run with a time of 2:09.64. Tony Peterson landed first place honors in the 110-meter hurdles with a time of 15.72, and again in the 300-meter hurdles with a time of 42.10. The 4x200-meter-relay was owned by the Vikings boys as well, as Ben Ackerley, Lund, Robert Kirk and Ian Lexen finished with a time of 3:53.07. In the boy’s high jump, Adam Chenal took first place when he hit a mark of 5–6. The Webster boys placed third overall as Mason Kriegel finished first overall in the pole vault, hitting a mark of 12-00. Teammates Ben Jensen, Cody Isaacson and Cody Dreier took second, third and fourth in the pole vault respectively. Kriegel also took second in the boys shot put, and Greg McIntyre placed first overall in the discus with a throw of 127-09.

Brrrr. Frederic’s Shabana Mishler waits for the gun for her race to start. – Photo by Becky Amundson

Frederic girls in first WEBSTER – The Frederic girls track team had another strong performance totaling 122 points, but the Webster girls weren’t far behind with their second place finish and 117 points. For the Vikings, Sage Karl led the way in the 100-meter dash with a time of 13.09. She also took first in the 200-meter run with a time of 27.19 in the finals. Sarah Knauber placed first in the 3,200-meter run with a time of 13:15.31, and helped the 4x800-meter relay team to a first place finish with a finish of 10:44.87. Leah Engebretson, Calla Karl and Samantha Nelson were also part of the team. Amanda Blok helped get 10 team points in the girls high jump with her first place finish, hitting a mark of 4–8. The Webster girls were able to get team points in the girls pole vault, as Shaina Pardun placed first with a mark of 7-00, while teammate Mackenzie Koelz took second with a mark of 6-06. Mary Johnson was the big points getter in the shot and discus, as she placed first in both events. She hit a mark of 33-03.50 in the shot put and threw an 88-08 in the discus.

Brad Peterson leaps over the bar in Webster on Monday, May 2. Tracksters were allowed to wear various items of clothing such as stocking caps due to the cold weather. – Photo by Becky Amundson in the finals with 11.64. Jack Taylor took Amery Invitational AMERY – The Frederic, Webster, Luck first overall in the 1,600 meter run with a and Grantsburg track teams traveled to time of 4:31.02, and also placed first in the Amery to compete with 13 other school 3,200-meter run with a time of 9:56.90. Tony Peterson of Frederic took first districts on Tuesday, May 3. The Frederic girls took third overall behind first-place overall in the 110-meter hurdles with a Somerset and second place St. Croix Cen- time of 15.95. A.J. Walsh-Brenizer of Luck also landed tral. Highlights included the Frederic girls in a spot on top in the pole vault, as he hit a first place in the 4x800-meter relay with a mark of 11–6. time of 10:20.99. Sage Karl was the first place finisher in the 100-meter dash with a time of 12.94. Melissa Gustavson of Webster was second overall with a time of 13.46. Karl also took first-place in the 200meter dash with a time of 27.21. In the 400-meter dash, Calla Karl placed first overall with a time of 1:02.99. Amanda Blok was the second place finisher in the high jump, with a mark of 4–10. The Webster boys 4x800-meter relay team took second overall with a time of 8:50.82. Mason Kriegel placed second overall in the 100-meter dash during the preliminary round, but took third overall

Allison Martin competed in the long jump. – Photo by Becky Amundson

The Frederic and St. Croix Falls boys had strong finishes at the Webster track meet. – Photo by Becky Amundson

Larissa Houtari of Frederic readies herself in the discus. – Photo by Becky Amundson

This hurdler from Webster cleared his obstacle with ease.

The St. Croix Falls boys are off to a solid start and continue to improve.

A Webster athlete attempts to clear the bar in the high jump in Webster.

A St. Croix Falls sprinter races down the track. – Photos by Larry Samson unless otherwise noted


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Unity boys complete sweep over Frederic

Unity 13, Frederic 0

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer FREDERIC – The Eagles swept the Frederic Vikings baseball team on Tuesday, May 3, in a doubleheader that had game one going just five innings. Brady Flaherty pitched three shutout innings with five strikouts and allowing two hits, and no walks. Jacob Ruck closed the final two innings, allowing one hit along with two strikeouts and no walks. The pitching had plenty of run support in the 13-0 victory, as Flaherty had a huge game going 4 for 4 with two RBIs. He scored three times and had three stolen bases as well. Nate Despiegelaere went 2 for 3 with one RBI, and Brady Turner was 1 for 3 with three RBIs. Alec Larson also had a pair of RBIs on a one hit. Zac Baxter, Jason Vlasnik, Derek Campbell, Luke Nelson, Justin Mooney and Jake Ruck each had hits as well. Unity 4, Frederic 1 FREDERIC – The tone was a bit different in Tuesday’s doubleheader in Frederic, as the Vikings kept a close game going into the seventh inning. Unity had a big start to the game as they got three runs in the bottom of the first singles from Jason Vlasnik and Brady Flaherty. Brady Turner also singled in the inning, but it was a quiet game otherwise for the Eagle offense, as they produced five hits off Frederic Trae Gehl. The Vikings only run of the game came off a double to the gap by Gehl, followed by an RBI single from Michael Tesch. The

A Frederic runner is tagged out on his way to second base against the Eagles on Tuesday, May 3. – Photos by Marty Seeger

Frederic managed to put a few balls in play during game two, but just couldn’t pick up the runs they needed for a win over Unity.

Vikes would get just two more hits for the rest of the game from Raif Poirier and Andrew Kurkowski. Zac Baxter was the starter, and winner for the Eagles as he pitched six innings with eight strikeouts, five walks and one earned run allowed.

Turtle Lake/Clayton 10, Siren/Webster 0 TURTLE LAKE – The Siren/Webster baseball team had a rough outing against a solid Turtle Lake/Clayton squad on Tuesday, May 3. Siren/Webster had just two hits in the game, both coming off their leadoff hitter, Lincoln Spafford.

Frederic, Siren/Webster split doubleheader

Siren/Webster 5, Frederic 4 (Game 1)

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer SIREN– The Siren/Webster baseball team earned a solid victory over Frederic during game one of a doubleheader in Siren on Thursday, April 28. It was Siren/Webster’s first victory of the season in what has been a bit of a shaky start. Evan Oachs was able to keep the Vikings offense off balance as he pitched six innings, allowing three runs on three hits, with only one earned run. Oachs struck out two and walked three in 27 batters faced, and was backed by some timely hitting, which began in the first inning when Lincoln Spafford and Alex Spafford led the top of the first inning with singles. Siren/Webster picked up a run in the first but the Vikings evened the score in the bottom of the inning when Michael Tesch drove in an RBI single. Siren/Webster would answer again, however, but this time with a bit of help from Frederic, who walked a pair of runners in the second inning and threw a pair of passed balls, which eventually gave up

It was a tense first game between Siren/Webster and Frederic on Thursday, April 28, during a doubleheader in Siren. – Photos by Marty Seeger two runs to Siren/Webster. The Vikings had one of their best chances to do some damage in the third inning when, with two outs and runners in scoring position, they loaded the bases. A groundout eventually ended the inning, keeping Siren/Webster in control. With a 3-1 lead heading into the top of the fifth inning, Siren/Webster scored two more crucial runs when, with two outs, Mycal Larson smoked a double that went deep to right field, which helped Siren/Webster to a 5-2 lead. The Vikings battled back in the bottom of the fifth, manufacturing at least one run after Trae Gehl drew a one-out walk. Gehl stole second and third base, and eventually reached home on a throwing error on his attempt to steal third. Working through a scoreless sixth and seventh inning, the Vikings tried to rally back in the bottom of the seventh, as Joe Draxler led things off with a single and eventually stole second base. He later The Siren/Webster and Frederic baseball teams shared a long evening of baseball during a scored on an RBI single from Tesch, but doubleheader that was split with Frederic taking game two. the inning ended quickly as Tadd Oachs

picked up three strikeouts in the final inning of relief, and ended the game with a win.

Frederic 13, Siren/Webster 4 (Game 2) SIREN– After a tough loss in game one of a doubleheader against Siren/Webster on Thursday, April 28, the Vikings battled back late for a win and earned a split to a long night of baseball in Siren. Siren/Webster scored four runs in the first inning off of Joe Draxler, but they were quieted after that, as Draxler went five innings with five strikeouts, three walks and allowed just four hits. None of Siren’s first-inning runs were earned, yet Shay Johnson singled, and Mycal Larson doubled in the inning. Larson drove in the two runs for Siren/Webster, and the Vikings grabbed two runs in the first inning with the help of singles from Raif Poirier and Michael Tesch. The Vikings got another run in the third with the help of two errors on Siren/Webster, but it wasn’t until the top of the fourth that the Vikings took the lead for good. Frederic scored three runs with the help of four errors on Siren/Webster, and another seven runs in a fifth-inning rally, which began with four consecutive walks before Siren/Webster recorded their first out. Draxler singled in the fifth inning, and Gehl drove in runs with an RBI double to help end the doubleheader.

Cameron 5, Unity 2 CAMERON– The Cameron Comets baseball team remained undefeated in the Central Lakeland standings after a win over the Eagles on Thursday, April 28. Cameron had a 1-0 lead heading into the top of the fourth inning until Unity tied the game at one apiece, when Nate Despiegelaere drew a two-out walk. Brady Turner followed the walk with a double, and Derek Campbell came through with an RBI single to help tie the game. Brady Flaherty pitched just over five innings, with four strikeouts, one walk and gave up four earned runs on four hits. Cameron regained the lead in the fifth in-

See Thursday bball/page 20


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Frederic softball runs rampant on Webster/Siren Pirates throttle Northwood, off to 7-0 start

Frederic 10, Webster/Siren 0

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer SIREN – The Vikings softball team piled on the runs against Webster/Siren on Thursday, April 28, during a doubleheader in Siren. During game one, the Vikings went quietly in the first inning before scoring on their first two runs of the game when, with one out, Frankie Knuf, Carley Gustafson and Kendra Mossey each singled, and the hits kept coming after that. In the third inning, Vanessa Neumann doubled, Krysta Laqua hit a two-RBI single and Tara Anderson, Knuf and Gustafson singled again to make it a 6-0 game. The Vikings tacked on another four more runs in the fourth with singles by Lauren Domagala, Corissa Schmidt, Neumann and Laqua, to help end the game in five innings. Frederic had 12 hits to back a stellar effort from Vikings pitcher Schmidt, who had eight strikeouts, and allowed just two hits in 17 batters faced. Knuf went 2 for 2 in the game, scored twice and had a pair of RBIs, and Gustavson went 2 for 3, scored twice and drove in two runs. Neumann was 2 for 2 with an RBI, and Laqua went 2 for 3 with an RBI. Domagala, Schmidt, Anderson and Mossey each recorded a hit apiece. Webster/Siren’s two hits came off singles from Kayla Duclon and Alex Holmstrom.

Frederic 16, Webster/Siren 1 SIREN – Webster/Siren was able to hold the Vikings softball team from scoring any runs during the first two innings of play in game two of their doubleheader on Thursday, April 28. However, things quickly unraveled as Frederic unleashed another hit parade as they swept the Webster/Siren softball team. Corissa Schmidt singled and later

Webster/Siren’s third baseman fires the ball to first.

The Frederic softball team spent a lot of time running the base pads last Thursday, April 28, during a doubleheader in Siren. – Photos by Marty Seeger scored on two stolen bases and a passed Vikings in game two, allowing three hits, ball in the top of the third inning, before with eight strikeouts and one walk. Sam the Vikings piled on seven runs on four Kopecky and Kayla Duclon and Young hits, including a two-RBI double by had the only three hits for Webster/Siren. Krysta Laqua, and singles from Frankie Knuf, Kendra Mossey and Lexi DomaGrantsburg 12 Northwood 2 gala. MINONG – With 18 Pirate hits on Webster/Siren did attempt to rally back Thursday, April 28, the Northwood Everin the bottom of the fifth inning, when greens didn’t stand much of a chance as Paige Young hit a one-out single and later the Grantsburg softball team powered scored on a Vikings error. Frederic had a their way to victory. chance to end the game in the fifth with Grantsburg used three pitchers in their their 10-0 lead, but Webster/Siren’s run rotation Thursday and all three proved pushed the game further into the sixth in- solid, as Macy Hanson nearly retired all ning, where Frederic piled on another six nine batters she faced, allowing just one runs to help seal the victory. hit with no walks, and struck out seven. It was another multihit game for at least Jessica Hoffman commanded the next four Vikings including Laqua and Mossey nine batters, pitching a no-hitter, while who went 2 for 4. Knuf went 2 for 3, and striking out five. The only runs of the Vanessa Neumann went 2 for 2. game for Northwood came in the sixth inSchmidt pitched another gem for the ning, when the Pirates allowed two un-

The Vikings played two solid games against Webster/Siren, winning both by 10 or more runs.

Corissa Schmidt has been solid for the Vikings this season. earned runs on walks and a pair of errors. Grace Corbin pitched the final frame for Grantsburg. Tiffany Meyer was solid at the plate for the Pirates, as she went 4 for 5 with three RBIs. Kylie Pewe also went 4 for 5 and Lauren Finch went 2 for 3. The other eight Pirate hits came from Emily Cole, Nicole McKenzie, Sam Schwieger, Wendy Roberts, McKenzie Ryan, Gabrielle Witzany, Kayla Casey and Hoffman.

Unity 10, Shell Lake 3 SHELL LAKE – The Unity girls were solid in their 10-3 victory over Shell Lake on April 29. Unity used a three-run first inning, a four-run third inning and several scattered runs after that to win handily, leading the entire way. Eagle Brittany Thomfohrda scored three runs in the win, while Crystal Donahue went 2-4 and scored twice, as well. Shell Lake had trouble getting into gear all night, and score two of their three runs in last two innings. Unity is proving to be one of the surprising West Lakeland Conference squads this season, and continues to play well against almost everyone they play. – Greg Marsten Grantsburg 12, Clear Lake 0 GRANTSBURG – The Grantsburg Pirates were able to fend off the Clear Lake Warriors with relative ease in the wet cold on Friday, April 29, at Grantsburg, using a giant first few innings of offense to get the lead and then hang on for the 12-0 win. The Pirates rallied for four first-inning runs, and then five more runs in the second inning to seal the win, with a 2-for-2, two-RBI performance by Gab Witzany in just those two innings. Clear Lake managed as many hits as Witzany did and struck out eight times in the loss. Grantsburg remains undefeated in both conference and overall play, and continues to pick up momentum as the season barrels forward with a heavy, weather-related makeup schedule. – Greg Marsten

Pirates squeak past Saints boys

Grantsburg 4., St. Croix Falls 3

by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – The hosting Pirates waiting until the final moments to come from behind and defeat the visiting St. Croix Falls Saints on Monday, May 2 at Grantsburg, winning 4-3 in the bottom of

the seventh inning. “We had every right to win this game,” stated Saints head coach Paul Randolph. “Unfortunately, they competed from beginning to the very end and caught us with a rally in the bottom of the seventh inning.” As Randolph noted later, the Pirate bats were kept somewhat in check until the

final inning, when they three of their five total hits. While Randolph was disappointed with the loss, he was quite impressed with the way the game went at times. “We liked how the guys competed and handled some tough early innings,” he said. “We are getting close to being the kind of team we want to be.”

Saints shortstop Nick Johnson led the way for his squad with a 2-3 performance at the plate, while Nathan Graveson was tagged for the loss on a five-hitter, and pitched the whole way for the Saints. Pirate second baseman Joe Engelhart went 2-4 and scored a pair of runs for his team, with Jimmy Nelson earning the win in relief for Trevor Thompson.


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Pirates erupt in fifth inning to silence Saints

Eagles win a close one over Frederic girls

Webster/Siren remains winless in conference, and overall, but continues to improve and make strong showings. Luck moved to 2-5 in conference play and 2-8 overall. – Greg Marsten

Grantsburg 14, St. Croix Falls 4

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – It was knotted at four heading into the bottom of the fifth inning as the Pirates and Saints softball teams met in a rival game Tuesday, May 3. But a 10-run inning by the Pirates ended the game rather quickly, as Grantsburg kept their undefeated record in tact. Alicia Chelberg got the Saints on board quickly in the first inning with a leadoff home run, but the Pirates answered back in the bottom of the first with four more runs on singles from Tiffany Meyer, Sam Schweiger and Gabrielle Witzany. The Saints managed to tie the game in the top of the third inning with a leadoff single by Heather Gilbert, followed by a double by Natalie Sempf. The Pirates had two costly errors in the inning, which helped lead to the other two runs, but the Saints managed to keep the Pirates bats silent through the next two frames. Chelberg was the Saints pitcher, allowing just four hits through four innings, before Grantsburg erupted in the bottom of the fifth.

The Luck softball team lost a tough game in the cold at Clear Lake on Monday, May 2. – Photos by Jenna Clemenson The Pirates got things started at the top of the order with leadoff singles from Kylie Pewe, followed by Meyer. The Saints had three errors in the inning which all came after two outs, but the Pirates had hits from Schweiger, Lauren Finch, Emily Cole and Nicole MacKenzie. Meyer ended the game going 2 for 4

LEADER SPORTS SCOREBOARD BASEBALL

West Lakeland Standings Team Conf. Overall 6-0 9-0 Grantsburg Pirates Unity Eagles 4-1 5-4 3-3 4-4 St. Croix Falls Saints Luck Cardinals 3-4 3-6 1-4 2-5 Frederic Vikings Siren/Webster 1-4 1-7 Scores Thursday, April 28 Siren/Webster 5, Frederic 4 Frederic 13, Siren/Webster 4 Cameron 5, Unity 2 Grantsburg 12, Northwood 1 Friday, April 29 Shell Lake 14, Siren/Webster 4 Monday, May 2 Grantsburg 4, St. Croix Falls 3 Luck 13, Siren/Webster 5 Tuesday, May 3 Shell Lake 5, Luck 2 Unity 13, Frederic 0 (game 1) Unity 4, Frederic 1 (game 2) Turtle Lake/Clayton 10, Siren/Webster 0 Upcoming - (Subject to change) Thursday, May 5 5 p.m. Siren/Webster at St. Croix Falls Unity versus Grantsburg at Frederic Frederic at Luck Friday, May 6 4:30 p.m. Grantsburg at Pine City, Minn. 5 p.m. Shell Lake at Luck Siren/Webster at Unity Monday, May 9 4 p.m. Luck at Unity 5 p.m. St. Croix Falls at Frederic Grantsburg at Webster Tuesday, May 10 5 p.m. Unity at Rice Lake Siren/Webster at Grantsburg Thursday, May 12 3:30 p.m. Grantsburg at Frederic 5 p.m. St. Croix Falls at Luck Unity at Webster

TRACK & FIELD

Upcoming - (Subject to change) Thursday, May 5 4 p.m. Frederic at St. Croix Central 4:15 p.m. Meet at Clear Lake (Luck, St. Croix Falls, Unity) 4:30 p.m. Webster at Clear Lake Friday, May 6 TBD Unity at New Richmond 4 p.m. Siren at Hinckley-Finlayson Monday, May 9 4 p.m. Meet at Frederic (Luck, St. Croix Falls, Siren, Webster, Unity, Grantsburg) Tuesday, May 10 4 p.m. Grantsburg and Unity at Rice Lake Webster and Luck at Colfax 4:15 Frederic at Siren Thursday, May 12 4:30 p.m. Meet at Grantsburg (Siren, Unity, Luck, St. Croix Falls, Siren)

GOLF

Upcoming - (Subject to change) Friday, May 6 Frederic at Hayward 9 a.m. 11 a.m. Grantsburg at Hayward Saturday, May 7 9 .m. Grantsburg at Hayward Frederic at Hayward Monday, May 9 4 p.m. Grantsburg at Unity Meet at Luck

(Frederic, Grantsburg, Luck, St. Croix Falls, Unity, Webster)

Tuesday, May 10 4 p.m. Meet at Siren

(Frederic, Grantsburg, Luck, St. Croix Falls, Siren, Unity, Webster)

Wednesday, May 11 9 a.m. Webster at Siren Thursday, May 12 9 a.m. Frederic and Luck at Rice Lake

SOFTBALL

West Lakeland Standings Team Conf. Overall Grantsburg Pirates 6-0 9-0 Unity Eagles 4-1 4-1 Frederic Vikings 4-3 5-3 St. Croix Falls Saints 2-4 2-4 Luck Cardinals 2-5 2-8 Webster/Siren 0-5 0-6 Scores Thursday, April 28 Frederic 10, Webster/Siren 0 Frederic 16, Webster/Siren 1 Grantsburg 12, Northwood 2 Friday, April 29 Grantsburg 12, Clear Lake 0 Monday, May 2 Clear Lake 15, Luck 14 Tuesday, May 3 Grantsburg 14, St. Croix Falls 4 Luck 12, Webster/Siren 6 Unity 5, Frederic 4 Upcoming - (Subject to change) Thursday, May 5 5 p.m. Webster/Siren at St. Croix Falls Unity at Grantsburg Frederic at Luck Friday, May 6 4:30 p.m. Clear Lake at Webster Monday, May 9 5 p.m. Barron at Grantsburg Tuesday, May 10 5 p.m. St. Croix Falls at Frederic Grantsburg at Webster Luck at Unity Thursday, May 12 3:30 p.m. Grantsburg at Frederic 5 p.m. St. Croix Falls at Luck Unity at Siren

Luck’s Morgan Denny meets the bat and ball for a hit against Webster/Siren.

with two RBIs. Pewe was 1 for 3 with two RBIs, as did MacKenzie and Witzany. Schweiger went 2 for 3 with three RBIs and Cole, Jessica Hoffman, Finch and Roberts each had one hit apiece. Grace Corbin was the starting pitcher for the Pirates, going just over two innings and allowing three hits, one run and three strikeouts. Macy Hanson threw the next inning allowing three runs, (two earned) with three strikeouts. Hoffman retired the final five batters of the game in order. No Pirate pitcher issued a walk.

Luck 12, Webster/Siren 6 LUCK – The Luck Cardinals were able to stay ahead of the visiting Webster/Siren squad on Tuesday, May 3, after a three-run blast by freshman Abbie Otlo, which gave the Cards a lead they never relinquished. “It was a shot off the bat,” stated Luck head coach Wayne Dickinson. “A no doubter.” The Tigons started senior Siiri Larsen, who was otherwise quite solid, and lasted several innings. Luck starter Maia Lehmann got the win and complete game, and was able to get out of several tough jams and continued to hit the ball very hard. Several Luck players had two hits on the night, and Tigon girls had several strong at-bats from the top of their order, as well as several solid innings from freshman reliever Evon Maxwell.

Thursday bball/continued

Unity 5, Frederic 4 FREDERIC – The Eagles won a close one against Frederic on Tuesday, May 3, as the Eagles got off to a good start, scoring three runs in the opening inning. It was a home game for the Eagles despite playing the game in Frederic due to poor field conditions at the Unity field. Despite the Eagles three runs in the bottom of the first, the Vikings chipped their way back into the game scoring one run in the second inning, and another run in the third. They eventually retook the lead in the top of the fifth inning, but the Eagles found a way to win it in the bottom of the seventh inning, scoring two more runs to take a key conference win.

Clear Lake 15, Luck 14 CLEAR LAKE – The Clear Lake Warriors were able to come from behind and defeat the Luck Cardinals on Monday, May 2, winning the gam in the bottom of the seventh inning buy a 15-14 final score. It was too cold for football, let alone softball,” Luck head coach Wayne Dickinson said. “But the girls gave a good effort.” Third baseman Tessa Clemenson went 3-4, and scored three times in the loss, with five other Cards getting two hits in the contest. The game was quite close the whole way, and went back and forth several times, but the Warriors used their homefield advantage well, stringing together several hits off starter Maia Lehmann in the bottom of the seventh for the one-run victory. – Greg Marsten Frederic 13, Turtle Lake 3 FREDERIC – A five-run fourth inning and another six runs in the sixth helped the Vikings softball team win against Turtle Lake on Monday, May 2. Corissa Schmidt had a huge game offensively, as she went 2 for 5 with five RBIs, and scored twice. She also pitched six innings, allowing six hits, two earned runs and had four walks with six strikeouts. Frederic saw Kendra Mossey go 3 for 3 at the plate with an RBI, and Lauren Domagala, Vanessa Neumann, Krysta Laqua and Frankie Knuf produced a hit apiece. – Marty Seeger

ning when they scored three runs with help of two batters getting hit by a pitch to start the inning. A one-out double drove in a pair of runs for the Comets, and an error proved costly as they stretched the lead 4-1. The Eagles scored one more run in the sixth with a Turner single and another single from Alec Larson before the inning ended. Unity threatened to score again in the seventh as Jason Vlasnik singled with one out and Flaherty drew a walk, but a strikeout and fly to center eventually sealed the win for Cameron.

Grantsburg 12, Northwood 1 MINONG– The Pirates continued with their winning ways on Thursday, April 28, at Northwood, with solid hitting from sophomore Lucas Willis, who went 3 for 3 with a double and two RBIs. Nolan Hanson went 2 for 3, and Joe Englehart homered and went 2 for 4. Grantsburg remained undefeated with the win.

Siren/Webster’s Mycal Larson has been hitting the ball well over the past two weeks. – Photo by Larry Samson

Shell Lake 13, Siren/Webster 4 SHELL LAKE – It was a rough outing for the Siren/Webster baseball team on Friday, April 29, as they traveled to Shell Lake, and were defeated 13-4. Despite getting four runs, Siren/Webster produced just two hits, a single from Evan Oachs, and a double by Tadd Oachs.


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MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 21

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ATVs • BIRDING • BOATING • CAMPING • FISHING • HIKING • HUNTING • RECREATIONAL VEHICLES

Concealed-carry course draws considerable interest More classes, including advanced courses, coming this summer

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer FREDERIC – Carrying a concealed weapon is a serious responsibility, but it’s something many Wisconsinites are ready for. Wisconsin, along with Illinois, are currently the only two states that prohibit carrying a concealed firearm, but with a Republican majority in both the House, and Senate, along with Republican Gov. Scott Walker, some form of concealedcarry law seems almost imminent. That’s part of the reason why the Advanced Protection Group, LLC., based out of Westfield, offered three, one-day courses last weekend at the South Fork Sporting Club near Lewis to give those interested in applying for a concealed-carry permit a head start should a Wisconsin concealed-carry law pass. Friday’s crowd of about 40 students was the largest of the three days, and most were men age 40 and older, but a handful of women were also in attendance. “It’s been a long time coming,” said one student, who was taking a break outside the clubhouse along with several others, who weren’t shy about showing their appreciation for the classes. “They seem to try and inform you of everything you might run into. I think there’s a lot of practical information there, which makes it more interesting,” another said. Many of the students that were interviewed on Friday had similar views as to why they were taking the course. Some were doing it for their own personal protection, while others were there based on principal. Yet all shared a common consensus in the right to exercise their Second Amendment rights and were enthusiastic at the thought of the state passing a concealed-carry law. “I think it’s very obvious that the sporting culture and the Second Amendment

Instructor Tim McCarthy (far left) gives a demonstration during the concealed-carry training course on Friday, April 29, at the South Fork Sporting Club. Frederic Police Chief R.J. Severude, (far right) played an instrumental role in bring the classes to the area. He is also an instructor. – Photo submitted culture is strong up here, and that’s a confrontation,” Ferraro said. written test. Those in attendance on Friwonderful thing,” said APG President, The course also featured time on the fir- day, and the ones who completed training and instructor, Dominic Ferraro, who was ing range to show instructors you are safe Saturday and Sunday, will likely be the humbled by what he described as some of with a firearm, yet effective in using one. first in line to get a concealed-carry permit the best shooters he’d seen in a long time. The second half of the course reiterated should Wisconsin pass a new law, but for Frederic Police Chief R.J. Severude, who several important lessons learned earlier now, it’s still a waiting game. is also an instructor for APG, was on hand in the day, as well as strategies for home “There’s a lot of really good attitudes up Friday as well, and instrumental in bring- security and safety, safe storage of here, a lot of excitement, and there’s a lot ing the course to the area. In total, there firearms, what you’ll need to know before of concern that our legislators are taking were four instructors assisting throughout applying for a concealed-carry permit and too long to pass something that needs to the weekend. The first half of the eight- to what to do when encountered with a life- be passed. I think they’re going to be hear10-hour courses began with instructors threatening situation, just to name a few. ing from a lot of our students, that it’s time preparing people’s minds for carrying a There was a bit of humor involved dur- to take action and get us our ability to weapon and handling confrontations ing the classroom portion in the afternoon, carry concealed weapons here in Wisconshould one arise. which helped keep students lively and in- sin,” Ferraro said. “It’s not just strap your gun on and go terested, but the seriousness of carrying a Those who couldn’t attend last weekout into the world, there’s a lot of things to concealed weapon was never forgotten. end’s courses will get another opportunity consider, both before, during and after the Several questions were raised on what this summer, as Ferarro plans to bring ansteps to take when confronted with the other course to the South Fork Sporting need to use deadly force. Ferraro went Club. He also said that many of those that through several basic scenarios that might took part in the class last weekend rebe encountered in the home or on the quested more advanced training, which street, but reiterated that those who carry he said he can also provide. Advanced a concealed firearm tend to avoid conflict, training involves mostly shooting, more rather than get involved. realistic scenarios and more difficult reforestation projects in the cutover area “When you start carrying a weapon, shooting positions. Ferraro stressed that of the north woods. you’re going to avoid problems, you’re the concealed-carry training, while very This year the nurseries are celebrating going to find yourself not being a tough detailed, is more basic than the advanced 100 years of seedling production. guy, or a tough girl, because you know course, but you must first pass the conThe mission of the nursery program what you’ve got, you know what you can cealed-carry training prior to enrolling in has always been to ensure a consistent do, and you have nothing to prove, nor the advanced course. supply of high-quality seedlings of deshould you,” Ferraro said to the class. Ferraro can be reached by phone at 608sirable forest species and at an economBefore official completion of the con- 218-4636, or e-mail at dom@apgwi.com. ical price to encourage reforestation in cealed-carry training course could be You may also register or find out more on Wisconsin. The nursery system has done, students were required to pass a their Web site at www.apgwi.com. adapted and thrived throughout the years, experiencing high demand for seedlings during the peak of the federal Conservation Reserve Program and the 1950s Soil Bank era and decreased sales during the Great Depression and the recent economic downturn. Seedlings are sold at cost of production to Wisconsin forest landowners and fill an important need that cannot be met solely by the private sector. The nursery staff is planning a number of activities throughout the year for the centennial celebration. Watch for updates on the State Nursery Program page of the DNR Web site or contact one of the nursery offices for more information: Hayward State Nursery, 715-6342717; Griffith State Nursery, Advanced Protection Group, LLC. President Dominic Ferraro (standing) speaks to about 40 715-424-3700; Wilson State Nursery, 608students during one of three concealed-carry training courses. This one took place on Friday, 375-4123. – from the DNR April 29. – Photo by Marty Seeger

Wisconsin state nursery system celebrates 100 years

WISCONSIN RAPIDS – It is treeplanting season in Wisconsin, and over the past 100 years the Wisconsin state nursery system has produced more than 1.5 billion tree seedlings planted in the state. The seedlings have been planted by public land managers and private landowners from a southern Kenosha County farm field to the cliffs of the Bayfield peninsula. The seedlings have blocked gusty winds from eroding soil, provided nesting habitat for songbirds and white-tailed deer, shaded picnickers and hunters, been processed into paper and lumber and provided fruits, nuts and sap for maple syrup. The state nursery system began in 1910 when State Forester Edward Merriam Griffith directed staff in the Wisconsin Conservation Department to begin a small nursery near the shores of Trout Lake on cutover pine land. That fall, Assistant State Forester Frank B. Moody, forestry student C. L. Harrington and three other young men collected pine cones from recently cut white and red pine after a timber harvest. The seeds were planted during the spring of 1911 and grew into the red and white pines that were distributed to state and county property as seedlings in 1913 for


American Legion Auxiliary Poppy symbolizes nation’s sacrifice

PAGE 22 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

“Wear it in honor of the millions of Americans who have willingly served our nation, all too many of whom made the ultimate sacrifice,” said Frederic unit President LaVerna Peterson and Centuria Auxiliary President Jean Rovney. The poppy also honors Wisconsin’s disabled veterans at the Zablocki VA Medical Center in Milwaukee who make the red crepe paper poppy. Wisconsin’s red poppies provide financial and therapeutic benefit to these veterans, as well as the thousands of veterans and their families who benefit from the donations collected from the distribution of the Auxiliary poppy. Please join the local American Legion Auxiliaries Thursday, May 13 and Friday, May 14 in Frederic, and

Get out and roll up your sleeve

Can be given to patients with types O+, A+, B+, AB+ All types A+, AB+ A+, AB+, A-, ABB+, AB+ B+, AB+, B-, ABAB+ AB+, AB-

Polk County notes

• More openness in county board expenses,

• Trade-in value for sheriff’s trucks, • Medical examiner under budget

by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – May started with a series of Polk County committee meetings. These are some of the highlights of those meetings.

Organizational committee, May 3 Supervisor Kristine Kremer-Hartung is calling for more transparency and accountability of county board expenses. She wants the supervisors per-diem and mileage expenses posted on the Web site and a more detailed county board budget presented. Kremer-Hartung also expressed concern with the amount of the $40 daily meal allowance for out-ofcounty travel. The organizational committee sent her proposed rule changes to the Administrative committee. County board chair William Johnson said that committee will hold a meeting this month and Kremer-Hartung’s concerns will be on the agenda.

Public protection committee, May 3 Polk County Sheriff Pete Johnson presented a detailed list of his department’s

activities through April. The sheriff’s department issued 762 tickets over the four months, compared to 638 for that period in 2010. Most of the tickets, 598, were for traffic offenses. There were 875 department cases reported, including 86 thefts, 24 drug cases, and 69 disorderly conducts and domestic abuse cases. Sexual-related cases included two Internet crimes. There were two suicides and an additional seven suicide attempts or threats. There were 219 adults arrested during the four months. Johnson also reported that the resale value of squad trucks was $10,000 higher than the resale value of squad cars. The crew cab trucks cost $5,000 more at purchase but have paid for themselves in the long run, Johnson said. He added that the squad trucks also allowed officers better mobility this winter when the driving was bad. Medical examiner Jonn Dinnies delivered his annual report and told the committee that his office came in under budget and returned $9,353 (10 percent of its levy dollars) to the county general fund. Fee revenues were up $8,440 over projections. Dinnies reported 21 accidental deaths in 2010, 10 suicides and no homicides. There were 14 autopsies conducted.

Supreme Court recount, ongoing Courtclerk Carole Wondra said the Polk County portion of the statewide Supreme Court election recount should be completed this week. The canvass will have taken four days, she projects. The four members of the canvass board each receive $40 a day plus mileage, so the recount cost to Polk County will be $640 in per diems plus travel expenses.

Inter-County Leader: Connect to your community

Polk County marriage license

Rachel A. Belisle, village of Webster, and Adam D. Derosier, village of Webster, issued April 25, 2011.

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-6699777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1800-927-9275. 445101 8a-etfcp 19Ltfc

(May 4, 11, 18, 25, June 1, 8) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff vs. DAVID L. BOOS, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case Number: 10 CV 630 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on March 18, 2011, in the amount of $143,406.12, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: June 22, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin DESCRIPTION: Lot 4, Block 3, Baker’s Riverside Addition to the City of Amery, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 232 Central Avenue, Amery, WI 54001 TAX KEY NO.: 201-00138-0000 Dated this 11th day of April, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Russell J. Karnes State Bar #1054982 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 268949

April 4: Lorrie L. Will, 52, Siren, was taken to Burnett County Jail at 4:30 p.m. following an incident at her home. The report indicated that Will will be cited for disorderly conduct and making threats of injury to an officer. April 20: Jason A. Spafford, 46, Minneapolis, Minn., was cited for speeding at 6:40 p.m. on Hwy. 35/70 and Elizabeth Street. April 21: Thomas J. Polski, 20, Danbury, faces charges of underage drinking, disorderly conduct, battery and resisting arrest following an incident that oc-

GARAGE SALE Fri. & Sat., May 6 & 7 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Clothes: Infant to adult; lots of inside/outside toys; much misc.

25119 Shady Oaks Ln. Siren 535413 37Lp 1/4 mile north of Government Center. Watch for sign.

ANNUAL RUMMAGE SALE Thurs., Fri. & Sat., May 12, 13 & 14

Fristad Lutheran Church 501 Hwy. 35, Centuria, WI Thurs., May 12, 7 - 5 p.m.; Fri., May 13, 8 - 5 p.m.; Sat., May 14, 8 - 1 p.m. Saturday is half-off day. 535505 37L 27a,d

curred in the alley behind the Alternate Learning Center in Siren at 12:02 p.m. April 24: Danielle R. Johnson, 32, Superior, was cited for speeding and operating a vehicle after suspension of registration. The citation was given during a traffic stop on Hwy. 35/70 and South Shore Drive at 9 p.m. April 25: Scott G. Buskirk, 21, Danbury, was taken to Burnett County Jail from the probation/parole office on a probation hold at 1:10 p.m.

Notices/ Garale Sales/ Real Estate

GARAGE SALE Sat., May 7 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Something For Everyone! Peterson/Gaffney 26954 Lee Rd. Webster Hwy. 35 in Webster to Cty. Rd. FF for 4 miles, left on Perida Rd. for 1 mile, right on Lee Rd., first house on right. Watch for signs.

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% of population 38 percent 7 percent 34 percent 6 percent 9 percent 2 percent 3 percent 1 percent

For more information call the Red Cross office at 715-485-3025. – from the ARC

Arvid M. Fossum, 82, Amery, died March 29, 2011. Lowell L. Carlson, 99, Grantsburg, died April 12, 2011. Everett Lough Jr., 76, Grantsburg, died April 12, 2011.

MOVING SALE

Thurs. & Fri., May 5 & 6, 8 a.m. - 7 p.m. Sat., May 7, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Outdoor play gym; computer desk; 2 dressers; couch & love seat; 2 bookshelves; file cabinets; antique buffet & hutch; toys; clothes: Boys, girls, women’s, XL - XXL , men’s and many household items.

1520 345th Ave. • Frederic, WI 715-566-2260

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Blood type O+ OA+ AB+ BAB+ AB-

prevalence of each of the blood types and its possible transfusion combinations.

Upcoming Bloodmobile dates Tuesday, May 24, Milltown Lutheran Church, Milltown, 12:30 to 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday, May 25, Fristad Lutheran Church, Centuria, noon to 6 p.m.; Thursday, May 26, St. Luke Methodist Church, Frederic, 1 to 7 p.m.; Friday, May 27, St. Luke Methodist Church, Frederic, 2 p.m.; Wednesday, June 1, American Legion Post 143, St. Croix Falls, 12:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Polk County deaths

Siren police report

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POLK COUNTY – Blood is a special gift that each of us holds. By sharing it, you can give someone another chance at life. If you choose to donate blood, you will be choosing to be an active part of heath care in your community. Chances are you or someone in your family will need blood someday, and by making a commitment to blood donation, you could be the one who ensures it is available. Every person has a certain blood type that is determined by antigens attached to his/her red blood cells. Antigens are classified as A, B, AB and O, and each of those can be either Rh positive or Rh negative. If you don’t already know your blood type, you will find out after your first blood donation. Below you can see the

Saturday, May 28, in Centuria, in recognizing the sacrifice of veterans by making a donation to the veterans poppy fund and by wearing a red memorial poppy this Memorial Day weekend. - submitted

FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH’S 15TH-ANNUAL SPRING SALE Saturday, May 7, 2011, 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. **Bag Sale Begins At 11 a.m.**

Faith Lutheran Church 421 South Russell Street Grantsburg, WI 54840

Bargains for everyone & great prices! LARGE variety of household items, clothing (infant to adult), books and much, much more! FOOD STAND Fresh-baked cinnamon rolls for breakfast served by Faith’s Youth. Faith Social Action will be providing the lunch beginning 10:30 a.m. (Supplementary funding provided by Thrivent Financial for Lutherans.)

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FREDERIC/BALSAM LAKE/CENTURIA – Frederic Auxiliary members of Paul G. Johnson, Unit No. 249, Balsam Lake American Legion and Auxiliary members of Ellis Hagler Post No. 278 and Auxiliary members of Centuria Post No 346, understand the sacrifice our Armed Forces have made to preserve freedom and to honor past and current service members. Members will wear a red memorial poppy, a symbol of the price of war and the sacrifice of millions, as a sign of their appreciation this Memorial Day weekend. The 900,000 members of the American Legion Auxiliary, the world’s largest women’s patriotic service organization, are asking everyone to wear a poppy on Memorial Day weekend.


MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 23

Apply In Person

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NOTICE CLAM FALLS TOWNSHIP

Tues., May 17, 2011 7 p.m. at Ken Kellogg’s 2026 Hwy. 46 Milltown Township

Ken Kellogg Secretary

535241

NOTICE The Regular Monthly Board Meeting For The Town Of McKinley Will Be Held On Tues., May 10, 2011, At 7 p.m.

