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W E D N E S D AY, M AY 1 3 , 2 0 0 9 • V O L U M E 7 6 • N O . 3 8 • 3 S E C T I O N S • S E C T I O N A

WE EKEN D WA TCH :

• Community Club sale @ Webb Lake • ACS rummage/bake sale @ Webster • Wildlife Experience Weekend @ Grantsburg • Breakfast/fishing workshop @ Balsam Lake • Crex by Bike tour @ Grantsburg • Scandinavian breakfast @ Siren • Nature walks/hikes @ St. Croix Falls See Coming Events, stories inside

IN SI DE

Leader INTER-COUNTY

Graduation section inside

Serving Northwest Wisconsin

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3 confirmed H1N1 cases in Polk School closings no longer recommended by CDC PAGE 3

Countdown to a new library at SCFalls Currents feature

State Patrol officer injured in crash

On e t i r e d g ro u p

Accident remains under investigation PAGE 2

City hand delivers letter to PUC

History of the Clam Falls area Part I Currents section

Requests amendment to Xcel’s permits for Chisago Project PAGE 3

Two men drown in Lake Wapogasset Midnight boat ride on lake turns tragic PAGE 4

Ignorance leads some to foreclosure abyss

Local pilot receives award Page 12

Rep. Hraychuck holds town hall meetings in Burnett and Polk counties PAGE 4

GAM Board ordered to comply with county rules Special meeting airs issues with finance office PAGE 5

Conference meet on the horizon for area track teams See SPORTS

Inside this section

Grantsburg pool repairs coming Judge Kutz swears in new village council PAGE 14

w w w. t h e - l e a d e r. n e t

Students removed a pile of trash from Mindy Creek at St. Croix Falls last year. They were able to get most of the 40 or more tires up to Day Road. Some of the tires were 17-inch tires, which would take them back to the Model T Ford days. Some were retreads from World War II. Three layers of rubber made them very heavy. There were even some “nifty spiffy” whitewall tires. from city of St. Croix Falls/Cora Dversdall

New copy deadline FREDERIC/SIREN/ST. CROIX FALLS — The new deadline for submitted copy to the Leader is 4:30 p.m. on Mondays. The current deadline for ad copy - 10:30 a.m. on Tuesdays - will remain the same.

Jeanne Daniels named Webster’s Citizen of the Year WEBSTER - Jeanne Daniels was named Webster’s 2009 Citizen of the Year at the Webster Area Chamber spring dinner held April 28 at the Yellow River Saloon and Eatery. Daniels was recognized for the countless hours she volunteers each year at chamber events and for the time she has given in coordinating the Webster queen pageant for many years. Daniels and her family help each year at Webster Santa Day and Gandy Dancer Days and Daniels presently serves on the Webster Area Chamber Board. As Webster Citizen of the Year, Daniels and her family will ride in the Webster July 4 parade and she will light the Webster Christmas trees at Santa Day this December. The Webster Area Chamber meets the third Monday of each month. Present Jeanne Daniels was named Webmembers are invited to attend and new ster’s 2009 Citizen of the Year at the members are always welcome. Upcoming Webster Area Chamber Webster Area Chamber spring dinner held April 28. – Photo by Priscilla Bauer events are: The annual Webster Craft Fair on Saturday, May 23, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Events will be happening all weekend. the Webster Elementary School Enjoy food, family games on Main grounds on Hwy. 35 in Webster. The Street, sidewalk sales, a community fair is one of the largest outdoor craft street dance and the Forts Folle fairs in the area with over 100 artists Avoine’s annual BBQ Fest. Volunteers are always needed for and crafters. Webster’s annual Fourth of July Pa- these chamber events and for other rade and Family Fun Day on July 4, be- chamber activities. For more information on chamber membership and ginning at 1 p.m. Webster’s annual Gandy Dancer events call Tim at 715-349-7499 or go to Days community celebration, Aug. 7-9. www.websterwisconsin.com - submitted

The Inter-County Leader is a cooperative-owned newspaper


PAGE 2 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 13, 2009

Leader

Serving Northwest Wisconsin

A cooperative-owned newspaper, the Inter-County Leader is published every Wednesday by the Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association, Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837. Second Class postage paid at Frederic, WI 54837.

MANAGER Doug Panek dougpanek@centurytel.net EDITOR Gary B. King, Editor gbking@centurytel.net STAFF Nancy Jappe njappe@centurytel.net Tammi Milberg tammi@centurytel.net Marty Seeger mseeger@centurytel.net Brenda Sommerfeld brendals@centurytel.net Sherill Summer sherill33@gmail.com Gregg Westigard greggw@lakeland.ws Carl Heidel cheidel389@centurytel.net Priscilla Bauer cilla@grantsburgtelcom.net Mary Stirrat marystirrat@hotmail.com EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Raelynn Hunter rael@centurytel.net

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OFFICES Frederic

P.O. Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837 (M-F, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.) 715-327-4236 Fax - 715-327-4117 (news copy) Fax - 715-327-4870 (ad copy)

Siren

24154 State Road 35, Siren, WI 54872 (M-F, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.) 715-349-2560 Fax - 715-349-7442

St. Croix Falls

Box 338, St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 (M-W, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. T-F, 9:30 - 4 p.m.) 715-483-9008 Fax - 715-483-1420

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The Inter-County Leader [ISS No. 87509091] is published weekly. Subscription prices are $34/yr. in Polk and Burnett counties; $38/yr. in Barron, Chisago, Washburn, St. Croix counties; $41/yr. anywhere in the United States $23/yr. for servicemen or women; $23/yr. for students or schools (9 months). Payment is needed before we can start the subscription. No refunds on subscriptions. Persons may subscribe online at www.the-leader.net, write us at Inter-County Leader, Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837, or stop by one of our three offices.

Board of directors Vivian Byl, chair Charles Johnson Harvey Stower Merlin Johnson Janet Oachs

EMS personnel from Frederic, Luck and Polk County responded to an accident Saturday evening, May 9, which injured a State Patrol officer as he attempted to turn around to pursue an alleged traffic violater. The accident remains under investigation by the Polk County Sheriff’s Department. - Special photos

Trooper injured in Hwy. 35 crash

POLK COUNTY - A State Patrol trooper was injured when his squad car was struck by a pickup truck, Saturday evening. Trooper Jorge R. Dimas, 23, Amery, was in the process of turning around to respond to a traffic violation when he pulled into the path of a northbound pickup driven by Richard R. Dvorak, 72, Trooper Dimas St. Paul. Dimas, also northbound, had activated his lights and pulled to the east shoulder of the road before beginning to make the turn, according to a news release from the Polk County Sheriff’s Department. The accident occurred at approximately 9:15 p.m. on Hwy. 35 between Luck and Frederic, just south of 160th Avenue. The 1994 Ford F-150 struck the patrol car in the driver’s side door, and both vehicles ended up in the southbound lane. Frederic firefighters extricated Dimas from the 2005 Crown Victoria and EMS personnel from Northland Ambulance transported him to St. Croix Regional Medical Center in St. Croix Falls. Dimas was then taken to Regions Hospital in St.

Paul for further treatment. He sustained deep cuts to his head and a fractured pelvis, according to Polk County Sheriff Tim Moore. Dvorak told authorities he was not seriously injured. Traffic was blocked for more than two

On the scene of the accident Watching a professional by Gregg Westigard LUCK – Last Saturday evening, a lawn party was interrupted by a sound that echoed through the valley along the Trade River on Hwy. 35. The party-goers looked up the highway and saw the flashing lights of an emergency vehicle on the road. Eric Olson, a Luck volunteer firefighter and trained emergency worker, was at the party. He immediately got in his truck, with several others, and went to the scene. They were the first to arrive at the site where a State Highway Patrol vehicle sat wrecked across two lanes of the highway. Olson went to work immediately to

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hours as authorities cleared the scene and gathered evidence. The accident remains under investigation by the Polk County Sheriff’s Department. – Gary King with information from Polk County Sheriff’s Department

A morning dew settled on four robin eggs in a nest built in a pine tree near Frederic. - Photo by Gary King

aid the State Patrol driver, using his training in a calm and sure manner. He leaned into the car, turned off the engine, and started talking to the injured and trapped driver. The side of the car had been pushed in nearly a foot, and the seat belt was cutting into the trooper’s body. Olson cut free the belt. “Just be still. Can you talk? Are you on any medications? Are you a diabetic? Hold on. We are getting help. It will be OK, buddy.” By the time emergency help arrived several minutes later, Olson had stabilized the situation and was able to advise the EMTs on conditions. It took some time to get the driver out of the car but the crisis moment was over. It is impressive to watch a well-trained and confident professional.

Panel to address environmental priorities, sustainable living BURNETT COUNTY - Environmental Priorities and Sustainable Living will be the subject of a panel presentation at 7 p.m., Tuesday, May 19, at the Burnett County Government Center in Room 165. The event is open to the public. Four experienced voices will discuss various ways that individuals and society are trying to protect the environment and encourage a sustainable lifestyle. The speakers will be: Kevin Schoessow, University of Wisconsin- Extension environmental specialist and agricultural development agent; Dave Jacoby, builder of straw-bale homes; Jen Barton, recycling control commission and environmental specialist; and Tracy Mofel, University of Wisconsin-Barron County environmental specialist. This is a nonpartisan public-service presentation sponsored by the Burnett County Democratic Party. - from BCDP


MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 3

Briefly SIREN - A community meeting to make people aware of and to discuss issues of concern regarding Siren School will be held Thursday, May 21, at 7 p.m. at the Lakeview Event Center (the former Yourchuck Hardware building). - Nancy Jappe ••• ST. CROIX FALLS - Matt Nikolay, regional coordinator for U.S. Sen. Russ Feingold, will hold office hours on Thursday, May 21, from 11 a.m. to noon at the St. Croix Falls City Hall. No appointment is necessary. Area residents are invited to meet with Feingold’s staff to discuss a problem they are having with a federal program or to express opinions before Congress. from the office of Sen. Feingold

First defendant sentenced MADISON - Christifer Sonnenberg, 19, of Luck, was sentenced Friday, May 8, in U.S. District Court in Madison to 5-1/2 years in federal prison without parole, for distributing crack cocaine on St. Croix Tribal lands. Chief Judge Barbara B. Crabb also imposed a $1,000 fine. The remaining eight defendants in the case have also pleaded guilty and will be sentenced later this summer. The defendant and other members of the conspiracy worked together to obtain and distribute crack cocaine on St. Croix Tribal lands from at least January 2001 through September of 2008. Prosecution of the cases is being handled by Assistant U.S. Attorney John W. Vaudreuil. - from the office of Erik C. Peterson, U.S. Attorney for Western District of Wisconsin

Man injured in lawn mower fire that developed into wildfire RURAL LUCK – A rural Luck man sustained burns to his leg when his riding lawn mower caught on fire, starting a wildfire that burned three to four acres of swampland along CTH I, just north of Hwy. 48. Donald Johnson was mowing grass at approximately 5:30 p.m., Monday, when either the grass or mower caught fire, according to Luck Fire Chief Roger Nelson. Johnson had to remove his pants, which had caught on fire. Johnson declined to be transported by ambulance but went to the hospital on his own. The mower ended up “burned to a crisp,” according to Assistant Chief Eric Olson, who noted that firefighters discovered a goose nest with eggs in the middle of the burned area and “worked around it” in hopes the mother goose will come back and the eggs will be OK. Although it’s late in the fire season, dry conditions still exist in much of the area. – Gary King

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Special deadline F R E D E R I C / S I R E N / S T. C R O I X FALLS — In observance of Memorial Day, the Inter-County Leader newspaper offices will be closed Monday, May 25. The deadline for any news articles and advertising will be 4:30 p.m. on Friday, May 22, for the May 27 edition of the Leader. Thank you.

TF hand delivers letter to PUC

Requests amendment to Xcel’s Minn. permits for Chisago Project

by Tammi Milberg TAYLORS FALLS, Minn. – Another twist in the Xcel Energy saga in the river valley has surfaced this week as the Taylors Falls City Council approved having a letter hand delivered to the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission at the May 11 meeting, indicating they are nobody’s fool when it comes to the Chisago Project. The council met April 30 in closed session to discuss their next strategy after information came to light to the city about Xcel meeting without informing the city or members of the steering committee, which violates the mediated settlement agreement between the parties that was signed in 2000. Members of the city’s steering committee, Ross Rivard and Loren Caneday, and the city attorney reviewed the letter prior to the council approval. Other information that the city became aware of was Xcel’s intent to install the line east of Cty. Road 20, which would violate the original agreement to have the line west of Cty. Road 20 in efforts to preserve the view of Cherry Hill Park. This was included in Xcel’s permit application to the Minn. PUC and is in direct violation of the agreement. Another section of the permit application includes Xcel’s claim that undergrounding the line in certain areas of the valley would have detrimental effects on the

environment and included an aboveground line for that section (in particular the area from Hwy. 95 to the St. Croix River). Xcel further backed up that claim in the permit application indicating the city of Taylors Falls supported that sentiment, and Taylors Falls says this is not true. In the cover letter to David Birkholz of the PUC, the city indicates the agreement violations by Xcel Energy stating, “The settlement agreement, among other things, required that the transmission lines were proposed to the necessary authorities in a specific configuration. The route permit application submitted to the public utilities commission for this project did not propose this configuration. Taylors Falls trusted that Xcel Energy would abide by the terms of the settlement agreement. When this has proved otherwise, the alternative was to file this amendment. We sincerely hope the public utilities commission will consider our amendment request once it has reviewed the enclosed information.” The enclosures included the amended language to the route permit application sections, the settlement agreement, the letter from Xcel Energy indicating installation would be done according to the route permits and a copy of the letter to Xcel Energy signed jointly by the cities of Taylors Falls and St. Croix Falls requesting the reinstatment of the steering committee and citing the violation of the agreement in changing the route. These were hand delivered to the PUC on Tuesday, May 12, by zoning administrator Larry Phillips.

Taylors Falls further requested the past 18 months environmental impact reports to substantiate Xcel’s claims but has not yet seen proof to support the environmental concern of Xcel. The city indicates they are sensitive to environmental issues, but the proof needs to be provided to them in order to consider amending the agreement. The letter addresses that issue as well, stating, “We have reviewed the environmental assessment published by the Minnesota Department of Commerce. The area between state Hwy. 95 and the river is mentioned, but in little detail. The environmental assessment covers the project as a whole. However, the information regarding the subject area is not conclusive enough to prove undergrounding through this area would be too damaging to the environment. It is our understanding that the PUC allowed the department of commerce to prepare an environmental assessment in lieu of an environmental report because it would be less confusing to the public. We desire a more in-depth, conclusive environmental study of the subject area to determine whether or not there would be too much environmental damage. Despite numerous requests to Xcel Energy over the past 18 months to provide such an environmental study, no study was provided to the city. We are and continue to be, sensitive to the idea there may be too much environmental disturbance if the line is buried in this area. However, the burden of proof is on the company to prove this.”

H1N1 update: 3 confirmed cases in Polk

No cases in Burnett; school closings no longer necessary at this time

BURNETT/POLK COUNTIES - The alarm over the spread of the H1N1 virus nationwide has subsided this past week, even as numbers of diagnosed cases continues to grow. In Wisconsin, the number of confirmed cases of the virus quadrupled this past week and as of Tuesday stood at 496. That includes three confirmed cases in Polk County - all in the Clayton School District and all related to one family, several members of which contracted the flu at a family gathering. The grandparents had retured in midApril from a trip to Mexico, feeling ill, and apparently passed on the virus to most of the family members at the gathering, some of whom were from Minnesota. The first family member to be diagnosed with H1N1 resulted in the Clayton School District closing its doors for three days. No further school closings are expected, however. Local health agencies are following the lead of the national Center for Disease Control. “The CDC is not recommending further school closures based on the fact the virus at this point isn’t any more se-

vere than the seasonal flue we normally see,” said Jennifer Swenson of the Polk County Health Department. “They are advising local health departments to continue to work with local schools and if the percentage of illness gets too severe the local health department will come up with some kind of a (school) closure system.” All three of the Clayton students diagnosed with H1N1 are recovering and none of them required hospitalization, Swenson noted. Meanwhile the Burnett County Department of Health and Human Services and St. Croix Tribal Health Clinic also continue to monitor the H1N1 virus but have seen no probable cases yet. Parents of school-aged children are recommended to pay close attention to influenza-like symptoms. If a child has symptoms, they are to stay home and not attend school or go into the community except to seek medical care for at least seven days from the onset of symptoms or for 24 hours after symptoms resolve. Symptoms include fever, headache, body aches, sore throat, congestion and cough. - Gary King RIGHT: A chart outlining H1N1 flu cases in Wisconsin as of Tuesday. from wpr.org

Business restructuring Jericho Trucking of Frederic has decided to restructure their over-the-road trucking business, selling off some of their trucks and trailers, becoming smaller with more control for a higher level of service. Frederic Truck and Trailer continues to be open, selling parts and doing repairs on semi trucks and trailers. – Photo by Ed Berdal


PAGE 4 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 13, 2009

Ignorance leads some to foreclosure abyss

Hraychuck holds town hall meetings to get input on housing crisis from citizens

by Priscilla Bauer GRANTSBURG – State Rep. Ann Hraychuck thanked those who came to Grantsburg Senior Center on Monday evening to talk about foreclosures for attending, then asked for their thoughts and ideas on the crisis. Several of those attending the town hall meeting shared the same view of those people facing foreclosures: people became heavily in debt due to little or no financial management skills. This lack of understanding had people taking out mortgages on homes they couldn’t really afford, leading them to a foreclosure abyss. Coming with Hraychuck to hear the citizen’s comments was state Assembly Majority Leader Thomas Nelson. “I brought Thomas with me because it is important to bring people from Madison up here so they can listen to what people have to say,” Hraychuck told Community Bank the group. “It’s a real President Ted Gerber challenge,” explained Hraychuck. “I’m outnumbered by Milwaukee and Madison and our voices need to be heard.” Hraychuck said for this reason she helped form the Rural Caucus, which is made up of senators and representatives from rural areas. The group meets once a week to talk about issues important to their districts. “We are doing everything we can to have an influence,” Hraychuck told the group. “The rural caucus is in constant communications with the state’s joint finance committee.” Nelson said part of his responsibilities as majority leader is to spend time crisscrossing the state attending meetings such as this. “It is a very important part of my

by Sherill Summer BURNETT COUNTY - Burnett County Sheriff Dean Roland discussed some department setbacks at a public safety committee meeting held at the government center last Thursday, May 7. The second chief deputy candidate that the sheriff’s department had offered a job to declined the job offer last week. The position has been vacant since December when former Chief Deputy Don Taylor retired. After the first candidate declined to take the job, reportedly because the poor hous-

Thomas Wisconsin Assembly Leader

job.” “We need geographic diversity. The Rural Caucus is very important in the b u d g e t process,” said Nelson. Although the focus of the meeting was foreclosures, Hraychuck and Nelson comNelson, mented, when State asked if they Majority could give an update on the state’s own fi-

nancial crisis. “This is the toughest budget in state history,” said Nelson as to how the state budget was coming along. Nelson said the state’s deficit has climbed to $7.5 billion. “All but three states are going through this crisis,” added Nelson. “The budget crisis and the economic crisis have a common link. The solution is getting people back to work,” Nelson told those attending. “It is very important to stay focused on the issues of foreclosures and unemployment.” Hraychuck said she is part of the Speakers Task Force on Prevention, which will be addressing the problem of foreclosures. Hraychuck said people from all around the state and in all walks of life would be part of the task force, which will travel to town meetings such as this to listen and look for solutions. “I don’t have all the answers and the task force doesn’t either,” stated Hraychuck. “But collectively, I think we can come up with solutions.” Burnett County Sheriff Dean Roland was also present at the meeting. Roland said since January there have been 50 foreclosures in Burnett County with about half the houses foreclosed on due to the owners getting overextended and the other half happened because of lost employment and hard luck. Hraychuck asked the group for their thoughts regarding enacting legislation, as a solution to the problem, saying she didn’t think the legislation was the answer. “We have enough laws.” Bob Anderson, a realtor in Luck, said he felt credit was made too easy and said he didn’t think state and counties were doing

enough to help those facing foreclosures. “It has to be a broader approach to the problem.” Anderson also suggested the need to educate young people about how to manage money while they were still Rep. Ann Hraychuck in high school. Anderson said people needed professionals with a financial background to counsel them on finding a way out. “Counselors used to be the local lender,” commented Ted Gerber of Community Bank in response to Anderson’s remarks. “We’ve gotten away from that,” Gerber said, noting he does a lot of financial counseling both in his job and in social situations. Gerber said many mortgages are not originated locally but through mortgage brokers operating in other states. Gerber asked Sheriff Roland how many of the 50 Burnett County foreclosures were through local lenders, to which Roland said none were locally made. “The problem needs to be addressed early. People need to get to someone to talk to before it gets to 15 days before foreclosure,” Gerber said. “The last thing Community Bank wants is to kick someone out of their home. We will work with people and if they show good faith we will do what we can to help them stay in their home. Negotiations depend on who is holding the mortgage,” Gerber told the group. Bob Blake, who came from the Indian Creek area for the meeting, stated he had been through the foreclosure process firsthand. “Everything is negotiable in foreclosures, I know, I’ve been Burnett County through it.” Eldon Blake cau- Supervisor

Freese

Piled on the sheriff’s desk

ing market made relocating to Burnett County impractical, the county decided to conduct a new search instead of offering the job to another applicant. Roland said that’s because considerable time has elapsed since applicants applied. None of the original applicants applied the second time, and a new top candidate was chosen, but this candidate unexpectedly declined the job offer last week, the same week he was expected to begin his new job. Roland and the county administrator Candace Fitzgerald, has not decided how

tioned about creating legislation to solve the problem. “You have to be careful about injecting other factors into the relationship between lenders and borrowers. If you do it lenders will be less likely to lend, making it more difficult to borrow.” Speaking to the idea of legislation, Gerber stated banks are already extremely regulated and that mortgage brokers were not under the same scrutiny. “If you are going to legislate, start with them,” said Gerber. Gerber talked about people’s misuse of their “financial lifelines.” “People used to have two financial lifelines, their home equity and their 401(k) plans. They have been using their home equity for other Luck realtor, Bob purchases and now have lost Anderson 401(k) money. They have gotten a double whammy.” County board Supervisor Eldon Freese spoke about how the wide reaching effects foreclosures have on families, citing increases in substance abuse and domestic violence. Freese said these increases in social problems come at a time when funds are being cut for human service programs. Freese asked Roland if his department is seeing increases in domestic abuse, to which Roland said yes, they were. Roland then commented on another consequence of the financial crisis he has been seeing. “There has been a huge increase in fraud. People are not thinking logically and many try one of these. No matter how much we talk to people about watching out for these schemes people are still getting involved.” “They are desperate,” said Hraychuck. “There are just so many spokes in this wheel.” Hraychuck concluded the meeting by once again thanking those for attending and stating she would be working on setting up another meeting in the future to continue the foreclosure discussion.

they will resume the search for chief deputy now that they find themselves back at the beginning for the second time. The mutual aid agreement between the St. Croix Tribal Police Department and the sheriff’s department has not been finalized. After months of work, the sheriff reported that he is not satisfied with the agreement yet, and “little things” still need to be changed. The sheriff has reported that the sides were close to finalizing the wording for several months now, but has not elaborated on what the little differences are. Wisconsin Attorney General J.B. Van

Hollen gave an opinion on Oct. 1, 2008, that disrupted the mutual aid the St. Croix Tribal Police Department and other tribal police departments in the state customarily gave to other law enforcement departments. The Leader reported in January that at least two other counties, Bayfield and Sawyer, had come to an acceptable agreement restoring mutual aid between county sheriff’s departments and tribal police departments.

Two men drown when boat overturns on Lake Wapogasset

Neither wearing life vests; third person swims to safety

AMERY – The bodies of two Polk County men were recovered from Lake Wapogasset last Thursday morning, May 7. According to Polk County Sheriff Tim Moore, Joshua Meline, 28, Deer Park, and Travis Foss, 27, rural Amery, drowned after their boat capsized in the middle of Lake Wapogasset just after midnight.

A third person in the boat, Cassandra Meyers, 19, Deer Park, swam to shore and alerted authorities following the accident. Sheriff Moore said the two men were not wearing life vests and that one of them did not know how to swim. He said alcohol was involved. According to a press release from the sheriff’s department, Meyers called authorities at approximately 3:26 a.m. and said the two men were missing. She said their boat had overturned for unknown reasons. She had fallen asleep and she awoke to find herself in the water with a

life preserver around her arm, and she swam for what she believed was about 20 minutes. Once on shore, she said she traveled by foot about a mile and arrived at a residence where she used the phone to contact a friend on the lake. Once back to the original starting point on the lake, she dialed 911. A search was conducted after sunrise using a DNR boat with “side searching sonar.” The boat was located in 24 feet of water. A combination of underwater cameras, sonar and the Interstate Dive Team from Clear Lake, helped located the bodies at approximately 10 a.m.

The boat, an older 14-foot Starcraft aluminum fishing boat, and two additional life preservers were recovered from the scene. The two bodies were taken to the Williamson-White Funeral Home in Amery. Responding to the scene and helping in the rescue were the Amery Fire Department, Amery Police, Amery Ambulance, Polk County Sheriff’s Department and the DNR. – Gary King with information from Polk County Sheriff’s Department


MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 5

P O L K

C O U N T Y

H E A D L I N E S

GAM board ordered to comply with county rules

Special meeting airs issues with finance office

by Gregg Westigard BALSAM LAKE – The agenda for a special meeting of the Golden Age Manor board Tuesday, May 12, included one item of business, coordination of efforts. It might have been labeled conflict resolution or improvements in communications. Jeff Fuge, the county’s corporation counsel, sent a two-page letter to the GAM board on April 20 which outlined a number of concerns regarding GAM financial issues. The GAM Board reportedly discussed the letter in closed session at its May 4 special meeting and decided to hold an open meeting to talk about the concerns. There was a full table plus a number of onlookers at the meeting Tuesday. At the table were GAM Board members Bob Dueholm, Patricia Schmidt, Gerald Newville, Robert Blake and David Ollman. Joining them were GAM Adminis-

trator Gary Taxdahl and staff, county board Chair Bryan Beseler, Finance Director Tonya Weinert, employee relations director Andrea Jerrick and Fuge. Five county board members, Herschel Brown, Kathy Keinholz, Brian Masters, Neil Johnson and Jim Edgell were also present. Fuge’s letter was direct and raised three specific concerns. Those were: 1) Contrary to a county board resolution, GAM continues to fail to provide finance the information needed to process vouchers, 2) GAM has not cooperated with the finance director on the annual audit and has mislead the finance director regarding some information, and 3) GAM has responded “untimely, and in some cases, not at all” to requests from the finance director for information. Fuge added that the chair of the GAM Board (Dueholm) has “exacerbated the requests for information.” Fuge then instructs the GAM governing board to manage the nursing home in compliance with county board resolutions and instructs the GAM Board to direct the GAM staff to answer the requests from the finance director com-

pletely and in a timely manner. The meeting started with a statement from Supervisor Brian Masters, a member of the finance committee. He said that the issues go back to October of 2008 and were raised in two county board resolutions in January. “Why do you continue to fight the rest of the board?” Masters asked. “I don’t understand why. This should have been resolved eight months ago. It is time to stop the dispute and start working with the board.” Dueholm said he called the meeting to resolve the issues in a constructive way and in an open manner. He asked for a civil discussion of the differences between GAM and the finance office. The meeting was a long discussion of some specific issues as examples of the lack of compliance and cooperation. Much of that discussion seemed to relate to communications; when was an e-mail sent or a phone call made, when was it responded to, was the response complete the first time. There were comments and statements made by some of the participants that seemed to express their thoughts.

“I have tried to stay out of this issue,” Beseler said. “I have tried to get people to come together on the same page. Is it getting better? Yes. Are there still problems? Yes.” “There have been lots of discussions about letting bygones be bygones regarding GAM,” Newville said. “That can be laughed at. I ask that we all grow up. Finance talks a good game but it doesn’t practice that. If you want cooperation, let’s cooperate.” Dueholm said that, “adding the power of financial auditor (to the finance director) means she is all-powerful and can’t be questioned.” “I disagree that I am moving ahead without talking,” Weinert responded. “I need details. I have offered my assistance. I don’t know what to do to make the situation better.” With a statement that communications is more than a one way street, the meeting ended with talk of more working together. The topic will come up again at the finance committee meeting Wednesday afternoon, May 13, when Dueholm has asked to be on the agenda to talk about other finance issues.

County board may get new member

Highway/lime merger on meeting agenda

by Gregg Westigard BALSAM LAKE – The Polk County Board may be back at full strength after the monthly meeting Tuesday, May 19. The appointment of a new supervisor for District 12 is one of the first items on the agenda. Resolutions up for consideration include the merger of the lime quarry to the highway department and borrowing

to make improvements at Golden Age Manor. A policy change would give more power to the executive committee. The meeting starts at 6:30 p.m. at the Government Center Building in Balsam Lake and is open to the public. The District 12 seat has been vacant since Pat Messicci resigned in January. Board Chair Bryan Beseler initially appointed former board member Duana Bremer to the spot, but she withdrew her name prior to the April board meeting. As of press time, Beseler has not announced who will nominate this time. District 12 includes the village and town of Clayton and portions of the towns of

Lincoln and Clear Lake. The merging of the lime quarry into the highway department was one of two department consolidations recommended by the executive committee in April. The quarry is located in Alden and now run as a separate county enterprise. A date has not been set for action on the second possible merger, that of the health and human services departments. The executive committee, composed of the county board chair and the chairs of the 10 governing committees and boards, has the duty of issuing guidance to the departments at the start of the annual budget and staffing process. Under

a proposed change, the executive committee would issue directives to the departments and committees. Golden Age Manor, the county’s nursing home in Amery, will get the funding required to start making some capital improvements if a borrowing resolution is passed. The county would secure a loan of up to $315,000 from the state trust fund for the replacement of windows, new carpeting and a new timekeeping system. All county board meetings start with a period for public comment and end with reports from the governing committees.

Stimulus funding helps Unity’s budget

Play equipment in Cody Ward’s memory to be donated to school

by Mary Stirrat BALSAM LAKE – Additional information now available regarding stimulus funding, retirements, insurance and enrollment numbers at Unity School have provided a brighter outlook for the 200910 budget, district Administrator Brandon Robinson told the school board at its May 12 meeting. The district anticipates a budget shortfall of $338,043, with an estimated $550,000 in increased expenses and only an estimated $211,957 in increased revenue. Proposed reductions of $120,000, consisting of a $50,000 adjustment in open-enrollment projections, a $50,000 reduction in the site-improvement budget, and a $20,000 reduction in the technology budget, brings the shortfall to $218,000. New information, said Robinson, indicates that $105,000 in stimulus funding, targeted for reading and math, preschool and special education, can be applied to this shortfall. The $105,000 will be applied to the special education inter-fund transfer, which is general fund money that is used to cover deficits in the special education program. This will free up $105,000 from the general fund to be used for other purposes. Proposed staffing reductions will cover the remaining $113,043 shortfall, with a 50-percent reduction for one certified staff person, saving $38,647 and

the elimination of two support staff, saving $80,100. “In addition,” said Robinson, “there will be two layoffs of elementary teachers, due to enrollment considerations, but they will likely be recalled when enrollment numbers become more solidified over the summer.” Stimulus funds, noted Robinson, provide a one-year reprieve. “There remains an effort to reduce other costs,” he said. “District insurance research and comparisons, along with the performance contracting efforts, may produce additional savings in the future.” Unity’s allocations through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act consist of $97,315 for Title I (reading and math), $227,332 for IDEA (special education) and $10,748 for preschool special education. Playground equipment Staff, students and families at Unity have come together to raise money in memory of Cody Ward, a second-grader who was hit by a car and killed last October. Those who raised the $4,000 would like to use it to buy play equipment for the elementary playground, elementary Principal Wayne Whitwam told the board. Tentative plans are to purchase a 4- or 8-foot-high, S-shaped climbing wall, to be installed by volunteers. A plaque will be placed on the piece, saying that it was donated in Cody’s memory. Whitwam and the board discussed liability issues regarding the proposed equipment and the options for a surface under the equipment. “This is what they’d like,” said Whit-

wam, “but they were pretty open.” He said that the fundraisers chose three possible pieces of equipment, then asked Cody’s classmates for their opinion. The climbing wall was the most popular, he said. It is designed for children ages five through 12. Summer projects A list of nine maintenance projects to be completed by June 23 was approved by the board. Each of the projects is included in the 2008-09 budget. The projects were awarded as follows: Middle school gym/auditorium roof replacement, to be done June 8-23, $63,000, Paul’s Sheet Metal of Rice Lake; Pool painting, to be done May 23 June 14, $15,000, Top Painting, Centuria; Pool changing rooms renovation, to be done May 23 - June 23, $9,260, Wissota Supply, Prescott; Middle school gym floor replacement, June 1 - July 7 with another two weeks for curing, $67,260, Baseman Flooring, Appleton; High school gym floor refinishing, June 1 - July 7 with another two weeks to cure, $11,500, Baseman Flooring, Appleton; Flooring replacement in five classrooms, June 8 - 23, $12,508, Kemis Carpet and Flooring, Luck; Sidewalk and curb replacement, June 8 - 23, $26,270, Swede’s Masonry, Centuria; Asphalt replacement at elementary playground, June 8-23, $37,850, Asphalt Associates, Roberts; Asphalt replacement on high school driveway, June 8-23, $26,500, Asphalt Associates, Roberts.

Election of officers Board members elected their officers for the 2009-10 school year, with Debbie Peterson re-elected to the position of president. James Beistle was re-elected as vice president and Dave Moore as treasurer. Kelly Bakke was elected clerk. Other business • The board approved the hiring of Beth Trudeau as high school tennis coach and Lori Anderson as high school crosscountry coach. The resignation of district bookkeeper Twila Sikkink was accepted. • The board approved a shared-services agreement with CESA No. 11 to hire Nicole Krause on a 200-day contract as school psychologist. Her time will be shared with the Prairie Farm School District. • An agreement with CESA No. 11 was also approved that directs CESA No. 11 to assist with planning and implementing the technical and fiscal activities associated with stimulus funding for Title I. CESA No. 11 will charge 4.95 percent of the stimulus funding received for the program. • The 2009-12 technology plan was approved by the board, with district Administrator Brandon Robinson stating, “It acts as a roadmap. It’s not necessarily a blueprint. We don’t necessarily know what our students will need in three years.” The plan was developed, in part, using results of a survey of students and staff. Board member Kelly Bakke noted that the survey indicated that staff members desire more training in use of technology.


PAGE 6 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 13, 2009

P O L K

C O U N T Y

H E A D L I N E S

Frederic Village supports concept of pool joint ownership

Children attending Frederic Library story time during May will learn about community workers, and they were excited to have Officer Jesse Kohls of the Frederic Police Department read to them May 6. After story time, the children were invited to have a close-up look at the police department’s squad car, see its flashing lights and listen to its loud siren. – Photo submitted

property owner/taxpayer in the village of Frederic, I would certainly not be troubled by that,” Wondra answered. “I think this is just the beginning of the discussion,” Trustee Kerry Brendel stated. After more discussion, a motion was made and passed that the village board supports the concept of a joint ownership of the pool with the school. Revolving loan fund resolution The funds from the town’s revolving loan fund will be combined with those of other communities and given to West Central Regional Planning to run. The money in the loan fund goes to help businesses get started in communities. WWTP update At the April meeting, it was discussed that the wastewater treatment plant may receive a stimulus package to cover half of the costs to cover the lagoons. In further research, Wondra and Public Works decided it better to wait and do more research on what needs to be done and on the costs. The stimulus package would have to be used by June 30, making the village come up with the other half of $1.3 million. Other business • Frederic Family Days permits and licenses were passed for June 19-21. • St. Croix Regional Medical Center asked for a donation for the salad luncheon fundraiser to be held at St. Croix Falls High School on June 12. • The annexation of the White property was handed over to lawyer Dave Grindell for review, along with two other sale properties.

BEULAH SAMO Is Celebrating Her

90TH BIRTHDAY Wednesday, May 20

Birthday cards can be sent to her:

1215 207th St. St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 She would love to receive your card and best wishes.

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Officer Kohls at the Frederic Library

Superintendent Jerry Tischer about having the school and village having joint ownership and then seating an operational board to run the pool. According to Wondra, Tischer sounded pretty open to the idea. “We can’t answer questions on how we fund this - on the village side what it would cost - because we’re really not there yet, but if we can provide the Friends of the Pool with direction, saying there will be joint ownership on the village side …” Wondra said. “I wouldn’t recommend the village at this point heading ownership. I think we need to work with the school on this.” “I don’t know that it would be appropriate to ask the board to commit,” Wondra added. “I think it would be appropriate to ask the village to commit to the concept of joint ownership so they can go on the record if they wish to do this tonight.” “It’s not really without precedent,” trustee William Johnson IV commented. “We have a hockey rink that’s on school property and various sort of informal joint ventures already.” “The amount of work that the Friends of the Pool have done – it’s pretty impressive,” Trustee Brad Harlander said. “I think they’re really well-organized and they put a lot of effort into it. I commend the group for what they have done and whatever we can do to facilitate it. I would say there’s obviously no problem with the concept.” Wondra acknowledged that there are still many questions to be answered, including President Phil Knuf’s, on tax amounts to the village property owners. “A lot of times municipalities have to step up and show leadership. This helps, as Maria said, build a community. As a

OPEN HOUSE WEDDING RECEPTION Jason & Nalani Desjardins

Sunday, May 17, 2009 2 - 8 p.m. at the Frederic Country Club

Tuesday, May 19, at 12:45 p.m.

The Frederic Public Library presents the comedy-juggling duo

In Capable

Hands

id s s ! k r Fo l l age of a

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for us, because we are a nonprofit organization, is that we can’t give the money back if large donors come on board.” Representatives from the village board, the school board and Friends of the Pool had met previously, and a discussion was started about joint ownership of the pool by the village and the school. Ammend opened a discussion during the May meeting with the village board to ask questions and comment on having a joint ownership of the pool with the school. Village Administrator Dave Wondra spoke of a discussion he had with school

Frederic Elementary School

Adm i s i s F R Es i o n E

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Steve Russell and Kobi Shaw have performed at Disney World, Disneyland and all over the world. This event is brought to you on behalf of the public library Summer Reading Program, Be Creative At Your Library.

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by Brenda Sommerfeld FREDERIC – Frederic Village Trustee Maria Ammend spoke to fellow trustees as president of the Friends of the Pool organization during the monthly village board meeting, Monday, May 11. Ammend explained what the organization has been up to for the past year. She stated they have been getting serious about fundraising but have come to a roadblock with many questions of ownership. “We really can’t continue on with proposals and grants, we feel, without that piece of ownership commitment there,” Ammend said. “The biggest constraint


ICAA awarded federal funds for distribution The Indianhead Community Action Agency has been awarded $6,244 in federal funds through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act BURNETT COUNTY – The Indianhead Community Action Agency has been chosen to receive and distribute the funds for Burnett County. The selection was made by a national board that is chaired by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency and consists of representatives, American Red Cross, Catholic Charities, Salvation Army, United Way and more. This is to expand the capacity of food and shelter programs in high-need areas around the country. The local emergency food and shelter program board will determine how the funds awarded to the Indianhead Community Action Agency are to be distributed among the local agencies that will

MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 7

qualify. The local board is responsible for recommending agencies to receive these funds, made available through the ARRA. Under the terms of the grants from the national board, local agencies chosen to receive funds must: 1. Be private, voluntary nonprofits or units of government, 2. Be eligible to receive federal funds, 3. Have an accounting system, 4. Practice nondiscrimination, 5. Have demonstrated the capability to deliver emergency food and/or shelter programs, and 6. If they are a private voluntary organization, they must have a voluntary board. Qualifying agencies are urged to apply. The Indianhead Community Action Agency has worked with many other agencies in the area. Some of the agencies they have worked with were responsible for providing meals and nights lodging. If you are interested in applying, please contact Mary Andrea, outreach specialist at the Indianhead CAA, P.O. Box 480, Webster, WI 54893 or call 715-866-8151 for an application. Deadline for application is May 20. – from ICAA

Tribal dispatch center remains open, for now

by Sherill Summer HERTEL - Gaming revenue from the St. Croix Tribe’s two casinos is down in this economic downturn, and the tribal council already has been forced to cut services to adjust to the reduced revenue. One money-saving idea considered by the council was to close the dispatch center located in the tribal police department. The dispatch center remains open, for now, because tribal police Chief Frank

Taylor and his office administrator, Jennifer Brugman, have applied for an Office of Judicial Assistance grant of more than $600,000, money they hope will fund the dispatch operations for two years. OJA has received federal stimulus money that is to be used for public safety projects. Taylor commented on Brugman’s work in putting together an excellent grant application, an application they hope will be accepted. The department will know by July 1 if they have received the grant or not. As of now, it is unknown if the dispatch center can remain open without the grant.

Sex offender faces new charges by Sherill Summer BURNETT COUNTY - Convicted sex offender Adam Hess, 23, was scheduled to be released to Burnett County a month ago when the maximum time allowed at Mendota Mental Health Institute expired. Hess was serving time there for a 2002 charge of causing a child between 13 and 18 years old to view sexual activity. In July of 2002, when former the Grantsburg resident was 17 years old, he was accused of indecent exposure at the girls public bathroom at Crooked Lake Park in Siren. He pled not guilty due to mental disease or defect to the charge later that year and was placed in a mental health institute by former Burnett County Circuit Judge Michael Gableman. The maximum placement that Gableman could have imposed for the charge is 80 months, equal to two-thirds the maximum prison sentence if he were sent to a prison. An additional charge of exposing genitalia to a child was dismissed. Hess was not released into Burnett

County because two days prior to his scheduled release, Judge James Babbitt ordered Burnett County to pursue protective placement and guardianship for Hess under Adam Hess Chapter 55. Without Chapter 55, Hess would have been released without any supervision. Now it seems that Hess’ release into Burnett County may be further delayed as he is now facing two new charges of fourth-degree sexual assault in Dane County. The reported offense date of the misdemeanor charges are May 1, 2008, and Aug. 18, 2008, both dates were when he was still confined to the mental health institute which is located in Dane County. His initial court appearance to face the new charges is Thursday, May 14.

Keep up with news about where you live. Inter-County Leader. Since 1933.

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PAGE 8 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 13, 2009

L e a d e r Results from last week’s poll:

We b Po l l

This week’s question Brett Favre should: 1. Stay retired 2. Sign with the Vikings 3. I have no interest in this issue at all To take part in our poll, go to www.theleader.net and scroll down to the lower left portion of the screen

J o e H e l l e r

F O R U M Staycations

More vacationers are expected at Wisconsin’s state parks this summer, according to an article this week on Wisconsin Public Radio. The poor economy is one reason. We dream of vacation destinations that are half a world away, but in reality, we can only afford to visit the family or attractions maybe a half state away. Burnett and Polk nature and history lovers are pretty lucky, actually. We have some state and national parks and other attractions that are worth a second or third or fourth visit – or maybe in some cases – a first visit. And they are within a half an hour’s drive for most of us. Interstate Park at St. Croix Falls is an amazing place to visit and explore. The rock formations, trails and river – can make for a great family outing – and there’s always somewhere in the park that makes you feel like you’re the only person in the park. Disney and the Coen brothers have chosen it to film movie scenes. Great destination. Crex Meadows, where they used to cut the grass to make carpets years ago, is a bird lover’s paradise – and a photographers playground – with swans, geese and hundreds of other species of wildlife in a natural habitat – on display all year round. There are picnic areas in the park and an impressive visitors center for information on how best to enjoy the wildlife area. Not far from there is Governor Knowles State Park, along the St. Croix River, which offers camping and easy access to the river for canoeing and fishing. Straight Lake State Park is the new kid on the block. Located north of Luck and about 3.5 miles east of Hwy. 35 via 270th Avenue, the 2,700-acre site is – according to our governor – “one of Wisconsin's best places – a pristine natural area with beauty that is second to none.” That’s a good review. Forts Folle Avoine Historical Park between Webster and Danbury (four miles west on CTH U from Hwy. 35) – brings history to life with the re-creation of a trading post that sat on the banks of the Yellow River a few centuries ago. There are some great events lined up for the summer, but just a spontaneous visit to the Forts is worth the time. There is the Ice Age Trail for hikers and nature lovers, an impressive museum at Balsam Lake (see John Phillips Sousa’s gloves and an exhibit on Burleigh Grimes, the baseball Hall of Famer from Clear Lake), and several other destinations you can find by visiting each county’s Web site (www.burnettcounty.com and www.polkcountytourism.com). And while you’re enjoying the outdoors you might consider catching your own supper. That seems to be the plan for quite a few of us. The DNR reports sales of fishing licenses are up 16 percent over last year.

EMS Week & Law Enforcement Memorial

May brings attention to some key elements to our communities, notably National EMS Week, an opportunity for us to recognize the commitment EMS workers and volunteers put into their job, every minute of every day. Local EMS services seem to get better every year - with better and increased training, better medicine and better response time, which translates into better survival rates for those of us who end up needing those services. A letter to the editor from Dr. R.J. Frascone, medical director for Ramsey Medical Center’s EMS department, sums it up nicely: “I see hundreds of patients every year who are alive today thanks to the skill, judgment and quick action of EMS professionals,” he notes. Also this week, law enforcement personnel who lost their lives while on duty will be honored as part of National Law Enforcement Memorial Day. Burnett County does an outstanding job with their memorial service, which will be held Thursday at noon the government center in Siren. And all law enforcement in Polk, Barron and Dunn counties have been invited to a short program at the Clear Lake Veterans Memorial this Friday, May 15 at 1 p.m. There will be a short service remembering Armed Forces Day and Law Enforcement Memorial Day, and officers who have given their lives in the performance of their duties.

Hard lesson

Views expressed on these pages do not necessarily represent those of the Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association management or board

Where to Write

President Barack Obama 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Washington, D.C. 20500 www.whitehouse.gov/contact/ Governor Jim Doyle P.O. Box 7863, Madison, WI 53707 wisgov@mail.state.wi.us

Congressman David Obey (7th District) 2462 Rayburn Office Bldg. Washington, D.C. 20515 or Federal Building, Wausau, WI 54401 (715) 842-5606 Rep. Nick Milroy (73rd District) Room 221 North, State Capitol P.O. Box 8952, Madison 53708 E-mail: rep.milroy@legis.state.wi.us

T h e

Rep. Ann Hraychuck (28th District) State Capitol, P.O. Box 8942 Madison, WI 53708 Phone: 608-267-2365 • Toll free: 888-529-0028 In-district: 715-485-3362 rep.hraychuck@ legis.state.wi.us

Rep. Mary Hubler (75th District) Room 7 North, State Capitol P.O. Box 8952, Madison, WI 53708 or 1966 21-7/8 St., Rice Lake 54868 (715) 234-7421• (608) 266-2519 rep.hubler@legis.state.wi.us U.S. Senator Herb Kohl 330 Hart Senate Office Bldg. Washington, D.C. 20510 senator_kohl@kohl.senate.gov

Senator Robert Jauch (25th District) Room 19 South, State Capitol P.O. Box 788, Madison, WI 53707 E-mail: Sen.Jauch@legis.state.wi.us Senator Sheila Harsdorf (10th District) State Capitol, P.O. Box 7882 Madison, WI 53707 (608) 266-7745 • (715) 232-1390 Toll-free - 1-800-862-1092 sen.harsdorf@legis.state.wi.us U.S. Sen. Russ Feingold SDB 40, Rm. 1, Washington, D.C. 20510 or 1600 Aspen Commons Middleton, WI 53562-4716 (608) 828-1200 senator@feingold.senate.gov

Last week’s tragic event on Lake Wapogasset in Amery in which two young men lost their lives when their boat overturned, leads us to a few observations, most of all the apparent fact neither of the young men had been wearing life vests. A young woman, who swam to shore, said she had the benefit of a life vest that may have accidentally ended up around her arm when the boat overturned and all three were tossed into the water. Other life jackets were recovered, meaning apparently they were in the boat – but just not being worn – when the accident occurred. Condolences to the families of the young men are foremost on everyone’s mind. And then may come the lesson learned from tragedy for the rest of us. Use caution and wear a life vest when you venture out on the water. All unsigned editorials by editor Gary King

From the first issue of the Inter-County Leader, November 2, 1933 “...stock has been sold with the understanding that this is to be a cooperative-owned paper serving the best interest of the common people, whether they be farmers, professional men or business men. The welfare of one group should mean the welfare of the other groups...”

I n t e r ! C o u n t y

Bennie Bye, editor

L e a d e r

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MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 9

Letters t o t h e e d i t o r Best of EMS

The 35W bridge collapse and the Hugo tornado last spring are dramatic examples of the heroism of first responders. They include the emergency medical technicians who are first on the scene to provide medical care to victims of an emergency, accident or natural or human-made disaster. We all admire them when there’s an event that makes headlines. But they perform heroic acts every day that deserve recognition. That’s why on Tuesday, May 19, Regions Hospital Emergency Medical Services will hold it annual Rig Wash to honor emergency personnel throughout the Twin Cities and western Wisconsin. As the medical director for a Level 1 trauma center, I see hundreds of patients every year who are alive today thanks to the skill, judgment and quick action of EMS professionals. The Twin Cities and western Wisconsin is fortunate to have among the finest EMS providers in the nation. This is National EMS Week and a great opportunity for us all to salute these heroes among us. RJ Frascone, MD, medical director Regions Hospital Emergency Medical Services St. Paul, Minn.

Sharing good news Sharing good news is always fun, especially today. Turn on the news and it is all about the crumbling economy, foreclosures and greed. Working with-in the senior care and services environment where most of our funding comes from state and federal agencies, we are one of the highest regulated services/businesses in the United States. Because of that funding, surprise and sometime scheduled visits from various state or federal agencies occur annually for the purpose of conducting surveys to make sure we are in compliance with the many state and federal regulations and codes. Within 15 days in April, three of our campus locations were visited by four separate regulatory agencies to conduct onsite surveys. On April 7, we were visited by the Division of Quality Assurance for our senior Assisted Living Apartments. We received no deficiencies and are in full compliance with Wisconsin Administrative Code DHS 89 for our on campus Assisted Living Program! On April 9, we were visited by the Wisconsin Housing Economic Department of Administration for River Town Heights HUD Apartments. This complex is managed by Good Samaritan Society – St. Croix Valley and offers affordable housing for seniors in St. Croix Falls. We received no deficiencies and are in full compliance with HAP HUD 202 Administrative Code! On April 13 and 14, we were visited by the DQA regarding our annual Federal and State Medicare/Medicaid and Life Safety Code surveys for our skilled long-term care facility. We received no deficiencies and are in full compliance with HFS 132 Administrative Code! On April 27 and 28, we were visited by the Department of Housing and Urban Development for Forest Heights HUD Apartments. This complex is also managed by Good Samaritan Society – St. Croix Valley and offers affordable housing for seniors in St. Croix Falls. The surveyor found the property to be well-maintained and the files to be in good order. Final results and rating will arrive sometime in May. We thank all of you who have supported us over the past 40 years. We especially thank our staff who cares for our residents, tenants, and clients seven days a week. Their attention to quality care in all of our locations definitely makes a difference in the lives of those we care for. Wade Reddy, administrator Good Samaritan Society – St. Croix Valley St. Croix Falls

Need stimulus package

After an exhausting attempt at fundraising for the St. Croix Falls Senior Graduation Lock-In Party on May 29, there is still a large shortfall in the budget. This annual party is a chance for the graduates to enjoy their friends one last time before saying goodbye. They have a chance to play Blackjack and other games, get hypnotized, have a massage and many other activities, all in a safe and sober environment. Between the activities, they eat, reminisce, eat, listen to music, eat some more, then go home at sunrise with a fantastic door prize. This very worthwhile event does cost money, however. Historically, local businesses in the St. Croix Falls area have financed a large portion of this event. But with the struggling economy, the SCF senior class is asking citizens of the community to provide a stimulus package of their own, so as to not put as much pressure on our business leaders. If you would like to help, please send your donation to: St. Croix Falls High School c/o St. Croix Falls Senior Lock-In 740 Maple Drive St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 Donations need to be received no later than Wednesday, May 27. Your assistance would be greatly appreciated. Attention parents of sophomores and juniors, if you would like to help at this event, you can call Shelley Skemp at the high school office, 715-483-9823, ext. 328. SCF Senior Class Lock-In Committee St. Croix Falls

Appropriate quote Seems an appropriate time to quote Samuel Adams, in a letter written Nov. 4, 1775: “Since private and public vices, are in reality, though not always apparently so nearly connected, of how much importance, how necessary is it, that the utmost pains be taken by the public, to have the Principles of Virtue early inculcated on the minds even of children, and the moral sense kept alive, and that the wise institutions of our ancestors for these great purposes be encouraged by the government. For no people will tamely surrender their liberties, nor can any be easily subdued, when knowledge is diffused and virtue is preserved. On the contrary, when people are universally ignorant, and debauched in their manners, they will sink under their own weight without the aid of foreign invaders.” Rita Luedtke Webb Lake

The poppy Our tribute to America’s war dead began in May 1918. America was engaged in a World War. For the first time, this country had joined forces with other nations to defend freedom. The young men of the American Expeditionary Forces faced a war in France more cruel than they could have imagined. They spent week after week crouched in trenches filled with rain, turning the frozen ground to mud. The spring breezes brought with them waves of mustard gas, and the smell of death. That same rain and warm sun that made conditions in the trenches so terrible also made the wild poppies grow. Field after field of poppies grew where so many had died. It was Nature’s memorial to lost friends and comrades. Those of us who have never been on a battlefield have no concept of what it was really like. Whether it was leaping out of those trenches, suffering in Korea, hitting the beach at Normandy, crawling through the rice paddies of Vietnam, fighting in Grenada, the Panama, Persian Gulf War, or the intense heat and constant bombing of Iraq. Losing a friend or fellow soldier takes a greater toll on that veteran than we can imagine. That’s why it is so important today, to remember to honor the dead and help the living. Poppy Days sends a message to America’s veterans of all wars that they are

Leighton Johnson’s Cadillac

It was finally time to move the decades-old Cadillac from its resting spot in Wood John Johnson’s hay field. Leighton Johnson and all his neighbors could no longer ignore the years’ worth of grass growing all around, under and up through its cream-colored body. Wood John Johnson had not sailed from Sweden and struggled to clear this field so that his soon-to-retire accountant of a great-grandson could turn it into a junkyard. Leighton knew that, but he dreamed of cruising the St. Croix River bluffs in his vintage Caddy. Instead, it sat decaying halfway up the hill between his home and River Road. Each fall, as people from the Cities drove by to see the colorful foliage, he imagined their comments: “Why would anyone destroy their view of the valley with a rusty old gas hog like that?” Crisp winds once again nicked the warm days of late summer. Still-farming neighbors cut a third hay crop around the Caddy, leaving it in an island of headed-out brown grass. Leighton drove his pickup down the hillside, keys in hand. Just a few squeezes of the graphite tube paved the way as his key slipped into the lock and the driver’s door opened. Struggling, Leighton hoisted the hulking hood and hooked up jumper cables. An immigrant’s stoic delight shone in his eyes as the engine turned over, sending just a tiny spark out of the chrome-plated respected for risking their lives to serve their country. It is a small item, these bright red flowers, but its purpose is great as an emblem of tribute. The act of wearing a poppy has great meaning to this nation. This is a very old and established program as veterans’ hands make these poppies, to help fund programs for others who follow. Today many promised benefit programs are underfunded and overwhelmed. All poppy funds received are returned to be used for Veteran Administration Hospitals, Christmas Gift Shop, Wisconsin Veterans and

Community Voices Lisa Doerr tailpipes. After disconnecting the jumper cables, Leighton drove back up to the house, leaving the car running to charge the battery. He picked up the phone to proudly tell Mike down at the shop that his Cadillac was finally ready to have the leather upholstery buffed up and a full paint job. Setting down the phone, Leighton looked fondly out the window at his made-in-America beauty. Unfortunately, the situation had changed drastically – orange flames engulfed the car! Carbon molecules stored for years in the unharvested grasses were exploding along with his half-baked fantasy. Adding to the picture was the town’s bright yellow fire truck - siren blazing - coming up River Road. Tears blurred the wry look on Leighton’s mortified face as he ran down the hill watching volunteer firemen unroll their hoses to douse his burnt-out hulk. Lisa Doerr lives with her husband, Ron Erickson, near Cushing, where she writes and trains Rocky Mountain gaited horses. (www.northernlakesfarm.com) families, Veterans Day and Cheer, Hospitals Treats and Camp American Legion. Volunteers will be on the street in the coming weeks, asking if you would like to help support this caring and honorable program. May we count on you again for your kind support? (A portion of this information was made available from the American Legion Magazine). LaVerna Petersen, president Dorothea M. Jensen, secretary-treasurer American Legion Auxiliary No. 249 Frederic

EMS professionals honored this week BURNETT/POLK COUNTIES - For 36 years, the American College of Emergency Physicians has been honoring medical personal who are on the front line of emergency care. This year’s theme, “A Proud Partner in Your Community,” illustrates the selflessness and commitment emergency medical professionals bring to their jobs every hour of every day of the year. Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College provides training for emergency medical technicians and paramedics. “We’re very proud of our EMS graduates and the service they provide to our communities,” said Associate Dean of EMS and Fire Steve Mackiewicz. “A majority of the EMS workers in this state do so out of a sense volunteerism, of giving something back to the cities and towns that they live in. “We’re also very proud of the role we play in the communities that we serve throughout the 11-county WITC district,” Mackiewicz added. “We provide the education and skills these students need to respond to emergencies and to help save lives. Wisconsin is a great state to live and work in. Our role in EMS and fire training in the WITC district makes it even more so by providing a stable workforce of EMTs and firefighters to serve our communities!” Nationally, there are around 1 million EMS professionals who provide lifesaving care to people in their communities. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the field is expected to grow 19 percent by the year 2016. To help meet the demand for qualified

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emergency personnel, Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College will be offering a new EMT-Paramedic program in fall. The EMT-paramedic program is a oneyear technical diploma that will offer an opportunity to further one’s professional EMS career. The program will prepare students with the knowledge and skills to work competently as an EMT-Paramedic. It offers additional certifications in advanced cardiac life support, prehospital trauma life support, pediatric advanced life support and neonatal resuscitation. The program consists of classroom lectures via IP Video and practical skills labs, laboratory simulations, and hospital and prehospital clinical experiences. There is limited space available at each of WITC’s four campuses, located at Ashland, New Richmond, Rice Lake and Superior. For more information regarding WITC’s EMT-paramedic or EMT-basic programs, contact admissions advisor Jen Ruid, 800-243-WITC or 715-234-7082, Ext. 5220. Or log on to witc.edu/academics. WITC serves the educational and career needs of more than 30,000 residents of northwestern Wisconsin each year. As one of four campuses in the district, WITC-Rice Lake offers career-focused associate degree programs, technical diplomas, customized training, and a wide array of courses for personal or career enrichment. WITC is a member of Wisconsin Technical College System. For more information, call 800-243-WITC or log onto witc.edu - from WITC

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Baucus’ raucus caucus Barack Obama appeared this week with health-industry bigwigs, proclaiming light at the end of the health-care tunnel. Among those gathered were executives from HMO giants Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and Health Net Inc., and the health-insurance lobbying group America's Health Insurance Plans; from the American Hospital Association and the American Medical Association; from medical-device companies; and from the pharmaceutical industry, including the president and CEO of Merck and former Rep. Billy Tauzin, now president and CEO of PhRMA, the massive industry lobbying group. They have pledged to voluntarily shave some $2 trillion off of U.S. health-care costs over 10 years. But these groups, which are heavily invested in the U.S. health-care status quo, have little incentive to actually make good on their promises. This is beginning to look like a replay of the failed 1993 health-care reform efforts led by then-first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton. Back then, the business interests took a hard line and waged a PR campaign, headlined by a fictitious middle-class couple, Harry and Louise, who feared a government-run healthcare bureaucracy. Still absent from the debate are advocates for single-payer, often referred to as the "Canadian-style" health care. Single-payer health care is not "socialized medicine." According to Physicians for

• "from: the insurance industry: $1,170,313 • health professionals: a National Health Program, $1,016,276 single-payer means "the gov• pharmaceuticals/healthernment pays for care that is products industry: $734,605 delivered in the private • hospitals/nursing homes: (mostly not-for-profit) sector." $541,891 A February CBS News poll • health services/HMOs: found that 59 percent in the $439,700." U.S. say the government That's almost $4 million from should provide national Amy Goodman the very industries that have the health insurance. most to gain or lose from Single-payer advocates health-care reform. have been protesting in Senate Finance Another of the Baucus 13, Russell Committee hearings, chaired by Democratic Montana Sen. Max Baucus. Last Mokhiber, co-founder of SinglePayerweek, at a committee hearing with 15 in- Action.org, has been charged with "disdustry speakers, not one represented the ruption of Congress." He was quick to respond: "I charge single-payer perspective. A group of single-payer advocates, including doctors Baucus with disrupting Congress. It and lawyers, filled the hearing room once was a democratic institution; now and, one by one, interrupted the pro- it's corrupt, because of people like him. He takes money from the industry and ceedings. Protester Adam Schneider yelled: "We does their bidding. He won't even difneed to have to have single-payer at the fuse the situation by seating a singletable. I have friends who have died, payer advocate at the table." As I traveled through Montana rewho don't have health care, whose health care did not withstand their per- cently, from Missoula to Helena to Bozesonal health emergencies. ... Single- man, health-care activists kept referring to Baucus as the "money man." Montana payer now!" Baucus gaveled for order, guffawing, State Sen. Christine Kaufmann spon"We need more police." The single-payer sored an amendment to the Montana movement has taken his words as a ral- Constitution, granting everyone in lying cry. At a hearing Tuesday, five Montana "the right to quality health care more were arrested. They call them- regardless of ability to pay," or health care as a human right. It died in commitselves the "Baucus 13." One of the Baucus 13, Kevin Zeese, tee. Wisconsin Sen. Russ Feingold, a sinrecently summarized Baucus' career gle-payer advocate, said his position campaign contributions:

Northern Wisconsinites reactions mixed over flu scare and coverage SUPERIOR - The swine flu has people preparing, talking and has generated more than a few opinions. This includes the streets of Superior. Here, many people say they think the swine flu has been overblown. All agreed that it’s good for government and schools to have plans in place, but this virus may not have been worth it. Jim Amundson of Lake Nebagamon sells hot dogs for the Knights of Columbus at Super One Foods in Superior. He says he doesn’t have any swine flu fears. “None whatsoever, none whatsoever. Everybody tries to compare it to the 1912 outbreak, but I think that technology today is so much better … I’m making sure I wash my hands all the time. When I go to church I don’t drink wine out of the cup or anything. I shake hands but other than that, no.” In the Mariner Mall, Bridgette Adrian

says the 24-hour news cycle as carried out by the Internet and TV is blowing the swine flu out of proportion. She adds the numbers just don’t scare her. “One person can die being hit by lightning, that doesn’t mean I’m going to avoid going outside when it’s raining,” she says. Superior resident Roger Schold, who was waiting outside the post office – says he doesn’t think the situation is going to be bad as people think until fall comes around. “And I wouldn’t suggest taking Tamiflu or anything like that until you find out if you really have it.” And although Schold does says there’s a lot of hype, he’s glad the government is prepared. He says it’s better to be safe than sorry. – Wisconsin Public Radio (Rich Kremer)

Construction industry says economic fortunes are improving STATEWIDE - Wisconsin builders and remodelers say they’re seeing some signs of hope, after what’s been a rough few years. It’s far from a building boom, but after hitting rock bottom Doug Scott, president of the Wisconsin Builders Association, says things are looking up. “We’re seeing encouraging signs in many areas especially with the new home buyer $8,000 tax credit,” he says. Scott says the federal incentive for first-time buyers is helping deplete some of the abundance of inventory. He also says it’s helping to free sellers of their existing homes so they can have new ones built. Tom Weiher, president of Milwaukee’s branch of the National Association of the Remodeling Industry, agrees

things are picking up, but he can only speculate why. “They seem to have more confidence in their homes as investing in the stock market.” And while remodeling has been more popular than new home construction in the downturn, Weiher says that didn’t necessarily give remodelers an advantage. “Well, that was kind of offset by a lot more competition coming into this industry in the form of people like new home builders and other construction people that were not working,” he says. Weiher and Scott both welcome this small upswing. It’s comes after a huge downturn that ushered many Wisconsin contractors out of business. – Wisconsin Public Radio (Kristen Durst)

will not likely prevail in Washington: "I don't think there's any possibility that that will come out of this Congress." That's if things remain business as usual. Mario Savio led the Free Speech Movement on the UC Berkeley campus. In 1964, he said: "There comes a time when the operation of the machine becomes so odious, makes you so sick at heart, that you can't take part, you can't even passively take part, and you've got to put your bodies upon the gears and upon the wheels, upon all the apparatus, and you've got to make it stop. And you've got to indicate to the people who run it, the people who own it, that unless you're free, the machine will be prevented from working at all." "Unless you're free," the Baucus 13 might add, "to speak." The current official debate has locked single-payer options out of the discussion, but also escalated the movement -- from Healthcare-NOW! to Single Payer Action -- to shut down the orderly functioning of the debate, until single-payer gets a seat at the table. ••• Denis Moynihan contributed research to this column. ••• Amy Goodman is the host of "Democracy Now!," a daily international TV/radio news hour airing on more than 750 stations in North America. She is the co-author of "Standing Up to the Madness: Ordinary Heroes in Extraordinary Times," recently released in paperback.

