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• WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2016 • VOLUME 83 • NO. 38 • 2 SECTIONS

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Sole Burner events Saturday

INTER-COUNTY

Survivors tell their stories

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BIKE RACE DRAWS 560

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ATV racetrack in SCFalls? Request draws early opposition, even before plan details emerge PAGE 10 INSIDE

Perfect conditions prevailed for the mountain bike race series opener at St. Croix Falls on Saturday, May 1, an event which drew 560 racers to the city. The event, sponsored primarily by the Woolly Bike Club, uses the extensive mountain bike trail system they have developed over the last few years. See more photos and story inside. - Photo by Greg Marsten

FIRST READ WEBSTER - Find answers to voter questions at a voter clinic on Monday, May 16, from 2 to 7 p.m., at Webster High School. County Clerk Wanda Hinrichs will talk about the Wisconsin Voter Photo ID Law and what documents you need to register to vote, vote at the polls and how to get a free photo ID. Watch videos on what to expect at the polls and practice voting on an electronic kiosk or on paper ballots. Burnett County residents can register to vote at the clinic by bringing a photo ID and a proof of residency document such as a payroll stub, bank institution statement, or utility bill with your current name and address. Refreshments provided. This clinic was organized by the League of Women Voters Upper St. Croix Valley. For more information about the Wisconsin League of Women Voters go to lwvwi.org or find them on Facebook. - submitted

SPORTS • OUTDOORS

Burnett County man sentenced for role in meth conspiracy Interstate Park fall reported Travelers to Burnett County spent more than $23 million in 2015 Grantsburg man announces candidacy for 28th Assembly seat May is Mental Health Awareness Month

ONLINE leadernewsroom.com

Drug abuse driving up child neglect reports in Wisconsin, including Burnett County Breaking local news News updates

TIME TO TAKE A STAND

A series on meth addiction and its impact on families and communities.

Local law enforcement joins call for community involvement to address drug addiction

Unity win shakes up West Lakeland See front page of SPORTS

E. Royal Emerson | Staff writer BURNETT COUNTY - According to local law enforcement, if our sons or daughters sought to acquire debilitating drugs such as methamphetamine or heroin, they could successfully score such drugs within 24 to 48 hours, all without having to venture far from the rural hamlets of Siren, Grantsburg or Webster, or the eight isolated enclaves of our tribal communities. The growing prevalence of these drugs, and its impact on our families and communities, has caused local law enforcement to join with social service providers

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• Fish and smelt fry @ Jackson • Free movie @ Luck • Spring art tour @ various locations • Cancer walks @ Luck and Frederic • Big Gig fundraiser @ Siren • Bird walk @ SCFalls • Pancake breakfast @ Garfield fire hall • Song circle @ SCFalls See Coming Events for details

Theodore Leroy Hughes LaVerne “Pete” Olson Robert Dale “Bob” Munson

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PAGE 2 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2016

Future food cooperative seeks volunteers ST. CROIX FALLS - In an effort to transition Fine Acres Market, in St. Croix Falls, from a for-profit business to a member-owned cooperative, a steering committee has been meeting over the last year to consider the steps needed to create a cooperative. Current owner of Fine Acres Market Susan Vezina stated, “I feel it’s important to keep healthy, locally produced food available to our communities, and I would like to see that happen through a member-owned cooperative.” To date, the committee has met with a consultant to filter the cooperative vision into a manageable concept and they have circulated a preliminary survey to find out the shopping habits of local consumers. The survey showed that there is interest in having a member-owned cooperative in the upper St. Croix Valley. Most recently, the committee co-hosted Everyone’s Earth Day activities that included showing the movie “Fresh,” that highlights the importance of a healthy, local and sustainable food system. Forming a food cooperative is commonly a multiyear process and requires

A cooperative-owned newspaper Board of directors:

Manager: Doug Panek

Charles Johnson, chair Ann Fawver Merlin Johnson Janet Oachs Richard Erickson

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Reporters Greg Marsten

Seed ball making was popular at the recent Everyone’s Earth Day celebration co-hosted by the Future Fine Acres Food Cooperative. - Photo submitted

gmarsten@leadernewsroom.com

Marty Seeger mseeger@leadernewsroom.com

the participation of volunteers to move the project toward success. The Future Fine Acres Steering Committee has created several committees for volunteers to join: Finance and fundraising; membership and outreach; media

and marketing; building and design. If you are interested in seeing a cooperative in St. Croix Falls and would like to participate on a committee you can sign up through the website, fineacres. com/sign-me-up. - submitted

Priscilla Bauer pbauer@leadernewsroom.com

Mary Stirrat

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• Wisconsin Newspaper Association

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Gregg Westigard E. Royal Emerson news@leadernewsroom.com

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Trees lining the Gandy Dancer Trail north of Centuria framed a gorgeous end of the day on Saturday, April 30. - Photo by Greg Marsten

The annual EarthArts spring art tour, a loose collaboration by 48 artists through out the upper St. Croix Valley who open their studios at this time each year and invite the public to meet individual artists, learn about the “craft” of their art and to see what’s new, will be held this weekend, May 7-8. See page 2 in Currents section for more information.

CREX COURTSHIP Sandhill cranes head out of Crex Meadows near Grantsburg early in the morning. They are flying out to the cornfields to glean them for wasted corn. The sandhills migrate north to breed and raise their young. Soon the two male sandhill cranes (photo below) are fighting for the affection of the female crane, who watches the two fight over her. The pair will remain together for 9-10 months to raise their young. - Photos by Larry Samson

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MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 3

Mail thefts bring over 50 charges

Local woman faces up to 137 years in jail on latest indictments

Greg Marsten | Staff writer BALSAM LAKE – A noted local rash of mail thefts has led to a battery of charges against a 29-year-old Milltown woman, who is now indicted in over 50 criminal charges in Polk County, on top of reports of similar charges in Chisago County, Minn., relating to more mail thefts and the subsequent use of some of those allegedly stolen items. Marlaina Tibbetts, 29, Milltown, appeared before Judge Jeffery Anderson in Polk County Circuit Court on Friday, April 29, where Tibbetts was officially charged with what is now a total of 54 charges, related to Marlaina Tibbetts the mail thefts. He set a $10,000 bond and scheduled a preliminary hearing for May 13. Tibbetts had been charged by criminal complaint in late February on 34 counts related to the mail thefts, including five felonies for misappropriating identification to obtain money. She also faces 12 misdemeanor charges for receiving or concealing stolen property, as well as 17 bail jumping charges. A warrant was issued for her arrest on those charges.

Polk County prosecutors filed an additional 20 charges against Tibbetts on April 11, which included seven more felony misappropriating identification to obtain money. That battery of allegations included three charges of receiving or concealing stolen property, with 10 more bail jumping charges. All of the latest, combined 54 charges, are related to an alleged rash of mail thefts from last fall and early 2016, first reported in Dresser, but later confirmed in both Minnesota and Wisconsin, and in multiple municipalities. Authorities had combined their efforts and met with U.S. postal officials on the mail thefts, which soon led to a suspected vehicle in the thefts, a maroon Buick sedan. They even had a license plate, which was tied to Tibbetts. An undercover investigation then commenced, and it was ironically on the first day of that surveillance when they had evidence confirming their suspicions. An officer had followed Tibbetts to a Frederic-area storage unit, where she allegedly discarded multiple pieces of stolen mail from the Milltown area. According to authorities, Tibbetts had also been stopped once on a similar suspicion, after she was seen near a mailbox, but claimed she was distributing fliers for a lost pet, although no such fliers were found. The subsequent investigation into the alleged mail thefts led to a more thorough look into what the perpetrator did with the stolen mail, revealing the person had used the stolen mail for a variety of purchases across the region. One of those purchases took place in St.

Croix Falls, where a small computer was purchased. The retail clerk at the store was able to confirm that Tibbetts was behind the purchase. That testimony was another key to breaking the case, and led to the latest charges, claiming she used stolen credit cards, checks, cash, gift cards and even tire store rebate cards for purchases at a variety of locations in both Wisconsin and Minnesota, although charges are pending in Minnesota. If convicted on all 54 Polk County charges related to a series of mail-theft incidents, Tibbetts has the potential of over 137 years in prison and over potentially hundreds of thousands of dollars in fines. Each felony charge carries a potential for six years in prison, and up to $10,000 in fines. However, Tibbetts already has several outstanding criminal cases, hence her multiple bail jumping charges, relating to theft from her employer in St. Croix Falls at a restaurant, as well as misdemeanor disorderly conduct charges from an incident where she is alleged to have attempted to run a man over with her car. She is also facing misdemeanor charges from allegedly stealing a purse and other items while she was at a Dresser church. All three of those cases are also pending, and are expected to ride along with the latest active Polk County mail-theft cases, meaning she has nearly 60 active charges in Polk County alone, and may be facing more charges from mail thefts in Minnesota. She is scheduled to appear before Anderson on May 13 for a preliminary hearing on the latest charges, where he will determine if there is enough evidence to

bind her over for trial. Tibbetts has a lengthy criminal history, going back to 2006, with a convictions for felony forgery, which led to a jail time. She also had several cases that were pleaded down, one in 2010 that began with a felony substantial battery charge, which was reduced down to a disorderly conduct charge in a plea, and led to simple fines. Ironically, she was giving a reduced sentence in part, because of glowing reviews from her then employer at a local restaurant. Tibbetts has since been accused of theft from that restaurant in St. Croix Falls. A 2013 disorderly conduct charge with a domestic abuse modifier was also reduced down in a plea deal approved by Judge Eugene Harrington, who combined several disorderly conduct charges down to a forfeiture of $263. Tibbetts also has a lengthy criminal history in Minnesota, where she has been convicted of a similar felony mail theft charge, when she lived in Wyoming. She was originally charged with two felonies, including identity theft, which was dismissed in the plea. sentenced to probation, with a two-week jail sentence stayed and no contact with the victim ordered, and $137 in fines or costs. She was also convicted of theft three times in 2005, for a variety of unspecified incidents, all about two months apart. She apparently served some jail time for those convictions, as well. Tibbetts remains in the Polk County Jail on the latest charges.

Grandmother recuperating after beating at hands of grandson WEBSTER - A 65-year-old woman who was severely beaten by her grandson is recuperating this week after surgery to her face. Her grandson, Jacob Taylor Widmyer, faces charges of first-degree reckless injury, aggravated battery and false imprisonment in connection with the battery, which occurred at the residence he shared with his grandmother on West Main Street. According to a statement by the Burnett County Sheriff’s Department, officers responded to a disturbance at the home at 1:45 a.m. Wednesday, April 27, and discovered the woman had been severely

beaten. They were able to rescue the woman from the residence by helping her escape through a window. She was taken by ambulance to a local hospital and then airlifted to a Twin Cities hospital for treatment of serious injuries. She was listed in stable condition. Webster Police Chief Mike Spafford said he’s never seen anybody take a beating like that in all of his years in law enforcement. “I’m just glad she’s OK,” Spafford said, noting that he knows the grandmother and grandson personally. He said the woman suffered severe

head trauma. The grandson, he said, had apparently been drinking earlier that evening and came home around midnight to ask his grandmother if he could borrow $20 from her and when she said no he pulled her out of bed and struck her with his fists. Widmyer barricaded himself inside of a bedroom and continued attempts by law enforcement to get him to surrender failed.Spafford said a decision was made at the scene to contact the Polk County Sheriff’s Department SWAT team. A window was broken to allow the woman to crawl out of the house and members of the SWAT team entered the house, and

arrested Widmyer with no confrontation. He was taken to the Burnett County Jail. Agencies assisting in the incident were the Polk County Sheriff’s Department, Webster Police Department, St. Croix Tribal Police Department and North Memorial Ambulance. No information on any formal charges was available via the Wisconsin Circuit Court system at press time. - Gary King with information from Burnett County Sheriff’s Department. This story appeared on our website Wednesday, April 27.

Burnett County man sentenced to role in meth conspiracy MADISON - A 30-year-old Grantsburg man was sentenced Friday, April 29, to 24 months in federal prison, followed by three years of supervised release, for his role in a conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine. Matthew Stone was sentenced by U.S. District Judge William M. Conley, according to a news release from John W. Vaudreuil, U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Wisconsin. Stone had previously pleaded guilty to being involved in a conspiracy with Jerry Vang to distribute methamphetamine in Northwest Wisconsin in early 2015. In 2012, an Organized Crime Drug

Enforcement Task Force led by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and comprised of federal, state and local investigators, began investigating the importation and distribution of methamphetamine Matthew Stone in Polk and Burnett counties. On March 30, 2015, Vang’s vehicle was stopped by law enforcement. During a search of the vehicle, officers located

a baggie containing approximately 13 ounces of methamphetamine, packaging material consistent with drug distribution, digital scales and firearms. Vang was sentenced to 120 months in federal prison on Oct. 19, 2015. He pleaded guilty to his role in the methamphetamine conspiracy and to possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug-trafficking crime. Vang supplied Stone with methamphetamine which Stone resold to others in Polk and Burnett counties. Vaudreuil praised the outstanding cooperation among all law enforcement agencies involved in addressing the prob-

lem of methamphetamine use in Northwest Wisconsin. In addition to the FBI, the task force included the Wisconsin Department of Justice, Division of Criminal Investigation; Polk, Burnett and Washburn County Sheriff’s Departments; the St. Croix Valley Drug Task Force; and the St. Croix Tribal Police Department. The prosecution of the case has been handled by Assistant U.S. Attorney Jeffrey Anderson. - Gary King with information from the office of U.S. Attorney Vaudreuil. This story appeared on our website on Friday, April 29

May is Mental Health Awareness Month POLK COUNTY - May is Mental Health Awareness Month, and Polk County Behavioral Health is raising awareness of the importance of speaking up about mental health and seeking services when facing difficult times. Too often people will not let others know they are struggling with life circumstances and strong emotions. Polk County Behavioral Health is attempting to remove and stop the stigma that often surrounds mental illness. This stigma stops individuals from seeking help, which can result in tragic

outcomes. They want to encourage community members to speak up and give mental illness a voice. Giving mental illness a voice means giving voice to feelings, fears, hopes and dreams. It means empowering people as agents of their own recovery, and it means changing the trajectories of our own lives for the better and helping those we love change theirs. The Polk County Behavioral Health unit is sponsoring a poster campaign at area schools. They sent letters to the school counselors and school principals

asking them to encourage their students to create posters that speak to “stopping the stigma” around mental health. Each school was asked to choose a finalist and send the winning posters to the behavioral health clinic. Once they have the posters, the employees of the clinic will vote on a grand-prize winner. The grand-prize winner will have their poster framed and displayed at the clinic until next year when they have another contest. In addition, all participants will receive a prize and have some type of recognition

in the Inter-County Leader. Polk County Behavioral Health is encouraging everyone to talk about mental illness and to reach out for help. There is a 24-hour mental health and AODA crisis line in Polk County at 888-552-6642. The county offers walk-in services Monday through Friday during regular business hours for those who are in crisis. – with information from Polk County Behavioral Health

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PAGE 4 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2016

More than 25 people gathered recently at the Burnett County Government Center to plan a monthlong educational campaign to combat methamphetamine addiction. The effort begins with a meth town hall on Wednesday, June 8, at the Siren High School. - Photo by E. Royal Emerson

Time to take a stand/from page 1 and others in an unprecedented call for the community to take action in helping to stem the tide of drug addiction, before it destroys our children and ravishes our communities beyond repair.

Drug addiction is a disease “Methamphetamine and heroin addiction needs to be recognized as a disease. Everybody needs to work together to bring community together,” said Frank Taylor, who has served as police chief for the St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin the past 10 years. “Law enforcement cannot possibly tackle this issue alone. It is getting very serious. I do not know of one area or town that is not affected by drug use and addiction. The community has to help us so that they can help themselves.” Taylor grew up in one of the St. Croix Tribal communities. The eight tribal communities under his jurisdiction are scattered throughout three counties. Taylor also regularly assists other village law enforcement that seeks to use the tribal police K9 drug-sniffing dog. “It’s disheartening to see what is going on in our communities,” Taylor said. “The hardest part is going to a crime scene of someone you knew since you were a kid, and now they are a grandmother suffering elder abuse or otherwise affected. It’s heartbreaking to see kids being taken away from their mothers and fathers all because of this disease. That’s what we have to remember – drug addiction is a disease. Families that are addicted are in such denial that they don’t understand or recognize that they have a problem,” Taylor said. Community means all of us “We can’t combat drug addiction on our own,” said longtime Siren Police Chief Christopher Sybers. Besides serving as police chief for the village of Siren, Sybers also serves on the Burnett County Board of Supervisors, chairing the health and human services committee. “The majority of people in this town are great, wonderful, hardworking people. But there is an element that we need help in trying to take care of. Community means all of us. If we don’t address the problem now the circle of addiction will just keep getting bigger and bigger until we, as community, can no longer control it.” Taylor agrees that most members of the community are decent, hardworking and law-abiding citizens. “Ninety-five percent of the households in our communities we don’t have a problem with. There are a lot of homes I’ve never been to because we don’t have any problems. But what we are seeing is that as the population gets older, many of the arrests are parents with children. So what happens to that child? What is going to happen to these kids? They need some sort of structure to grow into.” Meth town hall meeting Taylor and Sybers sat down together recently in the small, cramped offices of the Siren Police Department to discuss their support for a meth town hall meeting to be held on Wednesday, June 8, from 6 to 7:30 p.m., at the Siren High School. The town hall is being organized by the Restorative Justice Center in Siren. It is being promoted as an educational

forum to educate the community on methamphetamine and other substance abuse, and the impact it is having on our families and communities. “The meth town hall will help identify the need to recognize that this sort of stuff is going on,” Taylor said. “Just because your household may be drug free, your neighbors may be having all kinds of problems. It’s an opportunity to take back your community. The community has to take responsibility. We need the community to step up and help us. We need the community to become involved.” Taylor and Sybers both discussed the national trend where communities are becoming divided from law enforcement. It is hoped the meth town hall meeting can transcend such differences. “We’re seeing all across this country right now that law enforcement has a target. People get on social media and rile up the bee’s nest,” Taylor said. “Well, what good is that? How are you helping your community? Be part of the solution and not part of the problem. We need the community to back us and say, ‘Enough is enough.’ ”

A societal shift “The community has changed so much since I started,” Sybers said. “The days of not having to worry about the big stuff are long gone. That went out the window about 10 years ago. Society is changing. The structure is different. It is a complete societal shift. Not just here, but everywhere. What we are dealing with now is completely different than when we grew up. People can’t function, they can’t hold down a job once they start using methamphetamine and heroin. So, where are they getting their money? Well, they’re

scamming and shoplifting and burglarizing whatever they can walk up to. It’s a crime of opportunity. The crimes are not well thought out.” “Law enforcement is just a small piece of the pie,” Taylor said. “We’re not in every home in the areas we have jurisdiction. We can’t control what goes on in people’s houses. We understand that there is a problem. We have to have people come to us and say, ‘This is what I know to be going on,’ so that we can gather the information, open up an investigation and begin to address it. It’s one of those things where if you see something, say something. The police are not the enemy. We’re not out here just picking on people. We want to make sure that drug dealers are held accountable. It’s their choice. If they choose to get involved with methamphetamine or heroin we will be coming after them.” “Sometimes it’s very difficult to remain optimistic,” Sybers said. “There are days that are tough. You hope that you might get that addicted person some help, but then you go, ‘How is that actually going to happen?’ It’s up to the person to make a choice to stop using. It is a disease! The devil in their head is saying, ‘I have to have this drug.’ That’s the nature of the addiction. ‘I have to have it and I’ll do anything I have to do to get it.’ That brings them into our realm, where we now have to take care of it,” Sybers said. “Once we can get them into the court system we now have an avenue to get them to come clean, and to start working on their own well-being, to not do it anymore,” Sybers continued. “The criminal justice system seems to be the only way we can get them to stop doing these drugs. I don’t see any other way, because

they are not going to choose it on their own. It’s the rare person who will stop on his or her own without law enforcement or some other intervention. Every day that they don’t have access to the drug is a better day.”

Rebuilding community structure For Taylor and Sybers, a critical component to regaining a sense of community and stemming the tide of drug addiction is family structure and the traditional love of parent to child. Both police chiefs, who are parents of teenagers, see the meth town hall meeting as an opportunity to educate parents on the problems of drug addiction and empower them with information on what to look for. “I want people to come to the meth town hall and understand that there is no such thing as a drug-free community, to recognize that this sort of stuff is going on in every community, to no longer have our blinders on,” Taylor said. “I’m a firm believer that a lot of people start out using something less than methamphetamine or heroin and it’s a gradual increase to that level. Sit down and have a conversation with your children. Tell your kids about what is good and bad.” “Parents have to provide the structure – make sure your kids are in school, doing productive things so they aren’t out screwing around and getting into trouble,” Sybers said. Parents are encouraged to bring their children to the June 8 town hall meeting. To find out more about the meth town hall meeting and how you can help to stem the tide of drug addiction, you may contact Restorative Justice of Wisconsin at 715-349-2117.

Date for meth town hall meeting determined Choose Life Over Meth the message of the campaign E. Royal Emerson | Staff writer SIREN - More than 25 people gathered in the Burnett County Government Center on Tuesday, April 26, to plan a monthlong campaign to educate the community about methamphetamine and the implications of drug abuse on our families and communities. Among the group that gathered included representatives of local law enforcement, county social services and the schools. Burnett County Judge Kenneth Kutz and District Attorney William Norine were also in attendance. The educational campaign is to kick off with a meth town hall meeting to be held on Wednesday, June 8, beginning at 6 p.m., in the Siren High School. The town hall will include presentations by law enforcement and social services on how to identify, combat and treat methamphetamine and other drug addiction in our communities. The event is being organized through the Restorative Justice Center in Siren. The goal of the group is to organize on a local basis, reaching out to parents, teachers and pastors to educate and empower the community to stem the tide of meth-

amphetamine and other drug addictions.

The origin of concern The urgency to take action originated with the Burnett County Health and Human Services Committee in response to the startling increase in child abuse and neglect cases, with drug use being cited as a primary or contributing factor. At its meeting on Dec. 8, 2015, the HHS committee received end-of-the year reports showing a 358-percent increase in child abuse and neglect cases since 2011, along with federal government data indicating that 11.7 percent of all births in Burnett County are to drug addicted babies. The discussion in committee quickly turned to prevention measures, with committee members growing frustrated, realizing the nature of the social services system is to intervene after the fact, with resources for prevention extremely limited. “Prevention requires a commitment for several years to really see how it works. We need a long-term strategy,” county Supervisor Dorothy Richard said at the time. Choose Life Over Meth The theme of the educational campaign is Choose Life over Meth. The emphasis

of the educational campaign on “choice” also appears to have had its origin at the Dec. 8 HHS committee meeting. At that meeting, Siren Police Chief Christopher Sybers, who also serves on the Burnett County Board of Supervisors and is chair of the HHS committee, expressed the frustration of the committee as it grappled with how to apply limited prevention resources to the seemingly intractable problem of drug abuse and its associative impacts. “It all comes down to choice,” Sybers said at the time. “It all comes down to the addicted person wanting help. They have to want to do something. Right now they are making poor choices. Making it a crime doesn’t make much of a difference. If it feels good, they’ll do it. And they are doing it with little or no concern for the consequences. You can’t make someone do something they don’t want to do. It all comes down to the choices people make.” To find out more about the June 8 meth town hall meeting and how you can join the unprecedented call to stem the tide of drug addiction in our communities, you may contact Restorative Justice of Wisconsin at 715-3492117.


MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 5

Zilka announces for 28th Assembly seat Running with the Veterans Party of America GRANTSBURG - Vincent Zilka has announced he is a candidate for the 28th Assembly District, running as a member of the Veterans Party of America. Zilka, who has spent most of his adult life in service to the United States, says he wants to continue that service by serving the people of District 28 as their representative in the state Assembly. “I believe that the two-party system has a stranglehold on the country, the state of Wisconsin and District 28,” he said, “I want to return it to the people where it belongs!” Zilka currently works at McNally Industries in Grantsburg and is a husband, father and veteran. He joined the U.S. Army right after graduating high school in 2003, knowing he would be sent overseas. Zilka said he wanted to do his part

Vincent Zilka to serve America so he enlisted to work on the armament, avionics and electrical systems for the AH-64D Longbow Apache helicopter. He soon earned the additional duties of the unit armorer. This

role came with the responsibility of maintenance and accountability of the weapons for his entire unit, as well as training leaders and soldiers in the proper care, maintenance and use of the weapons to which they were assigned. During his time in the Army, he did two combat tours (Iraq in 2006 and Afghanistan in 2008) and was assigned to guard an international airport in Liberia to protect President George W. Bush. After receiving an honorable discharge in 2010, Zilka was hired by the Department of the Army as a civilian employee to work as a training specialist. He would go on to travel over 300 days a year with another six months in Afghanistan. During this time, he was responsible for training soldiers, airmen and special operations forces on new equipment that was being fielded while simultaneously being responsible for repairing any equipment that was down. He made this commitment to ensure soldiers could make it home to their families. In August of 2011, Zilka said he decided

he had been on the road long enough and chose to attend school at Pine Technical and Community College where he met his wife, Geniva, and started his family to include three children - Chase, Vivian and Evander. He completed three years of training in gunsmithing, machining and reverse engineering and prototyping, receiving an Associated Applied Science Degree, four diplomas and seven certificates. During his time at PTCC, he was also elected by his peers to be the president of the Shooters Association and acted as a representative in the student senate. After graduation, he started working at McNally Industries in Grantsburg and is still presently employed by that company. Zilka said voters in the 28th District should feel free to contact him and let him know how they feel he could best represent them. He is always willing to take advising from his constituents and help them in any way he possibly can. - Gary King with submitted information

Moving football field discussed at Siren

Tribe requests approval of eagle feathers, beads at graduation

Becky Strabel | Staff writer SIREN - Siren athletic director Ryan Karsten came before the Siren School Board on Monday, April 25, to discuss the condition of the football field. “It could be slid west of its current location to avoid the sinkhole areas, but that would only buy us a year, and that is if the field conditions don’t change from what they are this spring. We would have to move the field goalposts and maybe some drainage,” said Karsten. “The logistics of playing away with field rental, busing and loss of concessions and admission will be an obstacle.” School board member Mark Pettis suggested Karsten look at the possibility of something being developed in the ballpark owned by the village. “It is an out-of-thebox thought, but it might have potential.” Several donations were accepted by the board of education. Faith Lodge made a donation to the FACE department, several businesses donated to FCCLA’s Donut Dash (see elsewhere in this issue for photos) and Moms For Kids gave to the ninth-grade English field trip. As a result of the superintendent hiring survey, Dr. Kevin Shetler will be looking

BURNETT COUNTY - National Drug Court Month is coordinated by the National Association of Drug Court Professionals. This year, treatment courts throughout the nation are celebrating National Drug Court Month with the theme, Criminal Justice Reform in Action. Today 2,966 treatment courts are in operation in all 50 states plus U.S. territories, successfully treating close to 150,000 substance-addicted individuals each year. Since 1989, these courts have saved over 1.4 million lives and billions of tax dollars. “Drug courts and other treatment courts are the most successful programs for seriously addicted individuals in our nation’s history and represent true criminal justice reform in action,” said NADCP CEO Carson Fox. “Drug courts and other

Spring cleanup week coming soon Gregg Westigard | Staff writer GRANTSBURG – The Grantsburg Village spring cleanup week is coming Monday through Friday, May 9-13, and that annual effort to make the village more attractive was on the agenda of a special village board meeting Monday, April 25. The short meeting was the first for new Trustee John Dickinsen. Trustee Rod

at the marketing of the district and its vision or mission development. “These are area’s that were identified as concerns through the survey,” said Shetler. Building principals reported that testing was nearly completed, and that many events and field trips are being scheduled for the month of May. Denise Johnston, special education director, will be interviewing staff to be hired to fill open positions. Johnston reported that The Lodge at Crooked Lake will be working with youth from her department by providing supervised employment for students to gain job skills that will help them transition out of school. Title VII director Tara Voss attended the 2016 Wisconsin Indian Education Association Conference.Voss gathered information on how to help teachers teach Native history in an authentic way. The Native American Awareness powwow is being planned by the students for May 13. There will be a tribal graduation recognition in Turtle Lake on Thursday, May 26.

New business New business included Bryn Anderson and Therese Muus asking the board for approval of the high school music department’s trip to Disney World. The board approved the June 4-11, 2017, trip.

“The students raise all of the money for the performance, so we aren’t looking for funds just an OK so we can start planning,” said Anderson. Many policies were read and approved for their appropriate readings. The staff grievance policy did receive a nay vote by James Kopecky. Kopecky didn’t approve of the employees paying half of the legal fees that may occur from a grievance. “Why should the district pay the full amount? We need to be sure it is a legitimate complaint, but it does take quite a bit to get to this point,” commented Moore.

Eagle feathers at graduation High school Principal Jason Hinze shared a letter from the St. Croix Tribal Education Department asking the district to support Native American students’ right to wear eagle feathers at graduation. The letter discusses beading of graduation caps also. The letter states that the eagle feather symbolizes strength, love, perseverance and wisdom to the St. Croix Tribe, and feathers are only awarded in times of significant accomplishments. It is similar to other cultures showing respect of their cultural beliefs and spiritual practices. The board discussed whether the 1997 policy should be updated.

May is National Drug Court Month treatment courts restore lives, reunite families and make communities safer, all while saving money for taxpayers. Instead of punishment, these programs provide lifesaving treatment to those who need it most.” The Burnett County Drug Court is a judicially supervised court docket that reduces correctional costs, enhances community safety and improves public welfare. In these programs, seriously addicted individuals remain in treatment for long periods of time while under close supervision. Drug court participants must meet obligations to themselves, their families and their community. To ensure accountability, they are regularly and randomly tested for substance use, required to appear frequently in court for the judge to review their prog-

ress, rewarded for meeting goals and sanctioned for not meeting clearly stated obligations. Research continues to show that treatment courts work better than jail or prison, better than probation and better than treatment alone. Treatment courts are this nation’s most effective strategy to reduce recidivism among substance-addicted nonviolent offenders with criminal histories. Nationally, 75 percent of individuals who complete such programs are not rearrested. These courts save up to $13,000 for every individual they serve and return as much as $27 for every $1 invested. Since its inception in 2006, Burnett County Drug Court has had 67 participants. Out of the 67 participants, 43 have graduated, five are actively participating

Cleaning up Grantsburg

Kleiss was also present after withdrawing his previous announcement that he was resigning from the board. “The cleanup is about the appearance of Grantsburg,” village President Glenn Rolloff said. The village has started its cleanup with an inspection of properties, identifying lots with visible accumulations of junk including unlicensed vehicles. That survey is now being done by the newly hired community service officer, John Erickson, who is visiting homes and informing residents about the coming chance to get rid

of unwanted stuff. “We are looking for voluntary compliance,” police Chief Jeff Schinzing said. “John is looking at places with concentrations of things in their yards and giving them the flyer.” That bright orange flyer says that residents can have the village pick up many things including furniture, appliances, electronics, mattresses, tires and more. The village will charge for collecting some items that are more difficult to dispose of such as TVs, appliances with Freon and tires. The flyer includes an application

Breakfast and lunch prices School breakfast and lunch prices increased to be in compliance with federal standards. The early childhood through 12th grade breakfast price will be $1 straight across the board while the lunch prices will increase 10 cents for each school. Early childhood through fifth grade will be $1.75, and sixth through 12th grades will be $2. Following closed session the board accepted a shared agreement with Webster School. Krissa Ward’s school psychologist services will be shared 50/50 between the two districts. The board approved the resignation of Amanda Goeden, fourthgrade teacher, and Sally Lahners, middle school special education teacher. Other staffing changes included paraprofessionals. Rachael Trittelwitz resigned, and Betsy Liljenberg was hired. The board renewed the building lease for ALC and supported the community circus which will be a basketball fundraiser. The following committees are scheduled to meet on Monday, May 9: budget and finance committee at 5:15, building and grounds at 6:15 followed by personnel and negotiations at 7:15 p.m. Policy, planning and curriculum will meet the following Monday, May 16, at 6 p.m. The regular monthly school board meeting will be held on Monday, May 23, at 6 p.m.

and 19 have been terminated from the program. For the participant to remain successful after graduation as well as successful in the program, they need to apply the tools they were given in the program. AODA recovery does not end on graduation day. It is an ongoing process, where the life skills and self-esteem that were developed in treatment are necessary for long-term sobriety. Burnett County Drug Court is held the first and third Thursday of the month at 9 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact Tessa Anderson, drug court coordinator, at 715-349-8878 or at tanderson@ burnettcounty.org. – from Burnett County Drug and Alcohol Court

form to schedule a cleanup stop. Rolloff said that the No. 1 thing with the cleanup is safety as well as appearance. He said that the village wants to get rid of nonrunning and unlicensed cars from yards. Rolloff added that in the future Grantsburg will start looking at fire codes and housing inspections, but that is a later step. Schinzing said the question now is where to draw the line, saying, “We don’t want the village to look like a junkyard.”


PAGE 6 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2016

Wisconsin tourism increases by nearly $1 billion in 2015 Travelers to Burnett County spent more than $23 million BURNETT COUNTY - For travelers who helped Wisconsin achieve a nearly $1 billion increase in tourism economic impact in 2015, it’s all about fun and memories. For the state’s tourism industry, it’s big business. For taxpayers and residents, it’s all about jobs and tax revenue those travelers generate. A study conducted by Tourism Economics shows the impact of tourism on the state’s economy was $19.3 billion in 2015, an increase of 4.4 percent from the previous year. Locally, travelers to Burnett County spent $23.2 million in 2015, an increase of 3.5 percent compared to 2014. Among the contributing factors for local tourism growth were the efforts of the Burnett County Tourism Coalition that focused on branding the natural beauty and resources with a new logo and tag line Spirited Waters, Inspiring Wildlife and launching a dedicated tourism website, burnettcountyfun.com. “Tourism plays a critical role in our county, and from an economic standpoint, the numbers reflect that,” said BCTC President Larry Main of Webb Lake. “Last year’s numbers are very encouraging and we hope to capitalize on this momentum in the coming months with an intensive digital marketing campaign.” Statewide, traveler spending generated $1.5 billion in state and local revenue and $1.1 billion in federal taxes. Burnett County’s share totaled $3 million, up 2.6 percent over 2014. “These results let us know that what we have been doing over the last five years is working,” said Department of Tourism Secretary Stephanie Klett. “It’s a tremendous credit to the tourism industry in all 72 counties and the innovative work they do to create exciting vacation experiences, market their destinations under our united brand of fun and provide great customer service that

These are sample photos are from Washburn County’s new photo library for promoting tourism. — Photos by James Netz Photography

makes travelers want to return to Wisconsin time and again.” Tourism continues to be one of Wisconsin’s most important economic resources. Research continues to show that tourism advertising goes beyond just promoting vacations, it also positively influences the state’s overall image as a great place to live, find a job, or open a business. The Department of Tourism worked with a national research firm Tourism Economics and Longwoods International to produce the reports. Find BCTC on Facebook.com/BurnettCountyWI or e-mail them at BurnettCountyFun@gmail.com. The next general membership meeting is at 6 p.m., Thursday, May 12, Room 163 at the Burnett County Government Center and is open to all tourism-related business owners and individuals interested in promoting tourism in Burnett County. - submitted

NOAA emergency radios save lives … Listen, act and live! MADISON - Do you have an emergency weather radio? It could save your life. Wednesday, May 4, is NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards Awareness Day. The campaign encourages Wisconsin residents to own a NOAA All Hazards Weather Radio, a 24-hour source of weather forecasts, watches, warnings, and nonweather emergency information provided by the National Weather Service and its parent agency, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. “The early warning of possible danger gives you and your family time to act and stay safe.” says Brian Satula, Wisconsin

Emergency Management administrator. Satula adds, “Listen, act and live! Listen to the weather radio warnings and take action right away. You’ll have a much better chance of surviving the disaster.” NOAA All Hazards Weather Radios, with an alarm and battery backup, is one of the best ways to protect your family, especially at night when the alarm feature can wake you up during severe weather and give you and your family time to seek appropriate shelter. If there is no severe weather or emergency your radio can be switched to a silent, standby mode. Weather radios come in many sizes, with a variety of functions and costs. They

can be purchased at most electronic and home improvement stores. Most weather radio receivers are either battery-operated portables or AC-powered desktop models with battery backup. The portable weather radios are an important item to take along when you are enjoying the outdoors such as camping and boating. Many receivers have digital technology called Specific Area Message Encoding that allows users to program their radios to alarm only for hazardous conditions that affect their county. For additional information about weather radios including real-life stories of Wisconsin residents who survived a

tornado thanks to the early warning from a NOAA All Hazards Weather Radio, go to readywisconsin.wi.gov/tornado/survivors.asp. ReadyWisconsin is a campaign from Wisconsin Emergency Management with a mission to prepare individuals, families and businesses for emergencies and disasters. For additional safety tips, visit ReadyWisconsin.wi.gov or follow them on Facebook, facebook.com/ReadyWisconsin, Twitter, twitter.com/ReadyWisconsin and Instagram, instagram.com/ ReadyWisconsin. — submitted

State Patrol: Law of the Month NEXEN DONATES TO SASD Wisconsin’s Absolute Sobriety Law means not a drop of alcohol for drivers under age 21 SPOONER - Traffic crashes are the leading cause of death for teens in Wisconsin. To prevent needless deaths and injuries during the start of the graduation season and other springtime celebrations, law enforcement agencies are reminding young motorists and their parents about Wisconsin’s Absolute Sobriety Law for drivers under age 21. The law is quite simple. Absolute sobriety for drivers under age 21 means they may not consume any amount of alcohol, not even a drop, and legally operate a motor vehicle. Young drivers convicted of violating Wisconsin’s Absolute Sobriety Law will

have their driver license suspended for three months. They also will have to pay a $389.50 citation and will have four demerit points assessed on their driver license. “At any age, alcohol even in small amounts may impair the mental and physical skills needed to drive safely, such as decision making, concentration, coordination and reaction time. However, teens and young people, who often are inexperienced drivers, are especially susceptible to the adverse effects of alcohol on their driving ability,” says Wisconsin State Patrol Lt. Dori Petznick, Northwest Region-Spooner Post. “We don’t want young drivers or their passengers to suffer serious injuries or tragic deaths because of a disastrous decision, such as getting behind the wheel after drinking.” — from WSP Nexen recently donated a TV4 machining center to the Spooner Area School District for its technical education department. Through coordinated efforts from Northwoods Lumber, Spooner Machine and Nexen, the machine was successfully delivered to the metals and fabrications lab. — Photo submitted


MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 7

Enforcement of Balsam Lake boating laws promised Annexation into village a possibility for Five Flags Mary Stirrat | Staff writer BALSAM LAKE — The weather is just starting to warm up, but there have already been boating complaints on Balsam Lake. In a written report to the Balsam Lake Village Board, read by President Geno D’Agostino at the Monday, May 2, board meeting, police Chief Thomas Thompson reminded lake users of boating laws. Thompson asked people to watch the slow and no-wake zones, to carry enough life jackets of the right sizes and to carry appropriate registration materials. He also noted that the public protection committee has authorized the police department to issue tickets to boaters who power load or unload their boats at beach landings. This means that boaters cannot run their motors to get their boat on or off the trailer. Thompson warned residents to watch their bank and credit card statements because there have been a number of identity and ATM-type thefts. He said that the number of identity theft complaints, disorderly conduct incidents, animal complaints and threats/harassment complaints were higher last month than in the previous April. Traffic stops and drunk calls were down. Annexation With no commitment on either side, the village board and the owner of Five Flags Golf Course discussed the possibility of annexing the golf course property into the village. Right now, said owner Linda LaMere, she is just looking at options to increase revenue at the golf course. “It’s a breakeven proposition,” added her husband, Richard Welty, “and has been for years.” One thing under consideration, said LaMere, is developing the northern wooded area of the property into a residential area. Another possibility is to create a campground. No decision has been made, emphasized Welty, but they want to be able to investigate and find out if the village is interested. D’Agostino said that the board could

Two incumbents and a newcomer were sworn in to office on the Balsam Lake Village Board Monday evening, May 2. From left are incumbents Jeff Reed and Caroline Rediske. At right is Steve Biza, who is starting his first term on the board. Village President Geno D’Agostino reminded board members that their “first and foremost job” is to act on what is best for the village. — Photos by Mary Stirrat

program, which will begin with a Friday, June 10, kickoff party at the Balsam Lake beach. The party will be from 2 to 4 p.m. Milltown kicks off the program with an 8 p.m. showing of “Finding Nemo” at Bering Park starting at dusk. • Chamber of commerce President Steve Williams told the board that Freedom Festival activities have all been scheduled, and the schedule should be on the website late this week or early next. • The board approved a $269 ad for the Unity High School sports calendar. The ad will be 2 by 4 inches in size. • New signage listing the park rules is being erected at Pine Park, replacing the sign currently facing Tuttle Street. The sign facing Basil Street will be placed farther into the park so it will not interfere with disc golf. A new rule is being added to the beach sign which states that no alcohol is allowed. • Two 6-foot aluminum benches will be placed along the walking trails in Balsam Lake, purchased with money left over after buying additional snowflake ornaments. Total price for the benches is $947.

not really make a decision until they have a formal request. The process starts with LaMere filling out the application for annexation, according to the village attorney. LaMere noted that Five Flags has a liquor license from the Town of Milltown, and she asked whether that would go along with the business if it is annexed into the village. “That liquor license would be grandfathered in,” said D’Agostino, adding that this is the opinion of the village attorney. “You would not lose the liquor license. But at this point, it’s just speculation. If you think it’s a good idea, request the annexation. “If you come with a formal request we will receive,” he said.

Other business • During the public comment portion of the meeting a village resident spoke to the board about the condition of Whiskey Jake’s saying it was “junky looking.” D’Agostino said that things are “in motion to remedy the situation.” • Linda Heimstead, library director, reported that Balsam Lake and Milltown are collaborating on the summer reading

Linda LaMere, owner of Five Flags Golf Course, and her husband, Richard Welty.

Dresser Village Board considers berm

Water control issues conflict with budget plans   Greg Marsten | Staff writer DRESSER - The Dresser Village Board discussed a proposal to address storm-water concerns and passed the issue along to their finance committee, to find a way to pay for several early plans of action on the water issues, which follows up, in a way, on recent proposals from Cedar Corp. to deal with storm-water flooding issues in and around 206 South St., near the intersection with Blaisdell Avenue. The Dresser board dealt with the latest proposal at the their regular monthly meeting on Monday, May 2, where public works director Steve Jacobs outlined a recommendation that the village “straighten out” a ditch near the property, so as to keep the ditch within the village right of way. It currently loops around and is not on the easement, which Jacobs noted means anytime they do work on the area, they need to get permission. “That way we can control it,” Jacobs said, adding that they would also line the ditch with a poly liner, to speed the outflow and keep it from collecting debris. However, that proposal was met with an initial bit of skepticism by village President Bryan Beseler, who noted the recent engineering plans said nothing about the ditch “straightening.” “We spent some money on an engineer, and now we have our own design?” Beseler asked. There was bit of back-and-forth on the ditch proposal, which Jacobs estimated would cost about $5,000, but could be done over just a couple of days, and would help control the water in a so-

village right of way for the future, the board voted to send the ditch measure to the finance committee to decide how best to pay for the work, since it is not part of the current budget.

Cedar Corporation engineers presented a plan last month to address storm-water flooding issues near a Dresser properties. Some of those issues came to light again on Monday, May 2, when the Dresser Village Board addressed the issue, but took their own route on solving the problem. – File photo by Greg Marsten called 25-year flood. “None of those (Cedar engineering report) options guarantee (controlling) a 100-year-flood event,” Jacobs stated. As noted last month when reviewing the Cedar Corp. study, flooding at the 206 South St. home over the past six years has been a point of contention between the village and the homeowners, who paid to have a berm constructed near their home, but they were hoping to have the village assist with the cost of the berm. The study was commissioned to decide the best answer for the long run. Since the berm’s construction, the flooding has not occurred, but the Cedar review of the hydrological features of the area dismissed some of the berm’s effec-

tiveness, and instead outlined a variety of recommendations to solve the problem for a larger rain event, and better understand if the berm is enough, or if other issues are lying just below the surface. Jacobs said the plan would address part of the problem and would be a good first step toward controlling the storm water. Beseler asked Jacobs if he thinks the ditch lining and straightening would be his top priority for the next five years. “I would put it in the top two (priorities),” Jacobs said, adding that the Horseman Avenue water infiltration project would be his top priority. After some discussion and a legal opinion by village attorney Tim Laux, who believed the ditch should be within in

In other board business: • The board approved the purchase of a used Western plow for their 1997 International plow truck, for $3,000. The unit would cost over $10,000 new, and Jacobs was confident it would help meet the village needs for several years, until they purchase a new truck. • Laux outlined some changes he made to the village water and sewer regulations, per state Public Service Commission standards. Laux said the rules outline the fact that the charges are not negotiable. “It’s not ‘Let’s Make a Deal,’” Laux said, noting that the law is regulated by the PSC, and the village’s new regulations make it very clear and supports the PSC language. • Jacobs gave a brief update on public works and noted how they have had good results from the leak detection system they recently purchased. • The board approved an annual contribution to the Polk County Economic Development Committee, for $895, without debate. • Beseler noted the upcoming villagewide garage sales, which has maps available at the village hall. The sale takes place later this week and weekend. • The board approved moving their July board meeting to July 11, moved from July 4. • Beseler said he has started the conversation with the Town of Osceola on a possible joint meeting to discuss the ongoing cooperative boundary committee work, with more details later.


PAGE 8 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2016

C O N V E R S A T I O N S

Since 1933

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Headline equals racial stereotype Last week the Leader published two articles prompted by Prince’s death. Greg Marsten’s article was a wonderful, uplifting remembrance of Prince’s impact on his life. While I never bought a Prince CD, saw a concert or caught a glimpse of him on the street, I have followed his career and admired his contributions to his community. In the second article writer E. Royal Emerson felt it, «incumbent to resurrect the role of the critic.» That too is a worthy purpose, I suppose, as it is never wise to worship a cult personality, be he entertainer, pastor or politician. The critic found that Prince’s music, despite his musical talent, to be uninspiring and his lyrics trite. That is

Tommy honored F

ormer Gov. Tommy Thompson will get an honorary degree this month from the University of Wisconsin - Madison. He is being cited for his dedication to the university and the Wisconsin Idea. Thompson’s life is both a Horatio Alger-type story and a love affair with the university. It also is in stark contrast to Gov. Scott Walker. He grew up a grocer’s son in Elroy, got bachelor and law degrees at the Madison campus and entered a successful career in politics. The grocery store was a family business in which everyone helped out. Thompson worked as a campus-area bartender to help pay college tuition. Work came naturally to him. He first ran for the Assembly in 1966, winning an upset victory in the Republican primary. He would tell how his father gave him $5 per day to help in the election. It was one of his favorite yarns. Thompson said the best campaign investment might have been buying a drink for early-morning patrons at taverns that were part of small-town American a half-century ago. The morning drinkers were likely to be there for much of the day, perhaps extolling the virtues of the young man, Thompson, who had been there earlier. He would serve in the Assembly for 20 years before winning his

his opinion and I’m okay with that. What bothers me is the very title of the piece, “Prince, in the end, little more than shuck and jive.” Shuck and jive? At the risk of calling down the thunder of the anti-political correctness crowd, I need to point out the degrading racist nature of “shuck and jive.” It is a term that came out of slavery and survived through the Jim Crow-era. It comes out of a time when African Americans could be lynched for being uppity and looking at white people in the eye and walking with a spring in one’s step, or talking back even when the white person was wrong. Shuck and jive became immortalized by minstrel shows where white men painted their faces black and mocked black people with racist degrading humor. Think of those

State Capitol Newsletter Matt Pommer first of four terms as governor. He would later take a cabinet job under President George W. Bush. Republicans brought him back to the political ring in 2012 as their candidate for the U.S. Senate. He would lose that race to Democrat Tammy Baldwin. But the University of Wisconsin remains Thompson’s love. He says the research gains will spur economic growth in all parts of the state. As governor, Thompson provided extra state funding for the Madison campus to promote biotechnology and medical research. Sixteen years ago, Thompson came to deliver his annual State of the State message to the Legislature with a test tube of DNA strands in his hand. He called it “the face of the future.” Thompson continued to play the university champion even after he was gone from the state political scene. In a recent newspaper article in a Madison weekly, professor Michael Sussman, director of the UW-Madison Biotechnology Center, recalled the then-governor spent hours with him learning

movies from the ‘20s, ‘30s, ‘40s and ‘50s, when the only roles for black people were those of servants, shoe shine boys, porters or the lovable dufus. That is shuck and jive. Think of opera singers Marian Anderson and Paul Robeson who were denied opportunities to sing, or greats like Lena Horne, Louis Armstrong and Jackie Robinson who were denied lodging in whiteonly hotels. That is shuck and jive. I do not know nor do I care how history will judge Prince. I do care that a man, his life and his talent, are reduced to a dehumanizing racial stereotype. I do expect better of critics and the newspapers that print their words. Gail Lando Grantsburg

how DNA works. “My experience with Tommy was amazing. I had never worked with a Republican in my life,” said Sussman. The scene has changed. Walker sought to change the “Wisconsin Idea” of the university helping all aspects of the state. A Republican-controlled Assembly rejected Walker’s idea. Walker’s budgets have slashed hundreds of millions of state tax dollars from the university system. The Board of Regents, dominated by Walker appointees, discouraged a public presentation by chancellors on the impact of the cuts. Walker, who left college without a degree, has suggested high school students consider getting a vocational, rather than college, education. Thompson, by comparison, is a champion for going to college. “Going to a university transforms you. The stimulus, the intellectual capacity that you interact with, it makes you a whole different person,” Thompson said, “It gives you the opportunity and the ability to do just about anything.” Thompson is living proof of the statement. The content in this column does not reflect the views or opinions of the Wisconsin Newspaper Association or its member newspapers.