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The Comprehensive Planning Committee will meet monthly in 2011. Each scheduled meeting will be on the second Tuesday of every month at 7 p.m. in the township hall. For Additional Information, Call: Perry Karl 715-653-4247 Brad Olson 715-327-4614

343 McKinny St. St. Croix Falls, Wis.

NEW HOME CEMETERY ASSOCIATION ANNUAL MEETING Wed., May 11, 2011 6:30 p.m. Eureka Town Hall 2111 Hwy. 87 St. Croix Falls, WI

Info. Call 715-483-9140

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NOTICE SIREN SANITARY DISTRICT BOARD MEETING TOWN OF SIREN BOARD MEETING

The Siren Sanitary District will hold their monthly Board Meeting on Thurs., May 12, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Siren Town Hall. Immediately following the Sanitary District Meeting the Town of Siren will hold their monthly Board Meeting at approximately 6:45 p.m. The agenda will be posted. If you wish to be on the agenda, please call Mary Hunter, Clerk. Mary Hunter, Clerk, 715-349-5119 534991 37L WNAXLP

www.the-leader.net

Stay connected to your community.

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(April 20, 27, May 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY FORD MOTOR CREDIT COMPANY LLC Plaintiff, vs. RYAN M. FISHER Defendant(s) SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION Case No. 11-CV-198 Money Judgment: 30301 THE STATE OF WISCONSIN: To the person named above as a Defendant: RYAN M. FISHER 305 2nd Ave. SW #3 Milltown, WI 54858-9074 You are hereby notified that the plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. Within 40 days after April 25, 2011, you must respond with a written demand for a copy of the complaint. The demand must be sent or delivered to the court, whose address is 1005 W. Main St., #300, Balsam Lake, WI 54810, and to Schelble Law Firm, S.C. whose address is 622 N. Water Street, Suite 400, Milwaukee, WI 53202. You may have an attorney help you. If you do not demand a copy of the complaint within 40 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. Date: April 18, 2011 SCHELBLE LAW FIRM, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff By: Jeffrey E. Schelble, State Bar No. 1014739 P.O. Address: 622 N. Water Street, Suite 400 Milwaukee, WI 53202 Phone: 414-270-1930

(Apr. 13, 20, 27, May 4, 11, 18) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK, Plaintiff vs. DAN JASPERSON and SUSAN A. JASPERSON, and STATE of WISCONSIN, Defendants. Case No. 10 CV 693 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on November 22, 2010, in the amount of $143,610.82, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on: Thursday, May 26, 2011, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: Lot 4, Plat of Trollview Estates, Township of Osceola, Polk County, Wis. PIN: 042-01314-0400. STREET ADDRESS: 982 South View Lane, Dresser, WI 54009. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wis., this 28th day of March, 2011. Peter M. Johnson, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson / #1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787 533980 WNAXLP

(May 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF Agnes A. Otto DOD: February 19, 2001 Notice to Creditors for Summary Assignment (Formal Administration) Case No. 10 PR 50 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. A petition for summary assignment was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth September 9, 1918, and date of death February 19, 2001, was domiciled in Polk County, State of Wis., with a mailing address of 311 235th Street, Osceola, Wis. 54020. 3. The right of a creditor to bring an action terminates three months after the date of publication of this order. Creditors may bring an action by: A. filing a claim in the Polk County Circuit Court before the property is assigned. B. bringing a suit against the assignee(s) after the property is assigned. 4. The property may be assigned to the creditors and interested persons after 30 days have elapsed following the publication of this notice. BY THE COURT: Molly E. GaleWyrick Circuit Court Judge Polk County Justice Center 1005 West Main Balsam Lake, WI 54810 715-485-9238 April 19, 2011 Stephen J. Dunlap Dunlap Law Offices 600 Third Street, P.O. Box 129 Hudson, WI 54016 715-386-7620 535159 WNAXLP Bar No. 1016187

NOTICE OF OPEN BOOK VILLAGE OF FREDERIC

Notice is given that the Open Book session for the Village of Frederic will be held Monday, May 16, 2011, from 4-6 p.m., at the Frederic Village Hall. This session gives the property owner an opportunity to meet with the assessor, ask questions of the assessor and look over the property assessments.

NOTICE OF THE BOARD OF REVIEW VILLAGE OF FREDERIC

Notice is given that the Board of Review for the Village of Frederic of Polk County, shall hold its first meeting on the 16th day of May, 2011, from 6 to 8 p.m., at the Frederic Village Hall, 107 Hope Road W. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board: No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact, or provide information to, a member of the Board about that person’s objection except at a session of the Board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or contest the amount of assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent to file a written objection by appearing before the Board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48hour notice requirement and files a written objection, that the person provides to the clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any Board members and, if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the Board, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are the subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or object to a valuation; if that valuation was made by the assessor or the objector using the income method; unless the person supplies to the assessor all of the information about income and expenses, as specified in the manual under Sec. 73.03(2a) Wis. Statutes, that the assessor requests. The Village of Frederic has an ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the assessor under this paragraph which provides exceptions for persons using the information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or of the duties of their office or by order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determines that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under s.19.35(1) of Wis. Statutes. The Board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other person may testify by telephone. Respectfully submitted Kristi Swanson, Clerk 535383 37L WNAXLP

(May 4, 11, 18, 25, June 1, 8) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY FINANCIAL FREEDOM ACQUISITION, LLC Plaintiff vs. ESTATE OF ARLENE E. PETERSON, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case No.: 10 CV 928 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on March 18, 2011, in the amount of $63,484.19, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: June 22, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: The South 295.160973 feet of the West 295.160973 feet of the Southeast 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4, Section 16, Township 34 North, Range 18 West, Town of St. Croix Falls, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2121 150th Avenue, St. Croix Falls, WI 54024. TAX KEY NO.: 044-00393-0000. Dated this 14th day of April, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Russell J. Karnes State Bar #1054982 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 269135

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Monthly Board Meeting Monday, May 9, at 7 p.m. Milltown Fire Hall Virgil Hansen, Clerk

MILLTOWN CEMETERY ANNUAL MEETING

Agenda will be posted at the Town Hall. Town of McKinley Deborah Grover, Clerk

2nd-Shift Caregiver

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TOWN OF MILLTOWN

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NOW HIRING

NOTICE

The regular Monthly Village Board Meeting will be held on Monday, May 9, 2011, at 7 p.m., at the Village Hall, 107 Hope Road W. Agenda will be posted at the Village Hall. Kristi Swanson Clerk

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NOTICE OF MEETING Village of Frederic

NOTICE

The April meeting of the Village Board of Siren will be held Thursday, May 5, 2011, at 2 p.m. at the Village Hall. Agenda posted. Ann Peterson 534996 Clerk-Treasurer 37L

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Notices/Employment Opportunities

(Mar. 30, Apr. 6, 13, 20, 27, May 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY ANCHORBANK, FSB Plaintiff vs. DAVID M. SWENSON, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case Number: 10 CV 128 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on May 5, 2010, in the amount of $54,637.19, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 18, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: The Northeast One-quarter of the Southeast One-quarter, Section 9, Township 35 North, Range 15 West, in the Town of Johnstown, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2237 Pipe Lake Road, Comstock, WI 54826. TAX KEY NO.: 028-00168-0000. Dated this 25th day of March, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Marie M. Flannery State Bar #1045309 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 268116

UNITY SCHOOL DISTRICT April 21, 2011

Position Title: Payroll Clerk H.R. Contact: Brandon W. Robinson, District Administrator Contact Phone: 715-825-3515 Contact E-mail: brobinson@unity.k12.wi.us Position Description: Position will have primary responsibility for the oversight of the automated timekeeping system and calculation of employee payroll. Maintain all individual employee work records. Stamp and send all checks to employees. Orient new employees to personnel practices. Monitor and organize worker and unemployment compensation claims. Monitor and document employee leaves. Assist in processing requisitions and purchase orders. Prepare financial aspects of employment contracts. Qualifications: Position requires a balance of payroll and human resources expertise. Applicant must possess excellent interpersonal skills and collaboration as part of the District Office team. Excellent verbal and written communication skills. Personnel confidentiality. Strong technology skills including Microsoft Word and Excel proficiency. Working knowledge of insurance including: Health Insurance, Workers’ Compensation, District Liability and Unemployment Compensation. Requirements: Minimum of three years’ experience with payroll, accounting and/or bookkeeping experience, or any combination of education and experience that provides equivalent knowledge, skills and abilities. A strong understanding of math and finances. Position requires candidate to be highly organized, accurate and detail oriented; strong communication skills and a customer-focused, team orientation are critical to success in this position. Preference given to candidates with postsecondary degree or further training. Application Process: Please send a letter of interest, current resume and three references to: Unity High School District, Attn: Brandon W. Robinson, District Administrator, 1908 150th St./Hwy. 46 N., Balsam Lake, WI 54810. By return mail please receive: a formal application form, authorization for background check and current job description. Application period closes when filled, priority given to complete applications received prior to May 6, 2011. Projected start date is as soon as possible. Status: Full Time, 12-month contract. 534722 Salary: Depending on qualifications. 36-37L 26-27a-e


Notices/Employment Opportunities

PAGE 24 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

Agenda to be posted: 1) Eureka Town Hall 2) Eureka Town Garage 3) Eureka Clerk’s Office. Agenda may also be posted on Town Web site: www.townofeureka.org

MEETING NOTICE The Next Meeting Of The Meenon Town Board Will Be Held On Monday, May 9, 2011, At 7 p.m. At The Meenon Town Hall

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Monthly Board Meeting Thurs., May 12, 2011, 7 p.m. at Eureka Town Hall

NOTICE

(March 30, April 6, 13, 20, 27, May 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC. Plaintiff, vs. ARDELL K. STRENKE and SHELLEY A. STRENKE, husband and wife, Defendants. Case No. 10-CV-137 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on May 11, 2010, in the amount of $148,211.27, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 12, 2011, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: SE 1/4 of NE 1/4 of one acre in the NE 1/4 of SE 1/4, described as follows: Beginning at the Northwest Corner of NE 1/4 of SE 1/4, run thence East along the North boundary line of said description 22 Rods, then South at right angles 11 Rods, then Northwesterly to a point on the West boundary line of said description 3 Rods South of place of beginning, then North 3 Rods to beginning, all in Section 29-37-17, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1619 315th Avenue, Town of West Sweden. TAX KEY NO.: 048-00667-0000 Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1424 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 414-727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

The Monthly Board Meeting For The Town Of LaFollette Will Be Held At The LaFollette Town Hall On Mon., May 9, 2011, At 7:30 p.m. Agenda: Verification of Posting Clerk’s Minutes Treasurer’s Report Resident Issues Road Items New Truck Town Web Site Pay Bills And Look At Correspondence Linda Terrian, Clerk

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Agenda items to include: Reports from Clerk, Treasurer, Chairman and Supervisors, road report, Chelmo Property, pay bills and adjournment. Suzanna M. Eytcheson Meenon Town Clerk

TOWN OF LaFOLLETTE MONTHLY MEETING

(April 27, May 4, 11) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Portfolio Recovery Associates, LLC Assignee of MBNA Bank of P.O. Box 12914 NORFOLK, VA 23541 Plaintiff, vs. LOIS E. JOHANSEN 2449 150th St. Luck, WI 54853-3911 Defendant(s). Case No. 11CV115 AMENDED SUMMONS Money Judgment: 30301 Our File: 748470 THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, to each person named above as Defendant: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the Plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. The complaint, which is also served upon you, states the nature and basis of the legal action. Within 40 days after 04/27/ 2011 you must respond with a written answer, as that term is used in chapter 802 of the Wisconsin Statutes, to the complaint. The court may reject or disregard an answer that does not follow the requirements of the statutes. The answer must be sent or delivered to the court whose address is 1005 W. MAIN STREET, SUITE 300, BALSAM LAKE, WI 54810-4410 and to RAUSCH, STURM, ISRAEL, ENERSON & HORNICK, LLC, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is shown below. You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not provide a proper answer to the complaint or provide a written demand for said complaint within the 40-day period, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the complaint and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become alien against any real estate you own now or in the future and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. Dated: April 6, 2011. /s/ Ryan M. Peterson RAUSCH, STURM, ISRAEL, ENERSON & HORNIK LLC ATTORNEYS IN THE PRACTICE OF DEBT COLLECTION 250 N. Sunnyslope Rd., Suite 300 Brookfield, WI 53005 Toll-free: 877-667-8010 Attorney for the Plaintiff

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(April 27, May 4, 11, 18, 25, June 1) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Community Bank of Cameron d/b/a Community Bank of Cameron-Grantsburg Plaintiff, vs. Craig A. Jones and Kevin L. Jones, Defendants. Case No. 10-CV-202 Code Nos. 30301 and 30404 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on June 1, 2010, in favor of Plaintiff, Community Bank of Cameron, in the amount of $102,234.66, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: June 14, 2011, at 10 a.m. TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff at the sale in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds, payable to the clerk of courts (personal checks cannot and will not be accepted). The balance of the successful bid must be paid to the clerk of court in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds no later than ten days after the court’s confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold “as is” and subject to all real estate taxes, specials assessments, liens and encumbrances PLACE: At the front entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. DESCRIPTION: A parcel of Land in the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (NW1/4 NW1/4) of Section 31, Township 36 North, Range 18 West, Town of Laketown, Polk County, Wisconsin, described as follows: Commencing at a point that is 545 feet South of the Northwest Corner of Section 31, Township 36 North, Range 18 West, Thence running due East 178 Feet; Thence due South 131 Feet; Thence West 178 Feet; Thence due North 131 Feet to the Place of Beginning. Together with a 1/3 interest in the Well Agreement Recorded as Document No. 503224, Volume 596 of Records, Page 153, Polk County Register of Deeds. TAX KEY NO.: 030-00761-0000 PROPERTY ADDRESS: For informational purposes, it is believed that the property in question is located at 2488 240th Street, Cushing, Wis. Dated this 5th day of April, 2011. /s/ Peter Johnson Polk County Sheriff Benson Law Office LLC Attorneys for Community Bank of Cameron P.O. Box 370 Siren, WI 54872 715-349-5215

TOWN OF EUREKA

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Julie Peterson, Clerk 534981 37L WNAXLP

NOTICE

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(April 27, May 4, 11, 18, 25, June 1) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY KAREN E. MINUTELLO, as Assignee of M & I Marshall & Ilsley Bank, Successor by merger with Century Bank, Plaintiff, vs. DAVID J. DEHAVEN and JANE DOE, alias, his wife, if any, and ARDEN P. WILLIAMS and John Doe, alias, her husband, if any, Defendants. Case No. 04 CV 75 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wis., on Thursday, June 9, 2011, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: East Half of the Southwest Quarter (E1/2 SW1/4), Section 22-32-17, Town of Alden, Polk County, Except 1 square acre in NW corner of NE SW, Section 22; the North line thereof is the south line of CTH C and West line thereof is the West line of said NE1/4 SW1/4, Polk County, Wisconsin. PIN: 002-00574-0000, 00200578-0000, 002-00579-0000 The real estate shall be sold in parcels, as follows: Parcel 1: Northeast one-quarter of Southwest one-quarter (NE1/4 of SW1/4) Section 22-32-17, Town of Alden, Polk County, Except 1 square acres in NW corner of NE SW, Section 22; the North line thereof is the Southline of CTH C and West line thereof is the West line of said NE1/4 SW1/4, Polk County, Wisconsin. PIN: 002-00574-0000 Parcel 2: Southeast one-quarter of Southwest one-quarter (SE1/4 of SW1/4) Section 22-32-17, Town of Alden, Polk County, Wisconsin. PIN: 002-00578-0000 & 00200579-0000 Parcel 3: All real estate shall be sold as a single parcel. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wis., this 12th day of April, 2011. /s/Peter M. Johnson, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson No. 1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787

No burning is allowed until after 6 p.m. on the east side of River Road, per the Town of Sterling fire ordinance. This ordinance is in effect from April 1 through June 1, 2011. West of River Road a DNR burning permit is required.

Log on to www.theleader.net

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(March 30, April 6, 13, 20, 27, May 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, as Trustee for Ameriquest Mortgage Securities Inc., Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2003-1 by American Home Mortgage Servicing Inc., its attorney-in-fact Plaintiff, vs. STEVEN A. GAUSTAD; and BENEFICIAL FINANCIAL I INC. successor to Beneficial Wisconsin, Inc.; and CAPITAL ONE BANK USA N.A.; and MIDLAND FUNDING LLC; and CURRAHEE FINANCIAL, LLC; and THE CUMBERLAND MEMORIAL HOSPITAL AND EXTENDED CARE UNIT, INC.; and THE CUMBERLAND CLINIC, S.C., Defendants Case No. 10-CV-726 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on November 18, 2010, in the amount of $60,638.43, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 19, 2011, at 10 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 West Main St., Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land in Outlot 93 of the Village of Clayton, described as follows: Commencing at the East 1/4 corner of Section 24-33-15, thence West along the EastWest quarter line a distance of 2,289.75 feet, which is the point of beginning of parcel being described; thence due North 200 feet; thence due West 100 feet; thence due South 200 feet; thence East 100 feet to the point of beginning; Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 241 Clayton Avenue East, Village of Clayton. TAX KEY NO.: 112-00257-0000. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 (414) 727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

Agenda: 1. Reading of the minutes 2. Treasurer’s reports 3. Review and pay bills 4. Patrolman’s report Any additional agenda will be posted in the Luck Town Hall and Clerk’s office. Lloyd Nelson, Clerk

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(Mar. 30, Apr. 6, 13, 20, 27, May 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY AnchorBank, fsb f/k/a S&C Bank, Plaintiff, vs. Daniel R. Johnson, Individual and Sole Proprietor, d/b/a Swedes Masonry, Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Case No: 09 CV 929 Case Code: 30404 Judge: Molly E. GaleWyrick PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered April 26, 2010, in the amount of $181,175.54, the Polk County Sheriff will sell the described property at public auction as follows: DATE/TIME: May 17, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 10% of successful bid must be paid to the Sheriff at sale in cash or by certified check. Balance due within 10 days of court approval. Purchaser is responsible for payment of all transfer taxes and recording fees. Sale is AS IS in all respects and subject to all liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Foyer Area, Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main St., Suite 900, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. DESCRIPTION: Parcel 1: A parcel of land in the SE 1/4 of SW 1/4, Section 28, Township 35 North, Range 18 West, Town of Eureka, Polk County, Wis., described as follows: Commencing at the Southeast corner of SE 1/4 of SW 1/4, thence North along the Forty line 300 feet; thence West parallel to the South line of said Forty, 500 feet; thence South parallel to the east line of said Forty to the South line of said Forty; thence East to the place of beginning. Parcel 2: The SE 1/4 of SW 1/4, Section 28, Township 35 North, Range 18 West, Town of Eureka, Polk County, Wisconsin, except a parcel described as follows: Commencing at the Southeast corner of SE 1/4 of SW 1/4, thence North along the Forty line 300 feet; thence West parallel to the South line of said Forty, 500 feet; thence South parallel to the East line of said Forty to the South line of said Forty, thence East to the place of beginning. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2155 190th Avenue, Centuria, WI 54824. Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff ECKBERG, LAMMERS, BRIGGS, WOLFF & VIERLING, P.L.L.P. Nicholas J. Vivian (#1047165) 430 2nd Street Hudson, WI 54016 (715) 386-3733 Attorneys for Plaintiff Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (15 U.S.C. Section 1692), we are required to state that we are attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. If you are currently in bankruptcy or have been discharged in bankruptcy, this letter is not an attempt to collect the debt from you personally. This letter serves only as notice of the commencement of a legal proceeding as required by the loan documents, state law, and/ or federal law. 532796 WNAXLP

BOARD MEETING Tues., May 10, 7 p.m. Town Hall

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Assessor Prochnow will be available to discuss the evaluations of your properties and answer any questions you may have about them.

NOTICE TOWN OF LUCK

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OPEN BOOK May 10, 2011 4 - 6 p.m. Eureka Town Hall

TOWN OF STERLING BURNING BAN NOTICE

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The Pleasant Hill Cemetery Assn. will hold its annual meeting on Mon., May 16, at 7 p.m., at the home of Jerry & Carol Streed, 1271 State Rd. 35, St. Croix Falls. Cemetery families are welcome.

Follow the Leader

TOWN OF EUREKA 535353 37L 27a,d

PLEASANT HILL CEMETERY ASSOCIATION MEETING


ANCHORBANK, FSB Assignee of S & C BANK

Plaintiff vs. DAVID H. RAILSBACK II ARLA J. RAILSBACK LAMPERT YARDS, INC. ANTCZAK CONSTRUCTION, INC. STATE OF WISCONSINDEPARTMENT OF REVENUE JOHN DOE #1 AND JOHN DOE #2 the unknown tenants of the premises located at W8389 Carlton Road Spooner, WI 54801, JOHN DOE #3 AND JOHN DOE #4 the unknown tenants of the premises located at N5126 Greenfield Road Spooner, WI 54801, Defendants Case No.: 10CV822 Case Code: 30404 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE By virtue of a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above-entitled action on November 4, 2010, the undersigned Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin, will sell at public auction at the front entrance of the Polk County Justice Center in the City of Balsam Lake, in said county, on the 25th day of May, 2011, at 10 a.m., the real estate and mortgaged premises directed by the Judgment to be sold, therein described as follows: Lot 6, Plat of Big Island, except the NW 1/2 thereof, located in Government Lot 2, Section 2-34-17, Polk County, Wisconsin. Said property is also described as the SE 1/2 of Lot 6, of Government Lot 2 of Big Island, Balsam Lake, Section 2-34-17, Polk County, Wisconsin. TERM OF SALE: Cash. DOWN PAYMENT: A deposit of 10% of sale price to be deposited in cash or by certified check with the Sheriff at the time of sale; balance to be paid by cash or certified check within ten days after confirmation of sale. Dated this 1st day of April, 2011. /s/ Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff Donald R. Marjala, Lawyer Spangler, Nodolf, Bruder & Klinkhammer, LLC P.O. Box 1165 Eau Claire, WI 54702-1165 (715) 830-9771 Attorneys for Plaintiff Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (15 U.S.C. Section 1692), we are required to state that we are attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information we obtained will be used for that purpose. 533271 WNAXLP

NOTICE - VILLAGE OF SIREN RESIDENTS NOXIOUS WEED NOTICE

Notice is hereby given, to each and every person who owns, occupies or controls land in the Village of Siren, County of Burnett, State of Wisconsin, to destroy all noxious weeds: Canada Thistle, Leafy Spurge and Field Bindweed (Creeping Jenny). The term destroy means the complete killing of weed plants above the surface of the ground by the use of chemicals, cutting, tillage, cropping system, pasturing livestock or any or all of these in effective, combination, at a time and in a manner as will effectually prevent the weed plants from maturing to the bloom or flower stage as required by Wisconsin §66.0407. Ann L. Peterson, Clerk/Treasurer 534994 37-38L WNAXLP

NOTICE

LIFTING SPRING LOAD RESTRICTIONS

Pursuant to Wisconsin Statutes 349.16, Burnett County Highway Department will suspend seasonal weight restrictions. This will become effective at 12:01 a.m. on Monday, May 9, 2011. By order of the Burnett County Highway 535447 37L 27a Commissioner, Robert N. Morehouse

Foreclosure of Mortgage TO: Nelce C. Sluka P.O. Box 323 St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 THE STATE OF WISCONSIN TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANT: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the Plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. Within forty (40) days after April 20, 2011, you must respond with a written demand for a copy of the complaint. The demand must be sent or delivered to the court whose address is: Clerk of Circuit Court Polk County Justice Center 1005 West Main Street, Suite 300 Balsam Lake, WI 54810 and to plaintiff’s attorney whose address is: Steven J. Swanson 105 Washington Street South P.O. Box 609 St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not provide a proper Answer within forty (40) days after April 20, 2011, the Court may grant Judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Complaint and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Complaint. A Judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A Judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. Dated the 15th day of April, 2011. Steven J. Swanson Bar No. 1003029 Attorney for Plaintiff 105 Washington Street South P.O. Box 609 St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787 534397 WNAXLP

(May 4, 11, 18, 25, June 1, 8) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. AS SERVICER FOR THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS CWMBS, 2004-12 Plaintiff vs. INPONG LUANGRATH, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case Number: 10 CV 237 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on May 7, 2010, in the amount of $256,916.08, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: June 22, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot One (1) of Certified Survey Mall No. 1753 recorded in Volume 8 of Certified Survey Maps on Page 101 as Document No. 523410, being a part of the Southwest Quarter of the Northwest (SW 1/4 of the NW 1/4) of Section Twenty-Two (22), Township Thirty-Two (32) North of Range Nineteen (19) West, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 272 270th St., Osceola, WI 54020. TAX KEY NO.: 022-00533-0100 Dated this 13th day of April, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Chaz M. Rodriguez State Bar #1063071 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 269072

NOTICE OF MEETING TO ADJOURN BOARD OF REVIEW TO LATER DATE TOWN OF SIREN

The Board of Review for the Town of Siren, Burnett County, State of Wisconsin, will meet on Thurs., May 12, 2011, at 8 p.m. at the Siren Town Hall for the purpose of calling the Board of Review into session during the thirty-day period beginning on the 2nd Mon. of May, pursuant to Sec. 70-47 (1) of Wis. Statutes. Due to the fact that the assessment roll is not completed at this time, it is anticipated that the Board of Review will be adjourned until a later date in August or September. Notice is hereby given this 3rd day of May, 2011. Mary Hunter, Clerk, Town of Siren 534992 37L WNAXLP 715-349-5119

NOTICE TOWN OF BALSAM LAKE DUMP WEEKEND

Dump weekend will be held on Sat., May 7, 2011, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sun., May 8, 2011, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Town Shop Brush & leaves will be accepted but no tires or appliances will be accepted. Brian R. Masters, Clerk

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VILLAGE OF FREDERIC

SPRING CLEANUP WEEK May 9 - 13, 2011 Fees: Appliances $20/ea. Furniture (Incl. TV, Computer, VCR) $10/ea. item Tires $5/ea. Miscellaneous Items $10/minimum fee Call the Village office to schedule a pickup 535450 715-327-4294

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(April 20, 27, May 4, 11, 18, 25) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP Plaintiff, vs. DAVID FOUKS; SHELLY FOUKS A/K/A SHELLY L. SWANSON; Defendants. NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case No. 10 CV 312 Case Code No. 30404 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on September 29, 2010, in the amount of $194,069.18, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: June 15, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax from the proceeds of the sale. PLACE: Lobby of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Lot 3 of Certified Survey Map No. 5460 filed July 23, 2007, in Vol. 24 C.S.M., Pg. 145, as Doc. No. 734549, being Lots 3 and 4 of Certified Survey Map No. 5336 filed December 28, 2006, in Vol. 24 of C.S.M., Pg. 21, as Doc. No. 726610, located in the NE 1/4 of the NW 1/4 of Section 24, Township 32 North, Range 19 West, Town of Farmington, Polk County, Wisconsin. Together with and subject to a driveway agreement/easement recorded in Vol. 1007 of Rec., Pg. 649, as Doc. No. 735962. TAX KEY NO.: 022-00576-0300 PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2464 30th Avenue, Osceola, Wisconsin 54020. Gunar J. Blumberg State Bar No. 1028987 Attorney for Plaintiff 230 W. Monroe, Ste. 1125 Chicago, IL 60606 Phone: 312-541-9710 Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC, is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

(April 27, May 4, 11, 18, 25, June 1) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY ANCHORBANK, FSB, Successor to S & C Band, Plaintiff, vs. DENNIS LARSEN a/k/a DENNIS R. LARSEN and AMY LARSEN a/k/a/ AMY K. LARSEN, husband and wife, ANCHORBANK, FSB, Defendants. Case No. 10-CV-708 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on December 10, 2010, in the amount of $146,235.11, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: June 14, 2011, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 2404 Recorded in Volume 11 of Certified Survey Maps on Page 111, as Document No. 565148, located in the Southwest 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 9, Township 33 North, Range 17 West. Said land being in the Town of Garfield, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1599 105th Ave., Town of Garfield. TAX KEY NO.: 024-00145-0000 Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 414-727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

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NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case No. 10 CV 89 Case Code No. 30404 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on May 18, 2010, in the amount of $102,593.09, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: Time: May 18, 2011, at 10 a.m. Terms: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of slae; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax from the proceeds of the sale. Place: Lobby of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. Property Description: Commencing 480 feet north of the east 1/8 post in the South line of Section 15, Township 32 North of Range 19 West, thence North on said 1/8 line 95 feet; thence West at right angles with said 1/8 line 150 feet; thence South parallel with said 1/8 line 95 feet; thence East 150 feet to the place of beginning said described piece of parcel of land being a part of the Southwest quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 15, Township 32 North of Range 19 West, Polk County, Wisconsin. Tax Key No.: 022-00362-0000. Property Address: 307 State Road 35, Osceola, WI 54020. Gunar J. Blumberg State Bar No. 1028987 Attorney for Plaintiff 230 W. Monroe, Ste. 1125 Chicago, IL 60606 Phone: 312-541-9710 Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. 532976 WNAXLP

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT BRANCH 2 ST. CROIX COUNTY

(April 20, 27, May 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK, Plaintiff, vs. NELCE C. SLUKA, Defendant. SUMMONS (By Publication) Case No. 11 CV 186 Case Classification No. 30404

534357 WNAXLP

(Mar. 30, Apr. 6, 13, 20, 27, May 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION The Bank of New York Mellon f/k/a the Bank of New York, as trustee for the certificate holders CWALT , Inc., Alternative Loan Trust 2006-OC1, Mortgage pass-through Certificates, series 2006-OC1 Plaintiff vs. Steve M. Preisler; Julie A. Preisler; Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, acting solely as nominee for Intervale Mortgage Corporation; Defendants

(April 6, 13, 20, 27, May 4, 11)

534987 WNAXLP

Notices

MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 25

NOTICE OF MEETING TO ADJOURN BOARD OF REVIEW TO LATER DATE Town of West Sweden, Polk County, Wisconsin The Board of Review will meet on Tues. May 17, 2011, immediately preceding the monthly town meeting at 6:30 p.m. at the Town Hall for the purpose of calling the Board of Review into session during the thirty-day period beginning on the 2nd Monday of May, pursuant to Sec. 70.47 (1) of Wis. Statutes. Due to the fact that the assessment roll is not completed at this time, it is anticipated that the Board of Review will meet again on June 19, 2011, at the Town Hall and could possibly adjourn at that time. The final date has not been set as of this time. Notice is hereby given this 4th day of May, 2011. Andrea Lundquist, Clerk 534993 37L WNAXLP

TOWN OF ST. CROIX FALLS Polk County, Wisconsin www.townofstcroixfalls.org PLAN COMMISSION - NOTICE OF HEARING May 11, 2011 The Town of St. Croix Falls Plan Commission will hold a public hearing at 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, May 11, 2011, at the Town Hall at 1305 200th Street & U.S. Hwy. 8, St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin. Written evidence, testimony or comments, if any, must be delivered in person or by mail to the Town Hall. Baker Orchards Inc. requests a SPECIAL EXCEPTION to have weddings and wedding receptions on their property in the Commercial District. The property address is 1594 State Road 35, Centuria, WI 54824. The property is located in Section 13, and the parcel identification number is 044-00297-0000. John Marinovich, owner, requests to create a minor subdivision, creating 2 lots from the 4.38 acres located in the NE 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of Section 25, T34N, R 18W. The current parcel identification number is 044-00610-0000, and the property address is 1378 Hungerford Point Rd, St. Croix Falls, WI 54024. 534854 36-37L WNAXLP Jim Alt, Zoning Administrator


PAGE 26 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

Notices/Employment Opportunities ASSOCIATE DEGREE NURSING INSTRUCTOR

REQUEST FOR BIDS ROOFING PROJECT SIREN SCHOOL DISTRICT

WITC RICE LAKE

The School District of Siren is now taking bids for the replacement of 14,679 sq. ft. of flat roof membrane. This reroofing project must be completed by June 30, 2011. To obtain further specifications and view job site, please contact the Director of Buildings & Grounds at 715-349-7392, ext. 403 to make an appointment. All bids must be submitted no later than 4 p.m. on May 13, 2011, in a sealed envelope marked ROOF MEMBRANE REPLACEMENT. All mailed bids should be sent to Don Fleischhacker, Director of Buildings & Grounds, School District of Siren, 24022 4th Avenue, Siren, WI 54872. The School District of Siren reserves the right to 534977 26-27a 37-38L accept or reject any and all bids.

TOWNS OF OAKLAND, SWISS AND UNION SPRING RECYCLING CLEANUP

WISCONSIN INDIANHEAD TECHNICAL COLLEGE

For a complete list of qualifications and to apply visit our Web site at www.witc.edu/employ. TTY 711 535156 37r,L

WITC is an equal opportunity/access/employer and educator.

RN - Part Time (.6) $24.82/hr. Golden Age Manor 3rd Shift 10:30 p.m. to 6:45 am. Deadline to apply: May 9, 2011 Dietary Aide - Part Time $11.31/hr. 2 shifts of 4:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. & 7 shifts of 4 to 8 p.m. per pay period. Must also be available for replacement days & fill-in p.m. cook. Deadline to apply: May 9, 2011 YOU MUST COMPLETE OUR POLK COUNTY EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION TO BE ELIGIBLE. For applications, complete job description & qualifications, please visit our Web site at www.co.polk.wi.us, Employee Opportunities, or in person at 100 Polk County Plaza, #229, Balsam Lake, WI, 715-485-9176. or GAM, 220 Scholl Ct., Amery, WI, 715-268-7107. AA/EEOC

535507 37L

The OCC is accepting at no charge on May 21 only, the following goods: stoves, empty refrigerators and freezers, water heaters, washers, dryers, furnaces, air conditioners, televisions, computers, printers, microwaves, miscellaneous electronics and tires. Normal fees will apply following this one-day event.

CURRENT OCC CARD REQUIRED TO DROP OFF ITEMS RESIDENTIAL ONLY – NO COMMERCIAL BUSINESSES

535160 WNAXLP

(May 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY RAB Performance Recoveries LLC as successor in interest to GE Money Bank c/o Messerli & Kramer P.A. 3033 Campus Drive, Suite 250 Plymouth, MN 55441 Plaintiff(s) vs. Lawrence Rasmussen 1212 120th St. Amery, WI 54001-7300 Defendant(s) Publication Summons Case No. 11SC173 TO THE PERSON(S) NAMED ABOVE AS DEFENDANT(S): You are being sued by the person(s) named above as Plaintiff(s). A copy of the claim has been sent to you at your address as stated in the caption above. The lawsuit will be heard in the following Small Claims Court: Polk County Courthouse, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810, on the following date and time: May 16, 2011, 1:30 p.m. If you do not attend the hearing, the court may enter a judgment against you in favor of the person(s) suing you. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. You may have the option to Answer without appearing in court on the court date by filing a written Answer with the clerk of court before the court date. You must send a copy of your Answer to the Plaintiff(s) named above at their address. You may contact the clerk of court at the telephone number above to determine if there are other methods to answer a Small Claims complaint in that county. If you need help in this matter because of a disability, please call: 715-485-9299. Michael R. Link Plaintiff’s Attorney 763-548-7900 April 14, 2011 Bar No. 1077386 Messerli & Kramer PA 3033 Campus Drive, Suite 250 Plymouth, MN 55441

(Apr. 13, 20, 27, May 4, 11, 18) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK, Plaintiff vs. JOSEPH E. BARG, and DAN JASPERSON and SUSAN A. JASPERSON, Defendants. Case No. 10 CV 692 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on November 22, 2010, in the amount of $110,488.13, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on: Thursday, May 26, 2011, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: Lot One Hundred Four (104) of the Assessor’s Plat of the Village of Dresser, according to the Official Plat thereof on file and of record in the office of the Register of Deeds in Polk County, Wisconsin, being a part of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4 of NE1/4), of Section Eighteen (18), Township Thirtythree (33) North of Range Eighteen (18) West, Village of Dresser, Polk County, Wis. PIN: 116-00417-0000. STREET ADDRESS: 138 State Street, Dresser, WI 54009. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wis., this 28th day of March, 2011. Peter M. Johnson, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson / #1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787 533982 WNAXLP

(March 30, April 6, 13, 20, 27, May 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY ROCK N’ ROLL TO GO PLUS!, INC., Plaintiff, vs. BRIDGET A. SORENSON, Defendant CASE NO. 2010TJ000017 NOTICE OF SALE Public notice is here given that by virtue of an Execution issued under the seal of the Circuit Court for Eau Claire County, Wisconsin, upon a Judgment entered in the Court on October 20, 2009, in favor of Rock N’ Roll To Go Plus!, Inc., Plaintiff, and against Bridget A. Sorenson, Defendant, in the sum of $389,577.39, damages and costs, I have levied upon all right, title and interest of Bridget A. Sorenson in and to the following real estate: Lot 27 County Plat of Magic Lake, along with 1/5 interest Outlot 2 as recorded in Volume 956 on Page 88 as Document #683110, Section 32, Township 32 North, Range 17 West, Town of Alden, Polk County, Wisconsin. Lot 28 County Plat of Magic Lake, along with 1/5 interest Outlot 2 as recorded in Volume 956 on Page 88 as Document #683110, Section 32, Township 32 North, Range 17 West, Town of Alden, Polk County, Wisconsin. Parcel ID: 002-02267-2700, 002-02267-2800, 002-022670102. Property Address: 7th Avenue, Town of Alden, Star Prairie, WI 54026. I will sell this property at public auction to the highest bidder, for cash, at 900 Polk County Judicial Center, 1005 West Main Street, in Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, at 10 a.m., on May 11, 2011, to satisfy the execution, together with interest and costs. Dated this 22nd day of March, 2011. /s/ Peter M. Johnson, Sheriff Herrick & Hart, S.C. Terry L. Moore 116 West Grand Avenue P.O. Box 167 Eau Claire, WI 54702-0167 (715) 832-3491

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NO building materials, brush, leaves or hazardous materials will be accepted. 535328 37-38L

535240 WNAXLP

Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College is seeking a learning-focused, creative and dynamic individual for full-time Associate Degree Nursing Instructor position at the WITC Rice Lake Campus beginning fall semester. The ideal candidates will demonstrate interest in and potential for excellence in facilitating student learning and development. Qualifications include: Master’s degree with a major in nursing or significant progress toward Master’s degree, two years’ occupational nursing experience and direct care experience as a practicing nurse within the past five years. Deadline to apply: May 6, 2011

POLK COUNTY POSITIONS ANNOUNCEMENT

Oakland Collection Center - “OCC” Saturday, May 21, 2011, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

(May 4, 11, 18, 25, June 1, 8) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CitiMortgage, Inc. Plaintiff vs. KEVIN R. GUMM, et al Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case Number: 10 CV 990 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on March 21, 2011, in the amount of $228,348.24, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: June 23, 2011, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot 6 of Certified Survey Maps No. 2196 recorded in Volume 10 of Certified Survey Maps, page 120 as Document No. 554503, located in part of the Northeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 and part of the Northwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4, Section 25, Township 34 North, Range 16 West, Town of Apple River, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1323 64th Street, Turtle Lake, WI 54889. TAX KEY NO.: 004-00678-0600. Dated this 28th day of April, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Russell J. Karnes State Bar #1054982 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 269979

UNITY SCHOOL DISTRICT April 21, 2011

Position Title: Administrative Assistant H.R. Contact: Brandon W. Robinson, District Administrator Contact Phone: 715-825-3515 Contact E-mail: brobinson@unity.k12.wi.us Position Description: Position will have primary responsibility for providing administrative assistance to the District Administrator and Board of Education. Post type and file agendas, notices, minutes, policies and publications for the Board of Education and District Administrator. Complete District office correspondence. Maintain Board of Education Policy Books. Maintain District calendars and schedules. Accurate compilation and filing of Department of Public Instruction reporting. Receipt all District funds daily. File and maintain District records. Maintain student enrollment records. Serve as District Notary Public. Maintain personnel directory and data. Qualifications: Position requires a balance of secretarial and organizational expertise. Applicant must possess excellent interpersonal skills and collaboration as part of the District Office team. Excellent verbal and written communication skills. Personnel confidentiality. Strong technology skills including Microsoft Word and Excel proficiency. Bank & cash reconciliation competency. Attention to detail, initiative and strong organizational skills are necessary. Proficiency in shorthand or note-taking beneficial. Requirements: Minimum of three years’ secretarial/administrative assistant experience, or any combination of education and experience that provides equivalent knowledge, skills and abilities. Preference given to proven experience in an educational or institutional setting. Position requires candidate to be highly organized and detail oriented; strong communication skills and a customer-focused, team orientation are critical to success in this position. Preference given to candidates with postsecondary degree or further training. Application Process: Please send a letter of interest, current resume and three references to: Unity High School District, Attn: Brandon W. Robinson, District Administrator, 1908 150th St./Hwy. 46 N., Balsam Lake, WI 54810. By return mail please receive: a formal application form, authorization for background check and current job description. Application period closes when filled, priority given to complete applications received prior to May 6, 2011. Projected start date is as soon as possible. Status: Full Time, 12-month contract. 534720 36-37L 26-27a-e Salary: Depending on qualifications.