Alcohol a factor in accident

An early-morning crash on Thursday morning, May 7, sent a Grantsburg woman to the hospital. Minnie A. Cunningham, 43, Grantsburg, was southbound on South Williams Road in Wood River Township when she reportedly swerved to miss a deer. She lost control of her vehicle and it left the roadway and hit a tree, severely damaging the vehicle. Alcohol was a factor in the accident, and two citations, OWI and failure to maintain control of vehicle, were issued. – Photos submitted by the Burnett County Sheriff’s Department

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MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 11

Four Grantsburg Scouts awarded second-highest award

Tiffani Moyer

Angela Heinecke

Brandy Vollmer

Jordan Buggert

GRANTSBURG – The Girl Scout Council of Minnesota and Wisconsin River Valleys awards the second-highest Girl Scout award to four Grantsburg Girl Scouts. The Silver Award is the result of three years of work by these Grantsburg Girl Scouts. They started their work on this award when they were in the sixth grade. At this age, they could only work on certain levels of the program. This

level helped them hone their leadership skills and their skills in project planning. As seventh-graders, they learned to plan using the SMART method of project planning. This skill will benefit them throughout their futures. After the completion of their seventh-grade year, they searched out projects that interested them and were a need in our area. This group of girls chose to go away from their normal routine of working as one

group together and work as individuals on their projects. Tiffani Moyer chose a project that involved working with the residents of Bumett General Hospitals C.C.C. She spent the summer working with the residents and making many very special friends. Angela Heinecke decided to really hone her leadership skills by organizing a cookie rally for all of the Grantsburg Girl Scouts. This rally helped the new Daisy, Brownie and Junior cookie sellers to develop the skills to sell cookies, set goals and plan what to do with their cookie money. Brandy Vollmer loves to work with the younger Girl Scouts. Brandy chose to teach the Daisy and Brownie troops some of their try-its about diversity, and other cultures around the world. Jordan Buggert enjoys sewing and an-

imals. Jordan decided to look around the community and see what she could do with these interests. The Burnett County Humane Society drew her interests, and she made animal cage mats, collected food for the animals, flea and tick products, new and used collars and made many pet toys. Jordan used recycled materials donated by family, friends, and area businesses to produce her homemade items. These girls would like to thank the following groups for helping them achieve their Silver Awards: Grantsburg Family Foods, Brask Possum-Janke American Legion Post and Auxiliary, Burnett General Hospital and C.C.C., Grantsburg School District and the Burnett County Humane Society. They are also grateful to their leaders and advisors Diane Barton, Terri Andersen and Audra Moyer. – submitted

Sisters’ fight ends in arrest

CUSHING – Jody Anderson, 37, Cushing, was arrested and charged with domestic battery and possession of drug paraphernalia on Saturday, May 9. Police were sent to an address in Cushing that afternoon with a report of two sisters fighting. A woman came running out of the home when officers arrived, saying Anderson had been hitting her, scratching her face, throwing things at her and that she hit her with the phone when she tried to call the po-

lice. Officers reported seeing scratches on her face. The apparent victim reported that Anderson had hidden drug paraphernalia outside in back of the home. The officer looked around and reportedly found in a burn barrel three marijuana pipes, five syringes, along with a white jug containing razor blades, picks, tweezers, and other items. — with information from the Polk County Sheriff’s Department

BMC employees attend Pride Recognition program Julie Andersson, physician assistant and Kelli Eklof, practice administrator at Burnett Medical Center, recently attended the Wisconsin Hospital Association’s Pride Recognition Program. Andersson joined 76 other health care employees from across the state that were recognized at the 2009 Wisconsin Health Care Employee Pride Program recognition dinner at the Kalahari Resort in Wisconsin Dells. – Special photo

Take the test - beat the pest

STATEWIDE – The UW-Madison Agronomy Department, in cooperation with the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board, is again offering free soybean cyst nematode soil testing for Wisconsin growers. This program is intended for growers to sample several of their fields in order to identify if SCN is present and at what levels. SCN is expanding its range in Wisconsin and has now been identified in St. Croix and Dunn Counties. Growers will be responsible for collecting soil from fields suspected to have SCN and then sending the sample to the SCN testing laboratory for analysis. They will receive a lab report back with the SCN egg count and a brochure to help plan future rotations and other cultural practices to lower SCN infestation if they exist.

We have a limited number of these free kits available and will furnish them on a first come basis at up to four per farm. Crop consultants, advisors and crop input retailers are encouraged to request kits for their client’s farms. Each kit has a bag and a prepaid mailer for one soil sample, which should represent about 10-15 acres. Both the postage and lab fees are prepaid. Anytime before, during or right after the growing season are great times to collect soil samples for routine soil fertility analysis and for SCN monitoring. Soil-sample test kits are available now and can be requested from Colleen Smith at clsmith8@wisc.edu or at 608262-7702. – from the Polk County Farm Scene

Highground Hero’s Tribute Ride set

NEILLSVILLE – The idea for the Highground was actually born on Dec. 18, 1965, on a battlefield in Vietnam. Twenty-four-year-old Tom Miller was holding in his arms his good friend, 22year-old Jack Swender. Swender was unconscious and bleeding. As Swender lay dying in Miller’s arms, Miller made a silent promise to himself and to Swender that this terrible loss and great sacrifice would not be given in vain. Twenty years later, in 1985, Miller organized the first bike-a-thon, pedaling around the perimeter of Wisconsin for a total of 1,244 miles – the number of Wisconsin military personnel killed or missing in action in Vietnam. This bike tour was the first significant amount of money raised. The annual bike tour, which is celebrating its 25th anniversary in 2009, now encompasses six routes that will all converge on the Highground on Aug. 9, at 11:30 a.m., for a very special Journey’s End Celebration picnic. In honor of this major milestone in Highground’s history, veteran Tom Kingsbury has volunteered to recreate

the ride that Tom Miller made back in 1985. The Highground Hero’s Tribute Ride will cover 1,244 miles plus one mile for each person who has died in action from Wisconsin since Vietnam. Miller will pedal around the state – touching each border and many communities in between; over 1,500 miles in 10 days. Miller and his crew will make several stops along his journey, reaching out to communities to help honor Wisconsin’s heroes. The money raised from this special Highground Hero’s Tribute Ride will help bring the Persian Gulf Tribute to the Highground. This new tribute will honor the men and women who have served around the world beginning with Desert Storm, through multiple Middle East conflicts, while marching forward in the global war on terrorism. Planning is under way for the more than 30 stops along the route. For more information about the Highground Hero’s Tribute Ride, please call 715-7434224 or visit www.thehighground.org. – submitted

Container gardening workshop to be held May 28 SPOONER – The gardening public is invited to learn about container gardening for growing vegetable on Thursday, May 28, from 7 until 8 p.m. at the Spooner Ag Research Station east of Spooner on Hwy. 70. Area UW-Extension Master Gardener volunteers will give tips on proper planting techniques and offer suggestions on how to grow your own tomato, pepper and other vegetable transplants as well as flowers in containers. There will be hands-on demonstrations on proper transplanting and care of plants in various-sized containers.

According to Kevin Schoessow, UWExtension Area Ag Agent for Burnett, Sawyer and Washburn counties, “You don’t need a lot of space or to spend a lot to grow your own fresh vegetables. Vegetables planted in the right-size container and cared for properly can produce amazingly well.” This event is sponsored by UW-Extension’s North Country Master Gardener Association and is open to the public and free of charge. Preregistration is requested by calling 715-635-3506 or 800528-1914. - submitted


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Minar receives flight instructor of the year award

by Tammi Milberg MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. –Lynnwood (Woody) Minar was presented with the 2009 General Aviation Flight Instructor of the Year Award at the Minnesota Aviation Hall of Fame banquet on May 2. Minar lives in Dresser and has been very active with Osceola Areo at the Osceola Airport. He was selected as a district winner based on the following criteria: professional activities, pro bono service to the aviation community and continuing professional development and education. The plaque Minar received reads: “For your outstanding contributions to aviation safety through education within the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin.” Minar said he started his pursuit of flying in January 1999 when he attended ground school. In 2001, he earned his instrument rating, allowing him to fly in clouds and bad weather. In Oct. 2002, he received his tail-wheel endorsement. He was asked if he wanted to teach flight instruction shortly after that. In March 2003, he earned his commercial pilot license. In April 2003, he earned his flight instructor license. “It just took off from there,” Minar said. “I fly about 600-700 hours a year. It’s very rewarding to solo somebody or see them get their license and see the joy in their face.” Minar said he received his Master Certified Flight Instructor designation in September 2006. There are 15

Lynnwood (Woody) Minar, Dresser, is presented with the Federal Aviation Administration, Minneapolis Flight Standards District Office, 2009 General Aviation Flight Instructor of the Year Award by Gary Pendleton, FAA Safety Team program manager out of Minneapolis. –Photo by Dave Weiman, Midwest Flyer Magazine. Master CFIs in Wisconsin and fewer than 700 Master CFIs out of 90,000 CFIs in the nation. Minar listed some of his involvement that made him

eligible for the award. He is the assistant airport manager at Osceola Areo Sport where he helps run the business and has done so for the past five years. He has taught flying, helping 45 pilots get their licenses and provided training to more than 100 other pilots. He also assists the Boy Scouts with the aviation merit badge as a counselor. He teaches short courses on safety to spouses of pilots. He shows them how to land a plane or to administer care for health issues in the event of such emergencies. He also gives safety seminars to pilots throughout Minnesota and Wisconsin. He gives presentations at Oshkosh for the experimental aircraft convention. Minar continues his education with additional certification. He has his ratings for single engine, multiple engine, C-plane and recently, glider instruction. As far as the award presentation, Minar said, “I kind of had a feeling it was coming. It’s something I would never have expected when I started flying.” When asked what’s next for him, Minar joked that he’s been telling people hot air balloons. Then he responded, “I’m having way too much fun. You meet some really wonderful people who have the same passion. They want to fly. It’s something they’ve always wanted to do, and it’s the right time for them.” Minar was selected out of 2,000 flight instructors in the district for the award.

City authorizes property appraisals by Tammi Milberg ST. CROIX FALLS– The city council for St. Croix Falls authorized appraisals for two properties in the city at the May 11 council meeting. The properties are the Mark and Nancy Buley property and the Dorothy Weinhardt property. Both are located on River Street adjacent to the wastewater treatment plant. The city’s interest in securing these properties is for future expansion of the treatment facility. The appraisal quote is $800 per property. It was indicated that in 2006 the properties were appraised, but the council agreed a fresh appraisal is best to show a good-faith effort on the city’s behalf in the intent to secure the properties. The expenses incurred by the city can count toward the

city’s contribution of the Army Corps’ required match for the facility. The motion carried for the properties to be appraised for $800 each with the funds to come out of the sewer fund. In other business, the council was updated on the Day Road Reservior, which was to be repaired this week. The indication was to replace the cover, but once the tank was emptied, it was noted there are several holes in the bottom of the tank, resulting in costs for repair to go over the initial estimate by approximately $5,000. The council agreed the work should be done when the tank is empty and the workers are on-site. The tank repair is said to give the city at least 10 years on the reservoir in return. The council accepted a petition from citizen Woody

McBride. The petition was signed by 30 residents/families concerned about fluoride in the city water. McBride stated with two small children at home, he began to research the fluoridation issue and has found significant information reporting that fluoridation is not necessary for city water. McBride stated that fluoride is best applied topically to the teeth and more people are brushing their teeth than 30 years ago. Many reports indicate fluoridation of water is redundant, according to McBride. The council accepted the petition to not have the water fluoridated, and the council stated it will continue to review information as it comes forward.

Couple charged after assault with exploding diaper ST. CROIX FALLS - Rebecca and Jason Reis had a bad day Saturday, May 9. They were both charged with domestic disorderly conduct after a fight in their home. Police were sent to their St. Croix Falls residence after two 911 calls from there, one hang up, and another where a man said he had been assaulted. When police arrived, Jason, 32, told them Rebecca, 30, had thrown a diaper at him and it had “exploded,” and that she had also hit him in the nose with her hand. The officer re-

ported seeing what looked like “diaper debris” on Jason and in the home, but no apparent injury to his nose. Rebecca reported that Jason had been “out of control” since he woke up, yelling at her. She admitted throwing the diaper at Jason but added Jason had hit her in the face with it while it was in his hand. She said she tried to leave, but Jason took her purse and keys. She also reported they were arguing while their two chil-

dren were present and both of them “took the children away from one another” during the argument. Both parties were taken into custody and were provided 72-hour no-contact forms and both chose to waive them. – with information from the Polk County Sheriff’s Department

Taste of St. Croix Valley

St. Croix Falls junior prom royalty

St. Croix Falls junior prom royalty are pictured. Front row (L to R): Megan Yunker, Jamie Rohm, Cassie Petherbridge and Gabby Nuckles. (Not pictured Ali Greenlee). Back row: Chris Stenberg, John Mikl, Gus Koecher, Josh Larcom and Corey Gebhard. Prom is on the boat in Stillwater, Minn., this Saturday, May 16. – Photo by Tammi Milberg

Chateau St. Croix Winery owner Troy Chamberlin and St. Croix Falls City Administrator Ed Emerson greet each other with a fist bump at the Taste of the St. Croix Valley event held May 1 at the Chateau St. Croix Winery in rural St. Croix Falls. Restaurants, bakeries, wineries, orchards and more provided samples of foods available in the St. Croix Valley area. The event kicked off the Earth Arts Spring Studio Tour, which took place on Saturday and Sunday, May 2 and 3. Proceeds of the event went to the Falls Chamber of Commerce, which serves St. Croix Falls and Taylors Falls. – Photo courtesy Garth Olson of The Valley Wire


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Firefighters sought for SCF department

What does it take?

by Tammi Milberg ST. CROIX FALLS – The St. Croix Falls Fire Department is seeking new members and is holding a recruitment this Saturday, May 16, at the fire station located at 908 Pine Street from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. A second recruitment will be held Saturday, May 30, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. as well in hopes to get the numbers of the department up. Currently, the department has 22 members. Fire Chief Wade Sommer said ideally, he would like to see the membership at 30 members, with 10 additional persons on reserve. Sommer said it is difficult finding members because there is a time commitment required for members to meet and some people sign up, but find they don’t have the time to devote for meetings and training. “We want to get people who want to be on the department that can have fun, want to do the community a service, and be able to make the big commitment for training,” said Mike Dorsey, assistant chief. “We want people who respond to fires or first responders to be well trained not only for their own safety, but to provide the best care to people in an accident or fire.” Sommer said the training amounts to

three Tuesdays a month. The department has 36 meetings a year and members are required to attend 50 percent of those meetings. While the department is made of volunteers, they get paid a small sum for their time including one hour of every training session and one hour of every meeting. They also get paid for runs. “It’s not about making money, it’s really a reimbursement type of payment if you look at it,” Sommer said. “It’s basically a way to get money back for your mileage to meetings and training and replace clothes that may have gotten ruined in a fire.” Sommer said the department is trying to focus on the basic categories of a fire department including structure fires, wildfires, water rescue, high-level rescue and first responder. The training for structure fires involves completion of level one training. Drivers require a minimal amount of driver training, but are not required to have a CDL. First responder training is not required for department members unless they want to be first responders. Of all the calls the department gets, 75 percent of them are medical calls. “It’s a lot of training up front, but it tapers off after a while,” Sommer said. “Some people have said they didn’t think they could join because they work out of town. All they have to be is a resi-

Old fifirre hall has new tenants

Many who have driven through St. Croix Falls have likely noticed the change in the storefront of this building which used to be the old city fire hall. The city authorized a $30,000 revolving loan to the owners of the building to make enough improvements to lease the space in the building. The building is for sale with other lease space available. The newest tenant is Snap Fitness. Snap moved from its location on the hill to the downtown site and will be holding a grand - opening event Thursday – Sunday, May 15, 16 and 17. Glasswork in the building was installed by Indianhead Glass. –Photo by Tammi Milberg

Psi Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma literary contest winners

Pictured are this year’s winners in the Psi Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma’s Annual Literary Contest (L to R): Gretchen Bygd, third grade, Prairie Farm Elementary; Joey Carlson, fourth grade, Cumberland Elementary; Hailey De Motts, fifth grade, Osceola Intermediate; Emma Dressel, fifth grade, Osceola Intermediate School; Jessica Nelson, sixth grade, Riverview Middle School, Barron; and Amaris Vesely, seventh grade, Cumberland Middle School. In addition, Amaris Vesely placed second in the Sigma State literary contest; Hailey DeMotts and Jessica Nelson took third place; and Joey Carlson received an honorable mention. – Photo submitted BARRON – The literary and illustrator competition was open to all students in grades three through eight in the state of Wisconsin. Area winners were honored at a reception held on April 21 in the Barron High School IMC, which was attended by parents,

teachers and other guests. Delta Kappa Gamma is an international society of honorary women teachers. If other local teachers or schools are interested in becoming involved in this contest, please contact Barb Millerman at 715637-4114. - submitted

dent of the fire district, or work in town. Most of our calls lately have been during the day.” The fire district is CTH I for the northern border, to 113th Avenue to the south, and half of Deer Lake to the east. Sommer said that while training creates a drawback for some people to join, it is important to the department for people to have regular and tactical training to help everybody understand the job. Sommer said someone may be able to drive the truck, but they should know how the rest of the job works because they may need to understand where to position a truck if they are responding to an accident, for example. “We do as much training as we think we can do and offer more than is required. We want to do the best we can on-scene,” Sommer said. “While we have 22 members, 15 are considered active.” Sommer said that if you figure half the roster is available during a call, the department has maybe 11 people in town who can respond. If there were a structure fire, mutual aid would be called right off the bat. “If the fire services has to be contracted or full-time people would be on the payroll, the budget would be 10 times what the fire department budget is now. A volunteer fire department is the cheapest

way for fire protection services to be provided to a community. People’s insurance would go up also if there was not a local fire department operating in the community,” said Sommer. Sommer was asked how low the numbers in the department could get before they could no longer function as a department. He said, “I hope we never find out what that number is. We have been as low as 16, and have had as many as 27.” Sommer said that the age of volunteers begins at 17 and goes up from there. He said the department right now is pretty young. He also said females should not be discouraged from signing up for the department because the department consists of both males and females. “Basically we have a family atmosphere. We take things seriously that are important, but we have fun. We have males and females,” Sommer said. “If you get the bug, you get hooked.” Persons interested in joining the department should attend the recruiting open house May 16 or May 30 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the fire station. Applications can be picked up at city hall during office hours, or contact Chief Sommer or Assistant Chief Dorsey to pick one up at the fire station. Any questions can be directed to Sommer 715-483-9444 or Dorsey 715-483-3081.

Click It or Ticket campaign to start soon

POLK/BURNETT COUNTIES – Drivers in Polk and Burnett counties can expect to see more police officers on the streets in the latter half of May. A Click It or Ticket safety-belt enforcement campaign will start May 18 and run through the 31. During the campaign, “officers will be patrolling in greater numbers and for longer hours, including at night when seat belt use declines,” said Polk County Sheriff Tim Moore. “Our objective is not to write more tickets but to save lives.” Polk and Burnett County sheriffs’ departments will participate in the campaign, as well as the police departments of Grantsburg, Siren, Webster, Webb Lake and Amery. Grantsburg Police Chief Jeff Schinzing said it is hoped the campaign will reduce injuries through voluntary compliance with the law. “However, if voluntary compliance fails, we will enforce the law. We won’t accept excuses,

and you won’t get a warning if you are stopped by an officer and are not buckled.” Consistent safety-belt use is the single most effective protection against being ejected from a vehicle or thrown around violently inside a vehicle during a crash. An estimated 237 lives were saved by safety-belt use in Wisconsin in 2007. On hundred percent safety-belt use could have saved an additional 137 lives, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation. “Far too many people are killed or injured needlessly every day, because they were not buckled up,” said Chief Chris Sybers, village of Siren. “That’s why we urge you to buckle up every time you get behind the wheel or ride in a vehicle. However, if you ignore the law and common sense, we’ll also be ready to provide you with a very convincing reminder.” — from Burnett and Polk County law enforcement agencies

TOPS has new chapter officers

ST. CROIX FALLS/OSCEOLA – TOPS chapter officers for the coming year were installed on April 6, at Chapter No. Wisconsin 1205, St. Croix Falls and Chapter No. Wisconsin 0514, Osceola. The members are happy to announce the following members of the chapter executive committee: St. Croix Falls: Leader – Susan Youngren; secretary/treasurer – Jeanne Thomfohrda and weight recorder – Joyce Bjork. Osceola: Leader – Marian Madsen; coleader – Mavis Lindahl; secretary – Deb Greenwold; treasurer – Mary LaMere; weight recorder – Pat Bemis and assistant weight recorder – LaVonne Getschel. The St. Croix Falls group has been supporting healthy weight-loss efforts in our community for over 20 years. Visitors are welcome to attend their first TOPS meeting free of charge. Chapter No. Wisconsin 1205, St. Croix Falls, meets weekly on Monday evenings from 6 – 7 p.m., at Good Samaritan Nursing Home, 750 E. Louisiana Street, St. Croix Falls. To find another local

chapter, view www.tops.org or call 800932-8677 for more information. The Osceola group has been supporting healthy weight-loss efforts in our community for 40 years. Visitors are welcome to attend their first TOPS meeting free of charge. The Osceola chapter meets weekly on Wednesday at 8:30 a.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church. To find another local chapter, view www.tops.org or call 800-932-8677 for more information. TOPS Club, Inc. (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), the original, nonprofit weight-loss education and support organization, was founded more than 60 years ago to champion weight-loss support and success. Founded and headquartered in Milwaukee, TOPS promotes successful weight management with a philosophy that combines healthy eating, regular exercise, wellness education and support from others at weekly chapter meetings. TOPS has about 170,000 members in nearly 10,000 chapters throughout the United States and Canada and several chapters in Europe. – submitted


PAGE 14 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 13, 2009

B U R N E T T

C O U N T Y

H E A D L I N E S

Problems surface over Hwy. 70 overlay project by Nancy Jappe SIREN – The problem with the scheduled summer overlay on Hwy. 70 from the St. Croix River west of Grantsburg to just beyond the Hwy. 35/70 stoplight in Siren received attention during the May 7 meeting of the Siren Village Board. The work is scheduled to begin June 22 and be completed by August 3. This time frame includes the July 4 holiday, a time with a lot of traffic coming into and out of the village. Village Administrator Randy Surbaugh had been assured, on the original schedule, that the work would not start until after the holiday. He knew that work has to stop by noon on the Friday before the holiday, which this year is on Saturday. “If they would say by noon Tuesday, we would have a chance,” Surbaugh commented. Surbaugh will be following up on this to see what, if anything, can be done to alleviate potential problems with this schedule. Siren Police Chief Chris Sybers is asking that anyone in Burnett or Polk counties who wants the Department of Motor Vehicle’s examining station to stay in Siren call their state representatives. “The more phone calls, the more pressure on the DOT to keep that in the budget,” Sybers said, adding, “The representatives want to hear from the public. The more publicity they hear, the better it will be.” Chief Sybers had his say about how District Attorney William Norine is handling cases that are referred to him. “I am not very pleased with the district attorney’s track record,” Sybers told the village board. He referred specifically to a case the district attorney had thrown out involving tire slashing and a window

Chuck Awe, marketing manager for the farmers market, came to the May 7 Siren Village Board meeting to ask about possibly having an artisans market in the green area on the south end of Crooked Lake Park. The building, grounds and parks committee will discuss this. being broken out on a parked vehicle. “The D.A. is not prosecuting as I think he should,” Sybers said. The county police chiefs met Tuesday, May 12. “We will talk with Norine and find out what is going on. Law enforcement is having a difficult time with this issue. We are going to get to the bottom of it,” Sybers said. One of the board members asked about Siren starting municipal court such as is being done in Webster. Sybers said he is working on a grant and that it would cost $26,000 for a joint municipal court between Siren and Grantsburg. Chuck Awe, marketing manager for the farmers market, spoke to the board

Siren Village Board member Dave Alden presented potential diagrams for a sign to direct people to businesses in the downtown area of the village. “From my personal experience, people didn’t know there were any businesses down on Main Street,” Alden told the village board at their May 7 meeting. The building, grounds and parks committee will look into this. – Photos by Nancy Jappe about the possibility of starting an artisans market. He is working with the Burnett Area Arts Group on finding a suitable location and was asking the village about using the large green space at the south end of Crooked Lake Park. Surbaugh mentioned a possible problem with parking. The issue was referred to the buildings, grounds and parks committee for consideration. Issues approved at the meeting included: Contracting with Anthem Insurance for 2009-2010 health insurance renewal; writing off personal property tax bills (2005 and prior) where the files cannot be found or the businesses are no longer in existence; hiring a part-time leaf and brush dump attendant for Saturday work; approving a conditional use

permit to go from a two-family to a three-family residence at 7718-7720 Lilac Lane; approval of a certified survey map for Fourwinds Market property in case they move ahead with their expansion project; and final resolution authorizing public improvement and levying special assessments against property in the Southeast Neighborhood Project-Phase 1. Board member Dave Doty, who lives in the project area, abstained from the vote. Upcoming committee meetings are as follows: Public Safety – Thursday, May 14, 9:30 a.m. Roads, Streets and Utilities – Thursday, May 14, 11 a.m. Personnel and Finance – Monday, June 1, 9 a.m.

Grantsburg pool repairs coming

New council takes oath

by Gregg Westigard GRANTSBURG – The village board looked at swimming pool issues at the monthly council meeting Monday night, May 11. Other items included rules on what vehicles will be allowed on village streets and thanks from the Youth Hockey Association. This was the first meeting of the new council and the first in 14 years where Mark Dahlberg was not at the head of the table. The meeting started with Circuit Judge Ken Kutz swearing in the new council, with one new member and two longtime members trading chairs. Dahlberg chose not to seek an eighth term as village president at the April 7 election. He switched places with Trustee Roger Panek, the new village president. Dean Josephson joined the council along with incumbent Trustee Glenn Rolloff. Swimming pool issues were a major agenda item. The main swimming pool and the wading pool will need modifications to meet new federal standards for pool safety. New rules on drain hazards were passed after the death of a child in Minnesota. The village is looking at a cost of about $4,000 in preliminary costs

for the design and bidding on the pool projects plus an estimated construction cost of $21,000. The board will take final action on the repairs next month. The fees for using the pool were raised for the first time since 2006. The yearly membership increased by $10 and the per-session fee was raised by $2. However, there will be one daily session rather than the previous split session. Village residents will now be able to use the pool from 1 p.m. until 8 p.m. for a daily cost of $5. The yearly family memberships will now be $120 for village residents and $175 for nonresidents. The cost difference is explained by the fact that the village budgets about $30,000 a year to cover pool expenses not covered by the fee income of $15,000. Residents will be allowed to drive their golf carts on village streets from home to the golf course but other off-road vehicles are prohibited on village streets under a newly revised ordinance. The rule, adopted to give some guidance to the police force, bans any minibike, motorized scooter, go-cart, light utility vehicle or ATV from village streets. Skating and hockey are popular forms of recreation in Grantsburg, Rick Quimby told the council as he thanked the board for its support of the sport.

Burnett County Judge Ken Kutz swore in the newly elected members of the Grantsburg Village Board Monday night. New village President Roger Panek (left) has just taken his oath and watches as trustees Mark Dahlberg, Glenn Rolloff and Dean Josephson are sworn in. The four join Jim Nelson, Dean Tyberg and Mike Langevin on the seven-member board. – Photo by Gregg Westigard Quimby is president of the Grantsburg Youth Hockey Association. The village donated $2,500 for the new outdoor rink, and Quimby said “thank you very much” for help with a program that many families use. Over 160 kids took part in programs using the outdoor rink last winter, Quimby said. That number does not include community use of the rink for free skating. He said it took 200 volunteer

hours to prepare the outdoor rink for use once the temperature hits zero. Quimby said the entire skating program, including the indoor rink, has a yearly budget of $140,000. There are six youth hockey groups using the rink, ranging from the mini-mite program for kids 6 and under to the high school program that involves several schools.

Insurance coverage for law enforcement auxiliary group becomes an issue by Sherill Summer BURNETT COUNTY - Burnett County Law Enforcement Citizens’ Auxiliary is a nonprofit organization of volunteers dedicated to serving Burnett County. Each member donates a minimum of 100 hours of service to the community, specializing in public-safety activities. A total of 16 members of the group have completed an online SERT emergency-response training and are willing to use their training, under the direction of the sheriff, in the unfortunate event that there is an emergency in Burnett County. As appealing as all of these assets are, for now the auxiliary group cannot assist

the Burnett County Sheriff’s Department at all. There is confusion about the county’s insurance coverage for citizen volunteers when they are volunteering under the direction of the sheriff. The problem stems from the group’s 501(c)(3) nonprofit status, which is usually deemed an accomplishment for any organization. But the county’s insurance policy may not cover groups that have reached 501(c)(3) status. The county was notified of the potential problem at the end of March by the insurance company and the citizens’ auxiliary’s public-safety support for the county has been curtailed since. The citizens’ auxiliary does have their

own insurance to cover some circumstances, and Burnett County Sheriff Dean Roland brought up at a meeting last month the federal 1997 Volunteer Protection Act that seems to provide limited liability for volunteers working under the direction of the sheriff. The insurance company is still reviewing the matter. In the last six weeks, specific information about the citizens’ auxiliary in Burnett County has been given to the insurance company along with potential duties the group may be asked to do as volunteers under the direction of the sheriff, and an e-mail to the county clerk Wanda Hinrichs indicated that a decision should be made soon,

probably within a week. The insurance company’s decision likely would state not only if the auxiliary would be covered under the county’s insurance as it now stands despite their 501(c)(3) status, but what would need to be done to include the group under the county’s insurance so that county supervisors can judge if action on behalf of the citizens’ auxiliary would be worth the effort. Meanwhile, county Administrator Candace Fitzgerald is also reviewing the issue.


MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 15

Frederic music students back from state

Frederic High School students taking first place at the state music festival The Wednesday bell choir winners from the state music festival include in no held on Saturday, May 2 in Eau Claire include from (L to R): Kendra Wells, particular order, Will Primm, Bryan Meyer, Megan Anderson, Anna Tesch, Bobbi Marissa Nelson, Megan Anderson, Haley Kurkowski, Candace Buck, Isabel Jo O’Brien, Cathryn McConnell, Marissa Nelson, Brady McWilliams, Becca AnLexen and Bradley Knauber. – Photos by Marty Seeger derson, Haley Kurkowski and Kendra Wells.

The Frederic High School Show Choir winners from the state music festival include in no particular order, Will Primm, Erik Stoner, Bradley Knauber, Dan Halverson, Trae Gehl, Candace Buck, Josiah Lund, Bryan Meyer, Joel Knauber, Megan Anderson, Haley Kurkowski, Adrianna Otte, Sarah Lexen, Isabel Lexen, Kendra Wells and Calla Karl.

Thursday bell choir winners included, in no particular order, Sam Nelson, Alli Anderson, Isabel Lexen, Chris Hopp, Joe Draxler, Michael Tesch, Calla Karl, Bradley Knauber, Corissa Schmidt, Lauren Domagala, April Halvorson and Erik Stoner.

Luck Library Free movie at the library This month’s new release movie will be “Last Chance Harvey” with Dustin Hoffman and Emma Thompson. The library will reopen at 6 p.m. and the movie will begin at 6:30 p.m. This movie is rated PG-13 and is free to the public. Bring some popcorn and relax with us. The library is pleased to host local author Kathleen Melin on Tuesday, May 19, at 2 p.m. Melin has been invited to be the keynote speaker at the National Home School Conference. She will be giving a talk at our library entitled, “Being Our Own Education Experts (once we’ve gone out on the limb and declined the system).” Here is a brief description: You’re two months into home-schooling and suddenly you’re wondering if this was such a good idea after all. You feel inept, extremely busy and tired. Did I mention tired? The system seems to run so perfectly,

Knights of Columbus present a check to Sanay Hemingway

and there are even perfect parents around you whose kids are geniuses of one kind or another. Sometimes we lose track and forget we’re the experts of our own lives and the best possible teachers for our kids. Come remember. This one has quite a bit of how-to and brain science embedded in the story. Good for families with children at every age and skill level. All are welcome to come and enjoy this talk. Summer reading at the library We are gearing up for summer and with that comes the planning for Lucky Days. This year Lucky Days will be July 16, 17, 18 and 19. We are accepting donations for yard sale items as well as books for the book sale. If you are cleaning out, keep the library in mind. As far as the yard sale goes, we are giving Marilyn Berg a break this year and Camilla Johansen will be helping to organize the sale. If you have sale items to donate, please call the library, 715-488-2476. If you are having a sale yourself and want to donate your unsold items to the library sale, please call Camilla Johansen 715-4724290. We will also need volunteers to help organize and

lay out items before the sale, haul things from storage to the sale, help work at the sale and help clean up after the sale. Tents, tables and clothes racks are much appreciated. We will get them back to you so make sure they are marked with your name and number. We will need both youth and adult volunteers. Due to liability, volunteers must be over age 12. ONLY volunteers will be allowed early sales. Summer Reading is coming. This year’s theme will be Get Creative at the Library. This fits right in with us, because we’re always creative at the library. We will kick off Summer Reading on Wednesday, June 10, at 4 p.m. The next Wednesday, June 17, we will have an underwater adventure, as Mall of America’s traveling Underwater World program will be visiting our library. This is a free program and open to the public. Everyone is welcome. Hours Monday through Thursday, 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Friday, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Sunday, Ancestry.com tutorial only from noon – 4 p.m. Library is closed to checkouts and browsers.

Local Knights attend state convention in Appleton

The Balsam Lake Council of the Knights of Columbus recently presented a check to Dave and Lois Hemingway to help with the medical cost of their 14-year-old daughter, Sanay, who is undergoing cancer treatment. Picture (L to R) are: Council member Jim Otto, Sanay and her mother Lois. — Photo submitted

Knights from around Wisconsin attended The Knights of Columbus State Convention this year in Appleton. Members from councils in Frederic, Webster, Spooner and Balsam Lake attended this, and Fr. Dennis Mullen was selected to represent them at the supreme convention in Phoenix, Ariz., in August. Picture front row (L to R): Al Jirele, Fr. Mullen and Willis McLain. Back row: district Deputy Jim Otto, Don Glessing, Jeff Stellricht, Fr. Mike Tupa, Jim Henrich and Jon Beaulieu. Not pictured: Greg Maier and Michael Boie. — Photo submitted


PAGE 16 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 13, 2009

Osceola man charged with felony damage to property

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Polk County deaths Elaine M. Reynolds, 85, April 10, 2009, Milltown Dean R. Anderson, 84, April 23, 2009, St. Croix Falls Dora D. Anderson, 99, April 26, 2009, Amery Opal T. Brooks, 89, April 27,

Michael J. Andresen, 23, Webster, failure to pay fines, May 5. Gail M. Asper, 41, Frederic, failure to pay fines, May 5. Gregory C. Bartelt, 26, Frederic, failure to pay fines, May 5. Ashley K. Bromen, 22, Hinckley, Minn., failure to pay fines, May 5. Jacob R. Collins, 25, Hayward, failure to pay fines, May 5. Renae A. Davis, 48, South St. Paul, Minn., failure to pay fines, May 5. James R. Drury, 37, Homosassa, Fla., failure to pay fines, May 5.

Shannon M. Dugger, 29, Danbury, warrant - failure to appear, May 5. Beau D. Handy, 21, Grantsburg, failure to pay fines, May 5. Matthew D. Hatfield, 17, Sandstone, Minn., failure to pay fines, May 5. Gregory E. Hollon, 27, Grantsburg, failure to pay fines, May 5. Drew N. Jaspers, 22, Grantsburg, warrant - failure to appear, May 7. Dareck G. Juleff, 24, Clear Lake, failure to pay fines, May 5. Derek L. Lindemann, 25, Webster, failure to pay fines, May 5.

Polk Co. marriage licenses

Newer Construction

Sara D. Gustofson, town of Garfield and Brock A. Olson, Town of Garfield, applied May 5. Ma. Theresa C. Palang, village of Milltown and James D. Hutton Jr., village of Milltown, applied May 6. Mary L. Foss, village of Clayton, and Raymond A. Foss, vil-

lage of Clayton, applied May 7. Kathryne D. Rixmann, town of Farmington, and Francis D. Lavacot, town of Farmington, applied May 7. Molly J. Watson, city of Amery, and Todd J. Steeber, city of Amery, applied May 8.

GARAGE SALE 1512 Lake Ave., Luck Fri. & Sat., May 15 & 16 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Women’s regular & plus-size clothing; baby items; household items; PartyLite accessories; and much more.

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Paul S. Maurice, 24, Hinckley, Minn., failure to pay fines, May 5. Jay A. McDowell, 26, Minong, failure to pay fines, May 5. Renee L. Mosay, 38, Rice Lake, failure to pay fines, May 5. Guy R. Moser, 44, Webster, failure to pay fines, May 5. Teresa L. Nelson, 35, Hinckley, Minn., failure to pay fines, May 5. Matt L. Nolan, 41, Dairyland, failure to pay fines, May 5. Matthew A. Norman, 38, Spring Lake Park, Minn., failure to pay fines, May 5. Steven R. Powers, 46, Green Bay, failure to pay fines, May 5. Alycia K Riedl, St. Louis Park, Minn., failure to pay fines, May 5. Dianne K. Shea, 47, Coon Rapids, Minn., failure to pay fines, May 5. Billy J. Snyder, 22, Webster, failure to pay fines, May 5. Deanna R. Wicklund, 37, Spooner, failure to pay fines, May 5.

Burnett Co. marriage license

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S a t u r d a y, M a y 16 , 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. K l o p f e r P i ke R e s i d e n c e 2 0 0 P l e a s a n t Av e . • B a l s a m L a ke 5 houses east of 46 Store. Sofa and love seat; desk; vintage wicker; lamps; light fixtures; tables, chairs; many decorative items; bow; tree stand and gear; many hunting, fishing and golf related items; assorted rag rugs; large Oriental rug; games; TV; old Reploge lighted globe; large outdoor gas grill and much, 485567 38Lp much more. All clothing free.

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2009, Amery Raymond B. Schuller, 69, April 27, 2009, Osceola Linda K. Ogren, 62, April 30, 2009, Dresser Joshua G. Meline, 28, May 7, 2009, Deer Park

Michael W. Josephson, Frederic, and Kathleen Z. Simon, Frederic, May 11

Saturday, May 16

RUMMAGE & BAKE SALE Saturday, May 16, All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-6699777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1800-927-9275.

his driveway. The incident is under investigation.

Burnett County warrants

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May 11: Dwaine W. Persells, Webster, reported a decorated saw blade taken from the end of

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Arrests and citations May 4: Michael J. Kegal, 37, Siren, was arrested on a probation violation. May 5: Tamara A. Kauffman, 48, Shell Lake, was arrested in Washburn County on a Burnett County warrant. Other incidents May 6: Steven E. Olson, Forest City, Iowa, reported a dock taken from his property. The incident is under investigation.

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on Hwy. 70 at Hanson Avenue at 8:30 p.m. May 7: A truancy ordinance citation was issued to a student from Siren School for missing a number of classroom days.

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at Crooked Lake Park at 8:57 p.m. The bike had apparently been there all day. May 5: Darryl Joseph Schumann, 40, Webster, was cited for speeding at 6:32 p.m. on Hwy. 70 at Hanson Avenue. Arthur Maud, 76, Minneapolis, Minn., was cited for speeding

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ripping it up from the blacktop; then ran over two more trees, leaving a number of skid marks. The vehicle was found parked nearby. The officer recognized the vehicle and knew the owner, who was Bland. Bland came out of the apartment, was upset, and spoke with the officer, and reported apologized for crashing into “the tree.” The officer asked what had happened, and Bland said he and his girlfriend had a fight, he’d gotten into his vehicle and “put it to the boards,” flooring the gas pedal. He admitted hitting “some things,” but didn’t know how much. Bland was given field sobriety tests, then was arrested. His blood alcohol level when taken at the hospital registered .147. — with information from the Polk County Sheriff’s Department

May 4: Tammy R. Ackley, 35, Cable, was cited for speeding on Hwy. 70 and Hanson Avenue at 5:43 p.m. A mountain bike with the brand name NEXT was taken to the police department after the bike was found propped up against a tree near the boat ramp

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OSCEOLA – Glen Bland Jr., 26, Osceola, was arrested and charged with OWI and felony damage to property on Monday, May 4. Police were called to a possible crash near Chieftain Street and 2nd Avenue about 3 a.m. that day. The officer saw damage when arriving. Following the apparent path of a vehicle, the officer observed a vehicle had left the parking lot spinning its tires, jumped the curb, knocked over a tree, then a bench, both owned by the village of Osceola. Then the vehicle had apparently continued north on the east sidewalk of Chieftain, crossing over 2nd Avenue and hitting a garbage can, knocking it across the street. Next the vehicle apparently struck the 15-foot-tall sign in the Bill’s Ace Hardware parking lot, bending both legs and

Siren police report


MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 17

S PRING S PORTS INTER! COUNTY LEADER • INTER! COUNTY LEADER • INTER! COUNTY LEADER

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Track teams winding way toward conference

Frederic, Grantsburg girls breaking school records by Marty Seeger HAYWARD – The conference track meet is scheduled for next Tuesday, May 19, in Clear Lake, and area teams are slowly starting to peak. For the Webster boys and girls track teams it’s been a great season so far, and the boys have all but dominated the meets up to this point. “I would say we’ve got a good chance to win it,” said Webster boys track coach Jeff Postler, who said there were several athletes, both girls and boys, who recorded personal-best times in Hayward. The 4x100, 4x400, 800- and 1600meter teams, as well as individual girls and boys in shot put, triple jump and long jump recorded their best times and distances of the season. Postler was pleased with where he sees the team at this point in the season. Postler said Mary Johnson recorded a personal best in the shot and discus, and Quentin Johnson and Bryan Krause recorded times of 2:05 and 2:06 respectively in the 4X800 on Monday. “That’s a good time for this part of the season, and that’s really exciting,” Postler said, adding that they are getting close to the times normally needed to make it to the state track meet. Webster has been taking several approaches to improve their distance running with the help of coach Jim Muus, who has been holding those events to just one per week. “Just in the last three weeks I’ve watched what [Muus has] done, and the times have been just phenomenal. It’s just unbelievable,” Postler said. Going to several different meets this season has allowed Webster to compete on different track surfaces and to compete against different teams. On Monday they competed against teams from as far away as Eagle River and Drummond. The boys took first overall and the girls finished fourth, but either way, there’s no doubt Webster will be competitive at the conference meet. Where things will stand at the regional meet remains to be seen, according to Postler. He said the teams will probably be switching gears to get as many kids into sectionals as possible. “The kids have been training hard, and they’re excited,” Postler added. Viking girls dominating the field FREDERIC – The Frederic girls track team has been a dominant force in the conference this year and no doubt is looking for a conference title when they compete next Tuesday in Clear Lake. “We have had a great season so far,” said coach Jeff Larcom. Our girls have been working hard and they keep improving.” Three school records have either been shattered this year or tied. Sage Karl ran a 26.59 in the 200-meter dash, and Amanda Blok set a school record in the high jump with 5 feet, 2 inches. The 4x800 team, which includes Megan Anderson, Sam Nelson, Sarah Knauber and

Extra Points

The Webster boys track team is looking to roll right through conference and into regionals, with several athletes having great chances to go to state. – Photos by Brenda Sommerfeld Calla Karl, has improved considerably in comparison to last year’s state time of 10:01.55. “It has been a fun year to coach. Our team is a very balanced team in that we are scoring points in every event,” Larcom said. He feels the girls will be very competitive from the conference meet through sectionals and on to the state meet. Larcom said those to watch will be the Karl sisters, Anderson, Nelson and Knauber who will be competing in several different events and Candace Buck in the 100meter dash, long jump and triple jump. Blok will be strong in the high jump, and Adrianna Otte will compete in the 100meter hurdles. Jade Johnson will compete in the triple and long jump as well as Tanesha Carlson in the long jump. Allison Anderson will compete in shot and discus and Becca Anderson in the pole vault, 4x100 relay and 4x800 relay.

300 hurdles, and he is in the middle of the pack in the conference. He’s also about fourth or fifth in the conference in the 110-meter hurdles. “We’re doing a lot of good things, and the kids are working hard,” Wink said. Another key athlete for the Vikings has been Cody Gruel, who Wink says has been consistent in the discus this year with a throw of 133.5 feet as his personal best. Although the Vikings don’t have the depth they’re used to, Wink believes some of his individuals and relay teams should be able to do well at conference and beyond.

Zach Anderson

Sage Karl

Amanda Blok

Viking boys holding their own FREDERIC – Senior Zach Anderson has been one to watch for the Frederic boys track team this year. Anderson has moved himself to second place on the school’s all-time 300-hurdles list with a time of 44.04, which is about one second away from the school record, according to coach Troy Wink. Anderson is also one of the fastest in the area in the 110-meter hurdles, and competes in the 4x100, which also includes Tony Peterson, Tyler Calabria and Ben Ackerley. Peterson is a sophomore hurdler who has been putting up fast times. His best is 44.3 in the

Tony Peterson

Grantsburg girls break or tie records GRANTSBURG – “It’s hard to compete against numbers,” says Grantsburg boys track coach Bill Morrin, but there have been some exciting performances from the individuals on the track team so far this season. Sophomore Angela Gaffney broke a school record in the twomile this year twice already and has been doing very well in the mile run according to Morrin. Gaffney ran a 12:46 in the two-mile at a Webster invite earlier in the year, but she’s already beaten that mark with a 12:32.65. Kortney Morrin has also had success this year, in the high jump. She tied the old school record that was initially set in 1980, according to Morrin. “It’s something for both of them to get excited about,” coach Morrin said.

See Track/ next page

••• DULUTH, Minn. – Former Unity athlete and University of MinnesotaDuluth football player Cole Strilzuk was one of three players chosen to serve as captains of the Bulldogs football team this fall. The senior was the starting left cornerback last season as the Bulldogs went on to win the Division 2 National Cole Strilzuk Championship. Strilzuk had six interceptions last year including one in each of the team’s final three playoff games of the season. ••• COLUMBUS, Ohio – Ball State University men’s volleyball player and former Saints athlete Andy Nelson was named to the Midwestern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association AllTournament team along with three other teammates. Ball State ended their season last Saturday with a 3-0 (30-25, 32-30, 30-19) loss to Ohio State in the championship match of the MIVA tournament at St. John Arena. Nelson saw significant playing time in his first Division 1 debut with the Cardinals this season and accumulated 187 kills and 117 blocks. ••• WINONA STATE, Minn. – Mollie Bjelland and the Winona State softball team won the Central Region Championship with a 5-0 and 2-0 win over Wayne State, Neb., last weekend. In their 5-0 win on Friday, May 8, Bjelland helped the team with a two-out, three-run homer. In the team’s 2-0 win the following Saturday Bjelland scored once after getting hit by a pitch. The No. 1 seeded Warriors are No. 6 in the nation and advanced to the NCAA Super Regional, which takes place this weekend. ••• LEADER LAND – The Thursday, May 14, Luck at St. Croix Falls baseball game is being broadcast on 104.9 FM with the pregame starting at 4:50 p.m. The Saturday, May 16, Luck at Amery baseball game can be heard on 1260 AM beginning at 10 a.m. The Monday, May 18, Somerset at Amery and Tuesday, May 21, Amery at New Richmond baseball games begin at 5 p.m both nights, with pregame beginning at 4:50 p.m. on 1260 AM. ••• LEADER LAND – Local sports tidbits to share? Please contact the Leader by 4 p.m. on Tuesdays to go in Extra Points. – Marty Seeger and Brenda Sommerfeld ••• LEADER LAND – Leader Sports strives to follow the college careers of area athletes. If you know of an athlete who will be playing collegiate sports in 2009 and hasn’t been mentioned, send us an e-mail and we’ll take it from there. – Marty Seeger and Brenda Sommerfeld

SPORTS RESULTS DEADLINES: WEDNESDAY - MONDAY: 1 p.m. the following business day. TUESDAY: 7 a.m. on Wednesday. Missed deadlines mean no coverage that week! S P O R T S N E W S O R S C O R E S T O R E P O R T ? • P H O N E : 7 1 5 - 3 2 7 - 4 2 3 6 • FA X : 7 1 5 - 3 2 7 - 4 1 1 7 • E - M A I L : m s e e g e r @ c e n t u r y t e l . n e t


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Saints get by Webster/Siren Thursday Track/ continued from front Megan Finch and Kortney Morrin have been battling it out in the high jump all season long as well. “They’re both competing hard against each other, which is healthy,” Morrin said.

Angela Gaffney

Kortney Morrin

The Grantsburg boys have also been doing well individually, including Tony Larson, Jason Jensen and Mitch Evenson. “Mitch Evanson has really had a nice year throwing,” Morrin said, adding that he has been “coming into his own” in the shot and discus. Larson, Morrin said, has been moving along well in the pole vault and high jump. Jensen, so far this year, has seen a lot of different types of competition and excelled in several, and Morrin expects several individuals to be competitive Siren Track Invitational (5-12-09) Girls Team Results Place Team Points 1st Frederic 200.5 2nd Turtle Lake/Clayton 96.0 3rd Siren 77.0 4th Clear Lake 72.5 5th Grantsburg 67.0 6th Unity 65.0 7th Prairie Farm 43.0 8th Webster 14.0 Individual Results (Top area performers) 100-meter dash - 1. Sage Karl, F, 13.30; 3. Candace Buck, F, 14.40; 4T. Nikki Ticknor, G, 14.50; 4T. Saisha Goepfert, G, 14.50; 4T. Samantha Ince, U, 14.50; 7. Brianna Petersin, U, 14.51. 200-meter dash - 1. Sage Karl, F, 27.00; 4. Brianna Petersin, U, 30.20; 5T. Haley Larson, G, 30.90; 5T. Annie Kackman, F, 30.90; 7T. Haley Burkhardt, G, 31.30. 400-meter dash - 1. Calla Karl, F, 1:05.00; 6. Kendra Wells, F, 1:12.20; 7. Sara Underwood, F, 1:14.60; 8. Tatyanna Pope, W, 1:16.10. 800-meter run - 1. Calla Karl, F, 2:37.00; 2. Sarah Howe, S, 2:38.00; 3. Megan Anderson, F, 2:43.50; 5. Sarah Knauber, F, 2:46.40; 6. Katherine Ebensperger, U, 2:56.30. 1,600-meter run - 1. Sarah Howe, S, 5:54.60; 2. Megan Anderson, F, 5:55.90; 3. Sarah Knauber, F, 6:08.00; 4. Angela Gaffney, G, 6:28.30; 8. Amanda Kuske, U, 7:44.00. 3,200-meter run - 1. Sam Nelson, F, 12:08.10; 2. Angela Gaffney, G, 13:02.90; 6. Jessica Raboin, U, 16:13.00. 100-meter hurdles - 3. Adrianna Otte, F, 19.40; 4. Karry Simpson, F, 20.40; 5. Cadi Harper, U, 20.70; 6. Steph Kothlow, U, 21.30; 7. Jayme Mitchell, W, 21.70. 300-meter hurdles - 1. Sam Nelson, F, 51.70; 3. Sam Ince, U, 54.40; 4. Jade Johnson, F, 57.50; 5. Adrianna Otte, F, 57.60; 8. Katheryn Zahler, U, 1:01.50. 4x100-meter relay - 1. Frederic, 52.80; 2. Grantsburg, 55.80; 4. Siren, 58.50; 5. Unity, 1:00.20; 6. Webster, 1:01.10. 4x200-meter relay - 2. Frederic, 1:59.60; 3. Grantsburg, 2:00.00; 4. Unity, 2:07.30; 6. Siren, 2:11.10. 4x400-meter relay - 4. Frederic, 4:47.50; 5. Siren, 5:02.90; 6. Unity, 5:23.80. 4x800-meter relay - 1. Frederic, 10:31.70; 3. Unity, 12:21.60. High jump - 1. Megan Finch, G, 5-02; 2. Kortney Morrin, G, 5-01; 3T. Amanda Blok, F, 4-10; 4T. Saisha Goepfert, G, 4-10; 7. Steph Kothlow, U, 4-06. Long jump - 1T. Daphane Hubbell, S, 14-06; 1T. Jade Johnson, F, 14-06; 5. Tanesha Carlson, F, 13-09; 6. Carly Larson, G, 13-08.50; 8. Ashley Johnson, U, 13-07. Triple jump - 2. Jade Johnson, F, 30-05; 3. Candace Buck, F, 27-06.50; 5. Hayla Bader, U, 2704; 8. Carly Larson, G, 26-09.50. Shot put - 1. Daphane Hubbell, S, 30-10; 2. Ashley Guevara, S, 30-04.50; 3. Allison Anderson, F, 29-00.50; 4. Chelsea Larson, W, 28-05.50; 5. Kendra Wells, F, 27-10.75; 7. Sam Hill, U, 2701.00. Discus - 1. Ashley Guevara, S, 111-03; 2. Daphane Hubbell, S, 87-07; 3. Amanda Kuske, U, 86-00; 4. Cathryn McConnell, F, 74-08; 6T. Chelsea Larson, W, 69-03; 6T. Allison Anderson, F, 69-03; 8. Amber Hall, S, 68-11.

into the regionals. All of them are near the top of the conference already. Luck boys dominating some events LUCK – The Luck track team lacks depth much like the Frederic boys, but the individuals should be exciting to watch. Coach Jeff Brenizer says he sees the Webster boys and the Frederic girls dominating the conference, but he feels the Luck boys will be ready to compete and be right in the mix. “Our boys team will be fighting for second with several teams, including Unity, Frederic and Clear Lake,” said Brenizer, who at the beginning of the year said one of the boys strengths would be sprints and field events. “Arnold Gorr has been a great addition to the team and has dominated the 100 meter and 200 meter,” Brenizer said. adding that Landen Strilzuk has been perfect in the long jump. Nick Morgan will be another key to the boys team as well, but Brenizer says that they’ll need to peak soon. Much of their success will come down to how the team does in the shot and discus, pole vault and high jump. “It is very exciting because we have several kids that have a great opportunity to succeed,” Brenizer said. Siren Track Invitational (5-12-09) Boys Team Results Place Team Points 1st Frederic 136.0 2nd Unity 129.5 3rd Turtle Lake/Clayton 107.5 4th Clear Lake 86.5 5th Siren 60.0 6th Grantsburg 56.5 7th Webster 51.0 8th Prairie Farm 3.0 Individual Results (Top area performers) 100-meter dash - 1. Dustin McKinney, U, 12.00; 4. Damian Hubbell, S, 12.40; 7T. Matt Schultz, U, 13.10. 200-meter dash - 2. Tyler Calabria, F, 24.31; 4. Tony Larson, G, 25.30; 6. Tyler Christensen, U, 25.50; 7. Matt Schultz, U, 25.90. 400-meter dash - 2. Jason Jensen, G, 55.40; 3. Dylan Hendricks, U, 58.40; 5. Zach Edgell, U, 59.30; 6. Nick Koelz, W, 59.50; 7T. Ben Nelson, F, 59.60; 7T. Patrick Eaton, F, 59.60. 800-meter run - 3. Matt Emerson, G, 2:23.00; 4. Joel Anderson, F, 2:24.90; 6. Josiah Lund, F, 2:28.00; 7. Doug Bengtson, U, 2:28.20; 8. Daniel Gaffney, G, 2:28.30. 1,600-meter run - 2. Matt Emerson, G, 5:26.00; 3. Josiah Lund, F, 5:28.60; 5. Joel Anderson, F, 5:34.60; 6. Andy Falk, G, 5:41.20; 7. Jacob Stiemann, S, 5:52.10; 8. Nate Larson, S, 5:52.70. 3,200-meter run - 1. Ben Larson, F, 11:02.60; 2. Steven Olson, U, 11:05.50; 4. Mickey Muller, U, 13:01.50. 110-meter hurdles - 1. Zach Anderson, F, 18.10; 3. Tony Peterson, F, 19.40; 5. Dustin Bazille, U, 20.30; 6. Josh Baer, W, 20.40; 7. Xavier Foeller, U, 20.50; 8. Alec Carlson, U, 20.60. 300-meter hurdles - 1. Zach Anderson, F, 44.40; 2. Tony Peterson, F, 45.90; 5. Tim Sundstrom, W, 51.10; 6. Phil Preston, W, 53.90; 7. Mitch Galle, U, 56.70. 4x100-meter relay - 1. Unity, 46.70; 2. Siren, 47.20; 3. Webster, 49.80. 4x200-meter relay - 1. Unity, 1:38.40; 3. Webster, 1:48.50; 4. Frederic, 1:49.70; 5. Siren, 1:50.90. 4x400-meter relay - 2. Grantsburg, 3:46.60; 3. Frederic, 3:52.20; 4. Unity, 4:00.20; 5. Webster, 4:05.10; 7. Siren, 4:20.30. 4x800-meter relay - 1. Frederic, 9:18.00; 3. Unity, 10:02.40. High jump - 1. Tony Larson, G, 5-08; 3T. Tim Sundstrom, W, 5-04; 3T. Robert Kirk, F, 5-04; 3T. Luke Hilleshiem, U, 5-04; 6. Andrew Brown, S, 5-02; 7T. Murdock Smith, S, 5-00; 7T. Nick Koelz, W, 5-00. Long jump - 1. Dustin McKinney, U, 19-03; 2. Dustin Bazille, U, 18-05; 4. Isaac Wegner, S, 1706.50; 6. Mike Bamberry, W, 16-04.50. Triple jump - 1. Zach Anderson, F, 38-11; 2. Tony Peterson, F, 38-05; 3. Rush Hickethier, U, 37-02; 4. Isaac Wegner, S, 37-00; 6. Dan Dochinak, W, 34-11; 8. Tim Sundstrom, W, 33-02. Shot put - 1. Joe Swanson, U, 43-07.75; 2. Seth Stoner, S, 41-07; 3. Cody Gruel, F, 40-08.50; 4. Mitch Evenson, G, 38-06.25; 5. Andrew Brown, S, 38-03.25; 6. Garrett Eichman, W, 37-09; 7. John Chelmo, F, 37-07; 8. Kevin Berry, G, 37-02. Discus - 1. Joe Swanson, U, 144-04; 2. Cody Gruel, F, 129-07; 3. Collin Tewalt, S, 126-07; 4. Seth Stoner, S, 120-03; 5. Ben Shives, W, 115-08; 6. John Chelmo, F, 113-07; 7. Mitch Evenson, G, 111-05; 8. Jake Lubich, W, 110-09.

Luck’s Nick Morgan and Unity’s Dustin McKinney take off down the track in an earlier meet this season. – File photos by Marty Seeger Unity track suprising coach Morris BALSAM LAKE – Like the St. Croix Falls and Siren track teams, the Unity Eagles will be mixing it up toward the top of the conference. The Unity girls have been having some success and much of that has been due to the field events. “[I] have been very happy with our performances with all of the girls. We have been competitive in all of the meets,” said girls coach Mike Bielmeier. Although the Eagles haven’t had any real standout athletes this year, Bielmeier says the girls have been having good performances. The Eagles will face some pretty stiff competition after the conference meet. The regionals is set to be held in Somerset this season, and Bielmeier is hopeful they’ll have success beyond conference. “Hopefully we can get some girls to sectionals,” said Bielmeier. As for the boys, 30-year coach Mike Morris says he’s working with a large crop of underclassmen with just two seniors and five juniors. But that hasn’t stopped the team’s success this year according to Morris. “At the beginning of the season I felt we would be lucky to be in the middle of the pack but these young men have worked hard and accomplished far more than I expected. We are not a conference favorite by any means, but we do plan to make some noise at the conference meet,” Morris said. St. Croix Falls track ST. CROIX FALLS – “So far this season has gone very well,” says first-year girls track coach Steph Belisle. “I have a dedicated, hardworking group of young

ladies.” Belisle says she’s seen great improvement from her 4x800 relay with senior Meghan Smith, freshman Lauren Richter, and sophomores Ashley Bollig and Bailey Bergmann. The 4x400 has seen nice improvements as well with freshmen Ally Mahler, Lauren Richter, Sarah Petznick and senior Meghan Smith. The relays have been competitive according to Belisle, and she says Petznick has been improving in the 100- and 300-meter hurdles. She also mentioned Bergmann, who excels in the distance events. “Bailey Bergmann has run well in the distance races all season and is looking to find greater success as the end of the season approaches. With strong leadership from our senior captains, Meghan Smith and Paige Marek, the team looks to be competitive in the tournament season,” Belisle said. Siren track SIREN – The Siren Dragons track team will likely have several contenders looking to advance beyond the regional track meet, including Sarah Howe, who has been dominant in the 1600-meter run with times like 6:00.40. Ashley Guevara has also been standing out this year for the Dragon girls in the discus with distances of 96-9.5, and better. Although the boys lack depth they have been competitive in the 4x200 meter relay and Isaac Wegner has been competitive in the triple jump. Seth Stoner could be one to watch in the shot put.

Paige Marek of St. Croix Falls looks to clear her mark in the pole vault.


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Luck leads area golfers in Hayward well, shooting 163 and 164 respectively, and Reed Sorenson scored a 164 as well for Unity. Luck’s Christian McCabe fell into the top 50 individuals with a 171.

Unity still holding top spot in conference by Marty Seeger HAYWARD – Area golf teams headed off to Hayward for a two-day tournament last weekend at the Telemark Golf Course. The Scott Miller Invitational hosted 24 schools, with Luck taking 10th overall with a total score of 685. Rice Lake was ninth overall with a score of 669. Unity was not far behind Luck with a team total of 701. The Eagles held the 12th spot, and St. Croix Falls finished 16th, 711; Grantsburg 17th, 714; and Frederic finished in 24th place with an 832. Among the top 50 golfers participating, five area golfers fell into the category with Kyle Christensen of St. Croix Falls, shooting a 161, which was a tie with four other golfers in the 14th spot overall. Luck’s Carson Giller and Dylan Fultz did

Carson Giller of Luck has been consistently putting up good scores for the Cardinals this season.