The Inter-County Leader was established in 1933 by the Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association. Read about the cooperative’s history at iccpaonline.com

WHERE TO WRITE President Barack Obama 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Washington, D.C. 20500 whitehouse.gov/contact/ Gov. Scott Walker Wisconsin State Capitol Madison, WI 53707 transition@wisconsin.gov Congressman Sean Duffy (7th District) 1208 Longworth House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 PH: 202-225-3365 U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin 1 Russell Courtyard Washington, D.C. 20510 202-224-5653 FAX: 202-25-6942 Rep. Adam Jarchow (28th District) Room 19 North, State Capitol. P.O. Box 8952, Madison, WI 53708 608-267-2365 • 888-529-0028 FAX: 608-282-3628 rep.Jarchow@legis.state.wi.us Rep. Romaine Quinn (75th District) Room 7 West, State Capitol P.O. Box 8953, Madison, WI 53708 608-266-2519 • 888-534-0075 rep.Quinn@legis.wisconsin.gov U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson 2 Russell Courtyard Washington, D.C. 20510 202-224-5323 Sen. Janet Bewley (25th District) Room 126 South, State Capitol P.O. Box 7882, Madison, WI 53707 608-266-3510 sen.Bewley@legis.state.wi.us Sen. Sheila Harsdorf (10th District) State Capitol, P.O. Box 7882 Madison, WI 53707 608-266-7745 • 715-232-1390 Toll-free - 800-862-1092 sen.harsdorf@legis.state.wi.us Rep. Nick Milroy (73rd District) Room 8 North, State Capitol P.O. Box 8953, Madison 53708 rep.milroy@legis.state.wi.us

The Leader is a cooperative-owned newspaper

JOE HELLER

Informing more than 16,000 readers each week in print and online • leadernewsroom.com


MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 9

C O N V E R S A T I O N S LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Microchip scanner service for Polk County lost dogs In March this year, Gov. Scott Walker signed into law AB487/SB450 affecting Chapter 173 of the Wisconsin State Statute that addresses animals and humane officers. Among other items included in this bill is the state-required hold period for stray dogs that has been reduced from seven days to three days. In Wisconsin an unclaimed dog can be disposed of through one of several means after the required three-day holding time:

1) the animal is placed up for adoption to a new owner, 2) the animal is transferred to a rescue for rehoming, 3) the animal is killed or 4) the animal is turned over to a state-accredited facility for educational or scientific purposes. See Wisconsin State Statute 174.13. This new reduced hold time makes it imperative to get lost dogs back to their owners in as short a time as possible in order to avoid these costly and possibly life-threatening scenarios. Many owners microchip their pets as a means of identification should their dog become lost. These microchips are about

the size of a grain of rice and are inserted between the shoulder blades just below the skin. Scanning a found dog for that microchip immediately at impound can quickly identify the owner who can then be notified of where their dog is. Few municipalities in Polk County use our county-designated humane society for impound. A found dog without visual identification could be impounded in any of the 36 municipalities in Polk County depending on how far the dog could travel on its own. These municipalities do not have scanners to check for microchips. Here is where the Shelter Commu-

nity Action Team can help. The Shelter Community Action Team has a base of dedicated volunteers in Polk County with scanners, willing to travel to any municipality holding a lost dog to scan it for a microchip. There is no charge for this service. Each municipality in Polk County has been notified of this service. Our goal is to reunite lost dogs with their owners quickly and efficiently. Contact the Shelter Community Action Team at 715-501-8488. Tanya Borg Centuria

INTERSTATE PARK FALL While details remained sketchy at press time, there was an apparent rock fall that led to the need for emergency services at Interstate Park Wisconsin on Saturday, April 30, in St. Croix Falls. According to the Polk County Sheriff’s Department, the call came in at 4:19 p.m., calling for medical services. Park rangers, Lakes Region EMS and St. Croix Falls Fire responded to the incident, and an ambulance was also on the scene. Authorities have not released the name of the victim, nor the cause for the call. Dispatcher records show that the victim was later transferred to Hennepin County Medical Center for treatment. The incident appears to have taken place near the Summit Rock Trail in the park, which was very busy that afternoon. – Photo by Greg Marsten

“Long Live the Squeezebox XXVIII” to be held at Ceska Opera House HAUGEN - Tickets are now on sale for “Long Live the Squeezebox XXVIII,” spring edition, which will be presented 7:30 p.m. at the Ceska Opera House in Haugen, 320 W. Third St., on Friday, May 13. The show is a traditional celebration of accordion and concertina music. Reservations for seating are required, and may be obtained by calling 715-234-5600. This show is being presented in memory of accordion player Harry L. Hagen of Chetek, who died last October. Hagen appeared in the shows for 25 years and was a tireless promoter of the accordion as an instrument of fine art. Players scheduled to appear include: Sally Baumberger, Rice Lake, on piano

accordion; Fritz Brandenburg, Chetek, on button box accordion; Arnie Checkalski, Rice Lake, concertina; John Cynor, Cumberland, on concertina accompanied by Dorothy Haraburda, Cornell, on drums; George “Mr. Concertina” Dums, Rib Lake on concertina; Brad Kuchera, Hillsdale, on piano accordion; Larry Lompa, Eau Claire, on concertina; William Luedtke, Boyd on button box accordion; JoAnn Matthys, Barron, on piano accordion; Ralph Sokup, Rice Lake, on drums; and Mike Konop, Blaine, Minn., on tuba. In addition to the music, the evenings are interspersed with comic relief from Ceska Opera’s Mighty Uff-da Players. — from Ceska Opera House

Assembly of players from 2015 “Long Live the Squeezebox XXVII,” spring edition included seated (L to R): Aaron Dostal, Sally Baumberger, Ellie Paulson, JoAnn Matthys, William Luedtke and Brad Kuchera. Standing: Jeff Dostal, Rich Swanson, Joel Jensen, Arnie Checkalski, George “Mr. Concertina” Dums, Ralph Sokup and Mike Konop. — Photo submitted

Wisconsin taxes more personal property than neighbors

W

Purchase a subscription and make your money go farther along with the covenience of having the news delivered to you.

isconsin is one of 40 states that tax some personal property. However, exemptions and tax treatment vary widely. Of surrounding states, Wisconsin taxes more personal property than most. Illinois and Iowa do not tax personal property. Minnesota exempts nearly all of it, with only certain utility systems, railroad docks and wharves, and some manufactured

homes taxable. Michigan treats personal property similar to Wisconsin: Household goods are exempt and business property is taxable unless specifically exempted. The Wisconsin Taxpayers Alliance is a nonpartisan, nonprofit research organization dedicated to good government through citizen education since 1932.


PAGE 10 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2016

ATV racetrack in SCF?

Æbleskiver fever this weekend

Request draws early opposition, even before plan details emerge    

Unique little pancake-type treats this weekend, from a brand-new kitchen  LUCK – This weekend is not only the state fishing opener, it is also time for West Denmark Lutheran Church’s annual Æbleskiver supper. For over 70 years, church members have served the traditional Æbleskiver meal to neighbors and friends from an ever-widening circle. At the peak of the dinner rush, as many as 16 bakers can be seen turning batter into perfectly round Æbleskiver, the Danish version of a pancake. Also served is Medisterpølse, traditional Danish sausage, and Sødsuppe, fruit soup. The meal finishes with dessert and lots of coffee, and children are encouraged to attend. The meal will also be the inaugural event, of sorts, for a completely renovated and improved kitchen at the West Denmark Paris Hall, making it a state-of-theart facility. The 2016 Æbleskiver dinner will be held Saturday, May 7, from 3:30-7 p.m. at the West Denmark Parish Hall, located 1.2 miles west of Luck, off CTH N on 170th Street. There will be signs. The event also includes a bake sale, silent auction on original artwork and several theme baskets, and the event is also part of the Earth Arts Tour, as an Oasis. For more information, call 715-472-8393.

Greg Marsten | Staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – A zoning change request for a parcel of land just south of Hwy. 8 in the Town of St. Croix Falls is already drawing the ire of some residents and at least one neighboring business, which has started a petition to stop the effort. According to the Town of St. Croix Falls Plan Commission agenda for their May 11 meeting, a special exception zoning request has been filed to allow an All-Terrain Vehicle MotoPlex on two parcels of property, one being a 64-acre parcel just south of Hwy. 8. The request comes from landowner Robert C. Carlson, who owns several properties in the same area. The proposal is one of several proposals the plan commission is meant to consider, including several rezoning requests, subdivision plans and even a request for a new drive-up coffee kiosk very near the same ATV property along Hwy. 8. While the ATV racetrack request is the only one refered to so far by some residents, the details of the plan won’t be fully known until the May 11 meeting. Regardless of the lack of detail, the proposal has garnered attention from the neighboring business to the south, Dancing Dragonfly Winery, which has already started a petition to stop the idea before it starts. “We believe that an ATV racetrack would ruin the wonderful winery expe-

The annual West Denmark Aebleskiver event this Saturday, May 7, involves the careful creation of round, tennisball-sized Danish pancakes. - File photo by Greg Marsten

leadernewsroom.com

rience we have worked so hard to create, and would seriously harm our financial viability,” the memo stated, encouraging people to sign a petition and appear before the commission on May 11. County GIS maps show the land in question is generally undeveloped and mostly wooded to the north, and would apparently be accessed from another adjacent parcel on Hwy. 8. It is unclear how much of the property would be used for the ATV venture, and what types of regulations would be included, such as whether mufflers would be required, and what types of safety or regulation systems would be in place, let alone who could use any such facility. In the past, there have been other ATV “park” proposals floated, specifically by the village of Luck, which presented a proposal for an ATV off-road park several years ago on a former landfill site. That plan was met with a large number of opponents, many of whom claimed the noise and dust would be detrimental to local homes and businesses. That Luck plan died on the vine, and rumors of other similar facilities have yet to pan out, although ATVs have seen a much more broad acceptance on town and municipal roads in years since, to allow more touring options. The Town of St. Croix Falls proposal goes before the plan commission on Wednesday, May 11, at 6 p.m. at the Town of St. Croix Falls Hall. Comments for or agasint any of the proposed changes must be presented either in person or in writing at that time. Attempts to reach the landowner were unsuccessful by press time.

WITC residential construction and cabinetmaking open house set IT’S

GARAGE/YARD SALE TIME

An open house will be held Wednesday, May 11, for this home built by the construction and cabinetmaking program at WITC. — Photo submitted

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RICE LAKE - For students in the residential construction and cabinetmaking program, formerly wood technics, there couldn’t be a better hands-on project – to build a house from beginning to end. The students will celebrate the completion of their project with a public open house on Wednesday, May 11, from 5 to 8 p.m. The house is located at 102 Royal Crest Drive in Rice Lake. From Main Street, go west on Allen St., through the stop at Wisconsin Street, north on Royal Crest, corner of Sabrina Court. Follow signs. Now in its 14th year, this year’s sponsor is Jason Derousseau of Re/Max Advantage. Second-year students began construction of the house in late August, under the supervision of instructors Scott Theilig and Chris Harder, as well as director Scott Richter of Vanderport Construction. The students worked on nearly

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all aspects of the building, from framing and trusses, siding and roofing, to building and installing cabinets. First-year students in the program were also involved in the project, insulating and installing drywall. Broadband technologies students, formerly telecommunication, wired the home for telephone, cable TV and data. WITC-Rice Lake offers the only twoyear construction program in the state of Wisconsin. The residential construction and cabinetmaking technical diploma provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary for job success in the construction industry. Students learn the fundamentals of building design, construction, layout operation, related mathematics, blueprint reading, estimating, cabinet design, cabinet and furniture making and more. — from WITC

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INTER-COUNTY COOPERATIVE PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION

303 Wisconsin Ave. N Frederic, Wis.

715-327-4236

107 N. Washington St. St. Croix Falls, Wis.

715-483-9008

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715-349-2560

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Offer valid through May 27, 2016

Frederic • 715-327-4236 Siren • 715-349-2560 St. Croix Falls 715-483-9008 editor@leadernewsroom.com


MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 11

Burnett 4-H Talent Contest 2016

Brothers Nicolas and Jordan Webster from the Wood Creek 4-H Club competed in the choral reading contest on Saturday, April 23. The event was held at the Siren School. Who doesn’t want to know how to decorate a cupcake? Wood Creek member Hannah Hillman demonstrated how she decorated her cupcakes as part of the demonstration contest at the county-wide 4-H event on Saturday, April 23.

Photos by Becky Strabel

Emily Stiemann and Allie Webster both members of the Wood Creek 4-H Club performed Dr. Suess’ “Oh, the places you will go” during the choral reading competition. Both are seniors and have many years of experience. Judge John Tinman explained to the audience, “This is how it is done/”

“Old Farmer and the Turnip,” performed by the Wood Creek 4-H Club on Saturday, April 23 in the Siren School auditorium showed how lending a hand could provide for more than just one person but for a whole village.

LEFT: Participants of the Burnett County 4-H clothing revue held on Saturday, April 23, modeled a wide range of abilities and styles. Dahlia Dorn, a junior member of the Orange 4-H Club showed off a recycled design were she added a skirt to a T-shirt to make a romper. Alexis Slater, an intermediate member of the Wood River Beavers accessorized a purchased outfit and explained why she chose her ensemble. A Senior member of the Wood Creek 4-H Club, Emily Stiemann showed off her bold in pink business attire. The patterns for each piece were modified to become custom pieces to add to her wardrobe. AnnaDora Dorn junior member of the Orange 4-H Club showed the judge a recycled dress that she made from a tank top and one of her father’s button-down shirts.

The photography contest selects two best-of-show exhibits to be on display at the state youth 4-H conference in Madison. Two members of the Jolly H’s 4-H Club were chosen. They are Ayla Meyer and Kayla Glover.

The foods revue was done by junior member Alex Peterson of the Wood Creek 4-H Club. Alex made an egg bake and was ready for the judging to begin in the FACE room at the Siren School on Saturday, Apiril 23.

The Jolly Hs 4-H Club dressed as different colors and performed The Crayon Box That Talked by Shane DeRolf. The poem ends by saying. “We are a box of crayons, each one of us unique. But when we get together the picture is complete.”

Mary Charmoli volunteered her time and talents to judge the arts and crafts contest. She is shown with a display of grand champion winners. A couple selections will go to Madison for display at the Youth 4-H Conference in June.

Members of the Orange 4-H Club performed a mini-skit entitled “Dr. Suess’ Sneetches 4-H Style.” Star Belly Sneetches had frankfurter roasts and marshmallow toasts, By the end of the tale all Sneetches, Plain-Belly or Star, were the best kind of 4-H Sneetches by far.


PAGE 12 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2016

INTER-COUNTY LEADER

SPRING SPORTS FREDERIC • GRANTSBURG • LUCK • ST. CROIX FALLS • SIREN • UNITY • WEBSTER BASEBALL • BOYS GOLF • SOFTBALL • TRACK & FIELD

Saints hold Pirates offense at bay Fall against Unity for first conference loss of season St. Croix Falls 11, Grantsburg 0 Marty Seeger|Staff writer GRANTSBURG – Saints senior Brady Leahy gave up only a pair of hits against Grantsburg for another St. Croix Falls conference win on Thursday, April 28. It was the Saints only game last week as they continued to win in the West Lakeland where they remain unbeaten. Leahy finished with six strikeouts through five innings with no walks and no earned runs allowed. Along with great pitching the Saints collected 13 hits, which included an RBI single from Alex Johnson in the first inning to get the Saints on the board. St. Croix Falls scored another four runs on five hits in the third inning, with a Johnson two-RBI single and a two-run double by Josh Skallet, who finished with three hits. Jake Johnson hit an RBI single in a one-run fourth inning, and St. Croix Falls added another five runs in the fifth inning, which included a two-run triple by Tyler Henk. The inning was sparked by a Spencer Langer single to score Joe Gorres and Skallet, followed by Henk’s triple. “Defensively the team had another good night yielding only one hit and one error. Our main focus going into this week’s play is to concentrate on our fundamentals while remaining aware of the signs on offense,” said Saints coach Mark Gjovig. The Pirates meanwhile were credited with two hits with Majel Schmaltz singling in the third and Jackson Gerber getting credit for the single in the fourth inning. “We couldn’t get our bats on the ball. Leahy consistently threw the high fastball and we went after it too many times,” said Pirates coach Pete Johnson. “Once again we played clean defense, SCF just kept dropping hits in that area between

Another run scored for St. Croix Falls as they moved on to beat Grantsburg on Thursday, April 28. – Photos by Becky Strabel unless otherwise noted our infield and outfielders.”

Unity 2, St. Croix Falls 1 BALSAM LAKE – Saints pitcher Brady Leahy took his first loss of the season in a pitchers duel against Nathan Heimstead on Monday, May 2. It was the Saints first conference loss of the season and a big win for Unity as they move to 4-1 in the conference. The Saints still remain at the top of the conference at 5-1. The Eagles gave little run support to Heimstead as they provided two runs on just three hits. “Once again, Heimstead was masterful on the mound. He was very efficient, throwing 64 pitches through six-plus innings while picking up the win,” said Unity coach Matt Humpal. Heimstead allowed just three hits and one earned run through six innings, and

Saints senior John Petherbridge eyes a pitch against the Pirates on Thursday, April 28.

had one walk with one strikeout, as both teams provided a solid defensive effort. “Our guys have really bought into our defensive effort. They take pride in their individual defensive skills and we have turned it into exceptional team defense,” Humpal said. Heimstead was relieved by Logan Bader in the seventh inning, and Bader got the save despite a man on third with only one out. Leahy finished with six strikeouts and had one walk, while allowing six hits and no earned runs. The only runs in the game came in the fifth inning with the Saints taking a 1-0

See Baseball/Next page

Saints shortstop Tyler Henk scoops up a ground ball during a great defensive game against Unity on Monday, May 2. The Saints lost a close one, 2-1, for their first conference loss of the year. – Photo by Marty Seeger

Extra Points

••• WENHAM, Mass. – St. Croix Falls 2015 graduate Alex King is already having success with the Gordon College Fighting Scots men’s track team. Gordon College is located in Wenham, Mass., and King set a school record in the pole vault at the Commonwealth Coast Conference Invitational Saturday, April 30, with a vault of 13-01.50. He beat the next-best finisher by more than a meter and eclipsed the previous school record by more than a foot, which has been held since 2010. With his finish, King qualifies for a trip to the NCAA Division 3 New England Championships in Springfield, Mass. – with information from athletics.gordon.edu ••• SIREN – The Spring Ting was held at the Siren Ballpark last weekend, Friday, April 29 – Sunday, May 1. The 20-team slow-pitch tournament featured Sweeny’s in first place followed by the Axmen in second. There was a third-place tie between Deer’s Meat Locker and Mr. D’s. Sweeny’s and the Axmen both qualify for the best of the Northwest Tournament that will be held Aug. 29-21, at the Siren Ballpark. – with submitted information ••• LEADER LAND – Local sports tidbits to share? Please contact the Leader by 4:30 p.m. on Mondays to go in Extra Points. – Marty Seeger

SPORTS RESULTS DEADLINES: WEDNESDAY - MONDAY: 1 p.m. the following business day. TUESDAY: 11 p.m. on Tuesday. Missed deadlines mean no coverage that week! SPORTS NEWS OR SCORES TO REPORT? • PHONE: 715-327-4236 • FAX: 715-327-4117 • EMAIL: mseeger@leadernewsroom.com

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MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 13

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Lady Pirates lead girls standings at SCF invite Marty Seeger|Staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – It was a record-setting day for the Grantsburg girls 4x800-meter relay team as they broke the school record for the second time this season. Hallie Jensen, Violet Ohnstad, Gracie Gerber and Brittanie Blume were successful in shaving seven seconds off their time from a couple of weeks earlier and defeated seven other teams in the event with a time of 10:32. The Grantsburg girls also finished in first place in the overall standings among 10 other teams. St. Croix Falls was a very close second as Grantsburg had 118 points, while the Saints had 117.5 points. Frederic/Luck placed third, followed by Unity, Webster, Cameron, Siren, Shell Lake, Turtle Lake/Clayton and Clear Lake. Girls highlights included Nicole Nelson, Frederic/Luck, in first place in the 100-meter dash with 13.25. Delia Labatt from Grantsburg won the 200-meter dash with a time of 27.13, and also won the 400meter dash with 1:01.90. Raelin Sorensen of Unity took first in the 800-meter run with 2:22.60, and Grantsburg’s Jensen won the 1,600-meter run with 5:55.24. Jensen also won the 3,200-meter run with a time of 12:43.09. Ruthie Stewart of St. Croix Falls was first in the 100-meter hurdles with a time of 17.77, and the Saints girls were victorious in the 4x200-meter relay with Grace Klein, Alaina Driscoll, Stewart and Sophie Klein finishing with a time of 1:50.68. In the 4x400 relay it was another win for St.

On Thursday, April 28, at the St. Croix Falls Invitational, the Grantsburg girls 4x800-meter relay team broke the Grantsburg Pirate school record for the second time, shaving seven seconds off their previous time. Their new time is 10:32.81. The relay team consists of Hallie Jensen, Brittanie Blume, Violet Ohnstad and Grace Gerber. – Photo submitted Croix Falls as C.J. Basacker, Grace Klein, Addie McCurdy and Stewart finished with a 4:17 Siren’s Ashlee Rightman was victorious in the high jump with a height of 4-08, and Webster’s Sadie Koelz took first in the pole vault with a height of 8-06. Maddie Ammend of Frederic/Luck was the winner in the long jump with 15-

01.25, and Lindsay Mattson of Frederic/ Luck was first in the triple jump with 3102.50. Webster’s Kaitlyn Moser placed first in the shot put with a throw of 3311.50, and Maddie Joy won the discus throw for Frederic/Luck with a mark of 108-08. For the boys it was Unity who came out on top among the standings, followed

by Grantsburg, Webster, St. Croix Falls, Cameron, Turtle Lake/Clayton, Clear Lake, Siren, Frederic/Luck and Shell Lake. Josh Koenecke of Cameron was the front-runner in the 100-, 200- and 400meter dash races, while Unity’s Jesse Vlasnik was the winner of the 800-meter run with a time of 2:02.06. In the 1,600meter run, Unity’s Logan Jensen was first with a time of 4:49.36, and Andrew Ruiz of Webster dominated the 3,200-meter run with a time of 10:23.73. Jarett Davison of Unity took first in the 300-meter hurdles with a time of 45.08, and the Saints 4x200-meter relay team was the big winner with Tony DeLuca, Daniel Crandall, Roderick Hoggatt and Spencer Steek finishing with a time of 1:40.31. Unity’s Nathan Cousins, Alex Binfet, Davison and Vlasnik won the 4x400-meter relay with a time of 3:37, and Webster’s Ruiz, Joey Formanek, Hunter Erickson and Mason Schaaf won the 4x800-meter relay with a time of 9:13.98. In the pole vault, Peter Lund of Frederic/Luck finished first with 11-00. Derek Johnson of Unity also hit the mark of 1100. Unity’s Vlasnik won the long jump with 21-03.50, and he also won the triple jump with 40-00.50. Webster’s Grant Preston was first in the shot put with 41-11.25, and also finished first in the discus with a throw of 137-11. Complete results of the track meet can be found online at pttiming.com.

Baseball/Continued

Dylan Stenberg got caught in a rundown against St. Croix Falls while trying to score Monday, May 2, against the Saints. He was later called out during the two-run fifth inning, but the Eagles got the lead and held on for the conference win. – Photos by Marty Seeger

Saints senior Jake Johnson gets under a fly ball for the out against Unity. lead to start the inning, scoring a run on a sacrifice fly. In the bottom half of the inning Unity’s Wyatt Stenberg reached on an infield single and Cody Ince struck out, but was able to get to first on a dropped ball on the third strike. Dylan Stenberg then singled on a hard grounder to short for the RBI and tied the game. In the next at bat, Austin Donahue tripled to right and gave the Eagles a 2-1 lead. On the same play, Dylan Stenberg got caught in a rundown while trying to make it home, and the inning soon ended on a pop out. With a 2-1 lead the Eagles man-

aged to hang on to the win and stay alive as a contender for the West Lakeland title. “We have moved leadoff hitters around this year and every guy we put there has struggled. Austin Donahue told me he was going to break the curse tonight and came up with two hits including the game-winning RBI,” said Humpal.

Unity 2, Turtle Lake/Clayton 1 TURTLE LAKE – Unity managed to take yet another close conference win Friday, April 29, this time at Turtle Lake with the 2-1 victory. “It takes a lot of character to win these one-run games time after time. I hope we start to hit soon - these close games are taking years off the coaches lives,” said coach Matt Humpal. It was another big night for defense for the Eagles as is typically the case in close games.

“One big play in the game was a 1-6-3 double play we turned. Right when it looked like TLC would get a rally going, we always came up with a big defensive play,” Humpal said. Hunter Pederson got the start on the mound and was solid through six innings. He had five strikeouts with only one walk and allowed one earned run on five hits. Logan Bader saved the game and closed out the win with one man and nobody out. Pederson had the hot bat along with the arm as he went 2 for 4 at the plate, scored once and drove in a run. Bader, Brett Nelson and Wyatt Stenberg had the only other hits for Unity. “Hunter Pederson was like Babe Ruth tonight - winning pitcher and homerun hitter. Pretty impressive night,” said Humpal.

Grantsburg 11, Chetek-Weyerhaeuser 1 GRANTSBURG – The Pirates were able to shut down Chetek-Weyerhaeuser for the nonconference win on Friday, April 29. Ricky Clark had a solid night on the mound, allowing just five hits, with two walks and seven strikeouts. Grantsburg totaled eight hits in the game with Zach Tebow going 2 for 3 with two runs scored. Jacob Barnard also had a pair of hits with two RBIs and two runs scored. “Tebow and Bernard had the hot bats tonight, with a couple of hits each,” said Pirates coach Pete Johnson. “Ricky pitched a very good game.” Other Pirate hitters included Austin Bowman, Luke Anderson and David Nelson.


PAGE 14 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2016

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Pirates softball gets back on the winning path After loss to Turtle Lake/Clayton, Grantsburg wins next five Grantsburg 9, St. Croix Falls 1 Marty Seeger|Staff writer GRANTSBURG – The Grantsburg Pirates lost their first conference game in 12 years last Tuesday, April 26, but that seems like an awfully long time ago now since they quickly got back to their winning ways a couple of days later, starting with a big 9-1 conference win over St. Croix Falls Thursday, April 28. The Pirates held a 2-0 lead through the second inning with help from a single by Britta Roufs and double by Maddie Duncan. Another run on two hits in the third inning from Olivia Tucker and Megan Miller helped push the Pirates into a 3-0 lead, before they started opening the game up in the fifth with five runs. Cassidy Quimby and Miller both doubled in the inning and Mackenna Johnson hit a three-run triple to help give Grantsburg the leading edge offensively. The Pirates totaled 11 hits in the game off Saints pitcher Katie Kopp, who walked two and struck out three. Sam Mackenberg had one of the Saints two hits off Tucker, which included a double in the fourth inning. She later scored in the same inning as Kopp also singled.

Grantsburg had 11 hits against the Saints on Thursday, April 28, and have been on a winning streak ever since. – Photos by Becky Strabel Tucker finished with 14 strikeouts in the win and had only one walk.

Grantsburg 5, New Richmond 1 NEW RICHMOND – Olivia Tucker continued to mow down opponents in the Pirates nonconference game against

Another hit for the Pirates against the Saints, Thursday, April 28.

a much larger New Richmond school on Friday, April 29. Tucker finished with 15 strikeouts while allowing one run with no walks and three hits. On offense Grantsburg finished with eight hits with only one strikeout, as Tucker led with a 2 for 3 performance with two RBIs, and Jordy McKenzie was 2 for 3 with an RBI. She had an RBI triple during a three-run fifth inning. Other Pirate hitters included Britta Roufs, Briena Jensen, Claire Palmquist and Maddie Duncan each with one hit.

Grantsburg 5, Baldwin-Woodville 0 Grantsburg 11, River Falls 1 BALDWIN – The Pirates won a pair at a tournament held in Baldwin on Saturday, April 30, starting with a no-hitter thrown by Olivia Tucker against Baldwin-Woodville. She was backed by some big offense as well as the Pirates finished with 13 hits. Claire Palmquist led the offense against Baldwin-Woodville going 3 for 4, while Britta Roufs, Cassidy Quimby, Jordyn McKenzie and Briena Jensen each had a pair of hits in the win. Tucker also had a hit in the game but her no-hitter included 12 strikeouts and four walks. Grantsburg’s win over River Falls produced 11 runs on 10 hits with Megan Miller and Briena Jensen both going 2 for 2 with a pair of RBIs.

Saints shortstop Annalise Parks makes the catch against the Pirates.

Grantsburg 11, Cameron 1 CAMERON – The Pirates got back on top of the West Lakeland Conference with a convincing win over Cameron on Monday, May 2. The Comets, along with Turtle Lake/Clayton, continue to try and remain near the top of the conference and TL/C was successful in beating both Cameron and Grantsburg already, but the Pirates proved too strong for Cameron on Monday. Olivia Tucker allowed just two hits in the game and struck out 12 batters while walking three. The Comets scored just once in the bottom of the sixth with a one-out triple, with an error helping push their only run across. Megan Miller and Claire Palmquist led the offense with three hits apiece, Britta Roufs had two hits. Grantsburg jumped all over the Comets, jumping out to a 7-0 lead after two innings and never looking back.

Late Frederic/Luck rally falls short against Comets Shell Lake shuts down F/L offense on Monday Cameron 14, Frederic/Luck 12 Marty Seeger|Staff writer CAMERON – The Frederic/Luck softball team gave their best effort against a tough Cameron team on Thursday, April 28, trailing by as many as seven runs through three innings before rallying in the fifth and sixth innings. Frederic/Luck finished with 19 hits on the night, even taking a 12-9 lead after a six-run sixth inning, but couldn’t contain the Comets as their five runs in the bottom half of the sixth proved too much. Kyla Melin had a huge night offensively, going 5 for 5 and scoring four times with three RBIs. She also had two triples. Sophie Fredericks, Isabelle Jensen and Emily Amundson each had three hits, while Jensen drove in a pair of runs. Fred

See softball/Next page

Frederic/Luck softball player Tasian Arjes gets a small lead at third base during a comeback game against Cameron on Thursday, April 28. Unfortunately for Frederic/Luck, their late rally fell short. – Photos by Becky Amundson

Frederic/Luck’s Kyla Melin gets set to slide into second base safely against the Comets on a close play.


MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 15

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Luck/Frederic snaps six-game losing skid tafson who had a big night, going 3 for 3 with a run scored and four RBIs, which included a two-run double in the first inning and another run-scoring double in the fifth inning. Austin Spafford, Jack Washburn and Paul Sargent each had a two-hit night. Washburn started the game and went two innings with six walks, three strikeouts and two hits allowed. Gustafson went three innings with one walk, five hits and five strikeouts, and Sargent closed out the final two innings with no walks, two hits, two earned runs and three strikeouts.

Win three in a row following win over Siren Luck/Frederic 10, Siren 0 Marty Seeger|Staff writer SIREN – The Luck/Frederic baseball team snapped a six-game losing streak with a win over Siren on Thursday, April 28, and continued to play solid baseball over their next two games. All three of those wins came against conference opponents. “Finally nice to end the six-game skid with a good win against Siren,” said L/F coach Ryan Humpal. Devyn Ellefson got the start and allowed just two hits with seven strikeouts, and no walks. “Nice to see a senior take the hill and get us going in the right direction. At the plate we did real nice things, lot of real good at bats that turned into runs for us,” Humpal added. Luck/Frederic 6, Webster 1 WEBSTER – On Friday, April 29, Luck/ Frederic notched their second conference game in two days with a convincing win over Webster, backed by great pitching from starting senior Roman Poirier. “This was the first game of the year where everything seemed to bounce our way. Any time Webster put up a threat we were able to shut the door and we cashed in with two outs a couple times to get our second in a row,” said coach Ryan Humpal. Poirier finished all seven innings with 11 strikeouts, with only two walks and one hit allowed. “Back-to-back starts by seniors to get the ship going in the right direction is something real fun to see this time of year. Payton Ellefson, Austin Hamack and Poirier each had two hits for Luck/Frederic, while Derek Rennicke also added one hit and scored twice. Paul Sargent had Webster’s only hit of the game in the fourth inning and the Tigers used four pitchers on the night including Jordan Larson, Jack Washburn, Paul Sargent and Caleb Pardun. Luck/Frederic 11, Shell Lake 1 LUCK – Luck/Frederic hosted the Shell Lake Lakers on Monday, May 2, kick staring their ALS Awareness Month. “It was a great night for baseball, with

St. Croix Central 5, Webster 4 HAMMOND – A late sixth-inning rally by the St. Croix Central Panthers handed Webster a loss on Saturday, April 30. Webster was holding a 4-1 lead after five innings when the Panthers scored four runs in the sixth and hung on in the seventh for the win. Webster had only four hits in the loss, with Jack Washburn, Taran Wols, Paul Sargent and Brad Sigfrids collecting the lone hits.

The Luck/Frederic baseball team is on a recent hot streak with three wins in a row. All three have been conference wins. In the above photo Luck/Frederic gets set to take on Shell Lake on Monday, May 2, which helps kick start their ALS Awareness Month. – Photo by Larry Samson the warm weather it seems our bats might be heating up a little bit,” said coach Ryan Humpal. Shell Lake entered the contest 5-1 overall but Luck/Frederic finished with 15 hits, including a three-run homer by Roman Poirier in the fourth inning to stretch Luck/Frederic’s lead to 7-1. Payton Ellefson and Parker Steen both collected a three-hit night. “One thing that is fun to watch is how contagious hitting can become. This was one of those games where every guy stepped up to plate and they were confident and putting good at bats together.” Devyn Ellefson got another start on the mound and went six innings with 11 strikeouts, no walks and only four hits

allowed. “This is two great starts in a row for him. Crazy part for him, he is 2-0 in the past week and those are his first two varsity starts. His line for the last two starts is 11 IP, 18 K, 7 hits, 0 BB and ERA of 0.64,” Humpal said. “Let’s hope we can keep this winning streak rolling with the warm weather. Nice to see seniors lead the way on the mound, hope everything becomes contagious and we keep it rolling.”

Webster 8, Shell Lake 7 WEBSTER – The Webster Tigers had a long week of baseball starting with a close conference win over Shell Lake on Thursday, April 28. The Tigers got nine hits from four players including Trevor Gus-

Turtle Lake/Clayton 9, Webster 5 WEBSTER – The Webster Tigers slipped to 3-4 in the West Lakeland Conference standings with a loss against Turtle Lake/ Clayton on Monday, May 2. The Tigers were in control 3-0 through four innings before Turtle Lake/Clayton scored four runs in the fifth off three hits. Trevor Gustafson was strong on the mound for the Tigers through the first four innings, allowing three hits. He finished five innings with three strikeouts and three walks with six hits allowed. The Tigers still managed eight hits in the loss with Brad Sigfrids going 3 for 4 with three RBIs. Jordan Larson was 2 for 4 with one RBI. Grantsburg 15, Siren 0 SIREN – Grantsburg pitchers Zach Tebow and Jacob Barnard held Siren to a one-hitter Monday, May 2, in Siren, while producing 13 hits on offense. Tebow allowed no hits through three innings, with three strikeouts and had one walk, while Barnard allowed one hit in two innings of work with one strikeout and one walk. Tebow led the offense going 3 for 4 with two RBIs, and Majel Schultz was 2 for 5 with two RBIs. Barnard and Brett Anderson each had two hits as well.

Softball/Continued

Emily Amundson gets a steal against Shell Lake on Monday, May 2, in Frederic. – Photos by Becky Amundson eric/Luck only walked three times in the game. Fredericks also pitched through all six innings for Frederic/Luck and had six strikeouts, but walked eight batters while allowing 14 hits.

Shell Lake 16, Frederic/Luck 0 FREDERIC – After a big night of offense against Cameron the Frederic/Luck softball team went cold in their conference game against Shell Lake on Monday,

Julia Buck of Frederic/Luck gets back to first just in time.

May 2, getting just four hits against two Shell Lake pitchers. Tasian Arjes, Emily Amundson, Julia Buck and Brooklyn Petersen each had hits in the game, but had trouble getting on base with just two

walks and four strikeouts. Frederic/Luck also finished with four errors in the loss.


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Mountain bike race series opener draws 560 to SCF ST. CROIX FALLS—The Minnesota Mountain Bike Series found perfect conditions to open the 2016 racing season in St. Croix Falls, drawing 560 racers for a day of family fun on Sunday, May 1. The dance card for the day included classes from elite racers to kids, and even an event lasting over four hours.

The racing event, sponsored primarily by the St. Croix Falls-based Woolly Bike Club, uses the extensive mountain bike trail system they have developed over the last few years. Complete race results are available at mnmtbseries.com. For more information on the Woolly Bike Club and the

mountain bike trails near St. Croix Falls, visit their website at woollybikeclub.com. For Polk County visitor information, call 800-222POLK or visit polkcountytourism.com. – from Sports Area Media

Dave Wilcox hands a water bottle to his son, Cameron, both from Washburn, midway through the competition class. Wilcox finished ninth in his age group. Jay “Hollywood” Henderson, Minneapolis, No. 55, leads Tim Norrie, No. 36, on the second lap of the men’s elite race.

Ian Derauf, No. 1203, holds off Alex Turner, No. 1040, near the end of the competition race Sunday, May 1, in St. Croix Falls. The event was sponsored primarily by the Woolly Bike Club, which has developed an extensive mountain bike trail system in the area over the last few years.

Robert Holmberg, No. 3100, stays in front of Jason Kushier, No. 3122, near the end of the marathon class that saw riders completing six to seven laps of the course over approximately four hours of riding.

Photos by William Johnson

Tina Olson, River Falls, No. 3120, is shown at the start of the marathon race. Olson rode six laps of the course in four hours, three minutes, and was third overall in that class.

Corey Coogan Cisek, Minneapolis, No. 104, rides on her way to being the women’s elite class winner ahead of Anna Christian early in the race.

Lori Belz, Minneapolis, No. 2260, leads the pack at the start of the women’s sport class in the Minnesota Mountain Bike Series race in St. Croix Falls on Sunday, May 1. She finished fifth overall in that event.


MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 17

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Saints softball wins a pair Team bounces back after loss at Grantsburg St. Croix Falls 15, Glenwood City 3 Marty Seeger|Staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – After a tough loss against Grantsburg the Saints bounced back in a big way the following night against Glenwood City Friday, April 29. Along with hitting her second home run of the year, Annalise Parks also doubled in the win to lead the Saints, who had several extra-base hits on the night. Madison Snyder tripled in the game and pitcher Katie Kopp hit a pair of dou-

Saints pitcher Katie Kopp eyes an infield fly in the bottom of the seventh inning while Unity’s Courtney Vallesky gets set to go back to first. Vallesky made it back to first safely but only after the first baseman dropped the ball. The Saints managed to hang on in the end for their second straight win on Monday, May 2. – Photos by Marty Seeger bles. Sam Mackenberg also doubled in the game and Lilly Dillman had the Saints other hit. Mackenberg and Kopp each scored three times. The team also had eight stolen bases. “The girls really hit well and Katie pitched another good game,” said Saints coach Clayton Hanson.

Unity’s Ciara DeLozier pitched a solid game against the Saints on Monday, May 2.

St. Croix Falls 6, Unity 3 ST. CROIX FALLS – The Unity softball team played tough against the Saints at home on Monday, May 2, but fell short. Trailing 2-0 heading into the bottom of the third inning, the Eagles mounted a

rally to score three runs and regain the lead. They held it through the top of the fifth before the Saints stormed back with three runs to take the lead back. The Saints added another insurance run in the top of the seventh for the win. “Ciara DeLozier pitched a great game. Only three earned runs, she pitched well enough to earn a win,” said Unity coach Josh Miller. Along with DeLozier’s performance, Miller was pleased with Alexus Houman, who went 2 for 3 at the plate and doubled off the fence while notching a pair of RBIs. “Courtney Vallesky was outstanding

St. Croix Falls base runner Sam Mackenberg races to first base as Unity first baseman Courtney Allison waits for the throw. behind the plate. Throwing out runners at second and home and turning a bases-loaded 1-2-3 double play to end an inning,” said Miller. “Erika Priebe provided great defense, running down a few fly balls to take away extra base hits.” Sam Ferguson and DeLozier had two of the other four Eagles hits, while the Saints collected eight hits. Katie Kopp, Annalise Parks and Adrienne Stoffel each had two hits for St. Croix Falls, while Madison Snyder and Lilly Dillman each had a hit.

SCF football extravaganza Photos submitted

Greg Guggisberg announces a winning number at the football extravaganza. Guggisberg was the master of ceremonies for the evening, along with Dr. Steven Bont from Bont Chiropractic. Money raised at the event will go toward a new concession stand and indoor bathrooms at the Saints Stadium.

Curt Akenson receives high fives from the crowd as he makes his way to the podium to receive his grand-prize check of $2,500. RIGHT: Arica Stensven is one of the four gals who handed out meal tickets and registered guests as they arrived at the St. Croix Falls football extravaganza held at the American Legion Post 143 building on Saturday, April. 30.

Grant Belisle, head football coach for the Saints, holds up two samples of the engraved paver blocks that are available for purchase as an additional way to support the Saints football team.


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Unity boys hold strong at home track meet Marty Seeger|Staff writer BALSAM LAKE – Unity High School hosted a track meet on one of the most beautiful nights so far in terms of weather this spring, and for the Unity boys, it was a great night of competition as they placed first overall with 252 points among eight other schools. Clear Lake was second with 121, followed by St. Croix Falls, Turtle Lake/Clayton, Prairie Farm, Siren, Shell Lake and Webster. Complete results from girls and boys competition can be found at pttiming. com, but highlights for the boys include a first-place finish for Jesse Vlasnik with a time of 23.57. He also finished first in the 400-meter dash with 2:09.23. Logan Jensen of Unity was first in the 800-meter run with 2:09.23, and Jarett Davison was first in the 110-meter hurdles with 18.07. Davison was also first in the 300-meter hurdles with 44.03. St. Croix Falls athletes Ryan Peltz, Spencer Steek, Roderick Hoggatt and Tony DeLuca were first in the 4x100-meter relay with a time of 47.65. Unity won the 4x200-meter relay with a time of 1:39.91. The team includes Patric Tillery, Evan Countryman, Hunter Houde and Dylan Nyholm. Unity also won the 4x400-meter relay with Nathan Cousins, Davison, Eli Vos Benkowski and Logan Jensen completing a time of 3:41.42. The 4x800-meter relay was also a Unity victory with Matt

Unity’s Erik Peterson took fourth in the discus throw.

Unity’s Derek Johnson cleared the bar in this vault at the Unity track meet on Monday, May 2. Johnson finished in first place overall with a vault of 11-00. – Photos by Marty Seeger

LEADER SPORTS SCOREBOARD BASEBALL Lakeland-West Standings Team Conf. St. Croix Falls 5-1 Unity 4-1 Turtle Lake/Clayton 4-2 Grantsburg 4-4 Webster 3-4 Luck/Frederic 3-5 Shell Lake 2-2 Siren 0-6

SOFTBALL Overall 7-2 7-1-2 4-2 5-5 7-6 4-7 5-2 0-6

Lakeland-West Standings Team Conf. Grantsburg 6-1 Cameron 5-1 Turtle Lake/Clayton 5-1 St. Croix Falls 3-2 Shell Lake 2-3 Frederic/Luck 2-5 Unity 1-4 Webster/Siren 0-5

Scores Thursday, April 28 St. Croix Falls 11, Grantsburg 0 Luck/Frederic 10, Siren 0 Webster 8, Shell Lake 7 Friday, April 29 Luck/Frederic 6, Webster 1 Grantsburg 11, Chetek-Weyerhaeuser 1 Unity 2, Turtle Lake/Clayton 1 Saturday, April 30 St. Croix Central 5, Webster 4 Monday, May 2 Luck/Frederic 11, Shell Lake 1 Grantsburg 15, Siren 0 Unity 2, St. Croix Falls 1 Turtle Lake/Clayton 9, Webster 5 Tuesday, May 3 Turtle Lake/Clayton 5, Luck/Frederic 0

Scores Thursday, April 28 Cameron 14, Frederic/Luck 12 Grantsburg 9, St. Croix Falls 1 Unity at Turtle Lake/Clayton (Canceled) Shell Lake 18, Webster 1 Friday, April 29 Grantsburg 5, New Richmond 1 St. Croix Falls 15, Glenwood City 3 Saturday, April 30 Grantsburg 5, Baldwin-Woodville 0 Grantsburg 11, River Falls 1 Monday, May 2 Grantsburg 9, Cameron 1 Shell Lake 16, Frederic 0 St. Croix Falls 6, Unity 3 Tuesday, May 3 Turtle Lake/Clayton 16, Frederic/Luck 1

Upcoming Thursday, May 5 5 p.m. Unity at Grantsburg Turtle Lake/Clayton at Luck Webster at St. Croix Falls Shell Lake at Siren Friday, May 6 5 p.m. Amery at Grantsburg Saturday, May 7 10 a.m. St. Croix Falls at Cumberland Luck/Frederic at Elmwood Somerset at Webster Noon Spooner at Unity Monday, May 9 4:30 p.m. Turtle Lake/Clayton at St. Croix Falls 5 p.m. Grantsburg at Shell Lake Luck/Frederic at Unity Siren at Webster Tuesday, May 10 5 p.m. Siren at Luck Grantsburg at St. Croix Falls Webster at Shell Lake Turtle Lake/Clayton at Unity

Upcoming Thursday, May 5 5 p.m. Unity at Grantsburg Turtle Lake/Clayton at Frederic St. Croix Falls at Webster Friday, May 6 5 p.m. Amery at Grantsburg Monday, May 9 4:30 p.m. Turtle Lake/Clayton at St. Croix Falls 5 p.m. Grantsburg at Shell Lake Frederic/Luck at Unity Cameron at Webster Tuesday, May 10 5 p.m. Cameron at Frederic Grantsburg at St. Croix Falls Webster/Siren at Shell Lake Turtle Lake/Clayton at Unity

BOYS GOLF Upcoming Thursday, May 5 4 p.m. Varsity match at Clear Lake (Grantsburg, Luck/Frederic, St. Croix Falls, Unity, Siren/Webster) Friday, May 6 1 p.m. Luck/Frederic at Hayward Saturday, May 7 8:30 a.m. Luck/Frederic at Hayward Monday, May 9 4 p.m. Varsity match at St. Croix Falls (Grantsburg, Luck/Frederic, St. Croix Falls, Unity, Siren/Webster) Tuesday, May 10 4 p.m. Varsity match at Grantsburg (Grantsburg, Luck/Frederic, St. Croix Falls, Unity, Siren/Webster)

Overall 12-2 7-1 6-1 5-4 5-3 3-8 1-4 0-6

Peterson, Vos Benkowski, Alex Binfet and Jenson with a time of 8:35.58. Unity’s Derek Johnson was the overall winner in the pole vault with 11-00, and Vlasnik won the long jump with a leap of 20-09.50, and the triple jump with 4010.75. Grant Preston of Webster won the shot put and the discus with distances of 42-01.50 and 136-09, respectively. For the girls it was Shell Lake on top

The Saints girls finished third overall as a team on Monday, May 2, at Unity.

Competition continues for area golfers

TRACK & FIELD Upcoming Thursday, May 5 4:15 p.m. Varsity invitational at Webster (Siren, Grantsburg, Unity, Frederic/Luck, Webster, St. Croix Falls) Friday, May 6 4 p.m. Unity at New Richmond 4:15 p.m. Siren at New Auburn Tuesday, May 10 4 p.m. Varsity invitational at Colfax (Frederic/Luck, St. Croix Falls) 4 p.m. Varsity invitational at Rice Lake (Siren, Grantsburg, Unity)

with Unity in second, followed by St. Croix Falls, Turtle Lake/Clayton, Siren, Clear Lake, Prairie Farm and Webster. Raelin Sorensen of Unity was a firstplace finisher in the 400-meter dash with a time of 1:00.88, and Kendra Bramsen of Unity won the 800-meter run with 2:38.96. Unity’s Bramsen, Sorensen, Ali Kreft and Sierra Fjorden won the 4x400-meter relay with a time of 4:29.85, and the St. Croix Falls girls, including Anna Klein, Isabella Gatten, Autumn Hansen and Brandy Eisen, won the 4x800-meter relay with 11:00.61. Webster’s Kaitlyn Moser won the shot put with 35-04.50.

Boys golfers competed at the Frederic Golf Course on Thursday, April 28, and traveled to St. Croix Falls Tuesday, May 3. Results weren’t available at press time but will be updated on the Leader website at leadernewsroom.com as they become available. – Photo by Marty Seeger


MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 19

I N T E R- C O U N T Y LE A DE R

OUTDOORS ATVs • BIRDING • BOATING • CAMPING • FISHING • HIKING • HUNTING • RECREATIONAL VEHICLES

A good start Low 40-degree temps and a stiff northwest wind weren’t enough to keep my body from wringing with sweat on my hike to the top of a steep Dunn County ridge last Saturday morning. It was my first Marty of hopefully a handSeeger ful of hunts to come later this spring, with a turkey tag in my The pocket, even though I Bottom did spend some time calling for my fatherLine in-law the weekend before with very little luck. It easily took 15 minutes to reach the peak that seemed to stretch on forever. Every 25 yards or so, I’d shine the flashlight toward the top to reveal I wasn’t much closer than I was a few minutes before. My pauses along the way became more frequent, but there was still plenty of time to get there. My wife’s cousin and her husband live on the property and granted me permission to chase turkeys. I hadn’t slept the night before with the excitement of knowing there would be birds somewhere near the area. My 17-month-old son was also up intermittently throughout the night and so by 2 a.m., after putting him back in his crib, I stayed up, made coffee and had a small breakfast. There was a 40-minute drive ahead of me and even though I knew I was still going to arrive too early, it didn’t matter much. I was on a mission to reach the peak of that ridge long before any roosted birds could detect my approach.

By the time I set out a couple of decoys and got my chair placed along the base of a big white oak, it was still only 4:30 a.m. With plenty of time before daybreak, I sat, chilled with the now-cooling perspiration, and listened as the woods slowly came alive. The glittering stars above and the frequent hooting calls of the barred owls were the first things I noticed and yet I couldn’t see the turkey decoys still 25 yards ahead of me without a flashlight. Rather than risk being spotted, I turned everything off, slipped a diaphragm call into my mouth and closed my eyes. It took forever, it seemed, to hear the first gobble of the morning. Disappointing though, to the fact that every one of those gobbles were hundreds of yards away. I sat in hopes that one much closer would materialize but it never did. “Some turkeys simply stay silent,” I thought to myself, yet my optimism was fading even before the sun rose from the eastern sky, now splashed with brilliant orange glow. This trip was already worth the effort and lack of sleep. Even with the constant blinking of giant communication towers in the background, it was a calming scene, and one of the many reasons I lost sleep a night earlier. Turkey hunters crave these moments, sometimes more than bagging a bird, but after nearly two hours without a response from any distant gobblers, I decided to pack up my things and head to another ridge. After another unsuccessful effort I headed off to my in-laws property not far down the road to prepare for another setup. It was after 8 a.m. as I trekked into the next location, another hike up yet another steep ridge, but knowing the midmorning hunts can be just as successful, optimism was once again restored.