NOTICE OF MEETING OF BOARD OF REVIEW FOR THE TOWN OF EUREKA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Board of Review for the Town of Eureka of Polk County, shall hold its first meeting on the 26th day of May, 2011, from 6 to 8 p.m., at Eureka Town Hall. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the board. No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact, or provide information to, a member of the board about the person’s objection except at a session of the Board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the board by telephone or contest the amount of assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent to file a written objection by appearing before the board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48hour notice requirement and files a written objection, that the person provides to the Clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any Board members and, if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the board, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are the subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or subject or object to a valuation if that valuation was made by the Assessor or the Objector using the income method; unless the person supplies the Assessor all of the information about income and expenses, as specified in the manual under Sec. 73.03(2a), that the Assessor requests. The Town of Eureka has an ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the Assessor under this paragraph which provides exemptions for persons using information to the discharge of duties imposed by law or of the duties of their office or by order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determined that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under Section 19.35(1) of Wis. Statutes. The Board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability, no other persons may testify by telephone. Respectfully submitted, Town of Eureka Michelle Tonnar, Clerk 535355 37-38L 27-28a,d


MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 27

NOTICE OF MEETING TO ADJOURN BOARD OF REVIEW TO LATER DATE STATE OF WISCONSIN TOWN OF JACKSON BURNETT COUNTY The Board of Review of the Town of Jackson, Burnett County, Wis., will meet on Sat. May 21, 2011, at 7:30 a.m. at the town hall, 4599 County Rd. A for the purpose of calling the Board of Review into session during the 30-day period beginning on the 2nd Monday of May pursuant to s.70.47 910, WIS. stats. Due to the fact that the assessment roll is not completed at this time, it is anticipated that the Board of Review will be adjourned until June 23, 2011, at the Town Hall from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Notice is hereby given this 4th day of May, 2011. Lorraine Radke, Clerk 534990 37L WNAXLP

REQUEST FOR BIDS – 2011 ROADWORK

Notice is hereby given that the Town of St. Croix Falls, Polk County, Wisconsin, is accepting bids for roadwork for the 2011 road maintenance season as follows: 1. Chip seal approximately 2 miles in various locations. 2. Wedge approximately 550 feet in two locations. 3. Thermal patch approximately 1,725 square feet in five locations. 4. Pulverize pavement and replace approximately 2.25 miles in four locations, work to include removal of any visible clay deposits. 5. Crack seal approximately 20 miles in various locations and Town Hall parking lot. The bidder’s attention is called to the fact that these projects are subject to the prevailing wage rate determination which has been issued by the State of Wisconsin and that the prevailing wage rates and hours of labor set forth in this determination shall be applicable to this project. For specific details of the above projects, contact Steve Jacobs, Public Works, at 715-338-6433 or Town Hall, at 715483-1851. Bids to be considered must be sealed and received by the Town at 1305 200th Street prior to noon on Friday, May 13, 2011. Bids will be opened on Friday, May 13, 2011, at 12:30 p.m. and awarded at the Town Board meeting on May 18, 2011. The Town Board reserves the right to accept or reject any, any part of, and/or all bids and to waive irregularities and information therein and further reserves the right to award the contract in the best interest of the Town of St. Croix Falls. Janet Krueger, Town Clerk www.townofstcroixfalls.org 535401 37-38L WNAXLP

VILLAGE OF BALSAM LAKE GARAGE SALE ORDINANCE

247-10 Garage Sales: A. License Required: All garage sales shall have a current and valid license issued from the Balsam Lake Village Office. The license shall be obtained at least three business days prior to the sale and shall be prominently displayed during the sale. (1) The license fee for a garage sale shall be: $1.00 for the first sale, $5.00 for the second, and $10.00 for the third sale when held within the same calendar year. (2) The Balsam Lake Village Office will notify the Balsam Lake Police Department of all garage sale licenses issued. B. Frequency of Sales. Garage sales shall not be held more than three times per calendar year at any residence nor held more than three consecutive days. C. Ownership of Merchandise. The personal property offered for sale shall only be household goods or personal possessions from the residence, or from family members related to those who reside at the residence, from which the sale is being held. Or, in the case of a group sale, from the residences of participating households within the Village of Balsam Lake. In no case shall any sales become outlets for wholesale or retail commercial sales. D. Hours of Operations. Garage sales may only be held between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. E. Garage Sale Signs. (1) Signs may not exceed six square feet in surface area, nor have more than two sides. (2) Signs shall identify the location of sale. (3) Signs shall not be located less than five feet from any roadway or lot line. (4) Signs shall not be posted on utility poles or traffic control devices. (5) Signs shall not be posted on property adjoining a right of way unless the owner of the property has given explicit permission for its location. (6) Signs shall not be posted at the intersection of Highway 46 and West Main Street. (7) Signs may only be displayed 24 hours before commencement of sale and 24 hours after end of sale. (8) Only one sign may be posted at the sale site. If site is a corner lot with two or more adjacent roadways, two signs may be posted; one per roadway. Two off-site signs may be posted. Section 2. This amendment to the ordinance shall take effect and be in force November 4, 2010. Contact Information: Village Clerk, Lori Duncan P.O. Box 506, 404 Main Street Balsam Lake, WI 54810 Phone: 715-485-3424 Fax: 715-485-9339 534467 25-26d 36-37L WNAXLP E-mail: vobl@lakeland.ws

Notices/Employment Opportunities POLICE OFFICER Village of Balsam Lake Police Dept. Balsam Lake, WI Announcement: Fill Vacancy Seasonal/Full-time Position Responsibilities: This is a Chief of Police position. General police functions, including patrol; traffic enforcement; ordinance enforcement; etc. Also includes supervision of officers; attend village board meetings; prepare police department budget; employee reviews; training of department employees. Salary: Salary dependent on qualifications. Wisconsin retirement fund; sick leave; paid Benefits: holidays; clothing allowance; vacation; other items negotiable. Qualifications: U.S. citizen, minimum age 21; driver’s license; good driving record; good physical condition; eligibility for Wisconsin Law Enforcement Standards Board Certification; high school diploma; 60 college credits; ability to possess a firearm; no felony convictions; no domestic abuse convictions; vision correctable to 20/20; good verbal and written communication skills; react quickly and effectively to stressful situations; able to work evenings, weekends, and holidays; knowledge and skills in operating computer systems; clear and concise speech; ability to handle several tasks simultaneously; ability to use all standard law enforcement equipment; must be either LESB certified or currently in training for it; three years’ law enforcement experience. May 10, 2011, 4 p.m. Apply by: Contact: Village Clerk, Lori Duncan 404 Main Street, P.O. Box 506 Balsam Lake, WI 54810 Phone: 715-485-3424 534466 Fax: 715-485-9339 25-26a,d E-mail: vobl@lakeland.ws 36-37L

NOTICE OF THE OPEN BOOK FOR THE VILLAGE OF WEBSTER

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Open Book Session for the Village of Webster, Burnett County, Wisconsin, will be held on Wednesday, May 18, 2011, at the village office, 7505 Main Street West, Webster, Wisconsin, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. This Session gives the property owner an opportunity to meet with the assessor, ask questions of the assessor and look over their property assessments.

NOTICE OF THE BOARD OF REVIEW FOR THE VILLAGE OF WEBSTER

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Review for the Village of Webster, Burnett County, Wisconsin, will be held on Wednesday, May 18, 2011, at the village office, 7505 Main Street West, Webster, Wisconsin, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board: No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the Assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact, or provide information to a member of the Board about the person’s objection except at a session of the Board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or contest the amount of the assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent to file a written objection by appearing before the Board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48-hour notice requirement and files a written objection, that the person provides to the clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any board members and, if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the Board of Review, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are the subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or object to a valuation; if that valuation was made by the Assessor or by the Objector using the income method of valuation; unless the person supplies the Assessor all the information about income and expenses, as specified in the Assessor’s manual under Sec 73.03(2a) of Wis. Statutes, that the Assessor requests. The Village of Webster has an ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the Assessor under this paragraph which provides exceptions for persons using information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or the duties of their office or by order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determined that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under Sec 19.35(1) of Wis. Statutes. The Board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other persons may testify by telephone. Respectfully submitted, Patrice Bjorklund Clerk/Treasurer 534995 37-38L WNAXLP

FREDERIC BOARD OF EDUCATION

Regular Meeting - Monday, March 21, 2011 The President, Mr. Nelson, called the regular meting of the Frederic School District Board of Education to order at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, March 21, 2011, in the 7 - 12 School, Room 107. Board members present: Mrs. Amundson, Mr. Engen, Mr. Holicky, Mrs. Matz and Mr. Nelson. Administration present: Mr. Draxler, Mrs. Steen and Mr. Tischer. Motion Amundson/Holicky that this meeting was properly noticed. Motion carried 5 - 0. Also present for this meeting were Mrs. Burns, Mr. Worthington and members of the press. Mrs. Burns and 7th-grade band students and the 8th-grade percussion section gave an entertaining performance in recognition of “Music in our Schools” month. Mr. Nelson announced to members of the board that they should consider adjourning to closed session for the purpose of an expulsion matter. Mr. Nelson informed the Board that the closed session would be proper and is authorized by s. 19.85 (1)(c)(f)(i) of the WI Statutes. Motion Matz/Amundson to adjourn to closed session. Vote by roll call was unanimous to convene in closed session and the motion carried 5 - 0. Time: 7:04 p.m. The regular meeting reconvened at 7:21 p.m. Motion Engen/Matz to approve the 2-21-11, regular meeting minutes as corrected. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Holicky/Engen to approve the 2-24-11, and 2-27-11, special meeting minutes. Motion carried 5 - 0. Mr. Nelson provided a summary of the 2-21-11, 2-24-11, and 227-11, closed session minutes. Motion Engen/Matz to approve the 1-12-11, and 1-17-11, closed session minutes. Motion carried 5 - 0. The invoices for February 2011 were presented as follows: Regular invoices (#9143-9252 & 38571-38575).........$305,715.76 Payroll account...........................................................$246,642.77 Motion Holicky/Matz to authorize and confirm the money payments of the invoices presented. Motion carried 5 - 0. Mr. Engen presented receipts for February 2011 totaling $1,568,640.58. Mr. Tischer reviewed the 2010 - 11 budget and reported on the 2011 - 12 budget bill update. The administration presented their building and district reports. The food service and building reports were submitted. Motion Holicky/Amundson to approve district funding for the junior high softball coaches (2) and junior high football coaches (2). Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Holicky/Amundson to approve Ethan Bergstrom as junior high track coach. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Holiky/Amundson to approve the following volunteer coaches: Travis Pyke - Track; Brad Schmidt - Softball; and Steve Jensen - Baseball. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Engen/Holicky to accept the resignation of Erin Schmidt as junior high softball coach. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Engen/Holicky to approve the 2011 - 12 CESA #11 Head Start Agreement. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Amundson/Matz to approve 2011 - 12 open enrollment applications as follows: 7 applications transferring in and 21 applications transferring out. Applications denied were for 1 transfer in, and 3 transfers out. Motion carried 5 - 0. The following policies were reviewed: Medication and Fund 60Activity Account. Motion Holicky/Engen to not sponsor the cross-country program unless there are sufficient numbers of students interested in participating. Motion carried 5 - 0. Mr. Nelson announced to members of the Board that they should consider adjourning to closed session for the purpose of negotiations, personnel matters and Youth Options. Mr. Nelson informed the Board that the closed session would be proper and is authorized by s. 19.85 (1)(c)(f)(i) of the WI Statutes. Motion Matz/Amundson to adjourn to closed session. Vote by roll call was unanimous to convene in closed session and the motion carried 5 - 0. Time: 8:11 p.m. The regular meeting reconvened at 10:35 p.m. Motion Nelson/Amundson to adjourn. Motion carried 5 - 0. Time: 10:36 p.m. Rebecca Amundson, Clerk

FREDERIC BOARD OF EDUCATION

Special Meeting - Wednesday, March 30, 2011 The President, Mr. Nelson, called a special meeting of the Frederic School District Board of Education to order at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 30, 2011, in the 7 - 12 School, Room 107. Board members present: Mrs. Amundson, Mr. Holicky, Mrs. Matz and Mr. Nelson. Mr. Engen arrived at 5:35 p.m. Administration present: Mr. Tischer. Motion Amundson/Holicky that this meeting was properly noticed. Motion carried 4 - 0. Motion Holicky/Matz to rescind the 3-21-11, motion denying 1 open enrollment application in and 3 open enrollment applications out; with final approval of 2011 - 12 open enrollment applications as follows: 8 applications in and 24 applications out. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Matz/Amundson to approve the Youth Options program for Brandy Gravelle. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Engen/Holicky to accept the resignation of Kathleen Lexen with appreciation for her years of service to the Frederic School District. Motion carried 5 - 0. Mr. Nelson announced to members of the Board that they should consider adjourning to closed session for the purpose of negotiations, personnel matters, staffing patterns and Community Education negotiations. Mr. Nelson informed the Board that the closed session would be proper and is authorized by s. 19.85 (1)(c)(f)(i) of the WI Statutes. Motion Matz/Holicky to adjourn to closed session. Vote by roll call was unanimous to convene in closed session and the motion carried 5 - 0. Time: 5:50 p.m. The regular meeting reconvened at 9:00 p.m. Motion Amundson/Engen to approve the following volunteer coaches: Nick Kuechenmeister, high school baseball; and Paula Denn, high school track. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Matz/Holicky to adjourn. Motion carried 5 - 0. Time: 9:05 p.m. 535005 37L Rebecca Amundson, Clerk


PAGE 28 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

MINUTES OF THE

POLK COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS

RESOLUTION 12-11

RESOLUTION TO GRANT A ZONING DISTRICT CHANGE AND TO AMEND ZONING DISTRICT MAP FOR THE TOWN OF ST. CROIX FALLS

TO THE HONORABLE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS OF THE COUNTY OF POLK, WISCONSIN: WHEREAS, the Town of St. Croix Falls administers their own Zoning Ordinance; and WHEREAS, paragraph 3 of Wisconsin Statute Chapter 60.62 relating to town zoning authority, if exercising village powers, reads: "In counties having a county zoning ordinance, no zoning ordinance or amendment of a zoning ordinance may be adopted under this section unless approved by the county board”; and WHEREAS, the Town Board of the Town of St. Croix Falls has approved the attached amendment to their Town Zoning District Map on March 16, 2011; and WHEREAS, the Polk County Board of Supervisors must also approve of the District Map Change. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors hereby approves the attached Zoning District Map Amendment for the Town of St. Croix Falls. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Finance Committee Recommendation: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage and Publication. Submitted and sponsored by the Land Information Committee: Kim. A. O’Connell. Reviewed and recommend by Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on April 19, 2011, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 12-11: Resolution To Grant A Zoning District Change And To Amend Zoning District Map For The Town Of St. Croix Falls, by a unanimous voice vote. Dated this 25th day of April, 2011, at Polk County, Wisconsin. William Johnson, IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk.

April 19, 2011 - 6 p.m.

Chairman Johnson called the meeting of the Polk County Board of Supervisors to order at 6:00 p.m. County Clerk informed the chair that notice of the agenda was properly posted in three public buildings, published in the county's legal paper and posted on the county Web site the week of April 10, 2011, and the amended agenda posted on April 18, 2011. Corporation Counsel informed the board that the initial meeting notice was sufficient as to time and subject matter under the open meetings law, however, as to the amended agenda, the board would need to adopt a motion to suspend the rules, suspending the time provisions set forth in the County Board Rules of Order. Roll call was taken by the Clerk, with 22 members present. Supvr. Rattel was absent for roll call. Supvr. Rattel joined the meeting at 6:25 pm. Supervisor Moriak led the prayer. Chairman led the Pledge of Allegiance Chairman Johnson asked for a motion to suspend of the rules to allow for the amended agenda and include Resolution 1. Motion (Sample/Brown) to suspend the rules. Motion to suspend the rules, carried by unanimous voice vote. Motion (Brown/Schmidt) to approve the amended agenda. Carried by unanimous voice vote. Chairman Johnson requested consideration and any corrections to the published March 15, 2011, County Board minutes. Motion (Masters/D. Johansen) to amend the minutes to reflect an addition immediately before the adjournment stating the Supvr. Masters indication to speak was not recognized. Motion to amend the minutes, carried by unanimous voice vote. Public comments were offered. Presentation by Gretchen Sampson, Public Health Director, on the Polk County Community Health Improvement Plan, "Healthiest Polk County 2015." Presentation by Steve Healy, from Economic Development, on the 2011 Polk County Energy Fair coming up August 19 and 20 at the Polk County Fairgrounds. Chairman's Report was given by Wm. Johnson. Note: County Board meeting time changes to 6:30 p.m. beginning in May thru September. Time was given for discussion on the Rules of Order involved in clarifying the Motion to Table of Resolution 10-11 from the March 15, 2011, meeting. Administrator's Report was given by Dana Frey. Finance Director's report was given by Dana Frey. Committee/Board Reports were given. Chair called for a 15-minute break.

TOWN OF ST. CROIX FALLS Polk County, Wisconsin RESOLUTION 11-02 A RESOLUTION APPROVING A CHANGE IN THE TOWN OF ST. CROIX FALLS ZONING MAP WHEREAS, Marguerite Lindblom, owner of real property in the Town of St. Croix Falls, has requested a change in the zoning map of the Town of St. Croix Falls; and WHEREAS, the Plan Commission of the Town of St. Croix Falls after reviewing the change request and approving the same at its March 9, 2011, meeting recommends to the Town Board to concur in this decision and petition the Polk County Board of Supervisors to approve the requested change. THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Town Board of the Town of St. Croix Falls, Polk County, Wisconsin, requests the Polk County Board of Supervisors to change the Towns zoning map as follows: From AGRICULTURAL to TRANSITIONAL the following parcels: The NW 1/4 of Section 15, T34N, R18W, all parts of Parcel No. 044-0343-0000 consisting of 31.89 acres; and all parts of Parcel No. 044-0347-0000 consisting of 6.84 acres. Dated this 16th day of March, 2011. /s/William Hughes, Chairperson. Attest: Janet Krueger, Town Clerk. Approved by voice vote: 5 Yeas, 0 Nays, 0 Absent/Abstain. Res. 12-11 - To Grant A Zoning District Change And To Amend Zoning District Map For The Town Of St. Croix Falls. Motion (O'Connell/Brown) to approve. Supvr. O'Connell addressed the Resolution. Motion to approve Resolution 1211 carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution adopted.

RESOLUTION 11-11

RESOLUTION TO APPROVE ZONING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT FOR THE TOWN OF ST. CROIX FALLS TO THE HONORABLE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS OF THE COUNTY OF POLK, WISCONSIN: WHEREAS, the Town of St. Croix Falls administers their own Zoning Ordinance; and WHEREAS, paragraph 3 of Wisconsin Statute Chapter 60.62 relating to town zoning authority, if exercising village powers, reads: "In counties having a county zoning ordinance, no zoning ordinance or amendment of a zoning ordinance may be adopted under this section unless approved by the county board”; and WHEREAS, the Town of St. Croix Falls adopted Zoning Ordinance No. 1 on August 5, 1965, amended in its entirety on May 12, 1994, and subsequent amendments including the amendment on March 20, 2001; January 16, 2008; February 18, 2009; May 20, 2009; October 21, 2009; March 17, 2010; April 21, 2010, and August 18, 2010; and WHEREAS, the Town Board of the Town of St. Croix Falls deems it advisable and necessary to amend Chapter V Sign Regulations, Section C.3.d, Loss of Nonconforming Status of the Zoning Ordiance No. 1; and WHEREAS, the Town Plan Commission held a public hearing on February 9, 2011, on the proposed amendment; and WHEREAS, the Town Board of the Town of St. Croix Falls held the first reading of the proposed amendment on February 16, 2011, and a second reading was held on March 16, 2011; and WHEREAS, the Town Board of the Town of St. Croix Falls has approved the attached amendment to their Town Zoning Ordinance on March 16, 2011; and WHEREAS, the Polk County Board of Supervisors must also approve of the Ordinance Amendment. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors hereby approves the attached Zoning Ordinance Amendment for the Town of St. Croix Falls. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Finance Committee Recommendation: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage and Publication. Submitted and sponsored by the Land Information Committee: Kim A. O’Connell. Reviewed and recommend by Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on April 19, 2011, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 11-11: Resolution To Approve Zoning Ordinance Amendment For The Town Of St. Croix Falls, by a unanimous voice vote. Dated this 25th day of April, 2011, at Polk County, Wisconsin. William Johnson, IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk.

RESOLUTION 13-11

RESOLUTION TO GRANT A ZONING DISTRICT CHANGE AND TO AMEND ZONING DISTRICT MAP FOR THE TOWN OF CLAYTON TO THE HONORABLE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS OF THE COUNTY OF POLK, WISCONSIN: WHEREAS, Troy Cress has petitioned the Polk County Board of Supervisors requesting that a parcel of real estate be rezoned Commercial District, thereby removing said parcel from the General Purpose District; and WHEREAS, the Town Board of Clayton has not objected to said District Change; and WHEREAS, a public hearing was held on Wednesday, April 6, 2011, at 8:30 a.m., at the Polk County Government Center by the Land Information Committee of the Polk County Board of Supervisors as required by the provisions of Wisconsin Statute Section 59.69 (5) (e) regarding said District Change; and WHEREAS, at said public hearing objections were filed with regard to said proposed Zoning District Change; and WHEREAS, the Land Information Committee of the Polk County Board of Supervisors has reviewed said proposed Zoning District Change, and has recommended that the Polk County Board of Supervisors grant said proposed change. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors grants the proposed zoning change. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that pursuant to Wisconsin Statute Section 59.69(5)(e), the Polk County Board of Supervisors does hereby amend the Polk County Comprehensive Land Use Ordinance to provide that the following described parcel of real estate be removed from the General Purpose District and be rezoned in the Commercial District: "Lot 3, CSM #5822, Vol. 26/Pg. 88, located in Gov't Lot 3, Sec. 23/T33N/R15W, Town of Clayton, County of Polk, State of Wisconsin." BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that said district change to be recorded on the Zoning District Map of the Town of Clayton, which is on file in the office of the Polk County Zoning Administrator, pursuant to Section II (2) of the Polk County Comprehensive Land Use Ordinance. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Finance Committee Recommendation: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage and Publication. Submitted and sponsored by the Land Information Committee: Kim A. O’Connell, Larry Voelker, Herschel Brown, Craig Moriak and Wendy Rattel. Reviewed and recommend by Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on April 19, 2011, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 13-11: Resolution To Grant A Zoning District Change And to Amend Zoning District Map For The Town Of Clayton, by a unanimous voice vote. Dated this 25th day of April, 2011, at Polk County, Wisconsin. William Johnson, IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk.

TOWN OF ST. CROIX FALLS Polk County, Wisconsin

AMENDING ZONING ORDINANCE NO. 1 ENTITLED "TOWN ZONING ORDINANCE" ORDINANCE 11- 02

Section 1: Purpose The purpose of this ordinance is to amend Chapter V Sign Regulations and Restrictions, Section C Legal Nonconforming Signs, 3 Loss of Nonconforming Status, d. by amending as follows: The sign is destroyed by any means to the extent of fifty (50%) percent or more of its fair market value, percent of the display or structure is destroyed. Fifty (50%) percent or more of the sign structure is destroyed by any means. Structure in this instance also includes any wood or metal used for display, but not the copy on the display.

Adopted on March 16, 2011, by Resolution 11-04. /s/William Hughes, Town Chair. Attest: Janet Krueger, Town Clerk. Posted on March 18, 2011, at the following locations: Wayne’s Cafe, Lampert’s and the town hall. Res. 11-11 - To Approve Zoning Ordinance Amendment For The Town Of St. Croix Falls. Motion (O'Connell/ Edgell) to approve. Resolution was addressed by Supvr. O'Connell. Motion to approve Resolution 11-11, carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution adopted.

County Board Supervisors Zoning Administration April 6, 2011 District Change from General Purpose to Commercial Lot 3, CSM #5822, Vol. 26/Pg. 88, in Gov't. Lot 3, Sec. 23/T33N/R15W, Town of Clayton On April 6, 2011, Troy Cress petitioned the Polk County Land Information Committee to rezone 10.73 acres located on the above-captioned property in the Town of Clayton. The request is to rezone a General Purpose district to Commercial district for an automotive repair shop. At the public hearing, objections were filed and the Land Information Committee recommends the proposed change. TO: FROM: DATE: RE:

Section 2: Effective Date This ordinance shall take effect from and after its passage and legal publication.

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MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 29

If the County Board approves the district change, the following uses will be allowed: A. Permitted Uses. 1. Barbershop, Beauty Shop. 2. Business & Professional Offices or Clinics. 3. Drugstore, Pharmacy, Soda Fountain. 4. Fruit and Vegetable Market, Grocery, Meat and Fish Market or other food products store. 5. Hardware and Paint Store. 6. Notion & Variety Store. 7. Radio & Televisions sales & service. 8. Restaurant, Drive-In Food Service, Dinner Club or Tavern. 9. Clothing or Dry Goods Store. 10. Filling Station, tire and battery service. 11. Sporting Goods, Marine Supplies and Accessories. 12. Laundry, Cleaning & Dyeing establishments. 13. Furniture, Appliances, Office Equipment. 14. Bank, Savings & Loan or other financial institutions. 15. Motels or Hotels. 16. Funeral Homes. 17. Bowling Alleys, Dance Halls and Skating Rinks when sound is abated sufficiently so as not to be heard in the residence of any other than the owner or his agent. 18. There may be one dwelling unit on the premises, either attached or detached in connection with any of the above uses, for the owner or his agent. 19. Manufacture or storage in connection with any of the above uses, when clearly incidental to the conduct of the retail business on the premises. 20. Farm implement repair & sales. 21. Commercially sponsored & operated outdoor events & other related activities with a minimum of 30 acres.

Special Exception Use 1. Medical, correctional or charitable institutions and medical offices. 2. Contractor's storage yard. 3. Fur farms, charcoal kilns, pea viners or sawmills. 4. Kennels. 5. Quarrying. 6. Slaughterhouses. 7. Licensed game management or fur farms. 8. Service station and/or public garage. 9. Private/Public Stables/Tack Shops. 10. Junkyard/Salvage Yard/Recycling Center. 11. Composting site. Needs County Board Approval: Sanitary landfills and dumps, public or private. Res. 14-11 - To Grant A Zoning District Change And To Amend Zoning District Map For The Town Of Apple River. Motion (Voelker/Stoneking) to approve. Supvr. O'Connell addressed the Resolution. Motion to approve Resolution 1411 carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution adopted.

RESOLUTION 15-11

RESOLUTION TO AUTHORIZE APPLICATION FOR THE WISCONSIN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM LOAN TO KAPCO, INC.

TO THE HONORABLE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS OF THE COUNTY OF POLK, WISCONSIN WHEREAS, Federal monies are available under the Wisconsin Community Development Block Grant program, administered by the State of Wisconsin, Department of Commerce, for the purpose of economic development; and WHEREAS, after public meeting and due consideration, the Polk County Land Information Committee has recommended that an application be submitted to the State of Wisconsin for the following projects: Loan to KAPCO, Inc. for business retention and expansion in the Village of Osceola WHEREAS, it is necessary for the Polk County Board to authorize the preparation and filing of an application for the County to receive funds from this program; and WHEREAS, the Wisconsin Department of Commerce has reviewed the need for the proposed project and the benefits to be gained from said project. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Polk County Board of Supervisors does authorize and approve the preparation and filing of an application for the above-named project. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board Chairperson is hereby authorized to sign all necessary documents on behalf of the County. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors authorizes the County Administrator to take the necessary steps to prepare and to file the appropriate application for funds under this program in accordance with this resolution. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that Polk County authorizes the grant award to be deposited in a "Regional Community Development Clearinghouse Account" managed by the West Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission for the sole purpose of disbursing CDBG funds on the County's behalf in accordance with this resolution. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the County will contract with the West Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission to administer the grant for an amount not to exceed the funds provided by the grant for administration. FISCAL IMPACT: There is no budget impact. No county levy moneys are expended through this resolution. Funds available for the RBF, Inc. Consolidated Fund may be increased by the amount of this loan. Funding amount and source: $3,040,000 Federal Community Development Block Grant Funds. Date Finance Committee Advised: N/A. Finance Committee Recommendation: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage. Date Submitted to County Board: April 19, 2011. Submitted and sponsored by the Polk County Land Information Committee: Kim A. O’Connell, Herschel Brown, Craig Moriak, Wendy Rattel and Larry Voelker. Reviewed and recommend by Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on April 19, 2011, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 15-11: Resolution To Authorize Application For The Wisconsin Community Development Block Grant For Economic Development Program Loan To KAPCO, Inc., by a unanimous voice vote. Dated this 25th day of April, 2011, at Polk County, Wisconsin. William Johnson, IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Res. 15-11 - To Authorize Application For The Wisconsin Community Development Block Grant For Economic Development Program Loan To KAPCO., Inc. Motion (Jepsen/O'Connell) to approve. Steve Healy addressed the resolution. Motion to approve Resolution 15-11 carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution adopted.

C. Special Use Permits 1. Any similarly compatible commercial enterprise subject to the approval of the Board of Adjustment.

Res. 13-11 - To Grant A Zoning District Change And To Amend Zoning District Map For The Town Of Clayton. Motion (Moriak/O'Connell) to approve. Supvr. O'Connell addressed the resolution. Motion to approve Resolution 13-11 carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution adopted.

RESOLUTION 14-11

RESOLUTION TO GRANT A ZONING DISTRICT CHANGE AND TO AMEND ZONING DISTRICT MAP FOR THE TOWN OF APPLE RIVER TO THE HONORABLE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS OF THE COUNTY OF POLK, WISCONSIN: WHEREAS, Richard Bump has petitioned the Polk County Board of Supervisors requesting that a parcel of real estate be rezoned Agricultural District, thereby removing said parcel from the Commercial District; and WHEREAS, the Town Board of Apple River has not objected to said District Change; and WHEREAS, a public hearing was held on Wednesday, April 6, 2011, at 8:30 a.m., at the Polk County Government Center by the Land Information Committee of the Polk County Board of Supervisors as required by the provisions of Wisconsin Statute Section 59.69 (5) (e) regarding said District Change; and WHEREAS, at said public hearing no objections were filed with regard to said proposed Zoning District Change; and WHEREAS, the Land Information Committee of the Polk County Board of Supervisors has reviewed said proposed Zoning District Change and has recommended that the Polk County Board of Supervisors grant said proposed change. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors grants the proposed zoning change. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that pursuant to Wisconsin Statute Section 59.69(5)(e), the Polk County Board of Supervisors does hereby amend the Polk County Comprehensive Land Use Ordinance to provide that the following described parcel of real estate be removed from the Commercial District and be rezoned in the Agricultural District: "NE 1/4 of the SE 1/4, and SE 1/4 of the SE 1/4 of Section 9/T34N/R16W, Town of Apple River, County of Polk, State of Wisconsin." BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that said district change to be recorded on the Zoning District map of the Town of Apple River, which is on file in the office of the Polk County Zoning Administrator pursuant to Section II (2) of the Polk County Comprehensive Land Use Ordinance. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Finance Committee Recommendation: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage and Publication. Submitted and sponsored by the Land Information Committee: Kim A. O’Connell, Larry Voelker, Herschel Brown, Craig Moriak and Wendy Rattel. Reviewed and recommend by Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on April 19, 2011, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 14-11: Resolution To Grant A Zoning District Change And to Amend Zoning District Map For The Town Of Apple River, by a unanimous voice vote. Dated this 25th day of April, 2011, at Polk County, Wisconsin. William Johnson, IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. TO: County Board Supervisors FROM: Zoning Administration DATE: April 6, 2011 RE: District Change from Commercial to Agricultural NE 1/4 of the SE 1/4 and SE 1/4 of the SE 1/4 of Sec. 9, Town of Apple River On April 6, 2011, Richard Bump petitioned the Polk County Land Information Committee to rezone 80 acres located on the above-captioned property in the Town of Apple River. The request is to rezone a Commercial district to Agricultural district to have a dwelling. At the public hearing, no objections were filed and the Land Information Committee recommends the proposed change. If the County Board approves the district change, the following uses will be allowed: Permitted Uses. 1. Single-/multiple-family dwellings. 2. Churches, public and parochial schools. 3. Lodging or boarding house. 4. Municipal buildings. 5. Accessory buildings. 6. Private clubs and fraternities. 7. Gardening and farming. 8. Municipal parks and playgrounds. 9. Utility poles/lines. 10. Home occupation. 11. Professional office. 12. General farming. 13. Mobile home parks. 14. Dams, power plants & flowage areas. 15. Roadside stands. 16. Drive-in theaters. 17. Municipal warehouses, municipal shops & storage yards. 18. Garage incinerators, municipal sewage plants, municipal sewage disposal plants, recycling plants & hot mix plants. 19. Municipal sewage disposal plants, recycling plants & hot mix plants.

RESOLUTION 16-11

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RESOLUTION TO AUTHORIZE APPLICATION FOR THE WISCONSIN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM LOAN TO ENGINEERED PLASTIC COMPONENTS, INC. TO THE HONORABLE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS OF THE COUNTY OF POLK, WISCONSIN: WHEREAS, Federal monies are available under the Wisconsin Community Development Block Grant program, administered by the State of Wisconsin, Department of Commerce, for the purpose of economic development; and WHEREAS, after public meeting and due consideration, the Polk County Land Information Committee has recommended that an application be submitted to the State of Wisconsin for the following projects: Loan to Engineered Plastic Components, Inc. for business retention and expansion in the Village of Osceola. WHEREAS, it is necessary for the Polk County Board to authorize the preparation and filing of an application for the County to receive funds from this program; and WHEREAS the Wisconsin Department of Commerce has reviewed the need for the proposed project and the benefits to be gained from said project. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors does authorize and approve the preparation and filing of an application for the above-named project. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board Chairperson is hereby authorized to sign all necessary documents on behalf of the County. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors authorizes the County Administrator to take the necessary steps to prepare and to file the appropriate application for funds under this program in accordance with this resolution. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that Polk County authorizes the grant award to be deposited in a "Regional Community Development Clearinghouse Account" managed by the West Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission for the sole purpose of disbursing CDBG funds on the County's behalf in accordance with this resolution. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the County will contract with the West Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission to administer the grant for an amount not to exceed the funds provided by the grant for administration. FISCAL IMPACT: There is no budget impact. No county levy moneys are expended through this resolution. Funds available for the RBF, Inc. Consolidated Fund may be increased by the amount of this loan.


PAGE 30 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

NOTICE

TOWN OF LORAIN BOARD OF REVIEW Thursday, May 12, 2011 7:30 p.m.

Agenda: Call meeting to order; motion to adjourn Board of Review until July 7, 2012, at 5 p.m. Motion to adjourn. 535321 37L 27a Susan E. Hughes, Clerk

Notices

NOTICE

NOTICE OF THE BOARD OF REVIEW TOWN OF LAFOLLETTE

TOWN OF LORAIN BOARD MEETING

BURNETT COUNTY, STATE OF WISCONSIN

Thursday, May 12, 2011, 7:30 p.m. Lorain Town Hall, 252 345th Ave., Cty. Rd. E

The Board of Review of the Town of LaFollette, Burnett County, Wisconsin, will meet on Monday, May 9, 2011, at 7:30 p.m. at the LaFollette Town Hall for the purpose of calling the Board of Review into session during the 30-day period beginning the 2nd Monday of May, pursuant to s. 70.47 (1), WI. stats. Due to the fact that the assessment roll is not completed at this time, it is anticipated that the Board of Review will be adjourned until further notice. Respectfully, Linda Terrian, Clerk 535333 37L 27a

Funding amount and source: $450,000 Federal Community Development Block Grant Funds. Date Finance Committee Advised: N/A. Finance Committee Recommendation: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage. Date Submitted to County Board: April 19, 2011. Submitted and sponsored by the Polk County Land Information Committee: Kim A. O’Connell, Herschel Brown, Craig Moriak, Wendy Rattel and Larry Voelker. Reviewed and recommend by Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on April 19, 2011, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 16-11: Resolution To Authorize Application For The Wisconsin Community Development Block Grant For Economic Development Program Loan To Engineered Plastic Components, Inc. by a unanimous voice vote. Dated this 25th day of April, 2011, at Polk County, Wisconsin. William Johnson, IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Res. 16-11 - To Authorize Application For The Wisconsin Community Development Block Grant For Economic Development Program Loan To Engineered Plastic Components, Inc. Motion (Jepsen/O'Connell) to approve. Steve Healy addressed the resolution. Motion to approve Resolution 16-11 carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution adopted.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Personnel Committee and the Finance Committee provide a recommendation to the County Board of Supervisors on the plan developed by the Transition Committee. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Date Finance Committee Advised: N/A. Finance Committee Recommendation: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage. Date Submitted to County Board: April 19, 2011. Submitted and Sponsored By the Personnel Committee: Russell E. Arcand, Patricia M. Schmidt, Warren Nelson and James Edgell. Reviewed and recommend by Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and approved as to form by: Malia Malone, Assistant Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on April 19, 2011, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 18-11: Resolution To Create A Transition Committee by a voice vote. William Johnson, IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Res. 18-11 - To Create A Transition Committee. Motion (Schmidt/Sample) to approve. Supvr. Arcand addressed the resolution. Motion to approve Resolution 18-11 carried by voice vote. Resolution adopted.

RESOLUTION 19-11

RESOLUTION 17-11

RESOLUTION TO AMEND POLK COUNTY PERSONNEL POLICY 390, NONREPRESENTED EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION MANAGEMENT POLICY TO THE HONORABLE MEMBERS OF THE COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS OF THE COUNTY OF POLK: WHEREAS, pursuant to Polk County Perponnel Policy 040, entitled, Policy Development and Administration, the Polk County Personnel Committee has the responsibility to develop, in consultation with appropriate staff, and recommend to the Polk County Board of Supervisors, personnel policies that will affect the efficient use of human resources; and WHEREAS, pursuant to Polk County Personnel Policy 040, the Finance Committee has the responsibility to develop, in consultation with appropriate staff, and recommend to the Polk County Board of Supervisors, finance policies that will affect the efficient use of available financial resources; and WHEREAS, Polk County Personnel Policy 390, entitled, Nonrepresented Employee Compensation Management Policy, is a policy that affects the efficient use of human resources and financial resources of the County; and WHEREAS, the Personnel Committee and the Finance Committee have developed an amendment to said policy and each committees recommends that the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopt a resolution to amend said policy in conformity with the proposed amendment, which is attached hereto and incorporated herein. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors amends the Polk County Personnel Policy 390, Nonrepresented Employee Compensation Management Policy, as attached hereto and incorporated herein. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that Polk County Board of Supervisors directs the Employee Relations Department to cause to have posted on the Polk County Web site the Polk County Personnel Policy 390, Nonrepresented Employee Compensation Management Policy, as amended herein. Date Personnel Committee Advised: February 10, 2011. Personnel Committee Recommendation: Adoption. Date Finance Committee Advised: March 16, 2011. Finance Committee Recommendation: Passed. Effective date: Upon Passage. Date Submitted to County Board: April 19, 2011. Submitted and Sponsored by the Personnel Committee: Russell E. Arcand, Patricia M. Schmidt, Warren Nelson, James Edgell and Ken Sample. Submitted and Sponsored by the Finance Committee: Gary P. Bergstrom, Brian Masters and Neil Johnson. Reviewed and recommend by Dana Frey, County Administrator. Approved as to form by: Malia Malone, for Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on April 19, 2011, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 19-11: Resolution To Amend Polk County Personnel Policy 390, Nonrepresented Employee Compensation Management Policy, by a unanimous voice vote. William Johnson, IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Res. 19-11 - To Amend Polk County Personnel Policy 390, Nonrepresented Employee Compensation Management Policy. Motion (Edgell/Stoneking) to approve. Administrator Frey addressed the resolution. Motion to approve resolution 19-11 carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution adopted. Election of members to the Transition Committee. Three members to be chosen by ballot. Nominated were: Kristine Hartung, Larry Jepsen, Jay Luke and Herschel Brown. The outcome from the voting was: Supvrs. Hartung, Luke and Brown will serve on the transition committee, along with Brian Masters from Finance and Patricia Schmidt from Personnel. No discussion on the matter of the previously tabled Resolution from the March 15, 2011, meeting. Motion (Jepsen/Luke) to approve Administrator Frey's appointment of Gerald NewvIIle to the Nutrition Project Counsel. Motion to approve appointment carried by unanimous voice vote. Supervisors reports were given. Motion (D. Johansen/H. Johansen) to adjourn. Motion carried. Meeting adjourned 8:50 p.m.

AUTHORIZE 2011 HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS WHEREAS, the improvements of the County Trunk Highway System are of great importance to the residents of Polk County; and WHEREAS, the County has a responsibility to keep and maintain the County Trunk Highway system in repair; and WHEREAS, the Polk County Highway Committee has approved projects for FY 2010; and WHEREAS, the Highway Committee and the County Board has approved a budget to effect measured improvement on the projects approved by the Highway Committee for FY 2011; and WHEREAS, the County's purchasing policy requires the County board to take action and approve any and all public works projects over $150,000. THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors authorizes the Highway Department to proceed on the following projects: CTH I1 - Pulverize/Pave 1,007,000.00 CTH M3/M2 - 20% STP Match 498,200.00 CTH Y1 - Overlay 357,500.00 CTH F2/F3/F4/F4.1 - Chip Seals 198,500.00 CTH E4/E3/E6 - Chip Seals 232,500.00 CTH E1 - Culverts/Prep Work 73,300.00 STH 65 & CTH K - Intersection Repair (10%) 25,000.00 BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that in the event the approved project costs exceed the estimated project cost, the Board authorizes the department to eliminate projects to meet budget constraints. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, those projects eliminated may be moved to future funding years. Funding amount: $2,392,000.00. Funding source: 2011 Highway Budget. Effective date: Upon Passage. Date Submitted to County Board: April 19, 2011. Approved as to form: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. Submitted at the request of the Polk County Highway Committee: Craig Moriak, Marvin Caspersen, Dean Johansen, Jay Luke and Larry Voelker. Reviewed and recommend by Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on April 19, 2011, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 17-11: Resolution To Authorize 2011 Highway Construction Projects by a unanimous voice vote. William Johnson, IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Res. 17-11 - To Authorize 2011 Highway Construction Projects. Motion (Voelker/Caspersen) to approve. Emil Norby addressed the resolution. Motion to approve Resolution 17-11 carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution adopted.