Luck's Dylan Fultz eyes up a shot in an earlier golf meet. – File photos by Marty Seeger

Unity's Brandon Stencil takes a big swing at the ball. Stencil has been near the top of the mix of successful golfers for the Eagles this year. Saints junior Kyle Christensen chips the ball onto the green. Christensen did well at the Scott Miller Invitational in Hayward recently Siren Golf Invitational (5-12-09) Siren Golf Course Team Scores Place Team Score 1st Unity 166 2nd Grantsburg 173 3rd Luck 174 4th St. Croix Falls 175 5th Webster 181 6th Siren 185 7th Frederic 213 Individual Scores Name Score School Dylan Fultz 35 Luck Reed Sorenson 37 Unity Luke Bollant 40 Siren Tony Folk 42 Grantsburg John Mikl 42 St. Croix Falls Brandon Stencil 42 Unity Mitchell Elliott 42 Webster Derek Sando 43 Grantsburg Chris Aldrich 43 Luck Josh Yunker 43 St. Croix Falls Jake Bengtson 43 Unity Brad Berner 44 Grantsburg Connar Goetz 44 Grantsburg Kyle Johnson 44 Grantsburg Sam Bengtson 44 Unity Kyle Christensen 45 St. Croix Falls Drew Fontainelle 45 St. Croix Falls Roger Steen 46 Luck Blake Yunker 46 St. Croix Falls Alex Clemmons 46 Webster Dan Erickson 46 Webster Ian Anderson 47 Frederic Kevin Niedenfuer 47 Siren Erik Nelson 47 Unity Karl Weber 47 Webster Justin Decorah 49 Siren Jordan Sargent 49 Siren Scott Stromberg 49 Webster Christian McCabe 50 Luck Ben Clasen 50 Siren Hunter Wilson 51 Luck Brent Crandell 54 Frederic William Primm 54 Frederic Chris Hopp 58 Frederic Dayton Rivera 60 Frederic

Unity senior Sam Bengtson has been one of several consistent golfers this year for the Eagles. Frederic Golf Invitational (5-11-09) Frederic Golf Course Team Scores Place Team Score 1st Unity 164 2nd Grantsburg 167 3rd St. Croix Falls 172 4th Luck 173 5th Siren 176 6th Webster 181 7th Frederic 193 Individual Scores Name Score School Reed Sorenson 35 Unity Dylan Fultz 36 Luck Connar Goetz 40 Grantsburg Josh Yunker 40 St. Croix Falls Jordan Sargent 41 Siren Brad Berner 42 Grantsburg Tony Folk 42 Grantsburg Carson Giller 42 Luck Kyle Christensen 42 St. Croix Falls Blake Yunker 42 St. Croix Falls Justin Decorah 42 Siren Erik Nelson 42 Unity Derek Sando 43 Grantsburg Brandon Stencil 43 Unity Alex Clemmons 43 Webster Luke Bollant 44 Siren Sam Bengtson 44 Unity Mitchell Elliott 44 Webster Jake Bengtson 45 Unity Scott Stromberg 45 Webster Chris Hopp 47 Frederic Ian Anderson 47 Frederic Roger Steen 47 Luck Chris Aldrich 48 Luck John Mikl 48 St. Croix Falls Dayton Rivera 49 Frederic Kevin Niedenfuer 49 Siren Dan Erickson 49 Webster Brent Crandell 50 Frederic Taylor Sempf 50 St. Croix Falls William Primm 51 Frederic Christian McCabe 52 Luck Karl Weber 53 Webster Kyle Johnson 54 Grantsburg Ben Clasen 57 Siren

Scott Miller Golf Invitational (5-8 & 5-9-09) Hayward Golf Course Team Scores Place Team Score 1st EC Memorial 630 2nd Hudson 640 3rd New Richmond 641 4th Superior 649 5th Chippewa Falls 654 6th Hayward 664 7th Duluth Denfeld 665 8thT Northwestern 669 8thT Rice Lake 669 10th Luck 685 11th Cumberland 686 12thT Unity 701 12thT Washburn 701 14th EC North 705 15th Amery 708 16th St. Croix Falls 711 17th Grantsburg 714 18th Ladysmith 740 19th Menomonie 747 20th Bloomer 759 21st Spooner 774 22nd Barron 782 23rd Chetek 806 24th Frederic 832 Individual Scores Name Score School Kyle Christensen 161 St. Croix Falls Carson Giller 163 Luck Dylan Fultz 164 Luck Reed Sorenson 164 Unity Christian McCabe 171 Luck Blake Yunker 175 St. Croix Falls Derek Sando 176 Grantsburg Brad Berner 177 Grantsburg Sam Bengtson 181 Unity Connar Goetz 181 Grantsburg Ben Benstson 182 Unity Tony Folk 182 Grantsburg Brandon Stencil 183 Unity Jake Bengtson 185 Unity Josh Yunker 187 St. Croix Falls Roger Steen 188 Luck John Mikl 188 St. Croix Falls Dayton Rivera 196 Frederic Chris Aldrich 196 Luck Kyle Johnson 197 Grantsburg Alex Mikl 199 St. Croix Falls Chris Hopp 209 Frederic William Primm 210 Frederic Ian Anderson 225 Frederic Brent Crandell 226 Frederic

Frederic Invitational FREDERIC – The Frederic Golf Course held a conference invite on Monday, with Unity holding the top spot with a team score of 164. Grantsburg came close with a score of 167, and St. Croix Falls and Luck tangled scores with the Saints edging out the Cardinals with a score of 172 to Luck’s 173. Siren also had a competitive showing on Monday with a score of 176, with Webster totaling 181 and Frederic picking up the last spot with a 193. Unity is still holding that top spot in the conference and the Eagles are led by Reed Sorenson, who leads the conference individually with 162 points. Luck’s Dylan Fultz, Blake Yunker of St. Croix Falls, Carson Giller of Luck and Kyle Christensen of St. Croix Falls follow Sorenson with 120, 116, 114 and 112 points respectively. Sorenson was the medalist on Monday night as he shot a 35, while Fultz of Luck came in a close second with a 36.

2009 Golf All-Conference Points Standing Team Points Team Points Unity 43 Grantsburg 39 St. Croix Falls 37 Luck 34 Webster 22 Siren 15 Frederic 7 Standing Individual Points Name Points School Reed Sorenson 190 Unity Dylan Fultz 150 Luck Brandon Stencil 124 Unity Tony Folk 120 Grantsburg Blake Yunker 116 St. Croix Falls Carson Giller 114 Luck Kyle Christensen 112 St. Croix Falls Derek Sando 98 Grantsburg Luke Bollant 96 Siren Brad Berner 92 Grantsburg Josh Yunker 74 St. Croix Falls John Mikl 70 St. Croix Falls Connar Goetz 70 Grantsburg Sam Bengtson 64 Unity Mitchell Elliott 64 Webster Kyle Johnson 62 Grantsburg Jake Bengtson 58 Unity Karl Weber 30 Webster Justin Decorah 30 Siren Alex Clemmons 28 Webster Christian McCabe 26 Luck Erik Nelson 26 Unity Jordan Sargent 26 Siren Chris Aldrich 24 Luck Rhett Warner 18 St. Croix Falls Roger Steen 18 Luck Ben Bengston 12 Unity Scott Stromberg 12 Webster Siren Golf Invitational (5-6-09) Siren National Golf Course Team Scores Place Team Score 1st Pine City, Minn. 311 2nd Grantsburg 312 3rd Somerset 326 4th Webster 334 5th Siren 349 6th Glenwood City 351 7th St. Croix Central 360 8th Cameron 428 9th Turtle Lake INC Individual Scores Name Score School Derek Sando 74 Grantsburg Tony Folk 78 Grantsburg Kyle Johnson 79 Grantsburg Alex Clemmons 79 Webster Brad Berner 81 Grantsburg Karl Weber 81 Webster Mitchell Elliott 82 Webster Connar Goetz 83 Grantsburg Jordan Sargent 83 Siren Luke Bollant 84 Siren Justin Decorah 86 Siren Dan Erickson 92 Webster Scott Stromberg 95 Webster Kevin Niedenfuer 96 Siren Ben Clasen 105 Siren


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Vikings slide by Cardinals with two runs Saints hit away at Siren Frederic 2, Luck 1 by Brenda Sommerfeld FREDERIC – In a close game, the Frederic Vikings managed to slide by the Luck Cardinals in a 2-1 win on Monday, May 11. Luck’s run was scored in the third inning. Jade Schrock was put on base by a walk. Tabitha Pilz was safe at first on a throwing error. Krystal Stage grounded to the pitcher and was thrown out at first. Schrock attempted to score but was beat home by a throw from Frederic’s first baseman, Maria Miller. Pilz scored after a single hit from Ali Lehmann and a throwing error. Frederic scored their two runs in the sixth inning on a homer by Chrissy Chenal. Chenal was third up to bat in the bottom of the sixth. Corissa Schmidt was on base from a walk. Schmidt scored on Chenal’s home-run hit, before the inning ended with the next two batters. Chenal went 2 for 3 at the plate, with two RBIs. Alex Lonetti had Frederic’s only other hit against Luck pitcher Melissa Jenssen. Luck’s Stage and Lehmann had the team’s two hits against Viking pitcher Chenal and Lehmann scored an RBI. Birchwood 9, Luck 8 LUCK – The Luck softball team had one bad inning in a nonconference game on Tuesday night that eventually led to a one-run loss. The Cardinals had a 7-2 lead after four innings of play, which began with singles from Ali Lehmann and Melissa Jenssen in the first inning. Hannah Melin hit a two-RBI double and Gena Pearson hit an RBI single for the third run of the inning. Another three runs came in the third inning with a Jenssen double and a Taryn Pilz RBI triple. Pearson hit a double, Jade Schrock hit an RBI single and Tabitha Pilz also singled. With one more run added in the fourth inning off a Taryn Pilz RBI single, the Cards were in business.

Frederic catcher Alex Lonetti waits for the ball after Chrissy Chenal pitches to Luck’s Gena Pearson during the Vikings 2-1 win over the Cardinals on Monday, May 11. – Photo by Brenda Sommerfeld But Birchwood came back with a seven-run fifth inning on three hits and five walks. Luck had a chance to rally in the bottom of the seventh with an RBI single from Lehmann but fell short. – Marty Seeger Frederic 16, TL/Clayton 5 TURTLE LAKE – The Vikings crushed out a win over Turtle Lake/Clayton Tuesday night with 16 runs on 15 hits. Corissa Schmidt had the hot bat, going 4 for 4 with three RBIs, while Alex Lonetti and Maria Miller each had three hits with an RBI apiece. Despite five errors the Vikings pitching staff allowed just two hits. Chrissy Chenal pitched over four innings with one walk and 11 strikeouts. Schmidt pitched just over an inning with one strikeout and allowed one hit. Chenal and Vanessa Neumann each had a pair of hits for the Vikings, and Tara Anderson had a hit as well. – Marty Seeger

Grantsburg’s Lauren Finch slides into Unity second baseman Jordyn Christensen as Eagle Marisa Hacker goes to back Christensen up. – Photo by Scott Hoffman

Grantsburg 17, Unity 4 BALSAM LAKE – The Pirates softball team won easily over the Eagles Tuesday night with 17 runs on 14 hits. Cody Crawford led Grantsburg at the plate going 3 for 3, scoring three times with an RBI. The Pirates got eight runs in the second inning and had two four-run innings, in the fourth and fifth innings. Michelle Lund, Annie Palmquist and Emily Cole each had two hits for the Pirates, and Lauren Finch had three RBIs on one hit. Lund pitched three innings and allowed no hits, with one walk and five strikeouts. Jessica Hoffman threw the final two innings and allowed three hits, four runs and had two strikeouts. The Eagles had three hits total, and Cailin Turner pitched the five innings for the Eagles, giving up 16 earned runs. – Marty Seeger

St. Croix Falls 26, Webster/Siren 3 SIREN – The St. Croix Falls Saints had 20 hits during their 26-3 win against Webster/Siren on Tuesday, May 12. Each one of the St. Croix Falls players had at least one hit against pitchers Siiri Larsen and Audrey Mulliner. Alicia Chelberg, as lead batter, went 4 for 5, scoring four runs, Amanda Larson went 3 for 3, Megan Yunker 3 for 5, Rebecca Wamfler 3 for 4 and Jamie Rohm 2 for 4. Webster/Siren scored three runs on three hits against pitcher Larson. Larsen, Rose Kopecky and Nikki Steiner each had one of the hits. Samantha Kopecky, Loreto Stange and Larsen were the players to score in the teams four innings. – Brenda Sommerfeld

St. Croix Falls Megan Yunker makes it safely to first against Webster/Siren in their previous game this season. – File photo by Marty Seeger


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Unity on a roll with win over Luck last night, the defense is starting to come around, and the hitting has come a long ways,” Frederic coach Troy Schmidt said. The Saints had Nick Johnson go 4 for 5 at the plate, Will Ball 2 for 4 and Ben Anderson 2 for 3. Matt Vold had three RBIs, Sam Schmidt two and Ball one. “Our hitting was sporadic at the beginning of the game, but we turned it on at the end,” Randolph commented. This was a good team victory as everyone had a chance to contribute.” Frederic’s Trae Gehl went 4 for 4, Joe Draxler, David Harlander and Matt Norston each went 2 for 4 at the plate. Norston made two RBIs and Harlander and Andrew Kurkowski each one. “Our bats came to life last night and we hit the ball hard,” Schmidt said. – Brenda Sommerfeld

Saints remain undefeated in conference Unity 9, Luck 6 by Marty Seeger BALSAM LAKE – After a big win over Grantsburg last Thursday night the Eagles managed to pull out another big conference win over Luck on Monday. “It was a nice win for us. Our players have done a great job of overcoming adversity, and last night was no exception,” said Unity coach Matt Humpal. Unity grabbed an early 2-1 lead after the first inning, but Luck came right back in the second with a pair of runs that came with the help of a nice double from Gary Ekholm and a single from Derek Letch. It was a back and forth game, with Unity coming right back in the bottom of the third. Two lead walks and a key Jason Vlasnik bunt loaded the bases with no outs, and Eric Goulet hit a smash between short and third for an RBI single. Luke Nelson forced in the next run on a fielder’s choice, and the Eagles regained a 4-3 lead. Derek Jorgenson made it 5-3 with an RBI single before the inning ended. Harry Severson-Dickinson came up big in the top of the fourth with a key two-RBI double, which helped give the Cards another lead at 6-5. But Unity remained strong and never allowed the Cardinals another run in the game, as the Eagles tied it back up in the bottom of

Luck 11, Birchwood 1 LUCK – The Cardinal boys baseball team run-ruled the Bobcats in five innings on Tuesday night, moving their conference record to 4-3 and 8-7 overall. Harry Severson-Dickinson scored three times on three walks and was hit by a pitch. He threw all five innings for the Cards with six strikeouts and allowed just two hits and one walk. Luck got 11 runs on four hits with singles from Jamison Gross, Mitch Larson, Gary Ekholm and Jake Schrock. – Marty Seeger Unity’s Dennis McKinney plows up dirt at home plate against Luck on Monday night. – Photo by Marty Seeger the fourth. A key RBI single by Sam Florer gave Unity a 7-6 lead in the bottom of the fifth and a balk called gave Unity an-

Frederic’s Matt Norston hit a single base hit against St. Croix Falls while the bases were loaded to bring in two runs. – Photo by Brenda Sommerfeld

other run in the inning. Florer came up with a nice catch in right field in the seventh as well, which rounded out the team effort for the Eagles and the win. “It starts on the mound and trickles down to everyone else,” said Humpal. “Including the bench players who came through for us last night.” Luke Nelson pitched seven innings for Unity, allowed eight hits, had three walks and three strikeouts. He only allowed one earned run in the game. St. Croix Falls 11, Frederic 6 FREDERIC – St. Croix Falls took their sixth conference victory. The Saints defeated Frederic, 11-6, on Monday, May 11. “We played an improving Frederic team,” St. Croix Falls coach Paul Randolph said. “They certainly made us work for the victory.” St. Croix Falls was up 1-0 after the first inning and held it through the second. Frederic scored three runs in the third inning, followed by three from the Saints. St. Croix Falls scored seven more in the next four innings, while Frederic only had three. “We turned a couple of double plays

St. Croix Falls 19, Siren/Webster SIREN – The Saints dismantled the Siren/Webster baseball team on Tuesday night with an impressive win. “Believe it or not, the most impressive thing I saw our team do was routine in so many ways,” said Saints coach Paul Randolph, adding that his team was hustling and backing up each play the way they were supposed to. At the time Randolph said the Saints had a 13-2 lead, but they didn’t let up. “Sometimes during a game when the score gets stretched a bit, players may let up. There was no let up in our hustle from the first to last pitch of the game,” Randolph added. Cory Gebhard and Gus Koecher each went 4 for 5 and Matt Vold had four RBIs including a two run homer in the third inning. The Saints had 20 hits and six players had two or more RBIs including Sam Schmidt, Marcus Campbell, Josh Larcom, Ben Anderson, Koecher and Vold. “All the little things teams do are really big,” Randolph said. “We will continue to work on the little things.” – Marty Seeger

McKenzie Lanes Saturday mixed double winners

The I Laws took first place in the McKenzie Lanes Saturday night mixed doubles bowling league. Pictured (L to R): Gene and Kathy Braund, Sharon and Bill Berg and Jackie and Dave Berg. – Photos submitted

Tim and Linda Katzmark and Dorothy and Gene Ludack make up the Ten Pin Titans team that took second place for the Saturday night mixed doubles bowling league at McKenzie Lanes.


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Webster/Siren takes fourth in softball tourney Grantsburg wins both Saturday games Webster/Siren 4, Pact Charter 3 Ashland 9, Webster/Siren 4 Amery 10, Webster/Siren 0 by Brenda Sommerfeld SIREN – The Webster/Siren softball team won one game during the six-team tournament hosted in Siren on Saturday, May 9. Webster/Siren defeated Pact Charter, 4-3, but lost to Ashland 9-4 and Amery 10-0. Webster/Siren took third place in the tournament, with both Braham and Pact Charter not winning a single game. Against Pact Charter, Webster/Siren scored one run in the first inning with Siiri Larsen crossing home plate. Rose Kopecky hit a single during the inning and Ally Rydel was thrown out at first but scored Larsen after making contact with the ball. The fifth inning had Webster/Siren’s second run. Megan Baasch scored on contact by Rydel who was again thrown out at first. Samantha Kopecky scored the team’s third run with a home-run hit as the inning’s lead hitter. Kopecky went 2-3 at the plate during the game. Rose Kopecky hit a triple in the seventh inning and scored the team’s final run. During the Ashland game, all four of the Webster/Siren runs were scored in the sixth inning. Kayla Duclon, Nikki Steiner, Ellie Isaacson and Audrey Mulliner each crossed home for the team in the sixth. Most of the team’s batters had hits during the game, but Ashland had taken an early 7-0 lead and scored two more to win the game, 9-4.

MacKenzie Ryan, Grantsburg, slides home but is tagged out by the Osceola pitcher. – Photo by Scott Hoffman

Webster/Siren’s catcher Samantha Kopecky snags a pop fly during a previous game of the season. – File photo by Brenda Sommerfeld Webster/Siren’s two hits in the game against Amery were by Larsen and Steiner. Each inning at the plate ended quickly for Webster/Siren, while Amery scored 10 runs to end the game in the fourth inning. Grantsburg 9, Cumberland 0 Grantsburg 10, Osceola 5 GRANTSBURG – The Pirate softball team defeated both teams that visited their field on Saturday, May 9. Cumberland scored zero in Grantsburg’s 9-0 victory, and Osceola scored half the runs of the Pirates in the 10-5 game. Cumberland watched as Grantsburg quickly took a 6-0 lead after two innings. The Pirates final three runs happened in the sixth inning, while they held Cumberland to zero runs. Annie Palmquist went 4 for 4 at the plate. She scored three runs and had one RBI. Michelle Lund went 3 for 4, scoring two runs. Heather Davison went 2 for 4, scored one and had two RBIs. Osceola kept their game close to the Pirates for a few innings. Grantsburg scored three in the first two. It took Osceola three innings, but they tied the game 3-3, until the fourth. In the fourth, Grantsburg scored one more and followed it with six more in the fifth and one more in the sixth. Lund had three RBIs against Osceola, Jessica Hoffman two and Gabbie Witzany one.

Frederic’s Chrissy Chenal pitched against Shell Lake during the tournament hosted by Shell Lake on Saturday, May 9. – Photo by Larry Samson

Frederic 9, Spooner 1 Shell Lake 5, Frederic 1 SHELL LAKE – The Frederic softball team traveled to the Shell Lake tournament last weekend and split the day with a 9-1 win over Spooner, and a 5-1 loss to Shell Lake. The Vikings had 10 hits against Spooner, scoring two runs in the first inning on three hits, one by Corissa Schmidt, a double by Chrissy Chenal

and a Maria Miller single. Schmidt pitched seven strong innings for the Vikings, allowing no earned runs on four hits, walked none and had five strikeouts. Frederic stretched it to a 3-0 lead in the fourth inning when Miller singled and later scored on a groundout to short hit by Tara Anderson. The Vikings picked up another four runs in the fifth inning on three hits, from an Alex Lonetti single and RBI triples by Schmidt and Chenal. Their final two runs of the game came in the sixth courtesy of a Frankie Knuf single. She later scored on a fielder’s choice, and Chenal smacked another RBI triple to seal the one-sided victory for the Vikings. Chenal led the Vikings at the plate going 3 for 4 with one RBI and Schmidt had two hits with two RBIs, and Miller had two hits. Despite a nice win over Spooner, The Vikings lost 5-1 to Shell Lake and picked up just two hits in seven innings. Frederic had four errors and scored their first

run of the game in the top of the sixth inning without a hit. Their only two hits came in the top of the fifth inning on a Tara Anderson single and an Allie Lundblade single to load the bases, but Frederic left all three stranded. Chenal pitched six innings allowing six runs, five earned on six hits, with one walk and 10 strikeouts. – Marty Seeger St. Croix Falls 7, Bruce 3 ST. CROIX FALLS – The Saints softball team won at home last Saturday against Bruce, a day after getting shut out by Osceola. It was a different game for the Saints against Bruce, as the Saints compiled seven runs on 10 hits, and held the Red Raiders to four hits. Emily Scheuermann went 3 for 3 while Alicia Chelberg and Yunker each had a pair of hits. Larson, Laura Swenson and Rebecca Wampfler each had one hit. – Marty Seeger

The St. Croix Falls team high fives after a victory earlier in the season. The team defeated Bruce on Saturday. – File photo by Marty Seeger


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Soccer hits ground for youth in Webster by Nancy Jappe WEBSTER – “We have 11 teams that will be playing soccer in Webster every Thursday night of the season, which ends June 6. It is such a fun time watching the kids play,” Cherie Fischer said. Fischer is the regional commissioner for Region 1273 (Grantsburg/Webster/Siren) of the American Youth Soccer Organization. She is excited, because three soccer goals have now been set up on the Webster High

School football practice field with funding that came from the Siren/Webster Rotary Club. “The season is off and running,” Fischer said. “We are excited to have goals in Webster now, and we appreciate the rotary club for the donation.” With funding from the Siren Area Lions Club, the Burnett County Tavern League and the Wisconsin Tavern League, two soccer goals have been set up on the Siren School field for play

The players kicking the soccer ball in this photo are from the U08 Webster/Siren Team. With the U standing for under, these players are under the age of 8. Their games are played on the Webster High School practice football field Thursday nights from 5:30-8 p.m. – Photos submitted

The Siren and Webster players in this photo are from the U10 soccer team. The U in the name stands for under, indicating that these players are under the age of 10. They will be playing games on the Webster High School practice football field until June 6, the end of the season, using three sets of goals provided through a donation by the Siren/Webster Rotary Club.

there. “All together we have 33 teams, with 337 players, between Grantsburg, Siren and Webster,” Fischer went on to say. “It is always a tough job pulling together enough volunteers for all the work to be done for our soccer season to be successful, but somehow we always manage. We truly appreciate all the help from our

coaches (one for each team), referees, field setup and the rest of those that help organize the teams and players.” Games are played every Saturday in Grantsburg and every Thursday in Grantsburg and Webster. Webster hours are 5:30-8 p.m. Those who come to watch are always welcome.

Saints beat Pirates in Saturday tourney Frederic loses two in Shell Lake St. Croix Falls 15, Grantsburg 1 Somerset 3, St. Croix Falls 2 Grantsburg 11, Somerset 7 by Brenda Sommerfeld GRANTSBURG – St. Croix Falls, Grantsburg and Somerset baseball teams met up on the Pirates field on Saturday, May 9, to take part in a tournament. Both St. Croix Falls and Grantsburg won one game and lost the other. The Saints beat Grantsburg for the second time this season in a 15-1 victory. “We did a lot of things right against Grantsburg,” Saints coach Paul Randolph said. “This was a good win against a very proud baseball program. We know Grantsburg will be back to give us all they have and more.” “We got our butts whooped,” Grantsburg coach Pete Johnson said. “We curled up in a ball and I’m very disappointed about it.” Matt Vold had a strong game at bat for the Saints against the Pirates. Vold went 3-4; he scored two runs and had five RBIs. Nick Johnson also went 3-4 at the plate and scored two runs. Gus Koecher had three RBIs, Marcus Campbell and Josh Larcom each had two and Will Ball one. Grantsburg’s Thane Larson crossed home plate in the fifth inning for the Pirates only run. Larson also had the team’s only hit during the game. “My guys decided that this game was not Pirate ball and it can never happen again,” Johnson commented. The Pirates win during the tournament was against Somerset, who they defeated 11-7. “We came back after a rotten first game and hit really well,” Johnson said. “We needed this game to get back on track.” Somerset scored three in the first, but the Pirates came back in the second with four runs. Grantsburg scored two more in the third and fourth and three in the sixth, while Somerset only scored four

Saints Matt Vold looks to throw the ball to first base in an earlier game this year.

Grantsburg’s Austin Eskola throws the ball to first base from his secondbase position.

more the entire game. St. Croix Falls fell to Somerset 3-2 during the tournament. “We scored two runs in the first but could not capitalize on the bases loaded in the fifth,” Randolph commented. “Unfortunately, our batter hit a rocket line drive and our runner had no chance to get back to the base.”

tying run in the top of the sixth. Shell Lake sealed the win on a two-run homer in the top of the eighth inning, and Frederic struck out three times in the eighth. Flambeau got 13 runs on seven hits, and the Vikings only mustered a pair of hits from Draxler and Harlander for the second loss of the day Saturday. – Marty Seeger

Shell Lake 5, Frederic 3 Flambeau 13, Frederic 0 SHELL LAKE – The Vikings baseball team lost a pair of games in a tournament in Shell Lake last Saturday. Frederic’s game against Shell Lake offered up only three hits but went a total of eight innings. David Harlander had two hits for the Vikings and had an RBI single in the third inning. He hit another RBI single in the fifth inning, and a single from Joe Draxler in the fifth gave Frederic a 32 lead. The Lakers answered with two runs in the bottom of the fifth and tacked on the

Bruce 13, Unity 6 BRUCE – Unity didn’t go down without a fight at Bruce in a game played last Saturday. The Eagles jumped out to a 40 lead in the first inning and held a 5-4 lead after the second inning. But Bruce took the lead in the bottom of the third inning and didn’t look back as the Eagles managed five hits, including three from Dennis McKinney and one each from Brady Flaherty and Luke Nelson. – Marty Seeger

Frederic’s Joe Draxler is coached by first-base coach Steve Jensen. – File photos by Brenda Sommerfeld

Unity’s Sam Florer made a diving stab in right field. – File photo by Marty Seeger


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Zero walks given during Frederic-Grantsburg game Eagles and Saints defeat conference opponents Grantsburg 4, Frederic 0 by Brenda Sommerfeld GRANTSBURG – The Grantsburg Pirates shut out Frederic, 4-0, during their game on Friday, May 8. Neither teams’ pitchers gave a single walk during the game. Pirate Michelle Lund played seven innings and had 15 strikeouts and gave up only two hits. Viking Chrissy Chenal, while at the plate for six innings, struck out eight and gave up eight hits and four runs. Having 15 batters strike out, the Vikings didn’t have much opportunity to score. Krysta Laqua got two hits, one single and one double. Laqua attempted to get on third after her double but was thrown out at third base by Grantsburg’s Heather Davison in a close play. Grantsburg scored one run in the first inning by Sarah Wald, one in the third by Tiffany Meyer and two in the fifth by Meyer and Annie Palmquist. Lund, Palmquist and Emily Cole each had an RBI, while all but two of the batters received at least one hit against Frederic pitcher Chenal.

Unity’s Brooke Gillespie caught a pop fly and then tagged out Webster/Siren’s Nikki Steiner for a double play. – Photo by Brenda Sommerfeld

Viking Krysta Laqua gets tagged out by Pirate Sarah Wald at third base during the game Friday, May 8. – Photo by Scott Hoffman for Unity. Marisa Hacker, Thomfohrda and Crystal Donahue each had one hit. Webster/Siren’s Siiri Larsen had the only hit against Unity pitcher Turner. – Brenda Sommerfeld

The Saints got on board in the bottom of the first inning when Abby Swenson drew a walk that eventually led to an RBI single from Heather Gilbert. The next big inning for the Saints came in the second inning when they jumped out to a 5-0 lead. Amanda Larson led the inning off with a single and Emily Scheuermann singled in the next at bat for the Saints. Jamie Rohm knocked in the first run of the inning with a fielder’s choice grounder to second, and Vicky Houliston smacked an RBI double. Wild pitches were the cause of two more runs for the Saints before Swenson hit an RBI single, getting tagged out at second to end the inning. St. Croix Falls spent much of the rest of the game playing defense and holding back Luck from getting any more runs for a chance at a comeback. In the top of the third inning Luck scored their first run of the game with an RBI single from Melissa Jenssen. The Cardinals had a big opportunity to score more than just two runs in the sixth inning when they were able to draw four walks and eventually load the bases, only to end the inning on a groundout. Luck had no hits in the inning but capitalized on the four walks, one error and a wild pitch. The Cardinals went quietly in the top of the seventh as both teams moved to 3-4 in the conference. The Saints had a team total of 11 hits in the game with Gilbert and Scheuermann each batting 2 for 3. Larson gave up three hits to the Cardinals with eights strikeouts. – Marty Seeger

Osceola 10, St. Croix Falls 0 OSCEOLA – St. Croix Falls mustered just two hits from Megan Yunker and Amanda Larson in their 10-0 loss to Osceola last Friday, and went down onetwo-three in all four of the five innings played. Osceola helped themselves to two runs in the first inning and one run in the third before opening up their offense in the fourth inning with seven runs on three hits. – Marty Seeger

St. Croix Falls 5, Luck 3 ST. CROIX FALLS – It was a nice win for the Saints softball team last Thursday as they defeated their conference foe, Luck.

Unity 7, Webster/Siren 1 BALSAM LAKE – The Unity Eagles scored a 7-1 win over conference opponent Webster/Siren on Thursday, May 7 for their third conference win of the season. Neither team scored or got a runner past second base during the first three innings. Webster/Siren had the same happen in their fourth inning, but when Unity was up in the fourth it was a different story. The Eagles first five batters, Becca Milligan, Brittany Thomfohrda, Cailin Turner, Britney Peters and Jessica Kutina scored runs. Each run was capitalized on an error in the field. Two more runs were brought in for Unity during the fifth inning, while Rose Kopecky was the only one to cross home for the Webster/Siren team. Brooke Gillespie went 2-3 at the plate

Saints Abby Swenson heads to third as Luck shortstop Maia Lehmann flips the ball to Tabitha Pilz. Swenson was safe on the play. – Photo by Marty Seeger

Severson-Dickinson tosses one-hitter

Gehl allows four hits Luck 2, Frederic 1

by Marty Seeger LUCK – The Vikings and Cardinals baseball teams played a tight game last Friday night with solid pitching from both sides. The suspense began in the first inning for Luck after a leadoff double from Jamison Gross, who scored on a hit by Harry Severson-Dickinson. Bryson Clemenson hit a single in the inning, but Frederic got out of it without any further damage. It was a tough night for the Frederic bats but not for lack of connection with the ball. The Vikings went 1,2,3 in the first three innings but connected six Luck’s Harry Severson-Dickinson pitched all seven innings against the Frederic Vikings on Friday, May 8. – Photo by Marty Seeger

times only to come up short against great defense from Luck or by way of their three strikeouts. “We played alright, we just didn’t hit the ball. Harry shut us down and we had one hit, and scored one run … just not enough baserunners,” said Vikings coach Troy Schmidt. Severson-Dickinson pitched all seven innings for the Cards, with the Vikings only hit of the game coming in the top of the sixth inning. Andrew Kurkowski got on board with a single and got to second on a fielder’s choice hit by Pete Draxler. With two outs and Kurkowski on third after a stolen base, Brady McWilliam drew a walk on a wild pitch, and Kurkowski sped safely on a slide to home plate. But McWilliam’s attempt at reaching second base failed, as he was tagged out on a throw from Luck catcher Derek Letch. Luck held the Vikings defensively in the top of the seventh for the win despite Frederic getting a man on second.

The second run of the game for Luck proved the game clincher in the second inning when Gary Eckholm singled and later scored on an RBI double by Ben Kufalk. Cardinal pitcher Severson-Dickinson’s one-hit win featured eight strikeouts and one walk in 23 batters faced. Trae Gehl pitched a nice game for the Vikes in five innings with four hits allowed, six walks and one strikeout. Bryan Meyer finished off the final inning for the Vikings, and although Luck connected with the ball, each hit was caught for an out. “Trae [Gehl] pitched well and that inning we got out of Bryan Meyer was huge. In all coach Schmidt has been happy with the progress of his team throughout the season. “I thought we played really good defense and held a pretty good hitting team to two runs,” Schmidt concluded.


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Polk County Special Olympics 2009

Polk County’s relay team – Jason Neidermire, Jordan and Jarvis Warwas and Brianna Paulson - placed in the 4x100 relay.

The Polk County Special Olympics team carried the banner in the parade and opening ceremonies Saturday, May 9, at the Wisconsin 2009 Area 3 meet at Eau Claire North High School. The athletes competed in numerous trackand-field events. Some will go to state in Stevens Point in a few weeks.

Jessie Finneran placed in the turbo javelin, a new event this year, in which athletes had to see how far they Jason Neidermire (center) placed in the 200-meter run at the could throw a Special Olympics meet in Eau Claire. plastic javelin. Hayward Track Invitational (5-11-09) Girls Team Results Place Team Points 1st Hayward 188.0 2nd Northland Pines 103.5 3rd Drummond 94.0 4th Webster 75.0 5th Hurley 66.0 6th Shell Lake 64.5 7th Cumberland 52.0 8th Washburn 5.0 Individual Results (Webster performers) 100-meter dash - 7. Melissa Gustavson, 14.63; 15. Katie Payson, 15.66; 17. Billie Ingalls, 17.28; 18. Mackenzie Koelz, 17.82. 200-meter dash - 7. Melissa Gustavson, 29.48; 8. Shaina Pardun, 29.91; 9. Kendra Spurgeon, 29.94; 10. Alyssa Main, 29.99; 13. Sarah Nyberg, 34.39. 400-meter dash - 8. Sarah Nyberg, 1:14.90. 800-meter run - 9. Kayce Rachner, 2:53.77; 14. Tatyana Pope, 2:58.88; 16. Veronica Otero, 3:15.48. 1,600-meter run - 10. Veronica Otero, 7:12.28. 3,200-meter run - 6. Sarah Walsh, 14:26.37. 100-meter hurdles - 2. Michelle Gibbs, 18.17. 4x100-meter relay - 6. Webster (Katie Payson, Abby Ingalls, Billie Ingalls, Tatyana Pope), 1:02.63. 4x200-meter relay - 4. Webster (Shaina Pardun, Alyssa Main, Melissa Gustavson, Kendra Spiurgeon), 1:56.36. 4x400-meter relay - 3. Webster (Alyssa Main, Shaina Pardun, Chris Stoll, Michelle Gibbs), 4:41.47. 4x800-meter relay - 4. Webster (Kayce Rachner, Sarah Walsh, Veronica Otero, Ashley Robinson), 12:22.34. High jump - 3. Michelle Gibbs, 4-06. Long jump - 5. Kendra Spurgeon, 13-02.50; 11. Shaina Pardun, 11-11; 15. Katie Payson, 11-01. Triple jump - 2. Michelle Gibbs, 29-03. Shot put - 3. Mary Johnson, 31-07; 4. Reba Smallwood, 30-07.50; 9. Chelseas Larson, 2705.50. Discus - 3. Reba Smallwood, 98-05; 6. Mary Johnson, 90-07.

VARSITY TRACK RESULTS Hinckley-Finalyson Track Invite (5-8-09) Girls Team Results Place Team Points 7th Siren 35.0 Individual Results (Siren performers) 1,600-meter run - 1. Sarah Howe, 5:40. 4x400-meter relay - 6. Siren (Liz Otto, Jennica Kosloski, Kristen Sexton, Danielle Keller), 5:44.00 Long jump - 2. Daphne Hubbell, 14-06.75. Shot put - 4. Daphne Hubbell, 29-09.75; 5. Ashley Guevara, 29-08.50. Discus - 1. Ashley Guevara, 106-11. Hinckley-Finalyson Track Invite (5-8-09) Boys Team Results Place Team Points 6th Siren 36.0 Individual Results (Siren performers) 100-meter dash - 2. Damian Hubbell, 11.68. 4x100-meter relay - 2. Siren (Jeremy Wikstrom, Isaac Wegner, Collin Tewalt, Damian Hubbell), 47.00. 4x200-meter relay - 6. Siren (Collin Tewalt, Coty Reh, Murdock Smith, Andrew Brown), 1:49.40. Triple jump - 1. Isaac Wegner, 36-09. Shot put - 3. Seth Stoner, 41-06; 6. Charlie Brown, 35-02. Discus - 2. Seth Stoner, 119-09; 3. Collin Tewalt, 119-04.

Brothers Jordan and Jarvis Warwas did the 200meter run Saturday afternoon, May 9.

Photos by Regan Kohler Makinzie Miller competed in the softball throw.

Cornell Track Invitational (5-8-09) Girls Team Results Place Team Points 1st Bruce 159.0 2ndT Cornell 62.0 2ndT Lake Holcombe 62.0 4th Weyerhaeuser 58.0 5th Luck 20.0 6th New Auburn 18.0 Individual Results (Luck performers) 100-meter dash - 2. Marnie Rozumalski, 15.00; 3. Katie Gutzmer, 15.20. 200-meter dash - 5. Diana Kufalk, 31.02. Long jump - 4. Marnie Rozumalski, 13-01.50; 5. Diana Kufalk, 12-09.50. Shot put - 4. Brittney Danielson, 23-02. Discus - 4. Brittney Danielson, 69.20.

Cornell Track Invitational (5-8-09) Boys Team Results Place Team Points 1st Cornell 100.0 2nd Luck 93.5 3rd Lake Holcombe 69.0 4th Bruce 59.0 5th New Auburn 36.5 6th Weyerhaeuser 30.0 Individual Results (Luck performers) 100-meter dash - 1T. Arnold Gorr, 12.00; 3. Nick Morgan, 12.50; 4. Jordan Lundmark, 12.60. 200-meter dash - 1. Arnold Gorr, 24.50; 3T. Nick Morgan, 25.10; 3T. Landen Strilzuk, 25.10. 4x200-meter relay - 1. Luck, 1:38.00. High jump - 1. Adam Anderson, 5-08; 2. Brady Klatt, 5-04. Pole vault - 2. AJ Walsh-Brenizer, 11-00. Long jump - 1. Landen Strilzuk, 18-09; 3. Jordan Lundmark, 16-11; 4. Brady Klatt, 16-03. Triple jump - 3. Landen Strilzuk, 37-06. Shot put - 2. Max Musial, 40-06; 3. James Longhenry, 40-00.25. Discus - 3. James Longhenry, 114-07; 4. Adam Anderson, 109-10.

Hayward Track Invitational (5-11-09) Boys Team Results Place Team Points 1st Webster 170.0 2nd Hayward 159.0 3rd Northland Pines 94.0 4th Cumberland 71.0 5th Drummond 47.0 6thT Washburn 31.0 6thT Hurley 31.0 8th South Shore 24.0 9th Shell Lake 19.0 Individual Results (Webster performers) 100-meter dash - 4. Dan Pope, 12.03; 19. Adam Rinnman, 12.89; 22. Seth Pardun, 13.25; 23. Mike Bamberry, 13.26. 200-meter dash - 3. Dan Pope, 24.06; 16. Dan Dochniak, 26.11; 21. Seth Pardun, 26.64. 400-meter dash - 4. Kyle Godfrey, 54.61; 14. Taylor Heinz, 58.90; 16. Nick Koelz, 59.58; 19. Cody Isaacson, 1:00.54. 800-meter run - 1. Quentin Johnson, 2:05.89; 2. Bryan Krause, 2:06.40; 8. JT Elmgren, 2:17.30. 1,600-meter run - 1. Jack Taylor, 4:45.40; 3. Nick Krinkie, 4:52.17; 4. Devin Greene, 4:56.31; 6. Joey Erickson, 4:57.55. 3,200-meter run - 1. Jack Taylor, 10:27.79; 2. Joey Erickson, 10:53.95; 4. Devin Greene, 10:59.60. 110-meter hurdles - 8. Tim Sundstrom, 20.06; 15. Nolan Kriegel, 25.10. 300-meter hurdles - 4. Nolan Kriegel, 46.17; 8. Ryan Brickle, 47.31; 11. Tim Sundstrom, 49.54; 13. Phil Preston, 52.12. 4x100-meter relay - 2. Webster (Adam Rinnman, Trevor Fontaine, Dan Dochniak , Mike Bamberry), 48.94. 4x200-meter relay - 1. Webster (Ryan Brickle, Dan Dochniak, Mike Bamberry, Mason Kriegel), 1:40.99. 4x400-meter relay - 1. Webster (Dan Pope, Bryan Krause, Quentin Johnson, Kyle Johnson), 3:33.43. 4x800-meter relay - 1. Webster (Jack Taylor, Bryan Krause, Quentin Johnson, Nick Krinkie), 8:29.43. High jump - 4T. Taylor Heinz, 5-04; 9. Tim Sundstrom, 5-02; 11T. Nick Koelz, 5-00. Long jump - 2. Kyle Godfrey, 19-10; 9. Mike Bamberry, 16-10; 20. Cody Isaacson, 14-06. Triple jump - 4. Dan Dochniak, 36-10; 5. Tim Sundstrom, 35-02; 6. Kyle Godfrey, 34-10. Shot put - 4. Jessie Janssen, 40-11.50; 6. Kyler Liljenberg, 40-00.50; 8. Garrett Eichman, 3900.50; 12. Jake Lubich, 36.07. Discus - 4. Kyler Liljenberg, 125-00; 5. Dan Pope, 124-03; 9. Jessie Janssen, 112-08; 10. Ben Shives, 107-09.


PAGE 26 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 13, 2009

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Siren/Webster gives Saints a run Unity wins second game against Grantsburg St. Croix Falls 5, Siren/Webster 0 by Marty Seeger ST. CROIX FALLS – Despite the Saints 5-0 win last Thursday, the Siren/Webster baseball team played it close for the better part of four innings. St. Croix Falls scored a run in the first inning with the help of a single from Cory Gebhard, but both teams went scoreless in the next three innings of play before the Saints opened up a 4-0 lead. Saints pitcher Josh Larcom allowed just three hits, no walks and had eight strikeouts in seven innings. “Our catcher called a great game and our pitcher was outstanding with his control,” said Saints coach Paul Randolph, adding that Larcom threw just 78 pitches. Meanwhile, Siren/Webster pitcher Ben Roedl threw a nice game by keeping Saints bats away from a wicked curveball. He threw seven innings with one strikeout, two walks and gave up nine hits. Siren/Webster threatened to score in the first inning when Shane Rossow hit a single, making it around to third base off a steal and fielder’s choice. Spencer Peterson had a pair of hits for Siren/Webster and helped the team with another threat to score in the fifth inning with a single, but again the attempt to score failed. The Saints were relatively quiet in the first four frames, but in the fifth Sam Schmidt laid down a nice bunt and made it to second on a steal and eventually third on a wild pitch. Nick Johnson then hit an RBI triple and Gebhard hit an RBI single. Will Ball also hit an RBI single in the inning to help the Saints go up 4-0. “Coach [Jon] Ruud had his team play-

Unity’s Seth McKenzie catches a fly ball in a previous game. – File photo by Marty Seeger

Siren/Webster’s Evan Oachs looks to first base to make an out as teammate Austin Elliott looks on and Saints Cory Gebhard heads to third. – Photo by Marty Seeger ing well,” Randolph said. “They hustled and did a lot of right things. Siren/Webster will be a team to be reckoned with in the future.”

The Saints were led by Gebhard who went three for three with three stolen bases and an RBI. Ball and Johnson each had two hits in the game.

MORE TRACK RESULTS

Unity 3, Grantsburg 1 GRANTSBURG – The Eagles and Pirates first met on Thursday, April 16, where Grantsburg took a one-run, 2-1, victory over Unity. Unity took their revenge in a 3-1 victory, during the teams’ second conference matchup on Thurs-

New Richmond Track Relay Meet (5-8-09) Boys Team Results Place Team Points 1st Hudson 113.0 2nd New Richmond 84.5 3rd Osceola 61.0 4th Menomonie 50.0 5th Hayward 40.0 6th Unity 35.5 7th Ellsworth 32.0 8th Somerset 29.0 9thT River Falls 28.0 9thT Baldwin/Woodville 28.0 11th Eau Claire North 25.0 12th Rice Lake 24.0 13th Prescott 21.0 14th Amery 10.0 15th Barron 4.0 Individual Results (Unity performers) 3x110-meter shuttle hurdles - 6. Unity (Dustin Bazille, Alec Carlson, Xavier Foeller), 55.8. 3x140-meter shuttle hurdles - 8. Unity (Mitch Galle, Alec Carlson, Xavier Foeller), 59.0. 4x100-meter relay - 7. Unity (James Slate, Luke Hilleshiem, Mike Johnson, Dustin McKinney, Dustin Bazille, Matt Schultz), 48.1. 4x200-meter relay - 4. Unity (James Slate, Mike Johnson, Dustin McKinney, Dylan Hendricks, Dustin Bazille, Matt Schultz), 1:36.80. 4x400-meter relay - 12. Unity (Tyler Christensen, Zach Edgell, Rush Hickethier, Joe Swanson, Zach Cardot, Alec Carlson), 3:53.90. 4x800-meter relay - 12. Unity (Zach Edgell, Mickey Muller, Steve Olson, Steven Anderson, Doug Bengtson, Matt Schultz), 9:49.50. 1,600-meter sprint medley - 11. Unity (Mike Johnson, Dustin McKinney, Tyler Christensen, Zach Edgell, Rush Hickethier, Steve Olson), 4:04.70. High jump relay - 10T. Luke Hilleshiem, 5-06; 16T. Steven Krueger, 5-03; 30T. Dylan Hendricks, 5-00. Pole vault relay - 8T. Luke Hilleshiem, 11-00; 13T. Dylan Hendricks, 10-00. Long jump relay - 1. Dustin McKinney, 20-07; 10. Rush Hickethier, 18-11.50; 16. Dustin Bazille, 18-08.25. Triple jump relay - 16. Rush Hickethier, 36-03; 17. Luke Hilleshiem, 36-01.50; 31. Xavier Foeller, 32-08.50. Shot put relay - 10. Joe Swanson, 43-09.25; 35. Tyler Christensen, 35-07; 39. Zach Cardot, 3407. Discus relay - 2. Joe Swanson, 157-02.25. Zach Cardot, 103-02; 40. Jared Peper, 94-10.

Clear Lake Track Invitational (5-7-09) Girls Team Results Place Team Points 1st Turtle Lake/Clayton 125.0 2nd Webster 113.5 3rd Glenwood City 112.0 4th Clear Lake 95.0 5th Unity 81.5 6th St. Croix Falls 74.0 7th Prairie Farm 68.0 Individual Results (Top area performers) 100-meter dash - 3. Melissa Gustavson, W, 14.06; 4T. Shaina Pardun, W, 14.18; 4T. Brianna Petersin, U, 14.18; 7. Haley St. Amand, U, 14.36; 8. Gabby Nuckles, SCF, 14.41. 200-meter dash - 3. Sam Ince, U, 28.43; 5. Melissa Gustavson, W, 29.35; 7. Lauren Richter, SCF, 29.70. 400-meter dash - 5. Chris Stoll, W, 1:09.90; 6. Brittany Rudolph, SCF, 1:10.88; 8. Bailey Bergmann, SCF, 1:17.96. 800-meter run - 5. Kayce Rachner, W, 3:00.81; 6. Ashley Bollig, SCF, 3:05.80; 7. Ally Mahler, SCF, 3:08.70. 1,600-meter run - 2. Bailey Bergmann, SCF, 6:03.02; 7. Kayce Rachner, 7:14.02; 8. Danielle Dyson, W, 7:15.30. 3,200-meter run - 5. Jessica Raboin, U, 16:57.28. 100-meter hurdles - 2. Michelle Gibbs, W, 17.71; 3. Sarah Petznick, SCF, 17.13; 6. Kayla Bixler, SCF, 18.64; 7. Steph Kothlow, U, 19.21; 8. Hayla Bader, U, 20.37. 300-meter hurdles - 1. Sarah Petznick, SCF, 51.68; 5. Kayla Bixler, SCF, 57.64; 6. Steph Kothlow, U, 1:00.30; 7. Katheryn Zahler, U, 1:00.18. 4x100-meter relay - 2. Unity, 57.17; 3. St. Croix Falls, 57.28; 6. Webster, 1:04.95. 4x200-meter relay - 2. Webster, 1:57.34; 3. Unity, 2:01.01; 6. St. Croix Falls, 2:07.29. 4x400-meter relay - 3. St. Croix Falls, 4:33.70; 4. Webster, 4:39.33. 4x800-meter relay - 2. St. Croix Falls, 11.34; 4. Unity, 12.18. High jump - 2T. Steph Kothlow, U, 4-08; 5. Michelle Gibbs, W, 4-08; 6T. A Johnson, U, 406. Pole vault - 1. Shaina Pardun, W, 7-06; 3T. Brittany Bernier, 6-06; 3T. Mackenzie Koelz, W, 606; 3T. Paige Marek, SCF, 6-06. Long jump - 1. Ashley Johnson, U, 14-11.25; 3. Jenna Christensen, U, 13-09. Triple jump - 1. Michelle Gibbs, W, 31-04; 5. Sarah Petznick, SCF, 27-11; 6. Jenna Christensen, U, 27-05; 7. Hayla Bader, U, 27-00. Shot put - 1. Reba Smallwood, W, 31-04; 3. Mary Johnson, W, 30-10; 5. Chelsea Larson, W, 28-01.5. Discus - 1. Reba Smallwood, W, 103-08; 5. Mary Johnson, W, 87-02; 8. Shauna Rein, W, 6906.

day, May 7. “It was a big win,” Unity coach Matt Humpal said. “I think the hardest part for a lot of these kids is that they have never had a big win in any sport. It was tough to overcome that mental challenge for us.” The Eagles managed to overcome the challenge after being down 1-0 for the first three innings. Ben Larson led Grantsburg at the plate in the first inning. Being walked, he eventually scored on single hits by Trent Bonneville, Jamie Robb and Trevor Thompson. Unity scored the tying run in their fourth inning. Luke Nelson brought Dennis McKinney home with a hit. The fifth inning went fast for both teams at the plate. The Eagles first two batters in the sixth inning, Jason Vlasnik and Brady Flaherty, each scored. Vlasnik hit a single, while Flaherty walked to first. McKinney’s single hit and Derek Jorgenson’s sacrifice bunt scored the team’s winning runs. “We made a couple of nice defensive plays throughout the game,” Humpal commented. “We then took that momentum into our bats in the sixth inning to score two.” Being in the same regional bracket, Grantsburg and Unity may have the chance to face each other one more time during tournaments. – Brenda Sommerfeld

Clear Lake Track Invitational (5-7-09) Boys Team Results Place Team Points 1st Webster 179.5 2nd Clear Lake 147.5 3rd Unity 114.5 4th Turtle Lake/Clayton 102.0 5th St. Croix Falls 66.5 6th Glenwood City 47.0 7th Prairie Farm 5.0 Individual Results (Top area performers) 100-meter dash - 2. Dan Pope, W, 12.10; 3. James Slate, U, 12.12; 5. Matt Schultz, U, 12.40; 7. Brandyn Rudolph, SCF, 12.62. 200-meter dash - 2. Dan Pope, W, 24.71; 6. Matt Schultz, U, 26.39; 8. Dan Dochniak, W, 26.54. 400-meter dash - 2. Kyle Godfrey, W, 54.93; 3. Zach Cardot, U, 58.09; 4. J. Solberg, U, 59.06; 5. Nick Koelz, W, 59.22; 6T. Zach Edgell, U, 1:00.34; 8. Taylor Heinz, W, 1:02.29. 800-meter run - 1. JT Elmgren, W, 2:16.3; 2. Steven Olson, U, 2:16.9; 3. Ryan Nussbaum, SCF, 2:19.8; 5. Doug Bengtson, U, 2:24.11. 1,600-meter run - 2. Devin Greene, W, 4:57.9; 4. Jake Rademacher, SCF, 5:18.1; 5. JT Elmgren, W, 5:20.4; 7. Alex Frey, SCF, 5:25.6. 3,200-meter run - 2. Devin Greene, W, 11:11.29; 4. Alex Frey, SCF, 12:06.66. 110-meter hurdles - 3. Alec Carlson, U, 19.28; 5. Mitchell Galle, U, 20.75; 6. Josh Baer, W, 20.83. 300-meter hurdles - 3. Ryan Brickle, W, 49.14; 4. Tim Sundstrom, W, 51.03; 5. Philip Preston, W, 57.43; Mitchell Galle, U, 52.70. 4x100-meter relay - 2. Unity, 47.71; 3. St. Croix Falls, 49.6; 4. Webster, 50.22. 4x200-meter relay - 3. Webster, 1:45.63; 4. St. Croix Falls, 1:47.87. 4x400-meter relay - 1. Webster, 3:45.12; 4. St. Croix Falls, 4:05.75; 5. Unity, 4:07.31. 4x800-meter relay - 1. Webster, 9:24.4; 3. St. Croix Falls, 9:48.23; 4. Unity, 10:30.90. High jump - 2T. Steven Krueger, U, 5-08; 4. Tim Sundstrom, W, 5-06; 5T. Nick Koelz, W, 504; 5T. Taylor Heinz, W, 5-04; 5T. Jake Rademacher, SCF, 5-04. Pole vault - 1T. Mason Kriegel, W, 10-06; 1T. Dylan Hendricks, U, 10-06; 1T. Seth Pardun, W, 10-06; 4T. Ben Jensen, W, 10-00; 4T. Luke Hilleshiem, U, 10-00; 6. Zac Rintoul, SCF, 9-06; 7T. Jared Peper, U, 9-00. Long jump - 2. Kyle Godfrey, W, 18-07; 4T. Mike Bambery, W, 16-05.5; 4T. Garret Radinzel, SCF, 16-05.5; 8. Steven Olson, U, 16-00.5. Triple jump - 2. Rush Hickethier, U, 37-08; 5. Dan Dochniak, W, 34-10. Shot put - 1. Joe Swanson, U, 44-11.5; 2. Ryan Larson, SCF, 42-01; 5. Kyler Liljenberg, W, 4001.5; 4. Jessie Janssen, W, 37-11; 5. Garrett Eichman, W, 36-08; 7. Zach Cardot, U, 35-01.5. Discus - 1. Joe Swanson, U, 138-04; 2. Ryan Larson, SCF, 135-05; 4. Kyler Liljenberg, W, 116-02; 5. Zach Cardot, U, 113-07; 6. Ben Shives, W, 107-01; 8. Dan Pope, W, 104-04.


MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 27

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Here are some important questions, some inquisitive, some rhetorical. • Does probable future Minnesota Viking and future Hall of Fame quarterback Brett Favre have another Pro Bowl season in him? • Will Packer THE SPORTS fans still consider Favre to be the consummate leader and team player who “plays the game the way its meant to be played” even if he’s wearing a Viking uniform this fall? • Now that Leader scribe Marty Seeger has met the challenge of slaying a wild turkey gobbler with

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bow and arrow (see May 6 Leader issue) will he now set his sights on achieving the grand slam of North American sheep? • Who would’ve ever expected a clean-cut choir boy like Manny Ramirez to be among the major league baseball players suspended for consuming a banned substance? • Is Roger Clemens certifiably nuts or does he just act that way? • “If Webster High School grad and current Seattle Mariner Jarrod Washburn picks up a victory Wednesday night in Texas, might he be well on his way to his first allstar selection? • Can Twins megastar Joe Mauer continue at the pace that could have him finish the 2009 season with a .500 batting average and approximately 50 home runs? • Is coach Paul Randolph’s St. Croix Falls baseball team poised to hold off perennial champion

LEADER SPORTS SCOREBOARD BASEBALL

West Lakeland Conference Standings

Team St. Croix Falls Grantsburg Unity Luck Frederic Siren/Webster 10-----

Conf. 7-0 4-2 4-3 4-3 1-6 0-6

Scores

Overall 12-4 7-8 9-7 8-7 1-11 0-

Thursday, May 7 St. Croix Falls 5, Siren/Webster 0 Unity 3, Grantsburg 1 Friday, May 8 Luck 2, Frederic 1 Saturday, May 9 Bruce 13, Unity 6 Flambeau 11, Frederic 0 Shell Lake 5, Frederic 3 St. Croix Falls 15, Grantsburg 1 Somerset 3, St. Croix Falls 2 Monday, May 11 Unity 9, Luck 6 Grantsburg at Siren/Webster (stats unavailable) St. Croix Falls 11, Frederic 6 Tuesday, May 12 Luck 11, Birchwood 1 Grantsburg at Pine City (stats unavailable) St. Croix Falls 19, Siren 2

Upcoming

Thursday, May 14 5 p.m. Luck at St. Croix Falls Siren/Webster at Unity Frederic at Grantsburg Saturday, May 16 9 a.m. St. Croix Falls at Cumberland 10 a.m. Luck at Amery Monday, May 18 5 p.m. Grantsburg at Luck Frederic at Siren Unity at St. Croix Falls Tuesday, May 19 5 p.m. St. Croix Central at Unity Siren/Webster at Lake Holcombe Turtle Lake/Clayton at Frederic 7:30 p.m. Grantsburg at Rush City, Minn.

TRACK & FIELD Upcoming

Friday, May 15 4 p.m. St. Croix Falls at Siren Luck at Siren 4:30 p.m. Frederic at Turtle Lake Tuesday, May 19 3 p.m. Conference at Clear Lake

MEN’S SLOW-PITCH Standings

Team Overall Pour House 1-0 Fur, Fins & Feathers 1-0 Godsquad 1-0 Chell Well 1-0 Sundown 1-0 Grantsburg Sanitary 1-1 Lake Lena 0-1 Da Crew 0-1 Century 21 0-1 Shooter Bar 0-2 Scores Wednesday, May 6 Pour House 20, Lake Lena 7 Fur, Fins & Feathers 36, Da Crew 8 Godsquad 17, Shooter Bar 6 Chell Well 12, Grantsburg Sanitary 2 Sundown 13, Century 21 4 Grantsburg Sanitary 15, Shooter Bar 3

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Grantsburg and win their first conference diamond title since 1991? • Will the Saints success continue with potential conference titles in football and boys basketball as some are already predicting for the 2009-10 school year? • Why did wild turkeys seem so much wilier and craftier 10-or-so years ago when we first began to hunt them? • Will ex-Unity little leaguer Mark Hallberg shake himself out of what could be the first prolonged hitting slump of his career and eventually chalk up the 2009 season as a success for the Arizona Diamondback’s Class AA affiliate in Mobile, AL? • Were spies who work the Columbus, Ohio beat surprised when they observed that two St. Croix Falls High School grads, Andy Nelson and Molly Kalmoe, were both in town on May 2, competing for their respective Division 1 athletic teams? (Nelson for Ball State’s volleyball team and Kalmoe for the U of Minnesota’s rowing team) • Will ex-Grantsburg Pirate Aaron Berner–who is hitting .323 and has started 40 games both as a catcher and outfielder–continue to perform well as he and his Min-

nesota State (Mankato) Mavericks play in the NCAA Division 2 Regional playoffs which begin Thursday in Grand Junction, Colo.? • Did you know that pitcher Jordan Zimmerman of the Washington Nationals, who has started five games on the mound and has a 2-1 record, is a native of Auburndale and finished his college career in 2008 at the UW-Stevens Point? • Did you know that Auburndale is also the hometown of hefty and hirsute Green Bay Packers offensive tackle Mark Tauscher? • Is it true that not only will this region of the state not be identified as a white-tailed deer “Herd Control Unit,” but does it also mean we will see a major reduction in antlerless tags issued? And does that mean we will no longer see trailers at the registration station filled with seven to nine does and fawns piled inside, and will we then no longer have to endure local yokels proclaiming how proudly they single-handedly (and legally) shot 15 deer between archery and firearm seasons? John Ryan may be reached at jmr202@yahoo.com

West Lakeland Conference Standings

Team Grantsburg Frederic Luck Unity St. Croix Falls Webster/Siren

Scores

Conf. 8-0 5-3 3-4 3-5 3-4 1-7

Overall 19-0 10-5 6-9 5-6 7-10 2-15

Thursday, May 7 St. Croix Falls 5, Luck 3 Unity 7, Webster/Siren 1 Friday, May 8 Grantsburg 4, Luck 0 Osceola 10, St. Croix Falls 0 Saturday, May 9 Grantsburg 9, Cumberland 0 Grantsburg 10, Osceola 5 Webster/Siren 4, PACT Charter 3 Amery 10, Webster/Siren 0 Ashland 9, Webster/Siren 4 Frederic 9, Spooner 1 Shell Lake 5, Frederic 1 St. Croix Falls 7, Bruce 3 Monday, May 10 Frederic 2, Luck 1 Tuesday, May 11 Birchwood 9, Luck 8 St. Croix Falls 26, Webster/Siren 3 Frederic 16, Turtle Lake 5 Grantsburg 17, Unity 4

Upcoming

Thursday, May 14 5 p.m. Grantsburg at Luck Frederic at Webster/Siren Unity at St. Croix Falls Friday, May 15 5 p.m. Turtle Lake at Unity Cameron at St. Croix Falls Saturday, May 16 10 a.m. St. Croix Falls at Amery Tourney Monday, May 18 5 p.m. Cameron at Luck Unity at Frederic Tuesday, May 19 5 p.m. Webster/Siren at Luck St. Croix Falls at Grantsburg

READ LEADER SPORTS BALL TOURNEY TEAMS & ORGANIZER WANTED Central Burnett County Fair Webster, Wis.

July 9-12 For more info. call Renelle at 715-866-8261. 485110 38r,L

GOLF

Upcoming

Thursday, May 14 9 a.m. Unity at Rice Lake Luck at Rice Lake Frederic at Rice Lake St. Croix Falls at Rice Lake Friday, May 15 9:30 a.m. Siren at Birchwood Monday, May 18 4 p.m. All area teams at Unity Tuesday, May 19 4 p.m. All area teams at Luck

WOMEN’S SLOW-PITCH

Standings Team Overall Maurer Construction 2-0 Chell Trucking 1-0 Coyland Creek 1-0 Clam Falls/Pheasant Inn 0-2 Bobbie’s World 0-2 Scores Monday, May 11 Maurer Construction 37, Bobbie’s World 13 Coyland Creek 34, Clam Falls/Pheasant Inn 8

PREPS

OF THE

NAME: Sage Karl SCHOOL: Frederic YEAR: Sophomore COMMENTS: Frederic sophomore Sage Karl has had a great season so far for the girls track team. She set a school record in the 200-meter dash with a time of 26.59. She’s also done well in other events including the 100-meter Sage Karl dash. She placed first in that event on Tuesday night with a time of 13:30. – Marty Seeger

WEEK

NAME: Arnold Gorr SCHOOL: Luck YEAR: Junior COMMENTS: Arnold Gorr is a foreign exchange student from Germany who has been a nice addition to the Luck athletic programs, including the track team. Gorr has dominated the 100- and 200-meter Arnold Gorr dash in several events this year and, “Arnold Gorr has been a great addition to the team,” said coach Jeff Brenizer. – Marty Seeger


PAGE 28 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 13, 2009

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ATVs • BIRDING • BOATING • CAMPING • FISHING • HIKING • HUNTING • RECREATIONAL VEHICLES

Getting the lead out, again

There are roughly 16 nesting pairs of trumpeter swans on Crex Meadows alone and several others inhabiting the surrounding areas in Polk and Burnett counties and Marty across the border in Minnesota. It’s only fitSeeger ting that Crex Meadows be the host of the most recent presentaThe tion on the trumpeter Bottom swan, its life, history in Wisconsin, and more Line importantly, the effects of lead poisoning from hunting ammo and fishing tackle on the swans. It began with a one-hour slide show presented by avian biologist Pat Manthey, who has been studying the trumpeter swan for several years. She probably knows everything there is to know about the trumpeter swan and is dedicated like the hundreds of others that have been involved in its recovery. After writing several articles recently about the topic of lead poisoning and the success in the swan’s recovery, I still managed to pull knowledge from what was presented. But mostly, I was there to greet the people I’d been writing about over the past couple of months and see a film called “Mystery of the Toxic Swans,” which was shown following Manthey’s presentation. The Canadian documentary, which was filmed near Abbotsford, British Columbia, focused much of its attention on Judson Lake, which is located near the U.S./Canadian border near Washington state. Since 1990, the documentary showed that over 2,100 swans have died from swallowing lead pellets that were fired from shotguns, either from hunting or trap shooting. Because of these findings, the family living on the lake banned hunting altogether, which was a scary thought considering that nontoxic shot could still be used. Despite banning hunting on their property swans continued to perish. Lead doesn’t just seem to go away, so shots fired a

From (L to R): Mary Wicklund of Grantsburg, Barry Wallace of Hudson and DNR avian biologist Pat Manthey listened to a group at Crex Meadows last Saturday after a movie about the impacts of lead on trumpeter swans. – Photos by Marty Seeger hundred years ago could still realistically be ingested. The fact that trumpeter swans had been dying of lead poisoning was not really the mystery, but the source, where the swans were ingesting the lead, had scientists perplexed. They had even done a lengthy study that focused on chasing the birds off the lake to prevent them from eating in those areas where they felt the lead was coming from. Yet, birds continued to become poisoned. The film was just an hour long but still managed to drive home the point that lead is toxic and could continue to kill swans and other wildlife for years to come. Due to copyright laws the film could be shown only once at the Crex, but you can read more about it online and find short clips that review the basic storyline. After the documentary, Manthey and others shared their knowledge and answered questions people had regarding the film and lead poisoning. Mary Wicklund hails from Grantsburg and volunteers her time to help trumpeter swans that have been poisoned by lead. “She’ll go anywhere and do just about anything to help swans,” said Cindy Bertalan, education coordinator at Crex Meadows. Barry Wallace lives on the St. Croix River in Hudson where dozens of swans winter each year. He not only monitors them but records data and looks for signs of lead poisoning and other dis-

ease. Just this year he recorded around 15 birds that had been poisoned by lead. Over 90 percent of those birds eventually perished. Several people used the opportunity to ask what they could do to help. Most seemed motivated to go out and do something about the problems with lead poisoning, and I’d like to think they’ll at least consider using nontoxic shot or lead-free fishing tackle in the future. As for me, I grabbed a package of the complimentary nonlead fishing tackle offered after the presentation and headed off to the lake Saturday. Even after seeing, writing and researching the effect that lead poisoning can have on wildlife, it was honestly the first time I had tried a nontoxic lure. I have yet to begin to replace all of the lead shotgun shells and .270 cartridges packed away at home, but eventually it will probably happen. I managed to catch a small largemouth and a nice crappie on the leadfree jig last Saturday, and was happy with how the bullet weight and sinkers performed, yet my tackle box is not yet lead free. Someday soon it will get to that point, but it might be some time before other anglers and hunters, bait shops and retail stores start carrying nontoxic products. Like lead, this problem will be here for years to come.