Even before setting down my decoys, a series of gobbles could be heard along a distant ridge, closer than anything I’d heard previously. At that moment I was convinced the birds had heard me swooshing the leaves as I walked. Sneaking low to set out the decoys, I sat up my chair along the base of another white oak and waited. With every passing crow call, and even the sound of a local farmer banging a metal pipe against machinery, the birds gobbled. Using a series of purrs, clucks and yelps, the turkeys responded back to me several times before going completely silent. The birds never seemed to be much closer, even sounding at one point as if they were drifting away. It was unclear if they were on their way, and a few calls several minutes later revealed zero responses. Experience has shown me that if a bird goes silent, it’s best to wait, even though I was starting to get fidgety after only an hour. Lowering my gun, I also lowered my legs to stretch, and decided to close my eyes, peeking out every few minutes to be sure nothing was coming. I was nearly into a dreamlike state when a black spot slowly materialized to my left. It was a turkey, and only 10 yards away. I froze. Over the next several minutes, I was forced to reposition for a shot at a snail’s pace, as a total of three young jakes appeared. Two of them had a laser focus on my decoys, while another served as a lookout of sorts, and would later prove to make the hunt go quicker than I’d hoped. As the two juveniles were about to show the fake jake who’s boss, the lookout got nervous, and started putting nervously. He was onto me, so before he headed away and took the others with him, I took a shot and ended the hunt. Sure, it was only a jake. Not something

A small beard from a young jake taken by the author on a recent hunt. – Photo by Marty Seeger some hunters would choose to take, but it’s been awhile since my family and I have feasted on a wild bird, and to me, nothing beats it. One side of the turkey breast became a grilled Sunday evening dinner, while the other breast, thighs and legs will be eaten another day. I’m hopeful for another opportunity to get out and hunt again soon after purchasing a couple of $10 leftover tags. While it’s unlikely I’ll fill all of them, the option exists, and filling a tag doesn’t quite signal the end of what has started out to be a pretty fruitful turkey season.

Inland fishing season opens May 7 MADISON – Warming temperatures throughout Wisconsin this week should make for a great bite when the general inland fishing season gets under way on Saturday, May 7. Justine Hasz, fisheries director for the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, said spring survey work on lakes and rivers around Wisconsin indicates healthy fish populations and great opportunities for anglers based on the walleye, bass, northern pike, panfish, trout, muskies and even catfish netted and promptly released by fisheries crew members in recent days. “Wisconsin remains among the top three angling destinations in the nation, and for good reason,” Hasz said. “Whether you prefer fly fishing, casting live bait, trolling or simply watching your bobber dip, our fisheries offer something for everyone.” While fishing is a passion for many, it is also an economic driver for the state, with an estimated 1.2 million anglers pro-

ducing a $2.3 billion economic impact, according to the American Sportfishing Association. That impact becomes clear as tens of thousands of anglers take to Wisconsin’s 15,000 lakes, rivers and 13,000 miles of trout streams for opening day. Walleye continue to be an important target for anglers, and since 2013 the Wisconsin Walleye Initiative has worked to rebuild and enhance walleye populations throughout the state. The fish that have been stocked should reach legal size over the next two to three years, although some anglers have reported increased catch and release activity from the young fish. In 2015, Wisconsin stocked 760,000 extended growth walleyes, eclipsing the 2014 record of 720,000. For 2016, DNR intends to stock some 827,000 of the 6- to 8-inch fingerlings, including some 229,000 fish from private and tribal fish farms and 598,000 from DNR hatcheries. The trout population continues to make gains throughout the state and this year anglers will find 14 streams with up-

graded classifications as well as 27 that for the first time have been documented as sustaining trout populations. Six of the newly classified streams have earned the coveted Class 1 designation. Also new for anglers in 2016 will be simplified trout regulations designed to create more uniformity for anglers who fish on different trout streams and within small geographic areas. Under the new system, maps online and in the regulation pamphlet will indicate one of three regulations: • Green means go fish, with no length limit, a bag limit of five fish and no bait restrictions; • Yellow means caution, with an 8-inch length limit, a bag limit of three fish and no bait restrictions; and • Red means special regulations are in place. Anglers are advised to stop and understand the regulations before fishing. Anglers targeting panfish also will find new, experimental bag limits to optimize panfish size on high-potential lakes capa-

ble of producing large panfish. On these lakes, identified in the fishing regulations book, daily bag limits reflect efforts to limit harvest during spawning season or prevent overharvest of any one species. The general Wisconsin fishing season runs from May 7, 2016, to March 5, 2017. To learn more about statewide fishing regulations and rules that apply on specific lakes, visit dnr.wi.gov and search fishing regulations. For a complete calendar, search fishing season dates. Anglers can find fish species information, boat access sites, shore fishing areas, lake information and regulations by downloading the free Wisconsin Fish and Wildlife mobile app, which includes a full array of fishing information. DNR has tackle loaner sites in 50 locations, including many state parks, making it easy for people to enjoy fishing if they don’t have their own equipment or if they left it at home. – from dnr.wi.gov

Entries sought for Wisconsin stamp design contests MADISON – Wisconsin artists will have until July 22 to submit artwork for the 2017 Wild Turkey, Pheasant and Waterfowl Stamp Design Contests. Funds derived from stamp sales contribute to the restoration and management of thousands of acres of important wildlife habitat. The top three entries for each stamp will be displayed at the Wisconsin State Fair. With contest finalists on display, thousands of visitors will help increase visibility for both the artists and the stamp programs’ positive impacts on Wiscon-

sin’s wildlife. Visitation during the 11-day State Fair is close to one million people, with around 120,000 visitors to the DNR Park annually. Stamp design entries must be received or postmarked by July 22, 2016 in order to be eligible. Judging will take place in a closed session on July 28. Following judging, the top three entries for each stamp will be displayed in the Natural Resources Park at the Wisconsin State Fair and available for public viewing from Aug. 4-14. For rules, entry information, and Reproduction Rights Agreements,

visit dnr.wi.gov and search keywords “Wildlife Stamps.” Those who visit DNR Park will be the first to get a “sneak peek” at design winners for the 2017 Wild Turkey, Pheasant, and Waterfowl Stamps. Department staff will be on hand to discuss the history and accomplishments of each program, as well as the central role that wildlife art has played in Wisconsin’s habitat conservation efforts. All stamp contest applicants should review contest rules carefully to ensure the eligibility of their entries. Artwork must

meet technical requirements in order to be properly processed and prepared for judging and possible display at the Wisconsin State Fair. To receive contest entry deadlines, detailed event information, and the announcement for the winning artwork for 2017, visit dnr.wi.gov and select the email icon near the bottom of the page titled “subscribe for updates for DNR topics.” Follow the prompts and enroll in the “Waterfowl, Wild Turkey, and Pheasant Stamp Design Contests” list. – from dnr. wi.gov


PAGE 20 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2016

Party for a Lifetime raises $13,700 to help find the cure LEWIS - The seventh-annual Party for a Lifetime fundraiser was held on Saturday, April 23, at the Sundown Saloon in Lewis, raising $13,700 for the Luck and Frederic Sole Burner Walk/Runs that will be held this Saturday, May 7, and to those in need in the community. Activities during the day included raffles, a silent auction, Bingo and kid games. Glenn Meier volunteered as auctioneer for the live auction and his wife, Barb, assisted. Live music donated by Freeway Jam, under direction of Steve Wilson, finished off the night. Team Samantha – Cancer Fighter wristbands were on sale throughout the day. Sam is the daughter of Kevin and Dawn Ferguson. She is a junior at Unity School and is currently battling thyroid cancer. Some of the proceeds from the day will be given to Sam and her family to help with expenses that insurance does not cover, i.e., gas money for travel to and from treatments, parking, meals, etc. Sam’s junior class prom was held on Saturday, April 23, as well, but she was still able to make a brief appearance, dressed “to the nines” in her prom finery. Gratitude was extended to Ron and Patty Fredericks, Sundown Saloon, business and community donors, the volunteers who helped to make this event possible and to those who attended and supported it. Together the dollars raised will one day find the cure for a disease that has robbed too many before they could live their “lifetime.” – submitted

These volunteers get the food line ready for the seventh-annual Party for a Lifetime fundraiser held at Sundown Saloon in Lewis Saturday, April 23. - Photos submitted

RIGHT: Mallory Mckenzie modeling her newly colored hair and face painting.

BELOW: The raffle baskets are all lined up in a row. Over $2,400 was raised from $1 per entry on a chance to win.

Sandy Lundquist (left) welcomed Samantha Ferguson to the annual Party for a Lifetime fundraiser event held Saturday, April 23, at Lewis. Ferguson is battling thyroid cancer.

Johnson officially announces 2016 re-election bid

Battle for U.S. Senate seat is a 2010 rematch with Democrat Feingold

Patty Murray | WPR News STATEWIDE - Wisconsin U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson is officially launching his campaign for re-election with a tour around the state. Johnson, a Republican, will face Democrat Russ Feingold this fall in a rematch from six years ago when Johnson unseated the veteran lawmaker in the Tea Party wave election of 2010. At a campaign stop in Green Bay Monday, May 2, Johnson said it’s “crucial” that Congress stay in Republican control. “This election is not only about the direction of the country, it’s about the direction of the (U.S.) Supreme Court,” Johnson said. “Another liberal justice is going to flip the court, probably be hostile

U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson announces his re-election bid at an event in Green Bay. – Photo by Patty Murray/WPR

to your Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms.” Johnson reiterated his belief that the Senate should not vote on President Barack Obama’s Supreme Court nominee, and should instead wait for the next president to put someone forward. The Feingold campaign issued a statement calling Johnson “a partisan shill.” “It’s good that in his sixth year in office he’s starting to tour the state,” Feingold added. “When I was a senator, I toured it every year.” Johnson, meanwhile, is working to cast Feingold as a Washington insider despite his own status as the race’s incumbent. “I am the outsider in this race. I am the guy who really does understand how to grow our economy. All Sen. Feingold knows is how to grow government,” Johnson said. Polls in recent months have consistently shown Feingold leading Johnson.


MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 21

Polk County deaths

Personalized Graduation Open House Cards

Raymond L. Christensen, 83, Centuria, died April 18, 2016. Ruby I. Tanner, 93, Amery, died April 20, 2016. Patricia A. Alexson, 77, Amery, died April 22, 2016. George L. Doll, 103, Amery, died

NOTICES/EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Got a news tip? Opinion? Event? Send your information to

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April 22, 2016. Donna F. Johnson Beyl, 90, Osceola, died April 23, 2016. Arthur C. Sanvig, 85, Osceola, died April 24, 2016. Duane G. Larsen, 80, Town of Eureka, died April 25, 2016.

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NOTICE

Town of Luck Board Meeting May 10, 2016 7:00 p.m. Town Hall

Agenda (1) Reading of the minutes (2) Treasurer’s Report (3) Review and pay (4) Act on Bids for 120th St. & 270th Ave. (5) Patrolman’s report Any additional agenda will be posted in the Luck Town Hall and Clerk’s Office. 646054 38L Lloyd Nelson, Clerk

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

SOCIAL WORK CASE AIDE

Part-time, limited-term employment position available with Burnett County in N.W. Wisconsin. www.burnettcounty.com for further details or 715-349-2181, ext. #6. First review of applications May 11, 2016. EOE. 645545 37-38L 27a,b,c

NOTICE FOR LRIP ROADWORK BIDS FOR THE TOWN OF WEST SWEDEN

Notice is hereby given that the Town of West Sweden is now requesting bids: To resurface 2,112’ of 160th Street from STH 48 to 310th Avenue. Add 2” of gravel, pulverize, resurface with 2-1/2” of hot mix asphalt, and add 2’ gravel shoulder. (10-1/2-foot lanes with 2-foot shoulders). Questions, contact Simon Nelson, Town Chairman, 715-566-3055. All sealed bids to be clearly marked on envelope “LRIP Bid.” Bids are due by May 13, 2016, and must be mailed to Town of West Sweden, 3096 170th St, Frederic, WI 54837-4309. The bids will be opened and presented to the West Sweden Town Board at the regular monthly meeting on May 17, 2016, at 7 p.m. at the West Sweden Town Hall, 3147 3rd Ave. N., Frederic, WI. The Town of West Sweden reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids in the best interest of the Town. 646060 38-39L 28a Phyllis Wilder, Town Clerk

644907 25-28a,b,c,d 36-39r,L

INTER-COUNTY COOPERATIVE PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION 303 Wisconsin Ave. North Frederic, Wis.

715-327-4236

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715-483-9008

Part-time Police Officer Position. Salary $14.15 per hour

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The Frederic Police Department is currently accepting applications for a

11 West 5th Ave. Shell Lake, Wis.

715-468-2314

Responsibilities: Ability to perform all duties associated with Law Enforcement; good communication skills and the ability to multitask and problem solve; help enforce ordinances of the Village of Frederic and work with the public. Qualifications: U.S. citizen; valid driver’s license and good driving record; good physical condition; eligible for Wisconsin Training and Standards Board Certification; 60 college credits; ability to possess a firearm; no domestic abuse convictions; good verbal and written communication skills; be able to work evenings, weekends and holidays; clear and concise speech; ability to handle several tasks simultaneously; ability to perform essential functions of this position; ability to use all standard law enforcement equipment including office equipment. Apply by June 1, 2016, 4 p.m. Contact: Police Chief Dale Johnson, Frederic Police Department, 107 Hope Rd. W, P.O. Box 567, Frederic, WI 54837. Telephone: 715-327-8851, Fax: 715-327-4455; email fpddalej@fredericwi.com. 646125

38-39L 28-29c

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PAGE 22 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2016

Thurs., May 12, 2016, 7:30 p.m., at the Lorain Town Hall

Agenda: Call the meeting to order, verify properly noticed, roll call. Motion by board to adjourn until June 9, 2016, from 5 - 7 p.m. Motion to adjourn. Susan E. Hughes, Clerk 645719 38L 28a

TOWN OF LORAIN CEMETERY CLEANUP DAY/WORK DAY Volunteers Needed For More Info, Contact Roger 715-653-2566

645583 27a 38L

Saturday, May 7, 2016 10 a.m.

NOTICE OF MEETING TO ADJOURN BOARD OF REVIEW TO A LATER DATE Town of Daniels, Burnett County, Board of Review will meet on the 7th day of June, 2016, at 7 p.m. at Daniels Town Hall for the purpose of calling the Board of Review into session during the thirty-day period beginning on the 2nd Monday of May, 2016, pursuant to Sec. 70.47 (1) of Wis. Statutes. Due to the fact that the assessment roll is not completed at this time, it is anticipated that the Board of Review will be adjourned until the 9th day of August, 2016, at 7 p.m. A revaluation of property assessments in the Town of Daniels shall occur for the 2016 assessment year. The approximate dates of the revaluation notices being sent to property owners is expected to be in August 2016. Please also notice the Assessor has certain statutory authority to enter land as described in 943.13 and 943.15, Wisconsin Statutes. The ability to enter land is subject to several qualifications and limitations, as described within the foregoing statutes. Notice is hereby given this 2nd day of May, 2016, by: Liz Simonsen, Town Clerk 646010 38L WNAXLP

NOTICE OF OPEN BOOK TOWN OF WEST SWEDEN Notice is hereby given that Open Book for the Town of West Sweden will be held on Tuesday, May 17, 2016, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the West Sweden Town Hall, 3147 3rd Avenue N, Frederic WI. This session gives the property owner an opportunity to meet with the assessor, ask questions of the assessor, and look over their property assessments.

NOTICE OF THE BOARD OF REVIEW FOR TOWN OF WEST SWEDEN Notice is hereby given that the Board of Review for the Town of West Sweden, Polk County, will follow the Open Book on Tuesday, May 17, 2016, at 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. at the Town Hall. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board. No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the Assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact, or provide information to, a member of the Board about that person’s objection except at a session of the Board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or contest the amount of any assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent to file a written objection by appearing before the Board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48hour notice requirement and files a written objection, that the person provides to the Clerk of The Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any Board members and, if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the Board, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of value of the land and of the improvements that are the subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or subject or object to the valuation; if that valuation was made by the Assessor or the objector using the income method; unless the person supplies to the Assessor all of the information about income and expenses, as specified in the manual under Sec.73.03 (2a) that the Assessor requests. The municipality or county shall provide by ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the Assessor under this paragraph and shall provide exceptions for persons using the information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or of the duties of their office or by order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determines that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under Sec. 19.35(1) of WI Statues. The Board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other persons may testify by telephone. Respectfully Submitted Town of West Sweden 645601 37-38L WNAXLP Phyllis Wilder, Clerk Notice is hereby given this 27th day of April, 2016.

The May meeting of the Village Board of Siren will be held Thursday, May 5, 2016, at 2 p.m. at the Village Hall. Agenda posted. Ann Peterson 645727 Clerk-Treasurer 38L

Margaret L. Simon, 79, Town of Oakland, died April 13, 2016.

NOTICE OF MEETING TO ADJOURN BOARD OF REVIEW TO LATER DATE Town of Clam Falls, Polk County, WI

Board of Review will meet on the 25th day of May, 2016, at 7 p.m. at Clam Falls Town Hall for the purpose of calling the Board of Review into session during the thirty-day period beginning on the 2nd Monday of May, pursuant to Sec. 70.47 (1) of Wis. Statutes. Due to the fact the assessment roll is not completed at this time, it is anticipated that the Board of Review will be adjourned until the 14th day of September, 2016, at 7 p.m. at Clam Falls Town Hall. Notice is hereby given this 1st day of May, 2016, by: 646008 38L 28a WNAXLP Jane Schmidt, Clerk

REQUEST FOR ROAD CRACK & CHIP SEALING BIDS Town of Balsam Lake Polk County, Wisconsin

Notice is hereby given that the Town of Balsam Lake is accepting bids for Chip Sealing. The following locations in the Town of Balsam Lake: (1) 130th St. from 150th Ave. to 140th Ave. (2) 150th Ave. from 130th St. to State Rd. 46. (3) 160th St. from Hwy. 8 to County Rd. I. (4) 135th Ave. Double Coat from 160th St. to end. (5) 120th Ave. from 170th St. to Town Line. (6) 180th Ave. Double Coat from 173rd St. to 180th St. Crack Sealing. (1) 180th Street from 140th Ave. to 150th Ave. (2) 140th Ave. from Hwy. 46 to 130th St. For more information and specifications please call Brad Mabry at 715-554-1954. All bids to be considered must be received by June 17, 2016. Please mail or deliver your bid to: Town of Balsam Lake c/o Brad Mabry 1493 160th Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 Bids will be opened at the regular meeting of the Town Board to be held on Monday, June 20, 2016, at 7:00 p.m. The Town Board reserves the right to accept or reject any, any part of, and/or all bids and further reserves the right to award the bid in the best interest of the Town of Balsam Lake. Brian R. Masters, Clerk 645899 38-40L 28-30d WNAXLP

TOWN OF BALSAM LAKE NOTICE OF OPEN BOOK NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT the Open Book for the Town of Balsam Lake will be held on Tuesday, May 17, 2016, from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. at the Town Shop.

NOTICE OF THE BOARD OF REVIEW FOR THE TOWN OF BALSAM LAKE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Review for the Town of Balsam Lake of Polk County shall hold its first meeting on the 17th day of May, 2016, from 11:00 a.m. to noon at the Town Shop. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board: No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable request by certified mail of the Assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact, or provide information to, a member of the Board about the person’s objection except at a session of the Board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or contest the amount of assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent to file a written objection by appearing before the Board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48-hour notice requirement and files a written objection, that the person provides to the Clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any Board members and, if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the Board, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are the subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or subject or object to a valuation; if that valuation was made by the Assessor or the Objector using the income method; unless the person supplies the Assessor all of the information about income and expenses, as specified in the manual under Sec 73.03(2a), that the Assessor requests. The Board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon, or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other persons may testify by telephone. Respectfully submitted, Town of Balsam Lake 645876 38-39L Brian Masters, Clerk 28-29d WNAXLP Notice: The monthly meeting for the Town of Balsam Lake will be held on Tuesday, May 17, 2016, at 1:00 p.m. at the Town Shop. Agenda will be printed closer to the meeting.

James H. Dake, 51, Town of Siren, died April 12, 2016.

Burnett County marriages Travis S. Vanderhoof, Town of Dewey, and Kari R. Labrecque, Town of Dewey, issued March 22, 2016. Kevin J. Ackland, Siren, and Catherine M. Mulvihill, Rose(May 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Harbin, LLC P.O. Box 70163 Mobile, AL 36670 Plaintiff(s) vs. Shane Christian 2007 10th Avenue Star Prairie, WI 54026 Defendant(s). Small Claims Publication Summons And Notice Case No. 2015 SC 000838 Publication Summons And Notice of Filing TO THE PERSON(S) NAMED ABOVE AS DEFENDANT(S): You are being sued by the person(s) named above as Plaintiff(s). A copy of the claim has been sent to you at your address as stated in the caption above. The lawsuit will be heard in the following Small Claims Court: Polk County Courthouse, 715-485-9299, 1005 W. Main Street, Suite 300, Balsam Lake, WI 54810, on the following date and time: May 23, 2016, at 1:30 p.m. If you do not attend the hearing, the court may enter a judgment against you in favor of the person(s) suing you. A copy of the claim has been sent to you at your address as stated in the caption above. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. You may have the option to Answer without appearing in court on the court date by filing a written Answer with the Clerk of Courts before the court date. You must send a copy of your Answer to the Plaintiff(s) named above at their address. You may contact the Clerk of Court at the telephone number above to determine if there are other methods to answer a Small Claims complaint in that county. If you need help in this matter because of a disability, please call 715-485-9299. Dobberstein Law Firm, LLC 225 S. Executive Dr., Suite 201 Brookfield, WI 53005 262-641-3715 April 29, 2016 State Bar No.: 1088712 645917 WNAXLP

mount, Minn., issued April 11, 2016. Travis J. Cormell, Town of Lincoln, and Desiree J. Spafford, Town of Lincoln, issued April 29, 2016. William J. Schroeder, Town of Scott, and Rhonda J. Greder, Spooner, issued May 2, 2016.

PLEASANT HILL CEMETERY ASSOCIATION MEETING

The Pleasant Hill Cemetery Assn. will hold its annual meeting on Mon., May 16, at 7 p.m. at the home of Pete and Marilyn Peterson, 424 Milltown Ave. N., Milltown. Cemetery families are welcome. 645998 38Lp

HELP WANTED Part-Time Waitress Weekdays & Weekends

Part-Time Dishwasher Weekends

Apply In Person

BEAN’S COUNTRY GRIDDLE Frederic

644774

35Ltfc

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-6699777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1800-927-9275. 445101 8a-etfcp 19Ltfc

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

SOCIAL WORKER

Full-time position available with Burnett County in N.W. Wisconsin. www.burnettcounty.com for further details or 715-349-2181. Application deadline: Until position is filled. EOE. 645543 37-38L 27a,b,c

- SENIOR LIVING IMMEDIATE OPENING THE FRANDSEN APARTMENTS

Brand-new, 1-BR unit

800

$

/mo.

All utilities included except phone & electric. Lawn care/snow removal included. Located one block off Main St. Close to library, clinic & shopping.

South First Street, Luck, WI

Call Kyle At 715-566-3432

641948 27Ltfc 17a,dtfc

NOTICE TOWN OF LORAIN BOARD OF REVIEW

Burnett County deaths

NOTICE


MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 23

NOTICES

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE/ RECEIVABLE POSITION

Restaurant Now Accepting Applications For

Please apply in person weekdays For questions, call 715-349-7878

645620 27a 38L

Cooks, Servers, Bartenders & Dishwashers

HELP WANTED

Full-time Cook/Kitchen Manager For Breakfast & Lunch

645619 27a 38L

Management experience beneficial. Self-motivated • Hardworking • Team player

Please apply in person at

The Chattering Squirrel, Siren

HELP WANTED SUBSTITUTE CUSTODIANS WANTED

Webster School District is looking for qualified candidates to join our substitute custodial pool. Both day and evening substitute custodians are needed to work on an on-call basis at the rate of $12.00 per hour, with the possibility of continued work throughout the summer. Tasks include, but are not limited to, cleaning, dusting, mopping and vacuuming. Must be able to lift 75 lbs. Prior custodial/maintenance experience preferred but not necessary. Applications are available at the District Office or online at www.webster.k12.wi.us. Open until filled. The School District of Webster does not discriminate in education or employment based on sex, race, color, national origin, ancestry, creed, pregnancy, marital or parental status, sexual orientation, disability. 645566 37-38L 27-28a

DO YOU BELIEVE THE BEST IS YET TO COME? DO YOU HAVE THE PASSION TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN PEOPLE’S LIVES? If the answer is “yes,” then we should talk about your future at United Pioneer Home. The following important positions are open...

CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANT Full-time evening shifts (72-80 hours/pay period). Full-time day shifts (80 hours/pay period). Every other weekend rotation. Flexible scheduling. Benefits available for full-time positions.

RN/LPN

Full-time evening shift (64 hours/pay period). Every other weekend rotation. Flexible scheduling. Benefits available.

$1,000 Sign-On Bonus Available NEW WAGE SCALE! 646025 38-39L 28-29a,c,d

Please send resume to Jamie Paro jparo@unitedpioneerhome.org Or if you just can’t wait, stop in at the United Pioneer Home to pick up an application and request an interview.

United Pioneer Home 623 S. 2nd St., Luck, WI EOE

646093 38L

St. Croix Falls School District

The St. Croix Falls School District is accepting applications for a year-round accounts payable/receivable position in the District Office. Applicants must have: • Ability to work independently with little supervision • Working knowledge of accounting principles and procedures • Ability to develop and maintain work deadlines • Ability to perform work with a high degree of accuracy • Ability to provide quality customer service • Ability to exercise reliability, responsibility, dependability and fulfill obligations • Demonstrates attention to detail and thorough completion of work tasks • Must have a team-oriented approach • Must be at least 18 years of age with a high school diploma or equivalent • Must be able to pass a background check • Must be able to be bonded Interested applicants should complete an application found at www.scf.k12.wi.us and send it along with your resume, cover letter, 3 letters of recommendation and any certifications to: St. Croix Falls School District, c/o Darci Krueger, Finance Manager, P.O. Box 130, St. Croix Falls, WI 54024. Deadline to apply is May 13, 2016, at 4 p.m. 645518 37-38L

POLK COUNTY POSITION ANNOUNCEMENTS Jailer - Limited Part-time $14.04 - $16.05/hr. Responsible for providing care, custody and the detention of inmates, and positive rehabilitative influence to all inmates while ensuring compliance with all laws, regulations and policies.�This position will be utilized to assist with coverage of all shifts, including evenings and weekends. Polk County will provide training, including a six-week Basic Jailer Certification program. Part-time position for 24/7 operation. Deadline to apply:�May 10, 2016 Deputy - Seasonal Limited Part-time Assigned To Recreation Patrol $18.34/hr. Responsible for preventing, detecting and investigating crimes, apprehending criminals and other violators with primary focus on Polk County lakes, also responding to emergencies and all other calls for Law Enforcement services. Successful candidates must be available Thursday through Sunday throughout the summer season - additional hours may be available. Must be a certified or certifiable Wisconsin Law Enforcement officer. 646094 38L Deadline to apply: May 10, 2016 YOU MUST COMPLETE AN ONLINE APPLICATION TO BE ELIGIBLE. For complete job description, position requirements, application, and details please visit our website at www.co.polk.wi.us. Employment Opportunities. AA/EEOC

NOTICE OF EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Grantsburg School District

Job Title: Middle School Counselor Job Description: This person will assist students at Grantsburg Middle School, support classroom instruction. Help all students in the areas of academic achievement, personal/social development and career development, ensuring today’s students become the productive, well-adjusted adults of tomorrow. 7054 Certification. Hours: Full-time 1.0FTE. Qualifications: State certification as a Middle-Level Counselor.\ Rate of Pay: Per Contract Schedule. Requirements Qualified candidates should possess: • Ability to be student centered; • Passion in working with middle-school-aged students; • Ability to support all students toward academic, social, behavioral and emotional success; • Ability to communicate with students, parents and staff; • Trained and have demonstrated proficiency in the Wisconsin Comprehensive School Counseling Model • Knowledge of individual learning plans; • Knowledge of special education process and procedures; • Special consideration given to applicants that have experience with childhood/adolescent mental health; Experience with implementing data-based behavioral system; Rtl • Knowledge of culturally responsive practices • Passion to work with a diverse population • Willingness to work with students and families in small and large group settings How to Apply: Submit a letter of application, resume, credentials and a copy of license to the address below. Please include an email address and current references in your application materials. Position will close when filled. Contact: Bill Morrin Grantsburg Middle School 500 East James Avenue Grantsburg, WI 54840 645541 37-38L The School District of Grantsburg is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, national origin, sex, religion or handicap.

NOTICE OF THE BOARD OF REVIEW FOR THE TOWN OF SIREN Notice is hereby given that the Board of Review for the Town of Siren of Burnett County will be held on Tuesday, June 14, 2016, from 6 - 8 p.m., at the Siren Town Hall, 7240 South Long Lake Road. For appointments call 800-721-4157. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board. No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the Assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact or provide information to a member of the board about that person’s objection except at a session of the Board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or contest the amount of assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent to file a written objection by appearing before the Board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48hour notice requirement and files a written objection, that the person provides to the Clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any board members and, if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the Board, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are the subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at the estimate. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or subject or object to a valuation; if that valuation was made by the Assessor or the Objector using the income method; unless the person supplies the Assessor all of the information about income and expenses, as specified in the manual under Sec. 73.03(2a), that the assessor requests. The municipality or County shall provide by ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the Assessor under this paragraph and shall provide exceptions for persons using the information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or of the duties of their office by order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determined that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under Sec. 19.35(1) of Wis. Statutes. The Board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other person may testify by telephone. Mary Hunter, Clerk 646045 38L WNAXLP Town of Siren

NOTICE OF OPEN BOOK AND THE BOARD OF REVIEW FOR THE TOWN OF LUCK Notice is hereby given that Open Book for the Town of Luck will be May 11, 2016, from 10 a.m. - Noon, and the Board of Review for the Town of Luck, Polk County, shall hold its first meeting on the 11th day of May, 2016, from noon to 2 p.m. at the Luck Town Hall. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board: No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact or provide information to a member of the Board about the person’s objection except at a session of the Board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or contest the amount of the assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent to file a written objection by appearing before the Board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48hour notice requirement and files a written objection, that the person provides to the clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any Board members and, if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the Board of Review, the person shall specify in writing the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are the subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or object to a valuation; if that valuation was made by the Assessor or the Objector using the income method of valuation; unless the person supplies the Assessor all the information about income and expenses, as specified in the Assessor’s manual under Sec. 73.03 (2a) of Wis. Statutes that the Assessor requests. The Town of Luck has an ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the Assessor under this paragraph which provides exceptions for persons using information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or the duties of their office or by order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determined that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under Sec. 19.35 (1) of Wis. Statutes. The Board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other persons may testify by telephone. 646044 38L WNAXLP Lloyd Nelson, Clerk


PAGE 24 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2016

(April 27, May 4, 11) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Central Bank, a Minnesota banking corporation, 2104 Hastings Avenue Newport, Minnesota 55055, Plaintiff, vs. Tyrel D. Sackett 21 210th Avenue West Comstock, Wisconsin 54826, United States of America, Department of Housing and Urban Development c/o United States Attorney for the Western District of Wisconsin 222 West Washington Avenue, Suite 700 Madison, Wisconsin 53703, John Doe, Mary Roe, and XYZ corporation, Defendants. Case Type: 30404 Case No. 15CV26 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE, that by virtue of that certain Findings of Fact, Conclusions of Law, Order for Judgment, and Judgment executed and filed on May 22, 2015, in the above-entitled action, the Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin, will sell the following described real property at public auction as follows: DATE/TIME: May 31, 2016, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 10% of successful bid must be paid to Sheriff at sale in certified funds, with the balance due and owing on the date of confirmation of the sale by the Court. PLACE: Lobby of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 2 OF CERTIFIED SURVEY MAP NO. 3178, RECORDED IN VOLUME 14 ON PAGE 200, AS DOCUMENT NO. 602647, BEING LOCATED IN PART OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER, AND IN THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER, SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 35 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, TOWN OF JOHNSTOWN, POLK COUNTY, WISCONSIN. SAID SUBJECT PREMISIS WAS FORMERLY DESCRIBED AS: THE WEST HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 14, TOWNSHIP 35 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST (IN THE TOWNSHIP OF JOHNSTOWN, POLK COUNTY, WISCONSIN). (FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY: Plaintiff believes that the property address is 21 210th Avenue, Comstock, Wisconsin). Dated: April 14, 2016. Peter Johnson Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin THIS INSTRUMENT WAS DRAFTED BY: ANASTASI JELLUM, P.A. 14985 60th Street North Stillwater, MN 55082 (651) 439-2951 Joshua D. Christensen/#17458 645539 WNAXLP

DISPATCHER/JAILER

Part-time position available with Burnett County in NW Wisconsin. www.burnettcounty.com for further details or 715-349-2181. First review of applications May 25, 2016. EOE 645965 38-39L 28a,b,c

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Agenda to be posted. Lisa Carlson, Town Clerk

HELP WANTED!

ANNUAL MEETING OF HERTEL LAKEVIEW CEMETERY ASSOCIATION

Friday, May 6, 2016 6:30 p.m. at Lakeview United Methodist Church

G

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NOTICE

Patsy Gustafson Town Clerk

NEW HOME CEMETERY ASSOCIATION ANNUAL MEETING Monday, May 9, 2016 6:30 p.m. Eureka Town Hall 2395 210th Ave. St. Croix Falls, WI

NOTICE TOWN OF MILLTOWN

Monthly Board Meeting Monday, May 9, at 7 p.m. Milltown Fire Hall Virgil Hansen, Clerk 645047 26-27a,d 37-38L

(Apr. 27, May 4, 11) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF CLARENCE W. GOULD Notice to Creditors (Informal Administration)

RUDE CA S ’ Y FE AR PART-TIME LINE/PREP COOK 7721 West Main St. • Siren, WI

TOWN OF LAKETOWN BURNING BAN No burning allowed until after 6 p.m. from April 1 until June 1, 2016.

715-349-2536

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OPEN BOOK - TOWN OF SIREN

The Open Book for the Town of Siren will be held on Saturday, May 21, 2016, from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m., at the Siren Town Hall, 7240 South Long Lake Road. The assessor will be available at this time to hear any and all complaints from the taxpayers. Please call Associated Appraisal Consultants at 800-721-4157 to schedule an appointment. Board of Review will be held on Tuesday, May 14, 2016, at the Siren Town Hall from 6 to 8 p.m. Notice is hereby given this 2nd day of May, 2016, by Mary 646046 38-40L WNAXLP Hunter, Clerk.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Village of Frederic

The Village of Frederic Board will hold a Public hearing on May 9, 2016, at 7 p.m., at the Frederic Village Hall, 107 Hope Road W., to consider a recommendation by the Planning Commission to rezone parcels 126-005501000 and 126005460000 from R4, R3 to B-2 Highway Commercial District on property located on United Way. Public comment will be heard at this time. Janice Schott, Clerk 646013 38L WNAXLP

NOTICE - SIREN SANITARY DISTRICT TOWN OF SIREN BOARD MEETINGS The Siren Sanitary District will hold their monthly Board Meeting on Thursday, May 12, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Siren Town Hall. Immediately following the Sanitary District Meeting, the Town of Siren will hold their monthly Board Meeting at approximately 6:45 p.m. The agenda will be posted. If you wish to be on the agenda, please call Mary Hunter, Clerk. Mary Hunter, Clerk, 715-349-5119 645584 37-38L WNAXLP

ATTENTION TOWN OF CLAM FALLS

The Town Board invites you to our next monthly meeting on Wed., May 11, 2016, at 7:30 p.m. at the town hall to participate in discussion on the upcoming decision of adopting county zoning or opting out of county zoning. 646006 38L 28a

Jane Schmidt, Clerk Town of Clam Falls

Case No. 16 PR 32 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. An application for informal administration was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth October 12, 1926, and date of death December 18, 2013, was domiciled in Anoka County, State of Minnesota, with a mailing address of 3603 Interlachen Drive NE, Ham Lake, MN 55304. 3. All interested persons waived notice. 4. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is July 20, 2016. 5. A claim may be filed at the Office of Register in Probate, Polk County Courthouse, 1005 West Main St., Balsam Lake, Wis., Room 500. Jenell L. Anderson Probate Registrar April 14, 2016 Steven J. Swanson Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787 Bar No.: 1003029 645466 WNAXLP

NOTICES

NOTICE

TOWN OF LORAIN BOARD MEETING Thurs., May 12, 2016, At Lorain Town Hall At 7:30 p.m.

Agenda: Call meeting to order. Roll call. Verify publication of meeting. Approve minutes of previous meetings. Approve treasurer reports. Motion by Board to pay the bills. Old Business: New Business: Reports: Comp. Commission, Fire Dept., Ambulance, Cemetery. Motion to opt out of Polk County Zoning. Review ordinance drafts. Additional items for future meeting. Motion to adjourn. Susan E. Hughes, Clerk 645995 38L 28a

FREDERIC SCHOOL DISTRICT REGULAR BOARD MEETING NOTICE Wednesday, May 11, 2016 6-12 District Boardroom

The Frederic School District Board of Education will conduct its regular board meeting on May 11, 2016, in the District Boardroom at 6:30 p.m. The most current agenda is available after May 9, 2016, on the Frederic School District website: www.frederic.k12.wi.us/ 645958 38L

TOWN OF MILLTOWN Plan Committee Meeting

Mon., May 9, 2016, Milltown Fire Hall Virgil Hansen, Clerk

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Agenda: Verification of posting; clerk’s minutes; treasurer’s report; resident issues; road items; TRIP Program; Siren Fire Dept.; pay bills and look at correspondence. Next meeting June 13, 2016. 645878 Linda Terrian, Clerk 38L 28a

(Apr. 27, May 4, 11) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Royal Credit Union, a Wisconsin state chartered credit union, 200 Riverfront Terrace Eau Claire, Wisconsin 54703, Plaintiff, vs. Brent A. Troff 1461A 90th Avenue Amery, Wisconsin 54001, Carleen J. Troff, f/k/a Carleen J. Warren 888 179th Street Dresser, Wisconsin 54009, AnchorBank, fsb, a federal savings bank, f/k/a S & C Bank 25 West Main Street Madison, Wisconsin 53703, John Doe, Mary Roe, and XYZ corporation, Defendants. Case Type: 30404 Case No. 15CV303 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE, that by virtue of that certain Findings of Fact, Conclusions of Law, Order for Judgment, and Judgment executed on December 13, 2015, and filed on December 14, 2015, effective nunc pro tunc to November 30, 2015, in the above-entitled action, the Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin, will sell the following described real property at public auction as follows: DATE/TIME: May 31, 2016, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 10% of successful bid must be paid to Sheriff at sale in certified funds, with the balance due and owing on the date of confirmation of the sale by the Court. PLACE: Lobby of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Parcel 1: Lot Six (6) of Certified Survey Map No. 3632 recorded in Volume 16 of Certified Survey Maps, page 145, Document No. 629341 in the office of the Register of Deeds for Polk County, Wisconsin, located in the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE 1/4 SW 1/4), Section Fifteen (15), Township Thirtythree (33) North, Range Seventeen (17) West, Town of Garfield, Polk County, Wisconsin. Parcel 2: Together with and subject to a 15 foot easement for ingress and egress from the property to the public road which lies along the Eastern Edge of Lot Five (5) of Certified Survey map No. 3352 recorded in Volume 15, page 119, located in the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE 1/4 SW 1/4) of Section 15, Township 33 North, Range 17 West, said easement to be over and across the existing driveway. Including the following manufactured housing unit (Skyline Lexington, Model B214 28 x 56) HUD Nos. ULI539090 & ULI539091. (FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY: Plaintiff believes that the property address is 1461A 90th Avenue, Amery, Wisconsin). Dated: April 14, 2016. Peter Johnson Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin THIS INSTRUMENT WAS DRAFTED BY: ANASTASI JELLUM, P.A. 14985 60th Street North Stillwater, MN 55082 (651) 439-2951 Garth G. Gavenda/#18104 645540 WNAXLP

Monthly Town Board Meeting Will Be Held Mon., May 9, At 7 p.m. At The Town Hall, 612 Hwy. 8. 645723

The Monthly Board Meeting For The Town Of LaFollette Will Be Held At The Lafollette Town Hall On Mon., May 9, 2016, At 7:30 p.m.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

TOWN OF APPLE RIVER

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TOWN OF LAFOLLETTE MONTHLY BOARD MEETING

The regular Monthly Village Board Meeting will be held on Monday, May 9, 2016, at 7 p.m., at the Village Hall, 107 Hope Road W. Agenda will be posted at the Village Hall. Janice Schott Clerk 645725 38L

NOTICE

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NOTICE

NOTICE OF MEETING Village of Frederic

MEETING NOTICE

The Next Meeting Of The Meenon Town Board Will Be Held On Monday, May 9, 2016, At 7:00 p.m. At The Meenon Town Hall. Agenda to include: Opening of road bids; clerk, treasurer, chairman, supervisor and road reports; agreement with other townships for mowing and maintenance and approval of monthly bills. Suzanna M. Eytcheson 645953 38L 28a Town Clerk (Apr. 20, 27, May 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT Polk COUNTY U.S. Bank National Association successor by merger to U.S. Bank National Association ND, Plaintiff, vs. Lyle M. Johnson, et al. Defendants. Case Classification: 30404 SUMMONS (For Publication) Case No. 16 CV 80 Hon. Jeffery L. Anderson THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, to Defendant Unknown Spouse of Lyle M. Johnson: You are hereby notified that the plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. This is a real estate foreclosure action. Therefore, within 40 days after April 20, 2016, (60 days as to the United States of America), you must respond with a written demand for a copy of the complaint. The demand must be sent or delivered to the court, whose address is Clerk of Court, Polk County Courthouse, 1005 West Main Street, Suite 300, Balsam Lake, WI 54810 and to Kristine K. Nogosek, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 332 Minnesota Street, Suite W-1650, St. Paul, MN 55101. You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the complaint within 40 days (60 days as to the United States of America), the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. The object of this action is to foreclose a mortgage recorded with the Register of Deeds for Polk County, Wisconsin, on May 16, 2003. as Document No. 657285. Volume 930 Page 760. Date: April 8, 2016 STEIN & MOORE, P.A. By: /s/Kristine K. Nogosek Kristine K. Nogosek I.D. #1076967 Attorneys for Plaintiff 332 Minnesota Street Suite W-1650 St. Paul, MN 55101 651-224-9683 645077 WNAXLP


MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 25

NOTICES

The Town of St. Croix Falls Plan Commission will hold a public hearing at 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, May 11, 2016, at the Town Hall at 1305 200th Street & U.S. Hwy. 8, St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin. Written evidence, testimony or comments, if any, must be delivered in person or by mail to the Town Hall. Rob Carlson requests a special exception for an ATV-UTV moto plex with racetrack at parcel identification numbers 04400933-0000 and 044-00921-0000, St. Croix Falls, WI 54024. The property is located in Section 34, T34N, R18W. Rob Carlson requests a special exception for selling used service trucks in the Commercial District. The parcel identification number is 044-00921-0000 and the property is located in Section 34, T34N, R18W. John and Rhett Werner request a minor subdivision of parcel identification number 044-00618-0000. Two additional parcels will be created with the two new parcels totaling 3.75 acres. The property is located in Section 25, T34N, R18W. Julia Amrich requests a special exception to run a drive-up kiosk selling coffee and baked goods at 2028 U.S. Highway 8. The parcel identification number is 044-00923-0000 and the property is located in Section 34, T34N, R18W. Steven Kotilinek requests a rezone of 2 parcels from Agricultural to Transitional. The two parcel identification numbers are 044-00740-0000 and 044-00741-0000, both parcels are located in Section 27, T34N, R18W. The Town of St. Croix Falls will be holding a public hearing to discuss potential amendments to the Town Driveway and Public Access ordinance. Copies of the proposed amendments are available at the Town Hall. The Town of St. Croix Falls will be holding a public hearing to discuss potential amendments to the Town Zoning Ordinance. Copies of the amendments are available at the Town Hall. Jim Alt, Zoning Administrator 645616 37-38L WNAXLP

NOTICE TOWN OF TRADE LAKE BOARD OF REVIEW

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Review for the Town of Trade Lake will convene on Saturday, May 14, 2016, in the Town Hall, Trade Lake, Wisconsin, from noon to 2 p.m. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board: No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the assessor to view such property. After the meeting of the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact or provide information to a member of the Board about the person’s objection except at a session of the Board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or contest the amount of the assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of intent to file a written objection by appearing before the Board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48-hour notice requirement and files a written objection, that the person provides to the clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any Board members and , if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the Board, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and the improvements that are the subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. No person shall appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board of Review by telephone or subject an objection to a valuation; if that valuation was made by the Assessor or the Objector using the income method; unless the person supplies the Assessor all of the information about income and expenses, as specified in the manual under Sec. 73.03 (2a), that the Assessor requests. The Town of Trade Lake has an ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the Assessor under this paragraph which provides exemptions for persons using information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or of the duties of their office or by order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determined that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under Sec. 19.35 (1) of WI Statutes. The Board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other person may testify by telephone. Submitted by, Town of Trade Lake Deborah L. Christian, Clerk

NOTICE TOWN OF TRADE LAKE OPEN BOOK

Pursuant to Sec. 70.45. WI Statutes, the Town of Trade Lake assessment roll for the year 2016 assessment will be open for examination on the 14th day of May, 2016, at the town hall, 11810 Town Hall Rd., Frederic, WI, from 10 a.m. to noon. Instructional material about the assessment, on how to file an objection, and about board of review procedures under Wis. Law will be available at that time. Notice is hereby given this 25th day of April, 2016. Deborah L. Christian, Clerk 646011 38-39L 28a WNAXLP Town of Trade Lake

Village of Frederic

SPRING CLEANUP WEEK May 9 - 13, 2016

$20 per cubic yard, does not include: Tires - $5 each Appliances - $20 each TV’s and Computers - $10 Mattresses - $20 each piece There will be a $10 minimum charge

• Hot Mix Asphalt • Line Painting & Stop Bars The above materials and services will be used on the CTH C3 Local Road Improvement Project. Contracted services on county construction projects over $100,000 are subject to prevailing wage laws.

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TOWN OF ST. CROIX FALLS Polk County, Wis. www.townofstcroixfalls.org PLAN COMMISSION NOTICE OF HEARING May 11, 2016

POLK COUNTY HIGHWAY COMMISSION IS NOW ACCEPTING REQUESTS FOR PROPOSALS FOR THE FOLLOWING, DUE ON MAY 19, 2016, AT 3:00 P.M.