RESOLUTION 18-11

RESOLUTION TO CREATE A TRANSITION COMMITTEE TO THE HONORABLE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS OF THE COUNTY OF POLK, WISCONSIN WHEREAS, the Budget Repair Bill ("BRB"), when and if it becomes effective, will require the County to make significant changes to current policies and will require the development of new personnel policies concerning work rules and a grievance process; and WHEREAS, the BRB contemplates providing the County with four (4) month transition phase in which the County would develop a grievance policy consistent with the mandates of state law; and WHEREAS, it is in the interest of the County to adjust county personnel policies concerning county employees in conformance with state law; and WHEREAS, it is in the interest of the County to proactively respond to the BRB. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors creates an ad hoc committee, named as the Transition Committee, for the purpose of developing new personnel policies regarding work rules and a grievance procedure in conformity with the BRB. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Transition Committee shall be composed of five (5) persons, consisting of one member of the Personnel Committee and one from the Finance Committee, as designated by the respective chairpersons of said committee; and three members from the Polk County Board of Supervisors, who are not members of the Personnel or Finance Committee, and shall be nominated and elected by the County Board. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the staff of the Department of Administration, Employee Relations Department and the Office of Corporation Counsel shall provide technical assistance to the Transition Committee. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Transition Committee is authorized to bring in additional resources to assist the Committee as it deems necessary.

Agenda: Call meeting to order. Roll Call/Verification of meeting notice. Approve the minutes of the last meeting. Approve the treasury report. Motion to pay the bills. Discussion & possible action on reimbursement for First Responder. Reports: Road, Fire Dept., Ambulance, Cemetery, Comprehensive Plan Commission. Additional meeting items for future agendas. Motion to adjourn Susan E. Hughes, Clerk 535003 37L 27a

STATE OF WISCONSIN COUNTY OF POLK

535362 37L

) )

I, Carole T. Wondra, County Clerk for Polk County, do hereby certify that the foregoing minutes are a true and correct copy of the County Board Proceedings of the Polk County Board of Supervisors Session held on April 19, 2011. Carole T. Wondra Polk County Clerk


Earth Day/Arbor Day Trip

MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 31

A floor map of the St. Croix River from Danbury and south was a highlight for students to locate their own homes in relation to the river.

Students on the Earth Day/Arbor Day field trip last Friday, April 29, were able to observe and learn about the trout population raised at the fish hatchery in St. Croix Falls. One million brown and brook trout are shipped throughout Wisconsin from this facility each year.

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Students from St. Croix Falls, Osceola, Clear Lake and Clayton took part in an Earth Day/Arbor Day trip on Friday, April 29. Ali Cordie, Crex Meadows natural resources educator, shared a rehabilitated screech owl with the students and discussed the habitats and animal populations at Crex. - Photos submitted

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Janna, a teaching artist from Festival Theatre, shared with students the importance of properly recycling paper. Pulp from shredded paper was used by the students to make their own piece of recycled paper.

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Musical Movie Montage concert

PAGE 32 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

by Priscilla Bauer Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – The Grantsburg band department presented an evening of great movie music with the Musical Movie Montage concert on Monday, May 2. Band students in grades five through 12 entertained the audience with their fine renditions of movie theme songs

ranging from the intriguing to the sentimental and the silly. The most colorful moments of the concert came when members of eighth-grade drum line gave a very artful performance of “Funky Shoes.” Joel Rauchbauer, Carter Lee and Drew Alderman delighted the crowd as they beat drums filled with red, blue and yellow paint with

splashing success. The concert was presented under the direction of Grantsburg middle and high school band director Andrew Schultz and music assistant Angela Bram.

Eighth-grade drum line member Joel Rauchbauer’s colorful performance showed on his face after he and fellow drum line members Carter Lee and Drew Alderman, dressed in hooded white coveralls, delighted the crowd by beating drums filled with red, blue and yellow paint with splashing success. The trio’s artful act was the surprise number of the Musical Movie Montage concert presented by the Grantsburg fifth- through 12th-grade bands on May 2 in the school’s high school gym.

LEFT: Rachel Diffee showed her sax style during the high school jazz band’s performance of the “The Girl From Ipanema.”

RIGHT: Ryan Rauchbauer played the tune “Hip Lids” with garbage can covers accompanied by middle school drum line members Carter Lee, Drew Alderman and Cassidy Lee.

BELOW: Grantsburg middle and high school band director Andrew Schultz directed the high school band during the Movie Music Montage concert presented on Monday, May 2

Photos by Priscilla Bauer

RIGHT: Carrisa Skifstad was having fun during the handbell divas plus Nick and Joe performance of “Kiss the Girl.” BELOW: Nicholas Plunkett had perfect timing on his tuba during the sixth-grade band’s performance of “Rock Around the Clock.


Currents

WED., MAY 4, 2011 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER NORTHERN CURRENTS • SECTION B

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Cancer Walk chairpersons refl fle ect

THE-LEADER.NET

Luck and Frederic host ACS Walk/Run events this Saturday

Cancer as an inconvenience Perspective is a key for Debbie Wickstrom

by Mary Stirrat Leader staff writer LUCK — Cancer is a frightening word. It’s a frightening diagnosis, and a frightening disease. Debbie Wickstrom, high school administrative secretary at Luck Schools, heard that diagnosis in August of 2007, after a biopsy of a lump revealed during a mammogram came back malignant. The good news is that the lump was removed, Wickstrom underwent radiation therapy, and she is now cancer free. She is this year’s honorary chair for the American Cancer Society Luck Area Walk/Run. The event will be Saturday, May 7, starting at 9:15 a.m. at Luck Schools. Registration is from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. ••• Wickstrom’s personal journey with cancer actually began six months before her diagnosis, when her routine mammogram showed a small cyst. As a precaution her doctor scheduled her for another mammogram six months later. By the end of July, when the second mammogram was done, said Wickstrom, the cyst had grown “fingers” and a biopsy was scheduled. “I didn’t worry about it,” she said. “I really didn’t think it was going to be anything.” But on Aug. 17, 2007, a diagnosis of breast cancer came back. The surgeon who did the biopsy called her first, and within five minutes Wickstrom’s personal physician contacted her. “When you hear that word ‘cancer,’” she said, “you hear nothing after that. At least I didn’t. I lost control a little bit.” When her doctor’s words came into focus again, he was explaining that the diagnosis was not a death sentence, but rather an inconvenience. “He said there were hurdles I’d have to jump, but that I would just have to keep running,” Wickstom recalled. As Debbie and her husband, Barry, began to process the diagnosis, he asked her what might be of most help to her. She realized that talking to other cancer survivors, people who had been through what she was facing, would be of great benefit, so she contacted Sue Messar of Luck. Messar is also a breast cancer survivor, and in 2005 she and Steve Pomerleau served as honorary co-chairs of the Luck walk. “I needed somebody to cry with me, but be the strong person,” said Debbie. “Then I felt I got a better grip, and felt I knew better what I needed to do.” Aug. 17, the day they received the diagnosis, was a Friday, and Barry and Debbie

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Debbie Wickstrom, honorary chair for the American Cancer Society Luck Area Walk/Run. — Photo by Mary Stirrat

took the weekend just for themselves. Monday they started telling family. The Wickstroms have two grown children. Their son Brian lives nearby and they were able talk with him face to face, but daughter Jamie lives in Florida,k and it was necessary to give her the news over the phone. “She has a lot of good support in Florida,” said Debbie, “but it was hard. She couldn’t see my face, see that everything was OK.” The Wickstroms moved forward with developing a plan of action. An MRI was scheduled, and through a friend she found an oncologist with whom she was comfortable. “This happened right before school started,” said Debbie. “This whole school was wonderful.” Her MRI was scheduled for the first day of school, although at that time most staff did not know why she was absent. The surgery was done at St. John’s in Maplewood at the end of September, and Jamie was able to come home to be with her mom and dad during that time. The surgery did not take long, and Debbie was soon home. Shortly after she came home, said Debbie, she was taking a nap when the phone rang. Jamie woke her up to take the call, and it was the doctor. “The doctor asked me if I had a bottle of wine in the house,” said Debbie, “because I should greet my husband at the door with a glass. We had a lot to celebrate.” Debbie did as the doctor ordered, and she and Barry celebrated a successful surgery and being cancer free.

See Wickstrom, page 20

Looking ahead, not back

Hope Healy deals with the challenges after breast cancer surgery

by Nancy Jappe Leader staff writer FREDERIC - A very busy woman, Hope Healy of rural Frederic stopped in for a brief interview before going back to finish the preparation of lunch for a funeral at her church, St. Luke United Methodist, down the street. Healy came in with information on the cancer that had struck her written down on a card - date and exact name - verified for easy reference. “I don’t look back much,” she said. “I don’t really want to think about it. That’s just the way it works for me.” Saying this doesn’t mean that dealing with a bout of fast-moving invasive ductal carcinoma wasn’t a difficult time in Healy’s life. She just doesn’t dwell on it much these days. Her cancer surgery (first a lumpectomy and lymph node removal, then a second surgery to remove more lymph nodes) was done at Abbott Northwestern Hospital in the Twin Cities. She had chemotherapy through the Virginia Piper Cancer Institute, and underwent 30 weekday treatments of radiation in White Bear Lake, Minn. Building on her lifelong “can do most anything” attitude, Healy would have radiation in the morning, then go golfing in the afternoon. Healy attributes to fate having a mammogram that detected the cancerous spot in time. She had taken notice of a sign in the doctor’s office that said that if you have three clear mammograms in a row, you could wait for two years between the tests. Based on that, she decided to bypass a yearly exam and wait for the two years. However, for some reason, during the intervening time, something kept bothering her and, after 18 months, she went in to have another mammogram. Waiting that 18 months did turn out to be in her favor. A doctor explained that if she had gotten a mammogram at 12 months, and hadn’t waited, it wouldn’t have detected the fast-moving breast carcinoma. Chalk that one up to fate! The mammogram was done in Amery. A biopsy was then taken on the spot in question. During the discussion of options with her physician, Jonn Dinnies, Healy asked Dinnies, “If this was your wife, what would you recommend?” “I would send her to the Piper Breast Cancer Center,” Dinnies replied. Surgery was done a month after diagnosis of the cancer. For medication after surgery, Healy had three rounds of Adriamycin and Cytoxin, then three rounds of Taxol. After that, she went to Minnesota Oncology in White Bear Lake, Minn., for 30 weekdays of ra-

Hope Healy, Frederic, is a 10-year survivor of invasive ductal carcinoma, a fast-spreading breast cancer. Healy had no indication of any cancer until a biopsy was taken after a routine mammogram spotted a potential problem. Healy firmly supports women having mammograms every year. “It is so important for people to do. I am a good example of that,” she said. - Photo by Nancy Jappe

diation therapy. Following that, she was on a Tamixophen regime for four years and Femara for five years. Healy reports no side effects from the Tamixophen, but the Femara took its toll. Both drugs do nerve damage, leaving her with horrible pain in her legs and feet. She was unable to walk at all for a while. “I’m not taking any drugs now,” she said, happiness showing through in her voice. “I feel just fine now - just like I used to.” In her professional career, Healy was a teacher for 34 years before retiring 12 years ago. She taught for the Siren School District, working with seventh-graders at first, then teaching middle-school English for most of the years. Since retirement, she has gotten big-time into quilting, joining the Mixed Sampler Quilt Guild and winning several Viewer’s Choice awards in the guild’s annual fall show in Siren. Lots of flowers are grown on the farm that Healy and her husband, Emery, bought when they moved north over 50 years ago. They were from southern Minnesota (Hope was born in Owatonna) where farmland was pretty expensive for a couple that was just starting out. Playing 500 in Methodist and Lutheran card clubs and staying very active at St. Luke’s church help to fill up Healy’s time now in addition to time for children (three), grandchildren (eight) and now two great-grandbabies, a 3-year-old girl

See Healy, page 20


Kindergarten circus

PAGE 34 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

Frederic

Gunnar Schumacher, Kaleigh King and Rosalyn Lundquist. The Ladies, gentlemen, boys and girls were greeted at the elephants came by flapping their ears and swinging their trunks. circus by the ringmasters, Natalie Chartrand and Olivia Britton. They were great leaders at the circus.

Vivian Jorgenson and Jada Jeske, as the majorettes in Frederic’s Kindergarten Circus, Thursday, April 14, twirled batons, marched around and dazzled the audience with their great talent.

Chase Jensen, Jacob Olson and McKinley Conito were the funny circus clowns who made everyone laugh and giggle!

The lion tamer was Aaron Nelson, and Mariah Lemieux and Sommar Olson were his trained lions. The lion tamer cracked his whip and the lions did great feats. They jumped through a ring of fire and terrified everyone with horrifying roars.

Sophia Slather, Kylie Schultz and Miah Christen passed out treats at the 43rd-annual Frederic Kindergarten Circus. Up and down the aisles they sang “Popcorn, popcorn, pop, pop, popcorn!”

Musings on living self-reliantly Part II of a seven-part series

Living

Simply

I recently moved to a 450- Ed Emerson square-foot shack and live without hot water, television, Internet, cell phone or flush toilet. Outside of running my pump, and an occasional listening to NPR, I live unplugged and in silence. It is an intentional exercise in self-reliance. This is not the life I had always lived. Until recently, I was a man of great responsibility and obligation. My dropping out was purposeful. For I came to understand that our modern conveniences too often serve to complicate our life. And, like so many of my fellow citizens, I felt as if I were swimming against the current, underwater. The more I worked, and the more I acquired, only served to keep me drowning in a deeper hole. I felt as if I were splashing up against the current of my real calling - to live simply as an artist and poet. I wanted to live on as little money as possible – responsible for providing only the most basic necessities. I wanted to know what it is like to haul and heat my own water, to secure my own firewood, to wash my clothes by hand, and to grow and catch and cook my own food. So I decided to quit my job and live as deliberately as possible. My shack is a rickety old thing, whose floors sag from the middle, with a compromised foundation and a damp, cobwebby crawl space that houses an old seep, a colony of mice, numerous variety of spiders, and other assorted crawly things. My hope is the old shack will hang on for a few more years – at least as long as I have. For we are both deteriorating with age, and I can imagine no more fitting an end then the shack and I fall down together – and it be not too much labor for someone to

throw a few shovelfuls of dirt atop us both, and be done with it. The old shack was purchased for $12,500 under an arrangement with my sister. It had sat vacant for nearly one year. It holds the dubious distinction of being the cheapest house in Polk and Burnett counties. I made the offer to live here, because no one else wanted it, and I decided to embrace that which the world had passed by. I moved in on April Fool’s Day. For the first three weeks I was unable to turn on the water. The pressure tank sits atop an old seep. With the ground thaw I had more than 2 feet of near-freezing pooled water that inundated the pressure control tank mechanism. Rather than fight the seep, and try and stop it from doing what it wanted, I decided to go without running water, and wait for the water to recede on its own. I did have the foresight to bring along two 5-gallon plastic jugs that I filled with water from the Trade River. It was from this water, which seemed to flow freely and appeared readily available, that I drank, cooked, washed dishes, and bathed. It seems righteously natural to be hauling a jug of water up from the rushing current – despite the curious glances of passing motorists. To conserve my use of water, I fill a spray bottle from the Trade River and mix in some vinegar and oregano oil as antibacterials. I wash my dishes, (and my hands), by spraying a few drops and wiping clean. As an added precaution, I let the dishes sit out in the sun to dry, for it seems warm enough and allows me some time to sit and do nothing. I wash my clothes by soaking them in a large container of Trade River water mixed with baking soda and scrubbing any stains with Fels-Naptha. In the late afternoon, after the sun has warmed the water, I take off my shoes, roll up my pant leggings, and sort of march in place atop my clothes. (In washing machine

Traci Chenal, Jessica Blechinger and Olivia Rau were the tightrope walkers. They twirled and shined on the beam and made it safely back to the other side. – Special photos

parlance, I think they call this step the agitation cycle). As I march in place, I realize I am burning a good deal of calories. The thought crosses my mind that I could market this whole routine into an exercise video. But, as the process is so simple, and no feasible way to make money at it, neither LA Fitness nor Curves would be interested. To take a shower, I heat water atop a two-burner – for I have no stove – inserting the hot water from the tea kettle through a funnel and into a 5-gallon solar hotwater bag. It takes a good half hour to secure enough hot water for a decent shower. I hang the bag of hot water on a hook in the wall above the bathtub. It is a great feeling to shower in water you actually labored at. And, as I am forced to pay attention to how I use the water, I find myself feeling cleaner and fresher than ever before. There is an 18th century English proverb: We do not know the worth of water till the well is dry. Since April Fool’s Day, my average total water use has been 14 gallons per week. This is equivalent to what most Americans use before leaving their house each morning. And the process I use to secure my water, going down to the river to fetch it, is, contrary to modern thought, still practiced by a majority of peoples who call Earth their home. Over the past few weeks I have developed an intimate relationship with water. Earth and the body both are two-thirds water. Water is the great sustainer, without which we cannot live for more than two or three days. Being mindful of where I get my water has become a meditation in lucidity. I will continue to wash my self, and my clothes, with water from Trade River – for I have a special place I get it from, and the river and the birds and other animals have come to know me. I worry they may grow concerned if I stop coming.


Dinner at the Fort set for June 17

DANBURY - The Burnett County Historical Society invites you to join them for an evening at the Fort on Friday, June 17. This is an annual event, complete with wine tasting (by Clover Meadows Winery), live music and fivecourse gourmet dinner. The proceeds from the dinner help support the many works and programs of the historical society and Forts Folle Avoine Historical Park. This year’s dinner will take place on Friday beginning at 5:30 p.m. with hors d’ouevres, wine tasting and live music on the deck. The five-course gourmet dinner follows at 6:30 p.m., complemented by wine and other beverage choices. Cost is $45 per person, with prepaid reservations required by Sunday, June 5. In 2011, the Burnett County Historical Society is sponsoring a full schedule of events and educational programming, including the Yellow River Echoes, June 24-26, Great Folle Avoine Fur Trade Rendezvous, July 22-24, Garden Tea, Aug. 25, Beaver Club Dinner, Oct. 8, and Christmas at the Fort, Dec. 3, 4 and 10, as well as several wild rice pancake breakfasts. Funds raised help support the society’s mission to provide educational opportunities to the public by researching, preserving and teaching the history of Burnett County. For more information and details please call 715-8668890 or visit theforts.org. Forts Folle Avoine Historical Park is located at 8500 CTH U, Danbury. - with submitted information

A blind man

Just for

Laughs

was out walking with his seeing-eye dog when suddenly the animal paused and wet Joe Roberts the man’s leg. Bending down, the blind man stretched out his hand and patted the dog’s head. Having watched what happened, a bystander said, “Why are you patting him? That dog just peed on your leg!” “I know,” said the blind man, “but I gotta find his head before I can kick his butt.” ••• Once there was a girl who wanted a boyfriend. Her mom wanted to help her, so she set up a blind date for her daughter. When the girl got back from the date she said, “That was the worst night of my life!” “Why is that?” her mom asked. “He owns a 1922 Rolls Royce!” “Isn’t that a good thing?” “He’s the original owner, Mom!” ••• An old man was wondering if his wife had a hearing problem. So one night, he stood behind her while she was sitting in her chair. He spoke softly to her, “Honey, can you hear me?” There was no response. He moved a little closer and said again, “Honey, can you hear me?” Still, there was no response. Finally, he moved right behind her and said, “Honey, can you hear me?” She replied, “For the third time, yes!” •••

E-edition

Every page in color. Go to www.the-leader.net

Man theory

Cold Turkey

Men and women are different. We look different, we act different, we dress different, and we think different. Recently I was able to test my theories on the differences be- John W. Ingalls tween men and women. My wife had the opportunity of traveling to Florida with the Webster High School band and choir students on their spring trip, allowing me to be home alone for an entire week. I decided to test the theory that “If a man does something and his wife doesn’t know it, is he still wrong?” The first concern that most people have about a man who suddenly finds himself without a wife centers on his nutritional status. Many believe that a man can’t cook and therefore he can’t eat. I’m no slouch when it comes to cooking and would certainly never starve if I had to rely on my own culinary abilities. This however doesn’t dispel the misperception that men are incapable of feeding themselves. However, thanks to that belief I had plenty of friends willing to supplement my nutrition by inviting me over for meals. After eating three meals out with friends I had to decline any further invitations so that I could further test my theory. Back home alone in the evening I could now eat an entire frozen pizza in front of the television while watching all the sports channels that I could find. With a pizza there were no dishes and the dog ate the crust and crumbs -

My friend, Lanni, asked me

MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 35

Letters from

Home

what she should do. This was a treat, as Lanni is usually the one giving me advice. When I indulge in self-pity, she’s the one who will advise, Carrie Classon “take a spoonful of cement princess and harden up!” When someone takes themselves a little too seriously, she’ll offer them money to, “buy some wood, build a bridge, and get over yourself!” Lanni is a good friend with good advice, so I was excited to be able to give her some advice for a change. My advice was that she do nothing. Doing nothing is hugely underrated. Lanni is in the midst of a mid-life career change. She is concerned about all the things a lot of us are concerned about: what her real calling is and whether she will continue down the path of least resistance or make a change in her life that is less comfortable but more aligned with the person she has become over the years. She is eager to do something, but doesn’t yet know what that something is. She is busily looking at houses, looking at college programs, looking at business plans, looking at job offers. My suggestion was that she might consider spending an equal amount of time doing nothing— nothing but listen to the quiet voice inside. My friend Nora chafes at my “don’t just do something— sit there” advice. I don’t blame her. When I was in my 30s, I had a similar reaction to a lot of advice that came my way. I scoffed at the idea of meditation or making time for reflection. Who had time for nothing when there was so much to do? But the substitute I found for doing nothing was often a lot of meaningless something. I would busy myself with projects and diversions that filled my hours, but not my mind and heart. There is some-

thing profoundly liberating about losing the constant, reflexive need to be busy. A lot of people who read the book, “Eat, Pray, Love” took issue with the author, Elizabeth Gilbert, because she took a year of her life to eat, pray, and ultimately, love. In other words, she spent a year doing nothing. I love the book, but I can understand how someone might feel a little resentment towards someone who spent three months in Italy focusing on pasta. But I think that misses the point. It is hard to spend even a half hour doing nothing, much less a full year. Whether it is a half hour of silence or a summer eating pasta, there are times in my life when it can be very good to do very little. Often, when I do claim to be “doing something,” it does not mean I am accomplishing anything, but instead, trying to distract myself with something that is not really worth my time. It is my frantic attempt to give my attention to anything other than the quiet of being alone with myself. When I am doing nothing, I hear the natural world around me. I notice the seasons as they change. I feel myself living, as I live. Nora is encouraging Lanni (and me) on to bigger and better projects and, in the end, I am sure we will both do just as she suggests. We’ll throw ourselves into projects and deadlines and new challenges. But I hope that, when we do, we’ll remember what we learned while we were busy doing nothing. There are times when nothing is exactly what we need most to do. Till next time, —Carrie

SCRMC celebrates National Hospital Week, May 8 - 14 and National EMS Week, May 15 - 21

Just some of the area rescue personnel from Minnesota and Wisconsin and SCRMC emergency department staff who work together to provide emergency services in the area. - Photo submitted

ST. CROIX FALLS - Careful as we might be, accidents happen, illnesses overtake us, and yes, babies are born! By helping people access the care they need quickly and safely, an Emergency Medical Services team is a vital and integral part of hospital services. When you need medical care, there’s one place you can rely on in both good and difficult times – St. Croix Regional Medical Center. “A hospital is more than a place where we go to heal,” said Dave Dobosenski, CEO of St. Croix Regional Medical Center. “It is also a part of the community that fosters health and represents hope. These special weeks honoring health care and rescue staff are, first and foremost, a celebration of people.” Emergency Medical Services staff are important to the services a hospital provides. While there are times when

a perfect meal. The second thing that I did to test my theory was to go around the house and leave all of the toilet seats up. For an entire week there were no complaints and no one unexpectedly sat down on an MD unguarded toilet rim in the middle of the night with the lights off. The third thing that a man can do to test this theory is to organize his clothes in a manner that is very easy to recognize. Monday my clothes went in a pile by the side of the bed, Tuesday’s clothes were in the corner and I left Wednesday’s clothes in the family room because I changed in front of the TV while I was watching a latenight movie. The problem was when I got to Thursday I decided to revisit the organized piles of clothes already distributed around the house. By then I had to administer the sniff test to see which ones were safe to use. Unfortunately my nose isn’t as sharp as it once was so I couldn’t really distinguish between Monday and Wednesday. Rather than attempt to put them away in any acceptable fashion it was simpler to put them all into the dirty laundry. As the day of my wife’s return loomed on my horizon I swept the crumbs, washed the dishes and put the toilet seats back into the resting position. I believed deep down in my heart that I had disproven the theory. If a man does something and his wife doesn’t know, he isn’t always wrong. My only slip was forgetting to put out the garbage for pick up on Wednesday. When she

an EMS team saves a life, much of what these dedicated and highly trained providers do is less dramatic. But their work is no less important to a patient or family facing the unknown with fear and pain. When called on, their presence and compassion can have an impact far beyond the expert clinical care they provide. It’s comforting to know that when we call 911, we’ll get the help we need, no matter the circumstances. Please take a moment this month during National Hospital Week, May 8-14, and National EMS Week, May 15-21, to recognize, honor, and celebrate all rescue personnel – fire, police, EMS and medical center staff – who heroically provide outstanding care for you, your friends and neighbors whenever it’s needed. They are champions of care! - from SCRMC

returned home to find the garbage full of last week’s trash with added pizza boxes I was busted. With the next scheduled garbage pickup, I was prepared. In the driving rain I dutifully dragged the trash out to the road the evening before, sprinted back to the house, leaving the garage door open. Unfortunately we have nosy neighbors of the large, black, four-legged type. Leaving for work before me, my wife quickly called my cell phone to inform me that our garbage was all over the yard and road. She also told me I had left the freezer door open in the garage. I picked up the trash in the yard and as I went into the garage I discovered mud all over the freezer and chunks of half chewed frozen meat all over the floor. I can believe she suspected me of leaving the freezer door open. I also can understand that she suspected I had smeared mud all over the sides and top of the freezer and even inside the freezer. However it must have been the bite marks on the frozen package of ribs behind the car that made her suspect me. She brings out the wild streak in me. So what conclusion have I drawn about my theory? If a man does something he is wrong even if his wife knows about it. But we have managed to live with my shortcomings. Now every morning when I wake up the first thing I do is say “I’m sorry” and give her a big bear hug.


PAGE 36 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

River Road

Cushing in the 1930s, Part II

by Phil Iverson My father, Henry Iversen, was pastor of the Danish Lutheran Church in Cushing from 1931 to 1939 - my years of elementary school and first two years of high school in St. Croix. I am the only surviving member of my immediate family and felt a responsibility to write a family history book and prepare the family genealogy records for our children and other family relatives. One chapter of this book was about our years living in Cushing. – Phil Iversen. Some of the other happiest memories are the many days spent with Lloyd Westlund exploring the forest areas surrounding his dad’s farm, about three miles northwest of Cushing. On summer days, when we could ride our bicycles, we might ride the sandy roads of the pine barrens, not far from his home. It was a good place to raise watermelons and cantaloupe and once in awhile Lloyd and I would steal a watermelon when the opportunity was available. On one of our excursions into the Barrens we discovered an abandoned log cabin on a small lake. The walls of the cabin had been covered with newspapers, perhaps to block the free flow of air between the logs. One of the news items, dated Oct. 8, 1871, was about the great Chicago fire. The area was covered with jack pine trees. This was the Prohibition era and because the Barrens were remote and sparsely populated is was a popular place for bootleggers, or folks that made bootleg liquor. There were rumors that some of these bootleg operations, called stills, were connected to notorious criminals of that time, such as the notorious Al Capone gang from Chicago and there may have been substance to these rumors. Lloyd was a bright young lad with an active, curious mind and great imagination. As we traveled through the woods with his Airedale dog Sandy, we would speculate about the shapes of the ground and imagine that mossy mounds of earth might be Indian burial sites. We speculated on what treasures were buried with these bodies. A vaguely geometric pattern was probably an ancient teepee site and other exciting thoughts, more stimulating than modern TV mystery programs. Some memories of the Barrens are associated with fishing on the St. Croix River, near Nevers Dam, with brother Ray in his beautiful Old Town canoe. Fishing was usually pretty fair, in the turbulent water just below the dam. We sat on the bottom of the canoe to provide a low center of gravity, but it was still a risky location and we didn’t have life jackets in those days. The evenings on the river in this wilderness area were very special - the quiet peacefulness. We often observed deer coming to the river for a drink and heard an owl hooting in the background, and the glorious sunsets! In the spring time Mom used to coax Dad to take us for a ride in the Barrens to view wildflowers and occasionally see a deer. On more than one of these excursions I recall driving through the jack pine forest area and picking up the scent of a moonshiner’s still, somewhere off in the trees where the bootlegger was cooking grain and sugar to make alcohol. There was an area known as Evergreen (Old Settler’s Cemetery) in the Barrens where a group of emigrants from Sweden had settled, perhaps because the land was inexpensive. There was still evidence of the church foundation, the cemetery and clearing for homesteads. This spot was a favorite for a picnic lunch. The return trip home was usually along the “river road” which followed the St. Croix River and this was a very scenic drive with abundant wildflowers. One of the major landmarks was the Nevers Dam which was just a series of very large gates which were opened and closed to regulate the flow of the river. This dam may have been built to provide an adequate flow of water to transport logs down the river. The major dam was in St. Croix Falls which was built for producing electricity. In the spring of the year when ice was breaking up on the river it would stack up behind the dam and make some awesome cracking, crunching and loud bangs which could be heard for a mile or more. We could hear the ice breakup all the way up the hill at the St. Croix Falls High School. In retrospect, I cannot recall times of boredom, despite no television or electronic games that still leave modern kids with frequent expressions of boredom. Children made up their own games and families visited back and forth much more frequently than we do today. It was an era of a rich social life. In addition to baseball, softball and football we played several other games with a football. There were also other games like Anti-I-Over, Hide and Seek and in winter months Fox and Goose. I will describe these games, as best I can remember, only to illustrate how simple our pleasures were. Anti-I-Over: The captains took turns selecting team members. The teams would spread out on opposite sides of a single-story building and a tennis or soft rubber ball was tossed back and forth over the roof after shouting “anti-i-over.” At a time of their choosing, the team tossing

FREDERIC PUBLIC LIBRARY Main Street

Frederic, WI 54837

Ramblings Collected by Russ Hanson

Danish Lutheran Church in Cushing where Phil Iversen’s father was the minister in the 1930s. At least one service per month had to be given in Danish. – From Cushing Museum the ball would rush around the building and try to tag, or touch, the person who had caught the ball. If successful, that person was added to their team. This continued until one side was depleted in number. Hide and Seek: This game was played after dark. A door, a tree, a large rock or some object was designated as home base. By drawing straws, or any selection process, one child was designated as “it” and it was their job to guard home base. The person designated as “it” faced home base, closed their eyes and counted to 10. After completing the count “it” went in search for the other contestants and tried to tag one of them before they could beat “it” back to home base. If “it” tagged one of the players before they reached home base, that person then became “it.” Fox and Goose: This was a winter game played after a new snowfall. All participants made paths in the snow in the shape of a large wheel, perhaps 20 or 30 feet in diameter. The several spokes of the wheel converged at the center hub, which was designated as a point of refuge called “home.” One person was designated as “it” and the game began with “it” at home base while the other participants scattered out around the wheel. The object was for “it” to run along and within the paths and tag one of the other kids, but anyone that occupied home was protected and could not be tagged. However, only one kid could occupy home base at a time so if another kid was being chased and beat “it” to home base the previous occupant was forced to depart and subjected to being tagged. Another rule was that no one could cross home base while it was occupied. Notice that all games required a lot of running. There was another game called Kick the Can, but I don’t recall how it was played. I think one person was “it” and guarded an upright tin can. The rest of the group were in hiding and the object was to sneak up behind the “it” person and kick the can before he could touch you. If you were touched prior to kicking the can you became the “it” person. However, I think there were more rules to the game. Today young people play games with paint guns using paint pellets. We played a similar game with a homemade gun cut from a 1x4 board and rubber bands, cut strips from an old tire inner tube. Another homemade toy was a hoop and stick. The hoop consisted of a metal band from a small wooden keg, or nail keg. The stick was very similar in design to a draftsman’s T square and usually made from a piece of lath, used in plastering a house. The object was to roll the hoop on edge by propelling it, pushing it with the stick, and by turning the stick slightly to the side the hoop could be made to turn and do maneuvers. Everyone in the area lived in relative poverty, but we were not aware of it. Some people seemed to have a little more financial resources than others did, but not much different. There were no government programs to assist unemployed or elderly or people down on their luck, I don’t think home or auto insurance existed and certainly not health insurance. People had large gardens, maybe a few chickens and purchased beef or pork fresh from the farmers when they butchered. The fruit, vegetables and meat were all preserved in pint and quart jars stored in the basements. The pastor of the church received an annual salary, but the contract also provided that on certain days, two or

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three times a year, the church collection went to the clergyman as a part of salary. This was probably a democratic way the congregation could vote with the size of their offering - an active pastor and a good sermons probably produced a larger offering. Parishioners also brought gifts of food to the pastor and family, such as a freshly cleaned chicken or roast of beef or pork when they butchered. As previously described, there was a creamery in Cushing but we often churned our own fresh butter from the cream we purchased from Mr. Brenholt. The northern part of Wisconsin had quite a concentration of Scandinavian people and especially Danish Lutherans. The Cushing church at this time was the fourth largest congregation in the church district. There also were Danish Lutheran churches in Luck, North Luck, Milltown, Bone Lake and West Denmark, all within 10 miles or so of Cushing. Annual Bible camp meetings were held with all these churches at the West Denmark church on Little Butternut Lake. This church owned considerable acreage on the lake with a large campground and a recreation hall, which made an ideal facility for accommodating a large crowd. However, the West Denmark church was a different branch of the Danish Lutheran Church and did not officially participate in the meetings, but the members were friendly and politely attended some of the meetings. I never understood the fine points of difference between our churches and the congregation at West Denmark but knew that they were “different.” There were many factions of the Lutheran church at this time such as the Danish Lutherans, the Swedish Lutherans, the Norwegian Lutherans, the German Lutherans and many others. There was also a split in the Danish Lutheran church known as the Holy Danes and the Happy Danes. Our Cushing group was known as the Holy Danes, very strict, regulated behavior, opposed to dancing, smoking tobacco, playing cards, drinking alcoholic beverages including wine. All of these indulgences were considered sinful. However, the Happy Danes such as the church at West Denmark were a much more liberal and fun-loving group. They drank beer, had dances in their recreation hall, played cards and of course our group of Lutherans considered them to be lost souls with a questionable chance of making it to heaven. Despite this attitude, there was a polite tolerance between the congregations. There was very little interchange between churches of different denominations and differing levels of tolerance between different churches. For example, the Lutherans were pretty skeptical of the Methodists and Presbyterians, but even looked more askance at the Baptist, Holy Rollers and other fundamental churches that we thought were really out in left field. We thought the worst of all were the Catholics who we believed were really misguided by the church hierarchy. The girls were considered “loose.” Church members could sin all they wanted on Saturday night provided they confessed to the sin and paid penance for their sins. Thankfully, these attitudes have mellowed over the years. Cushing was a fun place for a young lad to grow up. I spent many delightful days at neighboring farms riding on loads of hay, stomping silage in the silo, riding in the horse-drawn wagons, feeding the animals and then in the evenings playing games with the family and neighboring children. In retrospect I cannot recall times of boredom. Cast of characters and places: Martin and Nora Hanson and family, LaVonne, Darlayne, Carol and Diane. The Larsen Twins, William and Walter. Lloyd Westlund. The Dramdahl grocery store and they had three daughters, Grace, Jean and Pharoah. Handyman Pete Peterson (Handy Pete). The traveling vaudeville show owned by the Brown family. Christian Askov’s daughters Sylvia and ? and son Robert. Mike Laier owned the tavern in town and son Robert (Bobby) Laier was one of my best friends. Ethel Olsen, church organist and piano teacher. Uncle Harold played violin, classical chamber music, with Henry Spencer and Percy Weinhardt. Buddy and Kathryn Jensen. Mavis and Wayne Jensen. The Louis Baker family across the street - Guy Jr., Billy, Dorothy plus one or two. The Christensen family were our neighbors to the north with at least a dozen kids. Mabel Hanson, a classmate. Oscar and Elizabeth Lindgren - children Uncle Harold, Gordon, Eugene, Harvey (died at 12 years of age) and Marjorie. Reynold and Ruby Swanson, Millicent and Roger Skone, Pinky and Margarete Eibs.

Burnett Community Library

Monday through Thursday 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Closed Sunday Main Street

Webster

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Remember Dorothy Parker

Our house is a collection of stories, articles and

poems I have written and never used. The other day I came across a sheet of paper covered with short poems written at a time when I was trying to copy Dorothy Parker, short and sassy.

Conclusion Some say a heart is like a room, That’s furnished with perfection. That all the lovely things inside, Result from true affection. There’s warmth and light and laughter too, Perhaps a pool of tears. But they are just the sort of thing, To freshen up the years. A bit of love goes very far, To melt away the gloom. But when a love is dead, my dear, A heart is like a bomb. The Finer Things You gazed at me With eyebrows quizzical Can the attraction Be merely physical? Are my mind and soul So ineffectual? Can’t you love An intellectual?

A Lie You told me that you loved me, And the moment sweetly lingers. How was I to know that you, Had calmly crossed your fingers.

Your Heart I looked into your heart tonight, And read your thoughts, my dear. And oh, the things I found in it, Were music to my ear. You see, it was a simple act, It’s really no surprise. The reason I could read your heart? Your heart was in your eyes.

Comparison The difference between the moon and me, Oh, I would it were forgot. The moon was out again last night, And you know that I was not. Declaration Oh I am not content to sit, And be a smug, safe hypocrite. And say you are my heart and mind, The noblest man of all mankind. To mount your name in letters high, And sing your praises to the sky. And give you hours of applause, Alas, my dear, you too have flaws.

Leftovers and hand-me-downs Many of us grew up in the big Depression of the ‘30s, and we never threw good food away. Anything not eaten at a single meal automatically became a glorious leftover. Nothing was wasted. It didn’t go into the garbage or down the sink disposal unit. A half cup of peas today may be added to tomorrow’s hotdish, so it automatically went into the refrigerator. Today’s leftover mashed potatoes can become tomorrow’s potato patties with egg added, formed into little flat rounds, fried in butter to a golden brown. Today’s meat loaf can be sliced cold tomorrow for a good sandwich at noon. A short trip into the microwave magically heats leftover fried chicken or heated-again tater tots. The trouble with leftovers is that cooks have to remember to use what’s there. If all those dibs and dabs stay too long in the fridge, they jam up the shelves and grow repulsive green mold (not good). The unwritten rule about leftovers is to use them promptly and consider yourself smart to use everything creatively. Remember that old saying, “Waste not, want not.” There is truth in old sayings. Hand-me-downs came to us from mothers, aunts and cousins. I have a tendency to wear favorite sweaters or tops until I, myself, am tired of them. But to someone else they may be like new to them. I wore my going-away wedding suit for years. It was olive green with two kick pleats in the skirt, a matching jacket without lapels and a half-hat to

Behind the

Signpost

Bernice Abrahamzon match. It was a wedding gift from my father’s employers, purchased at their store, T.A. Chapman Store, Milwaukee. It wasn’t on a rack in the store. We sat down in the store and a clerk brought in suit after suit for us to consider. It went well with Ken’s Marine Corps greens. I wore it for all dressy occasions and it fit fine after the birth of our first son. On impulse one day I gave it to my neice, and she reminded me of that, saying she loved that suit, too. I had almost forgotten I gave it to her. It’s a good thing Ken and I had no daughters because with so many moves and so many storage places, my wedding gown was destroyed because mice got into it and had a picnic. All that white satin, all those buttons at each wrist, all that tattered lace. There was no way to salvage it. That’s why it’s good that we had no daughters, although we would have loved to have one. We would have named her Laura, after my mother. But you know what they say “Our plans are not always God’s plans.” I had an aunt who was a schoolteacher in Madison and she gave me many blouses and skirts. Another aunt worked at a telephone office in Chicago, Ill., and gave me her fur coats. I grew up with hand-me-downs. My mother’s fur coat had such a big cape collar that I could put it on my head. It was a very heavy coat, but so warm. At rummage sales I look for slipover sweaters as winters are long and cold, and living on a windy hill is often chilly. I notice turtleneck sweaters are easy to find, often like new, as many women don’t like that neck. Fortunately, I am not too proud to accept hand-medowns or even go looking for them. Once you learn to make your peace with leftover food and hand-me-down clothes, you use them happily and with gratitude.