Free samples of lead-free, environmentally friendly tackle were available for those present at Crex Meadows last Saturday.

Sponsor sign-up period open for Disabled Deer Hunts Hunt set for Oct. 3-11 MADISON – The sign-up period for landowners interested in sponsoring a deer hunt open only to hunters with disabilities is open through June 1. In 2009, the disabled hunt will take place Oct. 311. Sponsor applications are available online and must be submitted to your local

wildlife manager by June 1. A list of approved sponsors will be posted on the Department of Natural Resources Web site. Hunters with disabilities interested in participating in one of these hunts should contact sponsors directly to make arrangements. Sponsors are required to submit a list of participating hunters to the DNR by Sept. 1. To be eligible to participate in the Disabled Deer Hunt, hunters must possess a valid Class A permit, a long-term Class

Great Northern Outdoors Thursday Bass Fishing League First week results 1. Cory Meyer, 5 lbs., 14 oz. 2. Rob Buchholz 5 lbs., 9 oz. 3. Adam Bistram 4 lbs., 13 oz. 4. Adam Memmer 3 lbs., 15 oz. 5. Aaron Bistram 3 lbs., 14 oz. 6. Shawn Hutton 3 lbs., 8 oz. 7. Al Briese 3 lbs., 2 oz. 8. Dean Clontz 2 lbs., 7 oz. 9. Marc Wiehl 1 lb., 4 oz. 10. Aaron Long 1 lb., 1 oz.

Did not catch legal-sized fish Ralph Britton Tim Hutton Kathy Erickson Jamie Magnuson Bryan Fox Vern Knauber Kirk Miller Micheal Clontz Tony Peterson Bruce Dau

B permit issued for more than one year and that authorizes shooting from a vehicle, or a Class C disabled hunting permit. The gun deer hunt for hunters with disabilities was started in 1990 in Wisconsin to give disabled hunters an opportunity to hunt deer at a time of year when temperatures are generally milder and mobility is less of a problem. The hunts are sponsored by private individ-

uals or organizations and almost entirely take place on privately owned lands. Interest in the program continues to grow. In 2008, there were more than 100 participating sponsors enrolled and more than 62,000 acres available for the hunt. For more information contact Linda Olver at 608-261-7588, or Ray Smith of the Polk County Sportsmen’s Club at 715-268-8267. – from the DNR

Fishing workshop at East Balsam Baptist Church BALSAM LAKE – A fishing workshop is being held at the East Balsam Baptist Church on Saturday, May 16, from 9 a.m. until noon, along with a free pancake breakfast, which is being served from 7:30 a.m. until 9 a.m. A DNR presentation and update on the local lakes, and a free seminar on

muskie, pike, bass and panfish is on the list of things to do, as well as a kids casting event and games. East Balsam Baptist Church is located at 1816 108th Street off CTH Rd I, five miles east of Jonzy’s Market. – Marty Seeger with submitted information


MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 29

Polk County circuit court

Burnett Co. deaths Michael B. Shute, 48, Grantsburg Township, April 22.

Steven A. Simonson, 61, Union Township, April 6.

Burnett County criminal court Shana L. Corbine, 28, Webster, operate without valid license, $186.00. Chelsea R. Lindmeier, 23, Danbury, operate without valid license, $186.00. Janet D. Beck, 69, Spooner, operate without valid license, $186.00. Antoinette J. Bearhart, 21, Webster, operate without valid license, $186.00. Max C. Gorkiewicz, 34, Grantsburg, bail jumping, twoyear probation, $88.00; disorderly conduct, two-year probation, 32-day jail sentence, absolute sobriety, complete mental health evaluation within first six months of probation, alcohol assessment, $188.00. Emily D. Benson, 17, Grantsburg, disorderly conduct, $309.00. Trevor D. DeMarre, 24, Webster, disorderly conduct, threeday jail sentence, $88.00. Brandon J. Bearheart, 24, Webster, resisting or obstructing an officer, three-year probation, 90-day jail sentence, Huber re-

NOTICE

TOWN OF LAKETOWN BURNING BAN

Burning is allowed from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. only from April 1, 2009 to June 1, 2009. Patsy Gustafson 484786 Town Clerk 38L

Luck, Wis.,

is looking for a Pianist/Organist for their worship services. Please call Pastor Mary Ann Bowman at 715-472-8153 for details. 485085 38L

VILLAGE OF LUCK

1:30 p.m. at the church in rural Grantsburg, Wis.

Saturday, May 16, 2009 10 - 11:30 a.m. at the Village Hall Hosted by Village President Nancy Webster-Smith

485675 38L

Sunday, May 24,

BONE LAKE LUTHERAN CHURCH,

LISTENING SESSION

485112 38-39Lp

PLEASANT PRAIRIE CEMETERY ANNUAL MEETING

lease granted for employment and work search, update sex offender registry as required. Mary F. Wheeler, 44, Grantsburg, possession of drug paraphernalia, $309.00. Daniel D. Hornbeak, 27, Frederic, possession of drug paraphernalia, $309.00. Jay A. McDowell, 26, Spooner, burglary to building or dwelling, five-year probation, one-year jail sentence, Huber release granted for work, work search and counseling appointments, alcohol assessment. $13,079.30 restitution, $1,420.93. Lynn M. Weiss, 39, Clayton, OWI, $1,977.00, 80-day jail sentence, Huber release granted, license revoked 27 months, alcohol assessment.

Darrel E. Johnson, New Richmond, seat belt violation, $10.00. Jennifer R. Johnson, Clayton, seat belt violation, $10.00. Justin J. Johnson, Balsam Lake, speeding; speeding, $160.80. Paige N. Johnson, Balsam Lake, retail theft, $203.00. Shawna M. Johnson, Clayton, county/municipality disorderly conduct, $175.40. Albert L. Kasdorf, Balsam Lake, seat belt violation, $10.00. Ahmed M. Keynan, Barron, speeding, $160.80. Thomas C. Kickbusch, Kewaunee, speeding, $160.80. Robert G. Kramer, Fond du Lac, speeding, $186.00. Steven J. Krizak, Luck, fail./stop at stop sign, $160.80. Pauline Lu, Rice Lake, speeding, $160.80. Dean A. Lunstrom, Cumberland, interstate record of duty status, $257.00. Alex J. Mazurek, Barronett, speeding, $211.20. (April 8, 15, 22, 29, May 6, 13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY C.U. Mortgage Services, Inc. 500 Main Street, Suite 100 New Brighton, MN 55112, Plaintiff, vs. Christopher W. Cobb Annadale R. Cobb 538 Roundlake Lane Osceola, WI 54020 and, J. Doe I-V and XY2 Company I-V, Defendants. NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE UNDER JUDGMENT AND DECREE OF FORECLOSURE Case No. 08-CV-481 Honorable Robert H. Rasmussen Foreclosure of Mortgage 30404 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure made in the above-entitled action on October 8, 2008, in the amount of $269,811.27, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: Thursday, May 28, 2009, at 10 a.m. TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff at the sale in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds, payable to the clerk of courts (personal checks cannot and will not be accepted). The balance of the successful bid must be paid to the clerk of courts in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds no later than ten days after the court’s confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold “as is” and subject to all liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Foyer Area, Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. DESCRIPTION: Lot One (1) of Certified Survey Map No. 505 recorded in Volume 2 of Certified Survey Maps on Page 234 as Document No. 385464, located in the West one-half of the Southeast Quarter (W 2 of the SE 3), Section One (1), Township Thirty-two (32) North of Range Eighteen (18) West, Town of Alden, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 538 Roundlake Lane, Osceola, WI 54020. Dated this 19th day of March, 2009. Peterson Fram & Bergman, P.A. By /s/Steven H. Bruns Attorneys for Plaintiff 55 E. 5th Street, Suite 800 St. Paul, MN 55101 Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (15 U.S.C. Section 1692), we are required to state that we are attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. 482192 WNAXLP

Jeffrey M. Mcgrane, Hammond, operating while under influence, six-month lic. rev., AODA assess. and compliance, $675.50. Mary K. Merrill, Balsam Lake, operating while revoked, not guilty plea. Carol J. Mittl, Hammond, speeding, $186.00. Abdinasir Y. Mohamoud, Barron, speeding, $186.00. Justin L. Nelson, Balsam Lake, seat belt violation, $10.00. Miles E. Nelson, Rice Lake, speeding, $160.80. Thomas H. Nonemacher, Clayton, nonregistration of vehicle, $249.00. Justin D. Ogdahl, Osceola, speeding, $160.80. Trent J. Parker, Balsam Lake, seat belt violation, $10.00. Jared A. Peper, Milltown, operating left of centerline,

$198.60. Meagan E. Peterson, Luck, seat belt violation, $10.00. Dawn M. Prigge, Shell Lake, speeding, $160.80. Tammy L. Ratajczak, Milltown, disorderly conduct with a motor vehicle, $173.40. Angela M. Reyes, Turtle Lake, speeding, not guilty plea. Kody L. Rosen, Amery, speeding, $160.80. Christopher A. Powell, Frederic, operate w/o valid license, $186.00. Jennifer E. Scanlon, Clayton, speeding, $160.80. Crystal L. Schmid, Roberts, speeding, $160.80. Robert S. Smith, Frederic, operate lg. veh. after rev./susp. of regis., $160.80. Tyler L. Stelton, Milltown, seat belt violation, $10.00. Amy L. Swanson, Rose-

(May 6, 13, 20, 27, June 3, 10) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK Plaintiff, vs. CAROLE A. RETANA and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, acting through the Rural Housing Service, United States Department of Agriculture, and WESTCONSIN CREDIT UNION Defendants. Case No. 08 CV 614 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on December 23, 2008, in the amount of $30,067.48, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on: Thursday, June 25, 2009, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: That part of Government Lot Two (2), Section Nineteen (19), Township Thirty-two (32) North, Range Fifteen (15) West, Village of Clear Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, described as follows: Commencing at a point 216 feet Southeasterly from the Northeast corner of Lot Six (6), Block Sixteen (16) in a Southeasterly direction parallel with Graves Street in the Village of Clear Lake; thence Southeasterly on a line with the Southerly line of Graves Street a distance of 75 feet; thence Southwesterly on a line parallel with the Easterly line of said Block Sixteen (16) a distance of 150 feet; thence in a Northwesterly direction on a line parallel to the Southerly line of Graves Street a distance of 75 feet; thence in a Northeasterly direction a distance of 150 feet to the point of beginning, being a portion of Outlot Eighty-nine (89), (previously recorded as Outlot 86), Village of Clear Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, according to the official plat on file and of record in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Polk County, Wisconsin. PIN: 113-00312-0000 Street Address: 150 Third Avenue, Clear Lake, WI 54005. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wis., this 24th day of April, 2009. Timothy G. Moore, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson / #1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787 484467 WNAXLP

(April 29, May 6, 13, 20, 27, June 3, 2009) STATE OF WISCONSIN POLK COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT WELLS FARGO BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, as Trustee, for First Franklin Mortgage Loan Trust 2004FFH3, Plaintiff vs. TROY D. CHRISTENSEN and JENNIFER S. CHRISTENSEN, husband and wife, and JANE DOE and/or JOHN DOE unknown tenants; and POLK COUNTY and DAVID HOLMDAHL; and DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY ASSOCIATES OF WISCONSIN, SC, and CHEMMASTER INC.; and RYAN M. BENSON and THE RIVERBANK; and LVNV FUNDING LLC, and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Defendants, and STATE OF WISCONSIN, Added Defendant. Case No. 08-CV-630 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00 AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on November 12, 2008, in the amount of $181,270.08, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: June 9, 2009, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 West Main St., Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: The East 515 Feet of the North 729 Feet of the Southeast Quarter of Northeast Quarter (SE 1/4 of NE 1/4), Section Twenty-nine (29), Township Thirty-five (35) North, Range Seventeen (17) West, Town of Milltown, Polk County, Wis., except the East 295 Feet of the North 362 Feet thereof, and except highway right of way. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1965 160th Street, Town of Milltown TAX KEY NO.: 40-969-0 Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 (414) 727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

mount, Minn., speeding, $186.00. Megan G. Taylor, Hayward, speeding, $186.00. Bee Thao, Brooklyn Center, Minn., speeding, $160.80. Joel P. Waage, S. St. Paul, Minn., speeding, $160.80. Leah D. Walker, Turtle Lake, seat belt violation, $10.00. Anthony T. Wall, St. Croix Falls, seat belt violation, $10.00. Bradley A. Wermter, Solon Springs, speeding, not guilty plea. Joshua A. White, Frederic, seat belt violation, $10.00. (May 13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY U.S. Bank National Association ND, Plaintiff, Vs. David B. Holmdahl and Teresa M. Holmdahl f/k/a Teresa M. Johnson, Defendants Case Code: 30404 AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Case No. 07 CV 666 Hon. Robert H. Rasmussen PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on the 14th day of April, 2008, the Sheriff of Polk County will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: DATE/TIME: May 26, 2009, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 10% of successful bid must be paid to the Sheriff at sale in cash or by certified check. Balance due within 10 days of court approval. Purchaser is responsible for payment of all transfer taxes and recording fees. Sale is AS IS in all respects. PLACE: Lobby of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810 DESCRIPTION: EXHIBIT A Parcel 1. The Northwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4, Section 27, Township 36 North, Range 19 West. Parcel 2. The Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4, Section 27, Township 36 North, Range 19 West, except the following parcels: a. The South 10 rods of the East 5 rods thereof, b. Parcel described as commencing at the Southeast corner of said SW1/4 of SW1/4, thence West along the South line of said forty a distance of 783 feet to the point of beginning of the parcel of land herein conveyed, thence continuing along the said South line a distance of 210 feet, thence North at right angles a distance of 210 feet, thence East at right angles a distance of 210 feet, thence South at right angles a distance of 210 feet to the point of beginning, and c. The South 280 feet of the East 589 feet of said SW1/ 4 of SW1/4, except the East 5 rods of the South 10 rods thereof, Parcel 3. The Southeast 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 Section 28, Township 36 North, Range 19 West. (FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY: Plaintiff believes that the property address is 2717 - 250th Ave., Cushing, Wis.) WARNING: There are encumbrances upon the subject property which have priority over the foreclosed mortgage. The property will be sold subject to such encumbrances. Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County Stein & Moore, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff 332 Minnesota St., Ste. W-1650 St. Paul, MN 55101 651-224-9683 485637 WNAXLP

David D. Engel, Hugo, Minn., speeding, $160.80. Jacob R. Espeseth, Clear Lake, disorderly conduct with a motor vehicle, $156.20. Paul M. Faymoville, Balsam Lake, seat belt violation, $10.00. Barbara A. Featherly, Shell Lake, seat belt violation, $10.00. Jared C. Firestone, Clear Lake, speeding, $280.50. Erica J. Fischer, Fridley, Minn., speeding, $186.00. Nathan E. Fouks, Deer Park, disorderly conduct with a motor vehicle, not guilty plea. Nelson T. French, River Falls, speeding, $186.00. Jacob D. Frokjer, Balsam Lake, speeding, not guilty plea. Eric B. Goulet, Balsam Lake, speeding, $160.80. Taylor T. Grunow, Dresser, license restriction violation, class D or M vehicle, not guilty plea. Lisa M. Gusse, Cushing, fail./stop at stop sign, $160.80. William A. Hanson, Clayton, issue worthless checks, $175.80. Adrian L. Harr, Luck, display false vehicle registration plate, $249.00. Dale J. Hellstern, Turtle Lake, vehicle equipment violations, group 1, $223.80. Charles M. Herbst, Clear Lake, violate absolute sobriety law; minor transporting intoxicants in MV, not guilty pleas. Tesha J. Horvath, Dallas, speeding, $160.80. Brittany M. Hoverman, Osceola, seat belt violation, $10.00. Christopher L. Illa, Turtle Lake, seat belt violation, $10.00.

483491 WNAXLP

Brady A. Aasmundrud, Clear Lake, disorderly conduct with a motor vehicle, $156.20. Douglas M. Ahrens, Clear Lake, speeding, $160.80. Justin W. Anderson, Clear Lake, seat belt violation, $10.00. Roger A. Anderson, North Branch, Minn., speeding, $186.00. Barbara L. Atkinson, Shell Lake, speeding, $160.80. Brian P. Avery, Spooner, speeding, $160.80; seat belt violation, $10.00. Laura L. Badman, Amery, speeding, $160.80. Fredrick R. Barbee, Spooner, speeding, $186.00. Todd L. Baumgardt, St. Paul, Minn., speeding, $160.80. Dwight Berg, Milltown, dog at large, $173.40. Kari A. Berntson, St. Croix Falls, speeding, $160.80. Ashley M. Berry, Foxboro, speeding, $160.80. Trisha D. Casey, Clear Lake, speeding, $186.00. Eduardo G. Chavez, St. Paul, Minn., speeding, $160.80. Michael A. Cloutier, New Richmond, seat belt violation, $10.00. Paula L. Cottingham, Shafer, Minn., speeding, $160.80. Gary L. Cottor, Osceola, speeding, not guilty plea. John J. Dargiewicz, Centuria, operating while suspended, $186.00. Shawn D. Denver, Clayton, operating while under influence, six-month lic. rev., AODA assess. and compliance, $665.50. Lucas J. Eggert, Glenwood City, seat belt violation, $10.00.


PAGE 30 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 13, 2009

Notices/Employment

Siren School District

The Siren School District invites bids on the following science classrooms renovation project:

CARPENTRY WORK

• Construct two small rooms within a classroom • Install steel door frames and doors • Move and reinstall base cabinets

38L

ELECTRICAL WORK

Agenda includes public comment, payment of bills, update on Mirrorwaters, various roads and equipment maintenance. Brian R. Masters, Clerk

LUCK PUBLIC LIBRARY P.O. Box 500 Luck, WI 54853

485631 38L 28d

482655 WNAXLP

(April 15, 22, 29, May 6, 13, 20) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, Vs MICHAEL SMITH, et al Defendants. Case Number: 08 CV 437 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on September 29, 2008, in the amount of $240,794.64 the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: June 2, 2009, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of the sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal leins and encumbrances. PLACE: Front Entrance to the Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 3337, filed April 16, 2001, in Volume 15 of Certified Survey Maps, page 104, as Document No. 610977, located in the Northwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 35, Town 34 North, Range 17 West, Town of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wis. Also described as: Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 3337, filed April 16, 2001, in Volume 15 of Certified Survey Maps, page 104, as Document No. 610977, located in the Northwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 35, Town 34 North, Range 17 West, Town of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin. Together with a 66 foot wide access easement for the benefit of Parcel 1 as designated by Surveyor of Certified Survey Map No. 3337. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1225 135th St., Amery, WI 54001. TAX KEY NO.: 006-01076-0100. Dated this 10th day of April 2009. /S/ Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County Benjamin J. Pliskie State Bar #1037985 Attorney for Plaintiff 13700 W. Greenfield Avenue Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. (148884)

(May 6, 13, 20) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY HSBC BANK NEVADA, N.A. S/I/I TO DIRECT MERCHANTS CREDIT CARD BANK, N.A. 111 TOWN CENTER DRIVE LAS VEGAS, NV 89128 Plaintiff, vs. JOHN WRIGHT 1356 HUNGERFORD PT. ST. CROIX FALLS, WI 540248105 Defendant(s). Case No. 09CV268 AMENDED SUMMONS Money Judgment: 30301 Our File: 675404 THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, To each person named above as Defendant: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the Plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. The complaint, which is also served upon you, states the nature and basis of the legal action. Within 40 days after 5/08/ 2009 you must respond with a written answer, as that term is used in chapter 802 of the Wisconsin Statutes, to the complaint. The court may reject or disregard an answer that does not follow the requirements of the statutes. The answer must be sent or delivered to the court whose address is 1005 W. MAIN STREET, SUITE 600, BALSAM LAKE, WI 54810 and to Rausch, Sturm, Israel, Enerson & Hornik, LLC, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is shown below. You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not provide a proper answer to the complaint or provide a written demand for said complaint within the 40-day period, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. Dated: April 15, 2009. /s/ Brandon E. Bowlin RAUSCH, STURM, ISRAEL, ENERSON & HORNIK LLC ATTORNEYS IN THE PRACTICE OF DEBT COLLECTION 2448 S. 102nd Street, Suite 210 Milwaukee, WI 53227 Toll-Free: 888-302-4011

The Frederic School District Is Accepting Applications For The Following Coaching Position:

Head Girls Volleyball Coach

Send letter of application, resume and credentials to: Jeff Carley, Athletic Director, Frederic School District, 1437 Clam Falls Drive, Frederic, WI 54837. Telephone 715-327-4223. Deadline for applications is May 26, 2009. 485243 38-39L The Frederic School District is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

(May 6, 13, 20, 27, June 3, 10) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY WM SPECIALTY MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. TAMBRA L. GREVICH, a single person, Defendant. Case No. 08-CV-462 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE (Foreclosure of Mortgage 30404) By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of said Circuit Court in the above-entitled action which was entered on August 21, 2008, in the amount of $167,315.53, I shall expose for sale and sell at public auction in the Foyer of the Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 W. Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on the 18th day of June, 2009, at 10 a.m., the following described premises or so much thereof as may be sufficient as to raise the amount due to the plaintiff for principal, interest and costs, together with the disbursements of sale and solicitors’ fees, to-wit: Parcel of land located in the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (NW 1/4 of SE 1/4) of Section Twenty Three (23), Township Thirty Two (32) North or Range Eighteen (18) West, EXCEPTING land described in that certain deed dated August 20, 1946, and recorded on August 21, 1946, in the office of the Register of Deeds, Polk County, Wisconsin in Volume 167 of Deeds on page 44 and shown as Document No. 241844. Tax Key No. 002-01563-0000. Terms Of Sale: 10% down cash, money order or certified check. Balance due within ten days of confirmation of sale. This property is being sold as is and subject to all liens and encumbrances. /s/ Timothy G. Moore, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Hersh Law Offices, LLC 10555 N. Port Washington Road Mequon, WI 53092 (262) 241-9339 State Bar No. 1016890 Velnetske The above property is located at 247 192nd Street, Star Prairie, Wisconsin. Hersh Law Offices, LLC, is a law firm representing a creditor in the collection of a debt owed to such creditor, and any such information obtained will be used for that purpose.

WNAXLP

• Chemical resistant plumbing for three sinks • Plumb emergency eye wash station and shower to existing drains and water lines. These projects may be bid on individually. Parties interested in bidding are invited to a prebid conference on Thursday, May 14, 484130 37-38L 2009, at 4 p.m. at the Siren High School.

484673 37-38L

COACHING OPPORTUNITY

The School District of Siren will be accepting bids on the replacement of 24,300 sq. ft. of flat roof membrane, with the reroofing project to be completed by June 30, 2009. All bids to be in the Siren School District Office by May 22, 2009, at 4:00 p.m. sealed and marked “Roof membrane replacement.” To obtain further specifications, and to view jobsite, please contact the Director of Building and Grounds, at 715-349-7392, ext. 403. The Siren Board of Education retains the right to reject any and all proposal bids. SCHOOL DISTRICT OF SIREN 24022 Fourth Avenue North, P.O. Box 29 484323 26-27a-e 37-38L Siren, WI 54872

484378

PLUMBING WORK

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HELP WANTED

The Luck Library is now taking bids for a cleaning person. Cleaning duties include, but are not limited to: Dusting, washing windows, vacuuming, sweeping, mopping and cleanning of bathrooms. This person will be needed 2 times per week for 2 hours each time. Must be able to clean between the hours of 9 and 11 a.m. weekdays. Please submit your bid before May 18, 2009, to the:

REQUEST FOR BIDS

• Install additional outlets, lights, power strips

(May 13, 20, 27, June 3, 10, 17) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC, AS SERVICER FOR DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF GSAMP TRUST 2005-SD1, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-SD1 Plaintiff, vs. ALISTAIR MCLAREN WILSON, et al Defendants. Case Number: 08 CV 732 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on December 18, 2008, in the amount of $272,157.25, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: June 30, 2009, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% of successful bid must be paid to Sheriff at sale in cash or by certified Check. Balance to be paid upon confirmation PLACE: Front Entrance to the Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 W. Main St., Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land located in the Northwest 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 and the Northeast 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4, Section 25, Township 32 North, Range 19 West, described as follows: Commencing at a point 165 feet West of the Northwest corner of the Northwest 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4; thence directly South parallel to the West line of said Northwest 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of said Section 25, 743 feet; thence directly East; 415 feet; thence directly North 500 feet; thence directly West, 205 feet; thence directly North 243 feet, more or less, to the North line of Northwest 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4; thence West to the point of beginning, Town of Farmington, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2448 20th Ave., Osceola, WI 54020. TAX KEY NO.: 022-00594-0000. Dated this 5th day of May, 2009. /s/ Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County Chaz M. Rodriguez State Bar #1063071 Attorney for Plaintiff 13700 W. Greenfield Avenue Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. (152509)

The Monthly Meeting For The Town Of Balsam Lake Will Be Held On Mon., May 18, 2009, At 2 p.m., Following The Open Book Review

(May 6, 13, 20, 27, June 3, 10) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE IN TRUST FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES, INC., ASSET BACKED PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005R4, Plaintiff, vs. RICHARD A. SCHROEDER; PEGGY SUE SCHROEDER, his wife; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; and STATE OF WISCONSIN, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, Defendants. Case No. 08-CV-658 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE (Foreclosure of Mortgage 30404) By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of said Circuit Court in the above-entitled action which was entered on December 30, 2008, in the amount of $108,761.22, I shall expose for sale and sell at public auction in the Foyer of the Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 W. Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on the 1st day of July, 2009, at 10:00 a.m., the following described premises or so much thereof as may be sufficient as to raise the amount due to the plaintiff for principal, interest and costs, together with the disbursements of sale and solicitors’ fees, to-wit: Lot 28 of the Assessor’s Plat of the City of St. Croix Falls, Polk County, Wisconsin, except the North 100 feet thereof. Tax Key No. 281-00985-0000 Terms Of Sale: 10% down, cash, money order or certified check. Balance due within ten days of confirmation of sale. This property is being sold as is and subject to all liens and encumbrances. /s/Timothy G. Moore, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Hersh Law Offices, LLC 10555 N. Port Washington Road Mequon, WI 53092 262-241-9339 State Bar No. 1016890 Velnetske The above property is located at 322 E. Louisiana Street, St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin. Hersh Law offices, LLC, is a law firm representing a creditor in the collection of a debt owed to such creditor, and any such information obtained will be used for that purpose.

(April 29, May 6, 13, 20) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC., Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM F. BOKENYI and SHERRI D. BOKENYI, husband and wife; and JANE DOE and/or JOHN DOE, unknown tenants, Defendants. Case No. 08-CV-608 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000 AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on October 17, 2008, in the amount of $199,967.55, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 26, 2009, at 10 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin DESCRIPTION: Lot 32 Of First Addition To Montriol Estates. Said Land Being In The City Of St. Croix Falls, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 684 South Moody Road, St. Croix Falls. TAX KEY NO.: 281-1341-0000. Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 (414) 727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

WNAXLP

INVITATION FOR BID

Agenda: Clerk’s report; treasurer’s report; discuss advertising for road bids; mileage reimbursement; set monthly meeting date; court date discussion & reimbursement; possible closed session for discussion of Mathy court case; open session; pay bills & review correspondence; adjourn. Immediately following the regular monthly meeting, there will be a selection committee meeting to choose an engineer for the 200th Street bridge project. 485633 Patsy Gustafson, Town Clerk

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715-472-2223

482918 26-27a-e 37-38L

Monthly Board Meeting Will Be Held Tues., May 19, 2009, At 7:30 p.m. At The Cushing Community Center

484491

501 Main Street S. • Luck, WI 54853

TOWN OF LAKETOWN

NOTICE FOR THE TOWN OF BALSAM LAKE

Capital One Bank vs. Connie L. O’Gara, Webster, $1,444.53. Discover Bank vs. Kevin A. Berry, Grantsburg, $2,806.49.

483490

HOMESHIELD COLONIAL CRAFT

NOTICE

WNAXLP

Homeshield Colonial Craft (subsidiary of Quanex Building Products Company) is now accepting bids for the sale of our shavings by semi trailer load. Please call or stop by for a bid form. All bids must be postmarked by Wed., May 20, 2009.

Burnett County civil court Livingston Financial LLC vs. Keith W. Oiyotte, Webster, $3,306.68. Liningston Financial LLC vs. Barbara J. Caliguire, Siren, $4,151.88.

484143

BIDS WANTED


MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 31

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(May 6, 13, 20) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF Dorothy Mae La Doucer Notice to Interested Persons and Time Limit for Filing Claims (Informal Administration) Case No. 09 PR 26 An application has been filed for informal administration of the estate of the decedent, whose date of birth was October 8, 1924 and date of death was March 30, 2009. The decedent died domiciled in Polk County, State of Wisconsin, with a post office address of: 202 Cedar Street E., Frederic, WI 54837. Please take notice that: 1. The application will be heard at the Polk County Courthouse, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, Room 1034, before Janell Anderson, Probate Registrar, on June 2, 2009, at 11 a.m. or when scheduled thereafter. You need not appear unless you object. The application may be granted if no objection is made. 2. Creditors’ claims must be filed with the probate registrar on or before August 7, 2009. 3. Publication of this notice shall constitute notice to any persons whose names or addresses are unknown. Jenell L. Anderson Probate Registrar April 28, 2009 Christine A. Rasmussen Personal Representative/ Attorney Doar, Drill & Skow, S.C. 103 N. Knowles Ave. New Richmond, WI 54017 715-246-2211 (April 8, 15, 22, 29, May 6, 13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff, vs. MILO T. MANNINO, et al. Defendants. Case Number: 08 CV 524 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on February 20, 2009, in the amount of $180,429.39, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 26, 2009, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Front Entrance to the Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: Lot 2 of Certified Survey Map No. 4382, recorded in Volume 19 of Certified Survey Maps, Page 163, as Document No. 675941, located in the Southeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 26, Township 33 North, Range 18 West, in the Town of Osceola, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1966 Dwight Lane, Dresser, WI 54009. TAX KEY NO.: 042-00588-0200. Dated this 1st day of April, 2009. /s/Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County Chaz M. Rodriguez State Bar #1063071 Attorney for Plaintiff 13700 W. Greenfield Avenue Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. (146846)

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(April 8, 15, 22, 29, May 6, 13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK, Plaintiff vs. GERALD R. WONDRA JR. and ROYAL CREDIT UNION, Defendants. Case No. 08 CV 422 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on November 25, 2008, in the amount of $67,839.07, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin on: Tuesday, May 26, 2009, at 10 o’clock a.m., TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: The East 67 feet of Lot 3, Block B, Peterson’s Addition to the City of Amery, Polk County, Wisconsin. PIN: 201-00503-0000. Street Address: 218 South Street, Amery, Wisconsin. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, this 31st day of March, 2009. Timothy G. Moore, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson No. 1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787

(April 8, 15, 22, 29, May 6, 13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION BANK MUTUAL, Plaintiff, vs. DONALD E. BURKE; KATHERINE L. GLOMB, Defendants. Case No. 08-CV-672 Branch No. 2 Foreclosure of Mortgage/30404 NOTICE OF REAL ESTATE FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that, by virtue of a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on November 21, 2008, in the amount of $206,716.19, the undersigned Sheriff will sell at public auction in the Lobby of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main St., Balsam Lake, WI 54810, on June 16, 2009, at 10 a.m., the following real estate and mortgaged premises directed by said Judgment to be sold, to-wit: Legal description: Lot 8, First Addition to Oak Meadows, being part of Outlot 67 and part of Outlot 68 of the Assessors Plat to the Village of Clayton, located in the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 24, Township 33 North, Range 15 West, Village of Clayton, Polk County, Wisconsin. (TAX KEY NO. 112-00370-0800.) Address of Property: 105 Oak Dr., Clayton WI 54004. Terms of Sale: 10% down in cash or certified funds (no personal checks) at sale, the balance due within 10 days of confirmation. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax from the proceeds of the sale upon confirmation of the Court. Said real estate is sold as is and subject to all liens and encumbrances. Tim Moore Polk County Sheriff STUPAR, SCHUSTER & COOPER, S.C. By: Jeffrey S. Schuster Attorneys for Plaintiff 633 West Wisconsin Avenue Suite 1800 Milwaukee, WI 53203 (414) 271-8833

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483299 WNAXLP

(April 22, 29, May 6, 13, 20, 27) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK, Plaintiff, vs. KEVIN L. BUCK, individually and d/b/a Lake Country Cheese and d/b/a Falls Maytag, f/d/b/a Appliances & More, and BILL’S DISTRIBUTING, and WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, Defendants. Case No. 09 CV 20 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on March 31, 2009, in the amount of $355,823.91, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on: Thursday, June 4, 2009, at 10 o’clock a.m., TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: Lot Two (2) of Certified Survey Map No. 1444, recorded in Volume 7 of Certified Survey Maps, page 21, Document No. 486208, located in the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (NW 1/4 of NW 1/4), Section 35, Township 34 North, Range 18 West, Polk County, Wisconsin. PIN: 044-00982-0000. Street Address: 1978 U.S. Highway 8, St. Croix Falls, WI 54024. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, this 14th day of April, 2009. Timothy G. Moore, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson No. 1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787

(May 13, 20, 27, June 3) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CITIBANK, NA as Trustee for WaMu Series 2007-HE2 Trust, Plaintiff, vs. JOSHUA MALEITZKE and JANE DOE, unknown spouse of Joshua Maleitzke, and JOHN DOE and/or JANE DOE, unknown tenants, Defendants. Case No. 08-CV-352 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00 AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on October 30, 2008, in the amount of $402,529.47, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: June 9, 2009, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: The Northerly 100 feet of the Southerly 200 feet of that part of Government Lot Six (6) of Section Seventeen (17), and of Government Lot Four (4) of Section Eighteen (18), both in Township Thirty-five (35) North of Range Sixteen (16) West, Polk County, Wisconsin, lying between Bone Lake and the North and South Highway running through said Government Lot 4. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2100 Bone Lake Drive W, Town of Georgetown. TAX KEY NO.: 026-00707-0000. Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 (414) 727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

(May 13, 20, 27) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF WENDELL EDWARD HURO Summary Assignment - Order for Hearing and Notice Case No. 09PR30 A petition has been filed for summary assignment of the estate of the decedent, whose date of birth was April 7, 1936, and date of death was April 20, 2009, who died domiciled in Polk County, State of Wisconsin, with a post office address of: 2462 Sunny Acres Lane, St. Croix Falls, WI 54024. Creditors may bring an action by: 1. Filing a claim in the Polk County Circuit Court before the property is assigned. 2. Bringing a suit against the assignee(s) after the property is assigned. The right of a creditor to bring an action terminates three months after the date of publication of this order. The property may be assigned to the creditors and persons interested on or after June 10, 2009. THE COURT ORDERS THAT: The petition be heard and heirship be determined at the Polk County Courthouse, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, Room 500, before Jenell Anderson, Court Official, on May 29, 2009, at 8:30 a.m. or when scheduled thereafter. BY THE COURT Jenell Anderson Probate Court Commissioner May 8, 2009 Steven J. Swanson, Attorney P.O. Box 609 St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787

482195

484788 38L

Agenda: 1. Call meeting to order 2. Clerk and Treas. Reports 3. Any corrections on the printed agenda in the newspaper. 4. Public input 5. Old Business 6. Employee report 7. Correspondence 8. New Business 9. Bills/vouchers 10. Set next meeting date 11. Move to adjourn Andrea Lundquist, Clerk

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Notice Is Hereby Given That The Regular Monthly Town Board Meeting Will Be Held On Tuesday, May 19, 2009, At 7 p.m. At The Town Hall

485241

NOTICE OF MEETING TOWN OF WEST SWEDEN

(May 13, 20, 27, June 3, 10, 17) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT WASHBURN COUNTY NORTHVIEW BANK, f/k/a FIRST STATE BANK OF FINLAYSON 2203 Finland Avenue P.O. Box 257 Finlayson, Minnesota 55735 Plaintiff vs. JEREMY R. COVEAU, a/k/a JEREMY COVEAU 6537 Griff Lane Danbury, Wisconsin 54830 JOHN DOE and MARY ROE, Defendants Court File No. 08-CV-28-0 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of Findings of Fact, Conclusions of Law, Order for Judgment and Judgment dated March 16, 2009, the undersigned Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin, will sell at public auction on the front steps of the Polk County Courthouse in the City of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on the 2nd day of July, 2009, at 10 a.m., the real estate and mortgaged premises located in Polk County, Wisconsin, directed by said Findings of Fact, Conclusions of Law, Order for Judgment and Judgment, to be sold, and described as follows: Lots 12, 13 and 14, Block 4, first Addition to the Village of Frederic, Polk County, Wisconsin. Terms of Sale: Cash or 10% of amount bid by certified check with the balance to be paid upon confirmation of sale. Sale subject to pay the debt then secured by said mortgage and taxes, if any, actually paid by the mortgagee, on said premises and the costs and disbursements, including attorney’s fees as allowed by law. Dated: May 6, 2009 Timothy Moore Sheriff of Polk County, Wis.

482254 WNAXLP

1285 208th Street St. Croix Falls, Wis.

483775 WNAXLP

MENARDS

(Apr. 29, May 6, 13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF SANDRA J. ORFEI Notice to Creditors (Informal Administration) Case No. 09 PR 20 An application has been filed for informal administration of the estate of the decedent, whose date of birth was June 11, 1939, and date of death was March 19, 2009. The decedent died domiciled in Polk County, State of Wisconsin, with a post office address of: 2329 Woodland Shores, Luck, WI 54853. All interested persons have waived notice. Creditors’ claims must be filed with the probate registrar on or before July 27, 2009. Jenell L. Anderson Probate Registrar April 16, 2009 Christine A. Rasmussen Attorney 103 N. Knowles Ave. New Richmond, WI 54017 715-246-2211

484943 WNAXLP

Apply In Person At:

480864 20a,dtfc 31Ltfc

Must have excellent people skills and be detail oriented. Retail experience preferred but not required. Flexible schedule and benefits available. Addl. $2.50/ hour for weekend hours.

(May 13, 20, 27) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III 2700 Sanders Road Prospect Heights, Illinois 60070, Plaintiff, vs. STEPHEN C. EKLUND and JANE DOE, unknown spouse of Stephen C. Eklund, 2515 Britani Lane Osceola, WI 54020 OR PO Box 506 Osceola, WI 54020; and JANE DOE and/or JOHN DOE, unknown tenants, 2515 Britani Lane Osceola, WI 54020; and GOULET COMPANIES, LLC c/o Richard D. Goulet 2088 E. U.S. Hwy 8 PO Box 852 Saint Croix Falls, WI 54024; and MARCUS DAMIEN 840 250th Street Osceola, Wisconsin 54020 OR 4262 Begonia Road Phelan, CA 92371, Defendants. Case No. 09-CV-229 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00 FORTY DAY SUMMONS THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, TO: STEPHEN C. EKLUND and JANE DOE, unknown spouse of Stephen C. Eklund 2515 Britani Lane Osceola, WI 54020 OR 18198 305th Street Shafer, MN 55074 MARCUS DAMIEN 4262 Begonia Road Phelan, CA 92371 You are hereby notified that the plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. The complaint, which is also served upon you, states the nature and basis of the legal action. Within 40 days after May 14, 2009, you must respond with a written answer, as that term is used in Chapter 802 of the Wisconsin Statutes, to the complaint. The court may reject or disregard an answer that does not follow the requirements of the statutes. The answer must be sent or delivered to the court, whose address is: Clerk of Circuit Court Polk County Justice Center 1005 West Main Street Balsam Lake, WI 54810 and to O’Dess and Associates, S.C., Plaintiff’s attorneys, whose address is: O’Dess and Associates, S.C. 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, Wisconsin 53213 You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not provide a proper answer within 40 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff By: M. ABIGAIL O’DESS Bar Code No. 1017869 POST OFFICE ADDRESS: 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 (414) 727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

485523 WNAXLP

PART-TIME POSITIONS AVAILABLE Sales


PAGE 32 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 13, 2009

(May 6, 13, 20) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY MTT FINANCIAL, LLC Plaintiff vs. JARIS C. JOHNSON, and DENNIS DIRKS, and GARY PEER, and COUNTRY COMFORT, Defendants. SUMMONS Case No. 09 CV 231 Case Classification No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage To: Jaris C. Johnson 406 220th Avenue Comstock, WI 54826 You are hereby notified that the Plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. Within forty (40) days after May 6, 2009, you must respond with a written demand for a copy of the Complaint. The demand must be sent or delivered to the Court, whose address is: Clerk of Court Polk County Justice Center 1005 West Main Street Suite 300 Balsam Lake, WI 54810 and to plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is: Steven J. Swanson 105 Washington Street South P.O. Box 609 St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not provide a proper answer within forty (40) days after May 6, 2009, the Court may grant Judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Complaint and you may lose your right to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A Judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. Dated the 28th day of April, 2009. Steven J. Swanson #1003029 Attorney for Plaintiff 105 South Washington Street P.O. Box 609 St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF Agnes H. Thorstad Notice to Creditors (Informal Administration) Case No. 09 PR 29 An application has been filed for informal administration of the estate of the decedent, whose date of birth was December 21, 1913, and date of death was March 16, 2009. The decedent died domiciled in Polk County, State of Wis., with a post office address of: 210 E. Park Ave., Luck, WI 54853. All interested persons have waived notice. Creditors’ claims must be filed with the probate registrar on or before August 14, 2009. Jenell L. Anderson Probate Registrar May 6, 2009 Merilee Thorstad Personal Representative 3519 W. 150th Lane Frederic, WI 54837 715-327-4606

COACHING POSITIONS AVAILABLE SIREN SCHOOL DISTRICT

Siren Girls Head Volleyball Coach for 2009 - 2010 Siren Girls JV Volleyball Coach for 2009 - 2010

484109 37-39L

(May 13, 20, 27) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CACH, LLC AS ASSIGNEE OF WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK 4340 S. MONACO ST. 3RD FL DENVER, CO 80237 Plaintiff, vs. JANE BRITAIN 116 MAPLE ST. W. #302 AMERY, WI 54001-1040 Defendant(s). Case No. 09CV208 AMENDED SUMMONS Money Judgment: 30301 Our File: 548853 THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, To each person named above as Defendant: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the Plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. The complaint, which is also served upon you, states the nature and basis of the legal action. Within 40 days after May 19, 2009, you must respond with a written answer, as that term is used in chapter 802 of the Wisconsin Statutes, to the complaint. The court may reject or disregard an answer that does not follow the requirements of the statutes. The answer must be sent or delivered to the court whose address is 1005 W. Main Street, Suite 600, Balsam Lake, WI 54810, and to Rausch, Sturm, Israel, Enerson & Hornik, LLC, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is shown below. You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not provide a proper answer to the complaint or provide a written demand for said complaint within the 40-day period, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. Dated: April 20, 2009. /s/Brandon E. Bowlin RAUSCH, STURM, ISRAEL, ENERSON & HORNIK LLC ATTORNEYS IN THE PRACTICE OF DEBT COLLECTION 2448 S. 102nd Street, Suite 210 Milwaukee, WI 53227 Toll-Free: 888-302-4011

(May 13, 20, 27)

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485673

STATE OF WISCONSIN TOWN OF JACKSON BURNETT COUNTY Pursuant to Sec. 70.45, WI. Statutes, the Town of Jackson assessment roll for the year 2009 assessment will be open for examination on the 30th day of May, 2009, at the town hall, 4599 County Road A, Webster, Wis., from 8 to 10 a.m. Instructional material about the assessment, on how to file an objection, and about board of review procedures under Wis. Law will be available at that time. Notice is hereby given this 13th day of May, 2009. For The Town Of Jackson 484784 38L 28a Lorraine Radke, Clerk

484469 WNAXLP

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Board of Review for the Town of Eureka of Polk County shall hold its first meeting on the 21st day of May, 2009, from 6 to 8 p.m., at Eureka Town Hall. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board. No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact, or provide information to, a member of the Board about the person’s objection except at a sesson of the Board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or contest the amount of assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent to file a written objection by appearing before the Board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48-hour notice requirement and files a written objection, that the person provides to the Clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any Board members and, if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the Board, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are the subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or subject or object to a valuation if that valuation was made by the Assessor or the Objector using the income method; unless the person supplies the Assessor all of the information about income and expenses, as specified in the manual under Sec. 73.03(2a), that the Assessor requests. The Town of Eureka has an ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the Assessor under this paragraph which provides exemptions for persons using information to the discharge of duties imposed by law or of the duties of their office or by order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determined that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under Section 19.35(1) of Wis. Statutes. The Board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other persons may testify by telephone. Respectfully submitted, Town of Eureka Michelle Tonnar, Clerk 484670 37-38L

NOTICE OF OPEN BOOK FOR THE TOWN OF JACKSON

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NOTICE OF MEETING OF BOARD OF REVIEW TOWN OF EUREKA

NOTICE

Polk County will be suspending the Spring Road Restriction Postings as of Monday, May 11, 2009, at 12:01 a.m. Effective May 11, 2009, the following Polk County roads will no longer be restricted to six (6) tons single-axle weight: • County Trunk Highway W from County Trunk Highway E to 80th Street. • County Trunk Highway GG from State Highway 48 to County Trunk Highway G. This removal of restrictions does not include Town Roads. Please check with Townships regarding seasonal weight restrictions on Town Roads. Please also note, it is unlawful to deposit anything in the road rights-of-way, including the planting of crops. Generally, the road right-of-way is 33 feet from the centerline. Contact the Polk County Highway office with concerns about specific rights of ways. 484867 27d 38L Polk County Highway Commission, 715-485-8700

485118

(April 8, 15, 22, 29, May 6, 13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK, Plaintiff vs. NICHOLAS B. HESTER and CAROL A. HESTER, Defendants. Case No. 09 CV 61 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on March 18, 2009, in the amount of $100,972.86, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wis., on: Thursday, May 21, 2009, at 10 o’clock a.m., TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: The Southeasterly 75 feet of Outlot 49 of the Outlot Plat of the Village of Osceola, Polk County, Wisconsin. PIN: 165-00411-0000. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, this 6th day of April, 2009. /s/ Timothy G. Moore, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson No. 1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787

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(May 13, 20, 27, June 3, 10, 17) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Bremer Bank, National Association, P.O. Box 107, 104 Maple Street West, Amery, WI 54001 Plaintiff, vs. Lori L. Grey and Jeffrey P. Grey, her spouse individually and in his own right, 13015 Carlberg Road, Grantsburg, WI 54840, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Code No. 30404 Case No. 08-CV-800 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE, that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure and sale entered in the above-entitled action on the 16th day of December, 2008, the undersigned sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin, will sell at public auction on the front steps of the Polk County Justice Center in Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on the 24th day of June, 2009, at 10:00 a.m. the real estate directed by said judgment to be sold, and therein described as follows: That part of the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (SE 1/4 NE 1/4), of Section Twenty-two (22), Township Thirty-seven (37) North, Range Seventeen (17) West, lying South and East of State Trunk Highway #35 except the South 640 feet thereof, and except for that parcel described in document recorded in the office of the Register of Deeds for Polk County, Wis., Volume 390, Page 633 as Document No. 373956. Dated this 6th day of May, 2009. /s/Timothy G. Moore Polk County Sheriff George W. Benson Attorney for Plaintiff Wis. State Bar No. 1012978 P.O. Box 370 Siren, WI 54872 484931 WNAXLP 715-349-5215

(May 13, 20, 27) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF Harold A. Peterson DOB: September 16, 1945 Notice to Creditors (Informal Administration) Case No. 09 PR 32 An application has been filed for informal administration of the estate of the decedent, whose date of birth was September 16, 1945, and date of death was April 18, 2009. The decedent died domiciled in Polk County, State of Wisconsin, with a post office address of: 1984 78th Street, Luck, WI 54853 All interested persons have waived notice. Creditors’ claims must be filed with the probate registrar on or before August 14, 2009. Jenell L. Anderson Probate Registrar May 8, 2009 John E. Schneider - Schneider Law Office - Attorney 205 Main Street, P.O. Box 215 Balsam Lake, WI 54810 715-405-3006

If interested, please contact Ryan Karsten, Athletic Director Via e-mail: ad@siren.k12.wi.us Via Phone: 715-349-2277, Ext. 310 Via Mail: 24022 North 4th Ave., Siren, WI 54872 Application will be taken until positions are filled!

NOTICE TOWN OF GEORGETOWN BOARD OF REVIEW

Board of Review will be held on Saturday, May 16, 2009, from 8 to 10 a.m., at the Georgetown Town Hall. In order to appear before the Board of Review you must file a written objection with the town clerk at least 48 hours before appearing before the board. Open Book, the assessment roll will be open to public inspection and the assessor will be present to answer questions on Friday, May 15, 2009, from 5 to 7 p.m. Kristine Lindgren, Clerk, Town of Georgetown 484584 37-38L 27a,d

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The Polk County Land Information Committee will hold public hearing(s) on Wednesday, May 20, 2009, at 10 a.m., in the Government Center (1st floor, County Boardroom), Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. The Committee will recess at 10:30 a.m. to view site(s) and will reconvene at 12:30 p.m., at the Government Center, in Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, to consider the following and other agenda items: GORDON & ROSETTE PALMER request a Special Exception from Article 8D1(a) of the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance to operate a Tourist Rooming House. Property affected is: 1388 Kemah Park Tr., Lot 2, CSM #491, Vol. 2/Pg. 220, Pt. of Govt. Lot 8, Sec. 35/T35N/R17W, Town of Milltown, Pond - class 3. KIRKHAM B. WOOD requests a Special Exception from Article 8D1(a) of the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance to operate a Tourist Rooming House. Property affected is: 2161 E. Pipe Lake Ln., Lot 7, CSM #1914, Vol. 9/Pg. 61, Pt. of Govt. Lot 3, Sec. 15/T35N/R15W, Town of Johnstown, Pipe Lake - class 1. 484496 37-38L 27a,d

ASSESSOR WANTED

The Town of Siren, Burnett County, is accepting bids for the reassessment of the township for 2010. Statistics are as follows: Residential 1121 Undeveloped 334 Improvements 849 Ag Forest 25 Commercial 76 Forest 443 Improvements 46 Other 14 Agricultural 93 Improvements 14 We have lakefront property and also a Mobile Home Park. Please include the following with your bid: Proof of State of Wisconsin certification, proof of insurance and references The Town of Siren reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Sealed bids will be opened on June 11, 2009, at 7:15 p.m. at the Siren Town Hall. Please mail bids to: Mary Hunter, Clerk 23340 Soderberg Road Siren, WI 54872 484787 38L 715-349-5119


MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 33

TOWN OF STERLING MONTHLY TOWN BOARD MEETING

The Monthly Board Meeting Will Be Held Monday, May 18, 2009, At The Cushing Community Center At 7 p.m.

Agenda: Clerk’s minutes, Treasurer financial report, Update/decisions on Old Settler’s Church rebuilding, Discuss individuals cutting wood on town land, Decisions regarding handicap accessibility of Community Center, Citizen Concerns, Review lease contracts, sign 2-year Unity Ambulance contract, Review/implement double chip seal test on 6/10 mile of Evergreen, Paul Noreen presenting possible cutting of town timber this year with possible board decision, Sign annual mowing contract, Road maintenance, Set June agenda, Pay bills. Julie Peterson, Clerk 485414 38L 28a

SCHOOL DISTRICT OF LUCK REGULAR BOARD MEETING Monday, May 18, 2009, 6 p.m. Boardroom Agenda 1. Call to order and seek approval of the agenda Robert Clifton. 2. Consideration of previous minutes - LeRoy Buck. 3. Presentation of vouchers - Amy Dueholm. 4. Treasurer’s Report - Amy Dueholm. 5. Recognition of guests or delegates. A. Chris Boland 6. Administrative Reports. A. Mr. Palmer. B. Mr. Gobler. C. Mr. Nichols. 7. New Business A. Resignation of Tech Ed instructor. B. Recommendation of Special Ed instructor. C. Consideration of “Student Assurance” insurance for 2009-10. D. Renewal of 66:30 agreement for Early Childhood at Unity. E. Recommendation for janitor position. F. Set dates for 2nd round of interviews for Elementary principal position. G. Any business that may properly come before the Board. 8. Motion to adjourn. 485630 38L

TOWN OF BALSAM LAKE NOTICE OF OPEN BOOK

NOTICE IS HERBY GIVEN THAT the Open Book for the Town of Balsam Lake will be held on Monday, May 18, 2009, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., at the Town Shop.

NOTICE OF THE BOARD OF REVIEW FOR THE TOWN OF BALSAM LAKE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Review for the Town of Balsam Lake of Polk County, shall hold its first meeting on the 18th day of May, 2009, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the Town Shop. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedual requirements if appearing before the Board: No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable request by certified mail of the Assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact, or provide information to, a member of the Board about the person’s objection except at a session of the Board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or contest the amount of assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent to file a written objection by appearing before the Board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48-hour notice requirement and files a written objection, that the person provides to the Clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of an board members and, if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the Board, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are the subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by the telephone or subject or object to a valuation; if that valuation was made by the Assessor or the Objector using the income method; unless the person supplies the Assessor all of the information about income and expenses, as specified in the manual under Sec. 73.03(2a), that the Assessor requests. The Board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon, or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other persons may testify by telephone. Respectfully submitted, Town of Balsam Lake 484734 37-38L 27d Brian R. Masters, Clerk Notice: The monthly meeting for the Town of Balsam Lake will be held on Monday, May 18, 2009, from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m., at the Town Shop. Agenda will be printed closer to the meeting.

NOTICE OF FREDERIC SCHOOL BOARD REGULAR MEETING Monday, May 18, 2009, 6:30 p.m. Frederic 7 - 12 School, Room 107

1. Call to order 2. Opening ceremonies A. Approve agenda B. Welcoming remarks C. Audience to visitors and delegations 3. Reports of officers A. Minutes from previous meetings B. Invoices and receipts C. 2008 - 09 Budget D. Board member reports/Governance 4. Reports of the administration A. Superintendent B. High School Principal C. Elementary Principal D. Buildings and Grounds E. Food Service F. Community Education G. Bus Loan Review 5. Unfinished business A. Pool B. 2009 - 2010 Budget 6. New business A. Personnel 1. Reduction in 4K aide position 2. Student aide position review 3. Approval of fall coaches 4. Resignation B. Contracts 1. WIAA High School & Junior High Memberships 2. CESA 11 Shared Services Addendum for the AARA Title I Services 3. CESA 5 Data Processing support 4. Purchase of HP Server 5. Football Press Box Finishing costs 6. Handicap automatic door opener 7. Summer School Contracts 8. Student Insurance 9. 66.30 contract with Grantsburg and Insight School of Wisconsin C. Boiler/Air Handling proposal D. Annual Meeting date E. Board Policy revision 1. Virtual Education 7. Closed session: Wisconsin statutes 19.85 (1)(c)(i), Negotiations, staffing 8. Business as a result of closed session 485650 38L 9. Adjourn

NOTICE OF THE BOARD OF REVIEW FOR THE TOWN OF JACKSON

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Review for the Town of Jackson, Burnett County, Wisconsin, will be held on Saturday, May 30, 2009, at the town hall, 4599 County Road A, Webster, Wisconsin, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the board of review and procedural requirements if appearing before the board: No person shall be allowed to appear before the board of review, to testify to the board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the board of review and before the board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the board of review may contact or provide information to a member of the board of review about the person’s objection except at a session of the board of review. No person may appear before the board of review, testify to the board by telephone or contest the amount of assessment unless at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the board of review or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent to file a written objection of appearing before the board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48-hour requirement and files a written objection, that the person provides to the clerk of the board of review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any board member and if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the board of review, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are the subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. No person may appear before the board of review, testify to the board by telephone or object to a valuation, if that valuation was made by the assessor or the objector using the income method, unless the person supplies the assessor all of the information about income and expenses as specified in the manual under sec. 73.03(2a) that the assessor requests. The municipality or county shall provide by ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the assessor under this paragraph and shall provide exceptions for persons using the information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or of the duties of their office by order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determined that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under sec. 19.35(1) of WI statutes. The board of review shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other persons may testify by telephone. For The Town Of Jackson 484782 38L 28a Lorraine Radke, Clerk

VILLAGE OF LUCK ORDINANCE 2-2-9(a) - MEETINGS

The Luck Village Board, at their May 6, 2009, Village Board Meeting, adopted the change in Ordinance 2-2-9(a) and amended the regular meeting of the Village Board to be held on the second Wednesday of each calendar month at 7:30 p.m. A copy of the ordinance may be viewed at the Luck Village Hall. Effective upon publication. 485521 Signed/Nancy Webster-Smith, Village President, 38L WNAXLP and Kathy Hanson, Clerk/Treasurer

VILLAGE OF LUCK ORDINANCE NO. 10-9-1 An Ordinance to Adopt The Comprehensive Plan Of The Village Of Luck, Wisconsin The Village Board of the Village of Luck, Wisconsin, does ordain as follows: Section 1. Pursuant to section 62.23(2) and (3) of the Wisconsin Statutes, the Village of Luck, is authorized to prepare and adopt a comprehensive plan as defined in section 66.1001(1)(a) and 66.1001(2) of the Wisconsin Statutes. Section 2. The Village Board of the Village of Luck, Wisconsin, has adopted written procedures designed to foster public participation in every stage of the preparation of a comprehensive plan as required by Section 66.1001(4)(a) of the Wisconsin Statutes. Section 3. The plan commission of the Village of Luck, by a majority vote of the entire commission recorded in its official minutes, has adopted a resolution recommending to Village Board the adoption of the document entitled “Village of Luck, Polk County, Wisconsin, Comprehensive Plan 2008-2030,” containing all of the elements specified in section 66.1001(2) of the Wisconsin Statutes. Section 4. The Village has held at least one public hearing on this ordinance, in compliance with the requirements of Section 66.1001(4)(d) of the Wisconsin Statutes. Section 5. The Village Board of the Village of Luck, Wisconsin, does, by enactment of this ordinance, formally adopt the document entitled, “Village of Luck, Polk County, Wisconsin, Comprehensive Plan 2008-2030,” pursuant to Section 66.1001(4)(c) of the Wisconsin Statutes. Section 6. This ordinance shall take effect upon passage by a majority vote of the members-elect of the Village Board and publication as required by law. Adopted this 6th day of May, 2009. Nancy Webster-Smith, Village President Attest: Kathy Hanson, Village Clerk-Treasurer Dated Published: May 13, 2009 485522 38L WNAXLP Effective Date: May 13, 2009 (May 6, 13, 20, 27 June 3) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT BURNETT COUNTY EVERHOME MORTGAGE COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. FRANK R. FLEISCHHACHER and JANE DOE, unknown spouse of Frank R. Fleischhacher; and PATRICIA A. OMUNDSON and JOHN DOE, unknown spouse of Patricia A. Omundson a/k/a Patricia A. Osmundson; and JANE DOE and/or JOHN DOE, unknown tenants; and BURNETT DAIRY COOPERATIVE; and LARRY’S L.P., INC., Defendants. Case No. 08-CV-296 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000 Code No. 30405 Other Real Estate AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on November 18, 2008, in the amount of $85,343.17, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: June 9, 2009, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Burnett County Government Center, located at 7410 County Road K, Siren, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: Lot 1 Of Certified Survey Map Survey Map No. 3312, Volume 16, Pages 58 And 59, A Part Of The Northwest 1/4, Southeast 1/4 Of Section 17, Township 39 North, Range 15 West, Burnett County, Wisconsin; Together With A Nonexclusive Easement For Ingress And Egress Over And Across The Following Described Parcels Of Land: Parcel 1) A Parcel Of Land Located In The South-

west 1/4, Northeast 1/4, Of Section 17, Township 39 North, Range 15 West, Town Of Sand Lake, County Of Burnett, State Of Wisconsin And More Particularly Described As Follows: Commencing At The Southwest Corner Of The Southwest 1/4, Northeast 1/4 Of Section 17; Thence South 89° 29’ 16” East 910.44 Feet Along The South Line Of The Southwest 1/4, Northeast 1/4 To The Point Of Beginning; Thence Continuing South 89° 27’ 16” East 24.11 Feet Along Said South Line; Thence North 33° 23’ 14” West 33.45 Feet To A Point On The Southerly Right-Of-Way Line Of Whistler Road; Thence Southwesterly Along Said Right-Of-Way Line 20.07 Feet On The Arc Of A Circle Concave To The Northwest Whose Radius Is 199.75 Feet The Chord Of Said Arc Bearing South 61° 07’ 53” West 20.06 Feet; Thence South 33° 23’ 14” East 21.57 Feet To The Point Of Beginning; Parcel 2) Beginning At The Easternmost Point Of Lot 1 Of Certified Survey Map No. 3312, Volume 16, Page 58 And 59; Thence North 55° 26’ 24” West 10 Feet To A Point; Thence North 33° 23’ 14” West To The North Line Of The Northwest 1/4, Southeast 1/4, Of Section 17, Township 39 North, Range 15 West; Thence Westerly Along Said Line To The Northeast Corner Of Said Certified Survey Map; Thence South 33° 23’ 14” East 110.26 Feet To The Point Of Beginning. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 26232 WHISTLER ROAD, Town of Sand Lake. TAX KEY NO.: 07-026-2-39-1517-4-02-000-013000. LEGACY PIN: 026-3217-03-210. Dean Roland Sheriff of Burnett County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 (414) 727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

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Notices/Employment


PAGE 34 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 13, 2009

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By: Brian J. Wisdorf, I.D. #1065688 Loren M. Solfest, I.D. #1036610 Attorneys for Plaintiff 7300 West 147th Street Suite 600 Apple Valley, MN 55124 952-432-3136

Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (15 U.S.C. Section 1692), we are required to state that we are attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a discharge in a chapter 7 bankruptcy case, this communication should not be construed as an attempt to hold you personally liable for the debt.

Whereas, the Village Board of Siren, Wisconsin, held a public hearing at the Village Hall meeting room at 5:30 p.m. on the day of April 30, 2009, for the purpose of hearing all interested persons concerning the preliminary resolution and report of the Special Assessments for the Southeast Neighborhood Improvements – Phase 1 project on the proposed public improvements consisting of street reconstruction and preliminary assessments against benefited property, heard all persons who desired to speak at the hearing. Now, therefore, be it resolved, the Board of Trustees of the Village of Siren, Wisconsin, determine as follows: 1. The report of the Special Assessments, a copy of which is attached hereto and incorporated herein as if fully set forth herein, including the plans and specifications and assessments set forth therein, is adopted and approved. 2. Payment for the improvements shall be made by assessing 100% of the cost of curb & gutter and driveway aprons to the properties benefited and determined as not exempt, as indicated in the report. 3. Assessments shown in the report represent an exercise of the police power and have been determined on a reasonable basis and are hereby confirmed. 4. Assessments for all items in the project are hereby combined as a single assessment but any interested property owner may object to each assessment separately or all assessments jointly for any purpose. 5. Assessments shall be due within 30 days of billing date. Billing will occur no sooner than October 1, 2008. Assessments may be paid in cash or in five (5) annual installments to the municipal clerk. Installments shall be placed on the next tax roll after the due date for collection and shall bear interest at the rate of 5.22% on the unpaid balance from January 1 of the year following the levy. Installments or assessments not paid when due shall bear additional interest on the amount due at the rate of 6% per annum. 6. The municipal clerk shall publish this resolution as a class 1 notice under ch. 985, Stats., in the legal newspaper and mail a copy of this resolution and statement of the final assessment against the benefited property together with a notice of installment payment privileges to every property owner. Ann Peterson 485555 38L WNAXLP Village Clerk/Treasurer

TOWN OF LORAIN

Comprehensive Land Use Meeting 7 p.m., May 18 Subjects to be covered: Implemention Open to the public Chairman Mike Sparish

POLK COUNTY GOVERNMENT CENTER 100 POLK COUNTY PLAZA BALSAM LAKE, WIS. COUNTY BOARDROOM Tuesday, May 19, 2009, 6:30 p.m. **Please Note Summer Hours Time**

I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI.