Call 327-4294 or email clerk@fredericwi.com to schedule a pickup TOWN OF EUREKA POLK COUNTY, WISCONSIN NOTICE OF THE BOARD OF REVIEW NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Board of Review for the Town of Eureka, Polk County, shall hold its first meeting on the 25th day of May, 2016, from 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. at the Town Hall located at 2395 210th Avenue. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board: No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the Assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact, or provide information to a member of the Board about the person’s objection except at a session of the Board. The Board or Review may not hear an objection to the amount or valuation of property unless, at least 48 hours before the Board’s first scheduled meeting, the objector provides to the Board’s clerk written or oral notice of an intent to file an objection, except that upon a showing of good cause and the submission of a written objection, the Board shall waive the requirement during the first 2 hours of the Board’s first scheduled meeting, and the Board may waive that requirement up to the end of the 5th day of the session or up to the end of the final day of session if the session is less than 5 days with proof of extraordinary circumstances for failure to meet the 48-hour notice requirement and failure to appear before the Board of Review during the first 2 hours of the first scheduled meeting. Objections to the amount or valuation of property shall first be made in writing and filed with the clerk of the Board of Review within the first 2 hours of the Board’s first scheduled meeting, except that, upon evidence of extraordinary circumstances, the Board may waive that requirement up to the end of the 5th day of the session or up to then of the final day of session if the session is less than 5 days. The Board may require objections to the amount or valuation of property to be submitted on forms approved by the Department of Revenue, and the Board shall require that any forms include stated valuations of the property in question. A person who owns land and improvements to that land may object to the aggregate valuation of that land and improvements to that land, but no person who owns land and improvements to that land may object only to the valuation of that land or only the valuation of improvements to that land. No person may be allowed in any action or proceedings to question the amount or valuation of property unless the written objection has been filed and that person in good faith presented evidence to the Board in support of the objections and made full disclosure before the Board, under oath, of all of that person’s property liable to assessment in the district and the value of that property. The requirement that objections be in writing may be waived by express action of the Board. When appearing before the Board of Review, the objecting person shall specify in writing the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are the subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone, or object to a valuation if that valuation was made by the Assessor or the Objector using the income method of valuation, unless the person supplies the Assessor all the information about income and expenses, as specified in the Assessor’s manual under Sec. 73.03 (2a) of Wis. Statutes, that the Assessor requests. The Town of Eureka has an ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the Assessor under this paragraph that provides exceptions for persons using information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or the duties of their office or by order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determined that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under Sec. 19.35 (1) of Wis. Statutes. The Board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon, or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other person may testify by telephone unless the Board, in it’s discretion, has determined to grant a property owner’s or their representative’s request to testify under oath by telephone or written statement. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone, or contest the amount of any assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board, or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed under Sec. 70.47 (3) (a), Wis. Statutes, that person provides to the clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for the removal of a member of the Board of Review and, if so, which member, and provides a reasonable estimate of the length of time the hearing will take. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN this 4th day of May, 2016. Respectfully submitted, By the Town of Eureka 645911 38L WNAXLP Clerk, David Anderson

Bids will be opened publicly on May 19, 2016, at 3:30 p.m. at the Polk County Highway Office. For additional information, please write or call: Polk County Highway Commission, P.O. Box 248 Balsam Lake, WI 54810 645880 38-39L 715-485-8700 NOTICE OF THE BOARD OF REVIEW FOR THE VILLAGE OF SIREN

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Review for the Village of Siren, Burnett County, shall hold its first meeting on the 25th day of May, 2016, from noon to 2:00 p.m. at the Siren Village Hall. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board: 1. No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the assessor to view such property. 2. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact, or provide information to, a member of the Board about that person’s objection except at a session of the Board. 3. The Board of Review may not hear an objection to the amount or valuation of property unless, at least 48 hours before the Board’s first scheduled meeting, the objector provides to the Board’s clerk written or oral notice of an intent to file an objection, the Board shall waive that requirement during the first two hours of the Board’s first scheduled meeting, and the Board may waive that requirement up to the end of the fifth day of the session or up to the end of the final day of the session if the session is less than five days with proof of extraordinary circumstances for failure to meet the 48-hour notice requirement and failure to appear before the Board of Review during the first two hours of the first scheduled meeting. 4. Objections to the amount of valuation shall first be made in writing and filed with the Clerk of the Board of Review within the first two hours of the Board’s first scheduled meeting, except that, upon evidence of extraordinary circumstances, the Board may waive that requirement up to the end of the fifth day of the session or up to the end of the final day of the session if the session is less than five days. The Board may require objections to the amount or valuation of property to be submitted on forms approved by the Department of Revenue and the Board shall require that any forms include stated valuations of the property in question. Persons who own land and improvements to that land may object to the aggregate valuation of that land and improvements to that land, but no person who owns land and improvements to that land may object to the valuation of that land or only to the valuation of improvements to that land. No person may be allowed in any action or proceedings to question the amount or valuation of property unless the written objection has been filed and that person in good faith presented evidence to the Board in support of the objections and made full disclosure before the Board, under oath, of all of that person’s liable to assessment in the district and the value of the property. The requirement that objections be in writing may be waived by express action of the Board. 5. When appearing before the Board of Review, the objecting person shall specify in writing the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are the subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. 6. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or object to a valuation; if that valuation was made by the Assessor or the Objector using the income method of valuation, unless the person supplies to the Assessor with all of the information about income and expenses, as specified in the manual under §73.03(2a), that the Assessor requests. The Village of Siren has an ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the Assessor under this paragraph that provides exceptions for persons using information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or of the duties of their office or by order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determines that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under §19.35(1). 7. The Board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other persons may testify by telephone unless the Board, in its discretion, has determined to grant a property owner’s or their representative’s request to testify under oath by telephone or written statement. 8. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or contest the amount of any assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board, or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed under §70.47(3)(a), that the person provides to the Clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for the removal of a member of the Board of Review, and, if so, which member, and provide a reasonable estimate of the length of time the hearing will take. Notice is hereby given this 4th day of May, 2016 Respectfully Submitted, Ann L. Peterson Village Clerk/Treasurer 645721 38L WNAXLP


PAGE 26 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2016

Library gala guests enjoy engaging evening with ER doc turned author

Priscilla Bauer | Staff writer readers to enter the story and feel the emotion.” GRANTSBURG – When author Tom Combs came to Combs said he has learned how to make stories hapthe podium to speak to guests at the 12th-annual Friends pen for people. “Writing stories is more than just putting of the Library gala, he confessed he had struggled a bit down facts. Writing stories is not just an accident, it’s not easy.” with what he was going to say. And Combs said he also really learned from a rather Combs, who turned to writing after an 18-year career as an emergency room doctor, need not have worried, unfavorable critique he received from Loft class memas within moments he had the audience engaged with bers on a scene he wrote for a class assignment. “It was a scene that I could not have read aloud due recollections of his experiences in the always hectic and often turbulent atmosphere of an ER room which he to the impact of the memory,” recalled Combs. “The critique group member did not like drew on for his first novel, “Nerve it ‘because the doctor was so cold. Damage.” He just didn’t care.’ “Medicine is an integral character in my books,” Combs noted. “The single best lesson about “In the ER, incredible things hapwriting I learned was that it pen, life-changing events. The ER doesn’t matter what I know, is the setting for incredible drama. what’s in my heart, how the scene “I’ve always been a big reading affects me. What matters are the guy and I’ve been lucky to join my words on the page. Do the words passions of reading, and writing on the page allow the reader access with medicine.” to the emotion and feeling of the Combs then went on to explain characters and events described? that in an ER setting multiple It’s the words on the page that events are always occurring. matter. They have to allow the “It is a remarkable place where reader access. When a scene puts life-changing things happen, and you on the edge of your seat, heart some of these have become part of in your throat and hard to breathe. my stories.” The home run of reading is when Combs said after retiring from words on the page allow the reader his medical career and starting to participate emotionally and trigger response. “ a new one as a writer, he spent In his closing remarks Combs reseven years learning to write, taking many writing classes at the iterated his love of reading. “Books well-known and respected Loft Author Tom Combs posed with fan Roberta and reading, it’s magic and it’s a Literacy Center in Minneapolis. Bitler after she purchased his book. - Photos by joy.” “I’ve been really lucky the past Priscilla Bauer “I feel sorry for people who don’t seven years, learning to be a writer have the pleasure, the wonder of and learning how to put words on a page that engage reading,” noted Combs, saying he delighted in seeing his grandsons reading and becoming “engaged in the magic

of reading.” Combs thanked the Friends of the Library for inviting him to speak and then commended the group, the library board and staff for their professionalism and dedication to the library. “I’m very impressed. You and the community have made the Grantsburg Library such an incredible resource.” Then in a generous gesture of support, Combs announced he would be donating $5 from each sale of his book at the gala to the library. Tom Combs is currently working on his next book, “Hard to Breathe,” set for release this summer.

Gala guests lined up to purchase an autographed copy of Tom Combs novel, “Nerve Damage.” Combs generously donated $5 from each sale to the Grantsburg Library.

Library gala guests checked out the many items to bid on in the silent auction. LEFT: Grantsburg Library Director Kristina Kelley-Johnson welcomed guests to the 12th-annual Friends of the Library Gala . RIGHT: Friends of the Library President Joe Lando showed off the library-theme tie he bought especially for the group’s 12th-annual gala held Saturday, April 30, at the Crex Convention Center.

CF Football Club seeks donations ST. CROIX FALLS – The St. Croix Falls Football Club is raising money for indoor bathrooms and a new concession stand at Saints Stadium. It is their goal to have the building done and ready for the 2016 football season. Although they are well on their way to making this happen, much more help is needed. One way to help the Saints reach their goal is to reward those who give generous donations with naming rights and other forms of recognition. They have established six levels of giving to receive special recognition. The highest level is a Saint Legend. Those who donate $75,000-$250,000 will receive naming rights to the concession pavilion and end-zone plaza, a 4-inch by 8-inch name plaque on the concession pavilion giving tree, naming rights on St. Croix Falls football Wall of Honor and 10 years of recognition on varsity football programs at home games. The next level down is an All-American Saint. At this level, those who donate $25,000-$74,999 will be honored with a 4-inch by 6-inch name plaque on the concession pavilion giving tree and the Saints football Wall of Honor and 10 years of recognition on varsity football programs

at home games. At the All-State Saint level, donors of $10,000-$24,999 will be honored with a 2-inch by 6-inch name plaque on the concession pavilion giving tree and Saints football Wall of Honor and 10 years of recognition on varsity football programs at home games. Donors of $5,000-$9,999 will be at the Saints Captain level. They will be honored with a 1-inch by 6-inch name plaque on the concession pavilion giving tree and the Saints football Wall of Honor and 10 years of recognition on varsity football programs at home games. At the Varsity Saint level, donors of $1,000-$4,999 will be honored with their name listed on the concession pavilion giving tree and the Saints football Wall of Honor. They will also receive 10 years of recognition on varsity football programs at home games. The last level is Friends of the Saints. Those who donate $250-$999 will receive 10 years of recognition on varsity football programs at home games. For more information or to make a donation, contact coach Grant Belisle at 651-206-1342 or Doc Bont at 715-483-3913. – with submitted information

Clare Chenal and Noelle Doornink presented their invention called the Staple Stoppers, the function of which was to help avoid being stapled in the fingers. See more photos and story on facing page. - Photo by Priscilla Bauer

Every page is in color in our e-edition leadernewsroom.com


MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 27

Diving in to the shark tank Priscilla Bauer | Staff writer GRANTSBURG – Grantsburg third-graders in Mrs. Stafford’s classroom have spent the last several months plunging into the depths of entrepreneurship in preparation for their very own version of the popular reality show, “Shark Tank.” According to Stafford, her students’ assignment was to come up with inventions or ideas that would help other students become more successful at school. “This project was intended to inspire creativity, curiosity and passion to prepare students to compete in an ever-growing global society,” commented Stafford. After coming up with their ideas, which included writing pitches, making visuals of how their product would work and developing an actual prototype of the product, students were given the chance to present their ideas to a panel of sharks. The sharks who students had to convince to invest in their products were Grantsburg Elementary and Middle School Principals Ibby Olson and Bill Morrin, district Superintendent Dr. Joni Burgin and Grantsburg School Board President David Dahlberg. “Students gave their speeches, shared visuals and models of their projects to the sharks in hopes of getting a partnership for their business,” said Stafford. “Students were then questioned by the sharks about different aspects of their products, along with everyday life situations and had to critically think their way through the situations so the sharks would invest in their product. “ At the end of their presentations Stafford asked some of her students what they really enjoyed about working on this project. “This project helped Dennis and me work together in a friendly way. Getting this project done in a certain amount of time was tricky, but it was really fun!“ commented Dillon Roatch. “Trying to figure out the questions the sharks would ask us along with some of the vocabulary the sharks used. We had to figure out things right on the spot and didn’t have much time to think,” said Clare Chenal of the experience. “It was really fun to work with my partner and build

a strong relationship with her,” Ella Kammeyer told the group. “It was also fun to make a model of our project.” Then Stafford gave her take on how her students handled swimming with the sharks. “This was the first time I have done this project with my third-graders. This project inspired me through the personalized learning model of education that I have been trying to incorporate into my instruction. I was thinking it would be a bit difficult for some at this age, but it really showed me how well the students can do when they have to think through problems and decide things about their everyday life.” Stafford agreed with one of her student’s assessment that working together on their inventions had brought classmates closer. “I really saw many relationships between my students that grew stronger through the cooperative learning, along with a great deal of creativity that was shown that many students didn’t think they had.” “It was definitely a great project for my students and I really enjoyed preparing such a life learning experience for them all! I am super proud of their accomplishments and hopefully sparked some good ideas!” The sharks seemed equally impressed by the young entrepreneurs. “I was amazed by the creativity, problem-solving abilities and entrepreneurship of our third-graders,” said Burgin of how students tackled the project. “They had some really good pro-types of ways to improve the classroom from the student’s perspective. Our county is in good hands with this type of American ingenuity! “ Olson praised the student’s efforts as well saying, “Shark Tank was a huge success for the third-grade students in Mrs. Stafford’s room. Their ideas were awesome and so fun to hear about. It makes me excited to see that we have such talent right here in Grantsburg. We will be in good hands with the kids that are coming up to take their place as leaders and citizens of our world.” Olson then reflected on what it felt like playing a hungry shark. “I thought being a shark was really interesting. It allowed me to see things through a different lens. I hope that someday I will become a billionaire so I can invest in

these inventions and products. Watch out, QVC.” After the presentation the sharks signed Young Entrepreneurs “Shark Tank” Competition certificates for each student, after which students and sharks posed for a photo together and then sat down for a well-deserved snack.

About Shark Tank From ABC Television Shark Tank,” the critically acclaimed reality show that has reinvigorated entrepreneurship in America, has also become a culturally defining series. The recipient of the 2015 and 2014 Emmy Award for Outstanding Structured Reality Program, the business-themed show returns to the ABC Television Network for its seventh season. The Sharks – tough, self-made, multi-millionaire and billionaire tycoons – continue their search to invest in the best businesses and products that America has to offer. The Sharks will once again give people from all walks of life the chance to chase the American dream and potentially secure business deals that could make them millionaires. The entrepreneurs who dare to enter the Tank must try to convince the Sharks to part with their own hard-earned cash and give them the funding they desperately need to turn their dreams into million-dollar realities. All of the good, bad, emotional and even absurd pitches help showcase the “I wish I had thought of that” business ideas and products. But the Sharks have a goal, too, to get a return on their investment and own a piece of the next big business idea. When the Sharks hear an idea worth sinking their teeth into, they’re more than ready to declare war and fight each other for a piece of it.

Dillion Roatch got a handshake from Principal Olson, the shark who thought his Velcro Ruler-help you draw straighter lines was a pretty good idea.

Photos by Priscilla Bauer

Trevor Geopfert pitched his Wristband Buzzer, a watch that would buzz if you were talking when the teacher is talking, to a shark, a.k.a. Principal Olson.

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PAGE 28 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 4, 2016

Donut Dash raises money for Siren FCCLA LEFT: Fending off sniffing dogs while wearing her donut costume with real sugar sprinkles was Cathy Hinze’s biggest challenge. While finishing the last leg of the race, a neighborhood dog came by to examine her decor, commented Hinze. Donuts and dashing don’t go together in a 5K, but the Siren FCCLA paired them to raise money for their organization. The Siren chapter recently returned from state competition with five qualifying for national competition in San Diego, Calif.

RIGHT: Jennie Carlstrom prides herself in her costumes. Her darling donut getup won her a best-dressed prize.

Seniors Emily Stiemann and Allie Webster emceed the Donut Dash closing ceremony. Both qualified for national FCCLA competition in San Diego, Calif., and will compete in July.

Delane Emery, Wren and Joe, in the stroller, Sarah Radke and Cortney Emery finish the race strong while sporting smiles. The final five enjoyed the fun event on Saturday, April 23, in Siren.

When asked if he ate the donuts, Nick Webster said, “No, they are in my pocket.” He did take the time to pose playfully for a photo at the finish line with a frosted donut with sprinkles.

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Awards went to Jonathan Gears and Molly Bentley. They received metal donut medals complete with sprinkles. The race did not have official timers but was a fun run to raise money. The Donut Dash had around 90 participants and replaced the Glow Run that FCCLA has sponsored in the past.

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MAY• 4,INTER-COUNTY 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER NORTHERN - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGEB 1 WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2016 LEADER CURRENTS • SECTION

Currents Northern

Stories from the NW Wisconsin community

Sole Burner chairpersons tell their stories 2016 Luck Sole Burner honorary chair shares her story

Soon-to-be 8-year-old is honorary chair at ACS walk in Frederic

Mary Stirrat | Staff writer LUCK - A girls’ weekend away, with sisters celebrating their mom’s birthday, is always a time to share laughter, stories, secrets and struggles. For June Hendricks of rural Luck, just such a weekend was a time to share some hard news. The news that June had to share was that she had just been diagnosed with breast cancer. After enjoying dinner together their first night in Grand Marais, Minn., June shared the news with her mom and her sisters. “I was blessed by the comfort of my family,” she said. “And so it began — my cancer journey.” June never considered herself a candidate for breast cancer. She had yearly mammograms and no history of breast cancer in her family. “That gave me a mistaken assurance that I would never get breast cancer,” she said. Believing she was “definitely not a candidate for cancer” because she was physically active and not overweight, June said, was her second mistake. “Cancer doesn’t discriminate,” she said. ••• June is the 2016 honorary chair of the 2016 American Cancer Society Sole Burner in Luck. She went in for her annual mammogram in 2014, and received word that the results were questionable and she needed to follow up. She had had calls like this before, and it never amounted to anything. For some reason, the followup biopsy and an appointment that was to be at Piper Breast Center in Minneapolis was never scheduled. In September, a finger injury sent June back to the doctor. When a nurse asked if there was June Hendricks, honorary chair for the anything else June needed, she remembered 2016 Luck Sole Burner. — Photo by Mary the appointment. An appointment was scheduled with a sur- Stirrat geon, who had looked at the mammogram. Because no biopsy had been done, he couldn’t say definitely that she had breast cancer, but he recommended she bring someone down with her. The biopsy was done, and the “C” word was confirmed. Because the tumor was small, said June, her surgeon gave her the option of either a lumpectomy or a mastectomy. She chose the less invasive surgery. “My doctor at Abbott assured me that my lumpectomy would be very routine and I would home that same day,” she said. “I would receive radiation after I healed.” Things changed, however. Surgery revealed that many lymph nodes were involved — she had 27 removed. “Later,” she said, “the lab report would come back as triple negative, stage 3 breast cancer. This was definitely not going in a positive direction.” There are many different “subtypes” of breast cancer, generally diagnosed based on whether or not any of three “receptors” are present. These receptors — estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 — fuel most breast cancers. These receptors can be targeted during treatment. In June’s case, none of the receptors were present. According to the National Breast Cancer Foundation, about 15 percent of all breast cancer is triple negative. Stage 3 means that the cancer has spread into the lymph nodes With the diagnosis, she said, everything changed. She knew she could die. “I mean, I know we all die, someday,” she said, “but now was not my plan. After all, I had a great husband who had just retired, nine grandchildren I was very close to, longevity, and a sewing room with boxes of fabric and lots of quilting ideas still in my head. “I didn’t want change. I didn’t have time to die.” ••• Treatment of June’s cancer started with the surgery, when the extent of the disease was determined. Not surprisingly, she found herself preoccupied. “My new oncologist told me he required that I walk every day that I was able,” she said. “I went out walking that evening and was so deep in thought I didn’t hear the snow plow until the last possible moment. When I saw it I froze, and he cruised around me. “I was trying so hard, but now I could have been killed. I had to let go and let God have my life. He loves me and would take care of me.” June knew she had to tell her church family at Zion Lutheran Church, and the pastor let her share with the congregation.

Marty Seeger|Staff writer FREDERIC – The thought of that first day, March 25, 2013, still stings, and evokes raw emotion, tears and heartache for Steve and Stephanie Nelson, listening to the devastating news of their son, Freddie, who was just 4 years old at the time. The youngest of six children in the Nelson family, had been experiencing a series of illnesses over the course of about two months. In January of 2013, Freddie had complained of an earache. That was a Friday, but the next day he felt fine. Then on Sunday, a fever sparked. “At that point you’re thinking he’s just sick,” Stephanie recalled. After a handful of doctor visits Freddie was placed on different antibiotics and diagnosed with strep throat on three different occasions, but gradually started looking worse. At that point Freddie’s parents started getting worried. He was sleeping a lot, and started getting thin. On a Friday, March 23, Steve was taking him to Frederic Elementary, but he had trouble walking to class, and sat down on a bench before going into school. “When Steve said he couldn’t finish walking to school I said that’s it. Something is really wrong,” Stephanie said. Another strep culture was taken on the following Monday, March 25, and the results within three minutes indicated once again a positive for strep throat, but his throat wasn’t red. Stephanie said she and Steve both had a bad feeling, and blood work was done quickly. A short time later, a lab technician came in wanting to speak to Dr. Vicki Skarda right away. Freddie’s hemoglobin was at a three, and the doctor soon asked if they would want an Freddie Nelson has been through a lot ambulance, or drive themselves to their next in his first eight years but is a happy, enstop. They chose to drive Freddie themselves ergetic young boy with a reason to smile. to St. Croix Regional Medical Center where – Photo by Marty Seeger the doctor spent a lot of the time talking to the children’s hospital in St. Paul, Minn. “We hadn’t been told much information at this point, we just knew he was sick.” Stephanie said. The couple then headed to St. Paul, where they’d spend another four hours in waiting, and nerves continued to run high, especially with Freddie’s hemoglobin levels at a three. “Finally I said ‘we’re going to admit him,’” Stephanie said, but the doctors told them quickly that Freddie was going to need to go to Children’s Hospital in Minneapolis, and that a hematologist and oncologist would speak to them when they arrived, as they were unable to give the Nelson’s an affirmative diagnosis, but Stephanie already knew. When they handed her paperwork to sign for the ambulance ride to Minneapolis, a diagnosis read leukemia, which is basically how they found out initially. Steve and Stephanie’s mom would follow the ambulance to Minneapolis. Upon arrival, Stephanie was still waiting for Steve and her mother to arrive, and still her questions persisted. What’s going on? What does Freddie have? “As soon as Steve and my mom got there my mom didn’t even put her purse down and the doctor came in and pulled the chair right up and basically, flat-out said, ‘I’m sorry to tell you this but we’ve found leukemia in his blood system,’” Stephanie explained. “It’s like your world comes crashing down. It’s just the devastation part. Steve was in denial. No, this is my baby of six kids. We all had an emotional meltdown. My mom started crying,” Stephanie said. By that time, it was after 7 p.m. Stephanie’s stepdad had come in to try and take notes as both Stephanie and Steve were too exhausted and filled with emotion to think clearly. In a way, they also explained they were thankful Freddie was too sick to remember the first day, and when asked, Freddie said he doesn’t remember that day, as he was just 4 years old. The Nelson’s were told they’d be staying in Minneapolis for as much as two weeks. They were also informed it would take up to two days to determine which one of the two types of leukemia Freddie had, either acute lymphocytic leukemia, or acute myeloid leukemia. Freddie was diagnosed with ALL, which is a more treatable form of leukemia. His parents eventually learned through statistics and education that ALL in the case of boys age 4-7, it required a 3-1/2-year treatment process. The older you were, the harder the cancer is to beat, but at Freddie’s age, it was a 97-percent survival rate.

See Freddie, page 13

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See June, page 13

Diagnosis


PAGE 2 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MAY 4, 2016

Art tour this weekend

A local snapshot

BURNETT/POLK COUNTIES - The EarthArts spring art tour is a loose collaboration by 48 artists through out the upper St. Croix Valley who open their studios at this time each year and invite the public to meet individual artists, learn about the “craft” of their art and to see what’s new. The tour will run Saturday and Sunday, May 7-8, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. EarthArts publishes a self-guided tour map, available at most businesses and maintains a website with downloadable maps and information at EarthArtswi.org. You will also easily notice red and white roadside signs locating each of the 27 stops. In Frederic this year, there will be 13 artists exhibiting their work, six at the Art Center, sponsored by Frederic Arts, and seven at Red Iron Studio. Make sure you take advantage of this local opportunity to visit both stops and see what creative hands can produce. Discover something new in a relaxed, comfortable atmosphere. Refreshments will be provided.

Showing at the Frederic Art Center

Images By Lee is comprised of Randy and Lisa, partners in crime, in life and business. They live amongst the corn and hayfields outside of Luck, along with seven cats, two dogs and a herd of ducks, chickens and goats. Together they enjoy the outdoors as much as possible. They designed the tour brochure cover. Their style can be described as simple, allowing the beauty of the subject matter to shine through. All of the art starts

as a photograph. Different techniques may be applied during the post-editing process to set the mood or to create a visual impact. Sometimes the image is left alone, depending on what end result is desired. Handmade custom frames encase most of their current body of work. Reclaimed barn wood, metal and found objects make up these pieces, creating individual and unique pieces of art. As each dabble and explore new techniques, such as watercolor and encaustic, the work offered will continue to broaden. Jimmy Springett Images LLC, of Siren, is exhibiting oil paintings at the art center for the third year. Springett’s recent works include birds in Crex Meadows, sandhill cranes, trumpeter swans, bald eagles, red-tailed hawks, great gray owls, horned owls, barred owls, snowy owls, rough-legged hawks, many northern duck species, blue heron, green heron, American Bittern and Canada Geese, as well as wildflowers, as the new season approaches. “Memories, experiences and pure emotions are a part of my work, and as I prepare each spring for the duck migration back northward and start to prepare for the USFWS federal duck stamp, I remind myself of the grandeur and beauty that abides with me each day. My passion is to share this experience with you, my collectors and my friends.” Kay Thorsbakken is a longtime Frederic area resident. She says, “My painting abilities are all thanks to Kaya Route. I painted with her for many years and am so indebted to her for her guidance, teaching and help. I will be displaying oil and watercolor paintings. I do the best with winter scenes, old buildings, birds, and I have some newer styles with more country-folk-style cows, horses, etc.”

Vivian Byl is a native of Sandstone, Minn., attended the University of Minnesota and for a time worked at Northwest Airlines as a secretary and a flight attendant.

In 1972, Kaya Route and Evelyn Benson invited her to their oil-painting group. “It was my first introduction to art and I loved it. They were excellent teachers. After we retired and moved to Luck, Bea Rowe took me to a watercolor workshop at Bayfield and I was hooked. Now I paint mostly in watercolor, alcohol inks and liquid acrylics. Thread painting and quilting also interest me. My art brings so much joy to my life.” Joan Worth, an energetic septuagenarian, came from the La Crosse area and is a jewelry designer and crafter who makes magnetic and fashion jewelry. “I started this 10 years ago because I believe magnets of high strength really help take some of the pain away from several different problems. People would ask me why I didn’t make this or that, so I also started making fashion jewelry.” Worth, who now lives just outside of Frederic, does several craft fairs in the area from Voyageur Village to Lanesboro, Minn. Dave Grossman is from the Center City/ Lindstrom, Minn., area where he grew up on a dairy farm. He has been making wooden utensils full time since 2007 outside of Balsam Lake. Grossman’s craft takes him to local farmers markets and shows from Barron to Pine City, Minn. His hand-carved and machine-shaped cookware utensils are his specialty, and he’s always willing to do special orders. The Frederic Art Center is located at 310 Lake Ave. S., the old Legion hall, in Frederic.

Showing at Red Iron Studio

Michael Route is an award-winning artist blacksmith, known for the long flowing lines in his work. His curvaceous pieces can be described as organic art nouveau. Your eye follows his never-ending lines around and around. He has found a nice balance to be complex, yet u n d e rstandable. The work is crafted with much care and thought for purpose and dimension. He established Red Iron Studio in his hometown of Frederic in 2008. He has since been creating and designing a wide range of work including signage, sculptures, railings, range hoods, benches and tables. His work can be found in parks, commercial spaces and private residences across the country. Jim Williams was born in Chicago with an engineer for a father and a crafter for a mother. He grew up tying, sticking, bolting and nailing things together or trying to draw “how

to” plans. He obtained an associate degree in technical electronics, and the focus of his work life became structure and creative problem solving. He eventually was able to earn an engineering position in the biomedical engineering department at the University of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic. “There, I designed and built custom devices for medical researchers in cardiology, electrophysiology, urology, EMG, EEG and psychology. Rather than discarding my technical background, I chose to meld it with my artistic expression into what has been called an ‘engineering’ aesthetic. Reason with passion. Left brain with right. As a contemporary sculptor, I work primarily in cast and welded metal, industrial found objects and wood. I have focused on these materials because of their histories in both art and engineering that seem, to me, to have made them fundamental components of human visual and textural vocabularies.”

Brian Hall. “Reuse, reclaim, recycle” is a recent phrase that I have been practicing for 20 years. The furniture I build is predominately reclaimed material, much of it recovered from remodeling projects from my construction business.” Hall says functionality is also a motivation, which led to entering the construction industry. “Timber framing appeals to me in the same way fur-

Joyce Halvorson. “From the first time I turned a hot shoe in farrier school, 30 years ago, I’ve been interested in learning more about metals and what you can make with them.” Halvorson grew up in Duluth, Minn., and graduated from the University of Minnesota with a Bachelor of Science in animal science. She worked as a farrier for 10 years in the Barron area before retiring, but continues to blacksmith. “I now forge items for the home or cabin such as hooks, towel racks, toilet paper holders, bottle openers and wind chimes and mobiles that can withstand Wisconsin weather. My work is sold at Naturally North in Spooner and Brush With Wildlife in Dallas. I also make customized bottle openers for the Valkyrie Brewery in Dallas. I enjoy the challenges of custom work and would like to do more.” Win Herberg. “I have been interested in pottery since high school. Since then, I have maintained this interest by taking pottery classes in college and in the community. After raising a family and retiring from a teaching career, I feel fortunate to renew my passion full time. I hope to move toward more abstract, sculptural forms and incorporate more found elements and patterns in collage-type

structures. When I go into the studio, I don’t often know what shape my pieces will take. For me, creating pottery is a process of trial and error, success and failure. I learn from my mistakes. I will continue this creative process.” niture does; the process is challenging and fulfilling. I think it is probably a Midwestern mindset to always focus on the practical; this doesn’t necessarily discount aesthetics. Furniture and timber framing can embody both of these philosophies.” Hall grew up near New Richmond and attended UWRiver Falls as an art major, later transferred to UW-Stout, earning a Bachelor of Fine Arts in art metals in 1991. He currently lives near Amery, where he creates artworks in metal, wood and found objects. “I have expanded my range to include furniture and sculpture, continuing to offer the jewelry I have done for 20-plus years. I also own a construction business, specializing in timber framing.” Wendy Frank. “When I began working with metal, I started with simple metal forming. I favor working with copper, although I also use brass, nickel and silver. I was fascinated with the different chemical reactions that metals have to fire and began exploring those relationships.” All of Frank’s pieces

start as flat sheet metal which she heats and hammers. All of her pieces are hand cut, no dies are used. Between torch firing, kiln enamel, torch enamel and the many different patinas, she is able to create unique, often chaotic, metal skins. Frank lives in Atlas.

Jon (Jack) Route. “I have been in love with metal, metal tools, the processes of metalsmithing and nearly anything and everything to do with this corner of the periodic table for over 35 years. With a Master of Fine Arts in metalsmithing, work experience as a bench jeweler and metal tradesman, two stints as an adjunct professor and nearly 30 years as an independent metal studio artist, you could say I’m passionate about metal.” Route’s current work on the wall is an exploration of color on metal using the technique of hot process chemical patination. Much of his work is commissioned by the health-care industry for lobbies and waiting areas. “A new direction for me this past year has been larger-scale found-art metal sculpture. I had been collecting old wheels, gears, pulleys and cranks in a pile in the corner. As with many artists, the genesis for creating often comes from giving yourself time to play with something new.” Pitchfork Brewing. This year, Saturday only, Frederic Arts is sponsoring a craft beer tasting at Red Iron Studio, featuring Pitchfork Brewing, of Hudson. They are a small-batch nano-brewery which means your beer palette can expect a different experience each visit: whole-leaf hops, locally sourced ingredients when available and responsible practices. The creative art of brewing will be the topic of discussion as you try three of their smallbatch ales for $5 while, of course, enjoying the great art. It’s a good combination. Stop on in on Saturday. Red Iron Studio is located at 110-114 Wisconsin Ave. N. in Frederic.


MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 3

Happy Cinco de Mayo

T

his Thursday is Cinco de Mayo, the fifth of May, a big day of celebration for our Mexican friends. A lot of folks think that Cinco de Mayo is the Mexican Independence Day, just like the Fourth of July. It is a day of celebration, with parades marching down Main Street, mariachi music blasting in most Mexican restaurants and street festivals! However, there are only a few towns in Mexico that celebrate Cinco de Mayo. Mexican Independence Day is on Sept. 16, so what is this big hoopla about Cinco de Mayo? To tell the truth, it is a holiday created by the beer and tequila companies. Go to any Mexican restaurants on that day, I guarantee that you’ll see red, green and white, which are Mexican national colors, colored banners hanging from ceiling to ceiling. I bet that for every three or four flags there will be one flag with a beer or tequila logo on it. Si, viva Corona, Dos Equis (yes, long live Corona, Dos Equis – beer companies); viva Cuervo Gold, Don Pedron (long live Cuervo Gold, Don Pedron – tequila companies)! No one ever remembers that on May 5, 1862, in the town of Puebla, Mexico, the outnumbered Mexican army, which was made up of mostly farmers and common folks, defeated the heavily armed French army, and stopped the French from colonizing Mexico. So, forget about the beer and tequila companies for a

Wok & roll Peter H. Kwong while and have a toast to the true heroes behind Cinco de Mayo. How do we do our own celebration? First, let’s start with making some margaritas. The easiest way to make margaritas is to mix tequila and triple sec with some sweet and sour (lime) juice. Tequila is made with blue agave plant in the city of Tequila, a region of Jalisco, Mexico. There are three grades of tequila, Silver is fresh from the distillery drum; gold has been aged in wooden barrels for at least six to 18 months; and anejo, which has been aged from three to six years and is much smoother and more expensive. Triple sec is an orange liqueur. Most sweet and sour juices are just plain lime juice with added sugar. A can of frozen lime juice in the market costs less than $2, but the bottled one with a known brand name attached costs $5 or more. So, it’s your choice. You can serve a margarita on the rocks - over ice, or blended - mixed in the blender. Either way, it is refreshing. For each serving add 1 oz. of tequila and a half oz. triple sec, with 4 oz. of sweet and sour. Pour it into a margarita salt-

rimmed glass with a lime wheel for garnish. Trust me, you’ll be the hero. To get a perfect lime wheel, take a fresh lime and remove both ends. Then make a small cut lengthwise, about half an inch, and then simply slice across. The wheels that come out will have an opening that just fits over the glass. There are special margarita glasses just for the drink but a wine glass will fit the purpose. Now, to be creative you can make margaritas with different fruits. The best ones are with fresh strawberries or with some fresh mangos. First, put the fruits in a blender, then add your margarita and blend it again with the fruits. There you have it, a fresh homemade strawberry or mango margarita. Be sure to try other fruits with the blended strawberries or mango. The list can go on and on, and your enjoyment lingers. Now you’ve a margarita in one hand, your other hand should be busy with chips and salsa - or better yet, with some fresh-made guacamole.

Pico de Gallo, “Salsa Fresca,” Serves eight Ingredients: 6 Roma tomatoes with the seeds removed 2 stalks of celery, diced 1 jalapeno, finely diced 1 red onion, finely diced 1 cup cilantro, finely chopped 1 lime’s worth of juice 1 tsp. garlic salt

In large bowl mix ingredients well. Adjust flavor to taste. Add more garlic salt and/or lime juice for a stronger taste. Pico de Gallo means the beak of a rooster. It is pronounced “pea-ko de guy-yo.”

Guacamole Serves eight

Ingredients: 4-6 soft avocados 1 tomato, diced 1/4 cup red onion, finely diced 1/2 cup cilantro, finely chopped 1 lime, juiced 1/2 jalapeno, finely chopped (optional) 1 tsp garlic salt In large bowl, add avocados that have their skin and pits removed. Add the rest of ingredients and mash till pulpy. Only use jalapeno if you like the hot and spicy kick. You can serve guacamole lumpy or smooth, which will require more mashing. Again, season to taste. Get the tortilla chips that won’t break when you dip into the mix. What are you waiting for? Summer is not that far away and it is time to practice now for that perfect margarita party in your backyard. Remember: practice, practice and more practice. Happy Cinco de Mayo, mis amigos!

Bird walks set at Interstate Park ST. CROIX FALLS - Migrant songbirds are returning to northern Wisconsin and Interstate Park. Many species of birds will remain here while others are passing through on their way farther north. Don’t miss the opportunity to view and listen to

these messengers of spring! On Saturdays, May 7 and 14, from 7 to 9 a.m., join local birding experts for a twohour morning bird walk on Silverbrook Trail. Join Joe Hudick on May 7 and Robin Maercklein on May 14. Meet at the

Pines Group Camp and bring binoculars and a bird field guide if you have them. Interstate Park is located in St. Croix Falls on Hwy. 35, just a half-mile south of Hwy. 8. The walks are free, but a Wisconsin State park sticker is required to enter

the park. For more information call 715483-3747, visit wiparks.net or become a friend on Facebook at Friends of WI Interstate State Park. - submitted

Family Days button design contest under way FREDERIC - It is time once again to design the annual Family Days button. This year their theme is American Hero. Use your imagination! Please remember to include the words “Frederic Family Days”

and “2016” somewhere in your design. There will be two age categories, kids 12 and under and adults 13 and older. You can pick up the design contest form at Frederic Public Library or Red Iron Studio.

Prizes are as follows: first prize for adults is $50; second prize is $25. First prize for the kids is an unlimited wristband for the inflatables in Coon Lake Park on Family Days Weekend; second prize is a pizza

lunch for the winner and immediate family. Please turn in completed design to the Frederic Public Library or Red Iron Studio by Sunday, May 15. - submitted

Tickets available for Citizens of the Year banquet FREDERIC - The Frederic Citizens of the Year banquet honoring Brian and Enid Johnson, Chris Byerly and

Mothers, marbles and mobility by Irene Bugg fter my father died, my mother lived alone with limited mobility for 27 years. She appreciated every moment and rarely complained. Her answer whenever anyone suggested that she might consider moving in with her daughter, to a condo or assisted living was, “No thanks, I like living in my own home.” When encouraged to consider the possibility that one day, living independently might simply become too difficult, her response was, “I am not leaving this house. They will have to carry me Irene Bugge out.” This determined lady lived on her own into her 90th year. She stayed true to her words, paramedics responding to a 911 call did indeed carry her out of her home. She was never able to return. Her acceptance of this dramatic change was remarkably rapid. Her new slogan became, “As long as I am not in pain and have most of my marbles, I want to live.” Defying all predictions, she joyfully lived three more years, savored moments spent outdoors in

A

Kevin Dunchan will be held Sunday, May 15, at 6 p.m., at Hacker’s Lanes. Tickets are $17 and are available at U.S.

Writers’

Carousel her wheelchair, afternoon tea with her housemates and visits from friends and family. I have now reached Medicare age and see my mother reflected back at me when I look in the mirror. And if I am being honest, I admit that I inherited her steely tenacity that some might call stubbornness. But until recently, I believed that I had been spared the genes that likely contributed to her needing a wheelchair as she aged. Last summer I embarked on a long cross-country road trip, sitting for hours every day. I had begun the trip with some hip pain, but it worsened considerably. After a while I hurt no matter what I did – sitting, walking and even lying down. After I returned home and was sitting less and exercising more, the pain lessened but did not go away. I decided to see the doctor. After a series of medical evaluations including a spinal X-ray, I was given the diagnosis, “Old age, nothing we can do.” With all the yoga I practice, I had hoped to hear that I had the spine of a 30-year-old. My spine unfortunately is much more mature. Essentially I was told by the doctor

Bank, Bremer Bank, the Frederic Public Library and Red Iron. You can also call Mike to reserve tickets at 715-371-0034.

that I should come back if the pain became unbearable, one or both legs stopped functioning, or if I began losing feeling in my feet or legs. Other than that, I was good to go. I did meet a physical therapist for an evaluation and one follow-up to figure out how to best take care of my body. No more sessions were authorized because my pain level was not high enough. She taught me three key exercises and said that she could show me many more, but because I was such a physically active person, especially with yoga, I was already doing everything possible to manage my rapidly aging spine. The physical therapist also said that the thing that surprised her most was that I was not in more pain given what my X-ray looked like. Somehow the latter comment was not as reassuring as I am sure it was intended to be. The message, however, was clear. Medicine had nothing more to offer. Maintaining optimal health was up to me. The specter of living with chronic pain and or severely limited mobility has certainly garnered my attention, resources and resolve. I did pursue one complementary medicine approach – a series of deep connective tissue massages (Rolfing) designed to realign and balance the body. This 10-session series helped improve my posture and strengthened support of my spine. But my major focus is on being active and moving every day. Currently my anti-aging exercise program includes a

Leadernewsroom.com

Checks can be made out to Frederic Area Chamber of Commerce. - submitted

combination of yoga and Pilates. I continue to research and experiment with creating the best exercise program for my aging body. My mother’s perseverance and gratitude in the face of adversity inspires and sustains me. I am learning to wholeheartedly embrace her legacy. Today I practiced yoga, paddled on our wildlife lake, walked through DD Kennedy listening to birds and wrote this essay. I am grateful to be alive, free of debilitating pain, with most of my marbles intact.

About the writer: Irene Bugge is retired and lives with her husband in the town of Balsam Lake in Polk County. She is looking forward to spring in Wisconsin, filled with gardening, hiking, biking, paddling, birding and of course, yoga and writing. Writers’ Carousel, a revolving menagerie of pieces for your enjoyment, is created by participants in Carolyn Wedin’s Write Right Now, WITC Community Education classes in Frederic and Luck. If you want to give the class a try during the summer, Writers at the Wren will meet on Wednesdays from 1-3 p.m. Class 1 is from June 1- July 6 and Class 2 is from July 13 Aug. 17, at Cafe Wren on Hwy. 35 just north of Luck. The cost is $10 for each class. Please preregister with Amy Aguado, CEd Director, Luck School District, 715-472-2152, ext. 103 or amya@lucksd.k12.wi.us by May 25 for Class 1 and by July 6 for Class 2. Welcome!


PAGE 4 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MAY 4, 2016

The best movie you’ve never seen

The view from here

uick quiz: What 2015 movie was Q nominated for Best Picture, stars comedian Steve Carell in a serious role

along with Brad Pitt, Ryan Gosling and Christian Bale, won the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay and told the story of a cataclysmic event that recently impacted the United States? Stumped? You’re not alone. The film is “The Big Short,” and until a few days ago, I knew nothing of it either. Think of this column as a prequel to the movie, a little primer on the crash that will save you having to sit through it twice like I did to make sense of it all. “The Big Short” showed up in our mailbox last week, apparently the result of a link I clicked a few months back that automatically placed all Oscar-nominated films in our queue. Reading the little blurb on the DVD jacket, I prepared myself for a real yawner. Another movie about the financial collapse of 2008 with all that obscure jargon and a lot of fast-moving mouse clicks. But in the words of the immortal Gomer Pyle, “Surprise, surprise, surprise.” The movie tells the story in a fastpaced, highly engrossing narrative of the bursting of the housing bubble. It’s a compelling argument for more regulation of Wall Street and gives weight to Bernie Sanders’ call to break up the big banks. And it sure makes me wonder what Hillary Clinton had to say in those three speeches to Goldman Sachs back in 2013 that netted her a cool $675,000. If you don’t plan to see the movie but are interested in just what did go on back in 2007-2008 on Wall Street, read on. Because, and here’s the teaser, it could happen again. All those little tags you see when you’re surfing the Web about another great financial crash looming contain at least a grain of truth. To understand how that might be possible, you have to go back to 1999 when something called The Gramm-Leach-Bliley Actwas passed by Congress and signed into law by President Bill Clinton. Commonly referred to as the repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act of 1933, which was passed during The Depression when 50 persent of all mortgage debt was in default, this bill tore down the firewall between banks, securities firms and insur-

Steve Pearson ance companies. In essence, it meant that the big banks could now operate as onestop shopping centers for all of the above functions. And it laid the groundwork for the crash of 2008. More importantly, the Dodd-Frank bill signed into law by President Obama in 2010, while providing more regulation of Wall Street, leaves the door open to some of the same kinds of excesses that led to the crash. But I’m getting ahead of myself. “The Big Short” is the story of the financial crash told from the perspective of those who actually profited from it. And in an odd way, it makes them sympathetic characters or at least humanizes them. After the passage of the GLBA in 1999, the big banks began creating something called “bundled securities,” aka mortgage-backed securities. These were essentially packages of consumer mortgages bundled together and sold as bonds. In this brave new world, you could go into a private mortgage company on a Friday, secure a mortgage loan to buy a house, and by Monday, that loan might have been sold several times, often ending up in the hands of the big banks who would then bundle them together with other loans. Retirement funds, both private and public, began buying these packages up in large numbers. The housing market was booming, with housing values increasing by double digits every year, making these look like surefire investments. It quickly became a seller’s market with the banks and mortgage companies scrambling to keep up with demand, hence the introduction of the subprime mortgage and what the industry called “NINJA loans” - no income, no job required to secure a loan. The American Dream - anybody could own a house! The big banks needed a new way to package these loans, a new obscure designation to make something of questionable value sound valuable, enter the Collateralized Debt Obligation, or CDO. CDOs were essentially packages of subprime

loans with variable interest rates. In other words, high-risk loans. What made the CDOs even riskier was the fact that the variable rate on the vast majority was set to kick in over a period of months in 2007 since most of the loans originated around the same time and guaranteed a fixed-rate for the first several years. Cash-strapped homeowners might suddenly see their mortgage payment rise by a couple hundred dollars. That set the stage for the possibility of massive simultaneous defaults, an eventuality that somehow escaped the notice of all but a select few who were paying attention in the early 2000s, one man in particular named Michael Burry, who is played by Christian Bale in the movie. Burry is a California doctor-turnedhedge fund manager and self-described social misfit who hires an accountant to look at the hundreds of individual mortgages that make up one of the CDOs he’s buying for his customers. The accountant’s report confirms what Burry suspected - these bonds are filled with junk mortgages that will lead to high default rates, bringing the whole CDO market crashing down in 2007. This is where it gets weird. Burry wants to do right by his investors, fulfill what’s known as his “fiduciary responsibility,” but he sees the storm clouds looming. So he goes to the big banks and convinces them to create a new product, the “credit-default swap,” an insurance policy that would bet against, or short, the CDOs. The banksters are glad to oblige Burry - “This is Wall Street - we’ll sell you anything,” he’s told by one who can barely conceal her amusement at what he’s asking her to do. After all, the housing market is booming; who would be crazy enough to bet against it? From here on out, director Adam McKay ratchets up the pressure as Burry, who has invested $1.3 billion in credit-default swaps for his clients, suffers through the months preceding the crash, watching as the bonds he’s betting against somehow retain their value and triple-A rating despite the fact that more and more subprime mortgages are going belly up. To solve this mystery, the Steve Carell character Mark Baum, based on real-life money manager Steve Eisman, pays a visit to Standard and Poor’s to confront them on why the CDOs aren’t being downgraded despite the rising rates of defaults. He’s told by an employee,

played to perfection by Melissa Leo, “If we don’t give them the ratings, they’ll go to Moody’s right down the block. If we don’t work with them, they’ll go to our competitors.” As Time magazine said after the crash, “. . . both agencies (S&P and Moody’s) granted an AAA rating to Collateralized Debt Obligations that were chock-full of crap mortgages, thereby helping to precipitate the 2008 financial collapse.” No one was ultimately held accountable for the big bust of 2008. Despite the web of deceit, malfeasance and assorted shenanigans that brought the whole thing crashing down, only one person ever went to jail, a Credit Suisse banker who hid a few million in bond losses, a widespread practice in ’07-’08. Bankers bought shorts on the same funds they were selling, unloading the funds at the last minute, then dropping them to zero to collect on the credit default swaps. In the end, $5 trillion in pension, real estate value, 401(k) savings and bonds disappeared into a cyber-haze. Then, to rub salt in the wounds of those devastated by the housing collapse, Congress, under the banner of “too big to fail,” bailed out the big banks who in turn used the money to pay big bonuses to their execs. Bank of America, Citigroup and Merrill Lynch alone doled out bonuses of more than $1 million to over a thousand employees. Could history repeat itself? The filmmakers suggest that it’s more than a remote possibility, citing the recent unveiling by Goldman Sachs of something called the Bespoke Tranche Opportunity - the jargon seems designed to obscure that looks suspiciously like a CDO. Neil Kashkari, a Republican and president of the Federal Reserve Bank in Minneapolis, who as a Treasury Department official in 2008 helped draw up the federal bailout, warned back in February that the U.S. remains vulnerable to another “meltdown” with so much capital concentrated in a few big banks. He called for breaking up large banks into smaller entities or turning them into public utilities. Hmm, a Republican banker and Bernie Sanders leading the fight to break up the big banks. An odd couple if ever there was one, the smooth-talking banker and the irascible politician, warning of another looming financial disaster. Sounds like the makings of a sequel to me.

Frederic ACS Sole Burner is this Saturday, May 7 grade. Freddie will celebrate his eighth birthday on May 7, the day of the walk. He was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in March 2013, and will complete a three-year treatment for ALL the end of May. Team pictures will be taken in the gym before the walk, so proceed to the gym after registration. Team captains are urged to register all team members early to allow times for all team pictures to be taken before 9 a.m. so the walk can start on time at 9:15 a.m. Sponsors for the Frederic ACS Sole Burner this year are Amery Regional Medical Center, St. Croix Regional Medical Center, Larsen Auto Center and Avalon. Frederic walkers may choose a two-, three- or five-mile route. Route signs are posted along the way. Also posted along Hwy. 35 in Frederic are Signs of Hope that

have been purchased by area businesses to support the walk. The Frederic Area Ambulance will be available if needed. The Frederic ACS Sole Burner will be selling tribute flags. Forms for the flags are available at the banks in Frederic, Larsen Auto Center and the Frederic Pharmacy, or may be purchased the day of the walk for a minimum of $5. Tribute flag forms for the Frederic walk may be sent to Kay Thorsbakken prior to the walk at Box 221, Frederic, WI 54837, or purchased the day of the walk. The flags will be on display outside near the registration area of the walk. A silent auction is being held for an autographed Green Bay Packer football. The football is on display at the Bremer Bank. Bids may be made there and the day of the walk at the elementary school prior to 9:15 a.m. The Frederic Golf Course is offering a

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buy one round of golf/get a round free for every run/walk participant. Returning for the third year on the day of the walk is a 50/50 drawing. See a committee member for tickets. Last year the winner won $48. Join the fight against cancer on Saturday, May 7. If you are unable to walk, sponsor a walker or purchase a tribute flag in honor or memory of a friend or loved one. The ACS walks are about having fun, coming together as a community and doing something positive to help cancer research, education, advocacy and service. The ACS offers hope, progress and answers. The walk fights cancer one step and one mile at a time. Together we make a difference. We want everyone to have more birthdays. For further information on the Frederic Area ACS Walk/Run, contact Elvira Schmidt at 715-653-2684. – submitted

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FREDERIC - The Frederic Area American Cancer Society Sole Burner Walk will take place on Saturday, May 7. Registration for the Frederic walk is $10 before the day of the walk and $15 on the day. Registration will be from 8-8:45 a.m. at the Birch Street Elementary School. Arrive early enough to register, turn in donations, receive a T-shirt if $60 is raised, and have team pictures taken. Refreshments provided by local businesses and individuals will be available before the walk. Cancer survivors are urged to register and receive a survivor flower, to have a picture taken as a group and to line up behind the honorary chair at the ribbon cutting at the beginning of the walk. Freddie Nelson is the honorary chair of the 2016 Frederic ACS Sole Burner. Freddie is the son of Stephanie and Steve Nelson. He attends Frederic Elementary School. He is 7 years old and in second


MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 5

Keep kids fishin’ ST. CROIX FALLS - Looking ahead to Saturday, June 11, another memory-making day for kids fishing on Deer Lake as part of the 13th-annual Neil McKenzie Youth Fishing Derby is in the planning stages. This is a kid-focused event sponsored by family and friends of Neil McKenzie, 1930-2003, and the Polk County Sportsmen’s Club. You are invited to help the coordinators plan another fun and meaningful day for the kids. Fishing guides, boat drivers, parking attendants and food preparers/servers make this event happen. Your volunteering is much appreciated. If you know kids who would benefit from a day on the lake learning how to fish, please preregister them before Wednesday, June 1.

Kids and volunteers are asked to preregister by using the online registration form at NeilMcKenzieYouthFishingContest.org or by calling Joyce McKenzie, 715-6462060. Each June many people donate the use of their pontoons, fishing boats, fishing rods and tackle, time, talents, prizes and trophies to provide a free day of fishing, learning and fun for area kids who might not otherwise have that opportunity. This has been a legacy of love and pride in area youth, a practice continued from the way McKenzie interacted with kids and encouraged them to love the outdoors. Please feel free to join in the fun, and preregister by June 1 to keep kids fishin’! – submitted

Pioneer School set at Taylors Falls, Minn. TAYLORS FALLS, Minn. - Children love going back in time and the Pioneer School gives them a three-day experience in the 1852 Town House School, located at 331 Government St., across the street from the Old Depot Memorial Community Center in Taylors Falls, Minn. There are openings at the three-day sessions which run Tuesday through Thursday on June 28 - 30, July 12 – 14. All-girls sessions are from July 19 - 21 and July 26 – 28. The girls session includes some needlework along with everything else. The overall theme this year is Early American History, with interesting stories and crafts woven into a typical 1852 daily one-room schoolhouse schedule.