Good thoughts As the men at church handed out Sunday bulletins, they also handed out plastic Easter eggs. Inside were slips of paper with a good thought typed on it. They gave me two eggs and one slip said, “There is always a lot to be thankful for if you can take the time to look. For example I’m sitting here thinking how nice it is that wrinkles don’t hurt.” That doesn’t really pertain to me as I’m fortunate not to have wrinkles. I am also grateful for my good hands that have no sign of arthritis. I think all my writing keeps them flexible. The other egg revealed the good thought, “When you wake up in the morning, do you say, ‘Good morning, God,’ or do you say, ‘Good God, it’s morning.’” Not exactly appropriate for me as I’m glad for every morning and another day. Regardless, both good thoughts brought a smile. One of our speakers on Saturday spoke for almost an hour on a lifetime spent canoeing in the U.S., in Canada and in Alaska. He and his wife were enthusiastic paddlers and his account was illustrated with color illustrations. He also write a book called “Six Knots” and I hadn’t flipped through the pages, so I asked, “What does the title mean?” I have little concept of canoeing.) He said something about Boy Scouts. I dared to asked, “Is that the most speed of a canoe? Six knots?” He look puzzled, and so did the others, until one person said, “Oh? She thinks it’s speed of the canoe.” (Well of course.) It was cleared up when I said, “Oh, you’re talking about tying knots.” No wonder communication is sometimes garbled, and I’m the one to do it. Until next week, Bernice

“Tortoise and the Hare” presented in Rice Lake

RICE LAKE — The final Best of Broadway Theatre presentation will feature the delightful family play “The Tortoise and the Hare.” The play will be presented Friday–Saturday, May 6-7, at 7:30 p.m. in the UW-Barron County Fine Arts Theatre in Rice Lake In this timeless play, Flash (the Hare) wants to prove that he is the fastest animal in the forest. He only has one more forest animal to beat in a race so he can claim his title. His final opponent is Theodore the Tortoise. Flash is so confident that he can beat Theodore that he doesn’t prepare for the race. In the end, Flash learns that it is not

MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 37

smart to brag or make fun of others while Theo learns that believing in himself is also very important. Local cast members are Brian Knutson, Cumberland, as Flash; Brook Dahlstrom, Shell Lake, as Edwina; and Tianna Willmeth, Barronett, as Barbara Beaver. Season ticket holders are reminded to call the UW-BC ticket office to reserve a seat for their preferred performance. To reserve theater tickets contact the UW-BC ticket office at 715-234-8176, Ext. 5457 or e-mail terry.wiesner@uwc.edu. — from UW-BC

Do you remember? Compiled by Bernice Abrahamzon

50 Years Ago

Obituaries included M. C. Gram and Ingeberg Petersen.-Because of Easter no dance was held April 1, 1961, at the West Sweden dance hall.-The movie “Where the Boys Are” was playing at the Auditorium Theater, SCF.-“The World of Suzie Wong” was coming to the Frederic Theater.-Specials at the Clover Farm Store (located where post office is now located at Frederic) included 2 lbs. Folgers coffee at $1.19, turkeys at 39 cents lb., lettuce at two heads for 29 cents, 2 lbs. bacon at 99 cents, and free coffee and Nabisco cookies were served.-The acreage of string beans and peas filled rapidly at Frederic.-The Wisconsin School of the Air would climax 30th year at Frederic on April 20.-Ed Jeffery was elected new chairman of Clam Falls.-April 1 marked the retirement of J.B. Benson.-”Dutch” camera and projector auction was coming soon, April 15 thru April 22 as announced by Chet Johnson & Sons (drugs, jewelry, cameras), Amery.-Sam’s Corner farm machinery auction sale was set for Saturday, April 8, Cumberland.-Sarah’s in Frederic had a sale on rain ‘n’ shine coats from $12.95 - $21.95.-A benefit card party was held April 7 at the Indian Creek Hall.-A roast chicken dinner was served every Wednesday night for $1.35 at the Sky-Lite Supper Club, Balsam Lake.

40 Years Ago

A Head Start round-up was planned at Danbury.An ad said, “Your best crop insurance against drought is Weather Master, available at the Frederic Farmers Union Co-op.-There was live music every Saturday night at Highway 35 Bar, Lewis, under owners Bernie and Jan Kurkowski.-John’s Bottle Gas, Danbury, offered LP gas service with slogan, “We fill all propane gas tanks – 24 hours a day.”Trollhaugen Chalet, Dresser, was available for private parties.-An appreciation dinner was set for Ida and Axel Westlund at the Lewis Memorial UM Church on Saturday, May 15, with everyone welcome for a potluck meal.-An old-time country store, Westlund’s, in Lewis, was under new ownership.Specials at Anderson’s Store, Siren, included round steak at 98 cents lb., book matches at 2/25 cents, potato chips at 39 cents and chocolate syrup at 23 cents.-Siren’s Home Bakery was open for business under John and Charlotte Fink.-A fish fry was held every Friday night at Pheasant Inn, Siren, from 5 p.m. and on.-Teacher contracts were approved by Siren Board of Education.-There were 70 graduates to receive diplomas at Frederic’s 58th commencement.-Family specials were chicken or fish at the Topper Cafe, Frederic.

20 Years Ago

Counties Association favored one supervisor per district.-Gregg Westigard was running for the Frederic School Board.-Roger Owens was running for a place in the Frederic School Board election.-Members of the Frederic American Legion celebrated the Legion’s 72nd birthday.-The Inter-County Leader sponsored a photography contest with chance of winning $25.-No open burning was permitted in the Town of Sterling effective March 20.-Atrazine information targeted the state’s corn producers.-McCann Properties, Siren, had one- or two-bedroom apartments for rent.-A summer cook was needed at Whispering Pines Camp and also a medical person.-Developing a solid waste system takes time.-Mary Ann Erickson resigned from the county board. A health hazard ordinance was adopted by the county board.-Bob Becker, Spooner, wrote about bluegill fishing being a year-round sport in his column Boot Prints.-The annual meeting of the Webster Co-op services was held April 10 at the Webster Community Center.-An Easter egg hunt was held Saturday, March 30, at the Masonic Lodge.-An affordable housing referendum was defeated.-The Amery school was hit with a bomb threat.-Jane Anderson’s crochet classes began April 15.-Spring fire season arrived.

Brought to you by

OLSEN & SON DRUG

Serving the community since 1882

24106 St., Hwy. 35 • Siren, WI Phone 715-349-2221 • Fax 715-349-7350

Tom Moore, Owner Brian Johnson - RPh


TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER

PAGE 38 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

Roman is a 5-year neutered male black Lab. He is a handsome black Lab in the classic sense, with solid breeding of an old-time Lab. He has a thick, solid frame, well-built and muscular. Roman an attentive dog. He loves people and interaction with them. He does know the commands sit, come and down and is always looking to add to his skills. He likes to be outside playing tag and fetch the ball. Roman is a mature dog with a lot of heart. He would be an excellent choice for a family with children looking for their first dog or a household who appreciates a mature dog with built-in smarts and instant companionship without the work of puppy problems. Roman has many more years of love and devotion to share. Donations for the Arnell Humane Society garage sale are now being collected at the shelter during business hours or by appointment. Our sale is scheduled for Saturday, June 11. Donations of clean, lightly used, ready to be loved in a new home items make this event one of our biggest fundraisers of the year. If you own an item that is taking up space and you aren’t using it anymore, put it to work for our animals. We will save you the hassle of putting on your own garage sale and give you a taxdeductible receipt for your donation. Please bring yard tools, household goods, fishing equipment, basement finds, furniture, artwork, antiques, boats, recreational equipment, pet supplies and more. Our sale does not include clothing, computers or televi-

sions. We have limited space for storage; if you have a large item to donate, please call ahead, 715 2687387 (PETS). We appreciate your consideration and look forward to doing business with you. Roman Five dogs and one cat went home last week. Stuart went home in the arms of a family that fell in love with his adorable face. Gus, the enormous yellow Lab, found a couple from Cornell delighted to find such a character to replace a loved Lab on their farm. All three were smiling as the truck pulled away from the shelter. Lilly the Jack Russell terrier will be keeping company with a senior who missed having a companion in the house and Pacer, the shih tzu-Chihuahua mix, went home with a couple that thought everything Pacer did was perfect for them. Smudge was lucky enough to find a home with four, count them, four kids. Still waiting their chance at the shelter are: Tilda, an engaging Border collie-mix mutt. She is the one

Await

Arnell Humane Society of Polk County

dog that doesn’t bark when you visit the shelter kennel. She waits to be selected and then rewards you with excited happiness. Tilda is a sweetheart. She would be ever so happy to chase the rabbits from your garden. Sheldon is a mini-dachshund-Brittany spanielmix neutered male. He is just the right size for any home and has manners too. Bentley is an energetic young chocolate Lab mix. He learns quickly and enjoys fun and games. Minnie is just that, mini. She is a full-grown Pomeranian-Chihuahua mix, white and buff. Minnie is gentle and sweet, easily carried in your pocket. J.P. is a 6-month-old Jack Russell terrier mix male puppy. He has a tricolor smooth coat, as cute as he can be. And last but not least, Everett, a miniature poodle with impeccable manners. Everett is 4 years old with a smoky gray coat, now without cockleburs and mats. All of these dogs and a handful of cats are waiting to meet you at Arnell Memorial Humane Society, 185 Griffin Street East, Amery, 715-268-7387 or online: arnellhumane.org.

Frederic Senior Center

Hazel Hoffman

Dewey - LaFollette

Karen Mangelsen

Another week has flown past and, yes, we lost another great member, Vi Luke, even though she had been living in Grantsburg, we could still go play cards once in awhile. Guess who won most of our games. Both Shirley and Vi will be greatly missed by all of us. One of my very best friends, when we heard about Vi, turned to me and said, “Well, Hazel, guess

Hank and Karen Mangelsen went to Siren Wednesday afternoon to watch a musical play put on by the fifth-grade class. Their granddaughter, Mandy Close, portrayed Cinderella. Brian Hines visited Gerry and Donna Hines Friday and Saturday. Lida Nordquist, Nina and Donna Hines and Karen Mangelsen went to Richfield, Minn., Saturday morn-

what? You and I are next.” Sure hope not, as I have a bunch more living to do. This past week on Monday the Spade winners were Arnie Borchert in first place, Marlyce Borchert in second place, Liz Ruhn in third place and Joyce Thompson and Inez Pearson tied for fourth place. Thursday evening 500 cards ended in a tie be-

tween Marlyce Borchert, Susan Hughes and Bill Ihrig for first place and fourth place going to Phyliss Peterson. So here’s wishing all our members, friends and neighbors a great week and please drive carefully and above all, stay healthy and happy.

ing to attend a bridal shower for Nicole Sweet. She is the granddaughter of Gerry and Donna Hines. A number of people went to the open house in Siren Saturday afternoon for Bob Denotter. The party was in honor of Bob for his 80th birthday. Congratulations to Seth Quinton who was confirmed in the Christian faith at Lakeview UM Church Sunday morning. He and the two confirmands from

Spooner UM Church, Michael Place and Clare Ringlien, assisted Pastor Starr during the worship service. The annual meeting of the Hertel Lakeview Cemetery Association will be held on Saturday, May 14, at 7 p.m. at Lakeview UM Church.

Webster Senior Center

I think the weather department has the seasons mixed up. We always need rain in the spring, but it would be great to see the sun for a couple of days and the temperature above 40 degrees. The April meeting was held on Tuesday with very few in attendance. Please mark your calendar for the next one on Tuesday, May 17, and plan to attend. New ideas and suggestions are always welcome. Another great group, 26 to be exact, came to play Dime Bingo and enjoyed the treats furnished by Karen Brooks. If interested, bring your dimes and join us every Wednesday at 12:30 p.m. The Wii bowling tournament held on Saturday was a huge success. The Sleepers, Pat and Al Niklason and Abby and Don Brand, were the overall winners with a 2,316 series. Pat had high single game with a 270 and also high series with a 773. The Strikers, Earl and Bernie Boelter and Carl and Sharon Link,

715-349-2964

Engagement

Happy Tails

had high team game with an 800. Sharon also picked up the 6-7-10 split. It was a lot of fun and we all look forward to the fall when we will start again. We would like to have one more team. If interested, call me at 715-656-3583. Remember the pancake breakfast, which will be held on Saturday, May 21, from 7 a.m. to noon, allyou-can-eat pancakes, adults $5 and children under 10 $3. There will also be a silent auction and a yard sale. Items for the silent auction will be on display starting the week of May 9. Some items in the auction include gift certificates, watch, radio, oil change, casino overnight, hair cut, Fox Run pass and many other items too numerous to mention. It’s not the years in your life but the life in your years that count. See you at the center.

Siren

Old Mother Nature still holds a death grip on spring, not letting the warm, sunny weather in. Trees that should be showing signs of leafing out still look like they are in the dead of winter. Some of the area weather reports tell of a repeat performance of April for the month of May – let’s hope not. I contacted some of the family on Facebook this weekend in Minot, N.D., and they were just miles away from a spring blizzard in their state. Saw my first bears of 2011 just last Tuesday. Big Bertha and her two yearling cubs strolled past the garden and through tree rat hollow. Now Big Bertha is a big sow, about 400 lbs., but a very mannerly bear. She has made several walks through bear country last year but never a mess and she keeps her kids in line too. Friday night however, was another story; a troublemaker came through leaving a mess. Paw prints revealed a small imp, probably Miss Prissy’s cub, it would be a 2-year-old and on its own. It was a troublemaker last year. Most of our snowbirds have all returned looking rested and lots with those golden tans. Sure could

Bernie Boelter

Bev Beckmark

use some of that sunshine here if only they had brought it back with them. Sympathy to the family of Stanley Kistler who passed away April 23. Mark your calendars for May 12. There will be a family night at the Siren School from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. This event starts with dinner followed by lots of reading and writing activities and more. This is a great way for family fun; the best part of it all is this is a free event. The annual spaghetti dinner/silent auction for the Burnett County Humane Society had a great turnout last Saturday evening out at the Moose Lodge north of Siren. Lots of good food, some super articles for the silent auction plus this year some super raffle prizes. This year’s Siren School Awards Night will be held on Friday, May 13, starting at 7 p.m. Congratulations to elementary student Adrian Belisle and high schooler Josh Tills for being chosen Siren Schools students of the week. A big congrats fellas.

www.the-leader.net

Boileau/Brust

Chris Boiileau and Terry Swosinski of Grantsburg proudly announce the engagement of their son, Brandon E. Boileau, to Jenna E. Brust. Brandon graduated from Grantsburg High School and is currently serving overseas in Gardez, Afghanistan, with the U.S. Army. Jenna is the daughter of Rocky and Cheryl Brust of Grantsburg. Jenna is a graduate of Grantsburg High School and is working for CPI as a photographer. An October 2011 wedding is planned. – submitted

Follow the Leader

St. Croix Senior Center

It’s May already. I hope the weather starts to warm up so we can get our gardening started. Seems like we can get outside to work one day and then it’s cool and wet the next day. Tuesday was our full day. It began with exercise followed by our Skip-Bo games. In the afternoon, games were played. Dottie and Russ Adams won in Hand and Foot. Martha Lundstrom, Ione White and Delores Benson won in Dominos. Winners in 500 cards were Laurice Lambert, Elaine Edlund, Marlys

Borchert, Charlie Mevissen and Don Benson. Thursday morning we did our exercises followed by Skip Bo. In the evening, 500 cards were played. The winners were Jo Ann, Roger Greenley and Sue Lundgren. Friday, May 7, Bridge will be played at 10 a.m. At 1 p.m. will be Bingo. On Wednesday, May 11, at 1 p.m., is our May birthday party with cake and ice cream served. The garage sale will be held on May 13 and 14. Come and join us for these activities.

Births

Born at Amery Regional Medical Center:

A girl, Isabella Teresa Christine Dosch, born April 3, 2011, to Christina Vanda, Clear Lake. Isabella weighed 7 lbs., 12.5 oz. ••• A boy, Owen Lee Harris, born April 4, 2011, to Amber and Charles Harris, Amery. Owen weighed 8 lbs., 7 oz. ••• A boy, Roman Nathaniel Lawrence Gago, born April 6, 2011, to Lara Stauner and Joshua Gago, Rice Lake. Roman weighed 8 lbs., 15 oz. ••• A girl, Aurora Dawn Ridlon, born April 8, 2011, to Noelle and Rusty Ridlon, New Richmond. Aurora weighed 7 lbs., 12 oz. ••• A girl, Natalie Briann Anderson, born April 17, 2011, to Rebecca and Steven Anderson, Clear Lake. Natalie weighed 6 lbs., 15.5. oz. ••• A boy, Greyson Rylan Kirk, born April 18, 2011, to Gina Lauth and Thales Kirk Jr., Amery. Greyson weighed 7 lbs., 5.5 oz. ••• A boy, Adam Isaiah Jurisch, born April 19, 2011, to Katie and Tim Jurisch, Clear Lake. Adam weighed 7 lbs., 10 oz. ••• A boy, Broagan Lee Byers, born April 21, 2011, to Fragile Gilpin, Clear Lake. Broagan weighed 6 lbs., 14.7 oz. ••• A boy, Tanner Charles Duane Hekrdle, born April 22, 2011, to Amy and Daniel Hekrdle, Amery. Tanner weighed 6 lbs., 1 oz.

Marian Edler

•••

Born at Burnett Medical Center:

A boy, Caleb Ellis Bergman, born April 25, 2011, to Jessica Haney and Ben Bergman, Luck. Caleb weighed 8 lbs., 14 oz. and was 21 inches long. Siblings include Tyler and Lumiana. •••

Born at St. Croix Regional Medical Center:

A boy, Miles John Garbow, born April 18, 2011, to Natasha Engstrand and Ricky Garbow Jr., Siren. Miles weighed 7 lbs., 12 oz. ••• A girl, Madison Elaine Lunzer, born April 19, 2011, to Paul and Amy Lunzer, Dresser. Madison weighed 6 lbs., 6 oz. ••• A boy, Isaiah Douglas Acero, born April 20, 2011, to Dawn and Elias Acero, Chisago City, Minn. ••• A boy, Channing Michael Jensen, born April 20, 2011, to Todd and Lisa Jensen, Frederic. Channing weighed 8 lbs., 8 oz. ••• A girl, Payten Isobella Rose Andersen, born April 22, 2011, to Katie Rose, Frederic. Payten weighed 8 lbs., 11 oz. ••• A boy, Archer John Chell, born April 24, 2011, to David and Jillian Chell, Frederic. Archer weighed 7 lbs., 11 oz. ••• A girl, Sophia Kristine Peterson, born April 24, 2011, to Joseph and Ashley Peterson, North Branch, Minn. Sophia weighed 7 lbs., 8 oz. •••


TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER

MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 39

Lewis

Bernice Abrahamzon

The rummage sale at the Lewis Memorial UM Church went fine despite the rain (or maybe the rain actually helped) as people came to shop. They had lots to choose from. Leftovers were delivered to various organizations and charities. Men of the church were in charge of Sunday’s church service with many men involved. The men’s choir sang “Just a Closer Walk With Thee,” and Brad Alden sang a song he had composed, accompanying himself on the guitar. As a grand finale, the men of the church treated everyone to a pancake breakfast complete with pancakes, sausages, scrambled eggs, juice and coffee or milk. The whole Sunday was a gift to the Lewis Church family. It was also Communion Sunday with Pastor Tom and Carl Warndahl in charge of giving the elements. Lots of laughs, but prayers too, for Carol Bohn, who spent several days in the hospital at St. Croix Falls and is undergoing tests; Judy Mruddt who is a patient in the hospital at Shell Lake; Brad Alden who is having an eye condition checked out; Arlene Lenz lost her husband, John Glockzin; and others in need of prayers and the support of friends. Arleen Jones visited her sister in the city for several days and is taking up residence in Evergreen Apartments at Amery. A man is occupying the Jones home as caretaker of the dwelling, cats and dog and outside yard chores. Bernice has Arleen’s new address if you need it. Alice Ford and Bernice Abrahamzon accompanied Mary Jacobsen and Denis Simonsen to the Catholic church at Balsam Lake on Saturday for an all-day spring writer’s conference. Boyd Sutton also attended. Two authors made presentations: Don Mitchell, author of “The Shimmering Blue Line” (St. Croix River) plus other books and author Phil Peterson, who wrote “All Things Are Possible – The Vernon Kruger Story” (100,000 miles by canoe, complete with color pictures) and other books. After a catered lunch in the church dining hall of wild rice soup and build your own sandwich on a fancy roll, an organ recital of the works of Bach welcomed participants back to the sanctuary where

many individuals read from their own writings and awards were given to the winners of the student writing contest held in area schools. Winners won cash awards and certificates plus congratulations. Poco Penners had also made a financial contribution to the prizes. President of the NW Regional Writters, Denis Simonsen, was in charge of this segment. For writers (or wanna-bees) attending a conference is like a shot in the arm, with writers inspired and invigorated. Always a challenge. The annual Wisconsin Regional Writers Conference will soon follow with several local writers planning to attend. Remember the jam session Saturday, May 7, at the Lewis Church from 6 – 9 p.m. with a fine program anticipated. This will be the last jam session at church until fall as musical groups have a summer schedule of appearances elsewhere. Driveways are a mess with all these puddles and mud. It’s the kind of mud that holds your shoes and you wonder if you’ll be in stocking feet. Nice to have Mickey Lenz back in church with us again, along with granddaughter, Debbie of Hayward. Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. David Chell on the birth of a baby boy. Happy for them. Nice to have Betty Jane back in her usual pew on Sunday after a hospital stay and a home recovery. She says she is feeling better. Good, also, to have snowbird Gerry Ackland back with us in church. Sheila Staples celebrated her birthday on Saturday evening with Mr. and Mrs. Brian Webster, Allie, Jordan and Nicholas, Mr. and Mrs. Darrel Imhoff, Nolan and Sarah, Suzanne’s mother, Karen Novotney, Rice Lake, Mr. and Mrs. Jon Olson and Erica, Somerset, and Rick Abrahamzon. On Sunday evening Sheila attended a piano recital at the Crossroads Community Church, Frederic. Allie and Jordan Webster and Riley Anderson were three of Maria Potvin’s students who performed for audience members.

Don and Annette Carlson of Blaine had Easter dinner with brother Mert and Peggy Carlson of Osceola, Wisconsin. Don and Shirley Flaa of Riverside hosted Easter dinner for brother Dick Flaa and Kris Plotz. Steve and Bonnie Holter of Blaine entertained 13 family members over the Easter weekend with four-wheeling and Easter dinner. They came from Chisago City, Minn., the Twin Cities, and Grand Rapids. Larry and Pat Kinblom of Cozy Corner spent a quiet Easter weekend because Pat had to work, but they spotted a rare treat of a female cardinal in their yard. Ron and Sharon Proffit had the pleasure of all the family coming home to spend time and celebrate Easter. On Sunday, the Kinblom children played special music at the Zion Church service. Vice Chair Patrice Winfield chaired the meeting of the East Pine County Wanderers last week. Pam and Leon Berg provided the birthday cake and door prize. Patrice won the prize, which was a combination flatbread, sausage and cheese set. April birthdays were Frank Schaaf and Dave Baker. Fran Levings-Baker has returned from a trip to Henderson, Nev., where she visited her son Bill and his family. They toured the Old Town section of Boulder City and the Hoover Dam and had a cookout at Lake Mead Park. Most of the trip was spent with her granddaughters. Mary Picton, Tammy Baer and Josh Baer went with the Webster High School band and choir to Disney World. The band and choir both performed there. The band marched in a parade down Main Street U.S.A., on Monday, April 18, at Magic Kingdom. The choir performed at Melody Garden Stage on Tuesday, April 19, at the Epcot Center. Two

buses left Webster on April 16 and they got home on April 22. The weather was hot when they were there. It was in the 90s. Josh Baer was selected to be on the king and queen court for Webster’s junior prom. He is the son of Karl and Tammy Baer. He was crowned king on Saturday night during the prom. As reported earlier, Peter Wagner won the University of Minnesota contest for ability to speak Chinese in the first-year division. The winners from each of the Big Ten schools then had a further contest at Purdue in West Lafayette, Ind. I am happy to report that Peter won this contest as well, but sadly, I misunderstood previously about the award of a scholarship to study in China for one year. This prize was only awarded to the winner of the third-level division. I’ll have to ask Peter what “c’est la vie” is in Chinese. Sandy and Dave Drake went to their daughter’s home in Anoka, Minn., for Easter. They had a wonderful dinner and nice day. Also, they saw Gracia and Joe’s new family room. Monday they went to visit Sandy’s brother and Dave’s stepmother in the nursing home. The roads here are in bad shape. Frank and Mary Schaaf went to Mora, Minn., for auto repair and shopping on Monday. On Friday Mary had a doctor’s appointment in Duluth. They spent Easter at home. After sunrise service they went to St. Croix Casino for breakfast. Gene and Cheryl Wickham had a nice trip to Superior for dinner at Barker’s Island Inn to celebrate their wedding anniversary. The Inn presented them with a free sundae and two spoons to commemorate the occasion. They spent their honeymoon in the Duluth-Superior area 45 years ago.

Borderline news

Academic news

Graduates from golf academy

ORLANDO, Fla. – Mitchell Gorres of Clear Lake joined 62 fellow students from the Golf Academy of America in Orlando to earn an associate degree in golf complex operations and management during graduation ceremonies on April 22. The Orlando golf school graduating class was composed of students from 19 states and four foreign countries including Canada, China, South Korea and Spain. “These students put in a lot of hard work, and all of them are now well-prepared to step into golf ca-

Bob Brewster

reer opportunities anywhere in the country,” said Brad Turner, campus director of the Orlando Golf Academy of America. “Our students are some of the best trained and most knowledgeable golf career professionals in the industry. When they leave Golf Academy of America, they are recognized as the future golf professionals who will lead this industry.” The GAA is the largest and longest-running twoyear golf career college in the world and prepares graduates for a wide array of golf career opportunities in the $76 billion a year industry. - from GAA

Follow the Leader

Good morning fellow neighbors and friends. What a weekend of cold weather it was, I thought my paws were going to freeze to the ground! At least the weatherman says it’s going to warm up this week, let’s keep our paws crossed that he’s right. It’s been a busy weekend and Eli and I are exhausted. The grandchildren were up visiting yesterday and they sure keep us on the move with everything that’s going on. I think it will be a day of napping for us. Wow is all I can say and I’ll say it again – Wow! Our fourth-annual spaghetti dinner and silent auction was a huge success and the folks in the community were wonderful in supporting us. Have to give a huge shout-out to all the volunteers that worked their tails off in making it a success and especially to my friend Jenny Shely who led the charge. Once again she did a fabulous job of making it happen! Also a big thanks to the Moose Lodge for hosting the event for us, we couldn’t do it without you. Can’t wait until next year’s event. I have to tell you that the spaghetti was delicious and so were all the desserts, but I have to watch my girlish figure so didn’t overdo it. On the other hand, I thought Mom was going to waddle out of there – she was having a lot of fun, especially at the dessert buffet. And the winners of the raffle are: • First-prize of the two American Airlines gift cards valued at $1,200 is Connie Hunt; • Second-prize of the beautiful quilt is Jan Aspholm; • Third-prize for the casino package is Janice (didn’t catch her last name). Congratulations to each of you and thank you again to those that donated the prizes and purchased tickets. Now back at the shelter, my good friends Ernie and Madeline were both adopted and have gone to their wonderful forever homes. Then on the feline side, Morisette, Sasha and Teddy were all adopted. Isn’t that great that there are so many caring people out there that adopt a shelter animal? The young mother cat Cindy will be avail-

Shelter

YAPpenings Sadie

able for adoption in about two weeks as will her three kittens Tanner, Cali and Morris. Reminds me of the nursery rhyme – three little kittens lost their mittens, although they don’t wear mittens so that’s kind of silly. Anyway, check out their pictures! Beautiful Jennifer and Shadow are still looking for homes as are my dog friends, fun-loving Polly, handsome Sully, big-hearted Sue and new to the adoption floor, the juvenile Penny. Then of course there are the two little guys, Homie and Rocco. Please stop by and visit us, we love the company. Almost forgot to mention, Jenny says we are getting low on laundry detergent and bleach. Anyway, guess that’s it for now and besides I’m starting to nod off. Sending you all licks and tailwags! The Humane Society of Burnett County is saving lives, one at a time. www.hsburnettcty.org.

Siren Senior Center

Father Nature dealt us a lousy day Saturday, but 51 hardy 500 players came out for our annual 500 card party and had an enjoyable afternoon in spite of the weather. (I am not ever going to refer this weather as Mother Nature again, as I know a mother couldn’t be that nasty). Our gratitude to the businesses and friends who so generously donated prizes for our silent auction and door prizes for the players. Without you we would never succeed at our fundraisers and hopefully everyone who attended the party will remember your generosity by shopping at your businesses. The card members sponsored a great party and the center would like to acknowledge Ralph and Nona Severson, Anke Olesen, Clara Palomaki, Sue Newberger, CeCe Olive and Gerry Vogel for expertise and also, all of the willing hands that helped to set up and take down all of the card tables and make the center presentable again. Without you folks we would never have been able to have the successful party we had. Thank you all. The Dining at Five dinner will be held this Thursday, May 5. As I mentioned before we will be honoring the Burnett County Nutrition volunteers, so if you haven’t made a reservation now would be a good time to call in to save a place at the table. CeCe will be serving roast pork, twice-baked potatoes, salad bar and apple pie. A white baseball hat with the inscription of USA didn’t walk out the door with its owner at our Good Friday breakfast. If the owner will stop in we will be happy to reconcile you two.

Alex

Feb. 4, 1996

The next time you are at the center be sure and stop in the gift shop and see the 28 beautiful knit stocking hats that Ann Agerbeck graciously donated. I thought maybe we would have to wait until next fall to start advertising them but they honestly would be very suitable for the weather we are having. They won’t last long at only $5 each. Thank you Ann for your generosity. Our sympathy to the family and friends of Vi Duke of Grantsburg who passed away this past week. Vi joined us at our Spade card games and we will miss her. The latest update on Millie Hartshorn is that she is in the hospital in Grantsburg and would enjoy your company. She didn’t break any bones due to her fall. She received some bruises and is still unsteady on her feet, but she still has her sense of humor and is happy to see all her friends. Winners at 500 this week were Tom Knopik, Mary Ellen Vorwald, Carl Link, Butch Connors and Muriel Todd. Anke Olesen, Inez Pearson, CeCe Olive and Barb Munger furnished treats for the players. Spade winners were Roger Greeley, Rich Husted, Arnie Borchert, Cora deJong and Marge Nyberg. Marge Nyberg treated the players to ice-cream sundaes after cards. Our weekly activities include Wii bowling on Monday morning, Dime Bingo Tuesday, 500 on Wednesday and Spades on Friday afternoons. For any information or to make reservations for dinner call, 715-349-7810 (center) or 715-349-2845 for dinner. Hope to see you at the center.

A Waiting Child

Alex is a charming, lovable 15-year-old boy who enjoys his share of attention. He loves telling stories and watching movies. Alex enjoys playing Nintendo and attending gym class. Alex also likes pets. He is very inquisitive and talkative and easily initiates conversation. Alex is in need of a forever family who can provide him with educational support and allow him to reach his full potential. Alex aspires to become someone like his social worker who speaks with children and helps them.

Barb Munger

Who knows? With the right family he may be able to meet, or at least come close to, his goal. Alex loves one-on-one attention and participating in family activities, such as meals, games and movies. Alex has been through a lot in the past. He deserves unconditional love and a committed family to lead him down the right path and provide him with opportunities to grow into a confident and self-aware young gentleman. For more information about Alex, or other Wisconsin children waiting for adoptive homes, call Adoption Resources of Wisconsin at 414-475-1246 or 800-762-8063 or visit the Web site at www.wiadopt.org.


TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER

PAGE 40 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

It’s been a while since I’ve submitted news from Luck. I think all of the snowbirds are back from the Southwest now. Marlys and Eiler arrived back at least a month ago, but left again for about a week I think they went east. But they are now back for our beautiful spring. Bob Kreutzian was in Hawaii for at least a month last winter, so he did get in on at least a little of the winter. Dave and I arrived back home in the middle of March, but also left again to spend a little time with grandkids in New Jersey. I am so happy to be home now. Luck is a great place to be in the spring. Sylvia and Gaylan Jensen always arrive home a little later than the rest of us. It was nice to see them last Wednesday at the center. So we are happy to see our center a little busier now, but we would always like to see more of our

Luck Senior Center

neighbors come in. Susan Eliason has been our hostess for the last few months now. She is at the center every Tuesday and Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. (You know, I can never remember if we are open till 3 p.m. or 3:30 p.m., but it doesn’t matter, because we just stay open until everyone decides to leave anyway!) Susan used to own the beauty shop downtown. Not only is she a super hairstylist (hey, she used to cut my hair, and then give me plants for my flower gardens to boot), I think she is a better cook. Her little pastries are just awesome with a cup of coffee and pleasant conversation. Our building has a pleasant homey feeling with Susan there. She brought the geraniums in last winter, and they still look lovely and healthy. So please come in to say hello. We welcome all - young, old, and in-between.

NARFE meets May 14

LUCK - The National Active and Retired Federal Employees Chapter 1581 will hold a dinner meeting at noon, Thursday, May 12, at the Hog Wild Restaurant on Luck’s Main Street. All ac-

tive and retired members are welcome. Reservations may be made by phoning 715-689-2252 by noon Monday, May 9. - submitted

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We are always looking for new members, but want you to come in even if you have no interest in becoming a member. I need to add that we are also open every Wednesday, when we have volunteer hostesses. Some of our members who have been filling that role are Judy Randall and Betty Schandorff - these two served many of the Wednesdays over the winter. Thanks so much to both of you. Over the summers, Sylvia and Gaylan Jensen, Marlys and Eiler, and I, and at times Silpa Ogren and Edna Lawson have been servers. And I know I have likely missed someone who has been doing some serving - please forgive me if I have - I’m a senior you know. We do love it when we have lots of happy people eating our goodies and sipping our coffee. Not all of life is great.

Polk Co. Health Department Notes Barb Blodgett

Stay safe, stay sober during prom and graduation season

Youth across the nation will be celebrating prom and graduation this spring. The Polk County Health Department wants to remind everyone of the importance of safety during these milestones. Every year, an alarming number of teens lose their lives to injuries associated with alcohol use and motor vehicle crashes remain the No. 1 killer of people ages 16 to 20. Let’s work together as community members, parents and students to make this prom and graduation season one of celebration and smart choices. The facts below paint a clear and sobering picture. Alcohol-related injuries claim the lives of more than 5,000 teens every year.

FACT: On prom and graduation nights, six out of 10 high school students feel pressure to drink or use drugs. More than eight in 10 teens say that students who drink or use drugs at prom will likely get behind the wheel. FACT: Car crashes kill more teens during the weekends of prom and graduation season than any other time of year. FACT: The risk of a high school student

There is always some sadness. Two of our members have lost their husbands just in the last few weeks. Our condolences to JoAnne Christensen and to Virginia Warwas and to their families. I need to mention here too that Richard and Virginia Warwas were also servers several times at the center before Richard became too ill. You may have noticed that our building got a minor facelift last summer when we repainted the blue trim and doors. So keep watching now for the big old overgrown trees to go and some new shrubs to take their place. We started this project last summer, so hopefully, we will see the job finished this summer. Have a happy spring – and we hope to see you at the center!

drinking and driving is cut by more than 70 percent when parents set clear rules and stay involved in their teen’s life. FACT: Three in four teens say their parents are the main influence on whether or not they drink alcohol. So what can parents do to increase their children’s safety? • Have ongoing conversations. When parents talk to teens about the dangers of illegal underage drinking, it makes a difference. • Set road rules. The following driving rules lessen the chance of accidents: - Limit the number of teens in one vehicle. - Set a driving curfew. The greatest number of accidents happen between midnight and 3 a.m. on weekends. - Make sure your teen buckles up and follows the speed limit. - Warn your teen about deadly distractions. Agree that there will be no loud music, texting, cell phone use or eating while driving. • Stay involved. When parents are part of their teen’s everyday life, less underage drinking and unsafe driving practices occur. • Talk to other parents. Let other parents know that you have a zero-tolerance policy when it comes to underage drinking. For more information please visit these Web sites: Parents who Host: sites.google. com/site/parentswhohostawi/ Students Against Driving Drunk: www.sadd.org.