Call to Order Evidence of Proper Notice Roll Call Prayer: Supervisor Edgell Pledge of Allegiance Appointment of Successor Supervisor to District 12 and Swearing In Approval of Agenda Approval of April 21, 2009, Minutes Public Comments - 3 Minutes Per Person - Not To Exceed 30 Minutes Total Finance Director’s Report Resolutions A. Resolution Adopting Adopting the Polk County Outdoor Recreation Plan B. Resolution to Approve the Purchase of a Countywide Time & Attendance System C. Resolution to Amend Polk County Policy 881 Staffing, Budget Planning and Position Administration D. Resolution to Merge Highway Department and Lime Quarry E. Tabled Resolution No. 29-09 Approving the Completion of the State Loan Application XII. Standing Committees/Boards Reports A. Highway: Supervisor Caspersen B. Finance: Supervisor Bergstrom C. Personnel: Supervisor Arcand D. Property, Forestry and Recreation: Supervisor Larsen E. Extension, Land and Water Resources, Lime Quarry: Supervisor Jepsen F. Public Protection: Supervisor Luke G. Land Information: Supervisor O’Connell H. Human Services Board: Supervisor Stoneking I. Board of Health: Supervisor Johnson J. Golden Age Manor Board: Supervisor Dueholm XIII. Appointments: Committee Name Gandy Dancer Trail Committee Golden Age Manor Board Zoning Board of Adj. Zoning Board of Adj. Zoning Board of Adj. - First Alternate

XIV. Supervisors’ Reports XV. Chairman’s/Administrative Coordinator’s Report XVI. Adjourn

Term Start May 19, 2009 May 19, 2009 May 19, 2009 May 19, 2009 May 19, 2009

Notice is given that the Board of Review for the Village of Frederic of Polk County shall hold its first meeting on the 26th day of May, 2009, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Frederic Village Hall, 107 Hope Road W. Assessor will be available from 4 to 6 p.m. for questions regarding your assessments. Kristi Swanson Treasurer/Deputy Clerk 485578 38L WNAXLP

LIQUOR LICENSE APPLICATION - Village of Luck

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the following applications have been received by the undersigned Village Clerk for Liquor Licenses for the ensuing year ending June 30, 2010. Merlin Nelson for Combination Class “B” Beer License and Class “B” Intoxicating Liquor License at his place of business known as LUCK-E-TAVERN & SUPPER CLUB located at 211 Main Street, Luck, Wis. Tyrone A. Shafer and Irvin R. Shafer for Combination Class “B” Beer License and Class “B” Intoxicating Liquor License at their place of business known as THE LUCK NORTHERN BAR located at 105 Main Street, Luck, Wis. Dudley M. and Amelia C. Cran for Combination Class “B” Beer License and Class “B” Intoxicating Liquor License at their place of business known as BON TON SALOON, INC., located at 212 Main St., Luck, Wis. Kent W. and Rachel Petersen/Ash-Whit L.L.C. for Combination Class “A” Beer License and Class “A” Intoxicating Liquor License at their place of business known as THE BOTTLE SHOP, located at 100 South Main Street, Luck, Wis. Lori Hansen and Kelly Steen, for Class “B” Beer License at their place of business known as LUCK COUNTRY CLUB, INC., located at 1520 South Shore Drive, Luck, Wis. Wayne King for Class “A” Beer License at his place of business known as WAYNE’S FOODS PLUS located at 151 Butternut Avenue, Luck, Wis. Edward M. and Jody K. Seck for Class “A” Beer License at their place of business known as HOLIDAY STATIONSTORE, located at Highway 35 and 48 in Luck, Wis. Jeff Hulett for Class “B” Beer License and Class “C” Wine License at his place of business known as OAKWOOD INN, located at 10 Robertson Road, Luck, Wis. David Swenson and Sharry Swenson for Combination Class “B” Beer License and Class “B” Intoxicating Liquor License at their place of business known as HOG WILD BBQ & GRILL, located at 129 and 131 Main Street, Luck, Wis. Notice is further given that the village board, Village of Luck, will meet in session on June 3, 2009, to act on the above applications. 485674 38L Kathy Hanson, WCMC, CMTW - Village Clerk WNAXLP

NOTICE OF OPEN BOOK FOR THE VILLAGE OF WEBSTER

POLK COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS

Comm. Member Debbie Peterson Robert Blake Marilyn Nehring Gene Sollman Wayne Shirley

CORRECTION NOTICE OF THE BOARD OF REVIEW FOR THE VILLAGE OF FREDERIC

Term End May 12 May 11 May 12 May 12 May 12

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Notice is hereby given that the Open Book Session for the Village of Webster will be held on Wednesday, May 27, 2009, from 2 to 4 p.m., at 7505 Main Street West, Webster, Wis. This Session gives the property owner an opportunity to meet with the assessor, ask questions of the assessor and look over their property assessments.

NOTICE OF THE BOARD OF REVIEW FOR THE VILLAGE OF WEBSTER

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Review for the Village of Webster of Burnett County, shall hold its first meeting on the 27th day of May, 2009, from 4 to 6 p.m., at 7505 Main Street West, Webster, WI 54893. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board: No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the Assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact, or provide information to a member of the Board about the person’s objection except at a session of the Board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or contest the amount of the assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent to file a written objection by appearing before the Board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48hour notice requirement and files a written objection, that the person provides to the clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any Board members and, if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the Board of Review, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are the subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or object to a valuation; if that valuation was made by the Assessor or by the Objector using the income method of valuation; unless the person supplies the Assessor all the information about income and expenses, as specified in the Assessor’s manual under Sec. 73.03 (2a) of Wis. Statutes, that the Assessor requests. The Village of Webster has an ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the Assessor under this paragraph which provides exceptions for persons using information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or the duties of their office or by order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determined that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under Sec. 19.35 (1) of Wis. Statutes. The Board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other persons may testify by telephone. Respectfully submitted, 484789 38-39L 28-29a Patrice Bjorklund, Clerk/Treasurer

(Apr. 22, 29, May 6, 13, 20, 27) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY GREENTREE SERVICING, LLC Plaintiff, vs. DOUGLAS J. WALTON, ANNA M. WALTON, CAPITAL ONE BANK, Defendants. Case No.: 08 CV 755 Case Code: 30404 Case Type: Foreclosure of Mortgage NOTICE OF SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on the 12th day of December, 2008, I will sell at public auction in the front lobby/ foyer area of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main Street, in the City of Balsam Lake, County of Polk, Wis., on June 23, 2009, at 10 a.m., all of the following described mortgaged premises, to-wit: Lot Thirty-five (35) of the Plat of Pixie Acres Mobile Home Second Addition to the Village of Milltown, being part of the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (NW 1/4 of SW 1/ 4), Section 8, Township 35 North, Range 17 West, Polk County, WI. Tax Parcel No.: 151-00427-0000 Address: 623 Milltown Ave. Milltown, WI TERMS OF SALE: Cash. DOWN PAYMENT: 10% down of amount bid in cash or certified check at the time of sale made payable to Clerk of Courts; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. SALE SUBJECT TO: Property to be sold as a whole “AS IS” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances, real estate taxes, accrued and accruing special assessments, if any, penalties and interest. Purchaser to pay all recording fees, Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax and cost of title evidence. Dated this 14th day of April, 2009. Tim Moore Polk County Sheriff Attorney Sam Kaufman 201 S. Marr Street Fond du Lac, WI 54936

482283 WNAXLP

SEVERSON, SHELDON, DOUGHERTY & MOLENDA, P.A.

VILLAGE OF SIREN SOUTHEAST NEIGHBORHOOD PROJECT – PHASE 1 FINAL RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT AND LEVYING SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS AGAINST BENEFITTED PROPERTY IN THE VILLAGE OF SIREN, WISCONSIN

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Eighteen (18) West, described as follows: Commencing at the Southeast corner of parcel described in Volume 392 Records, page 262, Document No. 375027; thence following said East line North 1°50’27” West 2,087.97 feet; thence North 89°08’33” East 418.72 feet; thence South 1°50’27” East to the Southwest corner of parcel G of Certified Survey Map No. 795, recorded in Volume 4 of Certified Survey Maps, page 40, Document No. 404768; thence South 82°57’35” East to the Westerly line of 66-foot roadway easement (the Easterly line of said roadway easement being described in Volume 467 Records, page 494, Document No. 426682); thence Southerly following the Westerly line of said roadway easement to a point that is 500 feet North of the South section line; which is the point of beginning; thence West 990 feet; thence South 500 feet to Section line, thence East along section line to a point which is located on the Westerly line of said roadway easement, Southerly of the point of beginning, thence Northerly to the point of beginning, except highway right of way, Polk County, Wis. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2331 230th Avenue, Cushing, Wisconsin 54028. Dated: April 23, 2009.

483840

(April 29, May 6, 13, 20, 27, June 3) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CapFinancial Properties CV2, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. Donald D. Smith, Evelyn K. Smith, Conseco Finance Servicing Corp. f/k/a Green Tree Financial Servicing Corporation, Household Finance Corporation, Capital One Bank, Elite Recovery Services, Department of Workforce Development, ABC Partnership, XYZ Corporation, John Doe and Mary Roe, Defendants. Case No.: 08-CV-615 Case Code: 30404 (Foreclosure of Mortgage) The amount claimed exeeds $5,000 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on December 23, 2008, in the amount of Fiftyone Thousand Eight Hundred Eighty-eight and 24/100 Dollars ($51,888.24), the Sheriff of Polk County will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: DATE & TIME: June 24, 2009, at 10 a.m. TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of the successful bid must be paid to the Sheriff at the sale in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds, payable to the Clerk of Courts (personal checks cannot and will not be accepted). The balance of the successful bid must be paid to the Clerk of Courts in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds no later than ten days after the court’s confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold “as is” and subject to all liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Entrance of Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin 54810. LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Part of the Southeast Quarter (SE 1/4) of Section Six (6), Township Thirty-five (35) North, Range


MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 35

Frederic Fine Arts program

Seniors Megan Anderson, Sarah Lexen, Candace Buck and Adrianna Otte each performed a solo during the choir’s performance of “Mama Mia Choral Highlights.”

Many art pieces were put on display in the hallway of the school during the Frederic Fine Arts concert held Thursday, May 7. These abstract art projects were among them. In this project, art teacher Greg Heine had the students work with oil pastels and geometric forms.

Cathryn McConnell’s spray-paint works of the casts of “High School Musical” and Harry Potter were displayed behind hand casts of McConnell (the orange one) and Anna Tesch.

LEFT - Sarah Lexen hugged instructor Greg Heine after he acknowledged her for receiving a senior piano award.

Photos by Brenda Sommerfeld Band instructor Patti Burns presented Bobbi Jo O’Brien with the John Philip Sousa Award. The award recognizes superior musicianship, dependability, loyalty and cooperation.

Peter Draxler received an MVP senior band member award, voted to him by the band members.

The show choir performed three selections during the Frederic Fine Arts concert on Thursday night.

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Valley Funeral H x i o r om t. C

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“Celebrating Life”

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Candace Buck received the National School Choral Award from choir instructor Greg Heine during the Frederic Fine Arts concert.

Alex Miller was just one of the band members who wore a memento of the trip to Disney World.


PAGE 36 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 13, 2009

Inter-County Cooperative Publishing purchases St. Croix Valley Graphics

ST. CROIX FALLS - The Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association, publisher of the Inter-County Leader and the Advertisers, announced this week it has purchased the Taylors Falls printing business, St. Croix Valley Graphics, from owners David and Linda Sandmann. Linda has been hired by ICCPA to be a printing consultant, working out of the company’s St. Croix Falls office Mondays through Thursdays. The Sandmanns decided to sell St. Croix Valley Graphics after 30 years in the printing business. They began with a shop in the basement of the Livery Mall on Taylors Falls Main Street. Five years later, to meet growing needs, they moved to a location on First Street, up

the hill from Main Street. “We have enjoyed the many people we’ve met and the relationships that we have built over the years,” the couple noted. They personally notified all of their customers of the sale prior to making an announcement in the newspaper. Customers were assured the printing quality they had come to know with St. Croix Valley Graphics will continue with ICCPA. Linda, a former president of the Taylors Falls Chamber of Commerce and current member of the Falls Chamber of Commerce (Taylors Falls and St. Croix Falls), said she plans to remain active in the chamber as she continues serving longtime and new customers in her role as a printing consultant for ICCPA.

New Pastor at Grantsburg’s Faith Lutheran Church by Priscilla Bauer GRANTSBURG – Pastor Victor St. George has preached just two sermons at Faith Lutheran Church in Grantsburg but says he finds his new parish a joy. “It’s been an absolute joy,“ said St. George, of becoming pastor to such an active and involved congregation. “I am just so impressed with all they do here at Faith.” St. George says he is also enjoying the area, although he is not new to northern Wisconsin, having grown up in Superior. He attended the University of Minnesota and received a Master’s of Divinity at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minn., in 1998. After graduation he served as pastor in the Western North Dakota Synod at the two-point parish of Napoleon and Kintyre. For the past seven years St. George served as pastor of St. Matthew Lutheran Church in Dubuque, Iowa. When his daughter, Jennifer, became ill, St. George and his wife, Karen, moved back to Minneapolis to help with her care. “It has been delightful to find a church to serve only one and a half hours from the Twin Cities,” said St. George, who explained his daughter’s continuing health concerns make it important for he and his wife to be close to her and her young family. St. George said his wife would continue to work in St. Paul while she seeks employment in the area.

Doug Panek, manager of the Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association (L) met recently with Linda and David Sandmann to finalize the sale of their company, St. Croix Valley Graphics, to ICCPA. - Photo by Marty Seeger The Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association has provided printing services since being established in 1933 and today offers a wide range of printing services - from design to finished product - utilizing its modern

printing plant in Frederic. Those with printing needs can contact Linda at the St. Croix Falls office (107 Washington Street North), by phone at 715-483-9326 or 800-950-1068 or by fax at 715-483-1420.

Pastor Victor St. George From his office window, St. George can look out and see golfers at the Grantsburg Golf Course. Although he described himself as “not a good golfer,” St. George said he loves to play and hopes to soon join the local league. He said Grantsburg is a lovely town and friends living in the Twin Cities who hunt and fish are jealous of his recent relocation to Burnett County. As for any plans for his new church and congregation, St. George says he wants to maintain the caring and ministerial attitude he sees guiding Faith Lutheran. “This congregation is absolutely committed to the church, and I want to spend time getting to know its members before I do anything else.”

Frederic accident

Local authorities and EMS personnel responded to a two-vehicle accident just north of Frederic on Hwy. 35 last Friday morning, May 8. According to information from Frederic Police Chief RJ Severude, Janelle K. Miller-Coulter of Frederic was southbound on Hwy. 35, making a legal left turn onto Benson Road when she was struck from behind by a vehicle driven by Florence Klinkerfues of Maplewood, Minn. All parties, including a passenger in the Miller-Coulter vehicle, Alexander K. Miller, were checked out by EMS at the scene or at a hospital, and no serious injuries were reported. The accident occurred just after 8 a.m. Frederic Fire Department, Frederic Police, Northland Ambulance and Polk County Sheriff’s Department responded to the scene. - Photos by Marty Seeger

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MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 1

Currents N

‘Follow the Leader’

O R T H E R N

News and views from the NW Wisconsin community

Co un td ow n t o a ne w lib ra ry

by Tammi Milberg ST. CROIX FALLS – Construction began on the St. Croix Falls Library April 1, 2009, after years of planning and dreaming by members of a steering committee and the library board, which began the process in August 2005. The library construction is expected to be completed Sept. 15, with the grand opening scheduled for Sept. 26 during the city’s Harvest Fest celebration. How it started In August 2005, the library board voted to recruit community members to serve on a steering committee. ”We recognized there was a need and called a group of citizens together to determine what kind of library we wanted and where it should be located,” said librarian Sarah Adams. “We looked at the movie theater next door, the Holiday, and a few other sites that were suggested.” Adams said that the firm of Short Elliot Hendrickson performed an analysis on the two sites that the steering committee narrowed down from the list, Holiday and movie theatre buildings. “The prices were relatively similar for the two sites, but with holiday, there was the plus of a flat space, as opposed to being on a hill, and parking was prime,” Adams said. Virginia Zoncki-Bunker, library board chair, said that the accessibility to all was a driving factor for the Holiday site. The committee then determined Holiday was the best choice. The next step was asking the council for authorization to fund raise and the goal of raising $1 million began in November of 2007. The partnership of Dr. Uddin and his dentistry business to occupy half of the building helped make the project a reality. Adams said, “Only in a small community where you know the people would a partnership like this exist and work.” Presently Construction was under way after the bids were awarded in March 2009. The plan will have solar heat, solar tubes for lighting, and many windows for natural light to come into the building. The general contractor, Gene Johnson, is local. Adams said that the goal was to have as much of the work done locally as possible to circle the dollars in the community. The city is hoping to capture stimulus dollars to help fund the solar component of the project because it is not only an energy savings, but is a model for communities who wish to do something positive with an existing building. One of the grants secured for the library in the early phases was from the Wisconsin Department of Commerce. The grant was for slum and blight, which the Holiday building qualified for in its beginning phases. To date, fundraising has been a success. The library is close to reaching

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The inside of the former Holiday building is pictured here, before any work was done, in October 2007, when the city handed the key to the library.

This photo of St. Croix Falls new library site was taken this week with construction well under way and completion expected for Sept. 15. –Photos by Tammi Milberg unless otherwise noted

This rendering shows what the library exterior will look like upon completion. According to the library’s director, Sarah Adams, the cantilevered roof will remind some of a book cover opening up. –special photo the $1 million mark, and is still in the process of raising funds to cover all the costs associated with the project. The library is in the process of securing funds for a matching grant. The grant matches up to $50,000 or 12 months of fundraising, whichever comes first. The kickoff for that matching grant happened in April and they are currently at $13,500. Adams said people who donate now will be doubling their donation through the grant match adding that donations are always appreciated. Currently, there are zero spaces of parking dedicated to the existing library, which is inside the Festival Theatre building. The circulation desk is a small work space dedicated to processing, on average, 400 items daily. There are 12,647 books and volumes in print, 4,723 electronic books, 832 audio materials, 3,975 downloadable electronic audio materials, 1,115 video materials,

and 56 subscriptions for newspapers and magazines in the St. Croix Falls library. Last year the library loaned out 9,219 items to other libraries and received 14,518 items from other libraries. There is a recorded annual count of 29,858 library visits and 10,196 are Internet or computer users. The library put on 19 adult programs, which were attended by 1,070 persons and hosts 52 children’s programs yearly, where were attended by 1,424 children. The lights are installed in the parking and public plaza but will not go on until the landscaping is completed. Some plantings will be happening in the next few months with native perennials to be planted in the fall. Future plans “The first surprise in getting a new library was how controversial a new library can be,” said Adams. “The second surprise was how successful the

fundraising is going.” The new library will have workrooms for staff. It will have a community room, a homework center available a few times a week for intergenerational communications with volunteers (retirees, or former teachers) helping students with homework, lifelong learning experiences for adults, laptop labs for use inside the library, eight stationed computers and wireless access for people who bring in their own computers. “There’s lots of work and recreation that happens here [library],” said Adams. “A lot of it depends on the space we have. I hope we are able to accommodate that in a more functioning way.” Adams said the library would be adding one staff person to work the evening hours who will have a strong background in computers and Webbased technology. The parking allows for approximately 33 spaces in the plaza, with onstreet parking that will be striped on both sides of the road. “We are excited this new building is going to be so welcoming to everybody,” said Zoncki-Bunker. “A library doesn’t just serve one purpose. We are hoping the community meeting room is used to the point that people wonder how on earth did we get along without it. We are also using a building that was vacant. We want people to know the library is not ‘we,’ it’s you. The library belongs to all of us. How great it will be to have this community resource become a destination used by people who have been here, and by those who have never been here.” Sidebar In 1921, the library was started by the St. Croix Falls Women’s Club with a box of 50 books in the municipal building. In 1924 St. Croix Falls organized a library under the state statutes and appointed the first library board. The library was housed at the municipal building, the First National Bank, and again at the municipal building during the years 1924 to 1972. In 1972, the library was moved to the current location inside Festival Theatre.

See Countdown, page 2


PAGE 2 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 13, 2009

Countdown/from page 1 In 1999, some remodeling allowed for enhanced customer flow. In 2001, the MORE library system allowed for access to over 1 million items through an inter-library exchange program. In 2002, four public access stations for Internet were secured through the Gates

Foundation grants, fine money collected provided furniture for the reader seating area, and ACT 150 funds helped begin bringing the library’s collection to state recommended standards. In 2006, the library celebrated 85 years of service in St. Croix Falls.

PHOTO ABOVE LEFT: Su Leslie, Virginia Zoncki-Bunker and Sarah Adams use the circulation desk as a workstation while going through bins of requested materials shipped to St. Croix Falls from other libraries in the MORE system. Adams said the circulation desk is the hub of the library and provides a small work space to process nearly 400 items daily coming in and going out. PHOTO ABOVE: This photo of the existing library’s children’s books section shows how much the library has in materials for this genre. The new library will have more space to accommodate more materials. - Special photos

Frederic spring concert Frederic Middle School music students presented their spring concert, Monday evening, May 11, under the direction of band director Patti Burns, vocal music director Greg Heine and bell choir and vocal music director Pat Anderson. LEFT: Band director Patti Burns took part in one of her concert band’s numbers by playing along on the xylophone. RIGHT: Percussionist Cameron McWilliam takes his turn at the kettle drums during the performance of “Halo 3.” - Photos by Gary King

Bell choir members Paige Burton, Natalie Phernetton and McKenna Cook await their cue to begin playing, under the direction of Pat Anderson.

Flute players Lexie Domagala, Carly Gustafson and Abbey Pickard.

Greg Heine directs the middle school choir.


MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 3

I just hope you’re okay by Amber Moore, winning memoir from the National Scholastic Youth Writing Contest It all started when Stefani and I heard an announcement: “Attention all campers, we will be having an ambulance coming. Please stay out of its way. Thank you.”

PoCo Penners The PoCo Penners meet the second Friday of the month at 2 p.m. at the county boardroom in the government center in Balsam Lake. Contact Brenda Mayer at 715-485-3571 or Iris Holm 715-294-3174 for more information. - submitted

Writer’s Corner This didn’t mean much to Stefani and me at the moment. But then the ambulance pulled up on the small dirt path beside Adam’s house. I watched impatiently and remembered earlier that day when Stefani and I talked with Matt, Adam, and Alex on the jumping pillow. Alex said, “Dude we should have some kind of contest tonight.” Adam … “Yeah, man, how about a pop drinking contest?” Matt … “With Mountain Dew?” Me … “Wow, don’t do something dumb.” Stefani interrupted, “Hey Amber, my dad said we have to go eat lunch back at the cabin.”

Stefani and I, along with family and friends, were at KOA Campgrounds in Hayward. We met Matt, Adam, and Alex on the jumping pillow our first day there. I guess we just became close friends with them. The flashback ended as the ambulance rudely interrupted my thoughts. Matt, Stefani, and I sat on the playground ship that was situated next to Adam’s house, since his grandparents owned KOA, and watched in fear. I remember hearing medics saying things in code; this made us more scared. Then we saw what I thought was the hardest thing to look at: Adam, eyes closed, covered in a gray blanket, and an oxygen mask. They loaded him up in the back of the ambulance. The blaring sirens slowly grew quiet. Away they went off to the hospital. We rose and wiped our tears. Then we walked back to the cabin in pure darkness and silence and went to bed.

The next day we revisited the wooden ship, but Adam never came out. After he had passed out from excessive Mountain Dew, he had gone to the ER and had his stomach pumped. He’d had way too much that night. He had stayed in the hospital that night and was released some time after we had already left. I never got to see Adam again. When we got into the truck to head home, I whispered to myself, “I just hope you’re okay.” One small tear ran down my face.

Northwest Regional Writers The Northwest Regional Writers meet at 1 p.m. the second Friday of the month either in Frederic or Grantsburg. Call Mary Jacobson at 715-349-2761 for more information about the organization.

Submissions should be typed, double-spaced on one side only of 8 -1/2 x 11 white paper, leaving a minimum of 1-inch margins all around. Handwritten submissions will not be accepted. Submissions should be no more than 800 words. Submissions may be delivered to The Leader’s offices in Frederic or Siren, mailed to Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837 or e-mailed to the-leader@centurytel.net. We prefer e-mailed copy. If hand-delivered or mailed, please write "Writers’ Corner" somewhere on the front of the envelope. If e-mailed, please use "Writers’ Corner" as the subject and include the submission as body text of the e-mail. No attachments, please. Your submission to Writers’ Corner grants The Leader one-time rights to publish the item in the weekly newspaper. The author retains the copyright and all future publication rights. The Leader may edit submissions for grammar and punctuation, clarity and length. If you have any questions about this feature, please contact us at the-leader@centurytel.net or call 715-327-4236. - Editor Hello again. Mother’s Day has come and gone. Can you believe it? What I really can’t believe is how long I have been a mother. My oldest daughter is 45 and the youngest is 38. How can that be, when I have just turned 55, or maybe older. I lost track at 55 and so will leave it right there. I like that number. We have just been to Madison where we saw our oldest grandson graduate from college. I still think of him as that beautiful blond baby. How that baby grew so tall and grew a beard I cannot imagine. How he got through college with high honors, having been on the dean’s list for every semester, I will never know. His mother is really very intelligent so I will give all of the credit to her. His father ... well, that is a different matter. Don’t you really wish you could pick your children’s husbands/wives sometimes? Once they are married it is hard not to be the meddling mother-in-law or mother or grandmother, so we should get the meddling out of the way before the wedding. I remember my mother orchestrating my first wedding. It was really her wedding right down to the shoes she chose for me. She even chose my first husband. I should have put my foot down, but I had on those shoes and

they hurt my feet. I was only 21 and still in college working on my master’s but I was still my mother’s daughter when I went home. I never really gained my independence when I was in her home. She was my “mother,” not my and never Blodgett mom, Mommy. Only after she passed away was I in charge, although I still think she is watching me when I do something she would never approve of. As far as she is concerned, in my eyes, I am still her little girl as she sits on her cloud with her beautiful wings and watches every thing I do. I was driving down Hwy. 53 the other day on the way to have lunch with my daughter, thinking how nice it was to leave the mess at the house, the phone ringing only to be answered by the answering machine and just the freedom to do anything she and I wanted to do.

Barb

Caregiver's

Gifts

As it turns out, we had a long lunch in Stanley at McDonalds and wandered the Dollar Store. Loved every minute of it. I turned Maze, the cat, over to her and hugged and hugged goodbye and drove back to reality. I did make a stop though. I got to Chippewa Falls, and because Sam’s Club was just a few miles down the road in Eau Claire, I thought I would stop. I was like a kid in a candy store. I could buy things in bulk, large sizes of detergent, fabric softener, Tang and Chiclet gum. I had a wonderful time. I was checking out and called Denny to find out which credit card I should put it on. After the shock of hearing the total he said, “What did you buy!” Now you have to understand, I have three people behind me and I am simply wanting to know if it goes on MasterCard or the Sam’s Discover. He kept asking “How much? What could cost so much?” All I kept saying was, “Den, I just want to know which card. There are people waiting.” Everyone was laughing by this time and although I was holding up the line, my end of the conversation and the imagined responses were too funny to get impatient. He made the choice and I apologized and everyone clapped. I’m sure others in the store thought it was one of those pep meetings like Wal-

Mart has. Getting home was even more fun. We unloaded and Denny just stared in amazement. I kept explaining that it was cheaper to buy 24 of the energy bars he didn’t care for than 24 of those he loves. I told him he would learn to love the cheaper ones. I hope he does or the chipmunks are going to be very energetic when they get the energy bars that Denny never did like so they turned hard in the pantry after three months. Before I say goodbye, I have to thank all of those who pledged for me at our bowl-a-thon. I did better than I expected, thanks to the granny squat. I walked to the line, squatted and pushed the ball down the alley. Some of the time I hit some pins. I bowled 121 for a total of three games. That is a record for me. It was fun and we were able to make some money for Interfaith Caregivers and with any luck at all, no one took pictures from the back. More to follow in a couple of weeks. I have some wonderful new stories from our care receivers. Can’t wait to pass them along. Until then, God bless, Barb

Spaghetti fundraiser to benefifitt St. Croix Falls Autumn Fest ST. CROIX FALLS – While most people are busy making plans for summer, organizers of the St. Croix Falls Autumn Fest are already thinking ahead to fall. On Saturday, May 16, from 4 – 8 p.m., they will host a spaghetti dinner at the senior center in St. Croix Falls to raise money for this year’s community celebration. For $7/person (children under 5 free), community members are invited to

enjoy dinner prepared by local gourmets and featuring fresh, local ingredients. Vegetarian and gluten-free options will be available. A silent auction will include tickets to Festival Theatre, Wild Mountain, Scenic Boat Tours, the Twins and more. Funds raised will go toward expenses related to the various activities that make up Autumn Fest, which will be held Sept. 26 and 27 this year and will include

art and craft fairs, music, kids’ activities and carriage rides, a local chili contest, and much more. “The spaghetti dinner is an open invitation for community members to get involved in shaping this year’s Autumn Fest and to share their ideas for making this an authentic expression of the vibrant community we’re building in St. Croix Falls,” says Ed Emerson, city administrator and spaghetti-dinner volunteer.

The senior center is located at 140 N. Washington Street in downtown St. Croix Falls. Contact Julie Hildebrand at 715-483-3929, ext. 15, for more information or to volunteer for the spaghetti fundraiser. The next Autumn Fest planning meeting will be Tuesday, May 19, at 10:30 a.m., at St. Croix Falls City Hall. Anyone interested in being involved in organizing at any level is encouraged to attend. – submitted

New volunteer opportunities at St. Croix National Scenic Riverway ST. CROIX FALLS - The National Park Service at the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway is pleased to announce new volunteer opportunities. These are great ways for community members to get involved in learning more about the Riverway, helping to protect the river, and providing information to the public. Volunteer program intern: Work with NPS staff to coordinate volunteer efforts along the Riverway this summer. Duties include providing volunteers with the proper information, instruction, and equipment to allow them to perform their duties safely and to the best of their ability and participating in a variety of volunteer projects throughout the park, such as island restoration, visitor contacts, and invasive plant removal. Intern will be based in St. Croix Falls but with

much work in the Stillwater area. Small stipend available. Must be 16 years or older. College student or immediate post-college person preferred. Contact Dale Cox at 715-483-2272. Oral history intern: Conducting interviews with community elders and other citizens with intimate knowledge of the river and its past is one of the best ways to document the history of the park. Intern will be trained on recording equipment and interview techniques and be scheduled to interview selected individuals. Transcribing interviews is also a part of this position. Position can be based in Grantsburg, St. Croix Falls, or Trego. Small stipend available. Must be a college or graduate student. Contact Jean Schaeppi-Anderson at 715-483-2271.

Stillwater Islands volunteer: Join the team helping to protect the Stillwater Islands area of the St. Croix River! This 4mile stretch, located from the Soo Line (Arcola) High Bridge downstream to north Stillwater, is known for its scenic cliffs and islands and is a very popular area for motorized boating, day use, and camping. Volunteers can work in several areas: educating the public about the significance of the Riverway and specific regulations that help to protect this area, restoring native plants to the islands and shorelines, and assisting with island cleanup – all while spending time outdoors along the river. Schedules and time commitments are flexible. Those interested in volunteering should complete a simple application at http://www.volunteer.gov/gov/results

.cfm?ID=9739 or contact Dale Cox at 715-483-2272. The NPS will provide training and orientation for all volunteers, as well as provide all supplies and equipment. Most volunteer work will take place during the summer months. The St. Croix National Scenic Riverway, a unit of the National Park System, was established by the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act in 1968; it is one of a group of eight rivers in the country which first received this recognition. For 252 miles, the St. Croix River and its tributary, the Namekagon, flow through some of the most scenic and least developed country in the Upper Midwest. For additional information about the Riverway, visit www.nps.gov/sacn. submitted


PAGE 4 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 13, 2009

Jones and Morrison brickyard by Stanley Selin This article is based on the booklet “Past Industries of the Grantsburg Area,” by Alton C. Jensen, with permission from the Grantsburg Area Historical Society. There were many clay deposits in the western part of Burnett County, which were suitable for making bricks. The largest of these was located on the north side of Wood River west of the presentday dam on Memory Lake. The clay found in this deposit was on the western part of the Hickerson Roller Mill property. It was purchased from Joel Hickerson by the Jones and

Collected by

Russ Hanson

River Road

Ramblings Morrison Company, and was known as Brickyard Pond. The clay was dug with hand labor from a pit over 70 feet deep. It was transported on a narrow-gauge track and then hauled across the river for molding. The clay was dumped into a mixing machine and then pressed and shaped into bricks. The bricks were

This photo of two of the four kilns was taken in 1906. One man recalled cutting all the poles used for fuel in the four kilns, for which he was paid 1-1/4 cents for each pole. – Photo from “Strolling Through a Century.”

The crew of workers pose for a photo at the brick drying yard. The factory made millions of bricks over many years. - Photo from the book “Strolling Through a Century.” slowly dried in open-air sheds, but sheltered from the sun and rain until the drying process was completed. The dried bricks were placed in four woodfired kilns for the firing process. The first firing that was done was in 1902 and produced 100,000 bricks. About this time, Jones and Morrison sold their factory to the Minneapolis Terra Cotta Factory, which was owned by the Minneapolis Brick Company. MBC built an office along the road between the Hickerson Roller Mill and the brickyard. A resident manager was placed in charge of production and sales.

When there were sufficient dried bricks for a firing, they sent a representative there to help oversee the operation. When the bricks in the kiln had cooled, the workers would take them out and sort them according to style and condition, and then stack them to be sold later. The former Burnett County Abstract Company building was constructed of MBC bricks, as well as several other buildings. Many homes in the outlying areas, such as in Trade Lake, had chimneys built of these locally made bricks in the early 1900s.

A brick made at the Grantsburg brickyard. Some bricks had the letters “MBC” on the top of the brick. Photo from Selin collection.

Main Street

Frederic, WI 54837

715-327-4979

HOURS: Monday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Friday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Tuesday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Wednesday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sunday Closed 445673 19Ltfcp Thursday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

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485255 38L

Monday through Thursday 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Closed Sunday Main Street

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MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 5

A wild dream Today I woke up at 6 a.m. I don’t like when that happens, as I had to get up at that time all my working years. So I went back to bed and fell asleep – and had a wild dream. I was walking from the back hall at the Leader, entering the front office. I didn’t recognize any of the women at the three desks. They were sitting there Abrahamzon like frozen zombies. I almost tripped on a camera on the floor. In fact, there were cameras all over the floor - flashes were going off from every angle. I bent down to pick up a camera and a frozen zombie said, “Leave it there.” “Wha-a-a-t?” I said. “Are were measuring foot traffic now?” “Yes,” she said. I sidestepped and headed for one of the offices I once had. It was a mess. My desk was askew in the corner, and right in the middle of the road was an ironing board set up with an electric iron on it. Purple cleaning rags were heaped in untidy piles on both the desk and nearby table. One of our longtime employees entered from the back shop and announced, “I’m drunk” and I said, “Oh, Zed, you are drunk and you never …” (Name changed to protect his privacy although I used his real name) Across the hall, Bernice Asper was sitting at her desk, typing, her back turned to the door. “What happened?” I asked. She turned to me, “I don’t know. All I know is the Boss didn’t come in today and …” I woke up, feeling upset and alarmed. The moral of my story is “Never go back to bed in the morning once you wake up, because it’s then that a person has wild dreams. And the worst thing is that a person remembers the dream. In the above dream – or was it a nightmare? – even the smallest detail is recalled. I saw the rough fabric of the purple cleaning rags. Once you wake up, wake up for good. Not that you have to leap out of bed like a gazelle. Slowly get up steady your equilibrium, then get dressed and get out of the bedroom. I think it was a nightmare. Perhaps I am just turning into a fiction writer after all. And you already know I am blessed – or burdened – with total recall. Blessing or curse, sometimes good, sometimes not.

Bernice

Behind the Signpost

The empty house next door We lived in three different houses when my husband, Ken, taught school in Ashland. One of the houses was a huge, old-fashioned mansion with two apartments on the first floor, two apartments on the second floor, and the penthouse on the third floor. Our apartment was on the first floor, a living room and dining room converted into a new living room and kitchenette and bathroom, and a dining room made into a bedroom. Both the living room and bedroom had fireplaces. Ken was at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, working toward his master’s degree for eight weeks one summer. I did not feel stranded, however, as my Aunt Pearl lived with us and our little boy. She had a cozy corner alcove in the living room with a sofa bed. It was one of those cold summers and the heat was turned off for the summer. If only we had some wood to burn in the living room fireplace. Across the street was a sprawling old house set in a grove of dark trees. The house had been deserted for a long time as the shingles were sliding off the roof, hitting the ground, piling up in heaps. The house was in ruins, deserted and forlorn. My Aunt Pearl and I dared to trespass and picked up fallen shingles and brought them back to our waiting fireplace. Before long, with crumpled papers and stolen shingles, we had a fire going. It was enough to take off the chill. But something was wrong. Instead of being warmed and comforted by the fire, we felt ill. Something was wrong with burning shingles. Perhaps they had been treated with some substance that gave off unhealthy fumes. We agreed we had better not burn any more of those ill-begotten shingles. Instead we put on heavier sweaters and spent more time outside where we could find patches of sunshine. We did a lot of exploring, walking our block and the next, taking refuge at the Vaughn Library, the bakery and other stores. We were glad when fall arrived and my husband returned home, and once again the furnace clicked on and off, heating the big radiators. Note: The above story was our assignment for last Friday’s writers club meeting, but I forgot it. (See! I did write it!) Until next week, Bernice

Postal service food drive

According to postmaster Steve Sventek, the Frederic Post Office collected between 1,800 and 2,000 pounds of food from the Frederic area and beyond during the 17th-annual NALC National Food Drive to “Stamp out Hunger” on Saturday, May 9. Food was collected nationwide, and will be distributed to local food pantries. It is the largest one-day food drive in the nation, in which carriers collected a record 73.1 million pounds of food last year. Pictured are (L to R): Heidi Skow, Lee Mangelsen, Deb Talmadge, Roxanne White, Vickie Mooney, Cindy Eggers and Sventek. Missing from photo are Kathy Wiseman and Bruce Olson. – Photo by Marty Seeger

Do you remember ? Compiled by Bernice Abrahamzon

50 Years Ago Commencement was held May 15 at the Siren High School, and 31 students received their diplomas.Many worked to put out the fire at the Siren dump.-A hypnotist appeared at the Siren school to present a program.-The Catholic Charities drive ended May 10.Obituaries included Elsie Peterson, Mrs. Victor Stenberg, Ida Peterson, Bruce Alan McKenzie and Christian Jensen.-Graduation was set for May 17 with 51 graduates receiving their diplomas.-Heavy rain and some hail hit the area.-Frederic salutatorian was Jane Friberg and Carmen Hable was valedictorian.-Specials at Route’s Super Market, Frederic, included carrots at two cello bags for 19¢, facial tissue at five boxes for $1.00, peas at 10¢ can, peach or blackberry jam at two jars for 35¢.-Additional obituaries included Mrs. Rakela Beres, John Walker, Anne Marie Olson, Lillian Boatman, Gertrude Rogers and Wm. Jensen.-Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Peterson celebrated their 40th wedding anniversary at their Trade River home on May 10.-A Trade River couple celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary on April 25 at their home. They were Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Kallman.-The film “Auntie Mame” was playing at the D’Lux Theatre, Luck.-Every spring a notice to control noxious weeds was published in this newspaper.-Fifty graduated from Osceola High School on May 22.

40 Years Ago The Frederic Dairy Queen had specials on DQ sandwiches at 11 for 89¢, foot-long hot dog or barbeque at 35¢, and with a malt at 65¢.-The DQ motto was “Live a Little – Eat Out.” The names listed were Dan and Arlene Frandsen and Janice Rommel.–The May special at the Our Own Hardware (Carlson Hardware) was a cast-aluminum food scoop for 39¢ for serving ice cream or mashed potatoes.-Special by Gustafson Wis. Fresh Dealers was strawberry cheesecake ice cream at 99¢ per half-gallon.-Homewood Resort at Round Lake was being expanded.-The Frederic High School home ec department was having its annual spring fashion show.-Starting June 1, the Farmers Union Co-op, Frederic, would close at noon on Saturdays.-Willard Johnson, an employee of the Frederic Farmers Co-op, was injured when a scoop unloading a railway car hit him in the abdomen.-Glen Nelson bought an old building at the Nielsen Motor Co., Luck.-Charter members of the Frederic Women’s Club were Ella Casperson, Carrie Spriggs and Irene Johnson.-A Community Concert was held May 17 at the Centuria gym with music for all tastes and ages.-Specials at the Frederic Co-op Store included bananas at 2 lbs. for 25¢, Winesap apples at one-third bushel for $1.79, and navel oranges at two dozen for 87¢.-J.B. Hanson, Inc., Siren, had an ad for plumbing and heating services. Everett Johnston had a blacksmith and welding shop three miles east of Lewis. Eldo Bengston did house moving and heavy hauling-Burnett Senior Citizens applied for funds to establish a senior center.

20 Years Ago Frederic prom royalty on April 15 included Troy Beecroft and Amanda Jensen. Royalty for 1988 were Terry Britton and Mary Beth Shearrow.-The Frederic School Board favored a new high school at a new site.Polk County’s recycling program would begin soon.Durex announced a new sales manager, Dennis Johnson.-Ethel Olesen was selected as Frederic’s 1988 Citizen of the Year.-Frederic school buses passed safety inspection.-Bernice Abrahamzon wrote a feature article on maple syrup production by Wally and Shirley Olson.-News came in from Frederic’s Masonic Lodge.Obituaries included Florence Otto, Hilma Broeffle, John Patrick Darmody, Wayne Elrod, Alice Knechtel and Ted Zinn.-Dena Paulson Pederson celebrated her 100th birthday on March 25 at the V.R. Hanson home near Cushing.-Secretary’s Week was celebrated April 24 – 28.-Anyone wishing to reclaim a lost bike should contact the Frederic Police Department.-The heating system for the Polk County Highway Department was discussed.-Ross Fellrath of Luck won the state math contest held in New London. It was sponsored by the Knights of Columbus.-Webster received a $302,800 grant to upgrade its wastewater treatment system.The Lions planned a shelter for Crooked Lake Park addition.-Wage agreements called for 3.5-percent increase in Burnett County.


PAGE 6 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 13, 2009

TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER Webster Senior Center

866-4334 The American Legion Auxiliary Otis Taylor Post 96, Webster, met on Tuesday afternoon at the Webster Community Center. Plans were made for their annual Memorial Day Dinner, which will be served at the community center after the service at Oak Grove Cemetery, Webster. Since May is traditionally Poppy Month, several members volunteered to distribute poppies in the Webster and Danbury areas. In 1920, the poppy was adopted as the American Legion memorial flower and they are handmade by veterans at the Zablocki VAMC Poppy Shop in Milwaukee and distributed by the Legion Auxiliary. I hope you all take the opportunity to get a poppy from one of Auxiliary members. Congregate diners loved Nicky’s spaghetti dinner that she served on Wednesday. Twelve ladies played dime Bingo in the afternoon and enjoyed eating the refreshments furnished by Nancy O’Brien, together with all the fun and laughter shared by all. The regular group of guys played pool on Thursday evening but only a few of the ladies played cards as the rest of them were attending the Webster Lioness Club monthly dinner meeting at the community center. My daughter, Heather Stahl, and I attended the graduation ceremony for daughter, Barbara Preddy of Menomonie, at Chippewa Valley Technical College in Eau Claire, where she obtained her associate degree in criminal justice – law enforcement. While attending school full time, working two part-time

jobs and raising a child, she still maintained a 3.92 GPA and graduated with scholastic jonors. The student address was given by Bettyann Nowak of Spooner, who obtained her degree in marketing and business management. Bettyann’s speech was on “Dancing Your Way to Success” and altering your life by altering your attitude. John Hoffland, news director of WEAU TV 13, who has over 30 years’ experience in journalism, gave the commencement address and told the graduates that they should always stay informed and never stop learning. He stated “Choose the job you love and you’ll never have to work a day in your life.” – Confucius, 495 BC. Jon Brutlag, in his faculty address, told the students that their final test is what they do after they walk out the door with their degree. I guess that also applies to high school seniors as they graduate in the coming weeks. The Chippewa Valley String Quartet entertained the packed stadium of proud family members while waiting for the 600-plus graduates to assemble. Our special gratitude goes to Sandy Wohletz for her donation of candy for the ever-emptying candy dish; Bernie Boelter for a supply of paper plates and napkins; Dave Wardean for his faithful efforts in keeping our building and equipment in tip-top shape; and Steve Hall, who helped Nicky give the kitchen and appliances a thorough cleaning. Our get-well wishes and prayers continue to go out to Olive Gehrke, Lynn Kern, Barb

Dewey - LaFollette

468-2940

Clam River Tuesday Club met May 6 at the home of Sandy Redding. The next meeting will be Wednesday, June 3, at 1:30 p.m. at the home of Kris Fjelstad. Each member and visitor is asked to bring their wedding picture to the meeting. Wednesday visitors of Hank and Karen Mangelsen were Les, Max, Kyle, Val, Isaiah and Kylee Lindquist and Benjamin and John Johnson. Gloria and Henry Schmidt visited Nina and Lawrence Hines Friday. Chris Harrison was a guest Saturday of

Meeting reminders

• Adult book club, Tuesday, May 26, at 10 a.m., “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society,” by Mary Ann Shaffer. • Afternoon craft groups, Tuesdays at 3:30 p.m., on the lower level. Bring a friend and your favorite craft. • Saturday, May 23, Friends of the Library Book Sale, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Our library has many databases available to use at the library or from your home on your Internet computer. To name a few: Ancestry Library (genealogy), BadgerLink (periodicals and newspapers), Chilton Library

Lawrence and Nina Hines. Don and Lida Nordquist went to Osceola Sunday to the home of Joleen and Richard Funk and family. Jan and Jim Schott and family were there also to celebrate Mother’s Day Mark and Sue Hines and family visited Donna and Gerry Hines Sunday. Karen and Hank Mangelsen were supper guests at the home of Jake and Holly Mangelsen and family Sunday. April and Dave Close and family were there also, and they celebrated Mother’s Day together.

(automotive repair), AskAway (online chat with librarian), NatLibrary (electronic books), OverDrive (download books to an MP3 player), Merlin (the NWLS online catalog), WISCAT (browsable catalog of Wisconsin library collections) and WorldCat (worldwide catalog of library collections). Links to these databases may be found at www.nwls.wislib.org.

New books for children

“Tales of Deltora,” by Emily Rodda.

New books for adults

“The 8th Confession,” by James Patterson; “Making Bead and Wire Jewelry,” by Dawn Cusick; “Afternoon Tea,” by Susannah Blake; “Denim by Design,” by Barb Chauncey; “Embroiderer’s Countryside,” by Helen M. Stevens; “Better Homes & Gardens New Decorating Book.”

New magazine subscription Taste of Home Holiday

Hours

Monday through Thursday 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.; Friday 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Burnett Community Library is at 7451 West Main Street in Webster.

Frederic Senior Center by Ardyce Knauber

Monday, May 4, Spades was played with the following winners: Hazel Hoffman in first place, Willis Williams in second place and Eleanor Bonneville in third place. Tuesday Whist was played and coffee time enjoyed. Pool players kept the morning game going. Early coffee time and visiting made for a busy center. Wednesday Pokeno was played. This group enjoyed their game and refreshments. Thursday 500 cards was played with the following winners: Tim Abrahamson in first place, Ed Berdal in second place, Nina Vold in third place and Arvid Pearson in fourth

final, for some, is when they cry in grief over the death of their son or daughter. Mary, the mother of Jesus, also experienced these times of joy and sorrow. What joy she must have been filled with when the Christ Child was born! Then the excitement when the shepherds and wise men came to worship him. Uneasiness must have occurred when Simeon prophesied in Luke 2:35 that a sword would pierce her soul. And then she must have felt heart-wrenching grief as she watched her Son dying on the cross. Her season of motherhood didn’t end there, because she was able to rejoice when he rose from the grave. Mary trusted him as her Savior, and she is now in heaven with him. “A mother experiences great joys and intense sorrows. But if she submits her life to God, every season of her motherhood serves his eternal purposes. Motherhood is a sacred partnership with God.” – H. Lugt. “Thank you, Lord, for motherhood with all its vale of tears, for happy moments never dimmed through all the many years.” – Strecker. See you at the center!

E-edition - this complete issue is online now. www.the-leader.net

Karen Mangelsen

Burnett Community Library One of the responses we received during National Library Week: My public library is important to our community because … “It’s a great place for children to explore the world one book at a time.” The youngsters from Mina Copeland Head Start sent a beautiful thank-you poster in appreciation of the visit they shared with Annette during National Library Week. The new afternoon craft club met for the first time on Tuesday at 3:30 p.m.; two new members have joined. We would love to see more eager crafters joining the group. Bring your favorite craft project and bring a friend. The library will be closed Monday, May 25, in observance of Memorial Day.

LeMire and Steve Hardy. Our sympathy and prayers also go out to Jill Norman and family in the recent passing of her mother, Clarice Lindahl of Frederic; Chuck and Donna Lehman in the death of their infant greatgrandson; the families of Joe Matrious and Ron Hansen in their recent deaths; and to the family of Jeanette Olson, Siren, in her unexpected death from a brain aneurism this past week. Jeanette was active in many community organizations, including the Siren Lioness Club, serving as the vice queen mother of the Ravishing Rubies Red Hat Society, and she was loved by all who knew her. She will be greatly missed. As we honor all mothers on this Mother’s Day, it makes one think of the many seasons of motherhood. First comes the season when a new mother rejoices over the birth of a precious new baby girl or boy coming into the world. Then there is another season when an anxious mother is worrying and praying for God to watch over her rebellious teenager. Another is when a mother sits at the bedside of an ill or injured child; and the

Mary Klar

place. Friday Pokeno was played at 12:30 p.m., with the monthly meeting held at 1:30 p.m. Many important issues were discussed. Games followed after the meeting with refreshments. Saturday food and fellowship was held at noon. Mother’s Day was recognized. Bernie Kurkowski gave each mother a plant, which was appreciated. A beef buffet dinner was followed by Bingo and cards, plus afternoon refreshments at coffee time. The Monday night knitters are back. It’s so nice to see the activity going on. “The only failure is not to try.”

Hi, everybody! Blacky here from Humane Society of Burnett County. If you are a regular reader, you noticed my column did not appear in the pages of the paper last week. I wish I could say it was because I was on a big assignment, or I had a wondrous adventure, but the truth is that I simply didn’t make my deadline. The days of the week don’t mean a lot to a guy like me, who whiles his time away digging holes and sniffing out fragrant things to roll in. Sorry. There was some excitement, however, at my house the other day. I was snoozing outside in a nice, cool dirt hole, along with my brothers, when an uninvited guest ambled into the yard and helped himself to our water bucket and food bowl - and he didn’t even ask! Now, most days, I have two sets of eyes I typically wear at home: my I Love You eyes and my Gimme a Bite of Your Sammich eyes. If they made a Mr. Blacky Potato Head, it would be pretty dull. So, when I woke up to see the first-ever bear in my yard, I blew the dust off of my I Mean Business eyes and hollered, “Hey, what are you doing stealing my stuff?” My other brothers started barking, too, and that scared that thief straight up into an oak tree next to the kitchen. I don’t think he was very old, maybe a year or two, because it was obvious he never went to charm school. He sat up in that tree flapping his lips and giving us the raspberry - “Thwwwwwwppt!” Some nerve. My mom made us come in the house, so he could climb down and leave, and I watched out the window as he ran off into the woods. “And don’t come back!” I shouted through the glass. That is probably the biggest tree rat I will ever see. Since I missed giving you the news last week, I have some catching up to do! First off, I told my eldest brother about all the dogs who get to visit the Siren Senior Center. Boy, ever since he found out he could go, he’s been licking his paws and getting himself all duded up for a ride into town ... and then he has to take a nap. I dunno if he’ll actually make it in, but he’s been awfully smiley when he isn’t sleeping lateley. Also, remember my friend, Phillip? The dog whose hair looks like yarn? Well, he found himself a new home on a farm, lucky dog! One of my favorite cats (shhh!) at the shelter, Noah, also went off to his new home. I will miss him tearing around the office and wreaking havoc with the papers on the kennel manager’s desk. I don’t know what makes him so mischievous, but it sure works. Three new cats have arrived at the shelter, and one dog. Murphy is a 6-year-old Lab/hound mix. He is reddish-brown with a white chest, toes, and a white-tipped tail. He says he doesn’t like to share the spotlight, and would prefer to be an “only dog.” It takes all kinds, I guess. Then there are the cats: Chloe is a black and white domestic shorthair, possibly 3 years old, who was found in Grantsburg. Leona is a domestic

shorthair who was picked up in Daniels Township. She is about 2 years old, and hot on her heels at the shelter is her kitten, Rascal. Rascal is about 2 months old, and he looks like he could indeed be rascally! That’s six cats, total, at the shelter right now, seven dogs. and Thanks to a generous donation of a new stainless steel cat cage YAPpenings complex, the newcomer cats have a little more elbow room. Joe Prinz and Carole Ranen of Birchwood, Minn., donated the cages in the name of “Cuz” Brown. That was awfully nice of them. It won’t be long before our second-annual wine and cheese tasting event rolls around, and I, for one, am looking forward to it! It is Saturday, May 30, at the Trade River Winery, outside of Frederic. It runs from 3 until 7 p.m., and costs $15 per person. There will be live music by Dave Frank and Mandikat Wirkkula, wines to sample, cheese from Burnett Dairy, and it all benefits the shelter. If you need directions to the winery, or have questions, you can call and ask at 715-327-4193. I’m going, even if it means I have to endure a bath. I can’t drink wine, but I like music, and I love cheese! My neighbor makes the cheese at the dairy, and I see him either going to or coming from work when I’m out for my daily walk. Sometimes I want to shout, “Hey, throw me some cheese!” but he doesn’t stop. Other times, he stops long enough to stick his arm out the window, scratch my ears, and tell me I’m a nice dog. That’s alright, too. Like cheese for my soul, so to speak. Then there’s my other neighbor: He has a golf cart he rides around in, and he doles out treats to me and my brothers. He’s like the Good Humour man, only he hands out biscuits instead of Push-Ups! Gee, I have everything a dog could ever wish for, and I hope I stay where I am until my dying days. Speaking of wishes, the shelter folks have a short list of their own, so I’ll get my head out of the clouds and tell you what they need: Bleach, paper towels, garbage bags, and AAA and 9-volt batteries. Hey, I just remembered - it’s my birthday this Friday! Instead of buying me a present, you can help out my friends at the shelter. I certainly don’t need anything, even any extra eyes, and my pals can always use the extra help. Well, it’s time for me to say so long, for now. Take care, everyone, and I’ll see you here next week - when I’m 5! HSBC is saving lives, one at a time. www.hsburnettcty.org 715-866-4096.

Blacky Shelter


MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 7

TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER Lewis

653-4281 Congratulations and welcome to new members of the Lewis Memorial United Methodist Church included Jim and Chong Jones plus Linda Boxter. Others will be welcomed into membership at a later date. Refreshments were served after the service by the two daughters of Jim and Chong and also by Linda Boxter. It was also a great day for visitors, including Deniece (Mrs. Dan) Noe of the Twin Cities and Beatrice and Vernon Redlich of Shell Lake. The two girls were Peterson girls, daughters of Axel and Muriel Peterson, and lived on the place now occupied by Ruth and Craig Lenz. Such fun to see them again as they grew up in the Lewis church and were very active in it. All the good leftover rummage sale items were donated to another party and picked up. Leftover books were donated to the Frederic Public Library. The rummage sale realized extra church funds with most items 25¢ or

50¢. In these difficult economic times some rummage sales at churches bear the sign “Free. Everything free.” In that case, not a fundraiser but a nice gesture. Did you remember to put some nonperishable foodstuffs in the mailbox or hanging on the mailbox designated for the local food shelf? We hadn’t experienced that before in the Lewis-Frederic area although they had in Luck. Remember, too, on Monday this week firstclass mail went up to 44¢. (I do my best to help the U.S. Mail service by writing dozens of letters for the Lewis church and for myself. I should, in turn, have piles of mail in our cluster box on Main Avenue.) In our NW Regional Writers group I am a rarity with no e-mail! I can write a pen dry in a very short time. I should own stock in the company that makes gel pens. The location of Friday’s meeting of the NW Regional Writers had to be changed at the

Twister is an 8year-old, purebred, neutered male Birman. He has a butter-soft medium-hair coat with seal points and white mittens. Twister is a loving, handsome fellow. He enjoys a nap in his favorite spot for most of the day, interrupted by the occasional trip to the food bowl and a head butt to your legs. Twister rather enjoys a brushing in the evening, after a long hard day of toy mouse catching and sun soaked napping. He is waiting for the perfect home; one where the

two of you can bask in your friendship, without another cat to come between you. You know it’s summer when the fundraising brat stands start up at Dick’s Market in Amery. The Arnell Humane Society Brat Stand will serve them up this Wednesday, May 13, starting about 10 a.m. Load up your bun with

Arnell Humane Society Happy Tails

Await

Bernice Abrahamzon

last minute to Espresso Cabin. Good turnout, around 14. The state conference at the Lodge was reviewed, listing good points and otherwise, bills settled, suggestions given, etc. The June meeting will also be held at Espresso Cabin at 1 p.m., with the assignment, “I wonder what’s in the envelope.” Carolyn Marquardt won first place on her entry in the Al Nelson contest. She described how she loves all the four season of living in Wisconsin and was congratulated on her achievement. She received a certificate, $75 check and the traveling trophy. Sheila Staples, Clarice Nelson, Larry and Sharry Nelson of Bayfield, Linda and Al Anderson of Naples, Fla., Jim and Geri Prodger, Steve Prodger and Amanda, Tim Prodger and Melissa, all of the Twin Cities area, were Mother’s Day dinner guests of Rene and Dan Edge at their home in Balsam Lake. Sunday visitors and dinner guests at the home of LaVerne Leep were family members, onions, relish or kraut, bratwurst or wiener; grab a bag of chips and a soft drink and you’re good for the rest of the day. Ain’t it grand?! The no-fuss fundraising lunch for a cause; a Plugger’s Charity Ball. And it tastes good too! Hope to see you there. The kennels are filling up with animals being forced out of their homes for one reason or another. Seems to be happening a lot lately. Jimmy the Jack Russell came because his owner needed to take medication for his heart just to take him on a walk and Buddy the Lab-husky lost his house to foreclosure. One pet had been living in a truck at the park after being evicted and another was displaced when her caregiver’s health forced her to move in with her cat-allergic family. It’s tough out there. Looking for homes at Arnell: Albert,

Carol and Lee Mangelson of rural Frederic, Jenny and Kryst Midbrod and children, Ethan and Emmy of Somerset, and Lisa and Tom Mangelson. Sheila Staples, Rick Abrahamzon and Bernice Abrahamzon enjoyed a Sunday ride in the Yellow Lake area. Another sign of spring and spruce-up time. This week the carpeting in the Lewis church is being professionally cleaned. Welcomed back to this area from Florida homes are Marie and Bob Nelson of Lewis. Garden report: Rhubarb will soon be big enough to welcome spring with rhubarb pie. Good news, too, the first cutting of asparagus was here for Mother’s Day menu. White violets are already in bloom, and the woods are laced with the white blossoms of wild plum and upland heather.

Simon, Star and Smarty Jones are “The LitRascals” of the cat room. tle They are active, playful and laugh-out-loud entertaining. Ms. Kitty, Baby and Twister are their more mature, gentle, “Love Me Tender” counterparts. Stoney is a tall drink of water shepherdhusky mix, thoughtful and ready for fun. Tiny is a wiggly, companion-smart rottweiler. He is a gentle giant with a big heart. A sleek black Lab-husky mix named Buddy is the perfect family dog. He is young enough to learn your rules but comes with some manners already installed. Visit our adoptable pets. Arnell Memorial Humane Society, 715-268-7387 or arnellhumane.org.

Siren Senior Center All it took was a few warm days to put a smile on everyone’s faces. Wasn’t it great to be able to go out without a jacket on? Our sympathy first to Neil Olson and Millie Hartshorn on the passing of Jeanette Olson. Jeanette participated in so many organizations and activities in the community and we especially enjoyed her at our 500 card games. She will be greatly missed by all of us. All of our activities have been well attended. It’s good to see the parking lot full of cars. The Dining at Five dinner had an all-time record of 66 people coming out to dine. CeCe served a roast turkey dinner and also baked some lemon bars, which were raffled off. The

winners of the lemon bars were: Don Peterson, Opal Johnson and Laurie Morse. Gratitude is extended to Nona and Ralph Severson, Lou Jappe, Corrine Root and Gerry Vogel. They helped serve and wait the tables. We want to also extend gratitude to Connie Crosby for lending a hand; and to all of the volunteers for the hours that they have donated this past year to make someone else’s life a little more enjoyable. Gratitude is also extended to Carol Berglind for delivering the last few week’s worth of donations to the humane society. Also, to all of you who generously donate regularly to our box for them. For those who are not aware, we have a collection box for the dogs and cats at the humane society and

they are so thankful for your gifts. A note for our ladies: the Fox Run Golf Course is open and they sponsor a fun league, for anyone interested, on Wednesday mornings. This is a great league for all players, good and bad, and everyone is on their own. Also, you aren’t obligated to play every week, everything is at your own time and pace. Come and join them. Next week our Feet First lady will be at the center on Monday, May 18, so if your feet need attention call and make a reservation. Also, we will have our monthly senior meeting on Tuesday, the 19th. We will be celebrating the birthdays of Don Brand and Judy Johnson after the meeting, with our usual birthday

SCF Senior Center Hope all the mothers had a most enjoyable day on Sunday, Mother’s Day, whether it was spent with family or close friends. On Tuesday, 40 people at the center enjoyed cards and Dominos. Winners for 500 cards were: Jim Anderson, Ray Nelson, Jeanne Thomfohrd, Wally Quist and Lonnie Jones. Pete Schlosser won the nine bid. Domino winners were: Martha Lundstrom, Don Anderson and Donna Schlosser. U-Care held their monthly meeting at the center on Wednesday morning with a good

number in attendance. Thursday night 500 card winners were: Roger Greenly, Jeanne Thomfohrda and Alice Anderson. Friday had two full tables for Bridge. If there is anyone else who would like to play Bridge, just stop by the center on Friday at 10 a.m. This week’s activities include a town hall meeting with Ann Hraychuck and Tom Nelson, assembly majority leader, at the center on Monday, at 1 p.m. Bridge and Bingo will be played on Friday,

May 15. There is a community spaghetti fundraiser on Saturday, May 16, from 4 to 8 p.m., at the center, along with a silent auction. Remember our monthly meeting is scheduled for Thursday, May 21, with potluck lunch prior to the meeting. This meeting they will be voting for the new officers and they do need a quorum of members for this voting. Enjoy the sunshine and the warmer weather.

Academic news TROY, N.Y. – David T. Maiden Mueller, son of Spike and Mary Maiden Mueller of Luck, will graduate this Saturday, May 16, summa cum laude, with a Bachelor of Science degree in aeronautical and mechanical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y., the oldest school of science and civil engineering in the United States. While at RPI, Maiden Mueller was inducted into Tau Beta Pi, an engineering honor society, and Pi Tau Sigma, a mechanical engineering honor society. In June he heads to a summer internship at the Jet Propulsion Laboratories in Pasadena, Calif., and has been accepted into the Master of Engineering in space engineering program at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor for the fall semester. David was the valedictorian of the Luck High School class of 2005. Photo/information submitted

••• ROCHESTER, Minn. – Nolan Neumann has been named to the dean’s list for the fall semester of 2008 at Rochester Community and Technical College with a 3.5 (or higher) grade-point average. – submitted

David T. Maiden Mueller

Nolan Neumann

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Barb Munger cake. We would like to extend gratitude to Marjorie Peterson for the box of cards, and Paul Schauers for the crafts that they donated to the center this week and also to Corrine Root for a big bag of paperback books and several decks of playing cards. Winners at 500 this week were Barb Munger, Gerry Vogel, Marie Van Gilder, Theresa Meiers and Muriel Todd. Spades winners were Barb Munger, Anke Olesen, Mary Sicard, Cora D’Jong and Dale Sicard. Remember we have Dime Bingo on Tuesday, 500 cards, Wednesday and Spades on Friday. All of these activities begin at 1 p.m. Everyone is welcome to come and join us. For any information on the center please give us a call at 715-349-7810 and for dinner

Orange Fran Krause

LaVonne O’Brien

A large crowd enjoyed the pop concert at Webster High School Friday night. Sympathy to the family of Jeanette Olson who passed away last week. Her father was a former pastor at the Webster Methodist Church. The funeral was Monday at the Bethany Lutheran Church with burial at the Orange Cemetery. The Brad Persons and Ed Peterson attended the graduation of Mallory Peterson from the U of M on Sunday. Carol Peterson visited with Maxine Stone. Jim and Donis Taylor also attended the graduation. Jack and LaVonne O’Brien had dinner with Teresa and Don Childus, Mike and Tylyn O’Brien and Tom O’Brien at Timber Ridge on Saturday evening. Sunday, they had a cookout for Mother’s Day.