Children entering first through eighth grades are eligible to attend. Preregistration is necessary by emailing tfhspioneerschool@gmail.com or calling 651-308-7790. The charge is $35 per student. Students are welcome to dress as pioneer children and each needs to bring a sack lunch. The day starts at 10 a.m. with the ringing of the school bell and goes until 2:30 p.m., when parents need to pick up their children. Parents are welcome to observe the class. Pioneer School is an ongoing summer event sponsored by Taylors Falls Historical Society. - submitted

Workers needed for Forts cleanup DANBURY - With the arrival of Spring, it is once again time to prepare the grounds at Forts Folle Avoine Historical Park in preparation for another successful year of sharing Burnett County history with visitors - local and tourists. In addition to the normal spring cleanup of the grounds, additional repairs are necessary at the amphitheater and the exterior of the logging museum must be sealed. The Burnett County Historical Society announces May

9 - 14, from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m., as Volunteer Cleanup & Repair Week. Skilled workers (including carpentry, chain saw and window washing) and unskilled workers are needed. Come for a few hours or for one or more days! Lunch will be provided. On May 14 of the workweek, year-round volunteers are invited to an appreciation lunch beginning at 11 a.m. For more information, contact The Forts, 715-8668890 or fahp@centurytel.net. - submitted

SCF students display artwork ST. CROIX FALLS - The St. Croix Falls Elementary and Middle School students will display their artwork at an art exhibition on weekdays, Thursday, May 12, through Friday, May 20, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. in the elementary school lobby. The exhibit will feature creations from all kindergarten through fourth-grade students and selections from the fifth- through eighth-grade art students.

This is a special showing. Work from the entire school year will be on display. Please stop by and admire all the handcrafted work. For more information, contact Mrs. Clemins at 715-4839832, ext. 1170, or clemije@scfschools.com; or Suzanne Imhoff, ext. 1311, or imhofsu@scfschools.com. – with submitted information

On Saturday, April 23, the Burnett County 4-H program had its annual Cultural Arts Festival. This event combined multiple art categories under one roof for a single morning of judging. Clubs performed memorized skits and plays, and individuals were judged on prepared speeches, oral prose and poetry, written prose and poetry, demonstrations, arts and crafts, and photography. The Orange 4-H Club presented an “Act in a Sack” improv performance. For their club art project, the Wood River Beavers 4-H Club was awarded a grand champion and Wisconsin State Fair nomination on their mural titled “Faces of 4-H.” Also, the county Junior Leaders, which includes all 4-H’ers ages 12 and up, hosted a supply drive for the Burnett County Humane Society. Great work happens when 4-H families come together. Congratulations to everyone who participated in the festival. I encourage you to connect yourself to the clover and explore the arts. Join us!

Clover

Connections Olivia Kopecky

Do you remember? Compiled by Sue Renno

50 years ago Army Pvt. Duane Hughes Jr., who attended Frederic High School, was assigned to the 385th Military Police Battalion in Germany, near Kornwestheim.–Pvt. Douglas Hughes, a 1965 Frederic grad, completed basic training and eight weeks of engineering in heavy equipment and was sent to Vietnam.–Pvt. Russell Swanson, from Luck, was assigned to the 459th Signal Battalion at Fort Hauchuca, Ariz.–Marine Pvt. Joseph Holmes, from Danbury, graduated from recruit training at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot in San Diego, Calif.–Pvt. Dennis Wikstrom, from Frederic, completed basic training at Fort Hood, Texas, and was transferred to Fort Gordon, Ga., to be trained for the Army Military Police Corps.–Winners in the annual Round Table competition sponsored by the Inter-County Leader included, from fifth and sixth grade, Vicki Glockzin, Grantsburg; Jeanne Pedersen, Luck; Harry Anderson, Frederic; David Hittle, Frederic; Laurie Creuzer, Luck; and Jean Hansen, Grantsburg. From seventh and eighth grade, winners were Kathy Martin, Frederic; Kathy Peterson, Grantsburg; Reg Behrends, Grantsburg; Tim Ryan, Frederic; Connie Johnson, Grantsburg; and Eric Simonson, Frederic.–Badger Boys State and Badger Girls State delegates from Frederic were Brian Johnson, son of the Arlie Johnsons of Clam Falls, and Jane Beecroft, daughter of the William Beecrofts of Clam Falls.–Mary Jensen was the recipient of the DAR Good Citizen Award at Luck High School.–Writers from Polk and Burnett County met in Frederic to organize a writers group, tentatively called the Northwest Regional Writers Club. They elected Ruth Christiansen as president, Don Liesch, vice president, and Bernice Abrahamzon, secretary-treasurer.

40 years ago A bit of West Sweden history was offered in this paper as the town observed its centennial year, having been officially organized on April 4, 1876. The first elected officers were N.P. Johnson, chairman, A. Dalberg and A. Larson, supervisors, C. Daniels, clerk, and C.G. Grimh, treasurer. Carl G. Grimh was also the first postmaster of the town. The first school was the Young Lake School, a log building near the Hulteen farm.–Art Baker sold his repair shop in Trade Lake to Tony and Ramona Zurawski. Baker’s father, Albert, had been one of the village blacksmiths in the “bustling Trade Lake community,” and Art built a new shop in Trade Lake when he returned from military service, to carry on his father’s trade.–The Frederic junior class play was “1776 And All That.” Among the players were John Harlander as Voltaire, Ronda LaValle as Cecile, Ron Hansen as George III, Jeff Pederson as George Washington, Gene Zuniga as Thomas Jefferson, Robb Nick as Benjamin Franklin, Carol Java as Martha Washington and Donald Knauber as the president of the United States.–The Siren High School jazz band received a first rating in their division at the jazz festival in Eau Claire, which included high school bands from four states and college bands from six states. It was sponsored by the National Association of Jazz Educators. One of the Siren members, John Lindberg, also received an Outstanding Solo Award.

20 years ago Jason Hinze, 23, from Siren, planned to bicycle across America, alone, from Portland, Maine, to Seattle, Wash., to raise funds for the American Cancer Society.–Mark Pettis, 45, Hertel, declared his candidacy for the state Assembly, 28th District.–The American Legion’s essay contest theme was Why I’ll Be True to the Red, White and Blue. Winners at Grantsburg were, third and fourth grade: first, Jory Fleischauer, second, Matt Stone and third, Cassie Johnson; fifth and sixth grade: first, Craig Lundeen, second, Nell Amundson and third, Allison Hesla; and seventh and eighth grade, first, Jessica Peterson, second, Josh Peters and third, Emily Loomis.–Nancy Tamminga, Siren, was the first woman in Burnett County to get the Melvin Jones Award from the Lioness organization.–Siren students who qualified for state solo and ensemble competition in Eau Claire were Jamie Wondra, Jacque Helland, Lori Anderson, Janet Johnson, Randy Mangelsen and Beth Peterson.–Champs from the five-school Round Table competition sponsored by the Leader were, fifth and sixth grade: Ian Connel, Siren; Bryan Johnson, Katie Hansen and Kelcy Johnson, Grantsburg; Erin Budge, Webster; and Roscoe Sopiwnik, Frederic. Seventh- and eighth-grade winners were Anne Lincoln, Siren; Stephanie Roberts and Sarah Stromberg, Webster; Dani Johnson, Luck; Kelly McCabe, Grantsburg; and Tadd Ryan, Frederic.–Lindsey Williams, Webster fourth-grader, was the CESA District 11 winner of the DNR’s fourth-grade writing contest, with her poem, “The Forest is a Magical Place.”

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PAGE 6 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MAY 4, 2016

TOWN TALK • COUNTRY CHATTER Shelter

YAPpenings

Humane Society of Burnett County with a bell when she was found. We named the lovely cat Mabel. Adoptions were divided equally with one dog, Dina, and one cat, Goldie, going to new homes. Dina will be living just outside of Siren, while Goldie makes her new home in the town of Webb Lake. I’ve featured cat Bailey before, a bit ago, but I think he deserves another chance. Bailey is 11 months old, with glossy black fur and lively green eyes. Bailey is a nearly perfect cat; he gets along with other cats and dogs alike, he just wants to play with them and be their friend. He loves people too, whether they’re young or old. Bailey is very adaptable, he does well in his condo, the outdoor cat house and in the office. Aside from getting rather feisty in his play, which may be too much for very little children, he is just a very wonderful,

St. Croix Valley Senior Center Pat Willits I am writing this on Monday morning and we have sunshine! Hope you get a chance to enjoy it outside as well as out the windows. I’ll be walking the dog soon as it warms up more, maybe I will meet some of you doing the same. We a had a busy week at the center, with the usual events plus a nice dinner the evening of Thursday, April 28, which was prepared by our regular chef BrenNel. It was a great way to start the weekend. We had a nice crowd for dinner and 5-1/2 tables for 500 cards. There will be no cards this Sunday, May 8, as it is Mother’s Day and everyone will want to be with their Mom and their families if possible. It will hopefully be a nice warm spring day. Don’t forget to mark your calendars for the monthly senior center meeting on Tuesday, May 17.

Siren news

We will have a potluck lunch, a meeting and cards after. May is the start of our new year with membership dues collected in May. $12 for the whole year. We need your support and attendance. Thank you. Our Tuesday, April 26, 500 winner was Marlyce Borchert. Arnie Borchert and Judy had the nine-bid. The Hand and Foot winners were Bill McGrorty and Ione White. The Thursday, April 28, 500 winners were Ray Nelson, Bob Norlander, Elroy Petzel and Shirley Sims. The nine-bid went to Elroy Petzel. On Sunday, May 1, the 500 Winners were Paul Strassert and Gary Borchert, the nine-bid went to Arnie Borchert. The St. Croix Valley Senior Center is located downtown at 140 N. Washington, St. Croix Falls. Phone 715-483-1901.

Bev Beckmark 715-349-2964

Friday morning Mr. Sun came out in a blaze of glory. Temps were in the 60s by late afternoon. The weathermen say we are in for some much-needed sun for my plants. The tomato plants in the living room window are wanting to be outside, as they are turning their heads toward the windows. There aren’t too many tree rats around since hubby cut off the black walnuts. There are a couple of them, though, that haven’t given up on a free meal and have started hitting the lopsided apple feeder to get sunflower seeds. They and hubby are getting a lot of exercise these days with hubby running after them while they take to the trees. Once up in the tree, they give him a piece of their minds. We have a winter bird that didn’t show up until spring in bear country, a pair of red-breasted nuthatches. I hope they hang around and raise a family here. We finally got to see some of the many big black buggers that like to raid our bird yard. They can’t hurt anything, as the only feeder out there is the disc blade. Saturday morning, around 8:30, hubby saw a pair of yearling cubs stroll in, looking for trouble. They were followed shortly by their mom. They had

been here before, as they cleaned up the seeds someone had torn down overnight. It was already down at 4:30 a.m. when I got up. A shout from the utility window and they took off to the woods. Sympathy is extended to the family of Albin Greener, who passed away April 20. Sympathy is extended to the family of Shelby Benjamin, who passed away April 26. It was so nice to see Cindy Taver on Saturday for a short visit. Congratulations to Siren’s prom King Garrett Hunter and Queen Riley Anderson. I heard all the kids had a great time at the prom. Congratulations to Jacob Rust for being chosen Siren Schools student of excellence for the week. Great job, Jacob. Congratulations to elementary student Braedon Thiex, middle schooler Jaslin Kegel and high schooler Jacob Rust for being chosen Siren Schools students of the week. Super job, guys. You have a great start on a great future. Don’t forget, next Sunday is Mother’s Day. Do something nice for your mom. She will love it.

Siren Senior Center Thanks to everyone who helped in any way for our seventh-annual 500 card party/fundraiser. A special thanks to businesses and individuals who donated silent auction and door prizes. We were happy to see so many people come and play cards. We had 13 tables of four. There were several towns represented, we had people from Webster, Spooner, Danbury, Balsam Lake, Dresser, Frederic, Luck, Grantsburg, St. Croix Falls, Shell Lake, Siren, St. Paul, Minn., Glendora, Calif., and Indiana. If I have missed your town, I’m sorry. The winners for the card party were Dean Elkin in first place, Doris Knopik in second, Gerry Vogel in third with Sue Newberger and Steve Anderson tied for fourth place. We have a balance class every Wednesday at 10 a.m. This is not a very strenuous class and you can go at your own speed. They would love to have more people come and take part in this healthy class. Our bowling on Tuesday at 9 a.m. is also looking for more people. I was not there this week but was told Abby picked up the 5-6-7 split. We have been practicing picking up splits, as we seem to get more than our share of them.

loving young fellow. He is also a very striking and handsome cat. He will fit into most any home environment, as long as there is something or someone to play with. As you have read earlier in the article, we have kittens. Sheamus, Clover and Fergus are absolutely adorable 12-week-old kittens who are looking for their new homes. Sheamus is black with white paws, a white stripe and little black dot on his nose. Clover is a tiger-striped tortoiseshell, and Fergus

Dewey-LaFollette Congratulations to Cheryl and Scott Hotchkiss on the birth of a granddaughter, Abigail Jean Graves. Abigail’s parents are Kim and Aaron Graves of Minnesota. Dirk and Sandy Benzer visited Hank and Karen Mangelsen on Monday afternoon. Brian Hines came to visit his parents, Gerry and Donna Hines, on Tuesday and Wednesday. Lawrence and Nina Hines had lunch Thursday with friends Dean and Lorraine Kendall. Donna and Gerry Hines, Karen and Hank Mangelsen, Lida Nordquist, and Marlene Swearingen went to the movie, “God’s Not Dead 2” together Friday afternoon at Timbers Theatres in Siren. Hank and Karen Mangelsen called on Pat and

is black with white paws and a stripe on his face, much like his brother Sheamus. What else can I say? They are kittens, so adorable, sweet, playful and cuddly. Besides Bailey and the three kittens we also still have Ollie, our 6-month-old, orange and white bundle of fun; Lila, our sometimes aloof princess; and Cleveland, our fun and friendly 1-year-old. Prince rounds out the adoptable crew, as a most handsome, longhaired, orange and white, 4-yearold gentleman. Something for everyone. All waiting to entertain, charm and love you. Summer is just around the corner so keep in mind our next fundraiser is our annual plant sale. It is to be held in the shelter parking lot on Saturday, May 28, from 11 a.m.- 2 p.m. Annuals, vegetables and perennials will be available, and 100 percent of the sales will be donated to the new building fund. The plants are raised locally by Peggy Tolbert and Becky Dickenson. We hope to see you there. The Humane Society of Burnett County, hsburnettcty.org, is saving lives, one at a time. Phone 715-866-4096, license No. 26335-DS. You can check us out and like us on Facebook, too. Have a great week.

Karen Mangelsen Don Israel on Saturday afternoon. Nina and Donna Hines and Karen and Hank Mangelsen were among a number of people who enjoyed dinner and bluegrass music at Timberland Free Lutheran Church Saturday evening. The music was by The Stringsmiths, a group of five musicians and singers from Cumberland and points south. Several ladies spent Sunday afternoon doing some bread baking and card making at Lakeview UM Church. Lida Nordquist was a Sunday afternoon visitor of Gerry and Donna Hines. Hank and Karen Mangelsen visited April, Dave, Patty and Mandy Close in Siren on Sunday afternoon.

Frederic Senior Center Now that May is here, maybe we will get some warmer weather. The winners for Spades were Sandy Hickey, Arnie Borchert, Nona Severson and Doug Harlander. John La Fond won the eight bid. The winners for 500 were Dave Peterson, Rich Hustad, Darwin Niles and Phyllis Peterson. Remember that we play Spades on Monday at

Dave Peterson

1 p.m. and 500 on Thursday at 6:30 p.m. All ages are welcome, and you don’t have to be a member. Our center is available to rent for graduations, birthdays and most any kind of party. Enjoy our early spring weather. We hope to see you at the center.

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Nona Severson

Do you enjoy Bingo? We play dime Bingo every Tuesday at 1 p.m. No reservations needed, just come and bring your dimes. Our 500 winners were Pat Bresina, Dewaine Bentley, Gerry Vogel, Sue Newberger and Candace Doriott. Our Spade winners were Steve Wenthe, Marlyce Borchert, Candace Doriott, Darwin Niles and Barb Geske. Once again, thanks to everyone who helped make our card party a success. We appreciate all of you.

Dates to remember May 4, evening meal at 4:45 p.m. with turkey on the menu May 8, Mother’s Day May 11, potluck at 11:30 a.m. May 12, salad luncheon St. John’s church in Webster May 19, monthly meeting at 9:30 a.m. May 28, farmers market starts, the seniors will be serving brats June 2, Music In The Park will start again June 10, the foot lady will be coming on Friday this time

Frederic • 715-327-4236 Siren • 715-349-2560 St. Croix Falls 715-483-9008 editor@leadernewsroom.com

Mother’s Day Is Sun., May 8, 2016 Breakfast Buffet

8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Adults - $10.29 Children 11 & Under $7.29 3 & Under Free ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT - Waffles - Pancakes - French Toast - Scrambled Eggs - Plain or Denver Style - Biscuits & Gravy - Ham - Sausage Links - Fresh Fruit - Muffins -Blueberry or Bran - Strudel

Sunday Buffet

11:30 a.m. - 7 p.m. Adults - $11.99 Children 11 & Under $7.99 3 & Under Free ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT - Full Salad Bar - Baked Chicken - Carved Ham - Meatballs - Mashed Potatoes & Gravy - Vegetable - Baked Beans - German Potato Salad - Bread Pudding & Custard Sauce

CHISAGO HOUSE

Taylors Falls, MN

651-465-5245

645446 37-38L 27a,d

Hello friends, We had one of those revolving-door kinds of weeks at the shelter. On Tuesday two stray dogs arrived from CTH B, out of Siren. They were reclaimed by their owner a few days later. On Wednesday a Siberian husky was brought in as a stray from the village of Siren. He was identified immediately as he is a three-time repeat offender. Max, who is a bit of a Houdini dog, was quickly reclaimed also. Sheamus, Clover and Fergus are the names given to our three surrendered kittens, and our surrendered calico cat goes by the name Buffy. We also had one stray cat come in, a longer haired, buffand-white female from the village of Grantsburg. She was found on West Burnett Avenue and was wearing a collar Bailey


MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 7

TOWN TALK • COUNTRY CHATTER Engagement Happy Tails

Benson/Dewey

Await

Arnell Humane Society of Polk County

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Benson announce the engagement of their son, Kris, to Autumn Dewey, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Dewey. Kris is a Webster graduate and Autumn is from Clearbrook, Minn. The couple will be married May 28, 2016, in Bloomington, Minn. - Photo submitted

Dallas is a medium-sized dog, compact and sturdy. He has a big old bowling ball head and a happy-go-lucky attitude. Dallas enjoys being a part of the action. He doesn’t understand or appreciate the confines of a kennel and wants to be with people. When he is out of his kennel, Dallas goes with the flow. “Go for a walk, sounds good. Relax in the play yard, even better. Stop for a conversation in the lobby, I’ll just lay down until you’re finished.” Dallas was surrendered with his brother Tipper, when his caregiver could no longer care for him. Dallas and Tipper lived in the house and enjoyed the company of their family, but were not introduced to leash manners early on. They are both learning this skill now, on daily walks at the shelter. Dallas and Tipper are Lab-pit bull mixes; Dallas is black and Tipper is chocolate. They are 1-1/2 years old. These two young gents are diamonds

in the rough. They are offering companionship and obedience. The obedience will come with the companionship, just show them how. The story of Dallas and Tipper is common for animals in need of Dallas a second chance from our shelter. This past month brought a number of “in dire need” cases to our care; an elderly springer spaniel, energetic and happy, with multiple cancerous tumors; a cat with a mangled leg; a terrier mix, barely able to walk with a severe skin condition; a dog with porcupine quills in his mouth and muzzle; and a half-bald cat with a pillow mat on his back that he had been trying to lick off. These stories are not common, but they do remind us why our shelter is here. All of these animals needed a helping hand they could count on. In March, the Arnell shelter took in an extra-large Lab-Newfoundland mix with an injured toe. We looked for a home that could take on his post surgery care to no avail. Six weeks later, we are happy to report that Huey’s toe is healed and

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Birth announcements A boy, Max Edwin Heier, was born April 21, 2016, to Earl “Dru” and Laura Heier, Tomahawk, Wis. Max weighed 6 lbs., 3 oz. and was 20.1 inches long. Grandparents are Mary Heier of Webster and Steve and Julie Prey of Tigerton. •••

Born at Burnett Medical Center: A girl, Presley Jayne Bearhart, born April 26, 2016, to Kati and John Bearhart of Danbury. Presley weighed 7 lbs. •••

Born at St. Croix Regional Medical Center: A boy, Amani Alan Warndahl, born April 8, 2016, to Ushindi and Troy Warndahl of Center City, Minn. Amani weighed 6 lbs., 11 oz. ••• A girl, Emma Faith Mueller, born April 13, 2016, to Christopher and Heather Mueller of Lindstrom, Minn. Emma weighed 8 lbs., 1 oz. ••• A boy, Uriah J. Herring, born April 14, 2106, to Luke and Tiffany Herring of Luck. Uriah weighed 9 lbs., 7 oz. ••• A girl, Leah Mae Dahlke, born April 14, 2016, to Amy and Christopher Dahlke of Frederic. Leah weighed 7 lbs., 11 oz. ••• A girl, Callie Ann Mara, born April 15, 2016, to Katie Simpson and Casey Mara of Luck. Callie weighed 6 lbs., 11 oz.

Academic news ••• A girl, Nicca Jane Gago, born April 16, 2016, to Nicholas and Jessica Gago of Turtle Lake. Nicca weighed 8 lbs., 10 oz. ••• A girl, Eliza Lou Perron, born April 18, 2016, to Jasmin Miller and Joe Perron of Lindstrom, Minn. Eliza weighed 7 lbs., 3 oz. ••• A girl, Leela Iris Love, born April 20, 2016, to Mariah Gravelle and Travis Love of Amery. Leela weighed 6 lbs., 9 oz. ••• A boy, Mason Elliot Roy Ninke, born April 20, 2016, to Nickole Mensen of Taylors Falls, Minn., and Anthony Ninke of Clear Lake. Mason weighed 6 lbs., 6 oz. ••• A boy, Justin Alan Will Jr., born April 21, 2016, to Jackie Moser and Justin Will of Webster. Justin weighed 7 lbs., 3 oz. ••• A girl, Marlie Raye Helen Ricketson, born April 21, 2016, to Brent and Jackie Ricketson of Chisago City, Minn. Marlie weighed 8 lbs., 2 oz. ••• A boy, Sullivan J. Calabria, born April 22, 2016, to Alicia Brousil and Scout Calabria of Centuria. Sullivan weighed 8 lbs., 2 oz.

LINCOLN, Neb. - Harriet Elizabeth Koball of Siren was among more than 1,800 University of Nebraska - Lincoln students honored during individual college celebrations and the All-University Honors Convocation Sunday, April 24, at the Lied Center for Performing Arts. Koball, a freshman in the Explore Center, was recognized as a high scholar. – from readMedia

SIREN DENTAL CLINIC

Jon E. Cruz, DDS 24164 State Rd. 35 Siren, Wis.

Milltown, WI

Meet Harper Adele

Sat., May 7, 1 p.m. Upstairs Hacker’s Lanes Frederic

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Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Open Some Fridays

Siren Dental Clinic is looking for patient ambassadors that are eligible for an incentive program. A patient ambassador is someone who would like to have our extensive cosmetic procedures done for either personal wishes or before a special occasion such as a wedding or family reunion. We ask our ambassadors to write a note, post a review and to share your positive feedback with others. We appreciate the support you give to our clinic and to other patients who are interested in similar procedures. We are offering 25% reduction in the typical fee for our cosmetic procedures to compensate for your time and goodwill. Please contact our office for further details and payment arrangements.

C & J MINI STORAGE

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Born at Aspirus

he is ready to go home. Potential adopters should be equipped with a home large enough for this 115-pound boy and a good throwing arm. Huey is a fetching fool. He has not met a tennis ball he didn’t like. He is all Lab in this regard. He gets his size from the Newfoundland half. Huey is a special boy in need of a special home. Last Tuesday, April 26, our community came together to support local nonprofits through the online day of giving, giveBIG St. Croix Valley. Our animal shelter was blessed with 52 unique donors online, numerous walk-in donations, three golden ticket awards, a prize for the number of online donors and matching grants from the Board of Directors and Nestle-Purina. With this tremendous support from our community, Arnell Humane Society was able to reach its goal, raising $10,900 for our mission to help the animals. Thank you to all donors. Your support means everything to our mission. giveBIG has become our top fundraising event of the year. We are able to be there for them because you are there for us. Your donations offer hope and a second chance to animals in need. Thank you. Arnell Memorial Humane Society, 715 268-7387, online at arnellhumane.org and on Facebook

715-349-2297 SirenDental@hotmail.com

www.SirenDental.com

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6 - 9’ Trees

Lakeside Landscaping & Tree Farm 645952 38L

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Frederic 715-327-4236 Siren 715-349-2560 St. Croix Falls 715-483-9008


PAGE 8 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MAY 4, 2016

LIBRARY CORNER Grantsburg Library news Preschool story hour Preschoolers and their caregivers are invited to join Kristi Pupak of Crex Meadows Wildlife Area for a fun and educational story time on Wednesday, May 11, at 10:30 a.m. Kristi will provide interactive activities with read-aloud stories.

Star Wars Week Come to the library this week, May 2-6, to celebrate the unofficial Star Wars holiday on Wednesday, May 4. You’ll be able to play a Star Wars-themed game and make a Star Wars-themed craft.

Board at the library Board at the Library is held Mondays at 1 p.m. It’s back to the good old days! Bring out your deck of cards or an old-fashioned board game! The library’s learning center will be reserved for people who want to play board games or card games and socialize.

Book club Join a lively discussion of literary fiction. Two book clubs meet at the library; one on the third Thursday of each month at 1 p.m. The other group meets on the first Tuesday of the month at 6 p.m. Thursday’s group will be reading “When Madeline Was Young,” by Jane Hamilton and Tuesday’s group will be reading “The Wright Brothers,” by David McCullough. Stop by the library to pick up a copy of these book selections.

Volunteers needed

ing program on Mondays and Thursdays. The after-school reading program is continuing into June and early July. Many children are signed up, but we need more volunteers to read one-on-one with these kids. Call Judy McDaniel if you are interested in becoming a part of this great program, 715-4634273.

During library story time Kristi Pupak, Crex Meadows Wildlife educator, taught preschoolers how to mimic animal movements and behaviors, making exercise and education fun. Story time is every Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. – Photo submitted

Materials coming soon “The Weekenders” by Mary Kay Andrews “Boar Island” by Nevada Barr “$2.00 a Day” by Kathryn J. Edin “Goodbye to the Dead” by Brian Freeman “The Second Life of Nick Mason” by Steve Hamilton “Lilac Girls” by Martha Hall Kelly “What She Knows” by Gilly MacMillan “The Little Red Chairs” by Edna O’Brien “15th Affair” by James Patterson “The Apartment” by Danielle Steele

Audiobooks “The Weekenders” by Mary Kay Andrews “Boar Island” by Nevada Barr “The Emperor’s Revenge” by Clive Cussler “Goodbye to the Dead” by Brian Freeman

DVDs “Deadpool” “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” “The Good Dinosaur” “The Peanuts Movie”

Volunteers are needed for our after-school read-

Library hours and information Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Thursday, noon – 8 p.m., Friday 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. and Saturday, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Phone number: 715-463-2244. Website: grantsburg.wislib.org.

To find out about the latest library events, follow us on Facebook.

Larsen Family Public Library news Saturday library hours Starting on Saturday, May 7, there will be new hours - the library will be open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturdays.

Friends of the Library Our wild rice cookbooks are on sale at the library and the coffee shop for $12. Upcoming events: May 14, Second Saturday Used Book Sale - with extended hours, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Author event on Thursday, May 19, at 7 p.m., Sue Leaf - refreshments will be served. Sue writes on environmental topics from the shore of Pioneer Lake in Center City, Minn. Memorial Day Weekend Used Book Sale on Saturday, May 28, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Preschool story time Please join us every Wednesday morning at 10:30 a.m. for stories, snacks, activities and socialization (for the children and the adults!) Everyone is welcome - we love to see new faces. And don’t forget our 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten program - babies love to hear your reading to them.

Another opportunity for story time Annette will be back reading for story time on the third Saturday of each month. Bring children to the library on May 21, at 11 a.m., to share wonderful

stories, snacks and a chance to socialize with other children. Sponsored by Burnett County Family Literacy.

Newly acquired materials Juvenile • “Red Butterfly” by A.L. Sonnichsen • “Flat Stanley on Ice” by Jeff Brown • “Agatha: Girl of Mystery: The Crime on the Norwegian Sea” by Steven Stevenson • “The Adventures of Sophie Mouse: Winter’s No Time to Sleep!” by Poppy Green • “Ponies of Chincoteague: A Winning Gift” by Catherine Hapka • “Just Like Me” by Nancy J. Cavanaugh • “We All Sing with the Same Voice” by J. Philip Miller • “A Chicken Followed Me Home” by Robin Page • “Tiptoe Joe” by Ginger Foglesong Gibson • “My House” by Byron Barton • “The Berenstain Bears: When I Grow Up” by Mike Berenstain • “Maisy Learns to Swim” by Lucy Cousins • “The Haunted Library: The Ghost in the Tree House” by Dori Butler • “Sprout Street Neighbors: A New Arrival” by Anna Alter

• “I See and I See” by Ted Lewin • “The Invisible Boy” by Trudy Ludwig • “The Gallaudet Children’s Dictionary of American Sign Language” • “Signing for Kids” by Mickey Flodin • “The Good Dinosaur” by Disney Pixar Little Golden Book • “Rude Cakes” by Rowboat Watkins • “My Heart Glow: Alice Cogswell, Thomas Gallaudet and the Birth of American Sign Language” by Emily Arnold McCully • “Hands and Hearts” by Donna Jo Napoli

Adult • “The Rescued” by Marta Perry • “Goodbye to the Dead” by Brian Freeman • “Hide Away” by Iris Johansen • “Extreme Prey” by John Sandford • “Lost Among the Living” by Simone St. James • “The Last Mile” by David Baldacci • “’Til Death Do Us Part” by Amanda Quick • “The Forgotten Girls” by Sara Blaedel • “The Passenger” by Lisa Lutz • “Try Your Hand at This: Easy Ways to Incorporate Sign Language Into Your Programs” • “Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture” by Carol Padden and Tom Humphries

• “Dancing with Words: Signing for Hearing Children’s Literacy” by Marilyn Daniels

DVD • “The Revenant”

Adult nonfiction • “Seeing Voices: A Journey into the World of the Deaf” by Oliver Sacks • “Islam for Dummies” by Malcom Clark • “When Skins Were Money: A History of the Fur Trade” by James A. Hanson • “Cook’s Kitchen Hacks: How Clever Cooks Get Things Done” • “If You Get There Before I Do” by David Hoeksema

Audio CD book • “The Last Mile” by David Baldacci

Hours and information Monday - Thursday 10 a.m. - 7 p.m.; Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. For more information, contact the library at 715-866-7697, website: webster.wislib.org. Online catalog: merlin. nwls.lib.wi.us/search.

Balsam Lake Public Library Moms and Muffins May 2-7 When you stop in enjoy a muffin and enter in a drawing for a prize.

National Library Week drawing winners The National Library Week drawing winners were $50 winner: Heidi Stenberg, $25 winner: Sheila Albrecht and Ledger subscription winner was Teri Wagner.

Tech time

Cribbage

Sign up for a 30-minute session and get your technology questions answered on Friday, May 6. Space is limited. For more specific times or to sign up, call or email us. Barb Krueger from Krueger Solutions is also available for personal appointments, contact her directly for more information at 651-343-5078 or email: kruegersolutions@icloud.com.

Play Cribbage at the library Wednesday afternoons beginning at 12:30 p.m. For all ages.

For kids and families:

Upcoming programming Summer reading events have been planned. The Kick off party is on Friday, June 10, from 2-4 p.m., at the Balsam Lake Beach. Once again this year’s summer reading is a collaborative effort between Balsam Lake, Milltown and Centuria libraries and Unity school. We are looking forward to an exciting fun filled summer!

Coffee and Crayons Coffee and Crayons will be held Friday, May 20, 10:30 a.m.

Polk-Burnett Electric Co-op Members District 6

Check our website and Facebook for the most current activities.

Story time Story time is for children 18 months to 5 years and is held Tuesday mornings at 10:30 a.m., with stories and activities. Tuesday, May 10 is Outdoors and Water. There will be no story time on Tuesdays, May 17, 24 and 31.

Movies “Norm of the North,” released in 2015 and rated G, will be shown Thursday, May 5, at 4:30 p.m.

Tween Time All programs begin at 4:30 Thursday afternoons. Ride bus 304 after school, get dropped off right here at the library. Lego Club will be held May 19. Gardening with Master Gardener Cheryl will be held May 26.

Book club Book Etc. meets in the community room at the library, every third Wednesday of the month at 1:30 p.m.

Anytime, Anywhere Book Club Anytime, Anywhere is a completely online book club for adults. It’s all online, so you can join the discussion whenever you have time. For more information visit the book club page on Facebook, facebook.com/ AnytimeAnywhereBookClub.

Hours and contact info Check out our website, balsamlakepubliclibrary.org. We offer free Wi-Fi, public computers, faxing and copying, free coffee and an inviting atmosphere. Hours: Monday - Thursday 10 a.m. - 7 p.m.; Friday 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. For the most updated information, like us on Facebook or email us at library@balsamlakepl. org. Our phone number is 715-485-3215.

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MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 9

HILLMAN CHAIR OF WHA’S WESTERN DISTRICT

GRANTSBURG ROTARY WELCOMES NEW MEMBERS

This past week the West Central District of the Wisconsin Hospital Association met in Stanley for its annual spring meeting and to meet the state officers. At that meeting, Jackie Hillman, from St. Croix Regional Medical Center Volunteer Partners, was installed as the district chair of the West Central District for 2016-2017. Shown (L to R) are: Bonnie Olson, River Falls, state president; John Tully, Rice Lake, secretary/treasurer; Jaci Fuller, River Falls, district chair-elect; and Jackie Hillman, St. Croix Falls, district chair. - Photo submitted

The Grantsburg Rotary Club recently welcomed two new members. Mary Griesbach, Realtor, and Steve Bont, chiropractor, were awarded their membership certificates. Rotary is new to Griesbach, but Bont had been a Rotarian for 25 years with the St. Croix Falls club. Shown welcoming the new members are Allan Johnson, Stan Peer and Roger Inouye. – Photo submitted

BEST IN THE WEST

SIREN FORENSICS STUDENTS DO WELL AT STATE

The following group of Siren students brought home a gold and two silver medals in the state forensics competition. Shown (L to R) are: Riley Anderson, Allie Webster, Lizzie Stanford, Emily Stiemann, Hannah Skold, Patty Close, Mandy Close and Cassie Maslow. – Photo submitted

Osceola Elementary School students have earned a distinct honor from the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, which praised the students for their efforts in the Pennies for Patients fundraising efforts to overcome the disease. The students raised more than any other school district in western Wisconsin this year, at over $3,600. Osceola students have now raised over $50,000 cumulatively, in an effort that began over two decades ago, led by teacher Barbara Jorgensen, who not only lost a family member to the blood cancer, but also several of her own Osceola students had fallen victim, but have made recoveries. Elementary students raise the research money through gathering pennies and other donations in the month of February. – Photo submitted

GRANTSBURG ROTARY RECOGNIZES NEW FELLOW

The Grantsburg Rotary Club recognized Linda Benge-Briggs as a Paul Harris Fellow for her outstanding community service. Benge-Briggs is employed by the Grantsburg Schools music department where she has served in many capacities: directing bands, choirs, music ensembles, plays, community chorales and more. For many years, she has demonstrated “service above self” in an exemplary way to her students, the school and the community. Pictured are Rotarian Greg Peer, Steve Briggs, Benge-Briggs, Rotary past District Gov. Gary Campbell and Grantsburg Schools superintendent, Dr. Joni Burgin. – Photo submitted

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PAGE 10 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MAY 4, 2016

SCF High School and Festival to perform “Cheaper by the Dozen”

The cast of “The Grapes of Wrath” is shown performing at the Franklin Square Black Box. - Photos submitted Those looking for more productions from Festival Theatre can look forward to the season brochure. This full-season pamphlet will feature former artistic director Jaclyn June Johnson as the cover photo and will feature two events that have not yet been released to the public. “We’re very excited to announce our full season” shared Pam Vlasnik, general manager. “Finding new venues for shows has been a challenge, and everyone will be pleased that we are bringing back popular and highly requested artists.” - from Festival Theatre

The St. Croix Falls High School students prepare for performances of “Cheaper by the Dozen” this coming weekend.

GARAGE SALE Sign up for emails of breaking local news @ leadernewsroom.com

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ST. CROIX FALLS - After closing a successful run of “The Grapes of Wrath,” Festival Theatre is celebrating the collaboration with ArtReach St. Croix, who helped bring John Stienbeck’s classic novel to the valley. Next on the schedule, Festival Theatre and the St. Croix Falls High School team up to produce their high school spring play. This weekend St. Croix Falls High School students will perform “Cheaper by the Dozen” by Christopher Sergel, continuing a four-year partnership with Festival Theatre. This partnership enables students to work directly with professional theater artists and get an insight into the world of professional theater. “Cheaper by the Dozen” is a heartwarming tale and is appropriate for the whole family. This show has been adapted for several Hollywood films, a musical, and a play. “Cheaper by the Dozen” tells the story of Mr. and Mrs. Gilbreth and their 12 children. Time and motion are key to organizing this large, chaotic family and the Gilbreths are experts in it. The show is being directed by Festival artistic director Andrew Bradford Benson and arts education coordinator Elizabeth Albers and performed by St. Croix Falls High School students. Show times are Friday, May 6, at 7:30, Saturday, May 7, at 7:30 and Sunday, May 8, at 2 p.m. at the St. Croix Falls Elementary School Auditorium. Tickets are $3 for students and $5 for adults and can be purchased by cash or check at the door.

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MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 11

Cafe Moonglow celebrates 10th anniversary Sherill Summer | Special to the Leader WEBSTER - Main Street cafes have long been the heart of a small town with the personalized service, madefrom-scratch food and the table filled with regulars solving the world’s problems before much of the world is awake. For seven days a week over the last 10 years, Cafe Moonglow has filled this bill in Webster. Sunday, May 1, marked the 10-year anniversary, and the celebration extends all month long with anniversary specials throughout the month. They will also continue to serve the food they are known best for: the hand-pattied burgers, hand-battered cod, homemade corned beef hash and roast beef hash, pies, homemade soups and the ever-popular Webster Mess. Owners Tex Cyms and Laurie Ament are grateful for all the regulars who have helped them keep the doors open for 10 years. They have made 10 years very rewarding. Cafe Moonglow is located on Webster’s Main Street. It is open every day at 6 a.m. On Fridays, the cafe is open until 7 p.m.

Cafe Moonglow is located on Webster’s Main Street.

Photos by Sherill Summer

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PAGE 12 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MAY 4, 2016

Grantsburg Senior Center All the rain from last week left everything looking very green. This week we hear the sounds of lawn mowers and smell the aroma of fresh-cut grass. Oh, and the leaves seem to have popped open overnight. Spring is indeed in the air. Friday morning was Ladies Day. It was a fun time with all the ladies dolled up, sporting their favorite hat and gloves while sipping tea or coffee from their favorite cup and saucer. The ladies enjoyed goodies and chatting about the days of regular tea parties and fashions. And to complete the party, a surprise serenade was given by some of the pool players singing “You are My Sunshine.” Thank you, Verner D., Gil S., Dave G., Gene G. and Peter J.

This weekend there was plenty to entertain us. Many of the area senior centers were busy too. Our family took part in some of their activities including the Siren Senior Center’s annual fundraiser with cards, games, food, silent auction items and door prizes. We enjoyed an awesome May Day meal at the Frederic Senior Center, sponsored by the CTH W homemaker group. Great job, ladies! Remember we offer Wi-Fi, coffee and goodies, and the book nook. For meal reservations call 715-463-2940. For hall rent or other questions contact Patzy Wenthe at 715222-6400 or Wally Mitchell at 715-463-2940. For questions on the center ask for Patzy or Wally. You can even email us at:gburg118@gmail.com

Coming events: ·Business meeting on the third Thursday of the month at 11 a.m. and evening dining. ·Bingo on the second Wednesday of the month at 2:30 p.m. Bring a $1-$2 wrapped gift. ·May 17: Medica workshop at 2 p.m. ·May 19: Social Security information at 4:15 p.m., evening dining at 5 p.m., historical society meeting at 6:30 p.m. ·May 23: Bloodmobile. ·Oct. 1: Fall rummage sale ·Fun with friends, every day! Wi-Fi available.

Marilyn Gronlund drinks tea from her favorite pretty cup at the Grantsburg Senior Center Ladies Day event on Tuesday, April 19. - Photos submitted.

The pool players at the Grantsburg Senior Center serenade the ladies with “You are My Sunshine” at the Ladies Day event Tuesday, April 19.

Patzy Wenthe, center, back row, enjoys tea and fun with some of her family members at the Ladies Day event held at the Grantsburg Senior Center Tuesday, April 19.

Noriko shows off her favorite cup and saucer.

LILYGREN HONORED FOR 60 YEARS OF SERVICE

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On Monday, April 18, at the American Legion birthday party held at Doc’s Pub and Eatery in Balsam Lake, an award was given to Dave Lilygren for 60 years of continuous service. The award was presented by Cmdr. Jim Milligan of American Legion Post 346 in Centuria. Lilygren is still an active member of this post and an honored American veteran. – Photo submitted

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Janet Gronlund Hayne wears fashionable attire for the Ladies Day tea party at the Grantsburg Senior Center Tuesday, April 19.

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MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 13

June/from page 1 “I told people the facts, but also that this was going to be a hard battle and I couldn’t afford pity.” She asked that, when the Lord brought her to mind, they would “simply picture putting me in Jesus’ hands where there is perfect peace and love.” She also asked forgiveness from anyone she had wronged, and forgave others. “To get better,” she said, “I needed all my strength in body, soul and mind to fight one thing — cancer.” June had a port put in through which intravenous medication can be administered, and she started chemotherapy just before Thanksgiving. She had four treatments, one every two weeks, where she was given an infusion of two chemotherapy medications. These were followed by 12 weekly treatments of a different chemotherapy drug. The regimen is known as AC-T, because the first two drugs given are Adriamycin and Cytoxan. The final one is Taxol. After each of the first four treatments June received a drug designed to keep her white blood count at acceptable levels. When the white count falls too low the body Shortly after losing her hair to chemotherapy, June is more susceptible to illness, Hendricks posed for this Christmas 2014 photo with her but the medication prevented grandchildren. Clockwise from bottom left are Woonyi, this from happening to June. Grayson, Mitchell, Sophia, Milan, Madeline, Oliver and During the 12 weekly Morgan. — Photo submitted treatments, however, when June did not have the additional medication, her levels dropped to below what was acceptable on more than one occasion. This meant that her treatment needed to be postponed until the white count was up again. Treatments were on Monday, said June. On Friday or Saturday she “crashed,” but felt better by the end of the weekend. She continued to walk whenever she could, bundling up against the cold. She drank all the water she could, ate healthy foods, and spent time with loved ones. June also underwent radiation therapy, traveling to Rice Lake five days a week for 28 treatments. Through it all, she said, friends and family were her constant support. Her mom stayed home through the winter, rather than make her annual trip to Arizona. “I was her first ‘child’ out of nine to be ill,” said June. “She came often with food, yarn and support.” She was done on July 2, just days after her 65th birthday. Needless to say, there was quite a celebration.

June Hendricks, seated in middle, with her family at Thanksgiving 2014, just after her first chemotherapy treatment. From left are grandchildren Milan and Sophia, with Woonyi in front and Madeline in center; husband Bruce with grandchildren Mitchell in front and Morgan in middle; son-in-law Pat and daughter Melissa; daughter Christi with grandson Grayson in front; daughter Jennifer with son-in-law Rob and grandson Oliver. — Photo submitted ••• “I feel it’s gone,” June says of her cancer. She will need to keep visiting her oncologist for five years, and still has the port for administering intravenous medications in the event she needs it, but she is confident of her health. “I am very thankful that they know what will kill it,” said June. “I am really grateful for all the women who have gone through chemo ahead of me, and what doctors and others have been able to learn from that. “I could go through it a lot better today, compared to what it used to be.” The medical staff that she worked with at all the different points in her diagnosis and treatment were wonderful, said June. Her doctor is at Amery, she had cancer treatment at Piper Breast Center and Abbot Northwestern, and radiation at Rice Lake. “They were all so good to me,” she said. “The nurses are so nice you just love them. I had great care.” June feels that she has learned a great deal from her experience. “You find out how many people care about you, and they let you know.” People she didn’t know well at all would ask how she was doing, offer help, and say they were praying for her. “It’s very humbling,” she said. “You aren’t as in control of your life as you think you are. You have to let go and let God take care of it.” She’s also learned to live life every day, not take things for granted, and be grateful in all things. She doesn’t succeed in all these areas every day, but she’s much more aware of the preciousness of life and of her many blessings. June’s cancer was a type that, if it hasn’t returned within five years, won’t come back at all. “I still eat a lot of vegetables, drink a lot of water,” she said. “I still walk, and I don’t eat a lot of sugar. “And I try not to live in fear.” She and her husband, Bruce, a retired contractor, have summer travel plans. This past winter, they took the vacation they had scheduled for the year before that was postponed due to the cancer.

Freddie/from page 1 “If you’re going to get it, that was the age you’re going to want to get it at,” Stephanie said, but by no means, would fighting the horrible disease be easy for Freddie, or his parents, who at times felt helpless, even questioning whether or not they could have prevented it. They were told by doctors that leukemia is a sneaky disease. There can often be several false positives for infections. There was nothing they could have done differently to try and prevent it, so they forged ahead, with no other option in front of them.

Fighting through it all

Freddie has endured a lot over the past three years, often taking as many as 30 pills a day as part of chemotherapy. He has had more than 30 spinal taps in three years. During the early part of the treatment, he suffered through five in one month. “They hurt a lot,” he said quickly, but on the day Freddie and his parents spoke to the Leader, you wouldn’t have been able to truly understand the pain he felt, as his appearance was not unlike your typical healthy, happy, and energetic 7-year-old boy. Within the hour, however, he was fast-asleep in the chair he sat in, despite sleeping in past 9 a.m. that day. He and his family had enjoyed a Minnesota Twins game a day earlier, and it was a long day for Freddie according to Stephanie, as the side effects of chemo have weakened tendons in his ankles, limiting long-distance walks. He will need to wear braces for the next two years and there are other side effects of the chemotherapy as well. Lately he has been complaining of stomach pains, which they believe is a result of all the chemo pills he had to take for more than three years now, every day. He’s also had to have a port in his upper chest where other rounds of chemo were administered. The port was placed there in the first week of treatment, and he still has it, but it will be coming out soon. On May 30, he will also receive his final at-home chemotherapy, and has only a week to go before not having to take steroids, a drug that completely alters Freddie’s demeanor. Freddie Nelson is pictured with his mom, “He becomes very unhappy, and unpleasant,” Steve said, adding that he doesn’t smile all week, Stephanie, and dad, Steve. The Nelson’s and and wants to eat constantly. At the beginning, entire family have had to endure a lot since Freddie was on steroids every day for a month, Freddie was diagnosed with leukemia on but it was eventually reduced to one week every March 25, 2013. Freddie is the honorary chair month. If people asked as to why Freddie wasn’t of this year’s 21st-annual Frederic Area Amerquite himself, his parents would simply tell them ican Cancer Society Sole Burner Saturday, it was “steroid week.” But through it all, Freddie May 7. It is also Freddie’s eighth birthday on May, 7. – Photos by Marty Seeger has remained a fighter. “He’s a little fighter. He is quite the fighter. I think he has been stronger than me and Steve through some of it. He’s been amazing through it,” Stephanie said, adding they were thankful Freddie continued to respond well to chemo, and were able to avoid a bone-marrow transplant. With everything Freddie endured, Steve and Stephanie too, have been through a lot. With five other children, they often felt they were neglecting them with having to spend so much time with Freddie. Their careers were also put on hold. “So many people have lost their jobs when their kids have got sick,” said Steve, but was thankful his boss was so supportive.

Another family scare

Along with Freddie’s fight, the family endured yet another scare last November when son Michael Nelson injured his arm in an accidental shooting, when a .270 caliber rifle discharged while Michael was driving a pickup in the Town of West Sweden. The shot severely damaged his right arm, and he continues to go through multiple surgeries and hospital stays at Regions Hospital in St. Paul to try and save it. The family is planning a possible benefit in August, and despite the setback, it has actually drawn the two brothers closer together. Freddie idolizes his big brother according to Stephanie, and once a month they travel together, to Regions and Children’s Hospital. “It’s still devastating with Michael,” Stephanie said. “But both are great kids and Michael and Freddie are troopers, I think.” Part of Freddie Nelson’s support system while battling leukemia includes five siblings. Pictured Support system Stephanie says that along with what back row (L to R): Tim Nelson, 25, and Michael Nelson, 16. Front: Evan Nelson, 12, Grace Nelson, 10, they’ve been experiencing, there has been a and Freddie Nelson, 8. Not pictured, Trisha Nelson, big support system to go along with it. From the community to all of the family and friends 27. – Photo submitted who have helped along the way, it has been a big reason they’ve been able to get through it all. “My family, his family, his work. We have had nothing but support and positive reinforcement with all of this,” Stephanie said, and even added that there has been mended relationships within the family too. “We’ve had some hard moments, but I think now we’re finally starting to feel a little stronger than we have been. Every day is a new day. It’s one day at a time, that’s what I say,” said Stephanie. The Nelsons have much gratitude to extend to the community, staff, friends, family and neighbors, as well as the support from Frederic Elementary School where Freddie is a straight-A student. They also extend gratitude to the staff and newfound family at Children’s Hospital. “They told us that at the beginning, that we’re going to become your family, and at first you don’t know what that means, until the end,” Stephanie. “I think we’re going to cry when we last see them.” The Nelsons have also been thankful for the many foundations out there that have helped them continue to move forward. As a family they’ve experienced professional sporting events and Freddie continues to participate in the Minnesota Gopher football mini-camp each year through Hope Kids Foundation. The entire family also enjoyed a stay at Walt Disney World as part of the Make a Wish Foundation and will soon get to experience a family outing at the Mall of America via the Pinky Swear Foundation. “We’ve got to do a few exciting things, but he’s had to suffer for it obviously,” said Stephanie. ACS walk On Saturday, May 7, the 21st-annual Frederic Area American Cancer Society Sole Burner is being held at Birch Street Elementary school, so it seems fitting that Freddie was chosen as this year’s honorary chair of the event. It is also the day he will be celebrating his eighth birthday. As part of the event, a team called “Freddie’s Fighters” has been set up and anyone who wishes to donate to the team can still do so. There will also be T-shirts with Freddie’s Fighters on them to commemorate the event, and help raise money for a good cause. There is no minimum number of members a team must have and you can also walk as an individual. Registration takes place from 8-8:45 a.m. at the Birch Street Elementary School. Stephanie said that they plan on having quite a team, with family friends, siblings and more.