Mother’s Day plant sale

WANDEROOS – The Polk County Master Gardeners will hold their annual plant sale in conjuction with the Wanderoos Mother’s Day pancake breakfast at the Wanderoos Fire Hall on Sunday, May 8, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Come join them for the pancake breakfast and treat

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MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 41

Dusting the cobwebs off history, Joanie’s way

Folle Avoine Chronicles

Joanie McKeown first heard about

Forts Folle Avoine during a conversation with longtime area resident Gene Connor about 25 years ago. Then, in 1990, she was introduced to the site when she participated in an outdoor Mass that was held there to commemorate the 1600s Mohawk woman Kateri Tatawitha, also known as “Lily of the Mohawks.” As McKeown recalls, “I set up the sound system for that Mass, so my first experience here was not just as a visitor but as a worker bee.” McKeown soon began an ongoing relationship with the Forts Folle Avoine site and its programs, culminating in her recent election to the Burnett County Historical Society’s board of directors, the group which acts as the site’s trustees. As McKeown puts it, “That day, standing on the grounds of the Forts, with its history stretching back around 200 years, I couldn’t help but feel a connection to the past ... being there makes you feel part of something that is bigger than just your life; you become part of the lives of all the people who passed this way before.” Taking the fur trade/Indian village tours, McKeown feels, is a fun way to delve into that heritage. As she explains, “You won’t find better interpreters than

Mothering, then and now

Of all the Mother’s Day cards I’ve

ever received the one that stands out in my memory was the work of my son Mark at age 7. His second-grade class assignment was to design a very personal Mother’s Day message. His handmade card, carefully printed with red crayon on blue construction paper, read simply, “Mothers are the ones who are always right.” Now in his 40s, Mark has become very adept at tuning me out, albeit with a loving wink, every time I remind him about that. It’s hard to take ourselves too seriously after we’ve spent a good chunk of a lifetime in the mothering role. One of many incidents my family won’t let me forget revolves around the “boot camp bran muffins.“ It was that very emotional experience of sending a young son off to the military. We were gathered at the airport for our final goodbyes as Scott headed for Marine Corps boot camp. As I hugged him for the last time, I quietly tucked a package under his arm. It was a fresh supply, packed “to go,” of his favorite bran muffins. “I can just see him now,” mused my husband after the departure, “face to face with his drill instructor, when he’s questioned about what he’s got in that package.” “Muffins, Sir, muffins from my mother,” he would dutifully reply as my labor of love was confiscated. Mother’s Day always triggers a flood of memories for me. As a stay-at-home mom in the days when that was the norm, I thought I had the upper hand over those little rascals, most the time. I believe God gives every mother the required amount of psychic power to stay on top of things Prophetic moms will always recognize reports of pain in a small belly as news that the teacher has scheduled a test that day. I recall the day I gave my fifth-grader the benefit of the doubt. His teacher called to check. “Pain in the stomach?” she snorted. “If you ask me, I think it’s a pain in his social studies.“ Because the malady had run epidemic proportions that particular day,

Woodswhimsy the gnome

the ones we have. I’ve taken tours at various historical places in the U.S. and around the world. Those tours are often informative, but after a while they all seem alike. Not at the Forts! We call our tour guides ‘interpreters’ because they don’t just tell you about the past, they make you feel like you’ve stepped back in time and are talking to people who actually lived in the past. This is fascinating!” Over the years McKeown has expanded her own role at the Forts by volunteering in the site’s gift shop and other areas, such as helping out with the pancake breakfasts and other culinary events. “I agreed,” she muses, “as long as they didn’t make me cook!” adding that she found her niche while working in the gift shop as it brought back memories of her years as a teen helping out

Potpourri by Pat

Pat Solomonson the teacher, one up on these connivers, rescheduled the test for a different date. Maternal clairvoyance is even easier with very young kids. Like when your first-grader swaggers home with a confident smile that means he’s earned the respect of his peers. He plops his books on the table, faces you squarely, then announces in true big-shot fashion, “I told the teacher that you would…” You know before he’s even finished the sentence that he has volunteered your service to either (1) provide 32 popcorn balls for the Halloween party, (2) accompany the class on their field trip to a farm, or (3) provide summer vacation board and room for the white rat that now inhabits his classroom. While everyone knows that mothers hear all, see all and know all, there are times when we are caught off guard. We had a 2-year-old acrobat who kept us all on our toes with his atrocious dinner table antics, all performed from varying positions in or on his high chair.. At one meal he suddenly stood up and fired a radish across the table, making a direct hit into his father’s glass. He acted so quickly that none of us was aware of what was happening until we saw the splash of milk. This, of course, prompted much gleeful howling from all of his siblings. Ah, the memories on this Mother’s Day. I wish God’s blessing on all the mothers who are still in the throes of raising children with the hope that you will treasure these years and not wish them away. You have the most important job in the world and you only get one shot at it. Special tribute is due also to the many grandmothers who are now sacrificing much of their own personal time of life to provide the care needed, at least for a while, by grandchildren. I stand in awe.

www.the-leader.net

Stay connected to your community.

in her dad’s grocery store, while toting up the sales figures is reminiscent of time she spent as a math teacher. She looks forward to more people joining the volunteer ranks at the site, noting that “All we need is your phone number and we’ll help you find a place here that is useful and enjoyable for you!” McKeown sees serving on the board of directors as an opportunity to uniquely expand on her background and talents. Having served on a state board as well as a national organization, she appreciates the opportunities she sees for the historical society and its anchor, the Forts site. As she explains, “I see so much potential at the Forts, not just for its fur trade educational focus, but as a location where we can have fun learning about other facets of our history.” She’s working with a group, for instance, on the history of schoolhouses in the area, “some of which lasted into recent times. Some of the stories we’ve uncovered are funny; some are touching. Visitors to the Forts this summer will be able to see the displays and read the stories.” Along the lines of making history accessible to more people, McKeown notes that “We asked a number of people what topics related to Burnett County they would most like to learn about. Based on the responses, I’ve worked with our education committee to engage a number of experts to give presentations about the sturgeon of Yel-

If you only look outside every other day and go outside the alternate days, you might be able to believe it is really spring. My tiger lilies think it is spring. It is almost like they are saying, “Believe and you shall receive.” I once read a book that Oprah said was the real thing. The deal was that if you believe it, it can really happen. It was all about positive thinking. Think positive and you would get you what you want. I have been thinking for a long time that I would get a new car and it is just not happening. Maybe I don’t get the concept. Maybe I missed the pages that say you have to stand on your head in the corner and then it will work. Of course I can’t stand on my head in the corner or anywhere, so it is a lost cause. Speaking of standing on my head makes me think of getting down on or up from the floor. I had no idea a body could creak like mine. My knees can actually play music in tandem. Down 2 inches releases a sound from one knee and down another inch and I get a sound from the other knee. And so it goes until the end of the “William Tell” Overture. Of course then I have to think about getting up. That music is not so sweet. Among the moans and groans comes an occasional snap, crackle or pop and I am not even eating Rice Krispies. I try my best not to get down if there is not someone nearby who can give me a hand, no I mean two hands, to help me up. The alternative is to call American Hoist and Derrick. I know those guys are out of business, but there must be a company that performs the difficult task of getting something that is down, up. Rereading that paragraph, I see it makes little sense, but that happens often to me. Thinking all of this over I guess I am lucky that the parts of me that don’t work very well are still available and they are even “new and improved.” My knees are heading in that direction and so is my right hip. They are ready to be replaced but I am dragging my feet. Sure, I want the operation right now when I am trying to get myself up or down, but when I am, a sitting or standing … no, not standing … position I know I can live with this pain. Moving is the problem. Watching me get in and out of bed deserves a standing ovation. Getting into one position is fine, moving is not so good. I always prided myself on sleeping in a very neat bed. Nothing out of place. Every blanket and pillow just as it was when I went to bed. Denny, not so much. He throws the covers hither and yon, (my grandmother’s language) and rolls into a ball. If he touches my perfect side of the bed there will be consequences. I love it when I get up and only have to make half the bed. After I dig around for a while I find his sheet

Joanie McKeown preparing a museum display at Forts Folle Avoine Historical Park. – Photo submitted

low Lake, mussels of the St. Croix River, the types of trees found here, and early quilting. The Knitwits, a local group, will be doing demos of knitting, crocheting, tatting and a number of other crafts.” Added in with all of the activities planned for the Forts, such as Yellow River Echoes, in June, the Rendezvous of late July, and a host of other fur-trade-era activities, the upcoming season promises to be, in McKeown’s estimation, “all in all, a fun year!” Signed, Woodswhimsy

Interfaith

Cares

Barb Blodgett

and blankets and can make them look somewhat like mine. Why this upsets me so much I have no idea. It is not the end of the world, we are not having earthquakes or tsunamis (doesn’t that word just look wrong?) or any terrible thing like that and I worry about messed up beds. OK, Easter resolution, it is too late for New Year’s, so I’ll begin at Easter. Resolution, I will not be irked about things that really mean nothing at all. That just sent a chill up my back. If I can’t sweat the small stuff, what control do I have on anything. I can leave the dirty dishes until tomorrow - that gave me goose bumps. I can, no wait, I can’t. Let’s just take one thing at a time. OK, I am calmed down now. One thing at a time. I’ll start with the messy bed. Once I have cornered that, I can do anything. At least I have allowed myself (Just a little) to think that I can do anything. Now, let’s get real. It is spring and that means spring cleaning. I have about 60 volunteers who will be in the area from May 20 - 25. If you know of someone who needs a house painted (one story) or a garden tilled or some such chore, let me know. People won’t ask for themselves so we don’t hear about the house in the woods that has not been painted since the Civil War. OK, I was just kidding about which war but you know what I mean. I need projects. Would appreciate some help. Thank you ahead of time. At least I know you are thinking. I have to begin reminding you of our yearly Memorial Day rummage sale. It will be held at 7596 Hayden Lake Road, Danbury. We have many things and beautiful clothes. The date is May 27 and 28, from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. For those of you who help, thank you in advance. I am usually so tired at the end of the sale I have forgotten all of my social graces and don’t remember to thank everyone. So, for the helpers, the buyers and the donators, a big thank-you. I just heard that the Arborists, the men who come from all over to cut our wood, will be here the Saturday of the rummage sale. This will give everyone a chance to see what is done, who does it and why it means so much to our Heat a Home project. See you at the sale. Enough for now. Hope everyone had a great Easter. Blessings, Barb


LIBRARY NEWS

PAGE 42 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

Balsam Lake Public Library

the public library as a vital community resource and a welcoming place. Book club Selection for May is “Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet,” by Jamie Ford. Ford’s first novel explores the age-old conflicts between father and son, the beauty and sadness of what happened to Japanese Americans in the Seattle area during World War II, and the depths and longing of deep-heart love. The book club meets Wednesday, May 18, 3 p.m. Extra books are available at the library. Hours Balsam Lake Library, (under the water tower) at 404 Main St., Balsam Lake. Hours are Monday 10 a.m. – 8 p.m., Tuesday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Wednesday 10 a.m. – 8 p.m., Thursday 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., Friday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. E-mail: balsamlakepl@ifls.lib.wi.us. Web site www.balsamlakepubliclibrary. org. 715-485-3215.

St. Croix Falls Public Library

line form. www.stcroixfallslibrary.org. School’s out at SCFPL Homework help and cool programs for youth are available for kids in grades five through eight Wednesdays 3:30-5 p.m. Homework help, quiet study, snacks, oldschool games, eco arts, computer access and a chance to help build more and better youth programs at SCFPL. Students need a note from a parent to catch bus No. 9 down to the library. Students in grades two through four are welcome to attend with a parent or guardian present at all times. For more information or to volunteer to be a tutor, contact Cole, the youth services librarian, at czrostlik@stcroixfallslibrary.org or at 715483-1777. Story hour with Cole Listen to stories, create art and have fun with other kids and parents every Wednesday, 10:30 a.m. Community meeting room is available for Check out our Web site your organization It has up-to-date information on what’s Reserve the meeting room with our on- happening at the library and other useful library tools you can use at home. www.stcroixfalls library.org. Look for us on Facebook. Technology Free wireless and eight 67th-Annual public computers are available at the library. Plus, seven laptops are available for use in the library, but you Saturday, May 7, 2011, 4 - 7:30 p.m. must have a valid MORE liHeld At The brary card in good standing. Hours The library is open from 10 New This Year – Kids Games! a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday and SaturSmelt, Beans, Coleslaw, Rolls, Pickles & day, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 715Beverage & Hot Dogs 483-1777. E-mail: $ $ Adults 10 Children (12 & Under) 5 scflibrary@ifls.lib.wi.us. Online: www.stcroix 6 Years & Under Free 535244 37L fallslibrary.org. One world, many stories – Great kids and family programs this summer at the St. Croix Falls Public Library. Sign up for our summer reading program. Earn incentives and participate in great programs all for free, ages birth to 18 years. Summer reading kickoff is Saturday, June 4, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Visit the safari petting zoo with baby animals from around the world from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Shop local at the farmers market, make a free collage button and find out what’s happening at the SCFPL and in your community this summer. Check out our Web site for more info www.stcroixfallslibrary.org Second-annual library gala will be held on Saturday, June 11. Save the date. Beginner computer classes to be scheduled soon – give us a call if you are interested 715-483-1777 or check the library news in two weeks.

TAYLORS FALLS FIREMEN’S

SMELT FRY T.F. FIRE HALL

Frederic Public Library – celebrating 75 years in 2011. Find collections, connections and community.

"Ana’s Playground" Frederic Library, in partnership with Frederic Arts, will host a Thursday, May 12, screening and discussion of “Ana’s Playground,” a film about the impact of war and violence on children. Short listed for a 2011 Academy Award nomination, the film (which was shot in Minneapolis) avoids political or regional stereotypes as it follows a rag-tag group of children at play in a war-torn neighborhood when danger strikes in the form of a sniper. This free program begins at 7 p.m. with the film, followed by a time for discussion and refreshments. For more information go to anasplayground.com.

Saturday, May 7, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.

CUSHING ROD & GUN CLUB Raffle Tickets Available 1st Place - Savage Model 110 270 Bolt 2nd Place - 12-gauge Remington 3rd Place - Etrex GPS Unit 4th Place - $50 Visa Drawing at shoot for Savage Bolt-Action .22

Burnett County Bulldogs Fundraiser

Story time Story time for preschoolers and their caregivers is held each Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. for an hour of books and music and activities. The May theme is “food,” and the author of the month is Laura Numeroff, author of “If You Give a Mouse a Cookie,” and other favorites.

Learn more about library events Frederic Public Library, 127 Oak St. West. 715-327-4979, e-mail fredericpl@ifls.lib.wi.us. Regular open hours are Monday through Friday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.; and Saturday 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Story time for preschoolers is held every Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. Web site: www.fredericlibrary.org. Facebook: Frederic Public Library.

Desperately seeking sunshine If you’re anxious to dig in the dirt and plant something, stop by the library first for a wide variety of books on all things gardening – container gardening, com-

Frederic School District announces academic leaders

FREDERIC – The Frederic School District has announced their valedictorian and salutatorian for the Class of 2011. The valedictorian of the Class of 2011 is Sarah Knauber, the daughter of Kevin and Donna Knauber. Knauber’s future plans include attending UW-Eau Claire and she will be enrolled in the School of Nursing. The salutatorian for the Class of 2011 is Tanesha Carlson, the daughter of Robert Carlson and Connie Carlson. Carlson is also going to attend UW-Eau Claire and will also be enrolled in the School of Nursing. In addi-

tion to excelling in the classroom, both Knauber and Carlson have been very involved in school activities. Both girls have been involved in athletics, FFA, music/fine arts and have been class officers. Knauber and Carlson will be recognized during graduation ceremonies scheduled for Sunday afternoon, May 22, at the high school. - submitted

AASPEN SPEN L LEAF EAF

COOKHOUSE

3270 State Rd. 35 • 1 mile north of Frederic, WI

715-327-8777

West Denmark Lutheran Church Cordially invites you to its annual

AEbleskiver Dinner Saturday, May 7, 3:30 - 7 p.m. For $8, enjoy traditional Danish delights! AEbleskiver (pancake balls) Medisterpolse (sausage) Sodsuppe (sweet soup) Beverages and dessert

FEATURING A TICKET AUCTION AND RAFFLE FOR

Dear Frederic and All Aspen Leaf Cookhouse Guests, After a long, cold, windy winter, which is still plaguing us yet, we would like to thank all of you for making our Easter Spring Opening an incredibly enjoyable experience. We will begin Summer Sunday Brunches Memorial Day Weekend. Join Us!

This Saturday, May 7, Aspen Leaf will feature a

SANDWICH CREATION STATION For the Earth Arts Tour Guests

West Denmark Parish Hall

From 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. (opening at 10 a.m.)

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Also 50-Bird Youth Shoot

panion planting, annuals and perennials, vegetable gardening, landscaping design and more. More and more folks are interested in gardening this year, for enjoyment and for food, so let the library help you with information and answers.

May book group choices The Thursday morning group meets Thursday, May 19, at 10 a.m., to discuss “For Whom the Bell Tolls.” This Ernest Hemingway novel is the story of Robert Jordan, a young American in the International Brigades attached to an antifascist guerrilla unit in the mountains of Spain. The evening book group will also meet May 19, at 6:30 p.m., to talk about “March,” by Geraldine Brooks. The author has crafted a story inspired by the father character in “Little Women” and drawn from the journals and letters of Louisa May Alcott’s father, of a man who leaves behind his family to serve in the Civil War and finds his beliefs challenged by his experiences. Copies are available at the library and new members are always welcome at the book discussions.

5th-ANNUAL

BCWC TRAP SHOOT 100-BIRD SHOOT

The April story time theme was Birds at Frederic Library and Ms. Hugo, who lives with Wayne and Bonnie Anderson, came to visit last week. The children learned about parrots and were fascinated by the lovely Ms. Hugo. – Photo submitted

• Hannah Wren Fawver Original Art • Luhrs-Bjornson Pottery • Minnesota Twins Tickets • Gift Baskets • And More! West Denmark Lutheran Church is located 1.2 miles west of Luck off County Road N on 170th Street. LOOK FOR SIGNS! Funds supplemented by Polk/Burnett 30915 Chapter of Thrivent Financial for Lutherans Care Abounds in Communities Program.

Carved Prime Rib & Ham, Andouille Sausages, Condiments, Cheeses, Garnishes, Grilled Sandwiches.

ON SUNDAY - MOTHER’S DAY

We offer our complete menu plus Roast Lamb w/mint jelly & soy honey jus and Salmon & Shrimp Surf & Surf w/mild Anchor butter sauce. Dinners include desserts for the Moms and mini appetizer bites for all.

For lamb, please call before Friday at 3 p.m. - 715-327-8777

Come over and eat sometime! Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 4 p.m. Saturday & Sunday (May 7 & 8) 10 a.m.

535458 37Lp

Spring will get here, and we have a lot of books on gardening, landscaping and how to have a great lawn and flower gardens. We need the color after this long winter. Free items With your library card, the best card in your wallet, you can check out DVDs, VHS, music CDs, and books of all kinds for all ages, books on CD and cassette. Use our public computers and free Wi-Fi. Check it out. Computer classes Open lab is from 2 to 3:30 p.m., and an instructor is available to answer questions and give one-to-one instructions. The next class will be Tuesday, May 10. Story time Wednesday at 11 a.m. Stories, crafts and snacks are available. All ages are welcome to join our lively group. Friends of the Library Friends group meets Wednesday, May 18, at 1:30 p.m., here at the library. Friends group is an organization for all who value

Frederic Public Library


MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 43

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PAGE 44 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

Frederic Area Walk/Run, snow, rain or shine the walk for minimum of $5. Tribute flags for the Frederic walk may be sent to Kay Thorsbakken prior to the walk at Box 221, Frederic, WI 54837 or purchased the day of the walk. The flags will be on display near the registration areas of the walk. Betty and Bob MacKean have created and donated a beautiful quilt as a fundraiser for the ACS Walk/Run. Quilt raffle tickets are $1 each or 6 for $5. Tickets may be purchased the day of the walk or prior to the walk from the U.S. and Bremer banks, Luck Medical Clinic, The Medicine Shoppe, from Betty MacKean or Walk/Run committee members. The drawing for the quilt will take place just before the walk begins at 9:15 a.m. A silent auction is being held for the autographed Super Bowl Champion Green Bay Packer football. The football is on display at the Bremer Bank this week and bids may be made there and the day of the walk at the elementary school prior to 9:15 a.m.

The Frederic Golf Course is offering a buy one, get a round of golf half price, for every Run/Walk participant (this is a correction from last week). The golf course is also donating a round of golf for four people. The free round of golf will go to the individual who raises the most money for the walk. For further information on the Frederic Area ACS Walk/Run, contact Elvira Schmidt at 715-653-2684. Join the fight against cancer on Saturday, May 7. If you are unable to walk, sponsor a walker, or purchase a tribute flag in honor or memory of a friend or loved one. The ACS walks are about having fun, coming together as a community and doing something positive to help cancer research, education, advocacy and service. The ACS offers hope, progress and answers. Together we can make a difference. Persistence is the key to finding a cure for cancer … the ultimate goal of the Walk/Run. - submitted

ST. CROIX TRIBAL SMOKE SHOP ALL YOUR TOBACCO NEEDS

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gym after registration. Teams captains are urged to register all team members early to allow times for all team pictures to be taken before 9 a.m. so the walk can start on time at 9:15 a.m. Sponsors for the Frederic ACS Walk/Run again this year are Larsen Auto Centers and Amery Regional Medical Center and a new sponsor is the St. Croix Regional Medical Center. The Kinetico Company is supplying water for the walk this year. Frederic walkers may choose a two-, three- or five-mile route. Route signs are posted along the way. Also posted along Highway 35 in Frederic, are Signs of Hope that have been purchased by area businesses to support the walk. The Frederic Area Ambulance will be available if needed. The Frederic walk will be selling tribute flags. Forms for the flags are available at the banks in Frederic, were in the Leader last week or may be purchased the day of

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Remember Mom With An Extra Special, Heartfelt Gift.

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FREDERIC – The Frederic Area American Cancer Society Walk/Run will take place on Saturday, May 7, regardless of weather conditions. If there should be inclement weather to walk in, that is nothing compared to what a cancer patient endures while fighting the disease. Registration for the Frederic walk will be from 8-8:45 a.m. at the Birch Street Elementary School, arrive early enough to register, receive a T-shirt if $50 is raised and have team pictures taken. Refreshments provided by local businesses will be available before the walk. Cancer survivors are urged to register and receive a survivor flower. Cancer survivors are asked to line up behind the honorary chair at the ribbon cutting at the beginning of the walk. Hope Healy is the honorary chair of the Frederic Walk/Run; she is a breast-cancer survivor and an excellent role model for all of us. Team pictures will be taken in the gym this year before the walk so proceed to the

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Polk Home and Sportshow

Many trophy deer and other mounts were on display in the Hunters Classic building.

MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 45

St. Croix Falls

The less-than-ideal temperatures put a damper on some of Saturday’s St. Croix Valley Family Home and Sportshow events, but Sunday was at least dry. Chris Lambert of The Great Outdoor Discovery Club of Osceola broke out some targets for these youth to take an aim at. The newly formed club has a mission to create confidence and self-esteem through outdoor adventures.

This little guy gave everything he had during the pedal tractor pull on Sunday, May 1.

Luke Shilson was more than happy with the rainbow trout he and his dad, Dan Shilson, hauled in at the trout tank. It was one of several activities for youth and grown-ups alike at the St. Croix Valley Family Home and Sportshow last weekend, Saturday, April 30 andSunday, May 1.

The bite was a bit slow at the trout tank during the 13th-annual St. Croix Valley Family Home and Sportshow on Sunday, but a few trout were caught by determined youth anglers.

This little girl seemed happy to learn the art of casting a line despite temperatures that made it feel more like ice fishing instead.

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Rendezvous a'Paris

PAGE 46 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

Unity

Crown bearers for Unity’s prom were Isabelle Hansch and Ethan Jerrick.

The Unity Prom held Saturday, April 30, with a theme of Rendezvous a’Paris, included court members (L to R) front row: Etta Johnson, Isabelle Hansch and Jenna Christensen. Standing: Jordan Hughes, Kaitlyn MacKinnon, Aaron Cousins, Jenny Vlasnik, Steven Krueger, Reide Bibeau, Xavier Foeller and Connor MacKinnon. Photos by Jeanne Alling

www.the-leader.net

Stay connected to your community.

Prom 2011

Webster’s 2011 newly crowned queen and king is Brittany Maxwell and Josh Baer. – Photos by Raelynn Hunter

Unity’s prom queen, crowned April 30, is Reide Bibeau and king is Xavier Foeller.

Webster

Webster’s prom was held Saturday, April 30, at the Lakeview Event Center in Siren. Prom court (L to R): Sarah Nyberg, Miranda Burger, Melissa Gustavson, Shauna Rein, Kaitlyn Payson and 2011 Webster Prom Queen Brittany Maxwell, 2011 Webster Prom King Josh Baer, Austin Bork, Joey Erickson, Matt Hophan, Robert Buehler and Taylor Heinz.


Prom 2011

MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 47

Siren

Back row (L to R): Evan Oachs, Tricia Kopecky, Andrew Brown, Leanne Pigman, 2010 Prince Seth Stoner, 2010 King Tadd Oachs, 2010 Queen Daphne Hubbell, 2010 Princess Ashley Guevara, Isaac Wegner, Abigail Mitchell, Christina Luna and Will Haines. Front: 2011 Prince Murdock Smith, 2011 King Adam Neurer, 2011 Queen Felicia Paulzine, 2011 Princess Amber Hall and crown bearer Riley Jones. Missing from Photo: Crown bearer Rylee Nelson.

A Night Under the Stars

King Adam Neurer and Queen Felicia Paulzine dance their first dance at 2011 Prom King and Queen. – Photos submitted

Frederic

=Back row (L to R): Frederic prom’s 2010 King Raif Poirier, junior candidates Waylon Buck, Erik Stoner, Bradley Knauber, 2011 King Bryce Williamson, 2011 Queen Kali Otte, April Halverson, Lauren Domagala, Maria Miller and 2010 Queen Sarah Knauber. Front row: Rosalyn Lundquist and Chase Jensen. - Photos by Becky Amundson

Little prom attendants Chase Jensen, son of Lisa and Todd Jensen, and Rosalyn Lundquist, daughter of Nick and Andrea Lundquist.

Prom candidates first dance at the Frederic Prom, Saturday evening, April 30. Shown are Waylon Buck, Lauren Domagala and attendant Chase Jensen. Frederic’s 2011 Junior Prom Queen Kali Otte and 2011 Junior King Bryce Williamson.

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We have designers on staff that can help with all your landscape design and install needs.

is May 21 & 22.

We have a kids workshop Bring in this Ad for your Free Gift during our on Sunday, May 8.

Call the store for details or to sign up.

Sales On 1-Gal. Shrubs!

Open House Weekend. (1 per customer) while supplies last.

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Mandy Ness and Seth David were recently crowned queen and king at the Unity Community Prom sponsored by the Unity Leos Club. - Photo by Jeanne Alling

Our greenhouses are full of beautiful varieties of flowers in all sizes for Mom.

We will have beverages and cookies. Sales throughout the weekend (while supplies last.) Door Prizes.

Locally grown, hardy plants. We have a huge selection of trees, shrubs and perennials. Our trees and shrubs come with a 2-year guarantee. Perennials, a 1-year guarantee. We also have a huge selection of annuals, vegetables, tropicals, water plants and gift items. 534955 26a,dp 37Lp


Prom 2011

PAGE 48 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

Luck LEFT: The Luck 2011 Prom Court.

Luck Prom King and Queen Michael Jenssen and Morgyn McGinnity. Luck Prom Queen Morgyn McGinnity plants a kiss on the cheek of new Prom King Michael Jenssen. Photos by Greg Marsten

Prom 2011

One of the more popular themes for dresses and formal wear at the Luck prom were camouflage and blaze orange, as junior Summer Johnson shows in a dress that she made.

Grantsburg

The Grantsburg 2011 Prom Court pictured (L to R) is: 2010 King Andrew Falk, Gabrielle Witzany, Zackery Arnold, Carly Larson, Thomas Labatt, Hannah Rod, Damien Rasmussen, 2011 King Daniel Biorn, 2011 Queen Amanda Lindus, Nikki Ticknor, Jin Jeon, Rachel Diffee, Nolan Hanson and 2010 Queen Valerie Jensen. Junior Royalty Mason Arnold, and Jordan Java, not pictured.

LEFT: Junior Royalty Mason Arnold and Jordan Java shown with 2010 Queen Valerie Jensen.

RIGHT: Queen Amanda Lindus and King Daniel Biorn dancing the first dance.


A honor roll

Freshmen Brittany Butler, Rebekah Curtin, Austin Handy, Macy Hanson, Gustav Johnson, Haley Larsen, Samantha Nelson, Jacob Ohnstad, Tiffany Peterson, Raelyn Pochman, Wendy Roberts, Katharine Rod, Brooke Roufs, Abigail Stevens, Austin Thoreen, Lars Thoreson, Hope Tucker and Keith Vollendorf.

Sophomores Stephanie Anderson, Liliana Benge Briggs, Elizabeth Corbin, Grace Corbin, Melissa Dahl, Chelsey Goepfert, Sean Handy, Catherine LaMere, Johanna Lauer, Aimee Lerud, Kassandra Lien, Dakota Linke, Stacey McKenzie, Jenna Michel, Scott Morley, Connor Myers, Kylie Pewe, Jacob Radtke, Brandon Ryan, Samantha Schuldt, Jennifer Schwieger, Bradley Taylor, Brady Thompson

Check out the school Web site for a complete listing at www.lucksd.k12.wi.us. Preregistration is required for the classes listed below. There’s a minimum number of participants needed to run each class and also a maximum number allowed. Don’t delay to put your name on the roster. Call Amy Aguado at 715-472-2152, Ext. 103, or e-mail amya@lucksd.k12.wi.us to register. Kickboxing. Began Mondays, May 2 – June 6, 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Course fee: $25. Instructor: Tina Atkinson, certified personal trainer.

Grantsburg Honor Roll

and Hannah VanSlyke.

Juniors Daniel Bjorn, Benjamin Davis, Rachel Diffee, Lucas Henneman, Daniel Larsen, Amanda Lindus, Nicole McKenzie, Shelby Morgan, David Ohnstad, Isaac Peterson, Kyle Roberts, Hannah Rod, Nicole Ticknor and Gabrielle Witzany. Seniors Emily Cole, Lauren Finch, Siqi Gao, Anna Horky, Alexa-Jo Maslow, Gavin Meyer, Tiffany Meyer, Brent Myers, Dianna Olson, Lydia Pfluger, McKenzie Ryan, Carissa Skifstad, Erin Stavne, Emily Swenson and Tabitha Wanless.

MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 49

B honor roll Freshmen Gabrielle Banks, Brody Bonneville, Jaicee Bowman, Jake Carlson, Timothy Corry, Heidi Horky, Zachary Joachim, Nathan Lewis, Jonas Miller, Whitney Oachs, Cory Peterson, Ryan Rauchbauer, Damon Roberts, Victoria Vitale and Chandler Witzany. Sophomores Shepard Berreth-Doran, Kayla Casey, Lea Chute, Arikka Davison, Jessica Glover, Jacob Glover, Jonathan Haley, Seth Ilgen, Nichole Johnson, Paige Johnson, Jacob Langevin, Tiffani Moyer, Austin Otis, Alison Owens, Adam Parker, RuthAnn Pedersen, Clay Poeschl, Brandon Roufs, Bryce Ryan, Samantha Schwieger, Jacob Wald and Mariah Zastrow.

Luck Community Education

Tree medicine. Thursday, May 12, 6 – 8 p.m. Course fee: $12 plus $10 supply fee. Instructor: Leah Wolfe. Locations: Luck School and Plowshares Land Trust, 740 Round Lake Rd., Luck. Movement meditation. Fridays, May 13 – June 17, 8:30 – 9:45 a.m. Course fee: $34/$19 ages 62-plus. Instructor: Luann Kleppe. Fishing the St. Croix. Monday, May 23 and Thursday, May 26, 6 – 8 p.m. Field session date TBD. Course fee: $27. Instructor: Charles Huver, Ph.D.

Great American nature writers.. Tuesdays, May 24 and 31, 6 – 8 p.m. Course fee: $18. Instructor: Charles Huver, Ph.D. Growing medicinal plants. Thursday, May 26, 6 – 8 p.m. Course fee: $12 plus $10 supply fee. Instructor: Leah Wolfe. Water aerobics: Mondays and Wednesdays, June 13 – July 20, 4:30 – 5:30 p.m.; Tuesdays and Thursdays, June 14 – July 21, 9 – 10 a.m. and 10 – 11 a.m. Course fee: $49/$26.50 pages 62-plus. Instructor: Stephanie Robinson.

Juniors Cody Benedict, Haley Burkhardt, April Campana, Joseph Engelhart, Sierra Erickson, Breanna Fickbohm, Kali Fleischauer, Elizabeth Gaffney, Dylan Heller, Alexander Jones, Thomas Labatt, Carly Larson, Darian Larson, Paul Lewis, Nicholas Lindgren, Kaelah Maslow, Devin McDaniel, Damien Rasmussen, Mathew Swenson and Craig Vollendorf.

Seniors Will Carlson, Joseph Dye, Andrew Falk, Lisa Gaffney, Haley Johnson, Kyle Johnson, Steven LaFond, Alyssa Landsberger, Jacob Lee, Lori Linke, Steven McKinley, Kortney Morrin, Cory Niles, Seth Odegard, Jonathan Radtke, Dylan Roberts, Tyler Sanvig, Trevor Thompson, Russell Thoreen and Cherissa Vollendorf.

Driver’s education. Tuesday, June 28, orientation night, 6 – 8 p.m. (at least one parent needs to attend with their student during this orientation session.) Tuesday, July 12 – Thursday, Aug. 4, 10 a.m. – noon (Monday – Thursday). Course fee: $75 classroom/$315 behind the wheel. Instructor: Safe Start Driving School.

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SUMMER STORE HOURS:

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127 Main St., Luck, Wis. • 715-472-2475 Bob & Dianne Dueholm

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Open Tuesday - Saturday 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

BALSAM LAKE POTTERY UPCOMING SALES Saturday & Sunday, May 7 - 8, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Join the EARTH ARTS TOUR Event!

In the big red barn at 501 50th St., Balsam Lake, WI (1/3 mile north of Hwy. 46N & Co. Rd. I corner or 3.5 miles north of Hwy. 8 on 150th St.)

Friday - Monday, May 27 - 30

See www.eartharts.org for more studios/artisans on the tour!

CAFE WREN’S GARDEN & ART SALE

Fri.-Sat., 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. each day • Sun., 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. (At Cafe Wren, Hwy. 35 just north of the Holiday Station in Luck.)

715-472-4700 See www.cafewren.com for more information! The pottery is original hand-thrown stoneware - oven, microwave and dishwasher safe, and all have lead-free glazes. For more information call: 715-485-3928.

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Thank You

It’s your right...

Unity Area Ambulance would like to thank all of you for your donations and attendance to our annual fundraiser. We could not have done it without your support! Marian Furlong Lakeland Communications Heidi Conrad Country Clips Gretchen Leiterman Holiday Station Store Francis McQuillan Milltown Hauge Dental Bernicks Mike & Renee Dau Cheese & More Balsam Lake Subway Frandsen Bank & Trust Wayne’s Foods Plus SCRMC McCurdy Insurance Little Log House Agency Chuck Reinhart U.S. Bank Napa Auto Parts Store Harvest Moon Saloon Jeff’s Small Engine Maxwell Heating & Air Carol Zygowicz Larsen Auto Ben Wheeler Hack’s Pub RJ Frascone Wise Guys Tom & June Larson On-Spot Graphics MarketPlace Foods St. Croix Casino - Turtle EMS Medical Billing Assoc. Lake Emergency Apparatus RCU Bank - Milltown Maint. Wal-Mart Taylors Falls Scenic Boat Grand Casino Hinckley Tours Action Services LouAnn White Barbara Tretheway Scott & Harmony Warren Patrick McCauley Indianhead Supper Club Jeff & Linette Erickson Tom Wilkes & Claudine Josh & Angela Salzman Evans

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PAGE 50 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

“Queen Bee” and mead maker at bee club

by Wayne Anderson Special to the Leader BALSAM LAKE—The “Queen Bee” met the mead maker at the Thursday, April 28, beekeeper’s meeting at the Polk County Government Center. Sarah Rushfeldt, 22, was crowned the 2011 Northwest District Honey Queen. Gary Reuter, bee researcher at University of Minnesota, gave a down-home presentation on how to make homemade mead, or honey wine. Queen Rushfeldt is no newcomer to beekeeping. She started keeping bees when she was 15. Her family in Dresser is well-known in the beekeeping community. Besides her love for bees, she is a student at Crown College, a private four-year Christian college. She is studying nursing there. “I am a public ambassador,” Rushfeldt said. “I want to re- Sarah Rushfeldt, newly crowned honey queen, stands with bee researcher and mead cruit new beekeepers ... and maker Gary Reuter at the Thursday, April 28, bee meeting. – Photo by Wayne Anderson educate the public on beekeeping.” She said people with gardens benefit by keeping how simple it is to make the ancient beverage. It is very bees and the mere enjoyment of it as a hobby is enrich- inexpensive to make, and the end result is sweet tasting. He donated a mead-making kit for a drawing that ing. “Besides, you get the honey to boot!” She will be appearing at local schools and community night. As an expert on bees, he also answered members events to talk about and demonstrate the wonders of questions on the science and art of beekeeping. beekeeping. For more information on beekeeping, call 715-327Mead, honey wine, is the oldest form of wine on earth. Reuter was on hand to show club members just 5525.

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Luck Historical Society Museum and Luck Library sponsor Civil War programming

LUCK – The Luck Historical Society Museum in collaboration with the Luck Public Library and the Friends of the Luck Library have planned a series of public programs developed around the topic of Wisconsin’s role in the Civil War. To commemorate the 150th year of the end of the Civil War, the Historical Society Museum and the Luck Library will sponsor five authors/lecturers to speak, and one book discussion to honor Wisconsin’s Civil War heroes sacrifice and commitment to unity and freedom. April 12, marks the sesquicentennial of the beginning of the Civil War. Readers may have noticed the programming on the History Channel, the Biography Channel, PBS and A&E, etc., all revolving around the United States Civil War. That is not just coincidence, everybody is celebrating 150 years of freedom and unity. In honor of the contributions and sacrifices made by Wisconsin’s Civil War heroes and their families, the Luck Library and Luck Historical Society plan to jointly host six Civil War programs focusing on Wisconsin’s role in the war. On April 14, 1861, the news that Fort Sumter had been taken by Southern forces came to Madison. The news caused a great deal of excitement in Madison and the Wisconsin Legislature, which had already gone home for the weekend, was recalled by the governor. The members were gathered together for the sole purpose of preparing the state for war. By April 15, $20,000 was appropriated for war purposes and two companies of German-American soldiers from Milwaukee had already enlisted. By April 16, many more citizens had enlisted and Wisconsin’s War Bill had been passed. This bill allocated $100,000 to be used for raising and equipping regiments and negotiating rations. In two days, Wisconsin had called her citizens to action, and they responded with overwhelming support for the Union. Wisconsin was going to war. While no Civil War battles were fought in Wisconsin, the state sent 91,000 troops in 56 regiments to help the Union Army during the war. That represented approximately 12 percent of the state’s population in 1860. Wisconsin regiments hailed from communities large and small and from every corner of the state. The citizens of Wisconsin also responded with increasing agricultural, timber and industrial enterprises and output. By the time the war was over in 1865, with the preservation of the Union and the abolishment of slavery, more than 600,000 lives had been lost, including more than 12,000 from Wisconsin.

Civil War sesquicentennial programming • Dr. Bob Kann will be speaking on “Cordelia Harvey: Civil War Angel.” Kann is an entertainer, historian, writer, motivational speaker and educator from Madison. His latest book, “Cordelia Harvey: Civil War Angel,” brings to light the heart and dedication of one Wisconsin woman who dared to make a difference. With kindness and compassion Harvey worked tirelessly to bring hope and comfort to those souls wrecked

and ravaged by the war. The library and Luck Historical Society invites you to join them in this tribute to a true Wisconsin hero this Thursday, May 5, at 7 p.m. • Michael Martin will be presenting information, artifacts and journals focusing on Polk County’s Civil War heroes, their lives in battle and their lives after battle. Rarely do we have historians who delve into the lives of local farmers, students and businesspeople in order to bring their heroic efforts to light generations after the fact. Through much research, Martin helps us to remember the honor and courage of our great-great-grandfather’s generation. • Lance Herdegen will be giving a presentation highlighting the fearlessness of Wisconsin’s Iron Brigade. Noted for their strong discipline, their unique uniforms and their tenacious fighting, the Iron Brigade was made up of the 2nd, 6th and 7th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiments. The designation “Iron Brigade” is said to have originated during the brigade’s action at Turners Gap, during the Battle of South Mountain, a prelude to the Battle of Antietum in September 1862. Major General Joseph Hooker, commanding I Corps, approached Army of the Potomac commander Major General George B. McClellan, seeking orders. As the Western men advanced up the National Road, forcing the Confederate line all the way back to the gap, McClellan asked, “What troops are those fighting in the Pike?” Hooker replied, “[Brigadier] General Gibbon’s brigade of Western men.” McClellan stated, “They must be made of iron.” Hooker said that the brigade had performed even more superbly at Second Bull Run; to this, McClellan said that the brigade consisted of the “best troops in the world.” Herdegen’s latest work is “Those Damned Black Hats! The Iron Brigade in the Gettysburg Campaign.” It won an Army Historical Foundation Distinguished Writing Award. He is former director of the Institute for Civil War Studies at Carroll University and presently works as historical consultant for the Civil War Museum of the Upper Middle West at Kenosha, and as a lecturer in the Carroll History Department. • Youth book discussion – Soldier’s Heart by Gary Paulson - for fifth through eighth grades. This book focuses on the mental, emotional and physical effects on the very young who volunteered for the Civil War. The protagonist is a 15-year-old boy from Minnesota. His views of war and soldiering change as his experiences with war expand. This book discussion is planned as a parent/child participation program. Copies are available at all the Polk County libraries. It is a short book and a fast read, but it also shows depth and good character development. Discussion will be held at the Luck Library Tuesday, July 12, at 6 p.m. Snacks will be served. The Civil War programming will also include two, soon to be announced. Local presenters, which will be the July and August programs. Schedules are not confirmed on these final two programs. Please call the Luck Library, check Facebook or watch the newspapers for updated information. - submitted


MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 51

AWSC elects offi ficcers

The Association of Wisconsin Snowmobile Clubs held elections for the 2011-2012 executive board during the annual meeting in Wausau. They are President Doug Johnson of Amery, Vice President Dave Newman of Unity, Secretary Sue Smedegard of Danbury, Executive Director Sam Landes of Dane and treasurer Andy Malecki of Green Bay. - Photo submitted

Foundations support Northern Waters Literacy tutoring programs

NORTHWEST WISCONSIN - Northern Waters Literacy is privileged to be one of the programs supported by the Hugh J. Andersen and Otto Bremer Foundation. In 2010, Hugh J. Andersen granted $2 million. Otto Bremer Foundation donated $25 million. In February, NWL was notified that it was the recipient of an $11,000 grant from Hugh J. Andersen and in March NWL was again notified that it was the recipient of a $25,000 grant from Otto Bremer Foundation. These grants allow NWL to continue to serve the Polk County and St. Croix County areas with free tutoring and educational programs. With education, struggling people will gain the skills and confidence they need for their families,

their schools, their jobs and their community. NWL is proud to be a partner with many local organizations that are striving to educate and train those in need. The organization is very humbled by its nearly 60 volunteers who work daily to provide education and a personal relationship for NWL learners. NWL is also proud of its learners who courageously come forward and ask for the help that they need. Currently, NWL is seeking additional volunteers to mentor and tutor their waiting students. If you are interested in becoming a volunteer tutor with Northern Waters Literacy, please call 715-405-READ or visit our Web site at www.northernwatersliteracy.org. - from NWL

Second-annual Advanced Art Exhibit

LUCK – On Friday through Wednesday, May 6 – 18, Luck High School will be holding its second-annual Advanced Art Exhibit at the Luck Public Library. Bryce Amlee and Kyle James will be exhibiting a variety of sculptures, paintings and drawings made over the course of the last year. There will be an opening reception on Friday, May 6, from 5 to 8 p.m. In addition, the Luck forensics squad will be performing on the night of the opening, and culinary arts students from Luck will be providing a variety of treats. Please join in supporting the arts on this evening.

Senior Bryce Amlee shows off one of the sculptures that will be on display during Luck High School’s second-annual Advanced Art Exhibit at the Luck Public Library.

Senior Kyle James displays one of the paintings that will be on display during Luck High School’s second-annual Advanced Art Exhibit at the Luck Public Library.

The Leader

Connect to your community

WHAT’S FOR LUNCH???

Menu LOCATION

MAY 9 - MAY 13

MONDAY

TUESDAY

BREAKFAST

BREAKFAST Bagel pizza. LUNCH Ham stacker w/cheese, chips, raw veggies, dip OR chicken-taco salad.

Combo bar.

FREDERIC

LUNCH Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes, gravy, green beans OR buffalo chicken salad.

GRANTSBURG

LUNCH Pizza, lettuce salad, corn, pineapple tidbits, apples, oranges, bread basket.

WEDNESDAY Tastries.

BREAKFAST

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

BREAKFAST

BREAKFAST Yogurt/Teddy Grahams. LUNCH Pizza dippers, marinara sauce, cooked carrots OR beef-taco salad.

Pancakes.

LUNCH Hot dog, tuna noodle salad, raw veggies, dip OR ham salad.

LUNCH Cheeseburger, baked Oriental salad.

LUNCH Chicken nuggets, mashed potatoes, gravy, steamed broccoli, mixed fruit, apples, oranges, bread basket.

LUNCH Ham & cheese stacker, pasta salad, multigrain chips, fresh veggies, dip, banana, apples, oranges, bread basket.

LUNCH Tater-tot hotdish, lettuce salad, mixed vegetables, orange push pop, apples, oranges, bread basket.

LUNCH Hamburger with fixings, french fries, sliced carrots, applesauce, oranges, bread basket.

LUCK

BREAKFAST Cereal/waffles. LUNCH Mini corn dogs, corn bread, baked beans, fruit sauce. Alt.: Hamburger, 7-12.

BREAKFAST Cereal/long john. LUNCH Grilled ham & cheese, corn chips, green beans, fruit sauce. Alt.: Chicken patty, 7-12.