Follow the Leader


PAGE 8 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 13, 2009

TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER Luck Senior Center by Kathy Mueller

Just a short note this week. Sylvia and Gaylan Jensen were our host and hostess last Wednesday. They always have the best food and snacks, but what is so nice is how pretty they always make lunch. Don’t you just love pretty tablecloths and nice flowers to go along with good food and friendly conversation? We had a crowd on Wednesday. It must be that others feel the same way. Have you noticed? We have made a few improvements to our entry. A good fresh coat of paint and a few pieces of newly painted

furniture—and we have a new look. Remember our men’s breakfast on Saturday, May 16, at 9 a.m. If you haven’t signed up, please do so soon. Marlene promises a fantastic meal – it will be good. Please call the center at 715-472-8285 to sign up for the meal. Keep in mind the Women’s Tea we will be hosting in June. It will be on Friday, June 19, at 1 p.m. All ladies are invited. Again, you will need to sign up at the center.

Birth announcements Christina Bearhart and Conrad Rainey wish to announce the birth of their son, Konrad Lee Rainey Jr., born May 4, 2009, at Burnett Medical Center. Konrad weighed 8 lbs., 10 oz. and was 22 inches long. Konrad joins six siblings: Karl Jr., Justin, Kyle, Jameson, Jona Matrious and Shyler J. M. Rainey. Grandparents are Gloria E. Benjamin and Gary Bearhart, Danbury, and Bruce and Jean Sonnenberg, Cumberland. •••

Born at Amery Regional Medical Center:

A boy, Lance William Pickard, born April 1, 2009, to Michele and Kent Pickard, Amery. Lance weighed 9 lbs., 3 oz. ••• A girl, Ava Marie Muller Opitz, born April 10, 2009, to Lisa Muller and Harlan Opitz, Milltown. Ava weighed 6 lbs., 12.5 oz. ••• A girl, Hailey Zoe Anderson, born April 14, 2009, to Amanda Goetz and Andrew Anderson, Centuria. Hailey weighed 8 lbs., 3 oz. ••• A boy, Cullen Steven Schreiber, born April 20, 2009, to Catherine Hoverman and Isac

News from the Service Sean Fox is now stationed in Germany. His address is AB Sean Fox, PSC 9 Box 949, APO AE 09123. - submitted

Air Force Airman Jacob D. Wilhelm graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. He is the son of Ronald and Nancy Wilhelm of Grantsburg. - submitted

Schreiber, Comstock. Cullen weighed 7 lbs., 8 oz. ••• A boy, Riley Louis Schultz, born April 20, 2009, to Michelle and Jason Schultz, Amery. Riley weighed 9 lbs., 5 oz. ••• A girl, Isabelle Veronica Schaffer, born April 23, 2009, to Brooke Cockrell and William Schaffer, Amery. Isabelle weighed 6 lbs., 13 oz. ••• A girl, Amara LaRee Ostenson, born April 20, 2009, to Jodie and Ryan Ostenson, Turtle Lake. Amara weighed 5 lbs., 1.5 oz. ••• A boy, Allen Oden Boe, born April 29, 2009, to Monica Boe, Amery. Allen weighed 6 lbs., 9 oz. ••• A girl, Peyton Suri Lyons, born April 30, 2009, to Savannah Kuhl and Patrick Lyons, Clear Lake. Peyton weighed 7 lbs., 11 oz. ••• A girl, Rebecca Joy Anderson, born May 3, 2009, to Bethany and Todd Anderson, New Richmond. Rebecca weighed 8 lbs., 6 oz. •••

349-2964

Siren

Bev Beckmark

The area’s trees are finally putting forth their summer garb of green leaves; they do seem to be several weeks behind schedule though. Have you seen them? The summer birds are returning to the Siren area in droves. Each morning it seems there is a new bird that has returned during the night. We now have a large group of rose-breasted grosbeaks, a few indigo buntings, the beautiful orange and black Baltimore orioles and, of course, the little jewel of everyone’s gardens, the ruby-throated hummingbirds. I have not had them at my feeders or the windows yet but I know the hummers are here as Naomi Glover and LaVonne Brethorst have reported seeing them at their feeders. The Siren Methodist men’s group will be serving a “frokast,” a Scandinavian breakfast this Saturday, May 16, starting at 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. So why not stop in and enjoy a great Scandinavian breakfast, and on your way out stop and shop for some of the great homemade goodies. Those of you who might be or are interested in joining the soon-to-be-available Siren’s loss and grief support group, call 715-349-2922. Sympathy to the family of Jeanette Olson who passed away suddenly last week. All you men slow-pitch ball players out there, the Memorial Day weekend is coming up and they are in need of men’s teams for a slow-pitch tournament at the Siren Ball Park. For more info or to sign up call 715-349-2391. Violet Beckmark spent last Sunday, Mother’s Day, at the home of her nephew Art Beckmark and his wife, Bev. Congratulations to elementary student Brady Mangen and high schooler Jamie Fischbach for being chosen Siren schools students of the week. Here’s hoping all you moms out there had a great Mother’s Day. Remember though, moms should be remembered every day of the year. Congratulations to longtime Siren resident Ethel Peterson on her 100th birthday last Saturday, May 9. Many more birthdays Ethel.

Interstate Park news Morning bird walks Migrant songbirds are returning to northern Wisconsin and Interstate Park. Many species of birds will remain here while others are passing through on their way farther north. Don’t miss the opportunity to view and listen to these messengers of spring! Join Robin Maercklein of the National Park Service for a two-hour morning bird walk on Silverbrook Trail from 7 - 9 a.m. Saturday, May 16. Meet at the Pines Group Camp at Wisconsin Interstate Park. Bring binoculars and a bird field guide if you have them. Spring wildflower mania The Friends of Interstate Park are hosting a wildflower walks on Sunday, May 17. It happens every spring—can’t distinguish a false rue anemone from a wood anemone from early meadow rue? Get it all sorted out on a

woodland wildflower walk with local plant ecologist and botanist Barb Delaney. The walk take place on May 17, at 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., and repeated at 3:30 – 5 p.m. There’s something new blooming every week! Meet promptly at the Ice Age Center at Wisconsin Interstate Park—we might car pool from there to other locations in the park. The walk will take place rain or shine! Preregistration is required and attendance is limited to 12 people. The fee is $5/nonmembers, $3/Friends members. A Wisconsin state park sticker is required to enter the park. Interstate Park is located in St. Croix Falls, on Hwy. 35 just one-half mile south of Hwy. 8. Annual passes for 2009 are $25 for Wisconsin residents or $35 for nonresidents. Daily passes are $7 for residents or $10 for nonresidents. For more information call Julie at 715483-3747.

Engagement announcement

Janssen - Petrangelo Missy Janssen and Jacob Petrangelo, both of Webster, are pleased to announce their engagement to be married in May 2009 at the Voyager Village Stables. Missy is a 2009 graduate from The College of St. Scholastica with a degree in nursing. Jake, also a 2009 graduate, from the University of Minnesota - Duluth, is receiving a degree in computer graphic design. Missy is the daughter of Kevin and Sue Janssen, and Jake is the son of Jim and Cris Petrangelo. The couple will make their home in St. Paul, Minn. - submitted

Engagement announcement

A Waiting Child LaQuasho

Anderson/Ryan

A typical teenager in many ways, LaQuasho is an attractive young lady who enjoys having fun and doing “girl stuff” like nails, hair, shopping and cooking. She states she cooks better with a cookbook in hand but likes anything food related. LaQuasho has passion for many things, including singing, dancing, basketball, hopscotch and drawing. However, her favorite activity is skating. She also likes going to church and would like to become involved with some church-related activities. LaQuasho describes herself as optimistic and talkative. She is a very inquisitive, friendly, engaging child who loves hugs and attention. She also possesses the added bonus of having a huge sense of humor. LaQuasho is a natural-born leader who is good with young children. She has a huge heart and a naturally giving nature. For more information about LaQuasho or

Todd and Renee Anderson, Grantsburg, are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Britta Elisabet, to Michael Francis Ryan, son of John and Peggy Ryan, Frederic. Britta is a 2005 graduate of Grantsburg High School and will graduate in May from St. Olaf College, Northfield, Minn., with a Bachelor of Arts degree in social work. Michael is a 2004 graduate of Webster High School and will graduate in May from the University of Minnesota with a B.A. degree in history. Following their upcoming wedding in July, 2009, the couple will reside in St. Paul, Minn., where Michael will attend law school at Hamline University. – submitted

12/30/93

other Wisconsin children waiting for adoptive homes, call Adoption Resources of Wisconsin at 414-475-1246 or 800-762-8063 or visit the Web site at www.wiadopt.org.

E-edition - this complete issue is online now. www.the-leader.net


MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 9

Editor’s note: This is the first in a series on the history of the Clam Falls area, compiled by local historian Clayton Jorgensen

From Clam Shell River Falls to Clam River Falls to Clam Falls

Since the first settlement, 152 years

ago, the Clam Falls area has been a storied and mystic place. The articles to follow are based on the best historical information available at this time. The intent is to share the rich heritage of the people of the Clam Falls area. Most of the information in this part of the story came from the Polk County Press newspaper published in 1873. It was edited by Timothy L. Ericson, historian from River Falls, for the Polk County Historical Society in 1980. The first non-native people to see the falls on the Clam River were trappers, lumber cruisers and lumberjacks, in the 1830s and 1840s. In 1845, logging started to the north by Clam Lake and to the south of Clam Falls around Ward Lake. At this same time the first road into the area was built by logging companies to tote supplies to the logging camps. The tote road went north from St. Croix Falls to Clam Lake, and was extended south, near Clam Falls and on to Ward, Blakes and Balsam lakes, and back to St. Croix Falls. This road is the only one shown on the 1853 govemment-survey map of the Clam Falls area. On the 1853 survey map, logging huts are shown in the area where the village of Clam Falls would later be built. ••• In 1847, the Hon. W. H. C. Folsom of Taylors Falls, Minn., was one of the first nonnative people to see the Clam Shell River Falls. After hearing Native American stories about the area, he wanted to see the place and he had one of the Native Americans from that area make a map for him. He mapped out the country for Folsom in the ashes of his campfire and drew the Clam Shell River, with a line across the river indicating the location of

Collected by

Clayton Jorgensen

Clam Falls area

152 years

the falls. The Native Americans called the river “Kinesca - Seba” or Clam Shell River, but some of our map publishers, thinking the word “clam” too vulgar, have used the name “Shell River,” thinking it more romantic, more appropriate. But loggers who drove logs in its crooked waters gave it its present name. They didn’t see a difference between “clam” and “shell.” They just called the river the Clam. Mining settlement, 1857 In the winter of 1857, the first settlement of Clam Shell River Falls, or Clam Falls, was established. Copper and silver mining excitement broke out among some adventurous characters, and it raged with great violence until spring. Among the miners were Dave Cannaday and John Robinson, great-grandfather of John Smith, whose family still lives in Clam Falls – he was also the second sheriff in Polk County. Others who came were: Bill Foster, who developed Butternut and Luck; C. C. Somers – Somers Lake was named for him; Ed Dwyer; Gordon Smith; Oscar Roos; A. M. Dodd; Donald McCloud and Jack Shaw. Daniel F. Smith, who had training in mining, was also in the group. Claims were staked out; some of them were very large. Fabulous sums were asked for some claims and many were the sleepless nights passed by the owners. Every crack and crevice and every point and pinnacle was carefully explored for the hidden metal. Every rock of less than 700-pounds weight was broken up and carefully assayed in a crude way. The smelter was down by the river. An abstract of each sample’s richness was carefilly chalked on the door of the prospector’s cabin for the benefit of the community.

Whenever copper was discovered, one of the noted characters would clamber up the rocks, wave his blanketed arms over the surrounding country, and in theatrical style exclaim, “Them gulches are full of copper!” The prospectors assumed the California miners ways and dress. Everyone had a fiddle and a fighting dog; everyone called a depression in the earth a gulch and named it Red Dog, Yaller Dog or Bobtail, and many others. Miners talked of organizing a vigilance committee and hanging one of their members in order to get their numbers up. The community had to grow in members in order to get enough help to work the mines. They thought a hanging would bring notice to the Clam Shell Falls settlement and more people would come, thinking it was a law-abiding settlement. But it was difficult to select someone to hang. No particular individual was willing to be hung for the notoriety of the community. Cannaday, Roos, and another partner or two, built a large, log house for the benefit of the traveling public, who would flock to and through the embryo city on a supposed stage line on a road built through the country from St. Croix Falls to Lake Superior. They called their house the Kiesca’s House and built a huge chimney of clay and rock. The house soon became known as Kiesca’s Chimney. A stable was erected capable of stabling 40 horses. It was planned to be a stagecoach relay station. The stage road was not built in 1857. The mining was too big a task for the number of miners, and the expected rush of travel was postponed. The hopes and prospects passed away and most of the company left. Some of the miners, headed up by Foster, built a road from Clam Shell Falls to St. Croix Falls in 1857. The road was called the Butternut Trail Road, later renamed the Clam Falls Road. The 1857 settlement of Clam Shell Falls started as a mining community, and the history and mystique of the place has been storied ever since. Thank you to the many people who have contributed information and photos to help make this project possible. - Clayton Jorgensen

Clam Falls area history 1850 First road - St. Croix Tote Road 1853 First logging camp 1857 First settlement - Clam Shell Falls (mining settlement) 1857 First south road - Butternut Road 1859 First dam - at Clam River Falls 1864 First bridge - Clam River Falls 1860s First trading post 1871 First settler - Daniel F. Smith 1871 First post office 1870s First non-native child born Rudoff Evenson 1872 First farming - D. F. Smith 1872 First platted village - Clam Falls 1872 First sawmill 1873 First large logging operation Nelson 1873 First school - Clam Falls (Luck Township) 1873 First school board - Page N. Butts, clerk; J. C. Perry, treasurer; Ezra Jewell, director 1874 Famous ballad was written about Clam Falls 1875 First state road - Clam Falls Road 1875 Clam Falls Motto: “Don’t pick a quarrel, but if anyone comes looking for trouble, give them all they want. While we are naturally a peace-loving people, we have had outsiders come in to run things, but they always found we were American citizens and were capable of running our own business. “ 1876 Township established 1877 First town board - John Almquist, John Bjornson, Porter Wetherby, Ezra Jewell 1879 First township road - Somer Lake 1886 First grist mill - Lundeen 1880s First fish-hatching ponds Knapp 1887 First church congregation Lutheran 1895 First threshing machine - S. Larson, C. Hanson 1890s First baseball team - Clam Falls 1898 First hospital - Turner 1902 First church building - Catholic 1912 First train - Lewis 1914 First hydro-electric plant - Clam Falls 1928 President Coolidge visits Clam Falls area

Then and now. The photo at left is one of the earliest photos of the Clam Falls settlement, showing the bridge and dam as they appeared in the mid-1800s. The photo shows the same area today, looking west from the village. - Photo at right by Suzanne Johnson

Poppy distribution in Siren SIREN – On Saturday, May 16, the Siren American Legion Auxiliary will be distributing poppies at the following locations: the Post Office, Fourwinds Market, Main Street Café, Auto Stop and Holiday Gas Station. Last year the Siren Auxiliary distributed a total of $550 to the following organizations: VA Minneapolis, VA Great

Lakes, Camp American Legion, Creative Arts, Christmas Cheer and Christmas Gift Shop, helping veterans and their families. The poppy was adopted as The American Legion memorial flower at the national convention in 1920. In 1924, The American Legion gave complete charge of the National Poppy Program to the

American Legion Auxiliary. The American Legion Auxiliary poppies are handmade by veterans at the Poppy Shop at Zablocki VAMC in Milwaukee. The activity provides therapy as well as extra spending money for the workers. The American Legion Posts and Auxiliary Units purchase the poppies for distribution to the public on

Poppy Day. The money donated by the public for the poppies constitutes a trust and are used only for the needs of veterans and their families. Show our veterans your support … wear a poppy. – From the American Legion Auxiliary – Department of Wisconsin and the Siren Legion Auxiliary


PAGE 10 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 13, 2009

TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER A & H Seniors via Illinois by Joyce Kirchhoff

It’s been some time since I let you in on what is happening in my part of the world. Easter came and went and that darned rabbit never left me a solid chocolate bunny. I just may give up believing in him. Neighbors across the street returned from Florida in the early evening on the Saturday before Easter. First thing Sunday they cut the grass. It hadn’t started growing yet, but there they were. Is it possible to hate someone for cutting grass? So now, every week, guess what? Yep, back in the lawn mower saddle again. I called Esther Haraldson on her birthday and she said Orris and she will celebrate 60 years of wedded whatever in July, so I’ll be coming up for that. I hope Orris is feeling better soon. He is quite ill, so keep those prayers coming. The New Lenox Library held a silent auction, and they asked our small painting group to donate something, so I gave a watercolor of a country house. Actually, it’s quite good, if I have to say so myself, and it looks like I have to. It sold for asking price and got more bids than any other thing. Joan and Fred Kramer were seen at the “Hole” getting free birthday and senior stuff. Well, why not? Old age has to have some benefits. I play Bridge on Mondays with the same three people, just us four elderly, but alert, people. Our combined ages are 260. I happen to be the youngest, but so far the only one using a cane, but no hearing aid. My kitty passed on. I was so sure she beat feline leukemia, almost got to 3 years old, but she didn’t. My lap is empty now

Slow Children

and I have the bed all to myself. I miss her a lot. Spring has sprung here, in fact I think it sprung a leak. So much rain. But every blooming thing is … well, blooming. Little grape things, tulips, hyacinths, tulips trying to be threelips and lilacs everywhere. It is fun to drive through petals falling off trees. I have lots of creeping Charlie and dandelions, so my lawn is lovely, all purple and yellow. Now why can’t the people on my street see the beauty in that? I am told the center is closed on Wednesdays, but the art group meets there anyway. You will never guess who came to visit me May 6 so I will tell you. It was Fritz Hernandez, his sister from southside and his niece who lives right here in New Lenox. What a pleasant surprise. Hugs and kisses all around, but Fritz really knows how to hug. And so talented, he can speak two languages, Spanish and some English. We talked about everything from 20 years back. He posed for our art class with a Mexican hat and a doily over his shoulder. He played Santa at our Christmas parties and Cupid for Valentines Day. I think he wore the same outfit for both occasions. He said Clarence and Marion Schmig are well now and Clarence bugs him something awful. Somebody has to. It sure was great seeing Fritz after about seven years. He has gotten much older. Still leaves toilet seats up. I should have asked him to put it down. I hope to visit A & H this summer. I really miss you guys. Take care of each other.

When I started my second career as a medical sales rep, I spent endless hours driving around North and South Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin and the UP. I listened to talk radio when I could get reception and when National Public Radio was the only option, I played Chuck Berry, Elvis, Jerry Lee Lewis or Roy Orbison tapes and CDs. When you’re driving three to five hundred miles every day you see a lot of signs. There is one on Interstate 90 east of Mitchell, S.D., that was upgraded once in the sixteen years I was on the road. The sign proudly advertises “Dick’s 24Hr. Toe Service.” The revision did not change the spelling, so I figured it was an advertising ploy. Before Hwy. 29 was rebuilt, I think I was going through Clinton when I noticed a sign near a school that read “Drug Free Zone.” All I could think was “I hope so.” Every community seemed to have signs that read “Slow Children.” That really made me sad. They didn’t have any of those signs when I was growing up.

Brooke Biedinger

Irregular

Columnist

Louie’s Finer Meats receives state awards CUMBERLAND – The exceptional quality of meat products produced by Louie’s Finer Meats of Cumberland was recognized at the 70th-annual convention of the Wisconsin Association of Meat Processors, held in Madison on April 17-19. At the meat product show held in conjunction with that meeting, Louie’s received the following product awards: Grand champion for turkey salami and bone-in-ham; reserve grand champion for pepper loaf and whole-muscle jerky; reserve champion for Cumberland steak and cotto salami; and honorable mention for precooked brats and summer sausage.

The size of this product show and the quality of its entries demonstrates the important role that sausage and processed meats play in Wisconsin’s meat industry and among consumers across the state. - submitted

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MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 11

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SIREN – Jane Wisse was a dedicated and loved teacher in the Siren School District. She taught and lived wellness, a way of living each day that includes choices and decisions based on healthy attitudes and values. Three years ago, after Jane lost her battle with cancer, her family established a scholarship in her name to be given to a student from Siren who exemplified her life-long values of fitness and health. Her husband, Duane, and several friends and walking companions organized a wellness walk to honor her memory and to continue the scholarship fund. In the spring of 2007 and again in June of 2008, close to 100 walkers made the 2.5-mile trek that Jane and her friends walked in all kinds of weather. Three scholarships have been awarded to three very deserving students, Wes Wegner, Lauren Howe and Adam Daniels. The Third-Annual Jane Wisse Wellness Walk will be held on Saturday, May 30, starting in Crooked Lake Park. Registration begins at 9 a.m., with the 2.5-mile walk starting at 10 a.m., rain or shine. The cost is $20 for adults, $10 for children ages 12 to 17 and free for children under 12 years old and accompanied by

BALSAM’S LAKESIDE GREENHOUSE,

NURSERY & LANDSCAPING

Jane Wisse an adult. Donations to the Jane Wisse Memorial Scholarship Fund will be happily accepted. Please send donations to Siren School District c/o Pam Daniels, 24022 North Fourth Ave., Box 29, Siren, WI 54872. Make checks payable to Siren School. Questions may be directed to Pam Daniels at Siren School, 715-3492278, ext. 235. – submitted

… • •

Trejo headlines Centuria's July Memory Days concerts CENTURIA - Javier Trejo Band, a nation-touring “rock-out” band from the Twin Cities, highlights Centuria’s Memory Days two-day Main Street concertfestival on Saturday, July 11. Hoping to leap over other community festivals in western Wisconsin’s Polk County, the village of Centuria centers its do-it-yourself economic recovery with a daring mix of diverse entertainment and sustainable-market renewal. Most important to July’s Memory Days, according to event volunteer Tim Krenz, is the entertainment around a Friday night and all-day Saturday concertfestival, July 10 and 11. “Javier is a phenomenal artist and performer. He is strongly connected to the local area through his family, friends and concerts, and he is a talent getting big time in other parts of the country, based

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Third-annual Jane Wisse Wellness Walk in 2009

on his outstanding music and ability,” said Krenz. Javier Trejo Band, who play a “psychobilly” cowboy country-punk, outlaw rock ‘n’ roll, is one of five local musical acts playing Memory Days. Other acts include Friday’s entertainment, Medula Headrush, and Saturday’s stellar lineup of Sandy Bishop’s Children’s Variety Family Show, folk string and dancealong by The Juggernauts, and the psychedelic “funk-it” rock grunge of the area’s own Squib. Centuria banks on the bands drawing crowds to its foods, crafts, trades, professions and farmers markets featured that big day, Saturday, July 11. For more info about Centuria’s July Memory Days, the concert-festival, or the low-fee vending booths, call the village hall at 715-6462300. - submitted

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Magnet display at depot needs updated FREDERIC - The Frederic High School Magnet display at the Frederic Depot/Museum is being updated. There are some yearbooks missing that the museum would like to have to fill in for a full display. If people have any of these books, would they be will-

ing to donate them to the museum? Drop them off at Affordable Quality Appliances in downtown Frederic or call Carol at 715-327-4271. Missing years are: 1918, 1919, 1927, 1928, 1967, 1970 and 2003. - Submitted

New KOPS announced WEBSTER – TOPS Chapter 1372 of Webster, would like to introduce Jeanne Nierad, the new KOPS (Keep Off Pounds Sensibly) member. TOPS refers to Take Off Pounds Sensibly. Jeanne reached her goal weight in December, 2008 and Nierad has qualified to go to the state recognition event in April as Webster Queen. Please attend, have a cup of coffee, and see what TOPS can do for you. submitted

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National Day of Prayer Breakfast attendance grows each year

The opening prayer at the May 7 National Day of Prayer Breakfast was given by sheriff’s department chaplain, Pastor Cindy Glocke. – Photos by Nancy Jappe

Brian Johnson, Frederic, chaplain coordinator for the Billy Graham Rapid Response Team, was the speaker at the National Day of Prayer Breakfast at Adventures Restaurant in Siren, Thursday, May 7. The largest number of people since the breakfast started here – 64 in all – were on hand. started by Billy Graham’s son, Franklin, after Sept. 11, 2001. It is the largest chaplaincy program in the country, with 3,000 chaplains taking part now. These chaplains, according to Johnson, have been called out 55 times for all kinds of national disasters, and 110,000 people have been served by them. Johnson was thinking about getting involved in some type of mission program as he and his wife contemplated selling their pharmacy business in Frederic. “Friends prayed,” he said. “Six days later someone from Rochester, Minn., called and said, ‘Do you want to sell your pharmacy?’” Johnson’s first mission as a chaplain was in Biloxi, Miss. “God opened the doors. It was time to walk through them,” he said, explaining that his mission is to talk and pray with people who are afraid. “It is the power of prayer with people we don’t know. God showed up and gave me a deep appreciation of how important it is to be there in those times.” He has gone all over the country since that time but told his breakfast audience about three of those calls, to Crandon after a rejected deputy had killed five friends, to Illinois after a classroom shooting and to Fargo, N.D., several weeks ago. “Folks, we are in this thing together,” Johnson tells those he talks and prays with. “We are God’s family … We all get battered. God knew tough times. It is when we really need help that we hang on to what is rock solid. It is our Lord.”

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Thank You We would like to say thanks for our Surprise 50th Wedding Anniversary Party. The gifts, food and your friendship made a great evening for us. Thanks again Love Darold (Bergie) and Nancy Johnson 485548 38r,L

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by Nancy Jappe SIREN – Adventures Restaurant in Siren was told at first to prepare for about 25 people attending the National Day of Prayer Breakfast Thursday, May 7. Then they got a call to up that total, based on last year’s attendance of 45. The final count came in at 64, the largest number of attendees since the prayer breakfast started here during the term of Sheriff Tim Curtin. The mission of the National Day of Prayer, as expressed in one of their leaflets, is to communicate the need for prayer to every individual and to mobilize the Christian community to intercede for America and its leadership in seven centers of power: government, military, media, business, education, church and family. National Day of Prayer was authorized by a joint resolution of the U.S. Congress and signed into law by President Harry S. Truman in 1952. In 1988, President Ronald Reagan signed a law designating the first Thursday in May as the annual observance of National Day of Prayer. This year’s breakfast in Siren was organized by the sheriff’s department chaplains headed by Pastor Roger Pittman. Brian Johnson, Frederic, chaplain coordinator for the Billy Graham Rapid Response Team, was the breakfast speaker, talking about his experiences in responding to three major national tragedies. Johnson explained that the rapid response team was


MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 13

CRA Open house held in Siren by Nancy Jappe SIREN – Open house at the Welcome Home Shelter office in Siren was held Friday afternoon, May 8. The location of the shelter office is not publicized for anonymity reasons. However, anyone needing its services can get the information by calling 715-349-7272 or toll free at 800-261-7233 any time of the night or day. Renee Nanez is the Burnett County outreach advocate. Because her responsibilities take her out of the office from time to time, she isn’t always there during the weekday hours of 9 a.m. to 4:305 p.m. She does quickly follow up on phone or e-mail messages (renee30@crashelter.org). When she isn’t available, the Siren phone number rolls over to the Community Referral Agency toll-free number in Milltown. Nanez referred to the fear and stigma that domestic-assault victims often experience when they think about asking for help. “We are here. We will definitely

A children’s room with television and a shelf filled with toys and games is included in the Welcome Home Shelter office in Siren. This is a place where children can amuse themselves while their parent gets help with the violence or assault the family is facing.

On hand for the Welcome Home Shelter Open House in Siren Friday, May 8, were (L to R) seated: board President Mary Poretti. Back: Sen. Sheila Harsdorf (there to spotlight domestic assault); CRA Director Joanne Phernetton; Pastor Freddie Kirk from St. Luke’s United Methodist Church, Frederic; Renee Nanez, Burnett County outreach advocate; Katie Hedlund, CRA volunteer for the past 19 years; and Kathe Good, CRA volunteer now for her second time around. Not shown: CRA volunteers Maxine Peterson and Judy Aadalen. have room for victims. Everything is thoroughly confidential. We offer many services to the whole family: men, women and children,” she commented. Nanez has been in her position since Nov. 6, 2008. Prior to this, she and her husband, Rick, were in Ecuador, where she was doing the same type of work for a women’s prison. She was working with people who were in dire circumstances, basically doing what she does now but on a volunteer basis. The couple is back home in Frederic for a while, living in the house they had rented out while they were in Ecuador. Nanez is the daughter of Dale and Kathy Erickson of Frederic. One interesting fact she related was that she got her first job as a youth working for Bernice Asper, longtime former editor of the Leader. She was hired to iron, paint and mow the grass. The Welcome Home Shelter is part of the Community Referral Agency, a domestic violence, sexual assault and child abuse support system which was incorporated in 1979. The idea for CRA came about during a League of Women Voters

program held at Nelson School. The first safe house, commonly known as the red house in Milltown, came out of this program and was replaced by a new, mortgage-free building in Milltown in 2000-2001. “Welcome Home Shelter offers alternatives to living with violence. A safe place is the most immediate need of a person in crisis … Within a homelike atmosphere, Welcome Home Shelter offers kitchen and laundry facilities, food and support for women and their children. We also offer a safe alternative for men who have been abused,” their informational flyer states. A Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Support Group for women will start in Siren Monday, May 18. Women are asked to call the shelter number for information on the group and the availability of child-care services. Coming soon will be a court-ordered two-hour domestic-violence education

Renee Nanez from Frederic is the Burnett County outreach advocate who works out of an office in Siren. Because of the need to remain anonymous, the location of that office is not published. Anyone wanting information can get it by calling 715-349-7272 any time, night or day. When no one is in the Siren office, the number rolls over to the shelter in Milltown. program for women who ask to drop restraining orders or no-contact provisions. Available services for victims of domestic and sexual assault include: A 24-hour help line, temporary shelter for abused persons and their children, transportation assistance, advocacy with legal and human resources, referral and information an ongoing support groups.

The Frederic Daisy Girl Scouts recently made a donation of new stuffed animals to the St. Croix Regional Medical Center. The stuffed animals will be given to children who visit SCRMC for treatment. Special photo

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A bouquet of Frederic Daisy Scouts

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Luck area ACS Run/Walk big success LUCK - The 14th-annual American Cancer Society Run/Walk Saturday, May 9, raised almost $26,000. Donna Erickson coordinated the opening ceremony. She thanked this year’s corporate sponsors, Amery Regional Medical Center – Luck Clinic, St. Croix Valley Hardwoods and Larsen Auto Centers for their support and Wayne’s Foods Plus, Wal-Mart, Bernick’s Pepsi, Ruby’s Pantry, and Bone Lake Lutheran Church for food and beverage donations. The names of cancer victims and survivors on tribute flags were read. Michele Gullickson Moore, ACS repregave the Web site sentative, (www.cancer.org) and telephone number (1-800-ACS-2345) for anyone requesting information or for help with cancer concerns. John Dinnies, PA, spoke about changes in a cancer diagnosis compared to 25 years ago. The monies raised from run/walks and other ACS fundraisers has provided for research and treatment in changing a cancer diagnosis from a death sentence to a chronic illness. This year’s honorary co-chairpersons, Amy Fossum and Beth Cunningham, spoke of their experiences with Hodgkin’s lymphoma before cutting the ribbon and leading the way for the 175 runners/walkers, bicyclists, children in wagons, strollers and dogs along the one-, three- or five-mile tribute-flag-lined route. A Luck fire truck with firemen John Fenning and Josh Carter and a Luck police car were stationed along the way to direct participants in the right direction. Bob Kreutzian was available to give assistance and water to anyone needing it. The honorary co-chairpersons also rode Bob Nelson’s one-of-a-kind bicycle built for two that he won in a silent auction to raise funds for an ACS run/walk a few years ago. Cheryl Langness and Joan Chaffee greeted 20 cancer survivors, and their names were put on the survivor tree. Hilda Trudeau and Barb Walstrom took team pictures. Sue Messer and Debbie

John Dinnies, PA, (center in dark jacket) spoke about changes in a cancer diagnosis compared to 25 years ago during the opening ceremony of the Luck ACS walk last Saturday. — Photo by Gregg Westigaard Richards, ACS representative, gave out T-shirts to those raising $60 or more. Jaime Anderson and Jean Tucker tabulated statistics. Margie Nelson was first-place individual fundraiser, bringing in $2,285. Shelia Berklund was in secone place with $1,405, Beth Cunningham was third with $1,105 and Marlys Hedberg fourth with $1,062. They had their choice of prizes that included a deacon’s bench from House of Wood, 18 holes of golf at Frederic Golf Course, a one-night stay and $20 gift certificate to Grand Casino – Hinkley and $25 gift certificate from Van Meters Meats. Other top individual money raisers were Amy Fossum - $775, Dorothy Mattson - $545, Sandy Lundquist - $520, Roger Hinrichs - $494, Hilda Trudeau - $480, Brian Cunningham - $336, Jill Cook - $335 and Donna Erickson - $325. The top team fundraiser was Amery Regional Medical Center – Luck Clinic $5,373. They were followed by Luck Lutheran - $4,045, Laketown Lutheran $2,262, Bone Lake Lutheran - $1,227, Rural American Bank - $1,165, Snociables and Cliff Trudeau - $1,160, House of Wood - $1,125, Ackerly Team - $985, St.

Croix Valley Hardwoods - $970, Erickson Family - $820. Other participating teams included Lakeland Communications, Bone Lake Beavers and Lucky Dollar Plus. Foot-a-buck brought in $397 and tribute flags, $310. The volunteers at the registration tables were Katie Tolan, Amy Cran, Sarah Elert (Luck royalty), Ashlyn Petersen (Luck royalty), Carol Giller, Jean Giller,

Marcy Plomski, Lynn Stoklasa, Barb Dueholm, Dorothy Roberts and Denise Nelson. Donna Erickson and Toby Erickson registered walk-ins. Without the generous support of the community, the American Cancer Society could not fight this disease as effectively as it does. It is dedicated to a future where cancer no longer touches the ones we love. – submitted

The Laketown Lutheran Church team raised more than $2,000 in the Luck ACS walk last Saturday. - Photo by Gregg Westigard

Luck School volunteers honored

Brett Larson went to state in solo ensemble with his baritone sax, and he shared some of his talent with the Luck School volunteers at their luncheon.

Lydia Rennicke, on the bass violin, and Manfred Schonauer, on the keyboard, entertained the volunteers at the annual Luck School Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon May 6. Rennicke has been taking lessons from Manfred for about two years, she said. Manfred operates Pipe Dream Center by Pipe Lake in Comstock, and is beginning his 22nd season of bringing Six hands crowded the keyboard but none interfered jazz, blues, and with the others as (L to R) Kassi Ingram, Ashley Valenboogie to area fans. tine, and Morgan Denny played a piano piece written for three players at one time. Luck School volunteers were honored at the annual volunteer appreciation luncheon last Wednesday, May 6. The event was coordinated by Luck Community Education Director Amy Aguado, front right, who said that about half the school volunteers were able to attend. The balloons represent the Volunteers of the Year, which went to former community education director Barb Kass and school board President Robert Clifton. Neither Kass nor Clifton were able to attend. Their names will be added to the plaque shown in the photo. — Photos by Mary Stirrat


MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 15

Frederic Area ACS Run/Walk had 17 teams FREDERIC – The Frederic American Cancer Society Run/ Walk on Saturday, May 9, had 166 registered participants and 17 teams. The total amount raised was $17,600. The run/walk committee members extend gratitude to the Honorary Chair Joan Funne and all the can-

After cutting the ribbon, Honorary Chair Joan Funne shares laughs with other cancer survivors before beginning the walk.

Committee member Elvira Schmidt spoke before beginning the walk. Corsages, donated by the Rose Garden, were given to all cancer survivors at the walk. cer survivors who attended the walk. The Frederic Area Run/Walk committee members are Sylvia Hansen, Kay Thorsbakken, Phyllis Wilder, JoAnn Gibbs, Clarice Lindahl, Nancy Hardenbergh, Colleen Draxler, Deanna McWilliams, Cora Dversdall and Elvira Schmidt. The 2009 team totals were: Hansen family and friends $2,182; Hacker’s Lanes $2,153; Ash Street Gals $1,311; Georgetown Lutheran, $911; Dot Buecksler family and friends, $ 965; Funne family, $813; Frederic schools, $667; Good Cheer Club, $646; St. Luke’s Saints, $645; Luck Medical Clinic, $550; Pilgrim Lutheran Church, $550; Schmidt family and friends, $510; Frederic Lioness, $210; Beaudry Company, $200; Crowns Against Cancer, $148, Harlander Tesch team, $100; Cancer Crushers, $60. Individual walkers raised $158 and participants with no team raised $10. The top individual fundraisers were: Jim Prodger, $1,232; Nancy and Reid Hardenbergh, $1,005; Sylvia Hansen,

Honorary Chair Joan Funne, surrounded by cancer survivors, cuts the ribbon to start the Frederic Area ACS Run/Walk on Saturday, May 9. $675; Linda Clausen, $505; Gerry Prodger, $415; Ron Hansen, $328; Elvira Schmidt, $325 and Rosemary Speiker, $305. Signs of hope raised $1,675, athletic shoes raised $555, the quilt raffle raised $479, tribute flags raised $85 and the autographed Packer football silent auction raised $60. The Frederic girls basketball team donated $250 from a fundraiser to the walk at the first committee meeting in February. The following businesses and individuals gave their help and support to the walk: Frederic ACS Run/Walk sponsors were Larsen Auto Centers and Amery Regional Medical Center. Chris Timme, Wausau, represented the American Cancer Society. The Rose Garden provided

Joan Funne draws Diane Barton as the winner of the quilt raffle.

PAINTED FARM & GARDENS 2009 Annual Plant Sale, Open May 17

Naturally raised, from seed to garden, annual and perennial bedding plants. Only organic fertilizers used on all plants. No pesticides or herbicides. Plants are all hardened off and ready for the garden. We have many heirloom varieties of tomatoes and also gourmet colored sweet peppers. Many varieties of ready-to-plant gourmet lettuces, chard and other greens.

Check out our new GARDEN PARTY locations:

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Turtle Lake - May 16 from 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. Luck Lion’s Park - May 22 & 23 from 3 p.m. - 7 p.m. Natural Alternative Food Co-op, Luck - May 29 & 30 from 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. Amery Art in the Park - June 20 from 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. Call 715-822-4229 or 715-419-1129, Shirley Crowe We will not be open during garden parties in other locations. We will remain open until the middle of June. We are located east of Luck on Hwy. 48, to Cty. Rd. E south 2-1/2 miles to 233rd Ave. Watch for signs.

corsages for the cancer survivors. Frederic Grocery donated the apples and the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board, Polk and Burnett County Dairy Promotion donated the string cheese that was given to participants as snacks and the Frederic Country Club donated a buy one, get one free golf voucher for every participant. Printing, advertising and publicity was given by the Inter-County Leader, the radio station Mix 104.9 and Jeanette Harder who did computer work. Many volunteers helped during the day of the walk. Stacy Wondra created the run/walk route map. Kay Graf helped in registering participants. Sarah and Isabella Lexen took team pictures. Rhoda Jensen served coffee, apples and

cheese. Cora Dversdall sold and lettered the tribute flags. Mary Ellen Ruhn sold quilt raffle tickets. Ben Kustelski and JoAnn Gibbs put up and took down the signs of hope and route signs. Lois Shearrow, Marlene Dahlberg and Timme did the final count of the money. Frederic schools provided the place for registration and the PA system and Pat Anderson set the system up. Jim Schommer set up the registration area in the school. Vernon Knauber, Linda O’Donnell and Kevin Douglas were the ambulance staff on duty. Officer Peggy Lester provided intersection patrol and escorted the money to the bank. Other people and businesses helped before the event. Hacker’s Lanes hosted the kickoff meeting, while Linda Richter set up the kickoff breakfast and the Frederic Holiday gas station provided egg sandwiches. Pilgrim Lutheran Church provided a meeting room for the committee. Rebecca Harlander displayed the run/walk information on the Frederic Village sign. Betty and Bob MacKean donated the quilt for raffle. Diane Barton was the quilt raffle winner and Charvey Spencer took the winning bid on the autographed Packer football. – submitted

Mary Ellen Ruhn sold quilt raffle tickets during the run/walk registration.


PAGE 16 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 13, 2009

Grantsburg choir concert

Mitch Evenson watches in amazement at the moves Jason Jenson was making after the two Travelers group members were encouraged by the audience to “do a little dance” at the Grantsburg choir concert last Friday evening.

Dressed as one of the Village People, construction worker Johanna Lauer waved her drill high, dancing to the YMCA song performed by the seventhand eighth-grade choirs at the Grantsburg choir concert on May 8. The Grantsburg High School Ladies Swing Choir had their umbrellas ready as the group sang “It’s Raining Men” at the Grantsburg choir concert on May 8.

Photos by Priscilla Bauer

Grantsburg seventh-grader Whitney Oachs snuggled her stuffed animal as The Swinging Sisters group performed “Dream A Little Dream Of Me” at the school’s spring choir concert held on March 8 in the high school auditorium.

Grantsburg School Pops concert Sixth-graders Carter Lee, Drew Alderman and Bryce Lee were part of the drumline performing at the Grantsburg Middle and High School Pops concert last week at the high school auditorium. Grantsburg Bell Choir members Carissa Skifstad and Jenna Brust rang their bells right on cue as the group performed the music of “Phantom of the Opera.” The bell choir was just one of the special music performances during the Grantsburg music department’s May 4 Pops concert.

Paige Johnson smiles at the sound of her sticks. The Grantsburg eighthgrader looked as if she was enjoying every minute of performing at the May 4 Pops concert.

Grantsburg fifth-grader Anna Erickson showed her saxophone style at the Grantsburg Middle and High School Pops concert held on May 4 at the Grantsburg High School gymnasium.

Photos by Priscilla Bauer

Concentration was key for these sixth-grade clarinet players as they gave a cool performance at the May 4 Grantsburg’s Pops concert.


MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 17

Grantsburg students win at Superior Math Night GRANTSBURG – Grantsburg High School continued its tradition of strong finishes at the University of WisconsinSuperior Math Meet on Wednesday, April 29, by returning home with a firstplace team trophy in the small school division. In addition to the team event, the students competed in individual events in Plane Geometry, Algebra 2 and Analytic Geometry, Trigonometry and Elementary Functions, and Probability and Statistics. The first team this year consisted of seniors Nicole Davis, Nathan McConnell, Tyler Myers and Darryl Richter; juniors John Schneider Jr., Chris Olson and Kallie Thoreson; and sophomore Brent Myers.

For the second year Grantsburg brought with a second team of underclassmen in a junior varsity role to give them experience for the future. The second team this year consisted of sophomores Steven LaFond and Dylan Roberts; freshmen Daniel Biorn, Ben Davis, Daniel Larsen and David Ohnstad. They took the same test as the varsity teams and their score was second only to Grantsburg’s first team in the small school division. Contest rules prevent the JV team from winning the second-place trophy. Grantsburg High School math instructors are Jay Gilhoi, Mark Johnson and Russ Hammer. - submitted

The first team, which took first place in the small-school category, consisted of seniors Nicole Davis, Nathan McConnell, Tyler Myers and Darryl Richter; juniors John Schneider Jr., Chris Olson and Kallie Thoreson; and sophomore Brent Myers. – Photos submitted

Names of youth fificction winners SIREN – The names of the youth fiction winners in competition sponsored during the Wisconsin Regional Writers Spring Conference at The Lodge at Crooked Lake May 1 and 2 were not listed in last week’s paper. The nonfiction and poetry winners were listed. The fiction competition was judged by

Susan Hanson, Katy King and Michael Veith. Winners were: First place – Casey Danielson, Osceola, for her story “Case of the Missing Elephant;” second place – Austin Bork, Webster, for his story “Untitled;” third place – Haylee Johnson, Osceola, for her story “Anniversary Present Gone Wrong.” - submitted

Pianist Lorie Line to perform at Amery

MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND

The second team this year consisted of sophomores Steven LaFond and Dylan Roberts; freshmen Daniel Biorn, Ben Davis, Daniel Larsen and David Ohnstad.

Society seeks volunteers POLK COUNTY - The Polk County Historical Society is looking for volunteers for the Polk County Historical Museum. The jobs are numerous, from dusting to filing and the hours are simple, whatever you can give. The museum is open daily, with the

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AMERY – Amery Community Education is proud to announce that they are hosting the nationally acclaimed pianist Lorie Line in the Amery High School auditorium for a special Father’s Day performance on Sunday, June 21, at 3 p.m. The glamorous pianist, known for her spectacular holiday show, is bringing what she calls her “jamming casual” show, with five of her favorite musicians from her world-class Pop Chamber Orchestra, for an intimate setting on smaller stages. Her tour will put her on almost 100 stages this year. Some of the stages and venues are so small that Line describes the experience as playing in her own living room. “I love the big holiday production, but the smaller, intimate show in the smaller Lorie Line towns is my favorite concert,” says Line. “It’s a chance for the audience to really get to know me, to hear my original in the country. Line will be autographing CDs and compositions and my favorite standards (instead of holiday songs) and to hear all taking photos with fans in the lobby folthe fun stories that go behind the lowing the performance. Tickets can be purchased for $29 by music.” Line is celebrating her 20th year of calling 800-801-5463 (LINE) or online at touring this year. Her story is amazing, www.lorieline.com. For more informaand one-of-a-kind. Discovered in Min- tion, call Amery Community Education neapolis in a department store once at 715-268-9771, ext. 220. - submitted called Dayton’s, Line serenaded shoppers who loved her music and encouraged her to record CDs. Since that time she has recorded over 20 albums, and has published 20 complete books of Te a m s n e e d e d f o r m e n ’ s music of her own s l ow - p i t c h to u r n a m e n t arrangements. She has sold over 6 million alSiren Ball Park bums, and most likely C a l l 715 - 3 4 9 - 2 3 9 1 484835 owns and runs the largest 27-28a 38-39L female independent label


PAGE 18 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 13, 2009

Volunteers save money for county in 2008 Lois Taylor, director of the Burnett County Aging Unit, presented certificates of achievement to home-delivered meal drivers, senior-dining site volunteers and elderly and handicapped transportation drivers during Senior Dining at Five at the Siren Senior Center Thursday, May 7. – Photo by Nancy Jappe

by Nancy Jappe SIREN – According to Lois Taylor, Burnett County Aging Unit director, volunteers saved the county a total of $155,800 in 2008 through their service as home-delivered-meal drivers, senior-dining site volunteers and elderly and handicapped transportation drivers. In the figures she presented at Volunteer Recognition Light (called that because of departmental cutbacks) at the Siren Senior Center Thursday, May 7, Taylor said that: 20 county volunteers drove 82,008 miles, spending 3,575 hours delivering 2,513 meals to homebound people. Fifty-three volunteers spent

clude Roy Clark, Lou Jappe, Gerry Vogel and Carol Berglind. Senior-dining site volunteers include Abby and Don Brand, Lou Jappe, Barb Munger, Marjorie Nyberg, Corrine Root, Nona and Ralph Severson, Della and Ed Smythe, Myrna Thomas and Gerry Vogel. Elderly and handicapped transportation drivers come from all over the county. Brad Alden, Cal and Les Jenneman and Dave McGrane are among those who live in the Siren area. Volunteer recognition was held at the senior-dining sites at A & H April 15, Grantsburg April 16 and Webster May 12.

1,778 hours at senior-dining sites around the county. Forty-seven volunteers made 6,514 trips, totaling 312,860 miles in over 11,000 hours to transport 259 unduplicated individuals to medical and other appointments. Siren home-delivered meals drivers in-

Open registration for Creativity Camp ST. CROIX FALLS – Youth ages 5 to 12 may register now for Summer Creativity Camp at three locations in Polk County, and two sites in Chisago County, Minn. Creativity Camp is a week long, daycamp experience that immerses youth in arts exploration with environmental themes. The camp is an arts education initiative designed by Festival Theatre. “Our philosophy is focused on building arts skills while encouraging individual creative growth,” says Amy Klein, education director at Festival Theatre. “Teaching artists in the disciplines of performing visual and literary artwork together around a single theme, and campers are invited into the process of making art rather than a product-based approach.” With funding support from the Hugh J. Andersen Foundation, the Xcel Energy Foundation, Polk-Burnett Operation

Round-Up, and individual donors, Creativity Camp prices are kept affordable at $85 per child per week of camp. Festival Theatre has coordinated its 2009 camps in partnership with five host sites: West Denmark Hall, Luck, (June 22-26); North Branch, Minn., Elementary School (July 13-17); St. Croix Falls Elementary School (July 20-24 and/or July 27-31); Clear Lake Community Center (August 10-14); and Camp Ojikta in Chisago City (August 17-21). Participating teaching artists include Shawn Boyd and Valarie Falkan, the cast of “Crimes of the Heart,” and Amy Klein and Stephanie Schmidt from the Festival Arts program. For additional information or to register for Creativity Camp, please call the Festival Theatre Box Office at 715-4833387 or 888-887-6002 or visit www.festivaltheatre.org. - submitted

Youth ages 5 to 12 may register now for Summer Creativity Camp. – Photo submitted

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MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 19

Valedictorian and salutatorian announced at Grantsburg GRANTSBURG – Grantsburg High School is pleased to announce Nicole Davis as the valedictorian and Tyler Myers as the salutatorian for 2009. Nicole has the distinction of having a 4.0 cumulative grade-point average all four years of her high school career. Davis is very involved in school and in the community, setting a positive example for others. Within the school community, Nicole is in the choir and participates in swing choir and vocal jazz, has been on the volleyball team all four years, is a member of the student Link group, a member of the Grantsburg National Honor Society, and has been involved in summer research for the biology department. One of Nicole’s greatest strengths is her natural inquisitiveness and thirst for learning. In addition to her extracurricular activities, Nicole loves to read and to participate in outside activities such as biking and swimming. Davis will be attending the University of WisconsinMadison, majoring in biology.

Tyler Myers and Nicole Davis

Myers has the distinction of having a 3.997 cumulative grade-point average for his high school career. Myers is very involved in the school and in the community, setting a positive example for others. Within the school community, Myers has participated in football, basketball, choir, acted in many of the school plays, is a member of the student Link group, a member of the Grantsburg National Honor Society, and has been involved in the summer research for the biology department. Myers’ greatest strengths are that he is able to take an idea and make something of it, he strives to achieve and he is a true leader. He is not afraid of standing up for what he thinks is right. He is also a true role model for our youth and enjoys being a role model in their lives. Myers will be attending Michigan Technological University, majoring in biomedical engineering. On Sunday, May 17, at 2 p.m., they will deliver speeches at the graduation ceremony.– submitted

Volunteer appreciation at Frederic

Volunteer Appreciation Day was held at Frederic Elementary School on May 6. It was a baker/ingredient/recipe theme and each volunteer received a baker’s hat, a cookbook for a good volunteer made by the Frederic students and a jar of chocolate chip cookie mix. There were waiters to usher the volunteers to their tables, readings from various students about what it takes to be a good volunteer, cheers and songs. The lyrics of one song were: “Volunteers, volunteers, you’re such a wonderful sight. Serving us your everyday talents and delight. A scoop of this, a dash of that, take a look and you’ll see: Patience, kindness and generosity. Two cups love, makes our smiles bright, A handful of help, helps to learn it right! A pinch of humor, makes us scream and shout. A dash of laughter we can’t do without!” - submitted


PAGE 20 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 13, 2009

CHURCH NEWS Defending our faith After Christ’s death and resurrection, Rome proclaimed it a crime punishable by death to be a Christian. This necessitated meeting and worshiping in secret, thereby causing many false rumors, such as cannibalism, against Christians. Consequently, some learned believers wrote letters in defense of their faith. Mark Minucius Felix, a Roman lawyer and orthodox Christian, wrote an inspiring account of a debate between Octavius (a Christian) and a pagan. The pagan’s chal- Perspectives lenges that Octavius’ answered are the same challenges the Christian church faces today. The Romans worshiped a variety of gods, including the sun, moon and stars. But Octavius debated, “Man is different from the wild beasts … who are always looking down at the earth … for their food. But man stands erect. His face is turned toward heaven. For this reason, we recognize, feel, and imitate God. No person has the right or reason to be ignorant of the celestial glory that’s imprinted on our eyes and senses. It’s wrong to seek on earth what can only be found on high.” In defense of God as Creator, Octavius quoted Romans 1:20: “For since the creation of the world, God’s invisible qualities—his eternal power and divine nature—have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made, so that men are without excuse.” Octavius also cited God’s perfect order of creation— the sun’s circuit, the moon’s phases, the seasons, the differences in animals and “the very beauty of our own bodies”—demonstrating that God is our designer. Octavius continued the debate by defending Christians. They didn’t kill humans nor did they abort babies, a common practice among the Romans in their god-sacrifices. Octavius urged the pagan to take an honest look at his religious rituals as “pitiful and laughable.” He challenged the pagan to use common sense, rather than blindly following the traditions of his ancestors. Then he could see that man-made gods had no power, no life, no real beauty. “You must KNOW God before you can WORSHIP him,” Octavius said, quoting Jesus in John 17:3. “Now this is eternal life: that they may know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom you have sent.” Because of Octavius’ articulate and passionate defense, the pagan ended up embracing the Christian faith. Lord, prepare us to defend our faith whenever we are challenged by unbelievers. Help us know you better—through dedicated and intentional meditation, study and prayer—so we will “always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks (us) to give the reason for the hope that (we) have.” (1 Peter 3:15) In Jesus’ name, amen. (Mrs. Bair may be reached at sallybair@gmail.com)

Sally Bair Eternal

What really matters?

“Physical health.” “Family.” “Making money.” “Happiness.” No doubt these are some of the more popular answers that we would receive if we asked people what really matters the most to them. Without question, a person’s physical health has a tremendous influence on his/her life in a number of ways. And, we all easily see the importance that a person’s family plays in his/her life. What about making money? In most cases when one has no money he is unable to obtain needed products or to receive certain services. Yes, having money is important. The fourth item in the list, “happiness,” or peace of mind, is also of great value, though one might count himself as “the happiest fellow in the world” and yet not be the kind of person that the Lord wants him to be. The word that comes to mind when we consider what really matters most in life is the word “priority.” “Priority“ is defined as “Something which takes precedence; something which must be done or taken care of first” (Webster’s Dictionary and Thesaurus, 1997). So, the question that must be asked is, “Should the items noted above take top priority in my life, or is there something that I ought to consider even more important than my physical health, my family, making money, and my personal happiness?” Indeed, there is something of far greater importance. The Lord Jesus said, “For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul? Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul?” (Mark 8:36, 37). Christ makes it sound as if the welfare of a person’s soul is of supreme importance, doesn’t He? Remember, the definition of “priority” is “something which must be done or taken care of first”. Didn’t the Master have something to say about “keeping first things first?” He did: “But seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness; and all these things shall be added unto you” (Matthew 6:33). There is no way to escape the force of Jesus’ demand: God and His cause must be first in the heart and life of a follower of the Messiah. Putting God’s cause any place but first is not acceptable! That’s not an American idea … it’s not an idea that originated in the 21st century … and it is not an idea that came from bishops or preachers. It came from the Son of the living God! Non-Christians sometimes think it’s strange or crazy that faithful disciples of Jesus consider Him and His kingdom as more precious than anything else in life. Sadly, even some members of Christ’s church look at their brothers and sisters in Christ as being fanatical or “out of it” when they see that those godly brethren have their priorities in the proper order: Jesus first, everything and everybody else comes after Him. Another passage that speaks plainly about priorities in the life of a child of God is Colossians 3:2 – “Set your affection [“mind,” ASV] on things above, not on things on the earth.” The choice is ours as to whether we will devote ourselves above all else to earthly affairs or to heavenly/spiritual

affairs, but we must always realize that the consequences of our choice … are eternal. “And thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind, and with all thy strength: this is the first commandment” (Mark 12:30). Loving the Lord and His cause above all else is a great demand of the teaching of Christ [John 14:15; Matthew 6:33; Colossians 3:2]. Jesus will one day raise all the dead. Some will be raised unto “the resurrection of life,” while for others it will be “the resurrection of damnation” [John 5:28,29]. Preacher’s What will be the determining factor as to whether a person will go into eternal life or eternal punishment? Each person will be judged according to “the things done in his body, according to that he has done, whether it be good or bad” (2 Corinthians 5:10). Those who had their focus in this life on something other than Christ and service to Him will have all eternity to think about their tragic decision to not make Him the center of their lives. We would not for an instant minimize the significance of a person trying to maintain his physical health …. loving and enjoying his family … making money to be able to provide for himself and others, or trying to be happy. These all have their proper place in life. But, we must accept the fact that none of these are God’s answer to the question “What really does matter most in life?” What matters most in life is for us to fulfill our responsibility to our Lord … to love Him and put His cause above all others. We close with one final consideration. When you and I make out our yearly plans, where does our service to Jesus fit in? When you and I make out our plans for each month, where does our service to Jesus fit in? When you and I make out our “things to do” list every week, do we have the Lord’s cause foremost in our thoughts? And, you knew this one was coming, when we make our plans for each day, things that we just “must” get done, where does our service to Christ fit in? May the Lord and His cause always be “near and dear” to us. Let’s keep first things first. (Written by Roger Campbell) If readers have questions you would like answered in this weekly column or simply wish to know more about the Church of Christ, you are invited to call 715-8667157, visit the Web site at www.burnettcountycofc.com or stop by the church building at 7425 West Birch Street in Webster. Sunday Bible class begins at 9:30 a.m. and worship begins at 10:30 a.m. We also meet Wednesday evenings at 7 p.m. Office hours are Tuesdays through Fridays, 9 a.m. - noon.

Garret Derouin The Pen

New members welcomed at Fristad Lutheran

New friends welcomed to the Lewis United Methodist Church

Linda Boxter

LEWIS – Three new friends of the Lewis Me- Chong and Jim Jones morial United Methodist Church were received into membership by Pastor Tom Cook on Sunday, May 10. Welcomed into membership were: Chong and Jim Jones and Linda Boxter. Accompanied by family members and friends, they reaffirmed their faith and the vows made at their baptism. Members welcomed each one into their church family. All three have been active in church. Several other new members will be accepted into membership this summer. The honored three served refreshments after the service. - submitted

New members were welcomed at Fristad Lutheran Church, Centuria, in April. Front (L to R): Pastor Mel Rau, Tim and Renee Greaner and Makellah, Lorraine and Charlie Turner and Chuck Turner. Back: Brad McCurdy and Laura Nick (holding Matthew) and Anne Fletcher. - Photo submitted

Grantsburg Christian Women's Club GRANTSBURG – Tuesday, April 21, will be a forever moment in a local pharmacist’s life. As the local Christian women’s club was honored with the talents and testimony of Brenda Copeland of Louisiana, one of her musical numbers was sung by Jack Samuelson. The Grantsburg Christian Women’s Club invites everyone to come share with them this month. Hear guest speaker, Lee

Ann Steffens, as she shares her message, “Finding Fulfillment for a Starving Heart.” For our special feature Steffens will show her Rock Solid jewelry. Deb Christian will add music for a memorable program. Join them on Tuesday, May 19, at the Grantsburg Senior Center at 9 a.m. Please call for reservations: Pam Albarado at 715-463-5953. – submitted


MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 21

CHURCH NEWS/OBITUARIES Marlys A. McCulley

The Sunday school children at Bone Lake enjoy singing in worship. Praise the Lord! – Photos submitted LUCK – Sunday, May 10, was a busy day at Bone Lake Lutheran Church, rural Luck. In celebration of Mother’s Day, the Sunday school children graced the worship service with praise songs. The sixth-grade students received their new Lutheran study Bibles from WELCA, and the sacrament of holy baptism was celebrated as a family of four was welcomed into the

Christian faith. If you would like to know more about Bone Lake Lutheran Church and its ministries, please join them for worship at 10:30 on Sunday mornings. Summer worship time is at 9:30 a.m. and starts on May 24. Please call the church office if you have any questions at 715-472-2535. - submitted

Sixth-grade students received their new study Bibles during worship on May 10. The Bibles are a gift from the women’s organization at Bone Lake. Pictured (L to R): are Hope Peterson, Kendra Mosay, Katie Pfaff, Hunter Fjorden, Jeremiah Johnson, Kalley Lunsmann and Emily Ferguson. Betty Bohn, vice president of WELCA, presented the Bibles. Missing from the picture are Danielle Tonnar, Dylan Broome and Franki Wilkinson.

On Mother’s Day a family of four was baptized into the Christian faith at Bone Lake by Pastor Mary Ann Bowman. The newly baptized (L to R) are Kristin Colassacco and her children, Andrew Thomas and Lexi. Sponsors are Patrick Jones and Linda and Bob Jones.

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Welcoming the first communicants to the Lord’s table on Sunday, May 3, were (L to R): Father Pat Ryan, Father Dennis Mullen and Deacon Stan Marczak. Children (L to R): Joey Duncan, Casey Trapp, Kaitlyn Olson and Rylee Hoffman. - Special photo

Marlys McCulley, 81, died Thursday, April 9, 2009, at her home in Andalusia, Ill. Marlys A. Shull was born Aug. 30, 1927, in Frederic, to John and Rose Nelsen Schull. She married Marvin “Mac” McCulley on March 20, 1947, in Frederic. She was employed by the former Illinois Bell Telephone Company in Rock Island, Ill., until the birth of twin daughters in 1951. After that blessed event, she was a stay-at-home mom, and was active in the girls school and sports activities as a member of the Andalusia Grade School PTA. Their large yard and garden, her love of sewing, and trying to keep Mac and the girls in line kept her busy. She was a member of the Andalusia Community Baptist Church, 309 E. Third Street, Andalusia. Marlys was preceded in death by her parents; husband; three brothers; and three sisters. She is survived by her twin daughters, Lynda (Larry) Ambrose, Oxford, Iowa, and Sandi (Steve) Mueller, Reynolds; three stepchildren, Donovan and Richard McCulley and Sylvia McClune, all of Iowa; sister, Allison Haney, Minneapolis, Minn.; brothers, Harlan and Gerald Shull, Minneapolis, Minn., and Carlton Shull, Branson, Mo.; five grandchildren, Lara Donohoe, Jodi Turner, Shelby Beebe, Megan Finch and Blake Bull; six step-grandchildren and their families; and seven greatgrandchildren, Josie, Ben, Madison, Bailey, Spencer, Grace and Ella. A memorial service was held Saturday, April 18, at Andalusia Community Baptist Church. Memorials may be made to Community Baptist Church or to the Andalusia Volunteer Ambulance. Online condolences may be sent a www.wendtfuneralhome.com.

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Bone Lake Lutheran news

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107 N. Washington St. Downtown St. Croix Falls, Wis.

11 West 5th Ave. Shell Lake, Wis.

715-327-4236 715-483-9008

715-349-2560 715-468-2314


PAGE 22 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 13, 2009

OBITUARIES Robert D. Smiley Sr. Robert D. Smiley Sr., 72, a resident of Danbury, died May 7, 2009, at his home. Robert was born on Dec. 29, 1936, in Danbury, to John and Pearl Smiley. Robert married Linda on March 25, 1961, in Grantsburg. Robert worked as a heavy equipment operator for Ray Jordan and Sons Construction from the age of 16 until he retired at the age of 70. He enjoyed ice fishing, fishing, hunting and anything that allowed him to be outdoors. He constructed diamond willow tables for all his family members. He enjoyed spending time with his family. Robert was preceded in death by his parents; infant daughter, Bobbi Jo; sisters, Betty Soens, Dorothy Terzini and Ruth Ferizell; brothers, Herbert Smiley, Toby Smiley, Peanut Smiley and Carl Smiley. Robert is survived by his wife of 48 years, Linda; children, Georgia (Doug) Beach, Brenda (Scott) Moser, Robert “Scrap” (Jessica) Smiley and Kim “Tyke” (Duane) Snorek; 15 grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; two great-great-grandchildren on their way; along with numerous other relatives and friends. Funeral services were held Monday, May 11, at Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home with Pastor Jack Martiny officiating. Interment followed at Danbury Cemetery. Casket bearers were Terry Jordan, Dave Jordan, Scott Holmstrom, Mike Jordan, Raymond Jordan and Gary Radman. The Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home, Webster, was entrusted with arrangements.