PAGE 14 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MAY 4, 2016

Spring Awakenings RIGHT: Local author Sue Leaf gave a presentation on Saturday, April 30, at the St. Croix Falls Library, discussing a variety of local canoe trip options, both locally and across the Midwest. Leaf is an avid birder, and detailed some of the trips she has taken over the years, ranging from Wyoming to Michigan, and even in the Twin Cities. Leaf also discussed her favorite local canoe trips, as well as some of the tips she has to pass along. She was also available to discuss her latest book, “Portage,” and encouraged locals to recommend other canoe trips.

Photos by Greg Marsten unless otherwise noted

The Spring Awakenings event also included a unique birdhouse building and decorating project, using prints from old books, at the St. Croix Falls Library. - Photo submitted.

Want A Brighter Smile?

The St. Croix Falls Spring Awakenings events at the St. Croix Falls Library included some river-based music to accompany author Sue Leaf’s presentation. The event was sponsored by the St. Croix River Association, which is based right next door to the library.

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MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 15

A night to remember: Frederic Prom 2016

Tori Rosenau, Casey Thaemert and a visiting students are all smiles at the Frederic prom on Saturday, April 30. LEFT: Kali Laqua and Mark Siebenthal enjoy their time dancing at the Frederic prom Saturday, April 30.

Jori Braden and Brock Phernetton were crowned queen and king of the Frederic prom Saturday, April 30.

Photos by Jessika Wink unless otherwise noted

Brenton Nelson, Seth Sullivan, Taylor Meyer-Zenzen and Marissa Nelson take a break from dancing for a group photo.

Blake Thompson and Bailey Hufstedler share a dance at the Frederic prom.

Kendra Erickson and Kody Menke dance the night away at the Frederic prom.

Brenton Nelson, Tyler Nelson and Melanie Jacobson participate in a line dance.

Members of the Frederic prom court shown front row (L to R): Crown bearers Devan Holmstrom and Casiella King. Second: 2016 Queen Jori Braden and King Brock Phernetton. Third: Shylie Burleson-King, Shannon Austinson and Stacy Tido. Back: Mark Siebenthal and Mason Gustafson. – Photo by Becky Amundson

Jori Braden, Shylie Burleson-King, Stacy Tido and Donna Tietz take time for a photo op at the Frederic prom.


PAGE 16 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MAY 4, 2016

A night to remember: Webster Prom 2016 Photos courtesy of Webster Schools

2016 King and Queen Felix Guddat and Savannah Varner are shown with crown bearers Janae Benjamin (left) and Cian Kroll (right).

The 2016 Webster prom was held at Voyager Stables on Saturday, April 30.

The 2016 Webster prom royalty (L to R) front row: Janae Benjamin, Jordan Larson, David Greiff, 2016 King Felix Guddat, Frankie DeBlase, Bradley Brown and Cian Kroll. Back row: 2015 Queen Cheyanne Staples, Hailey Hollis, Elissa Hendrickson, 2016 Queen Savannah Varner, Emma Rachner, Kassidy Benjamin and 2015 King Grant Preston.

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MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 17

A night to remember: Luck Prom 2016

Kaeden and Kaia Werner serve as the crown bearers at the Luck prom Saturday, April 30.

Photos by Lori Nelson 2016 junior prom Queen Morgan Pfaff dances with 2016 junior prom King Austin Hamack.

2016 Senior prom Queen Maddie Joy dances with 2016 senior prom King Taylor Hawkins.

Following the grand march and coronation at the school, some of Luck’s prom-goers board a coach bus for an evening of dining and dancing in Stillwater, Minn. Sydney Paulson, Rachel Sanford, Erin Engstrand and her date Lance Lindvall, Samantha Lindberg, and Devin Saenz and his date pose for a picture just after boarding the Empress for a dinner cruise on the St. Croix River in Stillwater, Minn.

Most of the juniors pose for a group photo following the coronation at the Luck School prom Saturday, April 30. Shown front row (L to R): Logan Grey, Amy Hacker, Tiffany Brown and Morgan Buskirk. Second row: Ivy Dyer, Sydney Paulson, 2016 junior King Austin Hamack, 2016 junior Queen Morgan Pfaff, Olivia Nielsen and Katherine Cherveny. Third row: Courtney Stevens, Jessica Mattson, Erin McGinnity, Paige Runnels, Rachel Sanford and Erin Engstrand. Back: Ben Broten, Graham Hershfield, Jacob Aguado, Casey Ogilvie and Alex Smith.

The Luck 2016 prom royalty (L to R) front row: Courtney Stevens, Sydney Paulson, Erin McGinnity, 2016 junior King Austin Hamack, 2016 junior Queen Morgan Pfaff, Rachel Sanford, crown bearer Kaia Werner, Erin Engstrand and crown bearer Kaeden Werner. Middle: Ben Broten, Graham Hershfield, Jacob Aguado, Alex Smith and Casey Ogilvie. Back: 2016 senior King Taylor Hawkins, 2016 Queen Maddie Joy, 2015 King Chris Pouliot and 2015 Queen Emma Pedersen. The prom theme was Yule Ball, inspired by the Harry Potter books.


PAGE 18 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MAY 4, 2016

A night to remember: Siren Prom 2016

The court members of the Siren prom shown back row (L to R) are: Kaylin Ritchey, Makayla Staples, Cassandra Wentland, Kayla Eideh, Heather Struck, 2015 Queen Kodie Anderson, 2016 Queen Riley Anderson, 2016 King Garret Hunter, 2015 King Keenan Cook, Brady Mangen, Max Lindquist, Tanner Lee, Bailey Mangen and Sampson Richter. Front: Crown bearers Eva Imme and Dayne McKnight. – Photos submitted

Riley Anderson is crowned prom queen by 2015 Queen Kodie Anderson.

Riley Anderson and Garret Hunter were crowned queen and king of the Siren prom Saturday, April 30.

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King Garret Hunter is crowned by 2015 King Keenan Cook at the Siren prom Saturday, April 30.


MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 19

Frederic fourth- and fifth-grade spring program

Cory Popham is the bear at Camp Runamuk.

Photos by Lisa Jensen

LEFT: Amanda Lawrence reminds all who are planning to attend Camp Runamuk for the summer to bring their moist towelettes. Desiree Hughes sings a solo part in “The Morning Routine.”

Sinyala Lupo-Gondwe sings a solo part in the song “Summer Camp” during the fourth- and fifth-grade spring program Thursday, April 28, at the Frederic Elementary School. Jessica Blechinger, Faith Hazen, Sophia Slather and Natalie Chartrand talk about going to Camp Runamuk.

The Frederic fourth-grade students sing “I Want It All” at their spring concert Thursday, April 28.

Counselor Ready, Oliva Britton, and Counselor Steady, Roz Lundquist, are doing skits for the campers at Camp Runamuk.


PAGE 20 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MAY 4, 2016

Fine day to run for reading Priscilla Bauer | Staff writer GRANTSBURG – The 142 people registered for the third-annual Grantsburg Middle School Run for Reading on Saturday, April 30, found the morning crisp and sunny, just right for a run or walk. Before the 5K, dozens of excited youngsters took off on a fun run around the school campus. Runners and walkers took off at 9 a.m. from GMS on the course, which made a large loop around the village, Memory Lake, and back to the middle school and the finish line. William Gerber was the overall winner of the 5K with a time of 21:48 minutes. Molly Bentley was the first female finisher. Participants who signed up with a registration fee had the option to receive a race shirt (designed by GMS seventh-grader, Gretchen Lee) or a new book. Grantsburg School District library media specialist Lisa Danielson recognized local businesses for their support of the event. Proceeds from the event will go toward purchasing enough books so each GMS student can pick a book of their choice free of charge from the school’s book fair.

GMS sixth-grade teacher Lindsay Anderson and husband Neal took a stroll with their son, Morgan.

Photos by Priscilla Bauer unless otherwise noted

Racers and friends Josie and Jordan shared a hug before taking off on their 5K run.

Before the start of the 5K, a large group youngsters took off on a fun run around the school campus.

Run for Reading 5K Run/Walk participants enjoyed the fine day as the course took them around Memory Lake.

Grantsburg School District library media specialist Lisa Danielson talked to racers and walkers before the start of the Run for Reading.

Runners and walkers took off at 9 a.m. from the middle school on the course which made a large loop around the village, Memory Lake, then back to the middle school and the finish line.

Steve McNally, Carol Vitalis and Bill Morrin took their best friends along on the 5K trek. LEFT: William Gerber, the overall winner of the Run for Reading 5K with a time of 21:48, posed with Molly Bentley, who was the first female finisher. - Photo submitted


MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 21

Grantsburg students perform concert just for fun Priscilla Bauer | Staff writer GRANTSBURG – Grantsburg Middle School fourth- and fifth-graders really took the title of their spring concert, “Just for Fun,” literally when they performed it for family and friends in the high school auditorium on Friday, April 29. Laughs and giggles could be heard from students during each of the humorous selections performed by the two classes. Adding to the fun were lots of silly jokes told by fifth-graders who were spot on with their delivery, timing and expressions. The audience was equally engaged in the lighthearted entertainment the students presented.

Photos by Priscilla Bauer

Olivia McNally and her fifth-grade classmates danced about the stage with paper plates as props during their performance of the fiddle tune “Soldier’s Joy.”

Jordan Java and Lucy Dahlberg took to the stage as part of a dancing chickens troupe during the fourth grade class’s performance of the silly song “Oh, How I Love the Opera.”

LEFT: Grantsburg K-6 music teacher Jenny Spiegel directed the fourth- and 5th-grade concert with her usual enthusiasm and talent. Dominic St. John was one of several fifth-graders who stepped up to the mic with a silly joke to share with the audience.

Tyler Fenton and Melanie Lee were two of the fifth-grade students who told silly jokes throughout the “Just For Fun” concert.

Fourth-graders Brady Ulmaniec and Ian Watt and their classmates played “Eine Kleine Kazoo Musik,” a Kazoo classic written by Wolfbane Armadillo Mozart.

Throughout the concert students gave out a cheer when it was time to stop with the corny jokes and get back to singing songs.

Daniel Nelson raised a hand to identify himself as Ed during the fourth-graders performance of the humorous song “Just Call Me Ed.”

The fifth-grade class’s tapping of paper plates as they danced to “Soldier’s Joy” made for a fun interpretation of the classic country dance or reel.


PAGE 22 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MAY 4, 2016

OBITUARIES Shelby Jean Benjamin

Theodore Leroy Hughes

Shelby Jean Benjamin, 24, of Hertel, Wis., passed away April 26, 2016. Shelby was born April 5, 1992, to Lonnie Benjamin and Stephanie Mosay in Spooner, Wis. Shelby enjoyed spending time with her family and friends, listening to music and shopping, but above all else, Shelby loved being a mom to her daughter, Brooklyn. Shelby was preceded in death by her grandparents, Ronnie Benjamin and Marion Benjamin; aunt, Rhonda Benjamin; uncle, Richie Merrill; and great-grandparents, Joseph “Pocket” and Mary Taylor. She is survived by her daughter, Brooklyn; parents, Stephanie Mosay and Lonnie Benjamin; sister, Lyric Benjamin; grandma, Wanda Taylor; grandpa, Morris Mosay; aunts, Janeen (Buck) Mosay, Renee (Ricardo) Fairbanks, Shannon (Bruce) Bellanger, Roxanne St. John and Lorena Benjamin; uncle, Steven (Shannon) Benjamin; special friend, Sundance Johnson; and many cousins, nieces, nephews, relatives and friends. Funeral services were held Friday, April 29, starting at the St. Croix Tribal Center at Hertel with “Skip” Churchill officiating. Pallbearers were Maurice Benjamin, Coty Benjamin, John Merrill, Jordan Rogers, Allan Mosay and Jack McFaggen. Honorary pallbearers were Elijah Benjamin, Gavin Benjamin, Sequoia Bellanger, Uncle Buck Zehner, Jay Emery, Steven Benjamin, Brandon Merrill, Joseph Rogers, Clint Mosay, Skylar Notinokey and Bruce Bellanger. Arrangements were entrusted to Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home in Webster. Online condolences may be expressed at swedberg-taylor.com

Theodore Leroy Hughes, 66, passed away in a house fire April 15, 2016. He was born May 27, 1949, in Amery, Wis., to Vernice (Ted) and Lillian (Swanson) Hughes. As a young lad Ted picked rock and worked on many farms. He graduated from Unity High School in 1968. On April 17, 1971, he was joined in marriage to Karen (Richard) Hughes. Together they raised six children, twins Stacy and Tracy, Mariann, Shawn, Mike and Megan. Ted has lived his whole life in Milltown, Wis., with an exception of one year in California as a truck driver. The majority of jobs he held were as a machinist. After graduating from WITC- Rice Lake, he was hired on to Angle Industries of Baldwin, Wis., until he retired for medical purposes. Ted was an avid deer hunter and fisherman. He taught hunters safety for many years to the local youth. His hunting guns and trapshooting were his passion. He was an active member of both Fox Creek and Balsam Lake gun clubs. He loved to sing karaoke. His grandchildren were his pride and joy. Ted was always willing to help you the best he could. He will be greatly missed by many. Ted was preceded in death by his wife, Karen Hughes; sons, Stacy and Shawn Hughes; parents, Lillian and Vernice (Ted) Hughes; sister, Nancy Hughes; brother, Gereald (Butch) Hughes; and brothers-in-law, Roger Mackinnon and Paul Vanpelt. He is survived by sons, Tracy (Jolene) Hughes, Jimmy Hughes and Mike Hughes; daughters, Mariann (Kevin) Sobczak and Megan Hughes; grandchildren, Jordan Hughes, Zachary Sobczak, Austin Hughes, Lauren Sobczak, Olivia Sobczak and Emily Shay; pets, Nicolas and Nellie; sisters, Laura (Tudy) Vanpelt, Janet (Charlie) Mackinnon and Julie (Joe) Carey; brother, Delbert Hughes; sister-in-law, Joyce Hughes; and many nephews, nieces and friends. Honorary pallbearers will be Jordan and Austin Hughes, Zach, Lauren and Olivia Sobczak and Jimmy Hughes. A Celebration of Life will take place Saturday, June 11, at noon, at the Blacksmith Shop in Balsam Lake, Wis. If you wish to send cards of condolence, they can be mailed to Rowe Funeral Home, Attn: Mariann Sobczak, P.O. Box 359, Luck, WI 54853. You are invited to sign the online guest book and leave a memory at rowefh.com. Arrangements are entrusted to Rowe Funeral Home in Luck, 715-472-2444 and the Northwest Wisconsin Cremation Center in Milltown, 715-825-5550.

Robert Dale “Bob” Munson, 78, of Webster, Wis., and Hastings, Minn., passed away unexpectedly on Sunday evening, May 1, 2016. Robert was born in South Sioux City, Neb., on Sept. 10, 1937. Following graduation from high school, he served a tour of duty in the U.S. Air Force. Bob was employed over 33 years as a radiology, or X-ray, technician at Regina Memorial Hospital in Hastings. He truly loved living in the Webster area near the lake. Bob will truly be missed. Surviving are his wife of 54 years, Jeanne (nee Phaneuf) Munson; three children, Michelle (Steve) Stearns, Michael (Barbara) Munson and Dale (Jodi) Munson; 14 grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. He is also survived by a brother, Harold Munson; and two nieces. Bob was preceded in death by his parents, Mary Pearl (nee Reed) and Sherman Ole Munson. The memorial service honoring the life of Bob Munson will be conducted at 3 p.m., with visitation 1-3 p.m., Saturday, May 7, at Wise Funeral Home, 400 Spring St., Hastings, Minn., with Pastor Jason Peterson officiating. A fellowship meal will follow the service at the Nelson-Lucking American Legion Post 47, 50 Sibley St., Hastings. Local arrangements have been entrusted with Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home and Cremation Services, Webster. Online condolences may be expressed at swedberg-taylor.com.

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Services Saturday for Wayne Johnson SIREN - Wayne K. Johnson, 78, former chief of police of Siren, Wis., passed away Friday, April 22, 2016. The memorial service honoring Wayne’s life will be conducted at 2 p.m. with visitation from 1 - 2 p.m., on Saturday, May 7, at Siren Covenant Church with Pastor Steve Ward officiating. Arrangements were entrusted to Swedberg Taylor Funeral Home, Webster, Wis. Online condolences can be made at swedberg-taylor.com.

LaVerne “Pete” Olson LaVerne “Pete” Olson, 78, went to be with his Lord on April 20, 2016, at NEA Baptist Memorial Hospital in Jonesboro, Ark. He was born Dec. 9, 1937, to the late David and Alvina Olson in Grantsburg, Wis. Pete lived in Jonesboro for 10 years, coming from the Dallas/Fort Worth area in Texas. He was a member of the Broadway Avenue Missionary Baptist Church in Bay, Ark. He spent his life in sales and loved to tell jokes and talk to people. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his brother, Curtis Olson; sister, Betty Jane Jack; and his grandson, Micah Jack Wheeler. Survivors include his wife of 26 years, Shirley Wheeler-Olson; sons, James Wheeler Jr. and Bryan (Amy) Wheeler; daughter, Shelia (LeRon) Gathright, all of Texas; brother, Harold (Marge) Olson; sisters, LaVonne Seemann and Mary Lou Barstow; sister-in-law, Winona Olson; grandchildren, Amanda, Brianna, Maegan, Caleb and Silas; great-grandson, Teagan, of Texas; and many nieces, nephews and friends.

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WEBSTER - Edna Mae Bremer, 94, formerly of Webster, Wis., passed away Friday morning, April 22, 2016, in Bloomer, Wis. A memorial service honoring the life of Edna Bremer will be conducted at 11 a.m., with visitation from 10 - 11 a.m., on Saturday, May 7, at the Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home, Webster, with Father Michael J. Tupa officiating. Following the service, a fellowship luncheon will be held at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church in Webster. She will be laid to rest by her husband at Northern Wisconsin Veterans Memorial Cemetery, Spooner, Wis. Arrangements have been entrusted with Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home and Cremation Services, Webster. Online condolences may be expressed at swedberg-taylor.com.

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MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 23

Church DirectoryCHURCH DIRECTORY ADVENTIST

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST - FREDERIC 605 Benson Road; Pastor John Redlich Sat. Worship 11 a.m.; Sabbath Schl. 9:30 a.m. ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE CHURCH OF THE VALLEY 1259 Hwy. 35 S., St. Croix Falls Senior Pastor Gary Russell Sunday Worship: 8:30 & 11 a.m.

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

WORD OF LIFE CHURCH Meeting in homes. Elder: Cliff Bjork, 715-755-3048 Sun. Fellowship - 10 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. LUTHERAN

LUTHERAN

BALSAM LUTHERAN CHURCH 1115 Mains Crossing, Amery 1/2 Mile South Hwy. 8 On 110th St. Sun. Worship 8:30 a.m.; Sun. School 9:45 a.m. BEAUTIFUL SAVIOR LUTHERAN (WELS) Gene E. Jahnke, Pastor, 715-635-7672, Hm. 715-354-7787, Hwy. 70 at 53, Spooner Sun. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School & Bible Classes For All - 10:45 a.m. BETHANY LUTHERAN - BRANSTAD Pastor Jay Ticknor, 715-463-5746 3 miles So. of Grantsburg on Hwy. 87 Sun. Schl. - 9:30 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m. BETHANY LUTHERAN - SIREN Hwy. 35, 1/2 blk. N. Main St. Pastor Paul Peterson, Cell # 715-566-3758 Pastoral Serv. 715-349-5280 Sun. Worship - 8:30 a.m.; Sun. School 9:45 a.m. BETHESDA LUTHERAN - DRESSER (LCMC) www.bethesdalutheran.ws Pastor Peter Rimmereid, 715-755-2562 1947 110th Ave., Dresser Blended contemp./traditional serv. 9 a.m.; Education hour and fellowship 10:15 a.m. BONE LAKE LUTHERAN bllc@lakeland.ws Pastor Ann Fenlason, 5 mi. E. of Luck on Hwy. 48, 1/2 mi. S. on I; Office - 715-472-2535; Pastor - 715-472-8153, 9 a.m. Sun. Schl., Adult Bible Study & Middle Schl cafe; 9:15 a.m. SHY; 10:30 a.m. Worship with Communion 1st & 3rd Sun. Of The Month; 11:30 a.m. Fellowship CHRIST LUTHERAN (LCMS) Pipe Lake CTH G & T, 715-822-3096 Pastor Steve Miller Sun. Serv. 10:45 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m. during schl. yr.; christlutheranpipelake.com CLAM FALLS LUTHERAN (AALC) Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt, 218-371-1335 715-327-4461 Worship 9 a.m.; Sunday School 10:15 a.m. FAITH LUTHERAN - BALSAM LAKE faithlutheran@lakeland.ws Pastor Diane Norstad 715-485-3800; CTH I & Mill Street Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:40 a.m. FAITH LUTHERAN - GRANTSBURG Rev. Sandra Hutchens; 715-463-5388 myfaithlutheran.org Sunday Worship with Communion 9:30 a.m.; Sun. service radio broadcast 100.9 FM FIRST EVAN. LUTHERAN 561 Chestnut St., Taylors Falls, MN, 651-465-5265; tflutheran.org Sun. Worship 9 a.m. (Memorial Day - Labor Day) FIRST LUTHERAN - CUSHING Pastor Marilyn Crossfield, cushingparish.org 715-648-5323 or 715-648-5324 Sun. Wor. 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9 a.m. FRISTAD LUTHERAN - CENTURIA ELCA - 501 Hwy. 35, 715-646-2357, Mel Rau, Pastor Sun. Worship 9 a.m. GEORGETOWN LUTHERAN - ELCA 877 190th Ave., CTH G, Balsam Lake, WI (Fox Creek) serving@georgetownlutheran.net Interim Pastor Paul Settergren; Parish Office - 715-857-5580 Wor. Serv. 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:30 a.m. GRACE LUTHERAN - WEST SWEDEN Phone 715-327-4340, 715-327-8384, 260-336-5974, Pastor Thomas McShannock Worship 9:15 a.m.; Sun. School 10:30 a.m. IMMANUEL LUTHERAN - FREDERIC (Missouri Synod) Pastor Jody R. Walter Office: 715-866-7191; Parsonage: 715-866-4622 Sun. Schl. - 8:45 a.m.; Service - 10:45 a.m. LAKESIDE COMMUNITY LUTH. - ELCA CTH H, 1/2 mi. N. of CTH A & H on H Church Off. 715-635-7791, Pastor Bill Schroeder Sun. Wor. w/Comm. 10 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9 a.m. LAKETOWN LUTHERAN - CUSHING Pastor Marilyn Crossfield, cushingparish.org Sun. Wor. 10:45 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:45 a.m. LUCK LUTHERAN Pastor Ralph Thompson - 715-977-0694 Office 715-472-2605; lucklutheran.org Sun. Wor. 8 & 10:30 a.m. (Sept. 13 - May 29); Sun. Schl. 9-10:30 a.m. (Sept. 27 - May 8) MILLTOWN LUTHERAN Vicar Angie Kutney, Pastors Mel Rau & Maggie Isaacson; 113 W. Main St.. W., 715-825-2453 9:30 a.m. Sunday Schl.; 10:30 Worship Communion 1st & 3rd Sunday of the Month

NEW HOPE LUTHERAN CHURCH Senior Pastor Emory Johnson, 715-463-5700 newhopelutheranchurch.org 685 W. State Road 70, Grantsburg Sun. Wor. Serv. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m. NORTH VALLEY LUTHERAN Pastor Maggie Isaacson, 715-825-3559 3 mi. W. of Milltown on “G” Sunday Worship - 9 a.m. OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN, (LCMS) WEBSTER Pastor Jody Walter Office: 715-866-7191; Parsonage: 715-866-4622 Sunday Worship - 9 a.m. facebook/OurRedeemerWebster PEACE LUTHERAN - DRESSER (ELCA) 2355 Clark Road, Dresser, WI, 715-755-2515 plcdresser.org Rev. Alan Buresh Sun. Wor. 8:30 & 10:45 a.m.; Sun. Schl 9:35 a.m. PILGRIM LUTHERAN - FREDERIC (ELCA) Pastor Paul Peterson 507 Wisconsin Ave. N., 715-327-8012 Sun. Worship - 10:30 a.m. pilgrimlutheranfrederic.org REDEEMER EV. LUTHERAN (Wisconsin Synod) Pastor Timothy Blauret 200 N. Adams St., St. Croix Falls Sun. Wor. - 9:15 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 8:15 a.m. ST. JOHN’S EV. LUTHERAN (Wis. Synod) 350 Michigan Ave., Centuria Sun. Worship - 10:45 a.m.; Sun. School - 10 a.m. ST. PETER’S LUTHERAN - LCMC 1614 CTH B, North Luck, 715-472-8190 Pastor Roger Kastelle Sunday Worship - 9 a.m.; Adult Bible Study Thurs. 6:30 p.m. SHEPHERD OF THE VALLEY LUTHERAN (Missouri Synod) 140 Madison St. South, St. Croix Falls Pastor Mark K. Schoen Sun. Service - 9 a.m.; Sun.School - 10:30 a.m. TRINITY LUTHERAN - ELCA 10 mi. W. of Cumberland on Hwy. 48 (McKinley) Interim Pastor Paul Settergren Parish Office 715-857-5580 Church 715-822-3001 Worship Service - 9 a.m.; Sunday School - 10:15 a.m. TRINITY LUTHERAN - FALUN Hwy. 70 East, 715-689-2271, Pastor Jay Ticknor Worship 9 a.m.; Sunday School 10:15 a.m. TRINITY EV. LUTHERAN CHURCH (WELS) 300 Seminole Ave. (Hwy. M), Osceola, WI 715-294-2828, Pastor David Rosenow www.trinity.osceola.com Sunday Worship 9 a.m., Bible Class 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Worship 7 p.m. WEST DENMARK LUTHERAN Pastor Linda Rozumalski 1 mi. west of Luck on N, 2478 170th St., Luck Sunday Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m. Fellowship 11 a.m. WEST IMMANUEL LUTHERAN - ELCA Rev. Rexford D. Brandt 447 180th St., Osceola, 715-294-2936 June 7, 2015 - Sept. 6, 2015 Sun. Wor. 9 a.m.; Communion 1st & 3rd Sunday YELLOW LAKE LUTHERAN 1/2 mi. W. of Hwy. 35 on U, 715-866-8281, yellowlakelutheranchurch.org Pastors Douglas Olson, Roger Kampstra, Myron Carlson and Danny Wheeler Service at 9:30 a.m. ZION LUTHERAN - BONE LAKE (LCMC) 5 miles E. of Frederic on W, 2 miles south on I; Church: 715-472-8660 Pastor Mike Fisk, 715-417-0692 Sunday Schl. & Adult Study 9:15 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. ZION LUTHERAN - EAST FARMINGTON (WELS ) Pastor Martin Weigand - 715-294-3489 Sun. Schl. 9 a.m.; Bible class 9:15 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m.; Thurs. Serv. 4:30 p.m. Communion 1st & last Sunday of month ZION LUTHERAN - MARKVILLE Pastor Janeva Stromberg, 320-679-1012; Council Chair, 715-244-3301 Worship - 11 a.m.; Sunday School - 10 a.m. ZION LUTHERAN - TRADE LAKE Pastor Thomas McShannock 715-327-8384, 260-336-5974 Fellowship - 10:30 a.m., Sunday School 9:45 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m.

PRESBYTERIAN

PRESBYTERIAN

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN Pastor Barbara Anne Keely 715-483-3550 719 Nevada St., St. Croix Falls Fellowship - 10:15 a.m.; Sunday Wor. - 11 a.m. METHODIST

METHODIST

ATLAS UNITED METHODIST - UPPER ST. CROIX PARISH Rev. Kris Johnson; Rev. Mike Brubaker, 715-463-2624 Sunday School - 11 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m. CENTRAL UNITED METHODIST - UPPER ST. CROIX PARISH - GRANTSBURG Rev. Kris Johnson; Rev. Mike Brubaker 715-463-2624 Wor. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:30 a.m. DANBURY UNITED METHODIST 7520 Water St., 715-866-8646 Rev. Eddie Crise, Sr. Pastor Rev. Thomas Cook, Assoc. Pastor Sunday Worship - 8:45 a.m.

GRACE UNITED METHODIST - WEBSTER 26503 Muskey Ave., 715-866-8646 Rev. Eddie Crise, Sr. Pastor, Rev. Thomas Cook, Assoc. Pastor Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m., Sun. Worship - 10:30 a.m. HOLY TRINITY UNITED METHODIST htslumc@gmail.com 1606 165th Ave., CTH I, Centuria Pastor Freddie Kirk, 715-485-3363 Sunday Worship - 8:30 a.m. LAKEVIEW UNITED - HERTEL Pastor Jack Starr Wor. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - during worship hour LEWIS MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST 3482 115th St., 715-866-8646 Rev. Eddie Crise, Sr. Pastor Rev. Thomas Cook, Assoc. Pastor Worship 8:45 a.m. OSCEOLA UNITED METHODIST osceolaunitedmethodistchurch@gmail.com 306 River Street, Osceola, 715-755-2275, Rev. Carolyn Saunders Sunday Worship - 10 a.m.; Fellowship - 11 a.m. Wed. School: Weds. 3:30-5 p.m. Oct.-May ST. CROIX FALLS UNITED METHODIST UPPER ST. CROIX PARISH Rev. Kris Johnson; Rev. Mike Brubaker Sunday Worship Serv. - 10 a.m.; Sunday School is at 9 a.m., Nursery available ST. LUKE UNITED METHODIST - FREDERIC 100 Linden Street, Frederic Pastor “Freddie” Kirk, 715-327-4436 Sun. Wor. 10:30 a.m.; Wed. Serv. 5:15 p.m. SIREN UNITED METHODIST 24025 1st Ave. So., 715-866-8646 Rev. Eddie Crise, Sr. Pastor Rev. Thomas Cook, Assoc. Pastor Sun. Schl. 9 a.m.; Wor. - 10:15 a.m. (Nursery available) TAYLORS FALLS UNITED METHODIST 290 W. Government Street, 715-294-4436 Reverend Dr. Rolland Robinson Sunday Service - 10 a.m. with nursery Sunday School - Sept. - May at 10 a.m. WOLF CREEK UNITED METHODIST Rev. Kris Johnson; Rev. Mike Brubaker Sunday Worship - 8:15 a.m. COVENANT

COVENANT

CALVARY COVENANT - ALPHA Pastor Scott Sagle, 715-689-2541 Sunday Schl. 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Wor. 10:30 p.m. Elevator provided, welcome SIREN COVENANT Pastor Brian Pardun 7686 Lofty Pines Drive, Siren, 715-349-5601 Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m. UNITED COVENANT - CLEAR LAKE Pastor Dan Pearson Sunday School 8:45 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m. CATHOLIC

CATHOLIC

ASSUMPTION OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY Rev. Andy Anderson, 715-247-3310 255 St. Hwy. 35, East Farmington Mass Sunday 9 a.m. IMMACULATE CONCEPTION - GRANTSBURG Rev. Tom Thakadipuram, 715-327-8119 Mass: Sat., 6:30 p.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m. OUR LADY OF PERPETUAL HELP Danbury - 7586 St. Rd. 77, 715-866-7321 Pastor - Father Michael J. Tupa Mass - Sat. 4 p.m., Fri. 9 a.m. (Sept.-May). Reconciliation as per bulletin & by appt. OUR LADY OF THE LAKES Balsam Lake Father Gene Murphy; Pastor - 715-405-2253 Mass: Sat. eves. 6 p.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m.; Tues. 5:30 p.m.; Fri. 9 a.m. Sacrament of Reconciliation 7:30 a.m. Sunday or by appt. SACRED HEARTS OF JESUS & MARY Pastor Father Michael J. Tupa CTHs A & H - 715-866-7321 Crescent Lake Voyager Village area. Mass Sun. 8 a.m., Thurs. 9:30 a.m. Reconciliation as per bulletin and by appt. ST. DOMINIC - FREDERIC Rev. Tom Thakadipuram, 715-327-8119 Mass: Sat. 4:30 p.m.; Sun. 10:30 a.m. Call the office for daily & holy day Mass times ST. ANNE PARISH Rev. Andy Anderson, 715-247-3310 139 Church Hill Rd., Somerset Mass Sat. 5 p.m.; Sun. 7 a.m. & 11 a.m.; Tues., Wed., Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m. ST. FRANCIS XAVIER Pastor Father Frank Wampach, 651-465-7345 25293 Redwing Ave., Shafer, MN Sunday 9:30 a.m. ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST Pastor Father Michael J. Tupa, 715-866-7321 Cedar & Muskey Ave. - Webster Mass Sun 10 a.m., Wed. 5:30 p.m. (Sept.-May), Fri. 9 a.m. (Summer) ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC CHURCH Pastor - Father Frank Wampach 490 Bench St., Taylors Falls, 651-465-7345 Sat. 5:30 p.m.; Sun. 7:30 a.m. Tues. - Fri. 7:30 a.m. ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC 1050 North Keller Ave., Amery, 715-268-7717 Father Gene Murphy, Pastor Sat. Mass 4 p.m., Sun. Mass 10:30 a.m. Mass Wed. & Thurs. 9 a.m.

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC Rev. Andy Anderson 255 E. 10th Ave., Osceola, 715-294-2243 Saturday Mass 4 p.m.; Sunday Latin Mass 8:30 a.m., Mass 11 a.m. ASSEMBLY

ASSEMBLY

OSCEOLA COMMUNITY CHURCH Pastor Larry Mederich, 715-294-4332 2492 Education Drive Sunday Serv. - 10 a.m. Child care offered at both services SIREN ASSEMBLY OF GOD Pastor Andrew Bollant Morn. Serv. - 9:30 a.m.; Supervised Nursery; Wed. Evening Youth

EVANGELICAL

EVANGELICAL

APPLE RIVER COMMUNITY (EFCA) Pastor Justin Hosking, 942 U.S. Hwy. 8, Amery, 715-268-2176 Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. CROSSWALK COMMUNITY CHURCH Pastor Greg Lund, 715-327-8767 700 Churchwood Lane; 505 Old CTH W, Frederic Sunday School - 9 a.m.; Morning Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services HOPE EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH 933 248th St., Osceola Pastor Dave Williams Morning Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School Sept.-May 8:45 a.m. Children’s Church & Nursery provided TRADE RIVER EVANGELICAL FREE Pastor Dale VanDeusen, 715-488-2296 or 715-488-2653 20296 Hwy. 87, Grantsburg Morning Wor. 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 10:45 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services BAPTIST

BAPTIST

EAST BALSAM BAPTIST - BALSAM LK. 1816 108th St., CTH I Pastor Gabe Brennan, 715-857-5411 eastbalsam.org Wor. Service - 9 a.m.; Sun. School - 10:30 a.m. EUREKA BAPTIST 2393 210th Ave., St. Croix Falls 715-483-9464 Wor. Service - 9 a.m.; Adult Sun. Schl. - 10 a.m. FAITH FELLOWSHIP Hwy. 35 and CTH N., Luck Bill McEachern Pastor, 715-485-3973 Sun. Bible study - 9 a.m.; Sun. Wor. - 10 a.m. FIRST BAPTIST - AMERY 131 Broadway St., 715-268-2223; fbcamery.org; Email: churchoffice@fbcamery.org Reg. office hours: Tues.-Thurs. 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. Pastor Charlie Butt, Lead Pastor; Nick Buda, Associate Pastor Sun. Serv.: 9 - 10:15 a.m.; All ages Sun. Schl. 10:30 - 11:30 a.m.; Nursery available FIRST BAPTIST - FALUN 715-689-2125 or 715-689-2156 Mike Kleven, Lead Pastor Steve Ward, Assoc. Pastor of Visitation Sun. School (all ages) 9:30 a.m.; Church Serv. 10:45 a.m.; Nursery provided FIRST BAPTIST - MILLTOWN Pastor Marlon Mielke, 715-825-3186 Assoc. Pastor Dan Mielke Sunday Schl. 9:45 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m., 7 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST - TAYLORS FALLS, MN Located across from elemen. school on West St., Pastor, Dr. Kevin Schumann; 651-465-7171 Sun. Morn. - Sun. School for all ages - 9 a.m. Morn. Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided. FIRST BAPTIST - WEBSTER Church Phone 715-866-4111 Pastor Tim Quinn Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Worship - 10:45 a.m (Nursery provided) GRACE CHURCH OF OSCEOLA “The Cure for the Common Church” 722 Seminole Ave., Osceola Pastor Dr. Kent Haralson; 715-294-4222 or 715-755-3454; info@gracechurchosceola.com Sun.: Praise & Worship Serv. 9 am., Adult Bible Study 10:45 a.m., Children’s Sun. School 10:45 a.m. GRACE BAPTIST - GRANTSBURG 716 S. Robert St., Grantsburg, 715-463-5699 Sr. Pastor Brad Moore George Selbher, Assoc. Pastor Sunday Schl. 9 a.m.; Sunday Worship 10:15 a.m. LIVING HOPE CHURCH Pastor Doug McConnell Youth Pastor Chris Radtke At Grantsburg High School, 715-463-5794 Sun. Serv. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m. TRADE LAKE BAPTIST Pastor David Prince, 715-327-8402 Sun. Schl. - 9:15 a.m.; Wor. Serv. - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided.; tradelakebaptistchurch.org

CHURCH OF CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST - WEBSTER Minister Garret Derouin, 715-866-7157 Musky & Birch St., Avail. in office 9 a.m. - noon, Tues.-Fri.; Sun. Bible Study 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. CHURCH OF CHRIST - FREDERIC Minister Guy McCarty Frederic Senior Citizen Building Robert Rutherford, 715-327-8387 Sunday Worship 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. WESLEYAN

WESLEYAN

WOODLAND WESLEYAN Dairyland - Rev. Andrea Wittwer 715-244-3649 Sunday School 10 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

FULL GOSPEL

FULL GOSPEL

WOOD RIVER CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP Pastor Dan Slaikeu 4 mi. SE of Grantsburg on Williams Rd. Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School 10:30 a.m. HOPE FELLOWSHIP OF SOMERSET 231 Bluff Drive, 715-247-2435 Services are Sundays at 10:30 a.m. DWELLING POINT Timbers Theatre in Siren, 912-424-5993 Pastors Bryan and Rebekah Davis Sunday Worship 10 a.m.

CHRISTIAN CENTER

CHRISTIAN CENTER

EL SALEM/TWIN FALLS CHRISTIAN CENTER 1751 100th Ave., Dresser Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Morning Wor. 10:30 a.m. Evening Services Sun. 6 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. Call Pastor Darryl Olson at 715-755-3133 for information and directions

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN

CHRISTIAN ORTHODOX

HOLY TRINITY ORTHODOX 523 1st St., Clayton, 715-948-2493 Fr. Christopher Wojcik, Pastor Sat. Vespers - 5 p.m.; Sun. Liturgy - 9:30 a.m. HOLY CROSS ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN Meeting at Zion Lutheran Church, 28005 Old Towne Rd., Chisago City, MN; holyx.net Sunday Worship Service 9:30 a.m. NAZARENE

NAZARENE

CALVARY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 510 S. Vincent, St. Croix Falls Rev. Richard Brunner, 715-483-3696 Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m. FAITH COMMUNITY 7534 Peet St., Danbury, 715-656-4010 Pastor Jason Peterson Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m. & 7 p.m.

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST

ST. CROIX UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP 715-483-1113 201 N. Adams, St. Croix Falls Services On 1st 3 Sundays of the Month, 10 a.m. www.scuuf.org

NONDENOMINATIONAL

NONDENOMINATIONAL

CROSSROADS CHRISTIAN CHURCH 28509 CTH H, 1/8 mi. north of A&H intersection Pastor Tryg Wistad 715-635-4816 crossroadschurch@gmail.com Sunday Worship: 10 a.m. NEW LIFE COMMUNITY - AMERY Interim Pastor Craig Jorgenson Sunday Worship 10 a.m.; Children’s Church: K to 6th Grade NEW LIFE CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY 201 Hwy. 35, Dresser (formerly The Boulevard) Pastor Tony Minell, 715-417-1982; Office 715-417-0945 Sunday Wor. 9:30 a.m.; Nursery available. NEW WINE CHURCH - CENTURIA 309 5th Street, 715-338-2751 Pastor Scott Petznick Sunday Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m. NORTHERN PINES QUAKER MEETING 715-866-5016 or 715-733-0480 for time of meeting OSCEOLA MEDICAL CENTER SPIRITUAL CARE 2600 65th Ave., Osceola, 715-294-5645 Rev. Thomas Reaume MyOmc.org/specialtyserv 1chapel.php Chapel open daily for meditation.

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

RIVER VALLEY CHRISTIAN 1289 160th St. (Hwy. 65), St. Croix Falls, 715-483-5378 Senior Pastors Paul and Sonja Hanson Sunday Adult Bible Class 9 a.m. Worship and Children’s Sunday Schl. 10 a.m. ST. PETER’S COMMUNITY CHURCH “Faith on Purpose” (Love God, Love People...period) faithonpurpose.org CTH F, Dresser, 715-553-1800, Pastor Rick VanGundy Sunday Worship 10 a.m.

church directory

ADVENTIST


PAGE 24 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MAY 4, 2016

CHURCH NEWS Good vibes

T

he drumming of a male ruffed grouse is often heard in spring along wooded paths. His call to attract a female comes from his wing display rather than his voice. He begins to beat his wings slowly, building to a blurred crescendo of vibrating sound. His wings beat up to 50 times in 10 seconds, causing percussion like no other. We’re treated to other instruments of nature in the spring, usually beginning with the red-breasted robin, who sings his heart out for God’s pleasure and ours. We enjoy the music of manmade instruments as well. All instruments produce their sound through vibrations. The harp and stringed instruments produce their soothing sounds by plucking

Take time to give your marriage ‘spring cleaning’ Q: My husband and I agree that overall, our marriage is in good shape. But we know we can probably do even better. What are some simple things we can try? Jim: I like the analogy presented by author Kim Wier. This is the time of year when we think about “spring cleaning” around the house. It’s a concept that applies to marriage as well. Living in the South, Kim understands that cleaning house in the spring is necessary due to her allergic reaction to the pollen in the air. She also realizes that marriages can often be, in her words, “plagued by irritants.” Pressures at work, raising children and financial stress all lead to petty annoyances that, over time, can grow into serious relational problems. To keep things fresh, Kim offers three simple suggestions: • First, declutter. Agree on at least one thing you can cut out of your schedules to minimize stress. Also, work on eliminating grudges, toward each other or someone else. If you need to work through deeper hurts, don’t be afraid to ask for help. • Second, polish. As Kim says, care

Eternal perspectives Sally Bair or scraping a bow over the stretched strings. Imagine violent King Saul being soothed by David’s playing on a harp. Just thinking about such music soothes my own spirit. The sounds emitted from wind instruments are produced by blowing a column of air either through buzzing lips in a brass mouthpiece, or through vibrating a reed in a woodwind or across a hole on the flute. Each unique sound individually or in a group brings joy to

for yourselves “like you did when you longed to catch each other’s eye.” Commit to focused communication, as well as face to face, with no distractions. • Third, make room. Take time for just the two of you, even if it means squeezing in a five-minute walk here and there. If one of you is traveling, talk by phone or video chat. Every relationship could use a good spring cleaning from time to time. Taking a few moments to sweep away the dust and cobwebs can leave you breathing easier, and your marriage stronger. ••• Q: Now that my adolescent son has his learner’s permit, how can I adequately prepare him to drive? I’m more than a little apprehensive about him becoming a driver at such a young age. Danny Huerta, executive director, parenting: It’s no coincidence that automobile insurance rates are greatly increased for adolescent drivers, especially males. But most teens do really want to learn how to drive safely. This is a time to influence a young driver’s behavior for life, passing on skills and knowledge that may save lives many years in the future. First, be patient. Helping your son learn to drive may be a nerve-wracking experience for you, but it’s even more so for him. Give directions calmly and

our souls. We can even enjoy the sound of a percussion instrument such as a drum. Its hollow shape amplifies the vibrating sound that comes from beating it. What would an orchestra be without such an instrument that causes the music to stir one’s emotions? God put much store into song. He sent the Israelites into battle, led by those who sang and played. He gave beautiful voices to the songbirds and to humans, his crowning achievement. We are told to “praise him with the sound of the trumpet; praise him with the lute and harp! Praise him with … stringed instruments and flutes … with clashing cymbals!” (Ps 150: 3-5) It doesn’t matter if we can’t carry a tune or play a melodious note. What matters is the attitude in which we sing or play.

Focus on the family Jim Daly clearly, and be generous with encouragement and praise. Second, it’s important to model safe driving habits yourself. Observe traffic laws and be courteous of other drivers. For better or worse, kids imitate their parents. Third, consider granting driving privileges on an incremental basis (some states do this as part of the licensing process). For example, initially allow your son to drive only in the day, and then progress to letting him drive at night with adult supervision. This allows him to gain experience while reducing some of the risks. Fourth, emphasize basic safety rules (seat belts, etc.). This is another area where your example speaks louder than your words. And your son should never drive if he is drowsy or otherwise impaired. While there are many good reasons for him to abstain from alcohol and drugs, let him know that he can always

When our hearts are right with God, he will cause us to be instruments of peace, joy and righteousness for the world around us to hear. As we face battles against evil and against our own sinful nature, he will bring us victory through our heartfelt praises. “And … present yourselves to God as being alive from the dead, and your members (bodily parts such as our lips and hands) as instruments of righteousness to God. (Romans 6:13) Lord, thank you for making us instruments of your peace and joy. Cause us to draw others to you, as the ruffed grouse draws a mate, by facing our battles with praise. In Jesus’ name, amen. Mrs. Bair may be reached at sallybair@ gmail.com.

call you for a ride in order to avoid being in a car with an impaired driver, whether himself or someone else. Finally, if he refuses to correct unsafe driving patterns or habits, don’t let him have the keys. He needs to learn that driving is a privilege, not a right. Your first priority is to keep him, and others on the road, alive and well while he learns to drive safely and skillfully. ••• Jim Daly is a husband and father, an author, president of Focus on the Family and host of the “Focus on the Family” radio program. Catch up with him at jimdalyblog.com or at facebook.com/DalyFocus. Copyright 2014 Focus on the Family, Colorado Springs, CO 80995. International copyright secured. All rights reserved. Distributed by Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St., Kansas City, MO 64106; 816-581-7500. This feature may not be reproduced or distributed electronically, in print or otherwise, without written permission of Focus on the Family.

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CUSHING

STATE FARM INSURANCE COMPANIES

CUSHING COOPERATIVE SOCIETY Feed Mill - Grain Dept. Cushing, Wis. 715-648-5215

FREDERIC BREMER BANK, N.A. Full-Service Banking Member FDIC Frederic - Danbury - Siren

DAEFFLER’S QUALITY MEATS, INC. Wholesale & Retail Meats Custom Butchering & Processing Phone 715-327-4456

Frederic, Wis. - 715-327-4236 Shell Lake, Wis. - 715-468-2314 Siren, Wis. - 715-349-2560 St. Croix Falls, Wis. - 715-483-9008

Corey T. Arnold, Agent Frederic, Wis. Phone 715-327-8076

BEAN’S COUNTRY GRIDDLE

LUCK

SIREN

WEBSTER

VAN METER’S MEATS

D & L FINANCIAL SERVICES

HOPKINS SAND & GRAVEL, INC.

Government Inspected Slaughtering and Processing, Sausage making • Ham & Bacon Cured & Smoked Sides and Quarters of Beef and Pork Available Old-fashioned Fresh Meat Counter Tim Van Meter and Ross Anderson, Owners Luck, WI 54853 Plant 715-472-2141

10022 Elbow Lake Road Siren, Wis. 54872 715-689-2539

Sand, Gravel, Ready-Mix, Concrete, Black Dirt, Dozer Work, Landscaping & Septic Tanks Installed Hwy. 35 North Webster, Wis. Phone 715-866-4157 M.P.R.S. #03059

SWEDBERG-TAYLOR FUNERAL HOME Webster, Wis. Phone 715-866-7131

Churches 8/10

ALPHA

Hwys. 35 & 48, Downtown Frederic Phone 715-327-5513

NORTHWESTERN WISCONSIN ELECTRIC CO.

“Your Electric Servant” Serving Polk & Burnett Counties “Use Energy Wisely”

CARLSON-ROWE FUNERAL HOME

Frederic, Wis. - 715-327-4475

Any area business wishing to help sponsor the church listings should contact the Leader at 715-327-4236.


MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 25

NOTICE OF FORFEITURE OF FUNDS HELD BY POLK-BURNETT ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE UNLESS CLAIMED BY OWNER Pursuant to Wisconsin Statutes Section 185.03(10), you are hereby notified that Polk-Burnett Electric Cooperative, of Centuria, Wisconsin 54824, has in its possession unclaimed funds belonging to you. You can claim these funds by contacting the Cooperative and furnishing proof of your legal interest in such funds on or before

July 15, 2016. You are further notified that unless you do claim such funds and provide satisfactory evidence of your right to receive the same by July 15, 2016, these funds will be forfeited to the Cooperative. Published this 4th day of May, 2016.