BREAKFAST Cereal/muffin. LUNCH Lasagna, garlic toast, corn, fruit sauce. Alt.: Hot dog, 7-12.

BREAKFAST Cereal/donut holes. LUNCH Chef’s choice.

BREAKFAST Cereal/cinnamon rolls. LUNCH Chicken nuggets, rice, peas, fresh fruit. Alt.: Hamburger, 7-12.

SIREN

BREAKFAST Assorted cereal and toast, juice and milk. LUNCH Hamburger on a bun, oven potatoes, veg. beans, carrots, pears, cookie. Alt.: Cook’s choice.

BREAKFAST French toast sticks, juice and milk. LUNCH Shaved turkey and cheese sandwich, chips, peas, pasta salad, diced peaches. Alt.: Cook’s choice.

BREAKFAST Assorted cereal and toast, juice and milk. LUNCH Taco salad, shredded lettuce, refried beans, cinnamon apple slices. Alt.: Cook’s choice.

BREAKFAST Cinnamon tastry, juice and milk. LUNCH Turkey and gravy over potatoes, peas, lettuce salad, apple crisp. Alt.: Cook’s choice.

BREAKFAST Assorted cereal and toast, juice and milk. LUNCH Chicken patty, nacho chips,carrots, green Pizza dippers, rice, corn, beans, coleslaw, orancelery, pineapple apples tidbits,and banana. ges. Alt.: Cook’s choice. Alt.: Cook’s choice.

ST. CROIX FALLS

BREAKFAST Cereal bar and toast. LUNCH California burger, potato salad, green beans, applesauce. Alt.: Tuna sandwich, Wisconsin cheese soup.

BREAKFAST Waffles with fruit. LUNCH Tacos, hard and soft shells, fixings, peas, pineapple, cinnamon rolls.

BREAKFAST Scrambled eggs and toast. LUNCH Sub sandwich, french fries, carrots, apricots. Alt.: Ravioli, garlic toast.

BREAKFAST Yogurt parfait. LUNCH Chicken fajitas, steamed rice, corn, pears. Alt.: Ham and cheese.

BREAKFAST Pretzel with cheese. LUNCH Mini corn dogs, tater tots, baked beans, chocolate pudding, fresh fruit. Alt.: Pizza dippers.

UNITY

BREAKFAST Lumberjacks. LUNCH Chicken nuggets and rice.

BREAKFAST Breakfast pockets. LUNCH Hot dogs and baked beans.

BREAKFAST Egg and ham combo. LUNCH Hamburger and fries.

BREAKFAST Cinnamon rolls. LUNCH Pizza calzones and corn.

Each building will have their own breakfast menu.

USA

WEBSTER

DIVERSITY WEEK

Waffles.

BREAKFAST

LUNCH Spaghetti, green beans and bread sticks.

fries

OR

GERMAN OR Swedish meatballs, rice, veggies, peaches.

ITALIAN OR Chicken barley soup with veggies, PBJ, applesauce.

ASIAN OR Sloppy joe, bun, potato wedges, fruit cocktail.

DIVERSITY WEEK

DIVERSITY WEEK

DIVERSITY WEEK

MEXICAN DIVERSITY WEEK


FFA members recognize community support

POLK COUNTY - During the last week of July 2010 the FFA Chapters Polk County (Amery, Clayton, Clear Lake, Frederic, Luck, Osceola, St. Croix Falls, Turtle Lake and Unity) worked the agricultural education tent and FFA food stand booth at the Polk County Fair. The agricultural education tent served 200 fair-goers milk and cheese samples donated by Burnett Dairy and Organic Valley. Just under 300 FFA alumni from all across Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota and Illinois signed up on clipboard and exchanged stories about their FFA experi-

ences. Students from the local FFA chapters demonstrated animal care and tractor safety. On Sunday of the fair, the Unity FFA chapter attempted to create the largest brownie sundae in Wisconsin, with the sundaes given away free. The FFA food stand gave away 1,000 free ices and sold local county food products. Daeffler’s Quality Meats of Frederic supplied the turkey legs, the Barron Turkey Store donated turkey sloppy joes and taco meat. Peterson Limousin donated the beef for the hamburgers, and the organic milk

came from Crystal Ball Farm in Osceola. Over 50 FFA members from the local FFA chapters volunteered to educate and serve the fair patrons and to raise money for Heifer International. The Polk County FFA chapters wish to recognize all the fair-goers, local school boards, Polk County Fair Board, Burnett Dairy, Crystal Ball Farms, Barron Turkey Store, Organic Valley, Rural Insurance, Farm Bureau of Wisconsin, Daeffler’s Quality Meats and Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board for their help in making an event that highlights the importance of

agriculture in Polk County. The Local FFA members and advisors are proud of the support and continued commitment they see to agriculture in Polk County. Everyone in Polk County should be proud of our agricultural heritage and the dedicated youth that continue to promote, live and serve in agriculture. See you all next year at the fair. - from Polk County FFA chapters

As a precautionary measure the surgery was followed with seven weeks of daily radiation therapy in the Twin Cities. Debbie chose not to work during that time, taking two months off from work at the school. ••• Debbie has worked at Luck Schools since May 1991. She is a graduate of Luck High School, as are both Brian and Jamie. “The people I work with here are just great,” she said. Hardly a day went by when there wasn’t some small gift or note of encouragement on her desk. On the day of her return to work, said Debbie, everyone was wearing pink in her honor. She felt good enough to work during her radiation therapy, she said, but she and her husband didn’t think it would be the wisest choice. Her treatments in the Twin Cities were in the middle of the day, and the situation was fatiguing. “It just consumes your mind,” she said. “We realized I really needed to take care of myself.”

Since then, every six months, Wickstrom has an MRI or mammogram, followed by appointments with her oncologist and radiation oncologist. That will continue for another 2-1/2 years. “I have fears every time I go,” she admits. But the news has always been good, and Wickstrom is thankful for that. Meanwhile, she has another success story to share. In August 2008, one year after Debbie was diagnosed with breast cancer, her mother received the same diagnosis. She underwent a mastectomy and is also cancer free now. ••• Interestingly, before Debbie even had the questionable mammogram, she was involved in raising money for breast cancer research. In 2006, one year before her diagnosis, she took part in her first Susan G. Komen 3-Day for the Cure. The three-day, 60-mile walks are held around the country, and the first one that Debbie participated in

was in the Twin Cities. Since then she has walked in Tampa, Chicago and San Diego, and this year will take part in the three-day in Detroit, Mich. “I walk all my walks with my very, very good friend, Shelly Bilicke, from River Falls,” she said. An added bonus was when daughter, Jamie, could join in the walk at Tampa. “That was kind of special for us,” said Debbie. Debbie was diagnosed with cancer just six days before the 2007 walk, and she and her husband agreed it was still the right thing to do. “Shelly was an awesome person to have walking with me,” remembers Debbie. “She was a wonderful support.” In all, she has raised in excess of $21,000 by taking part in the three-day events. ••• As a bit of insight for those of us who know someone going through cancer diagnosis or treatment, Debbie found it more comfortable when someone just called to bring a meal or help with a ride

or something around the home. Many good-intentioned people offered help, telling Debbie to call if she needed something, but she found it more helpful and encouraging when someone would be a little more proactive in setting up a specific way of helping and when they could do it. Sometimes people are afraid they will be offering to help at an inconvenient time or inconvenient way, said Debbie, but she found she just appreciated the thoughts and gestures. “Don’t wait to be asked,” she said. For Debbie, the love and support of friends, family, and co-workers made all the difference. The other important key was her own attitude. “All I know, is that a positive attitude does a lot of healing.” Regarding the fear that comes now and then, and always at the time of her sixmonth checkups, she said, “I don’t know if that will ever go away. “But I don’t let it consume me.”

in Baldwin and a boy born in January in Farmington, Minn. The Healy children are Cheri, who lives in Frederic and has three children, Michael, Erica and Devon Moats; Tammi, who has three children and lives in Blaine, Minn.; and David, who has two children and lives in Galesville. The family comes up to visit on holidays, and the boys come up every summer to help Grandpa Emery put up the hay for the registered Hereford cows that are raised on the farm. Healy has been very active at St. Luke’s church - serving as church-school coordinator, teaching fifth- and sixth-grade Sunday school, singing in the choir, leader of the Eve Circle for 20 years and, at present, the church board chair. She also directs one of three funeral-serving rotations. She

plays bridge once a week as well as golfs every Thursday during the summer. She takes care of her 96-year-old father, who lives in Rochester, Minn., when he visits for a week at a time now and then. “I don’t have a lot of extra time,” she said. When asked about her advice about cancer for women, Healy advises women to get yearly mammograms and Pap tests and to support the American Cancer Society. “The ACS is still learning about cancer,” she said. For years before cancer struck, Healy had walked in the annual Frederic American Cancer Society Walk/Run, but through the years, she had been wondering where the money raised went. Her experience with cancer has taught her all too well about the benefits of continuing can-

cer research. Every year before cancer struck, she had gone on the long walk, five miles. This year will be a shorter walk because she is not yet ready to go a long distance. Walkers/runners are urged to go whatever distance they feel they can handle, from going around the block to two, three or five miles. “You don’t have to feel bad about it if you are not doing a long distance,” Healy stressed. Now-deceased Frederic hairdresser Loueen Wikstrom, along with Wikstrom’s sister, was a big support for Healy and other women who were dealing with the effects of cancer. Wikstrom, while dealing with her own cancer, invited Healy to her home for lessons on wigs and makeup, giving her scarves and hats to wear over

her hairless head. Joyce, another woman from St. Croix Falls, also gave Healy hats to wear and other adaptive things to use. Nov. 22, 2000, the day of positive cancer diagnosis, will stand out as a milestone in Hope Healy’s life. Even now, after 10 years, she still wonders whether a new pain or ache means a return of the cancer. Tuesday, May 3, she went in for her annual cancer checkup - going every year now instead of the six-month reviews that were necessary at the beginning. A day to focus on cancer for a while, then it’s back to the busyness of life that keeps up the spirit of fun and a positive outlook for this 2011 Frederic Walk/Run American Cancer Society co-chairman.

Wickstrom/from page 1

Healy/from page 1

EVERY MON Amery Senior Center

.

EVERY TUES

CLIP & SAVE

EVERY WED

.

• Wii golf, 9 a.m.

.

EVERY SAT

.

• 500, 6:30 p.m.

• Open 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m.

• Open 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m.

• Open 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m.

• Dime Bingo, 1 p.m.

• Cribbage, a.m. • 500 Cards, 1 p.m.,

• Dining at 5, Every 1st Thursday

• Spades, 1 p.m.,

•= Exercise, 10-11 a.m. •= Skip-Bo, 11 a.m.-Noon • 500, 6:30-10 p.m.

• Bridge, 10 a.m.-Noon • Bingo, 1st & 3rd Friday, 1-3 p.m.

• Exercise, 10-11 a.m. • Skip-Bo, 11 a.m.-Noon • 500 Cards & Dominoes, 12:30-4 p.m.

St. Croix Falls Senior Center

.

•= Pokeno, 1 p.m.

• AA Meeting, 7 p.m.

• Senior Monthly Meeting, 3rd Tues. • Men’s Wii Bowling, 9:30 a.m.

• Dime Bingo, 12:30 p.m. • Cards & Pool, 7-9 p.m. • Mixed Wii Bowling, 9:30 a.m. •= Dining at Five Every 2nd Wednesday, 5 p.m.

• Ruby’s, Siren, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. • SCF, 1-4 p.m., 715-483-2920

• Frederic, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., 715-327-4425 • SCF, 9 a.m.-Noon

• SCF, Noon-6 p.m. •= Ruby’s, Siren, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

• Frederic, 2-6 p.m. • SCF, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.

• Siren VFW Aux., 2nd Wed., the hall, 7:30 p.m.

• Frederic Legion Aux. 249 Every 3rd Thurs., Golden Oaks, 7 p.m.

715-866-5300

VFW Aux./Legion Aux.

EVERY MON

.

EVERY TUES

.

TOPS

• Good Sam, St. Croix Falls, 5:45 p.m., 715-483-3666

Meat Raffles

• Webster Lioness At Last Call, 6 p.m.

EVERY WED

EVERY FRI

• Pokeno, 1 p.m.

715-349-7810

Food Shelf

EVERY THURS

Overeaters Anonymous, 6:30 p.m., 715-268-6605

Frederic Senior Center • Spades, 1 p.m. Luck Senior Center Siren Senior Center

Webster Senior Center

.

.

• Webster Chamber At The Tap, 5:30 p.m.

EVERY MON

EVERY TUES

.

•= First Baptist Church, Webster, 9:30 a.m., 715-349-2332

EVERY THURS

.

•= Luck Senior Center, 5:30 p.m., 715-472-2341 • Balsam Lake Municipal Building, 3:45 p.m., 715-485-3002 .

• Cushing Legion At Suzy Q’s, 6:30 p.m. • Siren Lions At Midtown Tavern, 5 p.m. • Danbury Fire & Lions Club, Yellow River Saloon, 5:30 p.m.

EVERY FRI

.

• Fishbowl Sportsmen’s Club At Smitty’s Saloon, 5-7 p.m. • Snowciables At Thirsty Otter, 6 p.m. • Grantsburg Legion, 6:30 p.m. • Sportsmen’s Club, Yellow River Saloon, 5 p.m. • Hockey Assoc. At Dreamers, 6:30 p.m.

CLIP & SAVE

•= Ruby’s, Siren, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

EVERY TUES

.

• Trinity Lutheran Church, Osceola, 8:30 a.m., 715-755-3123

EVERY FRI

.

• Siren Lions At Jed’s Laker Lounge, 5 p.m. • Lake Country Riders At The Pour House, 5:30 p.m. • Webster Lions At Gandy Dancer Saloon, 4:30 p.m. • S.N.O.W.S., West Sweden Skol Haus, 7 p.m.

• Frederic, 9 a.m.-Noon

EVERY WED

.

•= Comforts of Home, Frederic, 5:30 p.m.

EVERY SAT

.

• YLRA At Yellow Lake Lodge, Webster, 3-5 p.m. • Siren Lions At Howl’n Saloon, 4 p.m. • Wild About Education At Wild Waters, Danbury, 3:30 p.m.

EVERY THURS

•= Overeaters Anonymous, Amery Senior Center, 6:30 p.m., 715-268-6605

EVERY SUN

.

• Wonderland At Yellow Lake Golf Course, 4 p.m.

.


CHURCH NEWS

MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 53

Eternal

Perspectives Sally Bair

News from the Pews at Pilgrim Lutheran

After worship this past Sunday, May 1, the second Sunday of Easter, several students delivered May baskets that they had created several weeks ago. (L to R): Cade Engen, Sydney Domagala, Hope Goebel, Tessa Domagala, Miya Goebel and MaKenna Engen. The first stop was at Comforts of Home where the students sang several songs to the residents who were in the living room and getting ready to eat lunch. The residents knew some of the songs and joined in on the singing. Then the children distributed the beautifully decorated baskets filled with mints. The next stop was the Frederic Care Center where some of Pilgrim Lutheran’s members reside. Everyone loved hearing the children sing as witnessed by the smiles on their faces and their applause. The lesson learned is bringing joy to others. A joyful May Day was had by all! – Photo submitted

Burdens made light

While hiking down a mountain, a grouse startled me, causing me to trip and lose my balance. Catching myself, I ran down, my heavy backpack ready to push me headfirst onto the ground. I finally managed to slow and then stop, but not without hard huffing and puffing. I laugh now thinking about what a sight I must have been, but at the moment of difficult descent, I struggled mightily. The experience caused me to start carrying less weight on the trail. That’s a hard lesson for many of us. We tend to over-burden ourselves with nonessentials. Think about it. We collect stuff, hoard stuff, cling to stuff that is simply fluff. Yes, I know that some stuff—even fluff stuff—is necessary for living a comfortable life. But the more we collect, the more time it takes to file it, clean it, protect it, think about it. The list of things we collect is endless: clothing, appliances, household items, collectibles, vehicles, even our fun toys. Perhaps we all need to stop and consider our limitations. Some of us are stronger than others and can carry heavier loads. Most of us, however, carry more than we need. Like my hike down the mountain, this can lead to a life of imbalance, a loss of vision for the beauty around us, and a breathless exertion that is unnecessary and unproductive. Happily, our current economic situation has caused many people to pare down on their possessions. Living a simpler life, one with fewer encumbrances, has become the mantra for a growing number of us. Like mountain hikers, we’re packing less stuff, making our lives easier, freer, more satisfying. Jesus ministered on Earth without a bed on which to lay his head. His was the perfect example of an unencumbered, fulfilling life as God meant it. He doesn’t necessarily want us to go to his extremes, but his example does show us that he wants us to count on his help in carrying our burdens. He is more than able to supply all our needs. Jesus said, “Come to me, all you who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.” (Matthew 11:28-30) Lord, help us trust that you will meet all our needs so we won’t be tempted to overpack. Teach us what is necessary and what is nonessential to our lives as we travel your path up and down the mountains of life. In Jesus’ name, amen. Mrs. Bair may be reached at sallybair@gmail.com

The Holy Humor Sunday service at North Valley Lutheran Church Sunday, May 1, included the telling of jokes, the sharing of laughter and enjoyment of Dixieland jazz music as played by the Bill Bittner Memorial Dixieland Jazz Band. As worship leader Adam Bever explained it, Dixieland jazz came from a time of depression and darkness (created in this country during the time of slavery). “Humor heals,” he said. North Valley Lutheran Church is also celebrating the near completion of its building project that has expanded the 132-year-old church to include a badly needed elevator, a fellowship area, meeting rooms in the basement, new offices and bathrooms. The dedication of the addition will take place Sunday, June 12.

Holy Humor Sunday

Photos by Nancy Jappe

Blessing of the Animals The Bill Bittner Memorial Dixieland Jazz Band led the Holy Humor Sunday morning service at North Valley Lutheran Church, Centuria, Sunday, May 1. Band members on hand were: keyboard-Jodi Mealey, New Richmond; bass-Joe Lindberg, Frederic; drums-Robert Lindberg, Siren; trumpet-Matt Mealey, New Richmond; clarinet-Bryn Anderson-Siren and trombone-Adam Bever, Balsam Lake. According to the church bulletin, Holy Humor Sunday has its roots in history. For centuries, Easter and the Sunday after Easter (called Bright Sunday) were observed by the faithful as days of joy and laughter, parties and picnics to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus.

FREDERIC - You don’t have to go south of the border to enjoy a great Mexican feast. You are invited to join a Cinco de Mayo taco dinner fundraiser, Thursday, May 5, 5 to 7 p.m. at Crosswalk Community Church, 505 Old CTH W, Frederic. Dinner will be on a donation basis. All proceeds will go toward funding their summer youth mission trip to El Monte Christian Camp in Morelos, Mexico. - submitted

THURSDAY, THURSDAY, MAY MAY 5,5, 2011 2011

National Day of Prayer Evening Prayer Service Thursday, May 5, 2011 Siren Assembly of God Church 7 p.m.

535174 26a 37L

A Blessing of the Animals worship service will be held at the First Presbyterian Church, 719 Nevada St. in St. Croix Falls on Thursday, May 19. They will begin with a picnic at 6 p.m. followed by a gathering for worship, hymns and prayers of blessing upon each animal and their caregiver at 6:30 p.m. When they bless something, they focus their attention on the perfection that God put into it when he created it. By honoring the significance of these special family members, they provide joy and comfort to their owners. Come with a friend. Come with a neighbor. Come with one of God’s creatures, an animal of your love and choice, on a leash or in carrier or bring a picture. Above, Maggie attended last year’s event. - Photo submitted

Cinco de Mayo taco dinner fundraiser set


OBITUARIES

PAGE 54 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

Lauri Oscar Mustonen

Lauri Oscar Mustonen, 91, Siren, died Dec. 10, 2010 in McAllen, Texas, of a massive stroke. He was born in Kalajoki, Finland. on March 19, 1919. Lauri lived on a farm outside Cloquet, Minn., in his youth. He was a Boy Scout and sang in the church choir. He enjoyed fishing, playing tennis, baseball and hockey. His hobbies were travel and photography, where he won many trophies for his eight-millimeter movies. He graduated from Cloquet High School in 1937. He attended Northwestern Technical School in Chicago as well as Dunwoody Institute in Minneapolis for heating and air conditioning. He worked 31 years for Ray N. Welter Heating Company in Minneapolis. He served in the Navy four years where he became the navigator on an escort convoy ship in the North Atlantic. After the armistice, he served on a minesweep in the harbors of Japan. In 1948, he married Marliss. They lived in Minneapolis until he retired, then they moved to Siren. Lauri served as an usher at First Evangelical Free Church in Minneapolis. He volunteered with another member in the maintenance of the church. He was a trustee and mowed the lawn for seven years for Frederic Evangelical Free Church. While he spent his winters in Texas, he volunteered at Christian radio station. He also volunteered to do maintenance in Reynosa and Matamoros, Mexico, orphanages. He was preceded in death by his parents, Oscar and Sandra Mustonen of Cloquet, Minn.; sisters, Aune Adams and Toini Anderson; nieces, Hazel Adams and Anita Rautio and nephew, Herbert Adams. He is survived by his wife, Marliss (Webber); son, David; daughter, Laurie DeMarias; five grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. A memorial service will be May 14, at 11 a.m., at Crosswalk Community Church, formerly called Frederic Evangelical Church in Frederic, located 11 miles south of Siren on 505 Old CTH W or seven miles north of Luck. There will be a burial service in Esko, Minn., 11 a.m. on May 16, at the Apostolic Lutheran Church, 25 Church St.

Joyce E. Olson, 90, Grantsburg, died April 23, 2011, at her home in Grantsburg. She was born Aug. 14, 1920, to Curtis Judson and Anna (Platson) Booth in Glenwood City. Joyce grew up in Glenwood City and graduated from Glenwood City High School in 1938. She lived in St. Paul, Minn., for 30 years, Danbury for 18 years and Grantsburg for the past 10 years. She married Emmons Olson on Nov. 17, 1951, in Glenwood City. She worked for several places throughout the years including Minnesota Mining, Twin City Arsenal, Doughboy in New Richmond, Laundry in Eau Claire and the Toni Company in St. Paul. Joyce was preceded in death by her parents; siblings, Ruby, Harris, Merrill, Jean, Cassius, Milton, Lucille and Curtis John. She is survived by her husband, Emmons of Grantsburg; children, Greg (Loretta) Olson of Schertz, Texas and Emmons (Mary) Connell of Maui, Hawaii; grandchildren, Kati (Jeremy) Pownell of Hudson, Larry (Cheryl) Elj of Chisholm, Minn., Chrissy (Russ) Tuckner of Harris, Minn., Cory Connell of Oahu, Hawaii, and Andrew Riley of Schertz, Texas; great-grandchildren, Lilly, Colton and Andy; siblings, Pat (Lee) Dorwin of Baldwin and Phyllis (Dick) Hult of White Bear Lake, Minn.; many other relatives and friends. Funeral services were held on Wednesday, April 27, at Danbury United Methodist Church in Danbury, with Pastor Carolyn Saunders officiating. Music was provided by Katie Pownell and Dianne Gravesen. Interment followed at Danbury Cemetery. Casket bearers were Gary Hult, Brad Dorwin, Marvin Booth, Jeremy Pownell, Neil Miller and Larry Elj. Online condolences may be offered at www.swedberg-taylor.com. The Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home in Webster was entrusted with arrangements. Edna Marie Anderson, 98, Clear Lake, died Saturday, April 23, 2011, at the Golden Age Manor Nursing Home in Amery, where she had been a resident since 2005. Edna was born on May 25, 1912, in Clear Lake, the daughter of Alfred and Julia (Torgerson) Johnson. She grew up in the Clayton area and attended Clayton schools. On June 26, 1934, Edna was married to Ernest Anderson in Minneapolis, Minn. They lived there for several years before returning to Clear Lake in 1946 and operated a dairy farm there. Together they also raised their son, Marvin. Edna lived on the family farm until she moved to the Golden Age Manor Nursing Home in Amery in 2005. In her spare time, she enjoyed sewing, quilting, cooking, baking and gardening. She loved spending time with her family, especially her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Edna had also been an active member of Moe Lutheran Church for many years. Edna is preceded in death by her husband, Ernest Anderson; parents, Alfred and Julia Johnson; brother, Edward Johnson; niece, Sandy Standing; and sister-in-law, Jackie Johnson. She is survived by son, Marvin (Diane) Anderson of Clear Lake; grandchildren, Marvin (Joann) Anderson Jr. of Chetek, Melvin (Ora) Anderson of Clear Lake, Annette (Tim) Tietz of Coon Rapids, Minn., Mark (Robin) Anderson of Rice Lake, James Anderson of Clear Lake and Barbara Anderson of Coon Rapids, Minn.; seven great-grandchildren; two great-great-grandchildren; many nieces, nephews, family and friends. Funeral service was held at Moe Lutheran Church in Clear Lake on Wednesday April 27, with Pastor Margaret Grant officiating. Music was provided by Dianne Burri. Interment was at the Moe Lutheran Cemetery in Clear Lake. Honorary casket bearers were Kevin Anderson, Vince Anderson and Melvin Anderson. Casket bearers were Michael Anderson, James Anderson, Jeremy Anderson, Mark Anderson, Tim Tietz and Marvin Anderson Jr. The Scheuermann-Hammer Funeral Home in Clear Lake was entrusted with arrangements.

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Jack Swedberg, Monument & Marker Sales Patrick L. Taylor, Owner, Director Dennis W. Christianson, Director

Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Homes and Crematory

Webster, WI • 715-866-7131

Irene Erickson, 84, Grantsburg, died April 26, 2011, at Regions Hospital in St. Paul, Minn., from a lingering illness. She was born in St. Paul, Minn., on July 11, 1926, to Walter and Zell Carlstrom. The family moved to Grantsburg shortly after that. Irene attended Wood River Grade School and graduated from Grantsburg High School in 1944. After graduating, she worked at the Frederic Produce. In 1946, she was united in marriage to Russell J. Erickson. They spent their married life on the farm close to Wood Lake. She is survived by son, Joey Erickson of Grantsburg; sisters-in-law, Shirley Carlstrom Hanson of Texas and Barbara Carlstrom of Grantsburg; nieces and nephews in Arizona, California, Wisconsin and many friends and neighbors. Irene was preceded in death by her parents; brothers, Gordon and Jerome and husband, Russell. Interment was at Wood Lake Cemtery. The Edling Funeral Home, Grantsburg, was entrusted with arrangements.

Edna M. Anderson

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Irene M. Erickson

535020 26a 37L

Shirley Renee Sandquist, 85, Frederic, died April 9, 2011, at the Golden Age Manor in Amery. Shirley was born Nov. 1, 1925, in Minneapolis, Minn., the daughter of Alvin and Margaret Matson Sheppard. In 1954, she married Theodore A. Sandquist, and they resided in St. Paul, Minn. Shirley was employed by Farmland Industries Inc. for 34 years as a traffic manager and fertilizer order supervisor. While living in St. Paul, Minn., she belonged to many bowling leagues and clubs. Shirley and Ted moved to Polk County in October 1976. Ted Sandquist passed away in May 1990. Shirley enjoyed outdoor activities and was involved in many civic and volunteer service organizations including the Frederic Senior Center, Burnett County Lakes and Rivers Association, Big Wood Watershed Advisory Board and the Polk County ADRC. She was also a member of Pilgrim Lutheran Church in Frederic. Shirley is survived by several cousins and many friends. Cremation services were provided by the Cremation Society of Minnesota, and her ashes are interred next to her late husband and her parents at the Sunset Memorial Park in Minneapolis. A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. at Pilgrim Lutheran Church in Frederic on Saturday, May 14.

Joyce E. Olson

24154 State Rd. 35 Siren, Wis.

715-349-2560

107 N. Washington St. - Downtown St. Croix Falls, Wis.

715-483-9008

11 West 5th Ave. - Shell Lake, Wis.

715-468-2314

534700 26a,b,c,d 37rL

Shirley R. Sandquist


OBITUARIES

MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 55

Violet Irene (Peterson) Luke, 88, resident of Grantsburg, died peacefully April 28, 2011, at United Hospital in St. Paul, Minn. Violet was born to Karl and Marie Peterson in Lake Netta, Minn. Later, she married Mark Luke and together began a lifelong journey running a dairy operation and farm. She enjoyed working in her garden, cooking and playing cards with friends. She is preceded in death by her husband, Mark. She is survived by four children, Mike (Gloria) Luke, Kathie (Jim) Venske, Ken (Dawn) Luke and Kelly (Jodie) Young; eight grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; nieces, nephews and many friends. Funeral services were held at the St. Luke United Methodist Church in Frederic on Monday, May 2, with Pastor Arveda “Freddie” Kirk officiating. Music was provided by organist Liz Ruhn and soloist Kordi Kurkowski. Interment immediately followed the service at Maple Grove Cemetery in Frederic. Pallbearers assisting were Cole Venske, Jason Cook, Mark Swanson, Dustin Luke, Kody Luke, Joe Cook and Jesse Young. Honorary pallbearers were Duane (Bud) Lockert, Roberta Handy, Harriet Thompson, Sandy Brenizer, Eleanor Bonneville and Marlyce and Arnold Borchert. Online condolences may be left at www.rowefh.com. Please continue to check this Web site for updated information or call Bruce Rowe at 715-327-4475. Rowe Funeral Home of Frederic has been entrusted with funeral arrangements.

Mildred Elizabeth Spurrell

Mildred Elizabeth Spurrell, 88, Amery, died April 25, 2011, at Golden Age Manor. She was born in Alden Township of Polk County on June 24, 1922. Her parents were Alfred and Lottie (Elden) Anderson. Mildred was baptized and confirmed at East Immanuel Lutheran Church in rural Amery. She stayed an active member of the church until becoming homebound. On August 21, 1939, she was united in marriage to Archie Rufus Spurrell in Northwood, Iowa, and together they had five children. Together they farmed as a team near Little Falls on Archie’s family farm. She also spent time working at the Little Falls Mercantile for many years. After Archie’s death in 1986, she kept herself busy making quilts for East Immanuel Lutheran Church. Spending time with her family and grandchildren was always important to her. She also enjoyed a good game of Yahtzee with anyone that stopped by for coffee. Mildred has spent the past few months at Golden Age Manor. Mildred was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Archie; infant daughter, Betty Ann; sisters, Marie, Alfreda, Emma, Dorothy and Ida Mae; brothers, Herman, Gaylord, Nels and Arthur. She is survived by sons, Jimmie (Joanne Alling) Spurrell, and Aaron (Susan) Spurrell; daughters, Joanne (Ronald) Schladweiler and Angela (Michael) Langer; one brother, Walter Anderson; eight grandchildren, 12 greatgrandchildren; as well as other relatives and friends. Funeral services were held on Saturday, April 30, at East Immanuel Lutheran Church in rural Amery with the Rev. Kathy Pennington officiating. Soloist was Jim Haugerud. Jane Johnson served as the organist. Casket bearers were Richard Spurrell, Adam Spurrell, Nathan Spurrell, David Hansen, Kenneth Almquist and Marcus Carlson. Interment was at the East Immanuel Cemetery. Friends and family may sign an online guest book and view a video tribute at www.williamsonwhite.com. The Williamson-White Funeral Home and Cremation Services of Amery was entrusted with arrangements.

Vincent C. Johnson

Deborah S. (Everson) Dahlby

Deborah S. (Everson) Dahlby, 59, Osceola, died Friday, April 29, 2011, at her home. Deb was born April 10, 1952, in Munsville, N.Y., to Barbara Richmond. She graduated from Stockbridge High School in 1970. She worked many years as a bank teller, most recently at the Royal Credit Union. On Sept. 19, 1970, she married Darryl Dahlby at Balsam Lake. She enjoyed spending time with family and friends. Deb was preceded in death by her mother, Barbara. She is survived by her husband, Darryl; children, Wendy (Kevin) Sherrard of Balsam Lake, Heather Everson of Osceola, Terri (Rod Stone) Meister of White Bear Lake, Minn., Sherri Johnson of Lake Elmo, Minn. and James (Tammy) Dahlby of Hayward; grandchildren, Jack Sherrard, Wyatt Olson, Derek Meister, Thomas Meister Jr. and Garrett Johnson. Funeral services were held Wednesday, May 4, at Peace Lutheran Church, Dresser. Interment was at Pleasant Prairie Cemetery. Memorials are suggested to Osceola Medical Center. Condolences may be left at www.grandstrandfh.com. The Grandstrand Funeral Home, Osceola, was enIrene E. Peper, 84, Osceola, died Thursday, April 29, trusted with arrangements. 2011, at her home at Royal Oaks. Irene was born at Centuria to Fred and Ruth Peper on March 17, 1927. She graduated from Osceola High School in 1945. She received her nurses training at St. Barnabas Harold Albert Bradshaw Jr., 84, Danbury, died April 30, Hospital in Minneapolis, Minn., 2011. graduating as a registered nurse in He was born in St. Paul, Minn., on 1949. She worked as a registered April 27, 1927, to Harold Sr. and nurse at St. Barnabas Hospital, MetAlvina Bradshaw. ropolitan Medical Center and HenHarold entered the Navy at the nepin County Medical Center for age of 17 to serve his country. After 39-1/2 years. She was a member of he was discharged he received trainthe nurses diamond club and Trinity Lutheran Church ing to become a personal pilot and ladies quilting. In her free time, she enjoyed photogra- continued to fly for over 30 years. phy, sewing, nature in general, crafts and was always Harold had a strong work ethic, and there to lend a helping hand. became an ironworker for over 40 Irene was preceded in death by her parents; and years; he was a legend of his trade. brother-in-law Robert Heil. Harold has been a resident of Danbury for 36 years, and She is survived by her sisters, Julia Heil of Osceola and during that time he enjoyed the great outdoors by fishLaura (Marion) Horne of Omaha, Neb.; five nieces; one ing, hunting, and gardening. Many late nights you could nephew; 13 great-nieces and nephews; nine great-great- find Harold, friends and family gathered in the kitchen nieces and nephews. playing guitar and singing. A few of those times he was Funeral services were held Monday, May 2, at Trinity accompanied by some of country music’s greatest artists. Evangelical Lutheran Church in Osceola with the Rev. Harold is preceded in death by his parents; wife, CaroMark Kock officiating. Interment was in the Oak Grove line (Harloff); grandsons, John Vix and Nick Songetay. Cemetery. Memorials are suggested to Adoray Hospice He is survived by his two daughters, Lonnie Vix and or Trinity Lutheran Church. Condolences may be left at Julie Ann Carins; grandchildren, Daniel Songetay and www.grandstrandfh.com. Jeannie Gayle Bradshaw; great-grandchildren, Dakota The Grandstrand Funeral Home, Osceola, was en- Hemmer, Aiden Vix, Avery Vix and Shawn. trusted with arrangements. Funeral service will be held Saturday, May 7, at 3 p.m.,

Vincent C. Johnson, 71, Shell Lake, died May 1, 2011, at Lakeview Medical Center in Rice Lake. He was born Jan. 23, 1940, in Shell Lake, to Oscar and Marie (Miller) Johnson. Vince graduated from Shell Lake High School and moved to Alaska to work on the pipeline from 1972 to 1974. He then returned to the area and operated his own railroad salvage and welding business. Vince was preceded in death by his parents, three brothers, Iver, Rueben and Louis Melvin Johnson and one nephew, Steven Johnson, and life partner, Janice. He is survived by sisters Hilda (Albert) Sommerfeld, Spooner, and Ida Astrid Johnson, Chippewa Falls; brother John Marvin Johnson, North Pole, Alaska; and many nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held May 4 at Skinner Funeral Home, Shell Lake, with the Rev. Carol Ann McArdell officiating. Burial was at Clam River Cemetery. Honorary pallbearers were Dale Johnson, Duane Johnson, Dennis Sommerfeld, Daniel Sommerfeld, Randy Brown and Cheri Johnson. The Skinner Funeral Home, Shell Lake, was entrusted with arrangements.

Irene E. Peper

Harold Albert Bradshaw Jr.

visitation 1-3 p.m., at Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Home, Webster with the Rev. Steve Ward. Honorary pallbearers will be Danny Songetay, Tim Hurwurt, Tom Bradshaw, Tim Bradshaw, Mark Bradshaw and Andy Lloyd John Huberty, 70, Danbury, died April 26, 2011. Bradshaw. Burial will be at the Danbury Cemetery at a He was preceded in death by his wife, Nancy; and later date. Online condolences can be made at www.swedberg-taylor.com. daughter, Diane. The Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Home, Webster, He is survived by sons, Christopher (Debra) Huberty was entrusted with arrangements. of St. Paul, Minn. and Douglas (Hannah) Huberty of Mendota Heights, Minn.; four grandchildren, Valerie, Matthew, Courtney and Melanie; brothers, Edward Huberty of Coatesville, Pa., and Richard Huberty of Mendota Heights, Minn.; and devoted canine friend, Rocky. A private ceremony will be held. Memorials preferred Serving our community since 1903. to Humane Society of Burnett County, www.hsburnettcty.org. Online condolences may be offered at www.swedberg-taylor.com. The Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Home in Webster was entrusted with arrangements.

Lloyd John Huberty

EDLING FUNERAL HOME

Traditional & Cremation Services

David Edling Funeral Director

Grantsburg

St. Croix Falls

535000 37L

Violet Irene (Peterson) Luke

715-463-2994 715-483-3141 X

In Loving Memory

We Turn Feelings Into Flowers

of Jeanette Olson

BALSAM LAKE

“Worldwide Delivery”

or visit us online at floralandgardenpros.com EXPERTS IN THE ART OF EXPRESSION®

534999 37L

916 Badger Drive Balsam Lake, WI 54810

715-485-3131 888-374-8894

CREMATION CENTER

who passed away May 6, 2009 Little did we know that morning, God was going to call your name. In life we loved you dearly, in death we do the same. It broke our hearts to lose you, but you did not go alone. For part of us went with you, the day God called you home. You left us peaceful memories, your love is still our guide. And though we cannot see you, you are always by our side. Our family chain is broken and nothing seems the same. But as God calls us one by one, the chain will link again.

www.wicremationcenter.com

Polk County’s Only Crematory Milltown, Wisconsin Locally owned and operated by Trained, Licensed Professionals:

Bruce Rowe and Ray Rowe Call for a free quote or to arrange an in-home visit for preplanning:

Northwest Wisconsin Cremation Center 535245 37Lp

715-825-5550 Serving Polk, Burnett & St. Croix Counties

535509 37L 27d


CHURCH NEWS

PAGE 56 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

Dad’s control over son becomes less influential over time

Q: As a dad, how much control should I have over our 17-year-old son when it comes to dating? Juli: Let’s start out with the unpleasant truth that you actually have no control over what your 17-year-old does about much of anything. If you ever had control when he was younger, those days are long gone. In fact, by trying to control his behavior, you‘re likely to do more damage than good, either prompting him to rebel or impeding his maturity as a young man. So, instead, let’s use the word influence. Your role as a parent needs to shift to one of mentor or coach, guiding your son with encouragement, advice and good questions. Hopefully, you have spent the last 17 years instilling the values in him that now shape his decisions. Although he may still respect and value your opinion on issues like dating and sexuality, his own beliefs will guide him more than yours will. Even as he determines his own values, you still have authority regarding his behavior while he is living in your home, eating your food and driving your car. Use that authority not to be heavyhanded, but to set healthy boundaries DRESSER – Once again this year, several churches in the St. Croix Falls, Dresser, Osceola and East Farmington areas are working together to provide a baccalaureate service for the graduating seniors from the local school districts. This service will be held at Peace Lutheran Church in Dresser on Wednesday evening, May 18, 7:30 p.m. The serv-

Jim Daly

Focus on the Family

Juli Slattery

that will both train and protect your son. For example, he should respect a reasonable curfew and show honor to the girl he dates by not putting her in compromising situations. Recognize that an interest in girls and dating is normal for a young man his age. Talk with him about what his standards and values are. You might even ask him how involved he would like you to be in his dating relationships going forward. Express the desire to be a sounding board for him as he faces challenges and decisions in the future. Perhaps the most important influence you can be for your son during these late teen years is to cast a vision for him. Remind your son of the character you see in him, and help him envision the husband you’d like him to be someday. ••• Q: I think my daughter uses her iPhone too much. Even for a teenager, it’s excessive. Is there such a thing as an addiction to electronic devices?

Jim: The battle over too much talking and texting is one that most parents will face with their teens. Most of the time, it’s just a matter of setting healthy boundaries. However, if you feel your daughter is truly demonstrating addictive tendencies, we’d encourage you to contact a professional counselor. The staff at Focus on the Family can refer you to one in your area. That said, there is a trend toward what author and speaker Judith Wright calls “soft addictions.” These are different from the things we typically define as addictive, such as pornography, drinking or gambling. Soft addictions are those behaviors you’re not ashamed to tell your friends about, such as shopping online, watching TV, and yes, using electronic devices. Left unchecked, these behaviors rob us of precious time with our families and can become almost all-consuming. Smart phones are especially problematic because they’re loaded with Wi-Fi, games and hundreds of other bells and whistles that monopolize our time. I’ve been in restaurants in which the family at the table next to me — Mom, Dad and kids — is sitting in silence, fiddling with their own electronic devices! It’s hard to enjoy a “family mealtime” when everyone’s face is riveted to the blue glow of their smart phones.