Arlie Mae Randall

Clarice Leone Lindahl

Donald H. Johnson

Clarice Leone Lindahl, 81, of Frederic, died Sunday, May 3, 2009, at Abbott Northwestern Hospital. She was born May 16, 1927, in Eureka Township to Harry and Ruth Skoog. She attended St. Croix Falls High School where she graduated in 1945. She married Gene Lindahl on July 1, 1950. They spent the early years of their marriage traveling throughout Wisconsin for Gene’s job with the Department of Transportation. Gene’s first birthday gift to Clarice was their son, Mike, born on her birthday in 1951. Daughter Mary was born in 1952. In 1956, the family moved to Frederic. Another daughter, Jill, was born in 1957. In 1960, they moved to their newly built home on Park Avenue, where she resided until her death. For several years Clarice stayed at home raising her children and helping to raise others. She volunteered her time with Cub Scouts and Girl Scouts. For nearly forty years she was a well-known source of fresh cookies for the neighborhood children. When she deemed her children old enough, she took a job at the Frederic Clinic. Following that, she worked in the insurance department at Bremer Bank for many years. She was an active member of Pilgrim Lutheran Church. In over fifty years of membership she rarely, if ever, said no to an opportunity to serve. She enjoyed snowmobiling, gardening, walking, shopping, visiting with friends, and spending time at the lake. She took great pride in her housework and yard work. Each year she looked forward to and contributed to the food, fun and the fellowship of the annual Skoog reunion. She was preceded in death by her husband, Gene; son, Mike; twin sister, Alice; and her parents, Harry and Ruth Skoog. She is survived by daughter-in-law, Valerie Lindahl; daughters, Mary (Simon) Nelson and Jill (Greg) Norman; grandchildren, Jerome (Toni) Lindahl, Ruth Taylor, Carrie (Chad) Lindahl, Ben Nelson, Leah (Brad) Bulver, Anna (Randy) Antonich, Joe Nelson, Katie (Kraig) Kahl, Will (Missi) Grindell, Norah (John) Anderson, and Max Norman; ten great-grandchildren; sisters, Angie Bender and Irene Campbell; brothers, Don (Jan) Skoog and Les (Dee) Skoog; brother-in-law, Bill (Jane) Lindahl; sister-in-law, Donnis (Roger) Nagel; brother-in-law, John (Sue) Lindahl; nieces, nephews, cousins, and friends. Funeral services were held at Pilgrim Lutheran Church in Frederic on Thursday, May 7, with Pastor Mary Ann Bowman officiating. Music was provided by organist, Sandy Lundquist and soloists, Kordi Kurkowski and Mike Route. Pallbearers were Clarice’s grandchildren. The Rowe Funeral Home of Frederic was entrusted with funeral arrangements.

Donald H. Johnson, 77, died peacefully, surrounded by his family, at the Burnett Medical Continuing Care Center in Grantsburg on April 29, 2009, after a long battle with Alzheimer’s. He was born on Nov. 14, 1931, to Emil and Vella Johnson at their home in Karlsborg. Donald was baptized on May 5, 1932. He grew up on the family farm and attended Karlsborg School through eighth grade. As a young man, he enjoyed rollerskating, bowling and playing ball. He and his brother Louis farmed together on the family farm until Donald married Ruth Green on July 13, 1963. They moved just north of his homeplace to the home where they lived and raised their daughters, LaBrenda, Sheila and Debra. They were married for 45 years. Donald made farming his profession when he went to work for the DNR. He farmed the fields on Crex for over 30 years before he retired in 1990. Donald enjoyed anything outdoors. He especially enjoyed gardening. He loved hunting white-tailed deer, mule deer, bear, fox, bobcats, coyotes, ducks, geese, partridge, squirrels, just about anything. He was also an amazing fisherman. Cutting wood was another favorite pastime. Donald was a “Ford man.” His little Ford tractors were his pride and joy. Donald was a very kind, gentle and patient man. Nothing brought Donald more joy than to be surrounded by little children. Even after the Alzheimer’s had robbed him of many of the things he enjoyed, the children always brought back the sparkle in his eyes. He was adored by his children and grandchildren. Donald lived a life of quiet faith, which was made evident through his love of nature and people. He recommitted his life to the Lord in June of 1999 with Ruth at his side. Complaining was not in Donald’s nature. Donald was preceded in death by his parents, Emil and Vella Johnson, sister Viola Macho, brothers Louis, LeRoy, Floyd and infant brother Alec. Donald is survived by his wife, Ruth Johnson; daughters LaBrenda Holmquist (Jeff Lindus), Sheila (Jerry) Robinson, Debra (Scott) Peterson; grandchildren Christopher and Carson Holmquist, Ryan and Chelsey Ophus, Isaac and Carolyn Peterson; and great-grandson, Tyler Holmquist; many other relatives and friends. Funeral services were held Saturday, May 2, at Calvary Covenant Church in Alpha with Pastor Kevin Miller and Pastor Scott Sagle officiating. Donald was laid to rest in the Karlsborg Cemetery. Casket bearers were Orlie Luedtke, Bobby Gustafson, Donnie Olson, Bobby Fossum, John Johnson and Dan Swenson. Honorary casket bearers were Bud Christopherson, Jerry Fiedler, Curtis Fallstrom, Arvid Fossum, Peter Olson, Jerry Olson and Harley Lindus. The Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home, Webster, was entrusted with arrangements.

Arlie Mae Randall, 93, Roseburg, Ore., died April 22, 2009. She had recently moved to Oregon to live the next chapter of her life near her Oregon niece and nephew. Arlie was born on Sept. 22, 1915, in Amery. She majored in early childhood education and received her master’s degree in education from Miami University in Ohio. She taught kindergarten and elementary grades. She later became a primary school principal in Kettering, Ohio, a position she held for 15 years. Arlie married Floyd Randall in 1940. They settled in Kettering and remained there until retirement and a subsequent move to Phoenix, Ariz., in 1974. Arlie was a member of the P.E.O. Sisterhood and Delta Kappa Gamma. She became a docent for the Phoenix Art Museum in 1975 and was a member of the Church of the Beatitudes. Arlie moved to The Beatitudes Campus in Phoenix in 2000. Arlie’s many contributions to others included over 100 quilts that she pieced together and gave away to both children and adults. Arlie was always reaching out to connect with others. She was generous with her love and affection to her beloved family and to her many wonderful friends at The Beatitudes and elsewhere. A graveside memorial is planned for Saturday, June 13, 10:30 a.m., at the American Legion Building in Lu Marie Wulf Johnson, 78, died Monday, April 13, Amery. In lieu of flowers, send gifts to P.E.O. Foundation, P.E.O. Executive Office, 3700 Grand Avenue, Des 2009, at her home in San Antonio, Texas, after a twoyear battle with cancer. Moines, IA 50312-2899. Lu was born on Feb. 1, 1931, to Herbert and Lilly McCurdy Wulf in rural Balsam Lake Township. She attended grade school at Maple Grove School and high school in Balsam Lake. She graduated from AbbottNorthwestern School of Nursing in Minneapolis, Minn., in 1952. Dorothy R. Thompson died May 9, 2009. Lu marred Robert Johnson of Red Wing, Minn., on Dorothy was born and raised in St. Paul, Minn., and Nov. 6, 1954. They lived in Minneapolis, Minn.; Oklawas at home in many places as the wife of a career Air homa City, Okla.; and San Antonio, Texas. She worked Force officer. She lived for 23 years in Lynchburg, Va., as an RN at the Diagnostic Clinic in San Antonio for following Air Force retirement; and resided in Siren, over 20 years. since 1992. Lu was preceded in death by her parents and brother, She was preceded in death by parents, Oscar and Mil- William Wulf. dred Bergstrom; husband of 66 years, Robert ThompShe is survived by her husband; daughters, Dianne son Sr.; sisters, Mildred, Ruth and Alice; brother, Russell; Johnson of San Antonio, Texas, Bonnie (Randy) Thoma nephew, Charles and niece Alice Elizabeth. of Round Rock, Texas, Nancy (Craig) Ludrick of The She is survived by sons, Robert Jr. (Carolyn) and Woodlands, Texas, and son, Steven (Amberly) of CopRichard; granddaughters, Sarah, Kathryn and Jill; and pell, Texas; six grandchildren; sister, Mae Moore of Centuria; brother, Robert Wulf of Milltown; and beloved nieces and nephews. She lived with a loving and generous spirit, strong sister-in-law, Jean Wulf of Menomonie. A memorial service was held at Wayside Chapel in faith, a love of language and literature, and complete San Antonio, Texas, on Thursday, April 16, with a pridevotion to her family. Funeral service will be held Thursday, May 14, at vate interment at the Sunset Cemetery in San Antonio. noon, with visitation from 11 a.m. until time of service, at the Roselawn Cemetery Chapel in Roseville, Minn. Interment will be at the Roselawn Cemetery. Memorials preferred to Union Gospel Mission, St. Paul, Salvation Army or Gillette Children’s Hospital. The Holcomb-Henry-Boom Funeral Home, St. Paul, Minn., was entrusted with arrangements.

Lu Marie Johnson

Dorothy R. Thompson

Ronald (Ron) E. Hansen Ronald (Ron) E. Hansen, 71, a resident of Danbury, died May 3, 2009, at his home. Ron was born on Oct. 1, 1937, in Hendricks, Minn., to Jens and Clara Hansen. Ron married Janet on May 14, 1960, in Winner, S.D. Ron was an accountant for Land O’Lakes for a number of years working in Sioux Falls, S.D., Spencer, Iowa, and in St. Paul, Minn. He also owned and operated Sloan’s Motel in Burlington, Colo., and the Pinewood Motel in Siren. He was a past member of the Moose Lodge in Spencer, Iowa and the Elks Lodge in Sioux Falls, S.D. Ron enjoyed playing golf, fishing and bowling. He also enjoyed spending time with his family and watching his grandchildren in sports. Ron was preceded in death by his parents; and brother, Curt. He is survived by his wife, Janet; daughters, Vickie (Mark) Reiff of Sioux Falls, S.D. and Debbie (Eric) Anderson of Cottage Grove, Minn.; his grandchildren, Matthew, Brandon, Michaela and Jessica; along with other relatives and many friends. Memorial services were held Wednesday, May 6, 2009, at the Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home, with Pastor Steve Ward officiating. Music was provided by Kim Simon. Interment followed at the Northern Wisconsin Veterans Memorial Cemetery in Spooner, where military honors were rendered by the Wisconsin State Honor Team. The Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home, Webster, was entrusted with arrangements.


MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 23

OBITUARIES Jeanette Leone Olson

Helen Anna McKenzie

Donovan “Ole” Olson

Jeanette Leone Olson, 70, Siren, died Wednesday, May 6, 2009, at Abbott Northwestern Hospital in Minneapolis, Minn. Jeanette was born on Jan. 26, 1939, in Chippewa Falls, the daughter of the Rev. Richard and Myrtle Sweitzer. She spent the first years of her life living in Wisconsin and Illinois. She graduated from Rufus King High School in Milwaukee in 1957. In 1956, while working with Mildred Olson (her future mother-in-law) at Herzl Camp, she met her future husband, Neil. They began dating in 1957 and were married on April 12, 1958. They started their married life in Rice Lake and then moved to Siren where Neil opened his chiropractic practice in 1959. To this union, three sons were born, Larye, Jamie and Gary. Jeanette was involved in many clubs and activities: Mary Kay, Lioness, Burnett County Highway Commission, highway safety coordinator, Wisconsin Chiropractic Auxiliary, Red Hats Society, church council, Sunday school teacher, Boy Scouts, Siren queen pageant coordinator, Miss Wisconsin pageant advisor, queen pageant judge, snowmobile club and birthday club. Jeanette was an avid Green Bay Packer and Brett Favre fan, loved playing cards, shopping, antiquing, garage saling, traveling and spending time with her grandchildren. Jeanette greatly valued family and friendships and was always willing to help others in any way she could. Her warm smile and enthusiasm brightened many lives. She was preceded in death by her parents, the Rev. Richard and Myrtle Sweitzer. She is survived by her husband, Neil; sons, Larye (Tracey) of Siren, Jamie (Gayle) of Frederic and Gary of Siren; grandchildren Jason (Kim), Nick (Andrea), Danielle (Jamie), Cassi; great-grandchildren, Ella, Ryder and Haylee; brother, Richard (Sharon) of Madison, Fla.; mother-in-law, Mildred Hartshorn; and many relatives and friends. Funeral services were held Monday, May 11, at Bethany Lutheran Church, Siren, with Pastor John Clasen officiating. Music was provided by Kordi Kurkowski and Myrna Gardin. Casket bearers were Jason Olson, Nick Olson, Lowell Ingalls, William Ingalls, Norm Bickford and Dr. Earl Jacot. Interment followed at the Orange/Lakeside Cemetery. The Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home, Webster, was entrusted with arrangements.

Helen Anna McKenzie, 93, Grantsburg, died at home April 27, 2009. Helen was born May 13, 1915, to Christ and Anna Johnson in St. Croix Falls. She attended the Hillside School in Eureka Township, the St. Croix Falls High School and Polk County Normal and became an elementary schoolteacher. Helen married Edward McKenzie on March 21, 1936. They lived at Deer Lake and Pleasant Valley until moving to the Johnson Home Farm, north of St. Croix Falls, where they remained for 43 years. They have one son, Gene. Helen moved to Osceola in 1987, and then in 2001 she moved to Grantsburg to be near her family. Helen was preceded in death by her parents; husband; brother, George; and sister, Alice. She is survived by her son, Gene (Dona) McKenzie, Grantsburg; grandchildren, Jim (Julie) McKenzie, Grantsburg, Roxanne (Duke) Tucker, Grantsburg; and great-grandchildren, Nicole, Stacey and Jordyn McKenzie and Hope and Olivia Tucker. Funeral services were held Saturday, April 30, at First Presbyterian Church, St. Croix Falls. Pastor Bruce Brooks officiated and music was provided by Bonnie Fehrenbacher and Kurt Tebben. Interment followed at the Balsam Lake Cemetery. The Edling Funeral Home, Grantsburg, was entrusted with the arrangements.

Donovan James Olson, 69, died unexpectedly on May 3, 2009 at ARMC. Don was a lifelong resident of Clear Lake. In February, he moved to Golden Age Manor in Amery. He was born on April 5, 1940, the only son of Edhart and Edith Olson of rural Clear Lake. For his entire life, Don was a member of Moe Lutheran Church; he was baptized and confirmed at Moe, sang in the church choir and served on the church council. He graduated from Clear Lake High School in May of 1958 and began working for DHIA of Polk County where he remained for 18 years. During this time, Don served his country as a member of the Wisconsin National Guard. In September of 1970, he married Elise Hardesty. The couple had four children. From 1978 until 2001, Don was employed by Foremost Farms, Inc. in Clayton. In August of 1997, he met Sandra Jean Wright while attending Life Rebuilders Support Group at Faith Lutheran Church in Clayton. On Dec. 26, 1998, they were married at Clear Lake United Covenant Church. Don and Sandy celebrated 10 years of marriage this past December. They were their grandchildren’s biggest fans, traveling to sporting and school-related events whenever possible. They also attended many church events as well as concerts and plays. Don’s love of music led him to join the Polk/Burnett Indianhead Chorus in 2001. He treasured his membership in this organization and was never more proud than when he stood on stage with this group of men whom he considered his second family. He also enjoyed participating in local productions with the Clear Lake Community Theater group. As a former member of the National Guard, he marched in several local parades, was an Authorized Provider in the Military Funeral Honors Programs, and a member of the Clear Lake American Legion. Don was an avid American Red Cross donor, giving nearly 20 gallons of blood during local drives. Don is survived by his wife, Sandy, and children Jamie, Debbie (Tracy) Wittmer, and Mary; stepsons Greg and Curt Wright and the following grandchildren: Anthony, Alanis and Alexis Van Erp, Taylor, Seth, Jordon and Shannen Wittmer, Hilary, Eliot, Adrian and Isaiah Wright; sisters Nina (Keith) Larson, Kaye (Gary) Bird, Kathy (Bill) Schmidt, five cousins, nine nieces and nephews, six great-nieces and nephews and countless friends. He was preceded in death by his parents, Edhart and Edith Olson and infant son Terry Lee. Funeral services were at Moe Lutheran Church in Clear Lake, on Thursday, May 7, 2009, at 11 a.m. Clergy was Pastor Margaret Grant, with organist Dianne Burri and music by the Indianhead Chorus. Interment was at Moe Lutheran Cemetery in Clear Lake. Casket bearers were Christopher Bird, Kevin Miller, Ben Hagemann, Jamie Olson, Bill Schmidt Jr., Scott Larson and Jon Tanberg. Honorary casket bearers were Marvin Anderson, Alan Johnson, Gary Bird, Keith Larson, Eugene Burns and Bill Schmidt. Military honors were performed by the Clear Lake All Veterans Honor Guard Scheuermann-Hammer Funeral Home and Cremation Services were entrusted with the arrangements.

Elverna E. Anderson Elverna E. Anderson, 81, Frederic, died at the St. Croix Regional Medical Center in St. Criox Falls, following a brief but courageous battle with cancer. Funeral service for Elverna will be on Friday, May 15, 2009, at 5:30 p.m., at St. Luke’s United Methodist Church in Frederic. The family will greet visitors at the church on Friday from 4:30 p.m. until the time of service. Elverna will be laid to rest next to her husband, Gordon W. Anderson, at the Maple Grove Cemetery in Frederic. A full obituary will appear in an upcoming edition. For online condolences and complete information please visit www.kolstadfamilyfuneralhome.com Kolstad Family Funeral Home of Centuria has been entrusted with funeral arrangements.

David P. Rice David P. Rice, rural Dresser, died Friday, May 8, at his home at the age of 66. David was born March 19, 1943, to Ronald and Martha Rice at Willow Lake, S.D. On Oct. 16, 1987, he married his wife Michelle in Minneapolis, Minn. Until retirement, he worked as a private investigator. He enjoyed golf and poker. David was preceded in death by his daughter, Melissa Michelle Rice; granddaughter, Erin Ashley Jensen; and his parents, Ronald and Martha Rice. He is survived by his wife, Michelle; children, Justin, Jordan, Abigail, Karin Rameriz and her daughter, Sophia; Amy (David) Malatak and their children, Lucis and Lilly; brothers Richard (Elizabeth) Rice, Robert (Linda) Rice; sisters Patricia (Carl) Anderson, Lois (Carl) Gilley, numerous nieces and nephews. Memorial services were held Tuesday, May 12, at First Baptist Church in Amery with Pastor Charles Butt officiating. Private interment will be at a later date. The Grandstrand Funeral Home, Osceola, was entrusted with arrangements.

Manuel C. Larson Manuel C. Larson, 75, a resident of Freya, died May 8, 2009. Memorial services were held Wednesday, May 13, at the Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home, Siren Chapel. A full obituary will be published in an upcoming edition of the Leader. The Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home, Webster, was entrusted with arrangements.


PAGE 24 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 13, 2009

Church Directory ADVENTIST

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST - FREDERIC

609 Benson Road. Pastor Curtis Denney Sat. Worship 11 a.m.; Sabbath Schl. 9:30 a.m.

ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE CHURCH OF THE VALLEY Senior Pastor Bob Morton 1259 Hwy. 35 S., St. Croix Falls Sunday Worship: 8:30, 9:45 & 11 a.m.

LAKETOWN LUTHERAN - CUSHING Pastor Dorothy Sandahl Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.; Sunday School 10:30 a.m.

LUCK LUTHERAN

510 Foster Ave. E.; Mark E. Hall, Pastor Office 715-472-2605; Home 715-472-8424 Worship Service 10:30 a.m.

MILLTOWN LUTHERAN

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

113 W. Main St.. W., Phone 715-825-2453 Pastor Danny G. Wheeler 9 a.m. Prayer & Praise Service 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:40 a.m. Worship Service

WORD OF LIFE CHURCH

NORTH VALLEY LUTHERAN

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

Meeting in homes. Elders: Cliff Bjork, Jon Zens, 483-1357 and 755-3048 Sun. Fellowship - 10 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m.

LIFE 24/7 - CENTURIA

309 5th Street, 715-640-1450 Pastors Randy and Pam Stone Saturday 6 p.m.

LUTHERAN

LUTHERAN

BALSAM LUTHERAN CHURCH

1115 Mains Crossing, 1/2 Mile South Hwy. 8 On 110th St.; Pastor Matt Faarem Sun. Worship 9 a.m.; Sun. School 10:15 a.m. Wed. Bible Study 8:30 a.m. Wed. LOGOS 3:20 p.m.

BEAUTIFUL SAVIOR LUTHERAN (WELS)

Gene E. Jahnke, Pastor, 715-635-7672, Hm. 715-354-7787, Hwy. 70 at 53, Spooner Sun. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School & Bible Classes For All - 10:45 a.m.

BETHANY LUTHERAN - BRANSTAD

Pastor Jay Ticknor, 715-463-5746 3 miles So. of Grantsburg on Hwy. 87 Sun. Schl. - 9:30 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

BETHANY LUTHERAN - SIREN

Hwy. 35, 1/2 blk. N. Main St. Pastor John Clasen; Pastoral Serv. 349-5280 Sunday Worship - 8 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Sunday School - 9:30 a.m.

BETHESDA LUTHERAN - DRESSER (LCMC) www.bethesdalutheran.ws

Pastor Mark Richardson, 715-755-2562 1947 110th Ave., Dresser Sun. Contemp. Serv. 8:15 a.m.; Gospel Wor., Adult Ed. & Sun. Schl. 9:30; Trad. Serv. 10:45 a.m.

BONE LAKE LUTHERAN bllc@lakeland.ws

Pastor Mary Ann Bowman, 5 mi. E. of Luck on Hwy. 48, 1/2 mi. S. on I; 472-8153, Office/Kit. - 472-2535 Sun. Schl. 9 a.m.; Adult Bible Study 9:15 a.m.; Fellowship 10 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

CHRIST LUTHERAN

Pipe Lake CTH G & T, 715-822-3096 Sun. Serv. 10:45 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m. during school year; Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sun.

CLAM FALLS LUTHERAN (AALC)

Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt - 715-653-2630 Communion 1st Sunday Worship 9 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m.

FAITH LUTHERAN - BALSAM LAKE

faithlutheran@lakeland.ws Pastor Diane Norstad 715-485-3800; CTH I & Mill Street Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:40 a.m.; Holy Communion 1st & last Sundays

FAITH LUTHERAN - GRANTSBURG

Pastor Victor St. George, 715-463-5388 Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School 10:45 a.m.

FIRST EVAN. LUTHERAN

5561 Chestnut St., Taylors Falls, MN 651-465-5265 Traditional Wor. 8:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. & Youth 9:45 a.m.; Adult Learning 10 a.m.; Contemp. Wor. 11 a.m.

FIRST LUTHERAN - CUSHING

Pastor Dorothy Sandahl 648-5323 or 648-5324 Sun. Wor. 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:15 a.m.

FRISTAD LUTHERAN - CENTURIA

Pastor Maggie Isaacson, 715-825-3559 3 mi. W. of Milltown on “G” Sun. Wor. - 9:15 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:30 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN, (LCMS) WEBSTER

Pastor John Siedschlag, Phone 866-5406; Church Phone 866-7191 Sun. Schl. - 9 a.m; Sun. Wors. - 10 a.m.; Adult Bible Study 9 a.m.; Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

PEACE LUTHERAN - DRESSER (ELCA)

2355 Clark Road, Dresser, WI, 715-755-2515 E-mail: peace@centurytel.net Pastor Wayne Deloach, Intern Bob Sinclair Sun. Wor. 8:30 & 11 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:40 a.m.; Confirmation Wed. 6 p.m.; HS Youth Wed. 6 p.m.

PILGRIM LUTHERAN - FREDERIC (ELCA) Pastor Catherine Burnette 507 Wisconsin Ave. N., 715-327-8012 Sunday Worship - 9 a.m.; Holy Communion 1st & 2nd Sundays www.pilgrimlutheranfrederic.org

REDEEMER EV. LUTHERAN

(Wisconsin Synod) Pastor Gene DeVries 200 N. Adams St., St. Croix Falls Sun. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 8:30 a.m.

(Missouri Synod) Pastor Jody R. Walter, 327-8608 Sun. Schl. - 8:45 a.m.; Service - 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st & 3rd Sun.

LAKESIDE COMMUNITY LUTH. - ELCA

CTH H, 1/2 mi. N. of CTH A & H on H Church Off. 715-635-7791Roger Pittman, Pastor Sunday Schl. 9 a.m.; Worship Serv. 10 a.m. Communion 1st and 3rd Sundays

METHODIST

METHODIST

ATLAS UNITED METHODIST

Pastor Carolyn Saunders, 715-463-2624 Sunday School - 11 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

CENTRAL UNITED METHODIST - GRANTSBURG Pastor Carolyn Saunders, 715-463-2624 Worship - 9 a.m.; Sun. School - 10:30 a.m.

DANBURY UNITED METHODIST

Cindy Glocke, Pastor, 715-866-8646 Sun. Worship - 9 a.m.

GRACE UNITED - WEBSTER

Cindy Glocke, Pastor, 715-866-8646 Sunday Worship - 10:30 a.m.

Pastor: Rev. Dennis M. Mullen, 715-327-8119 Sat.: 4:30 p.m. St. Dominic; Sun.: 8:30 a.m. Immaculate Conception; 10:30 a.m. St. Dominic Call the office for daily & holy day Mass times

ST. ANNE PARISH

Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-247-3310 139 Church Hill Rd., Somerset Mass Sun. 8:30 a.m.; Wed. 9 a.m. Sacrament of Penance Sun. 8 a.m.

ST. FRANCIS XAVIER

Pastor Father Daniel Bodin, 651-465-7345 25293 Redwing Ave., Shafer, MN Sunday 9 a.m.

ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST

Pastor Michael J. Tupa, 715-866-7321 Cedar & Muskey Ave. - Webster Mass Sun 10:45 a.m., Wed. 5:45 p.m. (SeptMay), Fri. 9 a.m. (Summer) Sat. 8:15 p.m. on Sept. 1

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC

HOLY TRINITY UNITED METHODIST

404 Wis. Ave., Amery, 715-268-7717 Father John Drummy, Pastor Sat. Mass 4 p.m., Sun. Mass 8 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Sacrament of Reconciliation Sat., 3:30 p.m. or by appt.

LAKEVIEW UNITED - HERTEL

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC

Holytrinity@wisconsinumc.org 1606 165th Ave., Centuria Paul Foulke, Pastor, 715-485-3363 Sun. Wor. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:15 a.m.

LEWIS MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST

Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-294-2243 255 E. 10th Ave., Osceola Masses: Sun. 10:30 a.m., Tues. 5 p.m. Thurs. at 10 a.m. at Osc. Nursing Home

McKINLEY UNITED METHODIST

ASSEMBLY

Pastor Marty Nolet Wor. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - during worship hour Tom Cook, Pastor Worship 8:45 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 10 a.m. Pastor Bruce Stunkard Sun. Wor. 11 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m. Potluck dinner 1st Sunday

OSCEOLA UNITED METHODIST

ASSEMBLY

10 mi. W. of Cumberland on Hwy. 48 (McKinley) - Pastor Neal Weltzin GT Office 857-5580, Parsonage 822-3001, TR Office - 822-3001 Wor. Serv. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:15 a.m. Holy Communion - 1st Sunday

TRINITY LUTHERAN LCMS, DANBURY

Pastor John Siedschlag Home 715-866-5405; Church 715-866-7191 Sunday Worship Service - 8 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

TRINITY LUTHERAN - FALUN

Tom Cook, Pastor Sunday School 9 a.m. Worship - 10:15 a.m. (Nursery available)

TAYLORS FALLS UNITED METHODIST

290 W. Government Street, 715-294-4436 Reverend Dr. Rolland Robinson Sunday Service - 10 a.m. with nursery Sunday School - Sept. - May at 10 a.m.

WOLF CREEK UNITED METHODIST Rev. Mike Weaver Sunday Worship - 8:15 a.m. COVENANT

COVENANT

Hwy. 70 East, 689-2271 Pastor: Carl Heidel Worship 9 a.m.; Sunday School 10:15 a.m. Communion -Every Sunday

CALVARY COVENANT - ALPHA

TRINITY EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN OSCEOLA

Pastor Dave Guertin 7686 Lofty Pines Drive, Siren, 715-349-5601 Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m.

300 Seminole Ave. (CTH M) Mark Kock, Pastor, 715-294-2828 Sunday Worship at 8 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Sunday School (ages 4 thru 12th grade), Fellowship, Adult Bible Class at 9:15 a.m.

WEST DENMARK LUTHERAN

Pastors Mike & Linda Rozumalski 1 mi. west of Luck on N, 2478 170th St., Luck Worship - 9:30 a.m.; Fellowship after service.

WEST IMMANUEL LUTHERAN

1/2 mi. W. of Hwy. 35 on U, 715-866-8281, Pastor Ray Reinholtzen, Douglas Olson and Roger Kampstra Services begin at 9:30 a.m. Communion 1st & 3rd Sun.

ZION LUTHERAN - BONE LAKE (AALC)

Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt - 715-653-2630 5 mi. E. of Frederic on W, 2 mi. south on I; Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st Sunday

Pastor Scott Sagel, 715-689-2541 Sun. Schl. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Wor. 10:30 p.m.; Elevator provided, welcome

SIREN COVENANT

UNITED COVENANT - CLEAR LAKE

Pastor Gary Tonn Praise Time 8 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Sunday School 9:20 a.m. CATHOLIC

CATHOLIC

ASSUMPTION OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-247-3310 255 St. Hwy. 35, East Farmington Mass Friday 9 a.m.; Sacrament of Penance Sat. 3:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF ST. JOSEPH

Pastor - Father Daniel Bodin 490 Bench St., Taylors Falls, 651-465-7345 Sat. Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Sun. 7:30 & 10:30 a.m. Tues. - Thurs. 7:30 a.m.

OUR LADY OF PERPETUAL HELP

Danbury - 7586 St. Rd. 77, 866-7321 Pastor - Father Michael J. Tupa Mass - Wed. 5 p.m. (Summer), Fri. 9 a.m. (Sept.-May). Reconciliation as per bulletin & by appt.

OUR LADY OF THE LAKES

Pastor Tim Faust Worship - 11 a.m.; Sun. School - 10 a.m. Holy Communion - 1st & 3rd Sunday

Balsam Lake - Rev. John A. Drummy, Pastor - 405-2253 Mass: Sat. eves. 6 p.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m.; Tues. 5:30 p.m.; Fri. 9 a.m. Sacrament of Reconciliation 7:30 a.m. Sun. or by appt.

ZION LUTHERAN - TRADE LAKE

SACRED HEARTS OF JESUS & MARY

ZION LUTHERAN - MARKVILLE

Pastor David Almlie, 715-327-8384, 715-327-8090 Fellowship - 10:30 a.m. Sunday School - 9:45 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m. Communion - 1st & 2nd Sundays

Pastor Father Michael J. Tupa CTHs A & H - 715-866-7321 Crescent Lake Voyager Village area. Mass Sun. 8:15 a.m., Thurs. 11:30 a.m. Reconciliation as per bulletin and by appt.

Pastor Doug McConnell Youth Pastor Chris Radtke At Grantsburg High School, 715-463-5794 Sun. Serv. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m.

TRADE LAKE BAPTIST

Pastor Andy McDaniel, 715-327-8402 Sun. Schl. - 9:15 a.m.; Wor. Serv. - 10:15 a.m.; Wed. 6:30 p.m. Bible Study; Nursery provided.; www.tradelakebaptistchurch.org

CHURCH OF CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST CHURCH OF CHRIST - WEBSTER

Minister Garret Derouin, 866-7157 Musky & Birch St., Avail. in office 9 a.m. noon, Tues.-Fri.; Sun. Bible Study 9:30 a.m. Worship 10:30 a.m.

WESLEYAN

WESLEYAN WOODLAND WESLEYAN

Dairyland - Rev. Jack Martiny 715-244-3649 Sunday School - 10 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

FULL GOSPEL

HOPE FELLOWSHIP OF SOMERSET

SIREN UNITED METHODIST

TRINITY LUTHERAN - ELCA

LIVING HOPE CHURCH

OSCEOLA COMMUNITY CHURCH

Pastor Dale VanDeusen, 715-488-2296 or 715-488-2653 20296 Hwy. 87, Grantsburg Morn. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:45 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services

140 Madison St. South, St. Croix Falls Pastor Mark K. Schoen Sun. Service - 9 a.m.; Sun.School - 10:30 a.m.

Pastor Arveda “Freddie” Kirk, 327-4436 Early Wor. 8:30 a.m.; Sun. Wor. 10 a.m. Souper service Wed. 5:15 p.m.

716 S. Robert St., Grantsburg, 715-463-5699 Sr. Pastor Brad Moore David Ahlquist, Assoc. Pastor Sun. Wor. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m.

Pastor Dan Slaikeu 4 mi. SE of Grantsburg on Williams Rd. Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Wor. 10:30 a.m.

EVANGELICAL

SHEPHERD OF THE VALLEY LUTHERAN (Missouri Synod)

GRACE BAPTIST - GRANTSBURG

Pastor Don Wiltshire, 715-640-6400 Centuria - Phone 715-646-2172 Sunday Service: 10 a.m.

ST. LUKE UNITED - FREDERIC

Rev. Mike Weaver Sunday Worship Service - 10 a.m. Sun. School is at 9 a.m., Nursery available

Pastor Kevin Millen Associate Pastor Jim Carmon Sunday School - (all ages) - 9:30 a.m. Church Serv. - 10:45 a.m.

CENTURIA ASSEMBLY OF GOD

Pastor Andrew Bollant Sun. Schl. - 9:15 a.m.; Morn. Serv. - 10:15 a.m.; Supervised Nursery; Wed. Evening - Worship Serv. 6:30 p.m.

1614 CTH, North Luck; Mark E. Hall, Pastor Office Phone 472-2605 Dial-A-Devotion 472-2345 Sun. Worship - 9 a.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - FALUN

FULL GOSPEL WOOD RIVER CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP

ST. CROIX FALLS UNITED METHODIST

YELLOW LAKE LUTHERAN

IMMANUEL LUTHERAN - FREDERIC

Rev. Bruce Brooks - 715-483-3550 719 Nevada St. , (between Simonson & Tower Roads) , St. Croix Falls Worship - 10 a.m. (Nursery provided) Sun. Schl. - Child.- 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - Adults - 8:45 a.m.; Communion 1st Sunday

ST. PETER’S LUTHERAN - LUCK

GEORGETOWN LUTHERAN - ELCA

Phone 327-4340, 327-8384, 327-8090 Pastor David Almlie Worship 9:15 a.m.; Sun. School 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st & 2nd Sundays

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN

ST. DOMINIC - FREDERIC & IMMACULATE CONCEPTION - GRANTSBURG CATHOLIC MASS SCHED.

350 Michigan Ave., Centuria Sun. Wor. - 10:45 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10 a.m.

ST. JOHN’S EV. LUTHERAN (Wis. Synod)

Rev. Rexford D. Brandt 447 180th St., Osceola, 715-294-2936 Sun. Wor. 8:00 & 10:30 a.m.; Sun. School 9:15 a.m.; Communion 1st & 3rd Sunday of the month

GRACE LUTHERAN - WEST SWEDEN

PRESBYTERIAN

oumc@centurytel.net 306 River Street, Osceola, 715-755-2275 Pastor Alan J. Hagstrom, 715-294-3195 Adult Class - 9 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 10 a.m. Sunday Worship - 10 a.m.; Holy Communion 1st Sunday

ELCA - 501 Hwy. 35, 646-2357 Mel Rau, Pastor Sunday Worship & Holy Communion - 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School - 10:40 a.m. Rt. 1, Balsam Lake, WI (Fox Creek) Pastor Neal Weltzen; GT Office - 857-5580, Parsonage - 822-3001, TR Office - 822-3001 Wors. Serv. 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m.; Holy Communion - 1st Sun. of each month

PRESBYTERIAN

Pastor Larry Mederich, 715-294-4332 Mtg. @ Osceola Elementary School Sun. Service - 9:45 a.m.

SIREN ASSEMBLY OF GOD

EVANGELICAL

TRADE RIVER EVAN. FREE

APPLE RIVER COMMUNITY (EFCA)

Pastor Bruce Tanner, 715-268-2176 942 U.S. Hwy. 8, Amery Sun. Schl. 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible study 7 p.m.

FREDERIC EVAN. FREE CHURCH

Pastor Greg Lund, 715-327-8767 700 Churchwood Lane; 505 Old CTH W Sun. Schl. - 9 a.m.; Morn. Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services BAPTIST

BAPTIST

EAST BALSAM BAPTIST - BALSAM LK. Pastor David Sollitt 715-857-5411 or 715-268-2651 Wor. Serv. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl.-10:15 a.m.

EUREKA BAPTIST

2393 210th Ave., St. Croix Falls Interim Pastor, 715-483-9464 Sun. Schl. - 10 a.m.; Wor. Serv. - 11 a.m.

FAITH FELLOWSHIP

Hwy. 35 and CTH N., Luck Bill McEachern Pastor, 715-485-3973 Sun. Bible study - 9 a.m.; Sun. Wor. - 10 a.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - AMERY

131 Broadway St., 715-268-2223; www.fbcamery.org Pastor Charlie Butt, Lead Pastor Sun.: 8:30 - 9:45 a.m.; 10 - 11:15 a.m. Sun. Schl. for Pre-K to 5th 10 a.m.; Sun. Schl. for middle schl. 8:30 a.m. at teen center; Sun. Schl. for high schl. 10 a.m. at teen center. Nursery avail. only during second serv.

FIRST BAPTIST - MILLTOWN

Pastor Marlon Mielke, 715-825-3186 Sun. Schl. 9:45 a.m.; Wor. 11 a.m., 7 p.m.

GRACE CHURCH OF OSCEOLA

“The Cure for the Common Church” 722 Seminole Ave., Osceola Pastor Dr. Kent Haralson; 715-294-4222 or 715-755-3454; info@gracechurchosceola.com Sun.: Praise & Worship Serv. 9 am., Adult Bible Study 10:45 a.m., Children’s Sun. Schl. 10:45 a.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - TAYLORS FALLS, MN

231 Bluff Drive, 715-247-2435 Services are Sundays at 10:30 a.m. Call Pastor Darryl Olson at 715-755-3133 for information and directions

CHRISTIAN CENTER

CHRISTIAN CENTER EL SALEM/TWIN FALLS CHRISTIAN CENTER

1751 100th Ave., Dresser Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Morn. Wor. 10:30 a.m. Evening Services Sun. 6 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m.

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN

CHRISTIAN ORTHODOX HOLY TRINITY ORTHODOX

523 1st St., Clayton, 715-948-2493 Fr. Christopher Wojcik, Pastor Sat. Vespers - 5 p.m.; Sun. Liturgy - 9:30 a.m.

HOLY CROSS ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN Meeting at Zion Lutheran Church, 28005 Old Towne Rd., Chisago Lakes, MN Fr. Robert McMeekin, pastor 715-220-5111/hcomm.org Sunday Worship Service 9:30 a.m.

NAZARENE

NAZARENE

CALVARY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 510 S. Vincent, St. Croix Falls Pastor Lori Ward, 715-483-3696 Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:45 a.m. & Wed. 6:30 p.m.

FAITH COM\MUNITY

7535 Peet St., Danbury, 715-656-4010 Reverend R.A. Luebke Adult Bible Service 9 a.m.; Services: Sun. 10 a.m.; Sunday School during church service.

NONDENOMINATIONAL

NONDENOMINATIONAL

CENTERPOINT CHURCH “Come as you are”

Pastor Dick Enerson, www.centerpointstcroix.com 715-294-1833, Meeting at SCF High Schl. Main entrance 740 Maple Drive, St. Croix Falls Sunday Worship 10 - 11:15 a.m.

NEW LIFE COMMUNITY - AMERY Pastor Timothy Barnes Sat. 7 p.m. prayer; Sun. Worship 10 a.m.; Children’s Church to 6th Grade

NEW LIFE CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY

Meets at Dresser Elem. School, Dresser Pastor Michael Brand, 715-417-2468 Sun. Schl. 8:45 a.m.; Adult Class 9 a.m.; Worship Serv. 9:45 a.m.; Nursery available

NORTHERN PINES FRIENDS WORSHIP GROUP

Located across from elemen. school on West St., Pastor, Dr. Kevin Schumann; 651-465-7171 Sun. Morn. - Sun. Schl. for all ages - 9 a.m. Morn. Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided.

715-733-0481 or 715-733-0480 for time of meeting.

FIRST BAPTIST - WEBSTER

1289 160th St. (Hwy. 65), St. Croix Falls 715-483-5378 Pastors Dan and Claudia Denissen Asst. Pastor Ken Janes Sun. School 9 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m.

Church Phone 715-866-4111; Rev. Merrill Olson - Pastor Sun. Schl. - 9:30 a.m.; Wor. - 10:45 a.m (Nursery Provided)

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

RIVER VALLEY CHRISTIAN

church directory

ADVENTIST


MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 25

CHURCH NEWS Strong-willed kids must be given caring, firm discipline

lose consciousness. Anyone who has ever witnessed this full measure of willful defiance has been shocked by its power. One headstrong 3-year-old recently refused to obey a direct command from her mother, saying, “You’re just my mommy, you know!” Another “mere mommy” wrote me that she found herself in a similar confrontation with her 3-year-old son over something that she wanted him to eat. He was so enraged by her insistence that he refused to eat or drink anything for two full days. He became weak and lethargic but steadfastly held his ground. The mother was worried and guilt-ridden, as might be expected. Finally, in desperation, the father looked the child in the eyes and convinced him that he was going to receive a well-deserved spanking if he didn’t eat his dinner. With that maneuver, the contest was over. The toddler surrendered. He began to consume everything he could get his hands on, and virtually emptied the refrigerator. Now tell me, please, why have so few childdevelopment authorities recognized this willful defiance? Why have they written so little about it? My guess is that the acknowledgement of childish imperfection would not fit neatly with the humanistic notion that little people are infused with sunshine and goodness and merely learn the meaning of selfishness and disobedience. To those who hold that rosy view I can only say, “Take another look!”

Q: I want to manage and lead my strong-willed child properly, but I’m afraid I’ll break his spirit and damage him in some way. How can I deal with his misbehavior without hurting his self-concept? DR. DOBSON: I sense that you do not have a clear understanding of the difference between breaking the spirit and shaping the will of a child. The human spirit, as I have defined it, relates to the self-esteem or the personal worth that a child feels. As such, it is exceedingly fragile at all ages and must be handled with care. You as a parent correctly assume that you can damage your child’s spirit quite easily – by ridicule, disrespect, threats to withdraw love, and by verbal rejection. Anything that depreciates his self-worth can be costly to his spirit. However, while the spirit is brittle and must be treated gently, the will is made of steel. It is one of the few intellectual components that arrives full strength at the moment of birth. In a past issue of Psychology Today, this heading described the research findings from a study of infancy: “A baby knows who he is before he has language to tell us so. He reaches deliberately for control of his environment, especially his parents.” This scientific disclosure would be no surprise to the parents of a strong-willed infant. They have walked the floor with him in the wee small hours, listening to this tiny dictator as he made his wants and wishes abundantly clear. Later, some defiant toddlers can become so angry that they are capable of holding their breath until they

Dr. James

Dobson Focus on the Family

Returning to your question, your objective as a parent is to shape the will of your child while leaving his spirit intact. ••• Q: What would you and your wife do if the resources permitted her to stay at home after the kids were in school? DR. DOBSON: I don’t have to speculate about the answer to that question. Shirley and I did have that option (although we sold and “ate” a Volkswagen initially to make it possible), and she stayed at home as a full-time mom. Neither she nor I have ever regretted that decision. Now that our kids are grown, we would not trade the time we invested in them for anything on earth. Looking back today, we feel it was especially important for Shirley to be at home during our kids’ teen years. ••• Dr. Dobson is founder and chairman emeritus of the nonprofit organization Focus on the Family, Colorado Springs, Colo. 80995 (www.family.org). Questions and answers are excerpted from “Complete Marriage and Family Home Reference Guide” and “Bringing Up Boys,” both published by Tyndale House. COPYRIGHT 2009 JAMES DOBSON INC., DISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE 1130 Walnut St., Kansas City, Mo. 64106; 816-581-7500.

Brought to you by:

Siren/Lewis United Methodist Churches Siren, Wis.

Lewis, Wis.

Webster After 5 dinner meeting is Monday WEBSTER - The Webster/Siren Area Christian Women’s Club, After 5, invites all women to attend a dinner meeting on Monday, May 18, at 6:30 p.m. This meeting will be held in the fellowship hall of First Baptist Church, located on Hwy. 35 in Webster. With the theme Gems from the Heart, there will be a special feature by Lee Ann Steffens, from Pewaukee who will also be the special speaker. Steffens will be

doing a feature on making jewelry. She is a lapidary who cuts and polishes stones and turns them into jewelry. Her message will be: “Finding Fulfillment for a Starving Heart.” Steffens and her husband have two teenagers. She is a diversified businesswoman who overcame an eating disorder.

” “

Carolyn Marquardt and Sheila will provide special music for this occasion. Tickets will be sold at the door, but reservations are needed - please call Jane at 715-566-0081 or Carol at 715349-7006. Invite a friend. After 5 is affiliated with Stonecroft Ministries. - with submitted information

• •

Churches 5/09

’ ’ •


PAGE 26 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 13, 2009

WANTED TO BUY OR TRADE

440497 9Ltfc 51atfc

AT THE LODGE 24226 1st Ave. No. Siren, WI Local Movie Line 715-349-8888 Timbers1@starwire.net SHOW TIMES FOR FRI., MAY 15 THRU WED., MAY 20

ANGELS & DEMONS

WANT ADS FREDERIC 3-BR HOUSE FOR RENT. Attached 2-car garage. No pets. $700, 715405-2580. 37-40Lp CHOICE OF TWO LUXURY APTS. Milltown, 2 BRs, W/WD. No pets, $595, 651283-4257. 37-40Lp

Dr. Daniel C. Satterlund Hours: Tues., Thurs., Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Phone (715) 472-2121

Robert L. Nelson New York Life Insurance Company Box 313 Luck, Wis. 54853 Phone

715-472-2502

Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home Webster, Wisconsin

“Distinctive Funeral Service”

Rated PG-13, 127 Minutes. Fri. - Sun.: 1:00, 3:30, 6:00 & 8:35 p.m. Mon. - Wed.: 5:30 & 8:15 p.m.

(PG-13)

Sorry, no passes or reduced admission tickets.

X-MEN ORIGINS: WOLVERINE GHOSTS OF GIRLFRIENDS PAST Rated PG-13, 100 Minutes. Fri. - Sun.: 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Mon. - Wed.: 5:00, 7:00 & 9:00 p.m.

All shows and show times before 6 p.m. $5.00. Shows and show times subject to change. Visit us on our Web site: www.timberstheatres.com

Phone 715-268-2004

Eye health exams, glaucoma checks, foreign body removal, full line of street wear, safety and sport wear, contact lenses

STAR TREK

OPTOMETRIST 119 Arlington Drive Amery, Wis.

304 1st St. So., Luck, Wis.

NEW YORK LIFE

2179 E. Hwy. 8 Between Tractor Supply and Wal-Mart www.evergreen-entertainment.com

May 15 - May 21

Dr. T.L. Christopherson

Family Eye Clinic

All Stadium/Digital 715-483-1471

SHOWS AND SHOW TIMES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL SEATS $6.50 UNTIL 6 P.M.

Rated PG-13, 107 Minutes. Fri. - Sun.: 1:15, 3:45, 6:20 & 8:45 p.m. Mon. - Wed.: 5:30 & 8:00 p.m.

Follow the Leader

Cinema 8 SHOWS AND SHOW TIMES

Rated PG-13, 138 Minutes. Fri. - Sun.: 1:00, 3:35, 6:10 & 8:45 p.m. Mon. - Wed.: 5:00 & 8:00 p.m.

485503

WE HAVE PARTS for tractors, combines, machinery, hay equipment and more. Used, new, rebuilt, aftermarket. Downing Tractor Parts, Downing, Wis., 877-5301010. www. asapagparts. com 32Ltfc GUITAR LESSONS (beginner and intermediate) Start in May, learn to play songs by the end of summer (practice required). Also piano and professional voice lessons available from June through August. $14 per lesson (30 minutes). St. Croix Falls. Call guitar: 715-220-2781, and piano/voice 715-220-2782. 36-38Lp

• Fresh Flowers & Plants • Gifts • Complete Weddings • Flowers • Tuxedo Rental • Invitations • Linen Rental • Spring Garden Center “The Professional Florist with the Personal Touch”

Daily: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. AUSTIN LAKE GREENHOUSE & FLOWER SHOP • WEDDING BOUQUETS • FUNERAL DESIGNS • CUT FLOWERS • GIFTS • BALLOONS • BEDDING PLANTS • POTTED PLANTS • TUXEDO RENTAL BY SAVVI • ANTLER KING PRODUCTS Hwy. 35 & “FF,” Webster Flowers Phoned Anywhere

Call 715-866-7261

• Commercial Printing • Office Supplies • Daily UPS Pickup • Fax & Copy Service

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HAYWARD LAKESHORE LOT ONLY $69,950! 5.3 wooded acres with 215’ frontage on 586 acre Callahan Lake. Excellent musky and bass fishing! Incredible value! www.NaterraLand. com/Spooner. 1-800-5481074 (CNOW) OSCEOLA LAKE LOT $59,950! Less than an hour from the Twin Cities! 1.2 acres on peaceful 228 acre Horse Lake. Last lot available! www.NaterraLand. com/Spooner 1-800-5481074 (CNOW)

308 Wis. Ave. S Frederic, Wis.

www.theleader.net

LAND FOR SALE

The Minnesota chapter of CONCERNED UNITED BIRTHPARENTS (CUB) will hold the June support meeting at Wild Wind Farm Equestrian Center, Grantsburg, Wis. All members of the adoption triad (birthparents, adopted adults, etc.) are welcome to attend the support group on Sunday, June 7, 2009. Attendance is free of charge. For more information, please call: 715-689-2295. 485653 38Lp Registration required by June 1, 2009.

Fri.: 4:30, 7:00, 9:30; Sat. - Sun.: 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30; Mon. - Thur.: 7:00, 9:30 (G) Fri.: 5:05, 7:05, 9:05; Sat. - Sun.: 2:30, 5:05, 7:05, 9:05; Mon. - Thur.: 7:05, 9:05 (PG-13) Fri.: 5:20, 7:20, 9:20; Sat. - Sun.: 2:20, 5:20, 7:20, 9:20; Mon. - Thur.: 7:20, 9:20 (PG-13)

Sorry, no passes or reduced admission tickets. Fri.: 4:45, 7:05, 9:25; Sat. - Sun.: 2:05, 4:45, 7:05, 9:25; Mon. - Thur.: 7:05, 9:25

(PG-13) Fri.: 5:20, 7:20, 9:20; Sat. - Sun.: 2:20, 5:20, 7:20, 9:20; Mon. - Thur.: 7:20, 9:20

(PG-13) Fri.: 5:10, 7:10, 9:10; Sat. - Sun.: 2:10, 5:10, 7:10, 9:10; Mon. - Thur.: 7:10, 9:10 (PG-13) Fri.: 5:15, 7:15, 9:15; Sat. - Sun.: 2:15, 5:15, 7:15, 9:15; Mon. - Thur.: 7:15, 9:15 (PG-13) Fri.: 4:45, 7:00, 9:15; Sat. - Sun.: 2:15, 4:45 7:00, 9:15; Mon. - Thur.: 7:00. 9:15

• Pancake Breakfast for Camperships (Freewill Offering) (PG-13)

All funds raised will go to the Campership Fund. We offer

Camperships for all programs. Luther Point’s policy is that no one is turned away regardless of their ability to pay.

Sorry, no passes or reduced admission tickets. Thur.: 7:10, 9:25

• “Break in the Lake”

Show how brave you are! Jump in the cold waters of Big Wood Lake. Get a free “Break in the Lake” T-shirt!

GRADUATION OPEN HOUSE for Brent Crandell & Stephanie Tido Saturday, June 13 1 - 4 p.m. at Frederic Golf Course

• Camp Tours, Campfire and Sing-a-long

Come get a taste of camp! Wondering if you want to come or what it will be like? Now is the time to get all your questions answered and see why so many people love to come to Luther Point!

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HELP WANTED MISCELLANEOUS

Subscribe online!

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485611

DONATE VEHICLE Receive $1,000 grocery coupon. Noah’s Arc Support NO KILL Shelters, Research To Advance Veterinary Treatments. Free Towing, Tax Deductible, Non-Runners Accepted 1866-912-GIVE. (CNOW)

HELP WANTED TRUCK DRIVER

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AUTOMOBILE DONATION

Since 1933 Inter-County Leader www.the-leader.net

LOOKING FOR OLD fireworks and firecracker packs, bricks, and bundles. Plus other firework related items. Paying cash. Will pick up. Please call 507-458-5204. (CNOW)

• Register for Summer Camp

If you register and pay a deposit at the Kickoff, you will get a $15 discount for a full week of youth camp. GO TO LUTHERPOINT.ORG FOR MORE INFORMATION

Sponsored in part by Thrivent Financial for Lutherans matching grants.

Let’s Thrive.®

See us for all your printing needs.

• Frederic, 715-327-4236 • Siren, 715-349-2560

• Shell Lake, 715-468-2314 • St. Croix Falls 715-483-9008

Visit The Leader’s Web Site:

www.the-leader.net

22854A N1-07

200700115 12/08

485502 38L


MAY 13, 2009 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 27

Students of the Week GRANTSBURG

FREDERIC

Alexis Plunkett has been chosen Frederic Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in sixth grade and the daughter of Kevin and Tanya Plunkett. Alexis is a responsible student and always strives to do her personal best. Science is her favorite subject. Alexis enjoys listening to music and spending time with her dog. Her plans after high school are to attend college.

Matthew Tietz has been chosen Frederic Middle School’s student of the week. He is in eighth grade and the son of Joe and Donna Tietz. Matthew is easygoing, has a pleasant personality and accepts directions and authority readily. He likes to work on the farm and enjoys being outside and reading. Matthew is involved in football. His future plans are to become a police officer.

Peter Draxler has been chosen Frederic High School’s student of the week. He is a senior and the son of Ray and Colleen Draxler. Peter is a member of the National Honor Society and MVP in band senior year. He is polite, respectful, likes to learn and is a good school citizen. Peter is involved in football, basketball and baseball. He enjoys sports, reading and video games. He plans to attend Winona State University.

Danielle Erickson has been chosen Grantsburg Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in third grade and the daughter of Chris and Brian Erickson. Danielle is a wonderful girl and wonderful student. She is very kind, hardworking and always quick to help anyone who needs it. Danielle enjoys working hard, reading, art, doing math and being with friends at school.She enjoys dogs and horses, spending time with family and playing outside.

Coty Melin has been chosen Luck Middle School’s student of the week. He is in eighth grade and the son of Tammy Melin. Coty has demonstrated the characteristics of an excellent student, both academically and behaviorally. He shows respect and integrity and is willing to contribute constructively in class discussions. Coty is involved in basketball, baseball, football and track. He enjoys riding bike, swimming and basketball.

Ashley Overby has been chosen Luck High School’s student of the week. She is a senior and the daughter of Heidi Skow and Steve Overby. Ashley is a very good student who is a hard worker who takes the time and effort to do the best in all her classes. She is involved in Forensics, solo/ensemble, physics club, volleyball, is president of FCCLA and works at the Milltown Drive Inn. Ashley enjoys hanging out with friends. She plans to attend UW-Oshkosh to become a chiropractor.

Cady Costello has been chosen St. Croix Falls Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in first grade and the daughter of John and Dawn Costello. Cady has a younger brother and three older sisters. Recess and phy ed are her favorite things at school. Cady enjoys riding her bike and playing on her swing set. She has a cat, dog and really likes rabbits. Cady collects pretty rocks, especially white and orange ones.

Jacqueline Manoppo has been chosen St. Croix Falls Middle School’s student of the week. She is in eighth grade and the daughter of Paul and Jackie Manoppo. Jacqueline is a perfect example of what hard work can produce. She is a kind and fun kid to have in class. Jacqueline has a brother. Her hobbies are art, reading, listening to music and hanging out with friends. Her favorite subject is art because she is creative.

Marissa Campeau has been chosen St. Croix Falls High School’s student of the week. She is a junior. Marissa loves to golf and watch movies. She is involved in the basketball and golf programs at school.

WEBSTER

SIREN

Mandy Close has been chosen Siren Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in third grade and the daughter of Dave and April Close. Time and time again, Mandy goes out of her way to help other students. She is hardworking, kind and well liked by her peers. Mandy is involved in 4-H and loves horses.

Tiffany Meyer has been chosen Grantsburg High School’s student of the week. She is a sophomore and the daughter of Mike and Sheila Meyer. Tiffany works extremely hard in class and is also involved in extracurricular activities. She is kind and helpful to others. Tiffany is involved in hockey, volleyball and fast pitch. She enjoys sports, being on the lake fishing, snowboarding and being with friends. She would like to play hockey in college.

ST. CROIX FALLS

LUCK

Grace Jensen has been chosen Luck Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in kindergarten and the daughter of Jeremy and Toni Jensen. Library and gym are Grace’s favorite classes in school. She enjoys reading and writing and is a friend to everyone.

Stephanie Anderson has been chosen Grantsburg Middle School’s student of the week. She is in eighth grade and the daughter of Daryl and Tammy Anderson. Stephanie is an extremely conscientious student who excels in academics. She holds herself to very high standards and achieves them. She is involved in choir and swing choir. Stephanie loves singing, drawing, photography and is very active in her church.

Jessica Talbert has been chosen Siren Middle School’s student of the week. She is in eighth grade and the daughter of Janet Anderson and Elmer Talbert. Jessica is a very friendly and kind person who is easy to get along with. She likes music and doing things with her friends. Recently, Jessica attended a young authors conference where she continued to pursue her joy of writing. She has numerous pets.

Jackie Duncan has been chosen Siren High School’s student of the week. She is a junior and the granddaughter of Bennie and Tammy Rogers. Jackie has an outstanding work ethic and high level of academic achievement. She enjoys spending time with her daughter, Brianna, participating in powwows and going to Big Drum. She hopes to someday go to college and become a nurse.

Mia Madsen has been chosen Webster Elementary School’s student of the week. She is the daughter of Michael Madsen and Mistiy Matrious. She is a Tiny Tiger in 4-year-old kindergarten. Mia always has a smile on her face, and she loves school. Mia is a good worker and a great listener. Her favorite place to play in her classroom i s in the house.

Emily Curtis has been chosen Webster Middle School’s student of the week. She is in fifth grade and the daughter of Tracey Phernetton and Tim Buchholz. Emily has improved so much in school with homework and grades. She is someone who is always smiling, determined and has a very positive attitude. She is respectful and polite. Emily helps others and cares for their feelings.

Judson Mosher has been chosen Webster High School’s student of the week. He is a junior and the son of Jonathan and Linda Mosher. Jud was involved in the school play, “Lion King,” and did a great job playing the role of Simba. He has a great, outgoing personality. Jud is involved in SIGN, basketball, golf, band and plays drums for church. Jud is going to state music for his solo and ensemble pieces. He enjoys fishing, snowboarding and hanging with friends.

UNITY

Supporting our area students and their accomplishments. INTER-COUNTY

Serving Northwest Wisconsin

If You Would Like To Be A Sponsor Of

STUDENT OF THE WEEK Please Call 715-327-4236

Riley Peltz-Whipple has been chosen Unity Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in fourth grade and the daughter of Christopher Peltz and Rachel Foster. Riley radiates positive enthusiasm and shows great interest in learning. She has good speaking skills and shows leadership qualities with involvement in many activities. Riley is a member of the Girl Scouts, enjoys reading, writing and traveling.

Lily Lenk has been chosen Unity Middle School’s student of the week. She is in seventh grade and the daughter of Kevin and Holly Lenk. Lily is a hard worker and shows kindness to others. She has a positive attitude and a good sense of humor. Lily has many gifts that will serve her well.

Naomi Williamson has been chosen Unity High School’s student of the week. She is a sophomore and the daughter of Brad and Denise Williamson. Naomi is willing to go above and beyond. She is involved in choir, band, FFA, Girl Scouts and is the manager of the track team. Naomi enjoys hunting, fishing, volleyball and any outdoor activities. Her future plans include going to college to become a nurse.


PAGE 28 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 13, 2009

MAY

THURSDAY/14 Amery

• Trip to Minnesota Arboretum, sponsored by senior citizens center, 715-268-6605.

Frederic

• 500 cards at the senior center, 6:30 p.m.

Luck

Coming events

• Dinner meeting of the National Active & Retired Federal Employees at Hog Wild BBQ, noon, 715-327-8658.

• American Legion & Auxiliary will meet at the Legion Hall, 7 p.m.

Luck

• DBS meeting at the DBS/Lions Hall, 5:30 p.m.

Siren

• Intro to Home Funerals class at the high school, 5:30-7:30 p.m.

Webster

• Christian women’s club, After 5, dinner meeting at First Baptist Church, 6:30 p.m., 715566-0081 or 715-349-7006.

TUESDAY/19

St. Croix Falls

Clam Falls

• Exercise at the senior center, 10-11 a.m. • 500 cards at the senior center, 6:30 p.m.

• Coffee hour at Clam Falls Lutheran Church, 9 a.m. Goodies served. Everyone welcome.

Stillwater, Minn.

Frederic

• Annual spring membership meeting of the St. Croix River Association at the Grand Banquet Center in Stillwater, 6 p.m., 651-260-6260.

• Polk County United Aging Group Meeting at the Golden Oaks Apartments, 1:30-3:30 p.m. • In Capable Hands jugglers at the elementary school, 12:45 p.m.

FRI. & SAT./15 & 16

Grantsburg

Balsam Lake

• Christian women’s club meeting at the senior center, 9 a.m., 715-463-5953.

Fox Creek

• Lioness Club will have their regular monthly meeting at the senior center, 6:30 p.m. • Monthly meeting and May birthdays at the senior center. All seniors welcome, 9:30 a.m., 715-349-7810.

• Breast cancer 3-day garage sale, east from the tank. Fri. 8 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

Siren

• Garage/bake sale at Georgetown Lutheran Church, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Webb Lake

• Community club rummage sale at the community hall, 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m.

St. Croix Falls

Webster

• Exercise at the senior center, 10-11 a.m. • 500 cards and Dominos at the senior center, 12:30 p.m.

• Fundraiser rummage & bake sale sponsored by the American Cancer Society Relay For Life at the Orange School, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

FRI.-SUN./15-17 Cushing

• Co-ed slow-pitch softball tourney, 715-3274114, 715-554-7654.

FRIDAY/15 • Pokeno at the senior center, 1 p.m.

Luck

• Free public showing of the movie “Last Chance Harvey,” rated PG-13, at the public library, 6:30 p.m.

Siren

• National Drug Court Month breakfast and video at the government center, 7:30 a.m.

St. Croix Falls

• Bridge at the senior center, 10 a.m. • Bingo at the senior center, 1 p.m.

SAT. & SUN./16 & 17 Grantsburg

• Wildlife Experience Weekend at the Crex Meadows Wildlife Education Center. Sat. 5 p.m.-after dark, Sun. 4-10 p.m., 715-463-2739, information@crexmeadows.org.

SATURDAY/16 Amery

• Habitat for Humanity groundbreaking on Minneapolis Avenue, 10 a.m. • Vendors market at Balsam Lutheran Church, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. • Free pancake breakfast and fishing workshop, at the East Balsam Lake Baptist Church, breakfast 7:30-9 a.m., fishing seminar 9 a.m.noon. • Youth .22 shoot at the rifle range. Sign-up starts at 10:30 a.m. Shooting starts at noon, 715-857-5873, 715-554-0878. •Knights of Columbus will hold a Blue Mass at Our Lady of the Lakes Catholic Church, 6 p.m.

WEDNESDAY/20 Balsam Lake

• Book club at the library, 3 p.m.

Frederic

• Pokeno at the senior center, 1 p.m.

Danbury

Frederic

Balsam Lake

This plump fellow is a white-throated sparrow. He flew into a window, and while pausing to get his bearings, allowed a nice closeup photo to be taken. — Photo by Raelynn Hunter

• Orientation of Forts Folle Avoine volunteers & recognition of the Volunteer of the Year at Forts Folle Avoine, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. • Danbury Fire & Lions Mud Bog downtown, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., 715-656-3600.

Dresser

• 10th-annual yard and garden sale at Bethesda Lutheran Church, 8 a.m.-1 p.m.

Spooner

THURSDAY/21

Star Prairie

• 500 cards at the senior center, 6:30 p.m. • Lioness Club to meet, Skol Haus, 5:30 p.m. for supper and 7 p.m., Sunrise Apartments community room for meeting, 715-327-4271.