UNCLAIMED CAPITAL CREDITS Acct. # Name 32230...........................AAMODT, DUANE A. 34930.................................AAMODT, STEVE 54474.............................AARON, NICOLE A. 36602.........................................ABAIR, G.G. 9369.......................ABEL ESTATE, ARTHUR 9964..............................ABRAHAMSON F.R. 35907..............ABRAHAMSON, JEFFREY J. 37237................................ABRAMS, LARRY 38415..............................ADAMS, FRANK C. 34815...........................ADSITT, WILLIAM C. 29282.....................................AHO, AURA E. 18454.............................AHRENS, HAROLD 34955...................................AILPORT, MIKE 21783.......................................AINSLIE, J.A. 33761...............................AJER, WILLIAM F. 32268...............................ALBERT, JOHN R. 25429....................ALBRECHT, THOMAS B. 41003....................................ALDEN, BRIAN 36682....................ALDEN, GEORGETTE M. 22843............................ALDEN, WILLIAM J. 42333...........................ALECKSON, ERIC T. 32943.....................ALEXANDER, MAURICE 25555.........................ALFORD, RAYETTE L. 15909............................ALLEN, MARTHA H. 19300...................ALLEN ESTATE, JOANNE 39738.....................ALLING, GEORGE MJR. 16361................................ALLING, WALTER 34443.....................................ALM, ROBERT 36561........................ALMENDINGER, KIRK 35689...........................AMENT, MELISSA D. 24352.......AMERICAN FEED & LIVESTOCK 24992.................AMERY MASONIC LODGE 31988......................................AMES, DAVID 14110.........................AMETER, HAROLD E. 36637............................ANDERSEN, STACY 36507..................ANDERSON, BARBARA L. 29605.........................ANDERSON, BONNIE 27754........................ANDERSON, BRIAN E. 50874......................ANDERSON, CAROL A. 36059.........ANDERSON, CHRISTOPHER L. 27656.......................ANDERSON, CLINTON 36697.....................ANDERSON, DANIEL W. 44711........................ANDERSON, DAVID A. 54309........................ANDERSON, DAVID J. 26579........................ANDERSON, DAVID J. 35793..................ANDERSON, DOLORES T. 36229...................ANDERSON, DONALD B. 35535....................ANDERSON, DONALD P. 20340...................ANDERSON, EVERETT A. 20752..................ANDERSON, FORREST A. 27425.........................ANDERSON, GARY N. 35275...................ANDERSON, GEORGE G. 36310...................ANDERSON, GEORGE R. 4076....................ANDERSON, GORDON H. 55030......................ANDERSON, HEATHER 23361.........................ANDERSON, IONE M. 15679..................ANDERSON, ISABELLE V. 34170.......................ANDERSON, JAMES J. 30608.......................ANDERSON, JAMES L. 12078....................ANDERSON, JERALD C. 25034...........................ANDERSON, JOANN 33888.........................ANDERSON, JODY L. 7313...........................ANDERSON, JOHN R. 36797.......................ANDERSON, KAREN L. 20245..............................ANDERSON, LA N. 8349.................................ANDERSON, LOIS 36145................ANDERSON, MARJORIE J. 31152.......................ANDERSON, MARYE I. 49506......................ANDERSON, NANCY C. 36463...........................ANDERSON, NEIL J. 26567...................ANDERSON, PATRICIA A. 36041..........................ANDERSON, PAUL J. 15202.........................ANDERSON, PAUL O. 36346.......................ANDERSON, PETER A. 20202......................ANDERSON, ROGER D. 14453....................ANDERSON, RONALD A. 49988......................ANDERSON, SHANE D. 37652........................ANDERSON, SHARON 22690............................ANDERSON, TED E. 17866...................ANDERSON, THOMAS D. 46951...............................ANDERSON, TOM 7414.............................ANDERSON, VERNE 34707...................ANDERSON, WILLIAM M. 29599...........ANDERSON JR., CHARLES S. 34964........................ANDREA, RHONDA R. 20919..............................ANDRESEN, JOHN 12568............ANDREWS ESTATE, ALICE L. 35294................ANDREWSON, ROBERT W. 10452........................ANKLAM, LAURENCE 28329..........................ANNIS, CHARLES M. 29455...ARGETSINGER EST., WALTER FSR 31017...............ARMSBERGER, ROBERT F. 48162....................ARMSTRONG, MELISSA 10047.......................ARNOLD, FRANCES F. 35939...................................ARTS, LINDA J. 36557........................ASBURY, RICHARD D. 53499..................................ASH, KIMBERLY 20783...........................ATHEN, HAROLD M. 21886.....................................ATKINS, JANE 35439.............................AUBART, SCOTT A. 18836................................AURAND, LEONE 10704...........................BAARS, MARCUS H. 29757...........BACHMAN ESTATE, MARILYN 21896........................BACHMANN, JOHN C. 34648...................BACHMANN, THOMAS J. 16601..............................BADER, ELDON A. 32222........................................BAILEY, R.S. 33629...........................BAILEY, SHIRLEY A. 40086........................BAILLARGEON, TODD 26343.............................BAJORAS, VICTOR 11174.......................................BAKER, C.W. 35203........................BAKER, DELPHINE C. 35330.........................BAKKE, RICHARD W.

Acct. # Name 30112..........................BAKKEN, ARTHUR J. 32925.......................BALDWIN, GILBERT L. 37610........................................BALL, DAVID 35058..................................BALL, JAMES E. 37136........................BANASZYNSKI, TODD 5028...............BANISTER ESTATE, MARY E. 34107.................................BANKS, MARIAN 15397................BANNISTER, DOROTHY A. 25980......................BARANOW, ROBERT J. 52592...............................BARCLAY, BAMBI 22786......................BARKLIND, WALTER R. 30637......................BARNARD, DONALD C. 32180............................BARR, CHARLES A. 27523............................BARRETT, THOMAS 30703..........................BARRIGAR, JENENE 19485..............................BARRON, JACK L. 34929...............................BARTE, JOANN L. 53369........................BARTHMAN, JOHN H. 11737........................BARTLEY, GERTRUDE 30880.........................BARTON, ELIZABETH 37615..................................BASS LAKE INN 15135.........................................BATES, W.R. 36431...................................BAUCH, JON R. 21239...............................BAUER, ANDREW 56471............................BAUER, RONALD F. 13481.............................BAUMANN, BETTY 35281...............................BAXTER, MARY J. 35528........................BAZILLE, CYNTHIA A. 39278..............................BAZILLE, KEITH A. 4791...................................BEAN, GLENN C. 10798..............BEARHEART ESTATE, MIKE 8756......................BEAUCLAIRE, RALPH H. 52615..........................BEAVER, WILLIAM E. 37085.............................BECKER, ALLEN J. 26329.......................BECKER, FRANCES L. 6471.............................BECKER, HELEN M. 31008............................BECKER, SUSAN T. 54389..............................BECKMANN, KARI 3732......................BECKMARK, ALROSE A. 22182.............................BECKWELL, ALICE 36803..........................BECKWORTH, DARL 44605........................BEECROFT, DAVID M. 21543............................BEEDLE, JAMES W. 50287..............................BEERS, DANIEL S. 8795...........................BEESON, WILLIAM N. 19146....................BEKOWIES, WERNER E. 13464 BELDEN ESTATE, SYLVESTER J. 52599...........................BELISLE, BRANDON 37192......................................BELISLE, JAY 24156.................................BELISLE, JON A. 54890...................................BELISLE, LACY 29204.............................BELL, BARBARA L. 23234...........................BELSCHNER, GARY 35533...........................BELTON, STEVEN L. 36303..........................BELVAL, WELDON H. 33295.............................BELZER, MICHEAL 36629........................................BEMIS, JEFF 2524.....................BENGSTON, JOSEPHINE 5364.............................BENGTSON, HELEN 41454.................................BENJAMIN, RON 47286.....BENNINGTON, CHRISTOPHER D. 3384..........................BENSON, ARNOLD W. 35951............................BENSON, CRYSTAL 36511............................BENSON, CRYSTAL 35420..............................BENSON, JOAN L. 20483.........................BENSON, THOMAS J. 31081......................BENSON, WALLACE C. 29045.........................BENSON, WILLIAM L. 17597.....................................BERG, CAPPY 29147.....................................BERG, ELMER 13740...................................BERG, JOHN R. 25282.....................................BERG, SCOTT 36850...................BERGER, CHARLOTTE L. 35277.....................BERGSTEDT, KENNETH 2344...................BERGSTRAND, EILEEN B. 35341..........................BERGSTRAND GARY 33550...........................BERGSVEN, GAIL E. 28929...............BERKLAND, THEODORE A. 36711.....................BERTHIAUME, DALE W. 36779.........................BERTRAM, RICHARD 31488............................BERTRAND, STEVE 34927..........................BERTULEIT, JUDY C. 31184............................BESELER, WILLIAM 15800................................BEST, WESLEY L. 31238...........................BESTLER, HELEN J. 14900..........................BETHKE, EUGENE E. 36626..........................BETTCHER, GARY A. 36692.....................BICKERSTAFF, ROBERT 54601............................BICKLE, BRANDON 54260........................BILDEAU, FRANKIE J. 47376............................BILDER, JOSEPH J. 10801.........................BINANE, ALBERTA M. 34375..................................BIRD, MICHAEL 9238..............................BIRON, LUCILLE M. 35040....................................BISHOP, DAVID 26862........................BISTRAM RICHARD P. 31900..............................BIXBY, DARRYL R. 34556................................BIXLER, MIYOKO 8587............................BJORK, HOWARD W. 30791.............................BJURQUIST, EDNA 24124...............................BLACK, DORIS M. 34772...........................BLACK, PATRICIA J. 54409...............BLACKBURN, GREGORY L. 33415...............................BLAKE, MICHAEL 33850.................................BLANCH, BRIAN 25853..........BLANKENSHIP, KATHERINE A. 34201.............................BLEDSOE, PAUL E. 15335.................................BLISS, LEONA E. 37291....................BLOCKHUS, JOSEPH A. 14818......................................BLOM, ALICE 35984............................BLOMQUIST, GENE 21353.....................BLOOMER, ROBERT W. 24819..................BLOOMQUIST, WAYNE D.

Acct. # Name 42886...................................BLOUNT, HEIDI 35310...................................BLUME, JAMES 33260......................BOCKLUND, KENNETH 35790............................BODAGHI, HASSAN 17246................BODE ESTATE, MARIAN R. 11117..........................BODSGAARD, THOR 32748...............................BOE, CHARLES T. 51418.................................BOESEL, TOM F. 29938................................BOESER, ROY G. 24080................................BOHLKEN, FRED 36531.......................................BOHN, APRIL 32569...........................................BOHR, J.A. 52307................................BONA, JENNIFER 31182.........................BONDELI, STEVEN H. 36977...........................BONNER, JAMES A. 15013.........................BOOTH, RICHARD D. 35978.....................BORCHARDT, MARY M. 36866...........................BORDING, BETTY L. 22700................................BOREK, DAVID J. 36366..................BORNDALE, RICHARD O. 36752..................................BOSTER, LINDA 32027..........................BOTTOLFSON, JEFF, 8239............................BOTTOLFSON LE, R. 16119.......................BOTTOLFSON, LLOYD 35301..............BOTTOLFSON, MICHAEL D. 34777..............................BOUCHER, STEVE 36440......................................BOULT, CHAD 18908.......BOURGOIN ESTATE, ROBERT J. 32160.......................BOURKE, MICHAEL S. 29521...................................BOURN, ADA S. 36098...........................BOUTON, RICHARD 31219.................................BOVEE, ROBERT 25700.............................BOWELL, OWEN N. 30732..........................BOWEN, ROBERT G. 33984.......................BOWERS, JEFFREY A. 55361..............................BOWMAN, LORNA 37333..................................BOYD, KEITH L. 33424.............................BRAASTAD, CLELA 35415..........................BRAASTAD, GERALD 29254.....................BRAASTAD, HOWARD I. 28046.................BRADSHAW, CLEMENT G. 28622.........................BRAMWELL, JOHN S. 36565...................................BRANDT, GARY 28030........................BRANDT, QUENTIN B. 28627...............BRANTNER, GERHARDT L. 34313............................BRANUM, EDWARD 15908...............................BRAUN, EDWARD 52379................................BRAUN, ROBERT 25863............................BRAUN, ROBERT S. 37409..................................BRAUND, BRAD 36606...............................BREMER, PAUL J. 20939............................BRENDEMIHL, G.M. 35270.....................BRENHOLT, PATRICK L. 34414...........................BRENNA, DOUGLAS 33401.......................BRETZMAN, TERRY L. 7259........................BRIEGEL, KENNETH C. 24960.............................BRIESER, RUBY M. 11125...........................BRILL, RAYMOND F. 48845.................................BRITZ, ANDREW 13330............BROCKMAN SR., GEORGE J. 35511.........................BRODEHL, TERRY G. 30335..............................BROESCH, TERRY 35542........................BROGREN, MYLES W. 29724.......................BROKER, DELBERT G. 20104....................BROOKSHAW, HARRY F. 36085....................................BROOM, GENE 33580...........................BROSE, WARREN C. 36808.............................BROUGH, EUGENE 32182....................................BROWN, GARY 30485.........................BROWN, RICHARD B. 21542..........................BROWN, ROBERT M. 36437.........................BROWN, RUSSELL J. 24101.......................................BROWN, W.J. 34415...................BROWNING, JOSEPHINE 28226.................................BRUNETTE, DAN 35877..................BRUNGARDT, DONALD J. 12472.............................BRUNS, ALFRED J. 35809.............................BRUNS, DANIEL R. 33637...............................BRUSS, BRIAN R. 29595.............................BRYANT, JAMES K. 25922...................BRYNESTAD. LUCILLE P. 53179.....................................BUCK, BUTCH 35818..................................BUCK, DAROLD 24427...........................BUDROOT, EUGENE 17823....................................BUE, BEVERLY 48275........................BUESGENS, JANETTE 41954.........................................BUGG, DAN 47707....................................BUHLER, MIKE 20028.................................BULOV, JOHN G. 27387...................................BUNGE FAMILY 19005.............................BURCHARD, JOHN 31895..........................BURDASH, DIANE E. 17612...............................BURGER, DONNA 35782...............................BURGER, DONNA 35729.....................................BURNETT, JIM 55733..BURN. CO. HLTH. & HUMAN SVCS. 29746.....................BURNHAM, ROBERT M. 41948...............................BURNS, PATRICIA 33962......................BURRINGTON, JANE L. 34616...........................BUSCH, ROBERT R. 22669................................BUSH, LEONARD 15754......................................BUSS, JON V. 36801..............................BUSS, ROYALE W. 18031.........................BUTCHER, JAMES N. 52097............BUTTERNUT PARTNERS LLC 45020...................................BUZICK, TIM A. 35913.........................BYRNE, DOUGLAS A. 18207............................CAAUWE, STANLEY 37186........................................CAGLE, M.T. 33820.............................CAIRNS, KENNETH 37078.................CALABRETTO, CURTIS D. 35785........................CALLAHAN, GAYLE K. 54600......................CAMPBELL, SHANNON

Acct. # Name 18741......................CAMPEAU, ROLAND A. 20272.......................CAMPION ESTATE, T.J. 35757.........................CANADA, DARREL R. 14206..........................CANFIELD, ROLAND 33178................................CAREY, KEITH D. 17923.......................CARLSON, ALBERT W. 30279..................CARLSON, CLARENCE R. 25077...........................CARLSON, DAVID A. 17858....................................CARLSON, E.E. 14175......................CARLSON, EDWARD R. 37178......................CARLSON, JEFFREY S. 26195............................CARLSON, JOAN D. 18549....................................CARLSON, L.J. 49610..CARLSON PARTNERS GROUP LLC 37337.......................CARLTON, SANDRA K. 32913...............................CAROLAN, KAY L. 26164........................CARONNA, FRANCES 18046.....................CARPENTER, BEVERLY 30816....................CARPENTER, FRANCES 46620.........................CARPENTER, JOYCE 26980.........................CARPENTER, KAREN 28003......................CARPENTIER, JOHN R. 10739....................................CARR, JANE L. 51276......................................CARR, STEVE 28475............................CARR, WINFIELD J. 33950.................................CARTER, JERRY 34023...........................CARTER - KARNATZ 35014.................................CARTIER, LAURI 36730...........................CARUFEL, DAVID A. 35788...........................CASPERS, PHILIP P. 36624......................CASSELBERRY, SCOTT 35968.....................CASSELLIUS, STEVE A. 31351............................CASTO, MICHAL C. 49082......................................CATES, JOSH 23952.........................CAVEGN, LAURENCE 45287........................CEDERBERG, EILEEN 35129................................CEGON, GARY G. 36493...........................CELLARIUS, CAROL 35555......................CESAFSKY, DENNIS M. 51509...........................CHAFER, SHANNON 15711...........................CHAPLINSKI, RAY P. 7046......................................CHARLOT, L.H. 11172...................CHARTRAW SR., DAN W. 13759..................................CHASTEEN, C.F. 33927.....................CHASTEEN, WILLIAM F. 13937.........................CHAYER, ROLAND E. 37130......................CHEENEY, MICHAEL G. 34040........................CHENAL, RICHARD J. 32026..........................CHENEY, ARTHUR B. 7852...................CHENEY ESTATE, MAX W. 34831..................CHERMACK, MITCHEL P. 5580..............................CHISHOLM, AGNES 34467..........................CHMIELAK, RUTH A. 19319......................CHOCHOLE, RICHARD 30559......................CHOUINARD, THOMAS 30356...............CHOVICKOWICH, DUSHAN 25348............................CHRISMAN, KARLA 23709...................CHRISTENSEN, DARRYL 34093..............CHRISTENSEN, FLORENCE 2639..................CHRISTENSEN, HARRY M. 35470....................CHRISTENSEN, MARVIN 11846......................CHRISTENSEN, ROY C. 14171.....CHRISTENSEN ESTATE, GLADYS 28102....................CHRISTENSON, DALE E. 34878...................CHRISTENSON, GREG P. 28625..........................CHRISTENSON, O.E. 15522.................CHRISTENSON, SCOTT J. 4471...............CHRISTIANSEN, GLADYS U. 35696...........CHRISTIANSEN, KENNETH L. 26816..............CHRISTIANSON, CLIFFORD 34346...................................CHUDARS, JIM 37026..........CHURCH ON THE MOVE INTL. 36488...............................CHUTE JR., STAN 32401..................CLAPP TRUST, MERLE R. 27916.....................................CLARK, JOHN 8712............................CLARK, NORMAN R. 35257................................CLARK, SANDRA 17303....................CLEVELAND, BONNIE L. 36537...................................CLINE, CARA J. 22278................................CLOUTIER, DAVE 36975......................CLOUTIER, PATRICK T. 11587..........................CLOVER, MARION C. 15812..................................COEN, DONALD 32944...........COEN ESTATE, ELIZABETH A. 35016......................COLBURN, JEROME H. 37702......................COLBURN, JEROME H. 33029............................COLBY, RONALD K. 41431...................................COLE, MARK A. 31776............................COLE, SUZANNE R. 32239.............................COLEMAN, BETTY. 14115..............................COLLINS, PAUL D. 33341..................COMSTOCK, ROBERT W. 31674.............................CONLAN, SHARON 24877..............................CONNER, PAUL R. 32611...........................CONNESS, VIERLYN 9116....................CONNOLLEY, ELIZABETH 25595.............................CONNOR, DALE G. 37511................................CONNOR, JAN A. 34786................COOAN JR., CLARENCE J. 14180................................COOK, CALVIN F. 13537................................COOK, JAMES H. 33279..............................COOK, STEVEN D. 27027....................COOK ESTATE, MARY S. 36089..............................COOLEY, KEVIN K. 36225.................................CORTEZ, JAMES 26268..........................COUSINS, CARLTON 27674.........................COWAN, JEROME M. 20122..........................................COX, GENE 35473.................................COX, KOHLAN P. 32880...............................COX, RICHARD A. 6480..........................................COX, VELMA 11990...................................COY, LESTER J. 32153.................................COYLE, JOHN D.

645884 38L

WNAXLP Acct. # Name 36340..........................CRAFT, DOUGLAS B. 37265.............................CRAIN, KERMIT W. 37096............................CRAIN, RICHARD J. 45104................................CRAN, DELORES 35284.........................CREA, THEODORE T. 10954........................CRIST ESTATE, IRENE 36826.......................CROSS, KATHLEEN M. 27864...............................CROWE, KEITH J. 49904...........................CROWTHER, BRIAN 33206......................CRUMP, JOSEPHINE L. 18024.........................CRUSING, FRANK W. 11892.....................CULLEN, ELIZABETH J. 12036....................CULVER, MARGARET A. 26032........................CUMMINGS, JEAN M. 8155............................CUNDIFF, DOROTHY 16021...........................CURREY, JAMES W. 52796...................................CURTIS, KELLY 33221....................CZEBOTAR, EUGENE M. 16505............................DAHILL, RAYMOND 13521................................DAHL, CLIFFORD 28709.......................DAHLSTROM, JACK A. 37022...........................DAILING, PHILLIP A. 12833................................DALE, LESTER N. 25362............DALLES HOUSE MOTEL INC. 17257...........................DANCA, EUGENE R. 35591..............DANIELOWSKI, JEFFREY D. 35169............................DANIELS, PENNY L. 32157....................DANIELSEN, ROBERT E. 51326............................DANIELSON, JAMIE 36443........................DANNHOFF, BRIAN K. 36901...............................DARBY, JAMES E. 30423..............................DARWIN, ARTHUR 20966..............................DARWIN, RONALD 33358...............DAUFFENBACH, BRUCE D. 20654.....................................DAVIS, DAN A. 13230................................DAVIS, DARYL G. 29014................................DAVIS, DONNA E. 27935..............................DAVIS, RUFORD T. 37216.................................DAVIS, VIRGIL L. 8892..................................DAY, THOMAS W. 12047.................................DE GIDIO, LOUIS 14752................................DE JAGER, JOHN 15341.............................DE MARRE, LEO J. 35502.................DE ROCHEMONT, URLY L. 29529.....................DE VANE, GEORGEANN 35416.......................DEADRICK, MELVIN E. 29876.....................................DEARING, L.L. 55065...............................DECKER, JANICE 9270.......................................DEETZ, RAY L. 32621........................DEHMER, ADOLPH C. 33324...............................DEITCH, JOHN C. 36835.........................DEJAK, KATHRYN M. 37332..................DELMONTE, TERENCE D. 37470...........................DEMPSEY, JOHN W. 6511................................DENECKE, HENRY 23376....................DENKMANN, STEVEN A. 10151..........DENN ESTATE, MARGARET C. 11327.................................DENNISON, S.W. 11593.....................DENSMORE, JAMES M. 15778...............................DENVER, DENNIS 36080..........DEPT. OF VETERANS AFFAIRS 35340............................DEPTO, CHERYL D. 35303......................DERRICK, TIMOTHY S. 32994....................DES JARDINS, SHERRIE 37009...................DETTMANN, NORMAN J. 21317...............................DEZIEL, VIRGINIA 8448.......................DICKSON, DOROTHY E. 10907............................DIERCKS, ROSALIE 35690.............................DIETRICH, DALE J. 30936..................................DIX, ROBERT C. 36221.............................DOCK, ROBERT O. 10115.............................DODD, WILLIAM H. 34782....................................DODDS, DAVID 36337...................................DODGE, PAULA 34730..................................DODGE, TAMI S. 24790...............................DOHM, MYRON J. 33309........................................DOIG, JOHN 8947...........................DOLL, LAWRENCE H. 20303......DOMRESE ESTATE, JERROLD E. 32381...............DONAHUE ESTATE, KATHY 18227....DONATELLE ESTATE, CATHERINE 36233.....................DONNELLY, ROBERT W. 35105...........................DONOFRI, FRANK J. 26262................................DOOLIN, JOHN P. 12677...................DOOLITTLE, GENEVIEVE 37164.................................DORAN, NORMA 45195..............................DORIOTT, LELAND 11582.......................DORIOTT, STANLEY E. 26644...........................DORNSEIF, JUNE G. 55467..........................DOUGLAS, ANDREW 50660...........................DOUGLAS, DONALD 3376...........................................DOWD, ART 36460..................................DOWD, CONNIE 55302................................DRAKE, BRENDA 37229................................DRAVES, LORI B. 32291..........................DRAVES, RONALD J. 15869.........................DRINKWINE, LYNN E. 37577.............................DUCLON, DAVID J. 27343............................DUERSCHERL, JOE 29243................................DUFF, EUGENE J. 37339..............................DUMIRE, JOHN W. 8074...............DUNCANSON JR., RALPH O. 17754.............................DUNN, CHANEY C. 25901............................DUNN, RUSSELL D. 14141....................................DUPAY, ADA G. 36465............................DURAND, PETER J. 37147.........................DURAND, ROBERT F. 37117........................DUREN, ROBERT FSR 54396........................DUROCHER, JOSEPH 19364...............................DUSHANE, SUSIE 21882............................DUXBURY, JOHN R. 17688.................................DWYER, CAROL. 36436..........................DWYER, SHARON N.


PAGE 26 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MAY 4, 2016

NOTICE OF FORFEITURE OF FUNDS HELD BY POLK-BURNETT ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE UNLESS CLAIMED BY OWNER Pursuant to Wisconsin Statutes Section 185.03(10), you are hereby notified that Polk-Burnett Electric Cooperative, of Centuria, Wisconsin 54824, has in its possession unclaimed funds belonging to you. You can claim these funds by contacting the Cooperative and furnishing proof of your legal interest in such funds on or before

July 15, 2016. You are further notified that unless you do claim such funds and provide satisfactory evidence of your right to receive the same by July 15, 2016, these funds will be forfeited to the Cooperative. Published this 4th day of May, 2016.

UNCLAIMED CAPITAL CREDITS Acct. # Name 35091..................................DZUBAY, PETER 31655.............................EASLAND, GAIL M. 35896................................EASLEY, JOHN R. 34119.................................EATON, DEBBEE 33730....EAU CLAIRE SCREEN GRAPHICS 51921.................EBERHARDT, EDWARD C. 36749.....................................EBLI, JOSEPH 32922................................EBSEN, JULIE M. 32526............................ECKBERG, JOAN L. 32801...............................EDGETT, GARY C. 20432...................................EDLER, GRACE 37116.................EDSTROM, MARGARET A. 26052......................EDSTROM, ROBERT G. 10435..............................EFFERTZ, JOHN J. 32082..........................EFFERTZ, JUDITH A. 29884...................................EGAN, JOHN V. 26375...........................EGELAND, DORIS E. 8933..............................................EGGE, P.E. 28858..........................EGGEN, TIMOTHY P. 55224.....................................EGGERS, DAN 19939............................EHLKE, ARTHUR R. 14466......................EIBS ESTATE, DONALD 32095................................EICHTEN, RALPH 10671...................EINBERGER, DONALD J. 7315.......................EINERSON, ELWOOD L. 48999.............................EIYNCK, JASON G. 7417..............................EKSTRAND, LAURA 24809.....................ELDRIDGE, GEORGE H. 30496.......................ELDRIDGE, HARRY W. 35242...................ELFSTROM, DONALD W. 29412..............................ELFSTRUM, ALAN 15584........................................ELLIE, GENE 10432...................ELLINGSEN, MARGARET 10901.................ELLINGSON, KENNETH E. 35991...................ELLINGSWORTH, LARRY 52107................ELLINGWORTH, REBECCA 31942.................................EMERY, RUBY L. 34417..........................ENGELSMA, DONNA 32245..............................ENGEVIK, JERALD 32479......................ENGLERT, WILLARD W. 36715..................................ENGLISH, JOHN 15153...............................EPLEY, FRANK W. 31773............................ERICHSEN, BRUCE 36159........................ERICKSON, DONNA J. 17838...................ERICKSON, KENNETH G. 35469......................ERICKSON, NATHAN P. 54418...................ERICKSON, NICKOLAUS 9266.........................ERICKSON, ROGER E. 30492.....................ERICKSON, RONALD N. 36480.......................ERICKSON, WAYNE A. 24547........ERICKSON ESTATE, GERALD L. 31077..........................ERICSON, ROGER C. 36083.............................ERNST, WILLIAM J. 36264......................ESHER, MARGARET M. 54688..........................ESTRELLA, MARY A. 15576.........................ETTEN, MATTHEW G. 30217.................................ETTER, WILLIAM 36333..........................EVELAND, JAMES R. 37199...................................EVENSKI, MIKE 45271.................................EWALDT, DON J. 17829.....................................EWEN, RITA E. 33403........................................EWER, KYLE 6411..................................EWERT, LEWIS C. 31930......................FARMERS HOME ADM. 19258......................FARRELL, MILDRED A. 34237...................FASCHING, ROLLAND C. 32948............FASHINGBAUER, ROBERT P. 17334.......................FASTNER JR., FRED E. 30148......................FDIC/MONYCOR #2178 29166.....................FEATHERSTON, LYLE E. 18429...................FENELON TRUST, DORIS 35977..............................FENSKE, RONALD 38915............................FENTON, JASON A. 35617.................................FENZEL, ROGER 33987...........................FIELDS, JEFFREY D. 27079.....................................FILIP, KEVIN J. 31634........................FINSTAD, RANDALL J. 32653..........................FISCHER, CURTIS R. 12019..............................FISH, CLAYTON E. 22806.................................FISHER, DALE E. 26382......................FISHER, FREDERICK J. 32957...................................FLAVIN, CAROL 9164................................FOLEY, ROBERT J. 24249..........................FONTAINE, DONALD 35947.......................FONTAINE, PAMELA S. 34013................................FORD, LESLEY J. 32312..........................FORREST, BRYON N. 17873.....................FORREY, MARGARET L. 4656......................................FORS, MARTIN 20781..............................FOSBERG, RANDY 16140............FOSTER ESTATE, ROBERT J. 34805............................................FOUR G’S, 36878.................................FOWLER, STEVE 35230.........................................FOX, ARLYN 36420..................................FOX, CAROLE J. 10871..................................FOX, LORRAINE 36705.........................FRANCHUCK, KEN R. 37491.................FRANCHUK, KENNETH R. 52761..................FRANCIS, JOHNATHAN J. 34137...........................FRANDSEN, JOEL L. 30819...............FRANKLIN JR., GEORGE A. 14325.......................FRANSEN, GERTRUDE 29542...................FRANTZEN, MICHAEL A. 35121...................................FRANZEN, B.C. 25597.................................FRASCONE, LEO 32468..........................FREDERICKS, DAVID 31425........................FREDERICKS, SCOTT 26572..............FREDRICKSEN, RANDAL K. 32831.................................FREEL, DELMAR 36293..........................FREESE, ARNOLD J. 35592..................................FREESE, JAN S. 36114.................FREIERMUTH, ROBERT A. 23485.............FREILING ESTATE, SHIRLEY

Acct. # Name 53905........................FREMONT, VALENCIA 43173...........................FRENCH, COREY W. 31861......................FRETHEIM, RONALD L. 32649........................................FREY, GREG 36696................................FRICK, BRYAN D. 32273................................FRICK, FRANCES 48615..............................FRIDAY, RENEE K. 33079........................FRIESEN, FRANCIS C. 55207.................FRIESENHAHN, VICTORIA 17890........................FROEMING, EDWARD 32771....................................FROID, JON M. 20607............................FROST, THOMAS H. 36010....................................FRY, BARBARA 31711...............................FULLER, JOHN C. 27329..........................FURUHOLMEN, LILA 36468......................GAETKE JR., PETER C. 30814..............................GAITHER, DANIEL 11328..................................GALL, JAMES L. 35042..................................GALL, KATHY S. 32996.................................GALL, MARTY R. 34159...............................GALL, THOMAS L. 26103..........................GALLUP, RONALD G. 54018.................................GAMACHE, LORI 29383.........................GAPINSKI, DANIEL F. 32838.......................GAPPINGER, CARL M. 36087.............................GARCIA, ALFREDO 36434............................GARCIA, DANIEL L. 35599....................................GARCIA, FELIX 20737.....................GARDNER, LAMOYNNE 36418...........................GARHART, ROSE M. 55390.......................................GARIBALDI’S 55650.................................GARSKE, LARRY 38481......................................GATES, TONY 38153..........................GAUDETTE, CARA L. 35514.......................GAUDETTE, THERESA 18596..........................GAUVIN, ROBERT D. 35999.....................GAYLORD, STANTON R. 34481.........................GEHRKE, SHARON F. 32286.............................GEHRMAN, JAMES 17131..............GEHRMAN ESTATE, MINNIE 23471...................................GEIGER, JOY S. 54302........................GEISLER, THOMAS A. 19790........................GENGLER, NICHOLAS 37380.......................GENTILE, MILDRED K. 36832.......................GEORGE, NORMAN W. 31863.................................GERLACH, PAUL 54452...................................GERMAIN, LISA 30526..................................GERMAIN, ERIC 50871............................GERMAN, GABRIEL 18001.......................GERTEN, KENNETH A. 36076.............................GETSCHEL, ALLEN 40913...........................GETZIN, JEROLD K. 36203.................................GIBBS, TERRY L. 23838...............................GIBLIN, KATHRYN 18798............................GILBERT, LLOYD S. 18866..............................GILBERT, LOUIS P. 50861......................GILBERTSON, JOHN P. 13878.........................GILBERTSON, VIVIAN 32378.....................................GILL, ALVIN R. 25068...............................GILLE, GERALD J. 36032...................................GILLEN, PETER 16986...................................GILLER, DORIS 4407............................GILLER, LOUELLA L. 37267................................GILLER, MARY J. 23352................................GILLES, MARLYS 45410...........................GILLES, MICHAEL J. 31190..........................GILLUM, DONALD K. 36556............................GILMORE, DARREN 53798...................................GILPIN, SHANE 26680..........................GISVOLD, EVELYN L. 54399.................................GIVEN, THOMAS 2765............................GJONNES, LLOYD C. 33560................................GLASGOW, VICKI 3061........................GLENNA ESTATE, OTIS 34215...........................GLUNZ, DONALD H. 36282..........................GOEPFERT, ERMA J. 32207..........................GOETTL, PATRICK T. 31019......................GOETTSCHE, JOHN W. 34254...............................GOKEN, TERRY L. 49941...........................GOLDBERG, DEBRA 26234...................GOLDBERGER, EMMA L. 54894..............................GOLDEN, JEANNE 53730...........................GONZALEZ, SHEILA 55025.............................GOODYEAR, JOHN 34534.........................GORDON, GLORIA M. 32727..........................GORDON, HYMEN S. 35336............................GORDON, MARY M. 34758...........................GORHAM, DIANE M. 34241..............................GORMAN, DENNIS 18814..........................GORRES, PRISCILLA 36190..............................GOSS, RANDAL S. 55185....................................GRABER, AMY 24417............................GRAFF, BERTHA M. 36325.............................GRAMER, LEWIS J. 22137..............................GRANDE, ARLENE 31838...................................GRANT, JAMES 36510...................................GRANT, ROGER 36898.........................GRAVELLE, PATRICIA 21354...........................GREEDER, SALLY J. 3388.................................GREEN, KERMITT 33451..........................GREEN, STANLEY N. 52104...............................GREEN, VICTORY 36699.................GREENWALT, WILLIAM M. 26358......................GREFFIN, HERBERT W. 36407............................GREINKE, ROBERT 15159....................GRESHAM ESTATE, M.A. 17115.............................GREVE, WILLIAM L 25415........................GREVICH, GEORGE F. 22704.............................GRIFFEY, VIRGINIA 21631.........................GRIFFIN, PATRICK M. 55228...............GRIFFITH COMPANIES LLC 17796..............GRINDLAND, ELIZABETH A. 16112...........................GROGAN, BEVERLY

Acct. # Name 36777............................GROSS, EUGENE L. 32318............................GROSSMAN, ANDY 35274...................GROSULAK, YVONNE M. 30006...............................GROTH, ADELE E. 36991...............................GROVE, ALLAN A. 31502....................................GROW, LARRY 21573......................GRUNEWALD, FRED L. 35802...........................GRUNOW, TIMOTHY 28210...........................GTE OF WISCONSIN 33612......................GUNTHER, THOMAS J. 33847...............................GURROLA, DAVID 35139.........................GURTNER, WAYNE A. 49660........................GUSTAFSON, CARA L. 29780........................GUSTAFSON, DALE L. 35746.......................GUSTAFSON, DEAN E. 54548.........................GUSTAFSON, JUSTIN 41239..........................GUSTAFSON, KATHY 35020...........................GUTZMER, GERALD 34100................................GUYETTE, DAVID 24840.....................GYDESEN, GORDON W. 32517..........................................HAAS, TOM 31641.............................HAATVEDT, DUANE 30282.........................HACKER, ROBERT E. 23780.................................HACKING, EARL 14217.............................HAFNER, RALPH J. 4036.................................HAGEN, CLARA J. 25912.....................................HAGEN, JUNE 14794...........................HAGMAN, JAMES A. 30523......................HAGSTROM, LYNNE M. 36075..............................HAINLEY, GARY L. 15630..............................HAKES, JAMES R. 44670............................HALL, DEBORAH L. 40927...................................HALL, MARK E. 33004.............................HALL, RICHARD D. 37777......................HALLBERG, CONNIE S. 35056................................HALLER, PAUL R. 35055.......................HALLOCK, ROBERT A. 28592.............................HALMSTAD SALES 18703........................HALVERSON, FERN P. 32768.................HALVERSON, RICHARD B. 35864...............HAMBACHER, RICHARD P. 35774..........................HANCOCK, JOHN W. 35598........................HANCOCK, LAURIE A. 12409...........HANENBERGER, WARREN R. 41582..........................HANFORD, BRIAN H. 35684............................HANGGI, DOUGLAS 25276............................HANISCH, PHILIP J. 35538...............................HANKS, WADE M. 33683.............................HANSEN, BRENDA 20373...................................HANSEN, JUNE 32101.............................HANSEN, KEITH R. 34439.................................HANSEN, KELLY 34162........................HANSEN, LAWRENCE 11140..............................HANSEN, LUCILLE 49169..................................HANSEN, MARK 36156............................HANSEN, STEVE W. 19168...........................HANSEN, WAYNE A. 34659...............................HANSON, ANN M. 19890....................HANSON, FLORENCE D. 19480............................HANSON, JANET S. 84.....................................HANSON, JENNIE 33417............................HANSON, LUCINDA 22866.......................HANSON, RICHARD H. 35428.........................HANSON, ROBERT G. 30981...........................HANSON, ROGER D. 32878.............................HANSON, TODD R. 1520..........................HANSON, WARREN A. 33597...........................HANSON, WAYNE L. 36175.................................HANZAL, DARYL 35651...........................HARDINA, KAREN T. 34091....................HARGROVE, ROBERT B. 34677..........................HARMON, DANNY L. 44192....................HAROLDSON, MICHAEL 34061..................................HARPER, MARK 27153..........................HARRIS, DONALD D. 34518...................................HARRIS, LEE D. 36179...............................HARRIS, LINDA L. 35697........................HARRIS, WALLACE L. 13913.........................HARSHMAN, LILLIAN 30115.................HART ESTATE, JOSEPH E. 33246..................................HARTMAN, BILL 37541........................HARTWIG, STEVEN G. 15637.............................HARTWIG, EVELYN 36859...........................HARTYANYI, PETER 37431.....................HARVEY, ELIZABETH A. 34455......................HARVIEUX, FRANCIS J. 36562...............................HASART, GARY A. 23509..............................HASKIN, DAVID W. 26970.....................HASTINGS, GERTRUDE 34401............................HASTY, PATRICK W. 9200..................................HAUGEN, CAROL 35665...................................HAUS, ALBERT 48647......................................HAUSE, NEAL 15825....................HAUTH, ANNABELLE M. 30527..............................HAVATONE, MYNA 15144..........................HAWKINS, JAMES F. 49580.............................HAYES, GERALD E. 2107.................................HAYES, MELVIN J. 9839.............................HAYES, ROSANA M. 28992.............................HAYNE, ALBERT J. 13125...................HAZELBERG, MYRTLE E. 34909........................HAZELTON, DUANE L. 55214.......................HEACOCK, MATTHEW 30828.......................................HEALY, JOHN 33882.............................HEARITIGE, KEVIN 36252..............HEDBERG ESTATE, PAUL R. 11276.............................HEDSTROM, JOHN 34562...............................HEGGE, DARLA L. 13171...HEGSTRAND ESTATE, ARTHUR H. 13359.................................HEIDT, RALPH J. 16919...................................HEIDTKE, EMIL 37334...................................HEIER, EARL N. 6832.................HEIER ESTATE, MARTHA F.

Acct. # Name 15044.......................HEIMER, IMOGENE M. 32725...........HEINS ESTATE, MARJORIE S. 36885...........................HEISER, WILLIAM J. 35590..........................HEITMAN, DANIEL S. 16508...........................HENDEL, JAMES W. 6348.......HENDRICKS ESTATE, LORRAINE 24818............HENDRICKSON, THOMAS O. 34871.............HENDRIKSON, RICHARD M. 19414.....................HENNINGS, WILLIAM H. 3844........................HENRIKSEN, KRISTIAN 32965..................................HENRY, JOHN F. 30642............................HENRY, WILLIAM A. 35953...............................HERDAHL, DOUG 36708.............................HERMANN, FRANK 15756.....HERMANSON ESTATE, HAZEL M. 35197...............................HERRON, DALE J. 35498.................................HESS, RANDALL 36615.........................................HESS, RICK 37062.........................HESSLER, TOMMY R. 27917.................HESTDALEN, GORDON A. 16377............................HETZEL, CAROL W. 36438............................HEURING, DAVID T. 30117...................................HEXOM, DAVID 30721....................HEYWOOD, THOMAS R. 36702.............HIBBARD, RODNEY-BONNIE 53104..................................HIBBS, NATHAN 15643...............................HICKOK, DAVID F. 27498...................................HICKS, LISA M. 36751......................HIGHTOWER, DONALD 10289.......................................HILL, CAROL 34492.....................................HILL, DAVID J. 35524................................HILL, DONALD R. 14597...................................HILL, JULIET L. 23045....................HILL ESTATE, FRANK G. 31592.........................HILLBECK, PHILIP D. 54799....................................HILLMAN, PAM 36860.............................HILLS, MICHAEL L. 11245.......HINKFUSS ESTATE, WALTER W. 24991.................................HINNA, JOANNE 5088..................HINSCHBERGER, ROBERT 27908.............................HIRSCH, JAMES A. 31088...........................HITCHENS, GLEN R. 40031......................HNATIUK, PATRICIA M. 32355.....................HOCHSTETLER, ROY V. 36563..............................HODGE, KEVIN W. 35911..........................HODGE, WARREN E. 34570.............................HODGES, KARIN L. 32163....................................HOEFT, LARRY 14095.......................................HOFF, LEO A. 22648...................................HOFF, OWEN D. 4749.......................HOFFMAN, CHARLES F. 42005..........................HOFFMAN, STEVE E. 29697...........................HOGLUND, JOHN C. 16549.................................HOILAND, ROSE 35443............HOISINGTON ESTATE, MARK 27750..............................HOLDEN, GARY D. 39143.........................HOLECEK, RANDY A. 27253..........................HOLEN, MILDRED A. 36935...........................HOLLAND, ARVID A. 34296.....................HOLLAND, RANDALL S. 17840....................HOLMBERG, ALBERT E. 21989........................HOLMBERG, ELLEN I. 4716.............................HOLMBERG ESTATE 37069..............................HOLMQUIST, TOM 36018.............HOLMSTROM, DOUGLAS C. 33032.......................................HOLT, HAL P. 28140...........................................HOLT, JON 14749...............................HOLTEN, JOHN S. 29128...............................HOLTER, JOHN C. 8997......................................HOLTER, JUNE 35260...............................HOM, EUGENE R. 53102......................HOMES BY BIERMANN 32165.......................HONERBRINK, RANDY 15697.....................................HOOD, DORIS 49818....................................HOOEY, BRIAN 14589..........................HOOVER, LINNEA N. 35600............................HOOVER, ROBIN C. 31513..........................HOPPE, HOWARD C. 20257..................................HOPPE, MAYSIE 22401.............................HORN, MARIALICE 9679..........................HORSCHKE, WALTER 23723..............................HORSLEY, SUE M. 26158............................HORTON, KATHLYN 36327.......................HOULISTON, DAVID A. 36666.............................HOUSER, MARK D. 11801....................HOVERMAN, LAVERN E. 51478................................HOWARD, LEE R. 36652....................................HOWE, BILL M. 20865...........................HOWE ESTATE, N.W. 18447...............................HOWITZ, JOHN P. 36582.......................HOWLAND, MAUREEN 34827................................HOWLAND, MIKE 35168.......................................HOYT, DAVID 24262.........................HUEBNER, KAREN A. 28545..................................HUFF, HARRY E. 19644............................HUFF SR., EDDIE L. 35319...............................HUGHES, MATT F. 15864.......................HUMMEL, CONRAD A. 19675...................................HUNT, SHIRLEY 30333.............................HUNTER, DAVID B. 7146..............................HURLEY, JAMES M. 33963.....................HUSTVET, KENNETH M. 35582.........................HUTTON, GEORGINA 32837......................HYLAND, LORRAINE R. 27182...........HYSLOP ESTATE, ROBERT W. 37080................................ILSTRUP, JEFF A. 31504..........................................IMAN, LOIS 36364.....................INGBERG, BRADLEY R. 10446..............INGRAM ESTATE, ADDIE M. 36206................INGWALSON, CHARLES S. 31748............................ISHAM, ARNOLD A. 19393.......................JACKER, MARLENE L. 34658.......................JACOBSON, BRENT E.

645885 38L

WNAXLP Acct. # Name 34694......................JACOBSON, BRUCE A. 36163...............................JACOBSON, KIRK 32746..................................JAEGER, JANET 20634.........................JAGUSCH, JAMES H. 55565...........................JAMES, STEPHANIE 33262..................................JANSEN, DAVID 11940.............................JANTZEN, HARVEY 34573..................JAROSCH ESTATE, JOAN 37365.........................JASPERSON, SUSAN 16341...................................JAVA, LARRY E. 18384...JEHOVAH EVANG LUTH. CHURCH 11569....................JELLICH, MARGARET E. 20987..............................JENKINS, JOHN T. 21657.....................JENNINGS, WILLIAM M. 29630..............................JENSEN, DAVID E. 5778..............................JENSEN, HARRY M. 30380.............................JENSEN, JAMES L. 49207.......................................JENSEN, JAY 53689..................................JENSEN, JESSE 32235............................JENSEN, KAREN R. 35177..................................JENSEN, VIRGIL 11070.............JENSEN ESTATE, WINIFRED 11918.............................JENTZSCH, HAZEL 36906.......................................JERRY, MIKE 15409...............................JEWELL, JOHN L. 35795.......................JOHANSEN, JOHAN P. 35141................................JOHNS, KEVIN T. 14195...........................JOHNSON, ALVIN A. 17365......................JOHNSON, ARTHUR W. 36444....................JOHNSON, BARBARA A. 33773........................JOHNSON, BONNIE L. 30373............................JOHNSON, BURT A. 30894................................JOHNSON, CARL 42709..........JOHNSON, CHRISTOPHER M. 36320..............................JOHNSON, CINDY 31478....................JOHNSON, CLIFFORD T. 25417........................JOHNSON, CURTIS L. 23796............................JOHNSON, DALE P. 45956......................JOHNSON, DONALD A. 36984......................JOHNSON, DONALD D. 47416......................JOHNSON, DONALD P. 26307.....................JOHNSON, DONALD W. 16771........................JOHNSON, DURELL F. 1280...............................JOHNSON, ELMER 9749.........................JOHNSON, ERNEST A. 32473................JOHNSON, FREDERICK A. 34807...........................JOHNSON, GARALD 33387...........................JOHNSON, GENE A. 34042..........................JOHNSON, GEORGE 34187.......................JOHNSON, GERALD A. 34756.......................JOHNSON, GERALD E. 20238......................JOHNSON, GORDON J. 1472................................JOHNSON, HAZEL 26353.........................JOHNSON, JAMES H. 23020..........................JOHNSON, JAMES J. 32254.........................JOHNSON, JAMES K. 32712......................JOHNSON, JANELLE J. 36726..........................JOHNSON, JEFFERY 34078......................JOHNSON, JERILYN C. 32699.......................JOHNSON, JEROME P. 31233...........................JOHNSON, JOHN E. 31911...........................JOHNSON, JOHN E. 26592....................JOHNSON, KENNETH C. 29266....................JOHNSON, LENNART G. 31663............................JOHNSON, LOLA G. 34580...................................JOHNSON, M.L. 29107..................JOHNSON, MARSHALL F. 36839................................JOHNSON, MATT 49824..........................JOHNSON, MELISSA 54039..........................JOHNSON, MELISSA 25575.....................JOHNSON, MILDRED E. 6379...........................JOHNSON, PEARL M. 35975..........................JOHNSON, RALPH L. 13833......................JOHNSON, ROBERT C. 24604.......................JOHNSON, ROBERT E. 11852......................JOHNSON, ROBERT G. 55431...........................JOHNSON, SAMUEL 44041.......................JOHNSON, SAMUEL V. 27235.......................JOHNSON, STEVEN W. 46739...............................JOHNSON, TIM D. 36515...........................JOHNSON, TODD L. 34125........................JOHNSON, WAYNE B. 52597........................JOHNSON, WAYNE R. 18405..........................JOHNSON, WILBERT 34595.......................JOHNSON, WILLIAM I. 24031...........JOHNSON ESTATE, GLENN K. 3787...........JOHNSON ESTATE, INGVAR H. 36000........JOHNSON ESTATE, ROBERT D. 36447.............................JOHNSON REALTY 19690...............JOHNSON SR., ROBERT W. 37306..........JOHNSON SR., THEODORE R. 34493.......................JOHNSTON, FRANCES 35143............................JONAS, CHERYL A. 33625...............................JONAS, JAMES R. 25827........................................JONES, AVIS 9293........................JONES ESTATE, BELLE 39139........................JONES JR., CHARLES 50826...................................JORDAN, RYAN 16274..............JORGENSEN SR., WILLIE D. 33269...........................JOSEPHS, THOMAS 14482.......................JOSWIAK, MARGARET 37107.....................................JUEDES, JEFF 33979...........................JUETTEN, CYNTHIA 35852....................................JULEFF, JIM R. 16645........................JUNGMANN, LUCILLE 19304...............................JUREK, RALPH A. 25172.........................JURISCH, BONNIE C. 14331.........................KAASE, JOHANNE H. 29981...................................KACZUR, GEZA 37223...................................KACZUR, GEZA 34500.................KADLUBOWSKI, DONALD 29506..................................KAHL, GEORGE 15123..............KAHL ESTATE, CHARLES R.


MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 27

NOTICE OF FORFEITURE OF FUNDS HELD BY POLK-BURNETT ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE UNLESS CLAIMED BY OWNER Pursuant to Wisconsin Statutes Section 185.03(10), you are hereby notified that Polk-Burnett Electric Cooperative, of Centuria, Wisconsin 54824, has in its possession unclaimed funds belonging to you. You can claim these funds by contacting the Cooperative and furnishing proof of your legal interest in such funds on or before

July 15, 2016. You are further notified that unless you do claim such funds and provide satisfactory evidence of your right to receive the same by July 15, 2016, these funds will be forfeited to the Cooperative. Published this 4th day of May, 2016.