Local churches to offer baccalaureate ice will be an ecumenical one with several local churches sponsoring it, representing several Christian denominations. Combined choirs from Osceola and St. Croix Falls high schools will provide special music. Seniors who wish to participate are invited to meet in the fellowship hall at Peace Lutheran at 7 p.m. on the evening of May 18, to form the processional. Sen-

iors are encouraged to wear their caps and gowns for this event. Following the service, an opportunity for a social hour will be provided by the local churches with coffee, punch and bars being served. The worship leader for this year’s baccalaureate will be the Rev. Larry Mederich from the Osceola Community Church.

We all have things in our lives that could become soft addictions — if we let them. The key is to identify those weak areas and put barriers in place. Encourage your daughter with the thought that when it comes to even “harmless” pastimes, it’s important to exercise caution and self-restraint. ••• Jim Daly is president of Focus on the Family, host of the Focus on the Family radio program, and a husband and father of two. Dr. Juli Slattery is a licensed psychologist, co-host of Focus on the Family, author of several books, and a wife and mother of three. Submit your questions to: FocusOnTheFamily.com. Copyright 2010 Focus on the Family, Colorado Springs, CO 80995. International copyright secured. All rights reserved. Distributed by Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St. Kansas City, MO 64106; 816-581-7500. This feature may not be reproduced or distributed electronically, in print or otherwise, without written permission of Focus on the Family.

Brought to you by:

Siren Assembly of God Siren

The speaker will be the Rev. Chris Folkestad from the Alliance Church, St. Croix Falls. The public is both invited and encouraged to attend the baccalaureate service in honor of the graduating seniors. - submitted

Church listings sponsored by the following area businesses: BREMER BANK, N.A. Full-Service Banking Member FDIC Frederic - Danbury - Siren

DAEFFLER’S QUALITY MEATS, INC. Wholesale & Retail Meats Custom Butchering & Processing Phone 715-327-4456

INTER-COUNTY CO-OP PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION

“Your Electric Servant” Serving Polk & Burnett Counties “Use Energy Wisely”

CARLSON-ROWE FUNERAL HOME Frederic, Wis. 715-327-4475 Duane Lindh

HAULING • Gravel • Sand • Rock • Top Soil • Trackhoe 715-472-2717 Mobile 715-491-1861 1065 290th Ave. Frederic, Wis.

Printers & Publishers Office Supplies

LUCK

Frederic, Wis. - 715-327-4236 Shell Lake, Wis. - 715-468-2314 Siren, Wis. - 715-349-2560 St. Croix Falls, Wis. - 715-483-9008

VAN METER’S MEATS

STATE FARM INSURANCE COMPANIES Corey T. Arnold, Agent Frederic, Wis. Phone 715-327-8076

BEAN’S COUNTRY GRIDDLE Hwys. 35 & 48 Downtown Frederic Phone 715-327-5513

Government Inspected Slaughtering and Processing, Sausage making • Ham & Bacon Cured & Smoked Sides and Quarters of Beef and Pork Available Old-fashioned Fresh Meat Counter Tim Van Meter and Ross Anderson, Owners Luck, WI 54853 Plant 715-472-2141

WEBSTER

ALPHA

SIREN

CASHCO BUILDING SUPPLIES

BASS LAKE LUMBER

OLSEN & SON

• Complete Line of Building Supplies & Lumber • Cabot’s Stains Grantsburg, Wis. 715-488-2471 or 715-327-8766

Your Full-Service Drugstore Siren, Wis. Phone 715-349-2221

BURNETT DAIRY CO-OP

10022 Elbow Lake Road Siren, Wis. 54872 715-689-2539

Complete Lumber & Building Supplies Phone 715-866-4238 Hwy. 35 N. Webster, Wis. Tom & Becky O’Brien, Owners

HOPKINS SAND & GRAVEL, INC. Sand, Gravel, Ready-Mix, Concrete, Black Dirt, Dozer Work, Landscaping & Septic Tanks Installed Hwy. 35 North Webster, Wis. Phone 715-866-4157 M.P.R.S. #03059

1988 World Champion Cheesemaker Earl Wilson, Cheese Plant Mgr. Clif Gipp, Ag. Supply Mgr. for Feed, Propane & Fertilizer Alpha, Wis. 715-689-2468 • 715-689-2467

D & L FINANCIAL SERVICES

CUSHING CUSHING COOPERATIVE SOCIETY Feed Mill - Grain Dept. Cushing, Wis. 715-648-5215

SWEDBERG-TAYLOR FUNERAL HOME Webster, Wis. Phone 715-866-7131

BRUCE’S AUTO REPAIR & TOWING Wrecker - Flatbed Air Conditioning & Computerized Car Service - Cold Weather Starts Webster, Wis. 715-866-4100 Days 715-866-8364 Eves.

Any area business wishing to help sponsor the church listings should contact the Leader at 715-327-4236.

Churches 4/11

FREDERIC

NORTHWESTERN WISCONSIN ELECTRIC CO.


CHURCH ChurchDIRECTORY Directory

MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 57

ADVENTIST

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST - FREDERIC 609 Benson Road; Pastor Curtis Denney Sat. Worship 11 a.m.; Sabbath Schl. 9:30 a.m. ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE CHURCH OF THE VALLEY Senior Pastor Bob Morton 1259 Hwy. 35 S., St. Croix Falls Sunday Worship: 9 & 11 a.m.

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

WORD OF LIFE CHURCH

Meeting in homes. Elders: Cliff Bjork, Jon Zens, 715-483-1357 and 715-755-3048 Sun. Fellowship - 10 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. LUTHERAN

LUTHERAN

BALSAM LUTHERAN CHURCH 1115 Mains Crossing, 1/2 Mile South Hwy. 8 On 110th St.; Sun. Worship 9 a.m.; Sun. School 10:15 a.m. Wed. Bible Study 8:30 a.m.; Wed. LOGOS 3:20 p.m.

BEAUTIFUL SAVIOR LUTHERAN (WELS) Gene E. Jahnke, Pastor, 715-635-7672, Hm. 715-354-7787, Hwy. 70 at 53, Spooner Sun. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School & Bible Classes For All - 10:45 a.m.

BETHANY LUTHERAN - BRANSTAD Pastor Jay Ticknor, 715-463-5746 3 miles So. of Grantsburg on Hwy. 87 Sun. Schl. - 9:30 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

BETHANY LUTHERAN - SIREN Hwy. 35, 1/2 blk. N. Main St. Interim Pastor Keith Radiske Pastoral Serv. 715-349-5280 Sun. School 8:15 a.m.; Sun. Worship - 9:30 a.m.

BETHESDA LUTHERAN - DRESSER (LCMC) www.bethesdalutheran.ws Pastor Roger Kastelle, 715-755-2562 1947 110th Ave., Dresser Contemporary Serv. 8:30 a.m.; Adult Ed & Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Traditional Service 10:45 a.m.;

BONE LAKE LUTHERAN bllc@lakeland.ws Pastor Mary Ann Bowman, 5 mi. E. of Luck on Hwy. 48, 1/2 mi. S. on I; Office - 715-472-2535 Pastor - 715-472-8153, Exploring Prayer 8:45 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 3 - adult 9 a.m.; Wor. 10:30 a.m.; Fellowship 11:30 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

CHRIST LUTHERAN (LCMS) Pipe Lake CTH G & T, 715-822-3096 Pastor Steve Miller Sun. Serv. 10:45 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m. during schl. yr.; Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sun. www.christlutheranpipelake.com

CLAM FALLS LUTHERAN (AALC) Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt - 715-653-2630 www.clamfalls-zion-aalcparish.net Communion 1st Sun.; Wor. 9 a.m.; Sun. School 9 a.m.

FAITH LUTHERAN - BALSAM LAKE faithlutheran@lakeland.ws Pastor Diane Norstad 715-485-3800; CTH I & Mill Street Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:40 a.m.; Holy Communion 1st & last Sundays

FAITH LUTHERAN - GRANTSBURG Pastor Victor St. George, 715-463-5388 Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School 10:45 a.m.

FIRST EVAN. LUTHERAN 5561 Chestnut St., Taylors Falls, MN 651-465-5265 Traditional Worship 8:30 a.m.; Sunday School & Youth 9:45 a.m.; Adult Learning 10 a.m.; Contemp. Wor. 11 a.m.

FIRST LUTHERAN - CUSHING Pastor Dorothy Sandahl, 715-648-5323 or 715-648-5324 Sun. Wor. 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9 a.m.

FRISTAD LUTHERAN - CENTURIA ELCA - 501 Hwy. 35, 715-646-2357, Mel Rau, Pastor Sun. Wor. & Holy Communion - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:40 a.m.

GEORGETOWN LUTHERAN - ELCA Rt. 1, Balsam Lake, WI (Fox Creek) Pastor Neal Weltzen; GT Office - 715-857-5580, Parsonage - 715-822-3001, TR Office - 715-822-3001 Wors. Serv. 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m.; Holy Communion - 1st Sun. of each month

GRACE LUTHERAN - WEST SWEDEN Phone 715-327-4340, 715-327-8384, 715-327-8090 Interim Pastor Julie Brenden Worship 9:15 a.m.; Sun. School 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st & 2nd Sundays

IMMANUEL LUTHERAN - FREDERIC (Missouri Synod) Pastor Jody R. Walter, 715-327-8608 Sun. Schl. - 8:45 a.m.; Service - 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st, 3rd & 5th Sun.

LAKESIDE COMMUNITY LUTH. - ELCA CTH H, 1/2 mi. N. of CTH A & H on H Church Off. 715-635-7791 Roger Pittman, Pastor Worship Serv. 10 a.m.; Sun. School. 9 a.m.

LAKETOWN LUTHERAN - CUSHING Pastor Dorothy Sandahl Sun. Wor. 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:30 a.m.

LUCK LUTHERAN 510 Foster Ave. E. Office 715-472-2605; Home 715-472-8424 Sun. Wor. Serv. 10:30 a.m.; Mon. Wor. Serv. 6:30 p.m.

MILLTOWN LUTHERAN

113 W. Main St.. W., Phone 715-825-2453 Pastor Danny G. Wheeler 9:15 a.m. Worship ; 10 a.m. Sunday School

NEW HOPE LUTHERAN CHURCH Pastor Emory Johnson, 715-463-5700 685 W. State Road 70, Grantsburg Sun. Wor. Serv. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m.

NORTH VALLEY LUTHERAN

METHODIST

METHODIST

ATLAS UNITED METHODIST

Pastor Carolyn Saunders, 715-463-2624 Sunday School - 11 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

ST. FRANCIS XAVIER

LIVING HOPE CHURCH

Pastor Father Daniel Bodin, 651-465-7345 25293 Redwing Ave., Shafer, MN Sunday 9 a.m.

Pastor Doug McConnell Youth Pastor Chris Radtke At Grantsburg High School, 715-463-5794 Sun. Serv. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m.

ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST

Pastor Carolyn Saunders, 715-463-2624 Worship - 9 a.m.; Sunday School - 10:30 a.m.

Pastor Father Michael J. Tupa, 715-866-7321 Cedar & Muskey Ave. - Webster Mass Sun 10 a.m., Wed. 5:30 p.m. (Sept-May), Fri. 9 a.m. (Summer)

DANBURY UNITED METHODIST

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC

CENTRAL UNITED METHODIST GRANTSBURG

Pastor Maggie Isaacson, 715-825-3559 3 mi. W. of Milltown on “G” Sunday Worship - 9:15 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

Cindy Glocke, Pastor, 715-866-8646 Sunday Worship - 9 a.m.

OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN, (LCMS) WEBSTER

Cindy Glocke, Pastor, 715-866-8646 Sunday Worship - 10:30 a.m.

1050 North Keller Ave., Amery 715-268-7717 Father John Drummy, Pastor Sat. Mass 4 p.m., Sun. Mass 8 a.m. Mass Wed. & Thurs. 9 a.m.

Pastor Gerald Heinecke Church Phone 715-866-7191 Sun. Schl. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Wor. - 10:30 a.m. Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

HOLY TRINITY UNITED METHODIST

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC

Holytrinity@wisconsinumc.org 1606 165th Ave., CTH I, Centuria Pastor Freddie Kirk, 715-485-3363 Pastor Tammy Clausen Sunday Worship - 8:30 a.m.

Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-294-2243 255 E. 10th Ave., Osceola Masses: Sun. 10:30 a.m., Tues. 5 p.m. Thurs. at 10 a.m. at Osc. Nursing Home

PEACE LUTHERAN - DRESSER (ELCA) 2355 Clark Road, Dresser, WI, 715-755-2515 Web site: plcdresser.org Pastor Wayne Deloach, Intern Courtney Young Sun. Wor. 8:30 & 11 a.m., Sun. Schl. 9:35 a.m.

GRACE UNITED - WEBSTER

LAKEVIEW UNITED - HERTEL

ASSEMBLY

Pastor Jack Starr Wor. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - during worship hour

ASSEMBLY

PILGRIM LUTHERAN - FREDERIC (ELCA)

LEWIS MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST

Interim Pastor Andrew Hinwood 507 Wisconsin Ave. N., 715-327-8012 Sun. Parents & Toddlers 9:15 a.m.; Sun. Worship - 10 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 2nd Sundays www.pilgrimlutheranfrederic.org

Tom Cook, Pastor Worship 8:45 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 10 a.m.

Pastor Don Wiltshire, 715-640-6400 Centuria - Phone 715-646-2172 Sunday Service: 10 a.m.

REDEEMER EV. LUTHERAN

OSCEOLA UNITED METHODIST

(Wisconsin Synod) Pastor Gene DeVries 200 N. Adams St., St. Croix Falls Sun. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 8:30 a.m.

McKINLEY UNITED METHODIST Pastor Annie Tricker Sun. Worship 11 a.m.; Sun. School 11 a.m. Potluck dinner 1st Sunday

CENTURIA ASSEMBLY OF GOD

SIREN ASSEMBLY OF GOD

ST. CROIX FALLS UNITED METHODIST

EVANGELICAL

Rev. Mike Weaver Sunday Worship Service - 10 a.m. Sunday School is at 9 a.m., Nursery available

APPLE RIVER COMMUNITY (EFCA)

SHEPHERD OF THE VALLEY LUTHERAN

Pastor Arveda “Freddie” Kirk, 715-327-4436 Pastor Tammy Clausen Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.

10 mi. W. of Cumberland on Hwy. 48 (McKinley) - Pastor Neal Weltzin GT Office 715-857-5580, Parsonage 715-822-3001, TR Office - 715-822-3001 Wor. Serv. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:15 a.m. Holy Communion - 1st Sunday

TRINITY LUTHERAN LCMS, DANBURY Pastor Gerald Heinecke Home 715-327-8608; Church 715-866-7191 Sunday Worship Service - 8 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

TRINITY LUTHERAN - FALUN

Rev. Rexford D. Brandt 447 180th St., Osceola, 715-294-2936 Sunday Worship 9 a.m. Communion 1st & 3rd Sunday of the month

YELLOW LAKE LUTHERAN

WOLF CREEK UNITED METHODIST Rev. Mike Weaver Sunday Worship - 8:15 a.m. COVENANT

COVENANT

CALVARY COVENANT - ALPHA

Pastor Dave Guertin 7686 Lofty Pines Drive, Siren, 715-349-5601 Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m.

UNITED COVENANT - CLEAR LAKE Pastor Gary Tonn Sunday School 9:00 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. CATHOLIC

CATHOLIC

ASSUMPTION OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-247-3310 255 St. Hwy. 35, East Farmington Mass Friday 9 a.m.; Sacrament of Penance Sat. 3:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF ST. JOSEPH

Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt - 715-653-2630 5 mi. E. of Frederic on W, 2 mi. south on I; www.clamfalls-zion-aalcparish.net Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st Sunday

Danbury - 7586 St. Rd. 77, 715-866-7321 Pastor - Father Michael J. Tupa Mass - Sat. 4 p.m., Fri. 9 a.m. (Sept.-May). Reconciliation as per bulletin & by appt.

ZION LUTHERAN - EAST FARMINGTON (WELS ) Pastor Martin Weigand - 715-294-3489 Sun. Schl. 9 a.m.; Adult Bible Class 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m.

Balsam Lake - Rev. John A. Drummy, Pastor - 405-2253 Mass: Sat. eves. 6 p.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m.; Tues. 5:30 p.m.; Fri. 9 a.m.Sacrament of Reconciliation 7:30 a.m. Sun. or by appt.

ZION LUTHERAN - MARKVILLE

SACRED HEARTS OF JESUS & MARY

PRESBYTERIAN

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN

Rev. Bruce Brooks - 715-483-3550 719 Nevada St. , (between Simonson & Tower Roads) , St. Croix Falls Worship - 10 a.m. (Nursery provided) Sun. Schl. - Child.- 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - Adults 8:45 a.m.; Communion 1st Sunday

CHRISTIAN CENTER

EVANGELICAL

Pastor Bruce Tanner, 715-268-2176 942 U.S. Hwy. 8, Amery Sun. Schl. 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible study 7 p.m.

CROSSWALK COMMUNITY CHURCH

CHRISTIAN CENTER

EL SALEM/TWIN FALLS CHRISTIAN CENTER

1751 100th Ave., Dresser Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship 10:30 a.m. Evening Services Sun. 6 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. Call Pastor Darryl Olson at 715-755-3133 for information and directions

523 1st St., Clayton, 715-948-2493 Fr. Christopher Wojcik, Pastor Saturday Vespers - 5 p.m.; Sunday Liturgy - 9:30 a.m.

ZION LUTHERAN - BONE LAKE (AALC)

PRESBYTERIAN

231 Bluff Drive, 715-247-2435 Services are Sundays at 10:30 a.m.

HOPE FELLOWSHIP OF SOMERSET

HOLY TRINITY ORTHODOX

OUR LADY OF PERPETUAL HELP

Interim Pastor Julie Brenden 715-327-8384, 715-327-8090 Fellowship - 10:30 a.m., Sun. Schl. 9:45 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m., Communion - 1st & 2nd Sundays

Pastor Andrew Bollant Sun. Schl. - 9:15 a.m.; Morn. Serv. - 10:15 a.m.; Supervised Nursery; Wed. Evening - Worship Serv. 6:30 p.m.

Pastor Dale VanDeusen, 715-488-2296 or 715-488-2653 20296 Hwy. 87, Grantsburg Morning Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:45 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services

Pastor - Father Daniel Bodin 490 Bench St., Taylors Falls, 651-465-7345 Sat. Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Sun. 7:30 & 10:30 a.m. Tues. - Thurs. 7:30 a.m.

ZION LUTHERAN - TRADE LAKE

Pastor Dan Slaikeu 4 mi. SE of Grantsburg on Williams Rd. Worship 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:30 a.m.

TRADE RIVER EVAN. FREE

290 W. Government Street, 715-294-4436 Reverend Dr. Rolland Robinson Sunday Service - 10 a.m. with nursery Sunday School - Sept. - May at 10 a.m.

1/2 mi. W. of Hwy. 35 on U, 715-866-8281, Pastors Douglas Olson, Roger Kampstra and Myron Carlson Services begin at 9:30 a.m.; Communion 1st & 3rd Sunday

Pastor Tim Faust Worship - 11 a.m.; Sun. School - 10 a.m. Holy Communion - 1st & 3rd Sunday

FULL GOSPEL

TAYLORS FALLS UNITED METHODIST

SIREN COVENANT

WEST IMMANUEL LUTHERAN - ELCA

Dairyland - Rev. Andrea Wittwer 715-244-3649 Sunday School - 10 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

CHRISTIAN ORTHODOX

TRINITY EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN OSCEOLA

Pastors Mike & Linda Rozumalski 1 mi. west of Luck on N, 2478 170th St., Luck Sunday Wor. 10 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 9 a.m. Fellowship 11 a.m.

WESLEYAN

WOODLAND WESLEYAN

Tom Cook, Pastor Sunday School 9 a.m. Worship - 10:15 a.m. (Nursery available)

Pastor Scott Sagle, 715-689-2541 Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Worship 10:30 p.m.; Elevator provided, welcome

WEST DENMARK LUTHERAN

WESLEYAN

Pastor Greg Lund, 715-327-8767 700 Churchwood Lane; 505 Old CTH W, Frederic Sun. Schl. - 9 a.m.; Morn. Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services Sat. Worship - 6 p.m., Luck Senior Center

SIREN UNITED METHODIST

Hwy. 70 East, 715-689-2271, Pastor: Carl Heidel Worship 9 a.m.; Sunday School 10:15 a.m. Communion -Every Sunday

300 Seminole Ave. (CTH M) Mark Kock, Pastor, 715-294-2828 Sunday Worship 8 a.m. & 10:30 a.m.; Summer, 9 a.m.

Minister Garret Derouin, 715-866-7157 Musky & Birch St., Avail. in office 9 a.m. - noon, Tues.-Fri.; Sun. Bible Study 9:30 a.m. Worship 10:30 a.m.

WOOD RIVER CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP

1614 CTH B, North Luck, Pastor Rob Lubben Sunday Worship - 9 a.m. Contact Leslie Valentine, 715-646-2390; E-mail: leslie56@centurytel.net

TRINITY LUTHERAN - ELCA

CHURCH OF CHRIST - WEBSTER

FULL GOSPEL

ST. PETER’S LUTHERAN - LCMC

(Missouri Synod) 140 Madison St. South, St. Croix Falls Pastor Mark K. Schoen Sun. Service - 9 a.m.; Sun.School - 10:30 a.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST

Pastor Larry Mederich, 715-294-4332 www.occconnect.org Mtg. @ St. Croix Art Barn; Sun. Serv. - 9 a.m. Nursery and children church

350 Michigan Ave., Centuria Sun. Worship - 10:45 a.m.; Sun. School - 10 a.m.

ST. LUKE UNITED - FREDERIC

Pastor Andy McDaniel, 715-327-8402 Sun. Schl. - 9:15 a.m.; Wor. Serv. - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided.; www.tradelakebaptistchurch.org

OSCEOLA COMMUNITY CHURCH

oumc@centurytel.net 306 River Street, Osceola, 715-755-2275 Pastor Mark Gilbert Adult Class - 8:30 a.m.; Sunday School 10 a.m. Sunday Worship - 10 a.m.; Holy Communion 1st Sunday

ST. JOHN’S EV. LUTHERAN (Wis. Synod)

TRADE LAKE BAPTIST

OUR LADY OF THE LAKES

Pastor Father Michael J. Tupa CTHs A & H - 715-866-7321 Crescent Lake Voyager Village area. Mass Sun. 8 a.m., Thurs. 9:30 a.m. Reconciliation as per bulletin and by appt.

ST. DOMINIC - FREDERIC & IMMACULATE CONCEPTION - GRANTSBURG CATHOLIC MASS SCHEDULE Pastor: Rev. Dennis M. Mullen, 715-327-8119 St. Dominic: Sat. 4:30 p.m.; Sun. 10:30 a.m. Immaculate Conception: Sat. 6:30 p.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m. Call the office for daily & holy day Mass times

ST. ANNE PARISH Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-247-3310 139 Church Hill Rd., Somerset Mass Sun. 8:30 a.m.; Wed. 9 a.m. Sacrament of Penance Sun. 8 a.m.

BAPTIST

BAPTIST

EAST BALSAM BAPTIST - BALSAM LK. 715-857-5411 Worship Service - 9 a.m.; Sunday School-10:15 a.m.

EUREKA BAPTIST 2393 210th Ave., St. Croix Falls Pastor Willis Christenson, 715-483-9464 Sunday School - 10 a.m.; Worship Service - 11 a.m.

FAITH FELLOWSHIP Hwy. 35 and CTH N., Luck Bill McEachern Pastor, 715-485-3973 Sun. Bible study - 9 a.m.; Sun. Wor. - 10 a.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - AMERY 131 Broadway St., 715-268-2223; www.fbcamery.org; E-mail: churchoffice@fbcamery.org Pastor Charlie Butt, Lead Pastor; Nick Buda, Assoc. Pastor of Family Ministries Sunday Service: 9 a.m.; All ages Sunday School 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. Nursery available

FIRST BAPTIST - FALUN Pastor Kevin Miller Associate Pastor Steve Ward Sunday School - (all ages) - 9:30 a.m. Church Serv. - 10:45 a.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - MILLTOWN Pastor Marlon Mielke, 715-825-3186 Sunday Schl. 9:45 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m., 7 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - TAYLORS FALLS, MN Located across from elemen. school on West St., Pastor, Dr. Kevin Schumann; 651-465-7171 Sun. Morn. - Sun. School for all ages - 9 a.m. Morn. Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided.

FIRST BAPTIST - WEBSTER Church Phone 715-866-4111; Interim Pastor Ken Hyatt; Youth Pastor Jerry Scheumann Sun. School - 9:30 a.m.; Wor. - 10:45 a.m (Nursery Provided)

GRACE CHURCH OF OSCEOLA “The Cure for the Common Church”

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN

HOLY CROSS ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN Meeting at Zion Lutheran Church, 28005 Old Towne Rd., Chisago Lakes, MN hcomm.org Sunday Worship Service 9:30 a.m. NAZARENE

NAZARENE

CALVARY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 510 S. Vincent, St. Croix Falls Pastor Tom Reaume, 715-483-3696 Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:45 a.m. & Wed. 6:30 p.m.

FAITH COMMUNITY 7535 Peet St., Danbury, 715-656-4010 Adult Bible Service 9 a.m.; Services: Sun. 10 a.m.; Sunday School during church service.

NONDENOMINATIONAL

NONDENOMINATIONAL

CENTERPOINT CHURCH “Come as you are”

Pastor Dick Enerson, www.centerpointstcroix.com, 715-294-1833, Meeting at SCF High Schl. - Main entrance 740 Maple Drive, St. Croix Falls Sunday Worship 10 - 11:15 a.m.

NEW LIFE COMMUNITY - AMERY Interim Pastor Craig Jorgenson Sunday Worship 10 a.m.; Children’s Church: K to 6th Grade

NEW LIFE CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY Meets at Dresser Elem. School, Dresser Pastor Tony Minell 715-417-1982 Sunday Worship 9:45 a.m.; Sunday School 9:45 a.m.

NEW WINE CHURCH - CENTURIA 309 5th Street, , 715-338-2751 Pastors Randy and Pam Stone Sunday 10 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m.

NORTHERN PINES FRIENDS WORSHIP GROUP 715-733-0481 or 715-733-0480 for time of meeting.

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

RIVER VALLEY CHRISTIAN

722 Seminole Ave., Osceola Pastor Dr. Kent Haralson; 715-294-4222 or 715-755-3454; info@gracechurchosceola.com Sun.: Praise & Worship Serv. 9 am., Adult Bible Study 10:45 a.m., Children’s Sun. School 10:45 a.m.

1289 160th St. (Hwy. 65), St. Croix Falls, 715-483-5378 Senior Pastors Paul and Sonja Hanson Sunday Adult Bible Class 9 a.m. (No child care available) Worship and Children’s Sunday Schl. 10 a.m.

GRACE BAPTIST - GRANTSBURG

ST. PETER’S COMMUNITY CHURCH

716 S. Robert St., Grantsburg, 715-463-5699 Sr. Pastor Brad Moore David Ahlquist, Assoc. Pastor Sun. Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School 11 a.m.

“Faith on Purpose” (Love God, Love People...period) faithonpurpose.org CTH F, Dresser, 715-483-2911 Pastor’s res./office Sunday Worship 10 a.m.

church directory

ADVENTIST


PAGE 58 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

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ST. CROIX FALLS

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MAY 4, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 59

Students of the Week GRANTSBURG

FREDERIC

McKenna Engen has been chosen Frederic Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in first grade and the daughter of Troy and Pam Engen. McKenna is very polite and always has a smile on her face. She likes to play basketball, has two dogs and reads Clifford books.

Stephen Schaar has been chosen Frederic Middle School’s student of the week. He is in eighth grade and the son of Sarah Schaar. Stephen is friendly, gets along with everybody, is a hard worker and has a positive attitude. He enjoys sports, fishing and hunting. In the future Stephen would like to become a hunting guide.

Bryce Williamson has been chosen Frederic High School’s student of the week. He is a junior and the son of Scott and Sonja Williamson. Bryce has excellent work ethic, is always respectful and is a school leader. He is involved in youth group, football and works at the Medicine Shoppe pharmacy. Bryce enjoys playing video games. He plans to attend UW-Superior to become a personal trainer. The greatest influence in his life has been his dad.

Ruth Paquette has been chosen Grantsburg Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in second grade and the daughter of Joe and Ruth Paquette. Ruth is a very kind, respectful, hardworking and responsible student. She always has a positive attitude and is a good role model to her peers. Ruth helps create a caring atmosphere at school. In phy ed Ruth always does her best. She enjoys reading, writing, singing and going on vacations.

LUCK

Jared Hutton has been chosen Luck Elementary School’s student of the week. He is in second grade. Jared is kind, friendly and has a good sense of humor. Basketball and football are his favorite sports. The Green Bay Packers are his favorite team. Other things Jared likes are soldiers, gym class, his pet guinea pig and riding snowmobile.

Haley Larsen has been chosen Grantsburg High School’s student of the week. She is a freshman and the daughter of Kevin and Terri Larsen. Haley is a very diligent and hardworking student. She is friendly, has a good sense of humor and is willing to help. Haley is involved in soccer, school plays, youth group and has a cleaning job in the summer. She enjoys reading, swimming and being outside. Haley plans to go to college for CAD engineering.

ST. CROIX FALLS

Paul Byl has been chosen Luck Middle School’s student of the week. He is in eighth grade and the son of Mike and Joyce Byl. Paul is respectful and a hard worker. He is a member of Junior Holsteins and 4-H. Paul enjoys showing cattle at the Wisconsin State Fair and Polk County Fair. He works on the family farm and enjoys tractor and field work. The person Paul admires most is his dad.

Whitney Petersen has been chosen Luck High School’s student of the week. She is a freshman and the daughter of Rachel and Kent Petersen. Whitney is a hardworking student who works well with others and has a great attitude. She is involved in student council, FCCLA, dance, choir and drama club. Whitney enjoys snowboarding, sports and drawing.

Adam Briggs has been chosen St. Croix Falls Elementary School’s student of the week. He is in kindergarten and the son of Scott and Kelly Briggs. Adam loves to learn about math because he loves numbers. His favorite thing to do at home is play board games like Mousetrap with his family. Adam is a friendly and courteous student.

Travis Shannon has been choMiddle sen St. Croix Falls School’s student of the week. He is in seventh grade and the son of Jim and Robin Shannon. Travis has a dog, Mazzie. His favorite pastimes are model trains, jigsaw puzzles, playing basketball and jumping on the trampoline. Travis enjoys FACE because he likes to cook.Travis is very happy and fun to have in class.

Brian Gilbert has been chosen St. Croix Falls High School’s student of the week. He is a freshman and the son of Paul and Jodi Gilbert. Brian’s hobbies are fishing, hunting, being outdoors, video games, working with his dad, watching movies and cooking. He is in football, wrestling and track.

WEBSTER

SIREN

Jeramiah Liljenberg has been chosen Siren Elementary School’s student of the week. He works very hard at school and always does his best. Jeramiah never complains about having to do work or take something home. He is willing to miss recess to work on something he is struggling with. Jeramiah is kind to others and makes sure his classmates feel part of the class or group. He has a great sense of humor and is fun to be around.

Grace Lehne has been chosen Grantsburg Middle School’s student of the week. She is in fourth grade and the daughter of Kate and Keith Lehne. Grace is very conscientious, hardworking and demonstrates a willingness to go the extra mile. She is helpful, patient and admired by her peers. Grace’s favorite class is art. She is involved in choir, photo shop, Girl Scouts and youth group.

Congratulations for a job well done!

Felicity Lamb has been chosen Webster Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in kindergarten and the daughter of Jill Wieser and Jake Lamb. Felicity has made fantastic progress and has become a wonderful reader and writer. She is helpful to her friends, has a positive, happy attitude and always does her best. Her favorite activities are lunch and rest. At home Felicity likes to play with her brother Aiden.

Terry Curtis has been chosen Webster Middle School’s student of the week. He is in seventh grade and the son of Terry and Mildred Curtis. Terry is a good student who works hard and is respectful to staff members and students. He is a positive student to have in class. Terry is involved in soccer and enjoys hunting, fishing and playing video games.

Rylee Johnson has been chosen Unity Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in third grade and the daughter of Dawn and Gary Johnson. Rylee works hard and tries her best every day. She is an excellent role model in the classroom. Rylee helps her classmates when they're in need. She follows all rules on a daily basis.

Amanda Mattson has been chosen Unity Middle School’s student of the week. She is in sixth grade and the daughter of Jackie Ridener and Curt Mattson. Amanda has a positive attitude and cares about her education. She is kind and stays focused when given a task. Amanda is an all-around nice young lady.

Chelsey McIntyre has been chosen Webster High School’s student of the week. She is a sophomore and the daughter of Tim and Shonnah McIntyre. Chelsey has a positive outlook on life. She is polite, responsible, friendly and respectful. Chelsey is involved in band, AODA and volleyball. She enjoys shopping, painting nails and reading.

UNITY

Proudly Supporting Our Students Stop In or Call Us Today

Electricity • Propane 1-800-421-0283 www.polkburnett.com

Supporting our area students and their accomplishments. INTER-COUNTY

Serving Northwest Wisconsin

2547 State Road 35, Luck, Wis. (in the Evergreen Plaza) 715-472-4088

www.sterlingbank.ws

If You Would Like To Be A Sponsor Of

STUDENT OF THE WEEK Please Call 715-327-4236

Brandi Larson has been chosen Unity High School’s student of the week. She is a senior and the daughter of Mike and Janis Larson. Brandi is actively involved in FFA, National Honor Society, gymnastics and cheerleading. She enjoys spending time with family and friends. She plans to attend St. Cloud State University for radiologic technology. She resides in Milltown.


PAGE 60 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2011

Coming events

MAY

Wanderoos

THURSDAY/5

• Polk County Master Gardeners plant sale & pancake breakfast at the fire hall, 8 a.m.-1 p.m.

MONDAY/9

Balsam Lake

Amery

• 5th- and 6th-grade band and choir concert at the Unity school, 7 p.m.

• Weight-loss surgery education and support at the medical center, 5-6 p.m., 715-268-0597.

Centuria

• Public meeting referring to Hwy. 35 improvements at the village hall, 5-7 p.m., 715-395-3025.

Balsam Lake • Unity High School spring concert, in the auditorium, 7 p.m.

TUES. & WED./10 & 11

Frederic • Cinco de Mayo taco dinner fundraiser at Crosswalk Community Church, 5-7 p.m.

Luck

Cumberland

• Dr. Bob Kann to speak at the library about his book, “Cordelia Harvey: Civil War Angel.” 7 p.m., bobkann.com, 715-472-2770.

• Health fair health screenings at the hospital front entrance, 6-9 a.m., 715-822-2741.

TUESDAY/10

Siren

• National Day of Prayer service at Siren Assembly of God, 7-8:30 p.m.

Amery

St. Croix Falls

• Cancer support group at Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 7 p.m., 715-268-6722 or 715-268-7290.

• Year One: Bringing Up Baby class at the medical center, 6-7 p.m., 715-483-0431. • National Day of Prayer service at Alliance Church of the Valley, 7-8 p.m. • Legion meeting with dinner at the Legion hall, 7 p.m., 715-483-9386.

Swans swim through a light fog on a local pond. - Photo by Bill Stirrat

FRI. & SAT./6 & 7

SAT. & SUN./7 & 8

Bone Lake

• Church garage sale at Zion Lutheran Church. Fri. 8 a.m.3 p.m.; Sat. 8 a.m.-noon.

Burnett & Polk Counties

• Earth Arts spring art tour, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., 800-2227655, www.earthartswi.org.

• “The Tortoise and the Hare” play presented at UWBarron County, 7:30 p.m., 715-234-8176 Ext. 5457.

SATURDAY/7

Dresser

• Kentucky Derby Party, fundraiser for Festival Theatre programming, at Paradise Landing, 3:30 p.m., 888-8876002.

Rice Lake

FRIDAY/6

Balsam Lake

• Youth ministry spaghetti supper and silent auction at Peace Lutheran Church, 6-8 p.m.

Frederic • Setup for ACS Walk/Run at Birch Street Elementary School at 3:30 p.m.

Jackson

• Smelt/fish fry at the town hall by Second Alarm, 5 p.m.gone.

Luck

• Luck High School art show at the Luck Museum. • Open reception for high school’s Advanced Art Exhibit at the library, 5-8 p.m. Exhibit on display till May 18.

Rice Lake • Sen. Jauch and Rep. Rivard hold a dialogue session at UW-Barron County, 6 p.m., 715-234-8176, Ext. 5472.

Siren • Fish fry at the Burnett County Moose Lodge, 5:30-7 p.m., 715-349-5923.

St. Croix Falls

• Taste of the St. Croix Valley at Chateau St. Croix Winery. Reservations: 715-483-3580. 5:30-8:30 p.m., fallschamber.org.

Taylors Falls, Minn.

Cushing

• BCWC trap shoot at Cushing Rod and Gun Club, 8 a.m.4 p.m.

Danbury

• Ruby’s Pantry at the town maintenance shop, $15 donation. Open 9:30 a.m., distribution 10-11:30 a.m.

• Wisconsin Draft Horse & Mule Association’s demo, rides, lunch, etc. at the Luck school agriculture field, 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., 715-796-5509. • Aebleskiver dinner at West Denmark Church hall, 3:307 p.m., 715-472-2383. • Luck ACS Walk/Run team & individual check-in, late registration & pictures 8-9 a.m. at the high school. The walk begins at 9:15 a.m.

Milltown

• River’s Run and Ride Rally, community center. Registration begins at 8 a.m., races begin at 8:30 a.m., breakfast, lunch, bake sale, Bingo, Cribbage, silent auction, 715-5530212.

Rice Lake

• DAV Mobile Service Office at Harley-Davidson, 9 a.m.5 p.m., 414-902-5736. • Electronics recycling drop-off event at UW-BC, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 715-234-8176.

Falun • Spring sale at Faith Lutheran Church, 8 a.m.-1 p.m.

Frederic • Frederic ACS Walk/Run team & individual check-in, late registration & pictures 8-9 a.m. at the Birch Street Elementary School. The walk begins at 9:15 a.m., 715-653-2684.

Grantsburg • Feed My Sheep at Grace Church in Grantsburg. Doors open 8 a.m., 715-463-5699. • Faith Lutheran Church’s spring sale, 8 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Siren • Donation drop-off for Lion/Lioness yard sale at their building, 9 a.m.-noon, 715-349-2400.

St. Croix Falls • Bird walk at Interstate Park, 7-9 a.m., 715-483-3747.

Taylors Falls, Minn. • Smelt fry at the fire hall, 4-7:30 p.m.

Trade Lake

SUNDAY/8

• Clothing giveaway at the Baptist church, 9 a.m.-noon.

Lewis • Jam session at the Methodist Church, gospel, bluegrass and country, 6-9 p.m. Last one till fall.

Siren

Luck

• Head injury support group at Siren Covenant Church, 1-2:30 p.m., 715-349-8985.

• Bird hike at Straight Lake State Park, parking lots 270 and 120, 7 a.m., 715-472-2248.

St. Croix Falls

Post-prom

• Bingo at the community center by First Evangelical Lutheran youth, 6:30 p.m.

Happenings in the Upper St. Croix Valley communities

• Vocalist/instrumentalist Laura MacKenzie performs at Festival Theatre, 2 p.m., 715-483-3387.

RIGHT: During Luck’s post-prom party Megan Bartylla, Isabella Nelson, Jaimee Buck and others listen as Mrs. Cassie Moore explains how to play one of the games.

Tony Aguado bowls for Post-Prom Dollars to be spent on prizes during Luck's post-prom party, held at McKenzie Lanes in Centuria. – Photos by Lori Nelson

LEFT: Isaiah Tretsven plays one of the Minute to Win It games to win a prize. RIGHT: During Luck’s Post-Prom Party blackjack dealer Pam Klatt deals cards to Brett Bartylla, Jake Schrock and Megan Bartylla.

WEDNESDAY/11 Cumberland

• Lunch & Learn, Emergency/Disaster Preparedness at the hospital front entrance, noon-1 p.m., 715-822-2741.

Siren • Skywarn spotter training at the government center, 6:30 p.m., 715-349-2171. • Volunteer dinner at the senior center, 5 p.m., 715-8665300.

ONGOING

Every Day, AA &/or AlAnon, Polk & Burnett counties, 715-931-8262 for time/location. Amery, 715-268-8431.

Divorce care support group at Apple River Community Church, 715-268-8360, 715-268-2176.

Every Monday Indianhead Barbershop Chorus meets at the Balsam Lake Government Center, 7:30 p.m., 715-483-9202. Baby and Me class - Amery Medical Center, 1-2 p.m. Grief Share support group at Centennial Hall, Amery, 715-268-2176 or 715-268-8360.

Every Tuesday Bingo - Burnett County Moose Lodge, Siren, 6 p.m. Survivors of domestic violence & sexual assault support group, Polk Co., 800-261-7233, 6-7:30 p.m. Anger management group at Amery Regional Medical Center, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 715-268-4094.

Every Thursday Breastfeeding support group at the St. Croix Regional Medical Center, 2-3:30 p.m., 715-483-0431. Narcotics Anonymous meets at the Serenity House (old jail), Balsam Lake, 7 p.m., 612-205-2321.

Every Friday Moms In Touch International, First Baptist, Amery, 8:15 a.m., 715-268-5408.

Every Friday and Saturday The Balsam Lake American Legion Auxiliary and Post 278 members will be distributing The Memorial Poppy.

Luck

May 4  

weekly newspaper

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