• The First United Pentecostal Church will hold its 6th-annual ham dinner from 4:30-6:30 p.m., 715-635-9123 or 715-736-0485. • Game night at the Cedar Lake Community Center, 7 p.m.

St. Croix Falls

Frederic

Luck

• American Legion & Auxiliary meeting at the village hall, 7 p.m.

• Food and fellowship, at noon, cards, afternoon coffee and refreshments at the senior center. • Ruby’s Pantry at the bus garage, doors open 7:30 a.m., 715-327-4143.

• Bird walk at Interstate Park. Meet at the Pines Group Camp, 7-9 a.m., 715-483-3747. • Spring flower hike along St. Croix River. Sets out from Lions Park, 1 p.m., 715-472-2248. • Spaghetti fundraiser to benefit St. Croix Falls Autumn Fest at the senior center, 4-8 p.m.

Grantsburg

Turtle Lake

• General meeting (potluck) at the senior center, 12:30 p.m. • 500 cards at the senior center, 6:30 p.m.

Webster

FRI. & SAT./22 & 23

Frederic

• 60th-anniversary kickoff and pancake breakfast at Luther Point, 8 a.m., LUTHERPOINT.ORG. • Crex by Bike Interpretive Tour, 8:30 a.m.noon; Wildfower Expedition at Crex, 10 a.m., 715-463-2739, information@crexmeadows.org.

Laketown

• Laketown Lutheran rummage & bake sale, 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m.

Luck

• Men’s breakfast at the senior center, 9 a.m., 715-472-8285. • Village listening session at the village hall, 10-11:30 a.m.

Siren

• The Legion Auxiliary will be selling poppies all over town. • Frokast, a Scandinavian breakfast, at Siren Methodist Church, 8 a.m., and bake sale, 8 a.m.-1 p.m.

• Spring Market Day at the village park, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., 715-986-2241. • Annual walleye tournament on Big Yellow Lake, 7 a.m.-3 p.m., 715-866-7107.

SUNDAY/17 St. Croix Falls

St. Croix Falls

• Exercise at the senior center, 10-11 a.m. • Blood pressures at the senior center, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Danbury

• Interfaith Caregivers 3rd-annual freewill offering sale, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Hayden Lake Road, 715-866-4970.

FRI.-MON./22-25

• Wildflower walk at Interstate Park. Meet at the Ice Age Center, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 3:30-5 p.m., 715-483-3747. • Pancake breakfast at the Lone Maple Community Club, 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m. • Sunday breakfast at the American Legion Post 143, 8 a.m.-noon.

• Garden and art sale at Café Wren, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

MONDAY/18

• South Fork Sporting Club smelt feed, starts at 5 p.m.

Centuria

• Adolph Timm American Legion Post 346 will meet at 6:30 p.m. to do crosses. Regular meeting 7 p.m.

Frederic

Luck

FRIDAY/22 Clam Falls Frederic

• Pokeno at the senior center, 1 p.m.

St. Croix Falls

• Bridge at the senior center, 10 a.m.

• Spades at the senior center, 1 p.m.

McKeown chosen to board of directors WEBSTER – Joanie McKeown, Webster, has been chosen for a three-year term as secretary and officer of the National Conference for Catechetical Leadership Board of Directors. McKeown was named to this position April 28 during the board’s annual conference and election of officers. The NCCL serves to educate and provide an avenue for communication among Catholics who serve as leaders of religious-education programs at both the parish and diocesan levels. Its 2,500 current members come from all over the United States. Since 1988, McKeown has served as administrative assistant, pastoral minister, pastoral associate and director of faith formation for all ages in clustered parishes in the Diocese of Superior. As a master catechist, she has mentored and served as a consultant for other parish catechetical leaders. She served as secretary for two terms in her local Parish Catechetical Leadership organization and has been a member since 1993. She served as facilitator/president for two terms and as committee chair or secretary for various committees over the past 16 years. She assisted the province PCL organization in

writing and updating the book, “Employing Parish Catechetical Leaders.” McKeown has represented the PCLs of her province on the NCCL Representative Council since 2003, serving as secretary of the annual conference planning committee, chair of the membership committee and liaison to the bylaws committee as they drafted and presented bylaw changes in 2008. McKeown earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in math and secondary school education from St. Catherine University, a Master of Arts degree in curriculum and instruction from the University of Thomas and a Master of Arts degree in pastoral ministry from St. Mary’s University, Winona, Minn. She was presented with the Thomas P. Toohey Award for Outstanding Leadership in Catechetical Ministry in 2003 by the Superior Mutual Ministry Team in the Diocese of Superior and the Stephen C. Gilmour Award for Outstanding Leadership in Catechetical Ministry in 2004 by the Wisconsin Directors of Religious Education Federation. – submitted

Joanie McKeown, Webster, has been chosen for a threeyear term as secretary and officer of the National Conference for Catechetical Leadership Board of Directors. – Photo submitted


Page 2 - Wednesday, May 13, 2009

Graduation Issue

Frederic Class of 2009

Megan Anderson

Parents: Clifford and Junellyn Anderson Plans after graduation: Attend the College of St. Scholastica to become an occupational therapist.

Chelsey Chute

Parents: Michelle and Robert Melin and Vaughn Chute Plans after graduation: Attend Pine City Technical College for the LPN program.

Patrick Eaton

Parents: Bob and Cathy Thompson Plans after graduation: Enlist in the Minnesota National Guard and then attend WITC-Rice Lake for mechanical design.

Benjamin Knauber

Parents: Kevin and Donna Knauber Plans after graduation: Attend UW-BC for engineering.

Rebecca Anderson

Parents: Craig Anderson and Mary Anderson Plans after graduation: Attend Lawrence University, majoring in biochemistry, human anatomy and physiology.

Brent Crandell

Parents: Wayne Crandell and Mark and Anita Baker Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Barron County for two years and then transfer to a fouryear college for engineering.

Cody Gruel

Parents: Ray Gruel and Georgette Gruel Plans after graduation: Work for a paving and asphalt company.

Andrew Kurkowski

Parents: Ray and Kordi Kurkowski Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stout for business administration.

Zachary Anderson

Parents: Dave and Pat Anderson Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stout for either engineering or construction.

Kelly Daeffler

Parents: Bryce and Kim Daeffler Plans after graduation: Attend WITC for early childhood education.

David Harlander

Parents: Brad and Rebecca Harlander Plans after graduation: Attend SCSU.

Rhaya Larson

Parents: Lora and Dan Horsley Plans after graduation: Attend St. Cloud State University and major in accounting.

Kaylyn Ball

Parents: Kris and Ted Ball and Kim Schmid Plans after graduation: Take a year off to save money and then attend culinary school.

Christina Dahling

Parents: Rick and Ann Dahling Plans after graduation: Attend Brown College in Minneapolis for photography then Aveda for massage therapy.

Aaron Hedlund

Parents: Mary and Kurt Hedlund Plans after graduation: Attain a CDL and work for a local company.

Sarah Lexen

Parents: Kathleen and Kyle Lexen Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stout with a multimedia major and a specialization in photography.

Scout BerdalCalabria

Inter-County Leader

Candace Buck

Parents: David and Parents: Gretchen Brenda Buck Calabria and Eric Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stevens Anderson Plans after graduation: Point for a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, acting Enlisted in the Army. major.

Kelsey Dahm

Parents: Judy Shafer and Barry Dahm Plans after graduation: Adult Day Center in Balsam Lake.

Kristopher Hicks

Parents: Kris and Katie Hicks and Dawn and Gary Johnson Plans after graduation: Attend school for some type of law.

Travis Lysdahl

Parents: Karen Cook and Rick Lysdahl Plans after graduation: Enlist in the National Guard.

Peter Draxler

Parents: Ray and Colleen Draxler Plans after graduation: Attend Winona State.

Amy Jones

Parents: James and Chong Ae Jones Plans after graduation: Enlist in the Navy, attend school for pharmacy while in the military.

Amanda McKinney

Parents: David and Sherry McKinney Plans after graduation: Attend WITC for early childhood education.

Inter-County Leader graduation issue • 2009


Inter-County Leader

Bryan Meyer

Parents: John and Cynthia Meyer Plans after graduation: Enlist in the Marine Corps.

Timothy Nelson

Parents: Steven and Stephanie Nelson and Stephanie Coen Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Orianna Tesch

Parents: Dr. Steven and Brenda Tesch Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stout for multimedia design.

Graduation Issue

Wednesday, May 13, 2009 - Page 3

Frederic Class of 2009

Ana Miller

Parents: John and Nora Miller Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stout and major in nursing.

Matthew Norsten

Parents: Paul Norsten and Renee Swartz Plans after graduation: Work.

Stephanie Tido

Parents: Ben and Kelly Tido Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Barron County for generals and then attend a university for a major in predentistry.

Deniz Mirioglu

Host parents: Dr. Brad and Rebecca Harlander Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Bobbi O’Brien

Parents: Lori and Bryan McCann and Bob and Heather O’Brien Plans after graduation: Attend College of St. Scholastica and major in science.

Alexander Tuynman

Parents: Adrian and Angela Tuynman Plans after graduation: Attend WITC for masonry.

Brittany Mortensen

Guardian: Angie Ones and Daniel Mortensen Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Adrianna Otte

Parents: Tim and LuAnn Otte Plans after graduation: Work for a year, then attend college for an animal science major.

Andrew Tyler

Parents: Jenelle and Ralph Britton and Michael Tyler Plans after graduation: Enlisted in the Army.

Christopher Nanez

Parents: Rick and Renee Nanez Plans after graduation: Attend college for psychology and archaelology.

Corrie Pearce

Parents: Dan and Rebecca Pearce Plans after graduation: Attend WITC for medical administrative specialist and medical assistant.

Jordan Warwas

Parents: Robert and Lorraine Warwas Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Benjamin Nelson

Parents: Tom and Ameer Nelson Plans after graduation: Enlisted in the Navy as a damage controlman and then plan on firefighting in Hawaii.

Manuel Silva

Host parents: Rae Lynn and Don Johnson Plans after graduation: Attend college.

Brett Williamson

Parents: Scott and Sonja Williamson Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stout for engineering.

Frederic’s Top Ten

Class Motto: Only as high as we reach

can we grow, only as far as we seek can we go, only as deep as we look can we see, only as much as we dream can we be. Class Flower: Blue-tipped White Rose Class Colors: Royal Blue and Silver

Megan Anderson

Megan Anderson Adrianna Otte Rebecca Anderson Sarah Lexen Bobbi O'Brien Brett Williamson Stephanie Tido Zachary Anderson Amy Jones Kelly Daeffler

Adrianna Otte

Inter-County Leader graduation issue • 2009


Page 4 - Wednesday, May 13, 2009

Graduation Issue

Inter-County Leader

Frederic Class of 2009 CONGRATULATIONS FREDERIC GRADUATES FROM THESE BUSINESSES:

Affordable Quality Anderson Construction Avalon Bass Lake Lumber Bremer Bank Burnett Dairy Co-op Burnett Medical Center Carquest of Frederic Cashco Building Supplies

Chell Trucking Countryside Inn Daeffler Quality Meats Daeffler Trucking Drs. Harlander & Tesch Ed’s Auto Body Fiedler Ford Four Seasons Wood Products Frederic Area Sanitation Frederic Grocery Frederic Nursing & Rehabilitation Community Frederic Country Club Frederic Fuel Company Frederic Stop Frederic Wash House Frontier Trails Riding Stables Great Northern Outdoors

Grindell Law Offices Hair Designs Indianhead Credit Union Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association Dale A. Johnson, CPA Lakeland Communications Gene Johnson Construction Larsen Auto Centers Linda’s Family Child Care Luck Medical Clinic A division of Amery Regional Medical Center

Masonry Builders North Land Ambulance #975 Northwestern Wisconsin Electric Company Northwoods Bakery and Cafe Pioneer Bar

Polk-Burnett Ray’s Firestone Rowe Funeral Home Rural American Bank - Luck Skol Bar State Farm Insurance Corey Arnold St. Croix Chippewa Enterprises St. Croix Regional Medical Center St. Croix Valley Business Clinic Sterling Bank The Medicine Shoppe The Rose Garden Timbers Theatres U.S. Bank Wayne’s Foods Plus

CONGRATULATIONS GRANTSBURG GRADUATES FROM THESE BUSINESSES: Bass Lake Lumber Burnett Dairy Co-op Burnett Medical Center Cashco Building Supplies Countryside Inn Daeffler Quality Meats Daeffler Trucking Ed’s Auto Body Edling Funeral Home

Farmers Independent Telephone Co. Fiedler Ford Gary Nelson Insurance Agency Holiday StationStores Grantsburg Indianhead Credit Union Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association

Larsen Auto Centers Northwestern Wisconsin Electric Company Polk-Burnett State Farm Insurance Corey Arnold St. Croix Chippewa Enterprises St. Croix Regional Medical Center

Timbers Theatres U.S. Bank Wild River Sport Cycle

Inter-County Leader graduation issue • 2009


Inter-County Leader

Ingrid Ames

Parents: Brian and Arlu Ames Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Superior for prevet/sports coaching.

Trent Bonneville

Parents: Patty Bonneville and Tracey Bonneville Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Superior.

Brittany Davison

Parents: Tina Davison Berglund and Bruce Berglund, the late Tyler Davison Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Superior for social work.

Megan Finch

Parents: Jackie Finch and the late Glen Finch Plans after graduation: Attend UW-River Falls for art education.

Graduation Issue

Wednesday, May 13, 2009 - Page 5

Grantsburg Class of 2009

Kaylynn Anderson

Parents: Lane and Deb Anderson Plans after graduation: Attend college for elementary education.

Alycia Bonse

Parents: Russell Bonse, the late Vicki Beidleman, and Mark Beidleman Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Barron County for paralegal.

Jonathan DeRocker

Parents: Scott DeRocker and Dawn DeRocker Plans after graduation: Attend Ridgewater Technical for tool designer/CNC mill operator.

Taylor Finch

Parents: Tracy Finch and Joel Finch Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Superior for elementary education.

Nathan Anderson

Parents: Karl and Becky Anderson Plans after graduation: Attend WITC-Rice Lake for auto body.

Misty Bruzek

Parents: Joanne and Michael McCann Plans after graduation: Work.

Justine Diffee

Parents: Ron and Vicky Diffee Plans after graduation: Attend college.

Connar Goetz

Parents: Vicky and Rob Drohman and Troy and Carla Goetz Plans after graduation: Attend UM-St. Cloud for radiology.

Lydia Benge Briggs

Parents: Steve Briggs and Linda Benge Plans after graduation: Attend Gustavus Adolphus for communications.

Alexander Casler

Parent: Jacquelin Casler Plans after graduation: Attend Austin, Texas Community College for marine biology.

Shawn Downard

Parent: Cassandra Hayes Plans after graduation: Attend Collins College for game design.

Ashley Griffith

Parents: Terry and Taryn Griffith Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Bradley Berner

Parents: Tom and Cheryl Berner Plans after graduation: Attend UM-St. Cloud for natural resource management/game warden.

Benjamin Cole

Parents: Mike and Teri Cole Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Superior.

Bobbie Durand

Parents: Dana and Connie Durand Plans after graduation: Attend Vermilion Community College for taxidermy.

Chelsie Hansen

Parents: Per Hansen and Jennifer Hansen Plans after graduation: Attend college for nursing.

Kevin Berry

Parents: Lloyd and Marcia Berry Plans after graduation: Attend UW-River Falls for physics.

Nicole Davis

Parents: Bev and Dan Dahlberg and Mark Davis Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Madison for biology.

Mitchell Evenson

Parents: Jeff Evenson and Pauline Locke Plans after graduation: Attend UM-Duluth for chemistry.

Steven Hanson

Parents: Mark and Karin Hanson Plans after graduation: Attend Collins College for game design.

Inter-County Leader graduation issue • 2009


Page 6 - Wednesday, May 13, 2009

Graduation Issue

Grantsburg Class of 2009

Gretchen Hedlund

Parents: Paul and Sue Hedlund Plans after graduation: Attend UW-River Falls.

Kirsten Kaiser

Parents: Jim and Dawn Kaiser Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stout.

Lauren Leonard

Parents: Phil and Cynthia Leonard Plans after graduation: Attend UM-Twin Cities for physical therapy/ sports medicine.

Jessica Moyer

Parents: Paul and Audra Moyer Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stevens Point for biology.

Kyle Heinecke

Brittany Hollan

Parents: Mike and Vickie Parent: Val Chapman Heinecke Plans after graduation: Plans after graduation: Work. Attend WITC-Rice Lake for mechanical design.

Sarah Kline

Parents: Jeff and Carol Kline Plans after graduation: Attend Minnesota West Technical College for dental.

Jennifer Lisiecki

Parents: Kathy and Doug Anderson and Robert Lisiecki Plans after graduation: Attend Bethany Lutheran College for graphic design.

Tyler Myers

Parents: Mike and Lucy Myers Plans after graduation: Attend Michigan Tech for biomedical engineering.

David Larsen

Parents: Kevin and Terri Larsen Plans after graduation: Attend International House of Prayer for ministry.

Dylan Longhenry

Parents: Mike and Nancy Longhenry Plans after graduation: Attend Lake Superior College for criminal justice.

Nathanial Nadeau

Parents: Doug and Bonnie Finava Plans after graduation: Work.

Jason Jensen

Parents: Jason and Wanda Jensen Plans after graduation: Attend UW-La Crosse for premed.

Anthony Larson

Parents: Mike Larson and Elisa Efterfield Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Keegan Marek

Parents: Gary and Jeanne Marek Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stout for apparel design and development.

Travis Nelson

Parents: Jim and Lauri Nelson Plans after graduation: Work – farming.

Kayla Johnson

Inter-County Leader

Sean Johnson

Parent: Darlene Johnson Parents: LuAnn and Ted Plans after graduation: Sandstrom, the late Dana Johnson Undecided. Plans after graduation: Attend college for firefighter training.

Benjamin Larson

Parents: Wanda Hinrichs and Steve Larson Plans after graduation: Attend WITC-New Richmond for automated packaging.

Nathan McConnell

Parents: Doug and Suzanne McConnell Plans after graduation: Attend University of Chicago for generals.

Samantha Oman

Parents: Laurie and Jeremy Chell Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Superior for business/accounting.

Thane Larson

Parents: Robin Larson and Terry Larson Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Superior.

Nicole Mothes

Parents: Erma Goodman and the late Robb Mothes Plans after graduation: Attend Pine Tech for nursing.

Cara Peasley

Parents: Cheryl Peasley and Dale Peasley Plans after graduation: Attend Pine Tech for nursing.

Inter-County Leader graduation issue • 2009


Inter-County Leader

Kayla Peterson

Parent: Margo Peterson Plans after graduation: Attend college.

Lauren Stavne

Parents: Paul and Kris Stavne Plans after graduation: Attend Winona State University for nursing.

Graduation Issue

Wednesday, May 13, 2009 - Page 7

Grantsburg Class of 2009

Kathleen Preissing

Parents: John and Peggy Preissing Plans after graduation: Attend John Cabot University in Italy for elementary education.

Nace Sutherland

Parents: Joe and Tina Sutherland Plans after graduation: Attend Pine Tech for mechanic.

Darryl Richter

Parents: Dale Richter and Karen Spafford Plans after graduation: Attend Pine Tech for mechanical engineering.

Erika Syverson

Parents: Paul and Jill Syverson Plans after graduation: Attend WITC-New Richmond for medical administration assistant.

Ricky VanderVelden

Parents: Shelly Simon and Scott VanderVelden Plans after graduation: Work.

Travis Rikkola

Parents: Scott and Heidi Rikkola Plans after graduation: Attend Lake Superior College.

Devin Trantanella

Parent: Toni Trapp Plans after graduation: Attend Le Cordon Bleu for culinary arts.

Jake Ryan

Parents: Marshall and Beth Ryan Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Superior for physical education.

Kaitlin Unbehaun

Parents: Robbyn Bowman and Joseph Unbehaun Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Eau Claire for premed.

Kristin Zastrow

Parents: Kim and Janelle Zastrow Plans after graduation: Attend Carroll University for elementary education/theater and drama.

Abbey Vaksdal

Parents: Janet Vaksdal and Scott Finch and Doug Vaksdal Plans after graduation: Attend UM-St. Cloud for nursing.

Tina Zimmermann

Parents: Bart and Laurie Zimmermann Plans after graduation: Attend Cleveland State University for biological engineering or psychology.

Grantsburg's Honor Students

Class Motto:

"Life brings us tears, smiles and memories. The tears dry, the smiles fade, but the memories last forever." Class Flower: White Rose Class Colors: Black and Purple

Cindie Simon

Parent: Rhonda Benedickt Plans after graduation: Attend WITC-Rice Lake for nursing.

With distinction

Nicole Davis

Tyler Myers

Inter-County Leader graduation issue •

Nicole Davis, Tyler Myers, David Larsen, Jennifer Lisiecki, Jessica Moyer, Justine Diffee, Lydia Benge Briggs, Mitchell Evenson, Nathan McConnell and Tina Zimmermann

Honors

Abbey Vaksdal, Benjamin Cole, Bobbie Durand, Bradley Berner, Brittany Hollan, Connar Goetz, Darryl Richter, Gretchen Hedlund, Jake Ryan, Jonathan DeRocker, Kaitlin Unbehaun, Kathleen Preissing, Kaylynn Anderson, Keegan Marek, Kevin Berry, Kirsten Kaiser, Lauren Leonard, Lauren Stavne, Samantha Oman, Sarah Kline, Thane Larson and Trent Bonneville.


Page 8 - Wednesday, May 13, 2009

Graduation Issue

Inter-County Leader

Luck Class of 2009

Adam Anderson

Parents: Mark and Lisa Anderson Plans after graduation: Attend UW-River Falls for business administration.

Jerod Buck

Maraya Anderson

Parent: Terann Selling Plans after graduation: UW-Barron Attend County for generals, then UW-Stout to become an art teacher.

Brittney Danielson

Parents: LeRoy and Sue Buck Plans after graduation: Work for a year and then attend a tech school.

Parents: Judd and Sherry Danielson Plans after graduation: Attend Professional Hair Design Academy in Eau Claire for cosmetology.

Dylan Fultz

Jeffrey Gackle

Parents: Lori Ostby and Bryan Fultz Plans after graduation: Attend UW-River Falls.

Sierra Hulett

Parents: Jeff and Kim Hulett Plans after graduation: Attend Globe University for vet tech, then transfer to UW-Eau Claire to become a veterinarian.

Parents: Kathy Truitt and Greg Gackle Plans after graduation: Attend WITC-Rice Lake for automotive maintenance tech degree.

Jared Jensen

Parents: Steven Jensen and Joann Jensen Plans after graduation: Continue military service.

Cody Borresen

Parent: Dean Johnson Plans after graduation: Stay home and work on the family farm.

Brittany Douglas

Parents: Brent and Lori Hostrup and Barry Seehafer Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Rock County for generals.

Jamison Gross

Parents: Bill and Vicki Gross Plans after graduation: Attend Marian University to play baseball and get a degree in secondary education or business.

Grace Jenson

Parents: Mary Jenson and Tony Jenson Plans after graduation: Attend Stevens Point to major in the physician’s assistant with a minor in dietary studies.

April Branville

Parents: Mike and Barb Branville Plans after graduation: Attend CNA classes during the summer to become a nursing assistant.

Melita Ericksen

Parents: Janet and James Ericksen Plans after graduation: Work.

Brandon Gutzmer

Parents: Ben and Eileen Gutzmer Plans after graduation: Attend WITC-Rice Lake.

Melissa Jenssen

Parents: Steve and Lucie Jenssen Plans after graduation: Attend UM-Duluth for premed.

Aushleana Branville

Parents: Glen and Tanya Branville Plans after graduation: Attend Chippewa Valley Tech for a degree in business management and hotel/restaurant management.

Dylan Fjorden

Parents: Harvey Fjorden and Melodi Fjorden Plans after graduation: Attend college to be an automotive technician.

Kaleb Harr

Parent: Donna Harr Plans after graduation: Work in Alaska on a horse ranch.

Kasey Johnson

Parents: Scott and Karen Johnson Plans after graduation: Attend UW-River Falls for dairy science or ag studies.

Shane Buchholz

Parents: Rob and Lisa Buchholz Plans after graduation: Attend UW-River Falls for secondary education in social studies and psychology.

Christine Franzel

Parents: Carol and James Franzel Plans after graduation: Attend St. Olaf for international studies, creative writing and premedicine.

Jeff Holmes

Parents: Rebecca Holmes and Wesley Parker Plans after graduation: Soccer.

Timothy Kowalik

Parents: Lance and Melissa Stokes Plans after graduation: Attend MATC for auto tech.

Inter-County Leader graduation issue • 2009


Inter-County Leader

Dakota Krout

Parents: Julie and Nils Andersson Plans after graduation: Enlist in the Army, and attain a degree in computer sciences and software engineering.

Michelle Lindberg

Parents: Beth McAbee and Jon Lindberg Plans after graduation: Continue working and attend ITT Tech for criminal law.

Glenn Mishler

Graduation Issue

Luck Class of 2009

John Larkin

Parent: Peggy Larkin Plans after graduation: Attend college for auto tech.

James Longhenry

Parents: Vern and Tracy Longhenry Plans after graduation: Attend UW-River Falls for business administration.

Ryan Moore

Parent: Shea Mishler Plans after graduation: Enlist in the Coast Guard, then studying law enforcement.

Parents: Thomas Moore and Cassandra Moore Plans after graduation: Work for a year or two, then attend college for computer programming and computer maintenance.

Ross Petersen

Jennifer Roettger

Parents: Kelly Petersen and Billy Petersen Plans after graduation: Enlisted in the Marines, then attend college for psychology or stay in the military.

Wednesday, May 13, 2009 - Page 9

Parents: Kenneth and Patricia Roettger Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stevens Point.

Brett Larson

Parents: Aaron and Monica Larson Plans after graduation: Attend St. Cloud State University for new media.

Christian McCabe

Parents: Pat and Jennifer McCabe Plans after graduation: Attend UW-River Falls for business administration.

Nicholas Morgan

Parents: Joel and Barb Morgan Plans after graduation: Attend UW-La Crosse.

Chantalle Rowley

Parents: Shawn and Ann Rowley Plans after graduation: Attend Argosy University to become a vet tech, then attend the University of Minnesota to become a veterinarian.

Alyssa Lehmann

Parents: Diane Aldrich and Doug Lehmann Plans after graduation: Attend Ridgewater College to become a registered nurse, then another university to become a traveling nurse.

Hannah Melin

Parents: David and Julie Melin Plans after graduation: Attend UW-River Falls for agriculture business.

Brennan Olson

Steven Leisch

Parents: Christine Ledin and Dan Nelson Plans after graduation: Work.

James Mellon

Parent: Trudi Mellon Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stout for mixed media.

Ashley Overby

Derek Letch

Parents: Greg and Kari Letch Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stout for construction management.

Jacob Meyer

Parent: Kristi Bjorlin Plans after graduation: Attend tech school for a welding technical degree.

Megan Panek

Parents: Brian and Karen Olson Plans after graduation: Attend medical school for radiology.

Parents: Heidi Skow and Steve Overby Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Oshkosh for biology, to pursue a chiropractic degree.

Parents: Roger Panek and Vicki Panek. Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Eau Claire for nursing and specialize in neurology.

Maren Rozumalski

Harry SeversonDickinson

Krystal Stage

Parents: Mike and Linda Rozumalski Plans after graduation: Attend Gustavus Adolphus College for history or English literature.

Parents: Jeff and Joni Parents: Nancy and Stage Wayne Severson- Plans after graduation: Go to Eau Claire for cosDickinson Plans after graduation: metology school. Attend a four-year university.

Inter-County Leader graduation issue • 2009


Page 10 - Wednesday, May 13, 2009

Graduation Issue

Inter-County Leader

Luck Class of 2009

Ariel Thompson

Parents: Joe and Kathy Thompson Plans after graduation: Work at the hospital.

Joseph Thompson

Parents: Joe and Kathy Thompson Plans after graduation: Work in North Branch, Minn., at the sod company driving truck.

Ashley Valentine

Parents: Daniel and Jo Valentine Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Oshkosh to study music, major in vocal performance or music education.

Justin Virkus

Parents: Randy and Diana Virkus Plans after graduation: Attend WITC for accounting.

Andrew Wortman

Parents: Dan and Karen Wortman Plans after graduation: Attend VCC for two years, then attend U of M College of Natural Resources for wilderness management.

Class Motto:

We've come a long way, but not half as far as we'll go …

Class Flower: White Lily

Luck's Honor Students

Brennan Olson

Ashley Overby

Adam Anderson Christine Franzel Grace Jenson Melissa Jenssen Kasey Johnson Alyssa Lehmann Derek Letch James Longhenry Nick Morgan Megan Panek Jennifer Roettger Maren Rozumalski Ashley Valentine

CONGRATULATIONS LUCK GRADUATES FROM THESE BUSINESSES: Burnett Dairy Co-op Cardinal Shop Community Insurance Daeffler Quality Meats Daeffler Trucking Dugout Bar & Grill Fiedler Ford Flowers Forever Flying Pie Pizza Hog Wild BBQ & Grill Holiday StationStores Indianhead Credit Union Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association Dale A. Johnson, CPA

Lakeland Communications Lakeview Nails Larsen Auto Centers Luck Golf Course Luck Landscaping Luck Lumber Luck Medical Clinic - A Division of Amery Regional Medical Center

Luck Saddlery & Outfitters Maxwell Heating & Air Conditioning Nails by Cathi & Tanning North Land Ambulance #974 Northside Auto & Equipment Sales, Inc.

Oakwood Inn Parts Plus of Luck Pawn Gallery Peper Tire & Alignment Polk-Burnett Rowe Funeral Home Rural American Bank, Luck Scott Mellon/Edina Realty Superior Siding Sterling Bank St. Croix Chippewa Enterprises St. Croix Valley Business Clinic St. Croix Regional Medical Center

Timbers Theatres U.S. Bank Van Meter’s Meats View Hair Studio Wayne’s Foods Plus

Inter-County Leader graduation issue • 2009


Inter-County Leader

Graduation Issue

Wednesday, May 13, 2009 - Page 11

St. Croix Falls Class of 2009

Alexander Anderson

Parents: Eric and Tamyla Anderson Plans after graduation: Attend MacalesterLawrence for journalism, English and religion.

Jennifer Benoy

Parents: Jeff and Terry Benoy Plans after graduation: Attend Augustana College for chemistry.

Chase Bushweiler

Parents: Craig and Julie Bushweiler Plans after graduation: Attend Century College for criminal justice.

Alexandra Confer

Parents: John and Karen Confer Plans after graduation: Attend DePaul University for medical/sciences – prevet.

Ryan Andrie

Parents: Greg and Karla Andrie Plans after graduation: Attend UM-Duluth for business/marketing.

Brittany Bess

Kaitlin Asp

Erick Bethell

Parents: Paul and Lisa Parent: Renae Bethell Plans after graduation: Jensen Plans after graduation: Undecided. Attend UW-Whitewater for education.

Priscilla Castorena

Parents: Javier and Jackie Castorena Plans after graduation: Enlist in the Navy.

Tyler Craven

Parents: David Velasquez and Wendy Craven Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Andrew Austin-

Parents: Dennis and White Mary Asp Parents: Milo White and Plans after graduation: Jane Austin Undecided. Plans after graduation: Attend Century College to be an air traffic controller.

Ashley Chapman

Parents: James and Dianne Chapman Plans after graduation: Attend Dunwoody for electrical.

Alexandra Critton

Parents: Rex Critton and Jodi Kadrmas Plans after graduation: Attend UM-Duluth for environmental studies.

Travis Binkley

Shelby Ayde

Parents: Robert and Kristen Ayde Plans after graduation: Attend WITC for medical and social work.

Brittany Brenholt

William Ball III

Parents: William Ball Jr. and Michelle Evans Plans after graduation: Attend Hibbing Community College and enlist in the Marine Corps, study law enforcement.

Jacob Bruns

Parents: Mark and Andrea Binkley Plans after graduation: Attend Century College.

Parents: Pat and Nancy Brenholt Plans after graduation: Attend Argosy University for interior design, music and medical.

Parents: Steven and Julie Bruns Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Leif Chinander

Brittany Christensen

Thomas Colombo

Parents: Chris and Claire Chinander Plans after graduation: Enlist in the Marines, attend UW-Superior for fire fighting.

Sohrob Damawand

Parents: Saim and Joann Damawand Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Parents: Stephan Colombo and Lynn Parent: Jeraldine Museus Livingston Plans after graduation: Plans after graduation: Attend WITC-Rice Lake Enlist in the Marines, study diesel mechanics. for criminal justice.

Shelby Emerson

Parents: Brad Emerson and Dawn Emerson Plans after graduation: Enlist in the Army Reserves.

Cassandra Gray

Parents: Glen Evans and Laurie Evans Plans after graduation: Attend Globe University to be a vet technician.

Inter-County Leader graduation issue • 2009


Page 12 - Wednesday, May 13, 2009

Graduation Issue

Inter-County Leader

St. Croix Falls Class of 2009

Jessica Hall

Parents: Dan Meyers and Sue Meyers Plans after graduation: Attend Winona State for nursing.

Tilara Hills

Parents: Dan and Shelly Hills Plans after graduation: Attend WITC-New Richmond for early childhood education.

Jasmine Jones

Parents: Kevin Jones and Andrea Jones Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Superior for medical/social sciences.

Michelle Lamb

Parents: Ken and Yvonne Lamb Plans after graduation: Work and attend Aveda for cosmetology.

Daniel Hanacek

Parents: Scott Hanacek and Cindy Hanacek Plans after graduation: To become a firefighter.

Victoria Houliston

Parents: Jack Houliston and Dawn Houliston Plans after graduation: Attend Carroll University for psychology.

Nicole Julik

Parents: Doug Julik and Elizabeth Julik Plans after graduation: Attend CVTC for nursing.

Amanda Larson

Parents: Scott and Brenda Larson Plans after graduation: Attend UM-Duluth and Viterbo University for premed.

Thomas Hansen

Parents: Scott and Kay Hansen and Dawn Metcalf Plans after graduation: Go to Germany to study languages, business and communications.

Jasmine Hoverman

Parents: Dan and Angie Hoverman Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Ashley Kes

Parents: Ron Graves and Shari Ripley Plans after graduation: Attend Northern Michigan University for English, journalism and film.

Megan Larson

Parents: Edward Larson and April Johnson Plans after graduation: Attend WITC for auto mechanics, business and psychology.

Pierce Hanson

Parents: Allen Hanson and Christine Hanson Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stout for plastics engineering.

Matthew Jacobs

Parents: Stephan and Melody Jacobs Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stevens Point for environmental law, park and rec.

Kourtney Koch

Parents: Mike Koch and Faye and Todd Bibeau Plans after graduation: Attend WITC-New Richmond for nursing.

Andrew Lauritsen

Parents: Derek Lauritsen and Mary Peterson Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Jennifer Heilig

Parents: Wade Julik and Cheryl McKenzie Plans after graduation: Attend Stout for applied science.

Chris Johnson

Parents: Wayne Johnson and Vicki Johnson Plans after graduation: Attend Illinois Institute of Arts for media arts and animation.

Tyler Koonce

Parents: Craig Koonce and Sherri McKenzie Plans after graduation: Attend Rasmussen College for business.

Carissa Libbenga

Parents: Steve and Christie Libbenga Plans after graduation: Attend St. Thomas for premed.

Scott Hendrickson

Parent: Becky Hendrickson Plans after graduation: Attend Northland College for writing/history of ideas.

Zachary Johnston

Parents: Mike and Joann Johnston Plans after graduation: Attend WITC-New Richmond for computer science.

Michael Kralewski

Parents: Mark Kralewski and Elizabeth Kralewski Plans after graduation: Work.

Timothy Lusk Jr.

Parents: Tim and Crystal Lusk Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Superior for exercise science.

Inter-County Leader graduation issue • 2009


Inter-County Leader

Graduation Issue

Wednesday, May 13, 2009 - Page 13

St. Croix Falls Class of 2009

Paige Marek

Parents: Todd and Darla Marek Plans after graduation: Attend U of M-Twin Cities for agriculture sciences.

Gary Nelson

Parents: Roy and Tena Nelson Plans after graduation: Work.

Jesel Price

Parents: Kevin and Shelly Price Plans after graduation: Attend WITC for criminal justice.

Nicholas Seifert

Parents: Mike and Andrea Seifert Plans after graduation: Attend Dunwoody to be a electrician.

Tashina Martinson

Parents: Paul and Diana Martinson Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Superior for dental hygiene/ education.

Tyler Nelson

Parents: Max and Sharon Nelson Plans after graduation: Attend WITC for criminal justice.

Tiffany Przybycien

Parents: Kevin Przybycien and Debby Bjerke Plans after graduation: Attend Globe University for vet technician program.

Landon Shelby

Parents: Daniel Shelby and Kristine Shelby Plans after graduation: Attend college for neoscience.

Kaisha Merrick

Parents: Joel and JoAnn Gray Plans after graduation: Attend Globe University for accounting.

Derek O’Brien

Parents: Kevin and Teri O’Brien Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stout for mechanical engineering.

Jessica Rohm

Parents: Larry and Lisa Rohm Plans after graduation: Attend Globe University for graphic arts.

Meghan Smith

Parents: Steven and Jill Smith Plans after graduation: Attend North Central University for youth ministries.

Carlos Meyer

Host parents: Matt and Rebecca Berg Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Erin O’Brien

Parents: Craig O’Brien and Rosemary Slaughter Plans after graduation: Attend University of Arizona for psychology.

Brandyn Rudolph

Parents: Greg and Pam Rudolph Plans after graduation: Attend Vermillion for game warden/law enforcement.

Katherine Standing

Parents: Victor Standing and Ann Hooper Plans after graduation: Attend Mankato-St. Cloud State for business/languages.

Mason Millermon

Parent: Rhonda Rasmussen Plans after graduation: Attend WITC for welding-metals.

Adam Offerdahl

Parents: David and Rose Offerdahl Plans after graduation: Attend Stevens Point for engineering.

Jacob Sandgren

Parents: Richard and Traci Sandgren Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Colin Stone

Parents: Randy and Pamela Stone. Plans after graduation: Attend Minnesota Business College.

Christopher Mowen

Parents: Don Mowen and Theresa Veldhouse Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Shantelle Pranke

Parents: Daniel Pranke and Mary Ann Pranke Plans after graduation: Attend WITC-Ashland for nursing.

Sam Schmidt

Parents: William and Mona Schmidt Plans after graduation: Attend UM-Duluth for premed.

Mara Swanson

Parent: Briana Swanson Plans after graduation: Attend UW-River Falls for elementary education.

Inter-County Leader graduation issue • 2009


Page 14 - Wednesday, May 13, 2009

Graduation Issue

Inter-County Leader

St. Croix Falls Class of 2009

Abigail Swenson

Parents: Steve and Karrie Swenson Plans after graduation: Attend WITC-New Richmond to be an occupational therapy assistant.

Katelyn Swenson

Parents: Jeremy Swenson and Lynn Easland Plans after graduation: Work.

Laura Swenson

Parents: Rick and Diane Swenson Plans after graduation: Attend UM-Duluth for communications, environmental, languages.

Samantha Wheeler

Parents: Perry and Kim Wheeler Plans after graduation: Attend Northern Michigan University for English.

Sharanda Whittaker

Parents: Robert and Kelley Whittaker Plans after graduation: Attend U of M for architecture.

Jesse Wilson

Parents: Jim and Kellie Wilson Plans after graduation: Attend lineman school to be an electrical lineman.

St. Croix Falls Honor Students Gold cords

Katherine Wright

Parents: John and Denise Wright Plans after graduation: Attend St. Thomas for business/journalism.

Joshua Yunker

Parents: Rick and Sue Yunker Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stout for engineering.

Zachary Zelinski

Parents: Kym and Kimberley Zelinski Plans after graduation: Attend Embry-Riddle A e r o n o u t i c a l Institute/Navy for aviation science – pilot.

Jenny Benoy Carissa Libbenga Josh Yunker Shelby Emerson Ryan Andrie Megan Smith Alex Confer Amanda Larson Sharanda Whittaker Ashley Kes Paige Marek

Cassie Gray Shelby Ayde Kate Wright Jessica Rohm

Silver cords

Tyler Nelson Alex Anderson Ashley Chapman Sam Schmidt Adam Offerdahl Zach Johnston Abby Swenson

Jennifer Heilig Katie Standing Kaisha Merrick Zach Zelinski Tashina Martinson Derek O'Brien Megan Larson Brittany Brenholt Matt Jacobs Tommy Hansen Pierce Hanson Laura Swenson

Class Motto: "Life brings us tears, Jennifer Benoy

Carissa Libbenga

smiles and memories – the tears dry, the smiles fade, but the memories last forever."

Class Colors: Blue and White Class Flower: White Rose

CONGRATULATIONS ST. CROIX FALLS GRADUATES FROM THESE BUSINESSES: BARBer Shop Barb’s Family Hair Care City of St. Croix Falls Clyton's Hardware Dalles Auto Sales Eagle Valley Bank Edina Realty Edling Funeral Home Edward Jones Financial F & A Dairy Fielder Ford Festival Theatre Good Samaritan Center Greene Implement Indianhead Credit Union

Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association Johnson Motors, SCF Kassel Tap Larsen Auto Centers Little Swedes Wolf Creek Bar Luck Medical Clinic - A division of Amery Regional Medical Center

Majestic Falls Martens' Jewelry Maynard's Amoco Polk-Burnett Rural American Bank - Luck Sand Country Party

St. Croix Chippewa Enterprises St. Croix Family Dentistry St. Croix Regional Medical Center St. Croix Tavern St. Croix Valley Funeral Home and Cremation Services Steven McCormack, DDS Steven Swanson AAL Swank's Tammy Belisle - American Family Insurance Tangen Pharmacy

The RiverBank, SCF U.S. Bank Uncle Donuts Valley Pawn Wild River Flags

Inter-County Leader graduation issue • 2009


Inter-County Leader

Amanda Bachman

Parents: Mike and Sue Bachman Plans after graduation: Attend Malone University in Canton, Ohio and major in journalism.

Joseph Eischens

Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Damian Hubbell

Parents: David and Debbie Hubbell Plans after graduation: Attend WITC for criminal justice/law enforcement.

Vince Nasman

Parents: Rick and Carolyn Nasman Plans after graduation: Attend college.

Graduation Issue

Wednesday, May 13, 2009 - Page 15

Siren Class of 2009

Shawn Blum

Charles R. Brown

Parent: Gail Blum IV Plans after graduation: Parents: Charles R. Attend college for a sci- Brown III and Michelle ence-related degree. A. Brown Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stevens Point, majoring in business.

Janey Emery

Aaron Engstrand

Parents: James and Michelle Emery Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stevens Point for elementary education.

Parents: Jerry and Carolyn Engstrand Plans after graduation: Attend UW-La Crosse majoring in mass communication.

Mike Hunter

Tyler Johnson

Parents: David Hunter Parent: Dionne Johnson Plans after graduation: and LeaAnn Anderson Plans after graduation: Enter U.S. Marine Corps. Attend UW-Superior.

Kevin Niedenfuer

Parents: David and Nina Neidenfuer Plans after graduation: Attending Colorado Christian University and taking the computer information systems program, minoring in anatomy.

Cassandra Olson

Parents: Larye and Patricia Olson Plans after graduation: Attend WITC-Rice Lake for business management.

Ben Clasen

Parents: John and Bonnie Clasen Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Marshfield.

Amber Guevara

Parent: Linda Guevara Plans after graduation: Attend college for journalism.

Katy Kelley

Parents: Kathy Kelley and Chas Songetay Plans after graduation: Attend Aveda Institute for cosmetology and spa training.

Matthew Piper

Parents: Missy Chenal and Bob Chenal Plans after graduation: Further my education to become a law enforcement officer.

Christina Conrow

Allison Didier

Parents: Lisa and David Conrow Plans after graduation: Attend college to become a triage nurse.

Parents: Jeannie Schumann and Mark Didier Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stevens Point, majoring in mathematics.

Anthony Hanson

Jesse Hinze

Plans after graduation: Parents: Shane and Rhonda Hinze Undecided. Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stevens Point to pursue a career in writing.

Johnathan Lowry

Parents: Plans after graduation:

Sam Radke

Parents: Cheryl and Darwin Radke Plans after graduation: Attend a technical school or college.

Emily Muus

Parents: Theresa and James Muus Plans after graduation: Attend UM-Duluth and majoring in theater with an emphasis in musical theater.

Allen J. Rickford

Parents: Jeff and Brenda Rickford Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Inter-County Leader graduation issue • 2009


Page 16 - Wednesday, May 13, 2009

Graduation Issue

Inter-County Leader

Siren Class of 2009

Myia Schroeder

Parents: Marvin and Scheryl Schroeder and Louie and Carrie Moen Plans after graduation: Attend WITC in Rice Lake for early childhood education.

Collin Tewalt

Jessica Tills

Parents: Tim and Gail Parent: Richard Tills Tewalt Plans after graduation: Plans after graduation: Attend college for acting. Attend Colorado State University to become a computer engineer.

Jenna Wambolt

Parents: Wade and Kimberly Wambolt Plans after graduation: Attend UM-Duluth and major in biology.

Andrew Wellman

Parents: Gordon Wellman and Lynette Kennedy Plans after graduation: Enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps and attend a tech school for something in the automotive/mechanical field.

Siren Honor Students Class Motto: "Wherever you go, go with all your heart." - Confucius

Class Flower: Gerber Daisy Class Colors: Green and White

Emily Muus

Allison Didier

Emily Muus Allison Didier Shawn Blum Charles Brown IV Janey Emery Aaron Engstrand Jesse Hinze Michael Hunter Collin Tewalt Jenna Wambolt

CONGRATULATIONS SIREN GRADUATES FROM THESE BUSINESSES: Adventures - A Sport Pub and Cafe Bremer Bank Burnett Dairy Co-op Burnett Medical Center Cashco Building Supplies Daniels Plumbing and Heating Daeffler Quality Meats Daeffler Trucking Ed’s Auto Body Fiedler Ford Fishbowl Insurance Agency

Fourwinds Market Indianhead Credit Union Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association Jenneman’s Hardware Hank Kris’ Pheasant Inn Larsen Auto Centers Lee’s Sports Madden’s Steakhouse Moms for Kids Northwestern Wisconsin Electric Company Olsen & Son Drug, Siren

Polk-Burnett Pour House Russ’ Old Fashioned Meats Siren Dairy Queen Siren Telephone Company St. Croix Chippewa Enterprises

St. Croix Regional Medical Center

Sterling Bank T.J.’s Marine The Gallery Timbers Theatres

U.S. Bank Wayne’s Foods Plus Yourchuck’s True Value

Inter-County Leader graduation issue • 2009


Inter-County Leader

Brittany Arnett

Parents: Jessica Arnett and Eugene Arnett Plans after graduation: Enlist in the Air Force and become a registered nurse in the military.

Brittany Bernier

Parents: Kelly Cammack and Randy Bernier Plans after graduation: Attend Century College for generals and transfer to AI Institute for architecture and interior design.

Annie Confer

Parents: John and Kay Confer Plans after graduation: Attend UW-La Crosse for microbiology, biomedical concentration.

Ashley Elfers

Parents: LaReen and Kevin Elfers Plans after graduation: Attend Hamline University, major in psychology and become involved in Hamline’s prelaw program.

Graduation Issue

Wednesday, May 13, 2009 - Page 17

Unity Class of 2009

Johanna Alling

Parents: Albert and Jeanne Alling Plans after graduation: Attend UW-River Falls, major in agriculture education and elementary education and minor in music.

Esther Bielau

Host parents: Greg and Karen Peper Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Reina Cox

Parents: Connie Cable Plans after graduation: Attend WITC-Rice Lake for construction.

Amanda Fehlen

Parents: Lee Nehring and Allan Fehlen Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Superior, major in forensic chemistry.

Dustin Bazille

Parents: Barney and Tracey Bazille Plans after graduation: Work.

Christian Brown

Parents: Jeff and Janice Bailles Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Jake Davison

Parents: Scott and Shari Davison Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stout for a degree in computer science.

Samuel Florer

Parents: Steve and Maxine Florer Plans after graduation: Attend Chippewa Valley Tech School to become a lineman.

Sheri Belisle

Parent: Michelle DeSpiegelaere Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Amber Christensen

Mercedes Bengtson

Parents: Doug and Donna Bengtson Plans after graduation: Work.

Jordyn Christensen

Samuel Bengtson

Parents: Jeremy and Lisa Bengtson Plans after graduation: Attend UW-River Falls for computer science.

Jason Coen

Parents: Robert and Melody Christensen Plans after graduation: Attend a four-year college for child life specialist.

Parents: Jennifer and Troy Christensen Plans after graduation: Attend UMD, major in psychology.

Parents: James Coen and Robin Poe Plans after graduation: Enlisted in the Marine Corps.

Ray DeSpiegelaere

Samantha DeSpiegelaere

Elizabeth Ebensperger

Parents: Ray and Toni DeSpiegelaere Plans after graduation: Attend medical school.

Jennifer Gorne

Parents: Paul and Maria Gorne Plans after graduation: Attend Gustavus Adolphus College for premed.

Parents: Roger DeSpiegelaere and Kara Gray Plans after graduation: Take a year off and then attend college for cosmetology.

Eric Goulet

Parents: Dixie Welling and Brad Goulet Plans after graduation: Attend UTI for automotive and diesel technology.

Parents: Laura and Gary Ebensperger Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Madison or Carroll College for pharmacy.

Erica Gurtner

Parents: Duane and Marilyn Gurtner Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Barron County for generals.

Inter-County Leader graduation issue • 2009


Page 18 - Wednesday, May 13, 2009

Graduation Issue

Inter-County Leader

Unity Class of 2009

Samantha Hill

Michelle Hinshaw

Parents: Wendy and Jason Hill Plans after graduation: UM-Duluth, Attend major in prelaw.

Parent: Susan Brandt Plans after graduation: Attend WITC-New Richmond for early childhood to become a preschool or kindergarten teacher.

Stephanie Kothlow

Brianna Krumrie

Parents: Brad and Kathy Kothlow Plans after graduation: Attend University of Minnesota for biomedical engineering.

Devlyn Larson

Parents: Vern Larson and Stephanie Ballentine Plans after graduation: Attend WITC-Superior to be a CNC machinist or machine tool technician.

Dennis McKinney

Parents: Daniel and Heidi McKinney Plans after graduation: Attend tech school.

Parents: Annie Malluege and Peter Krumrie Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Barron for generals, then continue education elsewhere.

Mitchell Larson

Parents: Mike and Janis Larson Plans after graduation: Become a heavy equipment operator.

Jacob Merrill

Parents: David Merrill and Brenda Merrill Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Rachael Janusch

Parents: Heather and Mitch Janusch Plans after graduation: Attend Globe University for massage therapy.

Andrew Kruse

Parents: Jeff and Karyn Kruse Plans after graduation: Attend Globe University for the computer IT tech program.

Jordan Lehman

Kelsey Jensen

Michelle Parents: Sherrard and Jim Jensen Plans after graduation: Work, possibly more schooling, farm in future.

Amanda Kuske

Parents: Sylvia and Larry Kuske Plans after graduation: Attend UW-River Falls, major in human and health performance, minor in coaching.

Stephanie Lobert

Parents: Chris and Michelle Madison Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Parents: Bill Lobert and Darla Lobert Plans after graduation: Attend college for cosmetology.

Jonathan Merrill

Rebecca Milligan

Parent: Anna Merrill Parents: Jim and Diane Plans after graduation: Milligan Undecided. Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Eau Claire for predentistry.

Aubrie Jerhoff

Mikaela Kalinczok

Julia Larsen

Anthony Larson

Parents: Pam and Dewey Parent: Joan Folz Plans after graduation: Strilzuk Plans after graduation: Undecided. Attend cosmetology school.

Parents: Rick and Leslie Parents: Evelyn Larsen Plans after graduation: Larson Plans after graduation: Attend college. Attend Vermilion College for law enforcement.

Raya McKenzie

Parents: Nichole and Brad Mattson Plans after graduation: Attend a four-year college for premed.

Ricky Mosay

Parents: Adonis Mosay and Vivian Couture Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Seth McKenzie

Parents: LaVern and Leisha McKenzie Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Superior.

Jonathan Nielsen

Parents: Marcia and Brad Nielsen Plans after graduation: Enlisted in the Marine Corps.

Inter-County Leader graduation issue • 2009


Inter-County Leader

Britta Norlund

Parents: Fred and Janis Norlund Plans after graduation: Attend WITC-New Richmond for a nursing associate degree.

Andrea Paulzine

Parents: Heidi and Craig Johnson and Mark and Robin Loken Plans after graduation: Attend WITC-Rice Lake for early childhood education and transfer to UW-River Falls to finish degree.

Spencer Severson

Graduation Issue

Wednesday, May 13, 2009 - Page 19

Unity Class of 2009

Tilynn Norlund

Parents: Roxanne and Ted Norlund Hoehne Plans after graduation: Attend college to be a chemical dependency counselor.

Brittney Peters

Parents: Craig and Kathy Peters Plans after graduation: Attend a four-year college for elementary education.

James Slate

Parents: Candace Morris and Erik Olsen Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Eau Claire to study computer science.

Parents: Angie and Doug Kelch Plans after graduation: Attend WITC for two years and then go to St. Paul for train engineering.

Troy Voss

Benjamin Walsh

Parents: Steve and Janet Parent: Tamara Nelson Plans after graduation: Voss Plans after graduation: Attend college. Attend UW-Eau Claire.

Nicholas Ostman

Parents: Jeff and Jennilee Ostman Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Rebecca Pollock

Parents: Russell and Mary Pollock Plans after graduation: Attend Gustavus Adolphus, major in chemistry and go into premed.

Tyler Stelton

Parents: Dawn and Billy Shattuck Plans after graduation: Go to Missouri for seven months for military job training.

Randy Walton

Parents: Dennette and Jim Coen Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stout for social work.

Erin Owens

Parents: Jerry and Jacki Owens Plans after graduation: Attend Rochester Community and Technical College to be a medical transcriptionist.

Nathan Reda

Parents: Tom and Ronai Reda Plans after graduation: Attend a tech school to become a lineman.

Cody Suckow

Parents: Todd and Ann Suckow Plans after graduation: Attend college at Vermilion Community College in Ely, Minn. for forestry/park ranger.

Hannah Zahler

Parents: Jim and Becky Zahler Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Eau Claire.

Alesa Paulsen

Parents: Laurie Paulsen and Greg Paulsen Plans after graduation: Attend MATC for real estate.

Joseph Schewe

Parents: Greg and Julie Schewe Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Cody Trealoff

Parents: John and Diane Olson Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Kayli Paulsen

Parents: Greg and Laurie Paulsen Plans after graduation: Attend Harvard Law School.

Abby Schlechter

Parents: Dan and Lisa Schlechter Plans after graduation: Attend WITC-Rice Lake for law enforcement/criminal justice.

Cailin Turner

Parents: Jeff and Susan Turner Plans after graduation: Attend UW-River Falls for elementary education.

Alexandra Zarling

Parents: Richard and Charlene Zarling Plans after graduation: Possibly attend a community college.

Inter-County Leader graduation issue • 2009


Page 20 - Wednesday, May 13, 2009

Graduation Issue

Inter-County Leader

Unity Class of 2009 Unity's Honor Students

Class Motto:

Don't let the past dictate who you are, but let it be part of who you become.

Class Colors:

Elizabeth Ebensperger

Elizabeth Ebensperger Jennifer Gorne Ashley Elfers Stephanie Kothlow Hannah Zahler Cailin Turner Raya McKenzie Brittney Peters Julia Larsen Kelsey Jensen Annie Confer Alexandra Zarling Amber Christensen Spencer Severson Amanda Kuske Jordyn Christensen

Red, White and Blue

Jennifer Gorne

CONGRATULATIONS UNITY GRADUATES FROM THESE BUSINESSES: Balsam Lake Hardware Balsam Lake Market and Deli Community Insurance Dale A. Johnson, CPA Fiedler Ford Hair’s The Thing

Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association Jeff’s Small Engine Lakeland Communications Larsen Auto Centers Luck Medical Clinic -

Holiday StationStoreBalsam Lake Indianhead Credit Union

Luck Saddlery & Outfitters Milltown Appliance & Heating

Tanning & Nails

A Division of Amery Regional Medical Center

Milltown Auto and Radiator Repair Northwestern Wisconsin Electric Company Polk-Burnett Reed’s Sunnyside Marina Rural American Bank Sterling Bank Steve’s Appliance Plus St. Croix Chippewa Enterprises

St. Croix Regional Medical Center

Tire Experts U.S. Bank

Webster Class of 2009 CONGRATULATIONS WEBSTER GRADUATES FROM THESE BUSINESSES: Ace Hardware of Webster Adventures - A Sporting Pub and Cafe Austin Lake Greenhouse Benton A-1 Septic Bremer Bank Burnett Medical Center Burnett Dairy Co-op Cashco Building Supplies CopyCat Hearth & Home Danbury Coins and Collectibles Danbury Hardware & Building Center Dividend Lumber Ed’s Auto Body

Fiedler Ford Fishbowl Insurance Agency Four Star Sports Gandy Dancer Saloon Gary and Rhonda Erickson Auctioneers Holiday StationStores Hopkins Sand and Gravel Indianhead Credit Union Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association Kris’ Pheasant Inn Larsen Auto Centers Mangelsen’s Satellite Nexen Group, Inc.

Northwest Interiors Northwestern Wisconsin Electric Company Polk-Burnett Pour House St. Croix Chippewa Enterprises

St. Croix Regional Medical Center

Timbers Theatres TJ’s Marine The Main Store The Tap U.S. Bank Voyager Village Country Club

Wayne’s Foods Plus Webster Chiropractic Clinic Yellow Lake Golf Course Yellow Lake Lodge Yellow River Pharmacy Yellow River Saloon

Inter-County Leader graduation issue • 2009


Inter-County Leader

Cassandra Anderson

Parents: Doug and Cathy Brown Plans after graduation: Attend Minneapolis Business College for office administration.

Leagh Casey

Graduation Issue

Webster Class of 2009

Maria Perez Aldana

Host parents: Allen and Julia Steiner Plans after graduation: Attend college in the field of medicine.

Lindsey Chapman

Adam Baum

Parents: Julie Chalupsky and Wally Baum Plans after graduation: Attend tech school.

Ashley Clay

Parents: Jason Casey and Mandie Rixman Plans after graduation: Attend WITC Superior.

Parent: Joann Phernetton Plans after graduation: Attend school for nursing.

Parents: Dennis and Betty Clay Plans after graduation: Attend Rice Lake College for two years, then Carthage College and study biology, literature and psychology.

Mitchell Elliott

Courtney Erickson

Ryan Estridge

Parents: Mark and Chanda Elliott Plans after graduation: Attend Southwest Minnesota State University for premed.

Kyle Godfrey

Parents: Peggy and Tom Williams Plans after graduation: Working as a heavy machinery operator in Oklahoma.

Wednesday, May 13, 2009 - Page 21

Parents: Jessica and Sean Parents: Richard and Terri Estridge Holwell Plans after graduation: Plans after graduation: Attend Rochester Attend WITC. Community Technical College for child development.

Donald Holmes

Parents: Robert and Kristen Holmes Plans after graduation: Attend WITC for law enforcement.

Travis Hughes

Parents: Brent and Laurie Hughes Plans after graduation: Work.

Charles Bentley

Parents: Tony and Rhonda Bentley and Darcy Bentley Plans after graduation: Enlisted in the Army National Guard, study law enforcement and automotive mechanics.

Ryan Clemmons

Parents: Bruce Gibbs and Chrissy Gibbs. Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stout for Spanish.

Brittany Flatten

Parents: Fred and Georgeann Flatten Plans after graduation: Attend UW-River Falls for communications, broadcast journalism.

Grant Hulter

Parents: Dorinda Conroy, James Hulter, Clair Conroy and Della Hulter Plans after graduation: Work.

Jessie Bremer

Brittany Burrow

Parents: Debbie Wicklund and Paul Bremer Plans after graduation: Work.

Parent: Danette Burrow Plans after graduation: Attend Gateway for nursing.

Tiffany Cowen

Kaci Deering

Plans after graduation: Parent: Michelle Peer Plans after graduation: Undecided. Work.

Kara Gall

Parents: Kari Budge and Thomas Gall Plans after graduation: Attend UM-Duluth for paralegal.

Abigail Ingalls

Parents: John and Tammy Ingalls Plans after graduation: Attended Bethel University for English education.

Dakota Gardner

Parents: Gerald and Mary Gardner Plans after graduation: Attend tech school.

Brenda Johnson

Parent: Tim Johnson Plans after graduation: Enlist in the Army National Guard, study math.

Inter-County Leader graduation issue • 2009


Page 22 - Wednesday, May 13, 2009

Graduation Issue

Inter-County Leader

Webster Class of 2009

Quentin Johnson

Parents: Barbara Johnson and Gordon Johnson Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Eau Claire.

Olivia Main

Parents: Lori Ingalls and Clark Jewell Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Madison for theater.

Jacoby Mosher

Parents: Dawn Turchi and Steve Turchi. Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Marshfield.

Eric Plath

Parents: Doug and Linda Plath Plans after graduation: Attend WITC New Richmond for industrial controls and networking technician.

Rose Kopecky

Parents: Amy and James Kopecky Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Platteville for environmental engineering.

Gabrielle Marazzo

Parents: William and Karen Marazzo Plans after graduation: Attend Vermilion Community College for taxidermy.

Bradley Nutt

Parents: Wayne and Cheryl Nutt Plans after graduation: Attend Bethlehem Institute.

Thomas Polski

Parents: Jim Polski and Shelley Kanke Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Steve Krear

Parents: Mary Krear and Jere Krear Plans after graduation: Study art and be a glassblower.

Ashley Matrious

Parents: Wanda Matrious and Larry Demars Plans after graduation: Enlist in the National Guard and attend college for nursing.

Bryan Otero

Parents: Gary and Kandi Otero Plans after graduation: Attend school for mechanical engineering.

Zach Quigley

Parents: Don and Lisa Quigley Plans after graduation: Attend Rochester Community Technical College in the field of medicine.

Nicholas Krinkie

Parents: Kathy Krinkie and Glenn Krinkie Plans after graduation: Attend Northwestern or Bethel College University for a degree in psychology.

Anthony McCain

Parents: James and Barbara McCain Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Superior for pharmacy.

Jeremy Pardun

Parents: Kevin and Tammy Morse Plans after graduation: Undecided.

Adam Rinnman

Parents: Monte and Kris Rinnman Plans after graduation: Industrial work.

Michael Macke

Parents: Ken Macke and Melissa Mason. Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stout for video game design.

Shauna McCain

Parents: Barbara McCain and James McCain Plans after graduation: Attend WITC Superior and then transfer to UWSuperior to become a registered nurse.

Spencer Peterson

Parents: Brad and Pam Peterson Plans after graduation: Attend WITC for automotive mechanic.

Chelsey Robinson

Parents: Amanda Olson and Jeremy Sikorski Plans after graduation: Attend Rochester Technical College to become an X-ray technician.

Catherine Mahlen

Parents: Thomas and Catherine Mahlen Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Superior and study criminal justice/psychology.

Travis Moser

Parents: Scott and Brenda Moser and Carolyn Hopkins Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Superior for prepharmacy.

Brandon Pierce

Parents: Amber and Larry Kern Plans after graduation: Attend UTI in Phoenix, Ariz. to be an automotive/diesel technician.

Benjamin Roedl

Parents: Jeff and Jean Roedl Plans after graduation: Attend WITC for criminal justice/law enforcement.

Inter-County Leader graduation issue • 2009


Inter-County Leader

Rebecca Schrooten

Parents: Bill and Carolyn Schrooten Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stevens Point for psychology.

Niels Van Vliet

Host parent: Roger Leef Plans after graduation: Attend University of Antwerp in Belgium for language.

Graduation Issue

Wednesday, May 13, 2009 - Page 23

Webster Class of 2009

Trisha Simon

Parents: Lorenzo and Sheila Simon Plans after graduation: Work.

Jordan Werdier

Parents: Kyle and Chris Werdier Plans after graduation: Attend college.

Rebecca Smallwood

Parent: Joan Boos Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stevens Point for physical education.

ShonnĂŠ Stoll

Parents: Shari Stoll and Kevin Berry (deceased) Plans after graduation: Attend Aveda Institute in Minneapolis for cosmetology.

Scott Stromberg

Parents: David Stromberg and Theresa Stromberg Plans after graduation: Attend UW-Stout for technical engineering.

Kelsey Tretsven

Parents: Mark Tretsven and Karen Felix Plans after graduation: Attend UM-Duluth for chemical engineering.

Kara Woller

Parent: Jill Woller Plans after graduation: Attend Globe University to be a veterinarian.

Brittany Flatten

Kelsey Tretsven Rose Kopecky

Webster Top Ten Brittany Flatten Kelsey Tretsven Rose Kopecky Bradley Nutt Catherine Mahlen Oliva Main Eric Plath Mitchell Elliott Quentin Johnson Ashley Clay

Inter-County Leader graduation issue • 2009



Leader|may 13|2009