UNCLAIMED CAPITAL CREDITS Acct. # Name 25150.............KALDENBERG, GEORGE JR. 14892..........................KALLEVANG, ELMER 36909..............................KAMPER, BETH E. 52546................................KAMRATH, GARY 19463.......................KANER, MARSHALL S. 55428...................................KAPHING, KRIS 16412..........................KAPLAN, JOSEPH H. 10001.....................KARINEN, RAYMOND S. 37403..................................KARNICK, JOEL 35945.........................KARNUTH, KENNETH 37427.............................KASAL, MARGIE A. 34701......................KASPAREC, ANTHONY 29825...............................KATKE, MICHAEL 37500........................................KATUIN, LEE 23736...................KAWALSKE, MILDRED A. 36214......................................KAYE, SUSAN 51996..............................KAZEKS, ROBERT 10247...............KEATING ESTATE, JOHN E. 35882...............................KEELEY, ANNA M. 31128...................................KEENAN, JOHN 54510.............................KEENAN, VINCENT 52757...........................KEHBORN, JOSEPH 35698...............................KEIM, THOMAS J. 36473................KEIM ESTATE, ROBERT W. 34333........................KEITHAHN, JAMES E. 32703............................KELLER, KENNETH 27526..........................KELLER, RONALD P. 32121.................................KELLY, FRANK L. 13523.............................KELLY, JUSTINE D. 36872..................................KELLY, SANDRA 35031..................................KEMP, JEFFREY 31723............................KENDALL, RONALD 29533..............................KENNEDY, MABLE 28104...............................KENOW, DONALD 50238....................................KENT, MARIAN 36127........................................KERN, JUDY 24104.................................KESLER, WAYNE 23526...............................KESTER, CARL R. 27225..................KEYES ESTATE, DAVID K. 23090.......................KEZER ESTATE, JOHN 24107.........KIEFFER ESTATE, ELEANOR A. 35917............................KIENER, MAUREEN 31121........................KILBOURNE, MARCIE 30345...............................KILL, RICHARD T. 35247.................................KIMBER, WAYNE 36698...................KINDERMAN, ROBERT J. 17809.................................KING, CALVIN M. 32580......................................KING, PENNY 16147....................................KING, RUTH D. 36180........................................KING, SALLY 53342................................KING, TOMMY D. 9359...............................KINGSBURY LE, R. 33323...................KINGSBURY, THOMAS P. 35983............................KINOSHITA, SUSAN 54053............................KINSEL, VERONICA 33353...............................KINZEL, WARREN 36270.............................KIPKA, ROBERT C. 23550.................................KIRCHHOFF, B.J. 29658.......................KIRCHNER, NORMA J. 16650........................KIRKEBY, GEORGE H. 35136.....................KIRKPATRICK, GARY D. 34975.........................KITTRELL, CHARLES 32816............................KLEIN, MARGARET 35334.........................KLEINER, LORRAINE 43612...........................KLEIST, KIMBALL C. 11215...........................KLEMANN, JUNE O. 53989.............................KLEPPE, LUANN B. 21087........................KLOPOTEK, DAVID R. 35172......................KLUEDTKE, DOROTHY 34135................................KNAPP, PERRY J. 18808.............................KNAUF, ROBERT F. 20315...............................KNIGHT, OLLIE O. 35342........................KNIPFER, WILLIAM A. 19418.................KNOLLENBERG, ALLEN V. 30110............................KNUDSON, PHILLIP 37008...........................KNUTSON, JOAN B. 32426....................KNUTSON, KENNETH D. 50026...........................KNUTSON, MAGGIE 15264....................KOBERNICK, SHERMAN 24627.................KOBERNUSZ, ARVILLA A. 18935............................KOBINSKI, MARY V. 7771..............................KOCH JR., JOHN R. 31412..........................KODY SR., JAMES J. 36142...............................KOENIG, ROBERT 34751.........................KOLANDER, DEAN E. 35900............................KOLANDER, DELLA 34233..............................KOLLER, HAROLD 12849..........................KOMAROMY, ENDRE 16511.............KONEFES ESTATE, MARTHA 27267.................KONOBECK, MARLENE J. 37401....................KONODECK, EUGENE P. 26082......................KOPACEK, GORDON J. 21629..................................KOPP, FLOYD F. 33553...................KORDUPLESKI, CECILIA 55318.......................KORHONEN, JEFFREY 37175.............................KOST, KENNETH P. 35318.....................................KOTAS, GREG 34676...........................KOUTEK, DOUGLAS 9222...............................KOWALSKI, BETTY 12351.........................KOWSKI, GEORGE A. 32884..............................KOZLAK, MARK J. 23328..........................KRAEMER, PETER J. 15990.............................KRAFT, DAYTON E. 33287..................KRANCEVIC, MONICA M. 35004......................................KRAPF, DEAN 36532..............................KRASNY, ARTHUR 26076..............................KRAUSE, DAVID L. 34651...............................KRAUSE, DENNIS 11132................................KRENZ, FELIX M. 11874..........................KROENING, GLEN L. 35871..............KRUCKENBERG, MORRY P. 35150..........................KRUEGER, MARCUS 36905.............................KRUEGER, TRAVIS

Acct. # Name 35225...........................KTSANES, ANDREW 29862............................KUBES, EUGENE L. 31356...........................KUESTER, EDWARD 36599............KUETTEL, CHRISTOPHER M. 33092..............................KUHN SR., DWAIN 17766........................KULLMAN, ANTHONY 35830......................KURALLE, MICHAEL J. 19752..................................KURTZ, FRED L. 28371....................LA FOREST, FRANCIS P. 49956.....................LA FORTE, CARMEN M. 35075....................................LA MAR, TONY 35565..........................LA MOTTE, JEROME 18665............................LA RA, GEORGE W. 33792.........................LABBE, JACQUELINE 8018..............................LACKNER, JOHN T. 55014..............LAGUNES-RIVERA, JILLIAN 39503..............................LAHN, EUGENE A. 33771...................................LAIER, JOHN A. 48654..............LAKE COUNTRY CABINETS 30951.........................L’ALLIER, RAYMOND 29048...............LAMB ESTATE, DONALD C. 7579........................LAMBERT, MADELEINE 21977..........................LAMPMAN, MARY H. 53957.........................LAMSON, GERALD S. 25728.......................LANGEVIN, RAYMOND 19067.................LANGNESS, DONOVAN D. 32089............................LANPHER, DEAN E. 35616.............................LANZ, RICHARD D. 33509.................................LARDY, DAVID E. 23510...........................................LARK, R.P. 32684........................LARKENS, JANICE M. 3364.........................LARSON, DELORES E. 33334...............................LARSON, DENNIS 25888...............................LARSON, GLORIA 52443......................................LARSON, JAY 7113.............................LARSON, LESLIE W. 35850...............................LARSON, PAUL H. 34084....................LARSON, THEODORE N. 47904........................LARSON, THERESA L. 36001.............................LARSON, TODD W. 36211......................LARSON JR., RICHARD 31950.......................LARSON SR., MARK E. 34986........................LAUCK SR., JAMES E. 35456......................LAUER, FREDERICK G. 10534............LAUER ESTATE, CHARLES B. 5918......................LAURE ESTATE, LINNEA 35407.........................LAURENCE, ROBERT 36968........................LAURITSEN, MARY E. 34060.............................LAURSEN, DARRIN 22610...................................LAW, VIOLET E. 47823............................LAWRENCE, BRIAN 33399..................LAWRENCE, MICHAEL A. 49708.................................LAWTON, ALLEN 54716............................LE QUE, BUILDERS 35959.................................LEARY, MARY M. 40721......................LEBAKKAN, ROGER O. 37446.....................................LEE, ERICA M. 26771...................................LEE, HARRIS G. 28484...............................LEE, KENNETH E. 34767................................LEE, RICHARD L. 36771..............................LEGGETT, MONNA 36118....................................LEGUT, PEGGY 29222........................LEHMAN, WILLIAM R. 23656........................LEHMANN, DOROTHY 29992.............................LEIGHTON, JAMES 17041.................................LEINEN, JOHN J. 11617...........LEMKE ESTATE, DOUGLAS L. 21578........................LEMMERMAN, JERRY 10164..................................LENARD, LOUIS 32448............................LENZ, GREGORY P. 18632.............................LENZ, MILDRED S. 11929............LEONARD ESTATE, DAVID H. 26080...........................LERUM, DONALD O. 41149............................LESSARD, CHAD B. 32539..................................LETZTER, EDNA 35704.............................LEUTY, ROBERT B. 54747.......................LEVERTY, MICHAEL P. 25499.......................LEXVOLD, EDWARD A. 10554.......................L’HERAULT, ETHEL M. 31857................................LIEBGOTT, JOHN 27427.......................................LIND, PEGGY 36456......................................LIND, ROGER 19345..............................LINDAU, BEVERLY 32886.....................LINDBERG, ANDREW J. 34802...............................LINDE, BRUCE W. 28178.......................LINDEMANN, MARY E. 42330...............................LINDMAN, STACY 30060.............................LINDNER, WILLA J. 21617.....................LINDQUIST, EUGENE B. 7287...................................LINDQUIST, PER 33026......................LINDSEY, DOUGLAS A. 22965...........................LINDSKOG, NORMA 29730..................LINDSTROM, THOMAS G. 51473.....................LINEHAN JR., EDWARD 34812.............................LISSICK, SCOTT A. 32149...................................LITTLES, CECIL 16909....................LITTMAN, FLORENCE F. 20100..........................LIVINGSTON, RALPH 33382..................LLEWELLYN, LARSON M. 35846.................................LLOYD, ROBERT 55235.................................LOCK, HEATHER 33172.....................LOFGREN, CHARLES S. 17047..........................LOFQUIST, WARD M. 13005..................................LOING, GLADYS 8564..........................LOKKEN, GEORGE M. 37030....................................LONEY, WILLIS 35998.............................LONG, RICHARD J. 25782...........................LONG SR., JOHN M. 51563..........................LOOMER, RABYRDA 35446................................LOPEZ, CESARIO 36461.......................LORENTZEN, MARK S. 35476...............................LOWE, JEANETTE 23591...........................LOWELL, R. SISSON

Acct. # Name 39989.......................LUANGRATH, INPONG 31457................................LUDDEN, NANCY 17397................................LUECK, RUTH M. 24060..........................LUEPKE, MARCIA H. 40485..........................................LUKA, BOB 22820.................................LUMLEY, RALPH 36199......................LUNBERG, JEFFREY D. 32820..............................LUND, RONALD C. 12796............................LUNDE, FLORENCE 20685...........................LUNDGREN, DUANE 35857.........................LUNDGREN, SHERRY 31971....................LUNDSTROM, NORMAN 26250......................LUNNEBORG, ARLENE 24874.........................LUSIAN, RICHARD A. 37504....................LUTHER JR., LUCIUS C. 32510................................LYMAN, RONALD 34108.....................................LYNN, CANDIS 14520..............................LYNUM, MILDRED 42628........................MAACK, CAROLYN R. 29097................................MAACK, DAVID K 32192............................MAAS, RICHARD H. 36125.......................................MAAS, RUTH 31808....................MAC DONALD, GEORGE 53820..................MAC DONALD, TIMOTHY 29493.............................MAC MILLAN, BILL 55127......................MACKENBURG, DAVID 34604................................MACKEY, LAVINA 31126............................MADDEN, WILLIAM 34977..........................MADERA, ALBERT L. 23979......................MAGALSKA, JAMES M. 8585....................MAGNUSON, AMANDA S. 34161.................................MAKI, NANCY A. 36389..................................MALLO, BLAINE 33623..............................MALM, ALFRED J. 15350.....................MALMQUIST, OLIVER J. 36731.............................MALONE, JOHN W. 47263..........................MANDALKE, TAMMY 4772...........MANITOU LAKE COMM. CLUB 36029...........................MANKA, ROBERT P. 26821...........................MANN, CLAYTON O. 30797...........................MANSFIELD, KAY D. 37945................................MANSKE, JERRY 28984....................MARCOTT, DONAVON L. 48841...................................MARIER, GARY 30474.........................MARKGREN, EARL L. 11198......................................MARLOW, ED 31919......................................MARMON, AL 37352.............................MARQUAND, MIKE 14946...............MARQUARDT, WILLARD K. 31139......................MARQUESEN, JOHN L. 35117..................................MARSH, SUSAN 5716..............MARSH ESTATE, MARGARET 31733..................MARSHALL, CHARLES A. 30016............................MARTELL, DARRYL 33724..............................MARTIN, DAVID R. 34324.........................MARTIN, EDWARD H. 51883..............................MARTIN, KELLY L. 12241....................................MARTIN, PAUL 27568................................MARTIN, PAUL R. 29474................................MARTIN, PAUL T. 35634..........................MARTIN, THOMAS E. 33039................MARTINSON, BERNARD A. 28303.............MASER ESTATE, DONALD A. 34340...............................MASON, THELMA 28536.............................MATHER, SHIRLEY 34761.....................MATHEWS, PATRICIA B. 34760.....................MATTHEWS, DEBORAH 46030................................MATTSON, BRAD 34857..........................MATTSON, TERRY C. 47318..........................MATTSON, TERRY L. 19084................................MATTSON, VERN 29299...........................MATTSON, WADE A. 32544...........................MATTSON, WADE A. 31030.......................MATTSON SR., FRANK 34384..............................MAUNU, RALPH L. 49343...........................MAURER, MICHAEL 35987............................MAVES, WILLIAM J. 23667..............................MAY, BERNERD E. 36108.......................MC ANELLY, JAMES A. 28914..................MC ARTHUR, HAROLD L. 30602........................................MC AULIFFE 54533..................................MC BAIN, MIKKI 29325.........................MC CABE, GREGG W. 31965......................MC CALL, CHARLES J. 33302..........................MC CALL, HARRY M. 31673........................MC CLELLAND, EARL 30231...................MC CLINTOCK, ROBERT 34858....................MC CLURE, THOMAS R. 24974...............MC CONVILLE, PATRICK J. 31829.....................MC COURT, PATRICK L. 33371..............MC DONOUGH, WILLIAM J. 28318.........................MC ELROY, RALPH E. 26576..............MC FARLAND, ELENORA E. 34121.............................MC GINN, KEITH E. 29810........................MC GINNITY, JOHN A. 33090......................MC GREGOR, MARK J. 19605....................................MC KASY, DAN 4902............................MC KENZIE, EARL E. 29006.......................MC KENZIE, RUSSELL 13928..........MC KENZIE ESTATE, MARY M. 28933.................MC LAY ESTATE, MARY J. 39837........................MC LEOD, STEVEN R. 28559...................MC MANIGLE, ALLAN W. 18989.............MC MASTER, CLARENCE O. 7133............MC NALLY ESTATE, JAMES N. 35587...................MC NAMARA, DANIEL E. 29716...........................MC PHEE, DAVID M. 45078............................MC QUAY, KEVIN L. 51304..............................MEASNER, CRAIG 36701.........................MEDITZ, MICHAEL T. 16267................................MEEDS, JEANNE 35005...................MEHSIKOMER, JANET E. 49409...................................MEIZO, ROGER

Acct. # Name 36573...........................MELBERG, MARY A. 34420....................................MENDLIK, JON 9240............................MENKE, VINCENT C. 37442..........................MERCIER, JAMES B. 28721..........................MERRILL, BARBARA 26448............................MERRILL, BRENDA 23904..............................MERRILL, GLORIA 37464.................................MERRILL, LOUIS 25209.............................MERRILL, MARY A. 33733........................MERRILL, WILLIAM V. 30717...........................MERRITT, SUSAN E. 34244..............................MESNER, DARWIN 34719.....................................MESTAD, JON 21367................................MEYER, JACK M. 37044............................MEYER, JOSEPH A. 19522...............................MEYER, MARIE L. 35783.................................MEYER, PAUL L. 35974..........................MEYER, RICHARD S. 28930............................MEYER, WALTER C. 25701.............MEYER ESTATE, WESLEY C. 21691.......................MEYERS, ROMONA C. 35839.........................MICKELSON, LOREN 16776..............MICKELSON, LORRAINE M. 52195.................MIDWEST HOME CENTER 31578...........................MIELKE, LORRAINE 17976...........................................MIKE, SAM 36616..............................MIKKELSON, EVIE 30026...............................MILLER, AUDREY 16739................................MILLER, CARL A. 31056.....................MILLER, CATHERINE R. 32764.............................MILLER, DANIEL L. 28531...........................MILLER, DONALD P. 54884..........................MILLER, ELIZABETH 30346...............................MILLER, GEORGE 36445....................................MILLER, GREG 35932....................................MILLER, JOHN 8932.....................................MILLER, RAY L. 17827...........................MILLER, ROBERT H. 36289...................................MILLER, SALLY 33299..................................MILLER, SCOTT 26097..............................MILLER, VANCE L. 33231......................................MILLER, W.M. 36969...............................MILLER, WILLIAM 17339.........................MILLER SR., JOHN E. 35013.........................MILLIGAN, JAMES D. 26326............................MILNER, WAYNE W. 35412.................................MINER, TONY R. 33511.......................................MINOR, JEFF 31952..............................MINTON, DONALD 36915.................................MISHLER, LEE L. 36738...................MITCHELL, GREGORY J. 34507.....................MITCHELL, PATRICIA B. 13732....................MITCHELL, RUSSELL N. 36064........................MITTLER, EDWARD A. 21851...............................MOE, WILLIAM H. 5985........................MOEHRING, HELEN M. 36367........................MOGENSEN, DARREL 35481........................MOHRLANT, JESSE A. 19824.....................................MOHS, HELEN 48645......................MOLTZER, ROXANN M. 37343.................................MOLTZER, RYAN 35845...................MOLZAHN, SHELDONNA 37038..........................MONAHAN, JULIE A. 34494.....MONDAY MEDIA INC., WXCE AM 55289...................................MONGIAT, ERIC 34932...........................MONSON, BRYAN L. 35478.............................MONTAG, WILLIAM 25152....MONTGOMERY EST., MERRILL C. 51712............................MOOBERRY, MARK 30152.................................MOORE, BESSIE 55169..................................MOORE, CATHY 34704...................................MOORE, ERNIE 53975..................................MOORE, JAMES 31514.............................MOORE, JAMES S. 34950..............................MOORE, THOMAS 33988.......................MOOSMANN, JACK H. 20017............................MOQUIST, EARL W. 34373.......................MORAVEC, JOSEPH E. 36393..............MORCOM BROADCASTING 36489...................MORIARITY, THOMAS M. 54981...................................MORIS, SARAH 47620..........................MORK, SHANNON D. 35474.....................MORRILL, FORREST W. 44590.......................MORRIS, CANDACE D. 18727......................................MORRIS, O.D. 32429..............................MORRISON, GARY 41274...........................MORRISON, TANNIE 14271..................MORRISSETTE, SHIRLEY 52690........................MORRISSEY, ROBERT 55480......................MORSE, RICHARD DJR 33539....................MORTENSON, JERRY S. 4419......................MORTLOCK, RAYMOND 35043...................................MOSAY, DEBRA 37368...........................MOSAY, STEPHANIE 9058..................................MOYER, JOHN D. 35354................................MUELLER, DOUG 35607......................MUELLER, WILLIAM A. 34529..............................MULLER, DEAN R. 27381...........................MULLER, NANCY A. 26866...............................MULLIN, GROVER 35133..............................MUNDIS, GARY G. 22275........................MUNSON, SAMUEL N. 32259......................MURPHEY, ROBERT K. 29370............MURPHY ESTATE, DOROTHY 3207.................................MURRAY, EARL J. 10108...............MUSCH ESTATE, DANIEL F. 39918...........................MYEFSKI, JAMES E. 45969.................................MYREN, DENISE 36607.......................NADEAU, RICHARD W. 22653........................NASH, MARGARET H. 33861..............................NASH, WILLIAM J. 36281..............NATIONAL MORTGAGE CO. 15246......................NAUGHTON, JAMES A.

645886 38L

WNAXLP Acct. # Name 34781.................................NAULT, PATRICK 36593.....................NAVARRO, RICHARD H. 15224............................NAYLOR, CALVIN E. 11487....................................NEAL, FRED L. 21680.............................NEELY, CLARENCE 21047.........................NEIHART, HAROLD F. 44096........................NEIHU INVESTMENTS 33169.................................NEITZKE, MARK 3056..............................NELSEN, ELAINE L. 46828............................NELSON, BRENT N. 49681..............................NELSON, CHAD B. 25624...........................NELSON, CURTIS L. 24163...............................NELSON, DALE E. 36279...................................NELSON, DAVE 34742.........................NELSON, DONALD R. 11176......................NELSON, DORIS CCPA 33219............................NELSON, JAMES O. 46003........................NELSON, JEFFREY C. 29041..............................NELSON, JOHN N. 31112..........................NELSON, KARL WJR 16840..............................NELSON, KEITH F. 55061..................................NELSON, MARY 12331........................NELSON, NEWMAN A. 4941..............................NELSON, NORMAN 36040........................NELSON, NORMAN L. 35744.........................NELSON, RONALD H. 9043..................................NELSON, SAM G. 15929.............................NELSON, SHARON 27198..........................NELSON, WILLIAM F. 6685.........................NELSON ESTATE, M.H. 20895............NELSON SR., THEODORE W. 36996..............................NEPPLE, SHANYN 7843.....................................NESS, DAPHNE 14023....................................NESS, PAUL M. 9518...................NESS ESTATE, ALBERT G. 8671.......................NESSER ESTATE, ROSE 31785..........................NETYS JR., GREGOR 46338...........................NEUBARTH, JOANN 36938........................NEUMAN, GERALD C. 34304..............................NEUMAN, SHELLY 26165..................................NEUMANN, K.E. 31409..........................NEWBERG, WILLIAM 22962..........................NEWELL, ROBERT L. 30464......................NEWMAN, RICHARD T. 25650........................NICHOLSON, EARL G. 36505.......NICHOLSON ESTATE, RICHARD 36433.............................NICK, DARLENE K. 29149...............................NICK, ROBERT A. 17457..................................NICKA, JOHN J. 35162............................NIELSEN, ALLAN E. 36169..............................NIELSEN, JOSEPH 34287..........................NIELSEN, RAYMOND 12542...........NIELSEN ESTATE, HARLEY C. 15862...................NIERENHAUSEN, LLOYD 37190....................................NIGRO, KATHY 52534...........................NILSSEN, JENNIFER 36452...........................NIPPOLDT, ROBERT 34077...................................NISSEN, LINDA 54588..........................NOETZEL, HERBERT 20379...........................NORCROSS, BETTY 14982............................NORD, GEORGIA C. 18847....NORDSTROM ESTATE, ELMER W. 23401......................NORGREN, GEORGE P. 53083........................NORTHROP, BRIAN K. 35791.........................NORTHWAY, JOHN C. 29954.........................NORTON, DONALD J. 53111......................NOTERMANN, ALYSSA 34956............................NOVITZKE, PAUL S. 28036..........................................NUB’S PUB 12046.................NUSS ESTATE, ALFRED H. 35833.................................NUTTING, RORY 35644.......................NUTZMANN, SONYA F. 3833.......................................OBERG, PAUL 36396............................O’BRIEN, DARYL D. 55614........................O’BRIEN, RICHARD J. 36716..............................O’BRIEN, ROBERT 51211......................................O’BRIEN, TIM 30788...........................O’CONNOR, ROGER 29863.............................ODDEN, CURTIS T. 7931. .ODEGAARD ESTATE, THEODORE A. 37899.....................OELKERS, KENNETH L. 32457..............................OGREN, JAMES C. 36849..............................OGREN, JAMES C. 54087...........................OGREN, MELISSA J. 26459....................................OIYOTTE, ANN 21165.........................OKERMAN, ALLEN E. 34949.......................OLIPHANT, ROBERT E. 37248.........................OLMSTEAD, MARK T. 35454.................................OLSEN, ALICE L. 37010...............................OLSEN, PEDER J. 52232...............................OLSON, ANDREW 11942..................................OLSON, DAGNE 32657.........................OLSON, DOUGLAS A. 38396..........................OLSON, DURRELL A. 22376..............................OLSON, EDWIN G. 15225............................OLSON, EMRIAN R. 25798.....................................OLSON, ENID, 33731..................................OLSON, GARY I. 21994.......................OLSON, HERSCHEL C. 13702...........................OLSON, HOWARD P. 47894...................................OLSON, JASON 54883...................................OLSON, LAURA 34398........................OLSON, LORRAINE N. 22775................................OLSON, MARK E. 33790..........................OLSON, MICHAEL D. 33877............................OLSON, ROBERT T. 34941...........................OLSON, RODNEY A. 13604...................................OLSON, VIRGIL 12776...........................OLSON, VIRGINIA K. 25358............................OLSON, YVONNE L. 14086.............OLSON ESTATE, ROBERT R. 16275.............OLSON ESTATE, WILLIAM A. 40028.......................OLSON JR., JAMES C.


PAGE 28 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MAY 4, 2016

NOTICE OF FORFEITURE OF FUNDS HELD BY POLK-BURNETT ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE UNLESS CLAIMED BY OWNER Pursuant to Wisconsin Statutes Section 185.03(10), you are hereby notified that Polk-Burnett Electric Cooperative, of Centuria, Wisconsin 54824, has in its possession unclaimed funds belonging to you. You can claim these funds by contacting the Cooperative and furnishing proof of your legal interest in such funds on or before

July 15, 2016. You are further notified that unless you do claim such funds and provide satisfactory evidence of your right to receive the same by July 15, 2016, these funds will be forfeited to the Cooperative. Published this 4th day of May, 2016.

UNCLAIMED CAPITAL CREDITS Acct. # Name 36052..........................OLUFSON, CAROL J. 28118................................O’MALLEY, JOHN 34987.........................OMMEN, MICHAEL J. 36585...............................O’NEAL, JERRY L. 21172.............................O’NEIL, LOUISE M. 34700.......................................O’NEIL, MIKE 35200..........................O’NEILL, PATRICK H. 23031.......................OPHEIM JR., LEWIS E. 35860..............................OPHUS, MICHAEL 35643............................O’REILLY, EDWARD 17090..............................ORFEI, SANDRA J. 35480....................................ORME, MABEL 25788...................................ORME, RUTH J. 36622...................ORMISTON, CHARLES F. 37150..................................ORSAK, RANDY 22876.........................OSBORN, CAROLINE 19089........................OSBORNE, BERNARD 9328............................OSBORNE, DORIS E. 53814.........................OSBORNE, KRISTINA 25977..............................OSGAR, MICHAEL 20931.............................OSLUND, LEON W. 20198............................OSLUND, LEOTA M. 24721.....................OSTENSON, ELAINE M. 28837........................OSTERMAN, WALTER 31819.........................OSTROWSKI, BRUCE 55007....................................OTIS, ADDIE J. 35813..................................OTIS, JAMES R. 34881....................OUELLETTE, ROBERT J. 13790.........................OVERLAND, MORRIS 41272..................................OWEN, JACK A. 32164.......................................OWEN, MIKE 2092....................................OWEN, REBA A. 27113..............................OWEN SR., SAM V. 37460................................OWINGS, KAREN 55561.................................PADOVANI, CARI 24578...........................PALADINO, FRED R. 17955....................................PALM, DALE C. 1385........................PALMSTEEN, CECIL C. 35759..................................PAQUIN, LAURA 25012........................PARENT, KENNETH J. 30932............................PARISH, ROBERT J. 22899.............................PARKIN, MARLENE 36243..............................PARSLOW, JAMES 28668......PATRICK ESTATE, FLORENCE H. 10716....................................PATSY, EMIL T. 34628..............................PATSY, ROBERT R. 35097..........................PAUKERT, LUCILE L. 1072.............................PAULSON, LLOYD B 51713...........................PAULZINE, ANGELA 33621...........................PAVKOVICH, MARIA 49896.....................................PEARCE, DAN 35452......................PEARSON, VIRGINIA A. 33555..................................PEASLEY, DALE 54201..............................PEASLEY, DALE E. 15096...........................PECHMANN, JOS H. 14712.............................PECINA, ELMER E. 35855......................PEDERSON, DENNIS A. 36926..............................PEDERSON, EARL 35380....................PEDERSON, GAROLD D. 44266....................PEDERSON, GAROLD D. 32488..................PEDERSON, RICHARD H. 34067.........PEDERSON ESTATE, PETER K. 19109...............................PEEL, ROBERT C. 35503.....................................PEKA, ELMER 33935..........................PENARD, LYNNETTE 29926...............................PENN, PHILLIP D. 15992........................PENNOYER, IRENE S. 13578................PEPERA ESTATE, GEORGE 29720...................PERRAULT’S COTTAGES 32243.................................PERRY, DAVID A. 28388..............................PERRY, EILEEN M. 36904..................PESTORIOUS, CONNIE J. 20218.....................PETERSEN, AUDREY P. 35430...................PETERSEN, EDWARD W. 20232.............................PETERSEN, RAY E. 34890..................PETERSEN, RAYMOND J. 35060..........................PETERSON, ALAN B. 36474..................PETERSON, ANTHONY A. 35506...........................PETERSON, BRUCE 26500...................PETERSON, CYNTHIA C. 34931..................PETERSON, ENGWALD V. 21247.......................PETERSON, ETHEL W. 45806.........................PETERSON, GLADYS 8088.......................PETERSON, GLADYS L. 37338.......................PETERSON, GLENN A. 17784....................PETERSON, HAROLD O. 35163........................PETERSON, HENRY J. 27564.............................PETERSON, IRIS J. 9622............................PETERSON, JACK A. 30264.............PETERSON, JACQUELINE L. 34130.......................PETERSON, JAMES R. 51594.......................PETERSON, JAMES W. 22099.....................PETERSON, JOANNE E. 14161..........................PETERSON, LESTER 34557......................PETERSON, LESTER A. 36576.........................PETERSON, LINDA L. 22300......................PETERSON, MARIAN V. 31208................................PETERSON, NEIL 29893.......................PETERSON, RICHARD 17369...................PETERSON, RICHARD A. 23694.....................PETERSON, ROBERT E. 4851......................PETERSON, ROLAND O. 14926....................PETERSON, WILLIAM C. 28733...........PETERSON ESTATE, DOREEN 8189............PETERSON ESTATE, HELEN L. 30498..........PETERSON ESTATE, LORAINE 23258.....PETERSON ESTATE, MICHAEL T. 14306.........PETERSON ESTATE, SYLVIA C. 34016.....................................PETITT, LINDA 30742........................PETRICH, ROBERT D. 37141............................PETRILLO, JACK R. 29073...................PETTERSEN, GERALD S. 53601..........................PEWAUSH, AUTUMN

Acct. # Name 31660..............................PEWAUSH, DIANA 17381.................PFAFF ESTATE, GLENN O. 17212...................PHANUEF, STANISLAU J. 20776...............PHERNETTON, DONALD D. 13198...................PHERNETTON, IRVINE J. 30940....................PHERNETTON, MARION 52191........................PHERNETTON, STEVE 36821...............................PHH HOMEQUITY 34918............................PHILLIPS, JOAN M. 20721..............................PHILLIPS, PAUL P. 33816...............................PHILLIPS, WAYNE 6428.................................PIEPER, HAROLD 12717.............................PIERCE, BARBARA 15716........................PIERCE, RICHARD W. 35306..............................PIERE, RONALD J. 7144............................PIERRE, PHYLISS M. 32186.............................PIKUS, JEROME G. 34993........................PILGRIM, CHARLES F. 37626......PITSCHNEIDER JR., ROBERT M. 54924.........................PITTMAN, JOSHUA L. 54649..................................PLANTE, LORIN 14696...........................PLOURDE, WILLIAM 31421................................PLUNG, DARWIN 33185......................................PLUTH, DAVE 32701..............................PODANY, DONALD 28959.......................POHLEN, LORRAINE I. 50130....................................POHLEN, LYLE 35396...POLK COUNTY LAND SURVEYING 36110...........................POLLNOW, TODD E. 17044..........................POLLREIS, HENRY J. 24682...........................POLSON, LLOYD W. 16367.......................POMERLEAU, FERD E. 27872........................POMERLEAU, JOANN 32756.....................POMERLEAU, MIKEL J. 37602.......................................POOLE, MAX 20640...............................PORETTI, PAUL E. 35512...................................POSEY, DEBBIE 47024....................................POTVIN, ALICE 22390........................PRATHER, LORRAINE 52654........................................PRAX, DALE 13687..........................PREBLE, DONALD E. 18000......................................PRELL, JOAN 31969............PRESCOTT SR., HOWARD A. 12679................................PREUS, DAVID H. 28034..................................PRICE, LARRY I. 9171...............................PRIEBE, BERNARD 30183.............................PRINGLE, JEANNE 22816..........................PROCAI, MARDELLE 23688.............PROSPAL, JANET (MRS. ED) 28609..............................PROUSE, FRED D. 34249...........................PRZYBIL, JAMES R. 34327.........................PSYHOS, MARSHA J. 7934..........................PUCKETT, GERALD R. 33444.......................................PULFER, R.L. 18784........................PULVER, MICHAEL G. 33842........QUALITY LUBE & RENTAL LTD. 14578............................QUAST, HAROLD J. 35104...............................QUAYLE, MARY L. 30933........................................QUEE, JACK 9013.............................QUIGLEY, JAMES B. 25298.............................QUINN, BERNEICE 43733................................QUIST, RICHARD 18098..............................QUIST, STEVEN G. 34620.....................................RAABE, RUTH 36045..................................RABOIN, RAY A. 36069.......RACETTE ESTATE, PATRICIA M. 6398................RACHNER ESTATE, IOLA M. 24668..........................RADDATZ, RICHARD 17979...................................RAMSEY, ARNE 15558.......................RAMSTAD, ROBERT L. 37271...............................RAND, MELVIN H. 19796.....................RANDOLPH, LAURETTA 36673......................................RAPP, KAREN 32051.......................RAPPLEY, WILLIAM C. 33058.....................RASMUSSEN, ANDREW 33402......................RASMUSSEN, MARIAN 20266........................RASSETT, FLORENCE 33982..........................RATHBONE, JOHN L. 36257..............................RATZLAFF, JERRY 36182..................................RAYBURN, ROY 36042.......................RECTOR, CHARLES L. 35044..................................RECTOR, KEVIN 19583...................................REDIG, STEN E. 35841.................................REED, JAMES D. 34992.................................REED, NANCY A. 33492.............................REEVE, LORRAINE 44870...................REICHEL, MARCELLA K. 30031.....................................REID, JOHN L. 5886..................................REIDER, JOHN S. 33942..........................REIGOTTIE JR., BILL 34285....................REINECCIUS, ROGER E. 35195.............................REINHART, BRUCE 38133.........RELANDER ESTATE, LAVONNE 35338....................REMJESKE, THOMAS E. 34435........................REMPERT, JOSEPH P. 36790........................RENNINGER, JOHN E. 14439................................RESH, JOSEPH F. 24292............................REYNOLDS, LARRY 55213....................................RHODE, ERICA 28966...........................RHODE, RONALD R. 34147...................................RHODES, JACK 35938.........................................RICCI, NICK 32707......RICE LAKE TOURISM & RENTAL 8751............................RICHARD, HELEN M. 54086..................RICHARDSON, QUINTON 29962......................................RICHERT, J.D. 33801.........................RICHERT JR., JAMES 34727...........................RICHTER, KERRY D. 15367.........................RIDDELL, GERALD R. 32906..................................RIEBE, JULIA A. 29822..................................RIEDELL, EDITH 12870..........RIEMENSCHNEIDER, NINA M. 42282...........................RIKKOLA, SCOTT A.

Acct. # Name 12111...................................RILEY, EUGENE 35449.............................RILEY, THOMAS H. 36387.....................RINGHAND, THOMAS J. 14226.........................RINGOLD, DOUGLAS 55070......................................RIOPEL, AMY 11707..........................RITSCHEL JAMES A. 36930..................................RIVARD, LEE M. 29168...............................RIVARD, MARCEL 54471.....................ROADWAY SURFACING 25859...........................ROATCH, BEATRICE 5972.......................ROBERTS, CHARLES S. 53292.....................ROBERTS, NICHOLE M. 32375.....................ROBERTSON, DAVID M. 33405.............................ROBERTSON, ORV 26169......................ROBINSON, SEYMOUR 30584.............................ROBISON, CARL R. 34083.............................ROBOTTI, LUKE M. 4090..............................ROCKAWAY, LEWIS 50329..................RODRIGUEZ, CHRISTINA 30789.............................RODRIGUEZ, PAUL 17486...............................ROE, NORMAN C. 36799....................ROEHRICK, DONALD C. 16598......................ROESSLER, MARTIN D. 26665........................ROGERS, DELORES I. 44027..............................ROGERS, GERALD 30698..................ROGERS ESTATE, MABEL 2583...................................ROHR, EDDIE D. 30311........................ROHRICHT, MICHAEL 36597....................ROLFSON, GREGORY A. 35705.........................ROMBACH, THOMAS 10166.........................RONYAK, WILLIAM T. 42499.......................................ROOT, DIANA 36640...........................RORK, FREDRICK J. 31067.....................................ROSE, ROBBY 25212.............................ROSE, RONALD W. 28018...........................ROSENBUSH, JUNE 40043................................ROSS, JANICE E. 51325.............................ROSS, MICHAEL J. 34334.........................................ROTH, JEFF 32607..................ROUND LAKE POW WOW 34655...............................ROUSSIN, LLOYD 30723..........................ROWLAND, DAVID A. 36294.................................RUD, MAXINE D. 32314....................................RUDE, LYLE W. 37140...........................RUNNING, GARY W. 35992......................RUSHMEYER, GARY G. 34169......................RUSSELL, DARLENE K. 54357.........................................RUST, JOSH 36485..................RUTLEDGE SR., ROBERT 35461...............................RUUD, BERNARD 36308...........................RYAN, GREGORY C. 9663....................................RYAN, JAMES L. 44031.................................... RYAN, TOM A. 34790.......................S & L CONSTRUCTION 36397......................................S & M FAMILY 49734...................................SABLAK, JULIE 30466..............................SAGER, JAMES W. 46754................................SAIKO, JAMES J. 480..................SALSCHEIDER EST., MARIE 20350.....SALSCHEIDER EST., ROSEMARY 30676............................SANCHEZ, SERAPH 13129........................SANDA ESTATE, PAUL 21383.................SANDBECK, GREGORY N. 10783............................SANDBERG, IDA M. 28626...........................SANDERS, EUGENE 35773.............................SANDMANN, GARY 54847...........................SANFORD, DAVID A. 35193...............................SANFORD, JACKI 33239.................SANFORD JR., WALTER E. 35483................................SAROS, MARION 32102.....................................SAROS, RUBY 37930............................SAROS, THOMAS J. 36425...................................SATHER, KEITH 30965................................SAUER, GEORGE 9271.......................SAUNDERS, WALTER B. 32097....SAVAGE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 35114........................SAVAGEAU, STEPHEN 32805...................................SAX, ROGER G. 35048........................SAYERS, LEONARD J. 34898...............................SAYLOR, JOHN L. 28341...............................SAYRE, LOREN P. 37134............................SCANLON, DEAN A. 54644...................................SCHAAF, CASSI 36735...........................SCHAAF, ROBYN M. 31687..........SCHAFENACKER, ROBERT C. 34224..............................SCHAFER, ROY H. 20279...............................SCHAFFER, EBBA 35537........................SCHAIBLE, DEWEY R. 53211..................................SCHAKE, ERVIN 34568...........................SCHALET, PHILIP B. 35530....SCHAREIN ESTATE, RAYMOND H. 11776..................................SCHEID, WM. C. 31881....................SCHEMBER, GEORGE F. 36097.....................SCHEMEHORN, LISA D. 34590........................SCHERLING, EUGENE 36410..............................SCHEUBLE, TODD 29824................SCHILF ESTATE, MARIA A. 35976.......................SCHILLING, DOLORES 34464.........................SCHILLING, EUGENE 30544.........................SCHILTGEN, STEVEN 30326..................................SCHIPPER, ROY 24237.........................SCHIRE, LEONARD F. 36578...................SCHIRMER, WALLACE F. 27640...............................SCHLAPPER, KIM 29604...................SCHLICHTING, WAIVE A. 5436..................................SCHLIEF ESTATE 12434.......SCHMALZBAUER EST., JOHN J. 35053........................SCHMIDT, CLARENCE 31441........................SCHMIDT, DENNIS W. 28506................................SCHMIDT. KELLY 34849....................SCHMIDT SR., LARRY L. 33083.......................SCHMITT, MICHAEL R. 34673....................SCHMOLL, WALLACE P.

Acct. # Name 33650...................SCHNEIDER, DONALD L. 34354..................SCHNEIDER, MICHAEL J. 36889....................SCHNEIDER, ROBERT J. 36026.......................SCHNEIDER, WARREN 34074.......................SCHNIER, WILLIAM R. 32698.......................SCHOLL, BRADLEY R. 31556..............................SCHOLL, JOANNE 36027.....................SCHOMMER, KAREN L. 19498...........................SCHOONOVER, J.R. 29150........................SCHREINER, JOHN G. 35560...........SCHROEPFER, THEODORE J. 37590......................SCHULTZ, BARBARA J. 14502.....................SCHULTZ, BLANCHE A. 14040...................SCHULTZ, CLARENCE F. 36498................................SCHULTZ, DAVID 23271.......................SCHULTZ, GENEVIEVE 36761..............................SCHULTZ, JOEL L. 11999.............................SCHULTZ, JOHN A. 13252.............................SCHULTZ, JOHN J. 31833....................SCHULTZ, LORRAINE H. 30585............................SCHULTZ, ROBERT 31914...........................SCHULTZ, STANLEY 12596.................SCHUWEILER, JOSEPH J. 10659......................SCHWABE, ARTHUR J. 30534...............SCHWARTZLOW, DORIS B. 30605..................SCHWEDERSKE, PIERRE 31101.........................SCHWEITZER, DAVID 24742.................SCHWEITZER, DONALD J. 9696..................SCHWEPPE ESTATE, EMIL 19228........................SCHWORER, GLADYS 22731.....................................SCOTT, KEITH 46357................................SEAMAN, JERRY 36003............................SEARS, WILLIAM D. 18569.....................................SEBION, EARL 35531.....................................SEBION LE, R. 23371............................SEE, MILLICENT M. 44131......................SEIFFERT, WILLARD A. 45679.....................................SEILER, LUKE 19202..............................SELVIG, ABNER O. 36091..............SELZLER EXCAVATION INC. 21992.........................SEMINAR, JOSEPH J. 55477...................................SENSKE, TONY 30644.............................SEVERIN, ROLAND 36518.....................SEVERSON, JEROME L. 53711...........................SEVERSON, LAURIE 18610..........................SHANLEY, CHARLES 36388......................................SHAW, BRIAN 45302...................................SHEA III, DAVID 12486...........................SHEARER, BRENDA 34442..............................SHEASBY, WENDY 31471.........................SHEESER, JEANNINE 33101.............................SHIELDS, HAROLD 53617.............................SHIFFER, DANA M. 54823..................................SHORESOX LLC 50337..........................SHORTESS, RYAN S. 7342..........................SHRIDER, FLORENCE 22694...............................SHULZ, RICHARD 32223..........................SIBINSKI, PHILLIP J. 36131..................................SIEBEN, NEIL A. 29274......................................SIECK, KEITH 32357......................SIGSWORTH, VERNON 31296............SIGSWORTH JR., GEORGE V. 35819.......................................SILER, JIM A. 20581.......................SIMMONS, GERALD E. 36980.............................SIMONSON, DAVID 17704.......................SIMPSON, ROBERT W. 36054.........................SINNOTT, JOSEPH E. 35944............................SIREN LIONS CLUB 32586.........................SITTER ESTATE, A.W. 24962........................SJOBECK, ROGER W. 35477..............................SKINAWAY, MAVIS 26304.............................SKINNER, JOHN V. 12093.......................SKOLD ESTATE, KARL 36004............SKRYPEK ESTATE, RICHARD 21739............................SKYDIVE OSCEOLA 18244...................SLAUGHTER, LORRAINE 29754...............................SLAVIK, FRANCIS 35593......................SLAWTER, CAMILLE S. 24835................................SLOAN, JOHN W. 24671..................................SMILEY, LAURA 34300...........................SMITH, BARBARA P. 35323.....................................SMITH, CINDY 32434............................SMITH, CLAUDIA R. 30838................................SMITH, HELEN D. 35496....................................SMITH, IRVING 30441...............................SMITH, JAMES R. 34814...............................SMITH, KATHRYN 34806...........................SMITH, RICHARD E. 34563......................SMITH JR., ROBERT S. 34973..............................SMITH, ROXANNE 6966......................SMITH ESTATE, EARL G. 35325..................................SMITH JR., DAN 54521.............................SMITTY’S SALOON 13988................................SMUELES, MARY 36933............................SNIDER, BERNARD 26764.......................SNIPSTEAD, RICHARD 34535................................SNOREK, DUANE 35627.................................SNOW, SANDI H. 55679.................................SNYDER, SCOTT 29426............................SOBOL, JOSEPH A. 16036..................SODERBERG, AUSTOR T. 27785....................SODERQUIST, RICHARD 27902............SOEBBING, JACQUELINE M. 51307.............................SOHOLT, LAVAUNE 12862...............................SOLBERG, EMILY 26593..................SOLFIELD ESTATE, GARY 34279...................................SONKA, LEO E. 23410..............................SONNACK, ALF C. 36723...........................SONSALLA, LUKE J. 46140............................SOPER, GERALD C. 54846..........................SORENSON, JENICE 34176......................SORSOLEIL, VIVIAN M. 32341.......................SOURDIFF, JERALD E.

645887 38L

WNAXLP Acct. # Name 37097....................SPALINGER, BRENDA L. 32733....................SPANGLER, DONALD D. 11769................................SPANGLER, RITA 33789..............................SPENNY, EDWARD 9464.................................SPERL, WINFRED 9493...................SPIEGELBERG, ELMER B. 36941.................................SPIES, ALLEN D. 13418...................................SPIESS, SYLVIA 33542............................SPOUSTA, GARY G. 25492.........................SPRAGUE, DUANE A. 28213......................SPRINGER, BERTHA A. 28075....................ST. PETER, BERNARD V. 9541...............................ST. PIERRE, DAVID 35685.............................STACK, MORRIS E. 27165.........................STADLER, GERALD J. 28396..................................STADLER, JOEL 36527........................STANDISH, CALVIN G. 36009...........................STANEK, JOSEPH J. 25430...........................STANGER, MARTHA 36196.........................STANGLER, DAVID H. 36591...............................STANKE, DEAN P. 32829.....................STANNARD, GEORGE J. 37316.........................STANTON, MONTY D. 35719.................................STARIHA, JERRY 21007........................STARIHA, STANLEY R. 12637...................................STARUP BROS. 31737......................STAUNER JR., PAUL C. 53812...................................STAVES, JAMIE 55117.................................STEEBER, TODD 35427.............................STEEGE, LLOYD C. 51001...............................STEERE, NATHAN 50178........................STEFFEN, JEREMY D. 8203..............................STEIN, CLINTON W. 33475.............................STEINES, DELORIS 34771..........................STEINHOFF, BONNIE 15189............................STEPHAN, DARWIN 32302........................STEPHAN, JOLENE L. 14529.............STEPHAN ESTATE, AUDREY 33108..............................STERN, KENNETH 33893......................STERNER, MICHAEL D. 16590.........................STEVENS, ALBERT R. 33582.............................STEVENS, BERTHA 34820.......................STEVENS, MARILYN J. 32895................STEVENS SR., THOMAS H. 24207.................STEVENSON, RICHARD E. 36646..................STEWART, MARGARET A. 32292.........STEWART ESTATE, LOWELL G. 36217.....................STILLMAN, GEORGE W. 34874......................STODOLA JR., RUDY F. 48948..........................STOFFELS, JEFFREY 21779.......................................STOKES, JIM 13815..........................................STONE, F.J. 2060..................................STONE, LUCILLE 35313...............................STONE, MARILYN 23435.................................STONE, MAXINE 34447......................STORDAHL, MELFORD 35996..............................STRACK, ROBERT 33835....................................STRAIT, PAULA 13873......................................STRAND, H.D. 53326......................STRASBURG, GILBERT 36363........................STRASSER, STACY R. 35462..............................STREETER, MARK 31772......................STREICH, MICHAEL W. 35132.........................STREITZ, JEROME A. 4921...............................STRENKE, ALBERT 36829...............................STROM, DAVID H. 18759....................STROMBERG, JAMES E. 22670...............STROMBERG, SUSANNE J. 35283....................STROMBERG JR., DALE 12959...................STROMEN, SHERMAN K. 35186...........................STRUSZ, ROBERT F. 21296...............................STUB, ROBERT T. 34746....................STUDEMAN, MARVIN G. 31740..........................SULLIVAN, MICHAEL 30046...................................SUMMER DAZE 47382........................SUNDBERG, ROBERT 36101......................SUNDERLAND, BRUCE 53016...........................SUTTON, LAUREL J. 33611......................SVOBODA, LAVONE M. 33216...........................SWAGGER, CONNIE 12642...............................SWANK, DONALD 30837...........................SWANSON, BONNIE 35661.......................SWANSON, DANIEL D. 36202.....................SWANSON, DONALD O. 4727.......................SWANSON, LUCILLE M. 29012..................................SWANSON, O.H. 35605..........................SWANSON, THOMAS 35859..............................SWANSON, WADE 23225.......................SWARD, JERRAULD A. 33752.....................SWENSON, ANDREW S. 37100......................SWENSON, ROBERT J. 13532.....................SWIONTEK, ARTHUR R. 25235......................SWONGER, GERALD E. 30609......................SYCHOWSKI, JEROME 19151............................SYLTE, LAVERNE R. 33968........................SYVERSON, RUSSELL 19439.............................SYVERTS, WALTER 20631.........................TAGG, LAWRENCE E. 43979................................TALBERG, MARK 52430.............................TALMADGE, CHAD 37423..........................TANGEN, ANGELA L. 17553...........................TANGEN, ROBERT I. 34195......................TARNOWSKI, DIANE M. 24050........................TAYLOR, BEATRICE S. 31652...................................TAYLOR, IRENE 35017........................TAYLOR, KENNETH J. 35073...............................TAYLOR, TROY M. 30418............TAYLOR ESTATE, GEORGE F. 13748..............TAYLOR ESTATE, HAZEL M. 30953...................................TERRY, DENNIS 13149........................TERRY ESTATE, JOHN 31812..............................TESMER, JOHN A. 36706...............................TESTER, DANA R.


MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 29

Siren’s Encore! program offers showcase for student art

Siren High School’s annual Encore! program, highlighting the artistic talents of students, was held Tuesday, April 26, at the performance center. Artwork by students was on display in the school’s commons area for visitors to view before and after the musical performances in the auditorium.

Photos by Renae Paulson

A group presentation of “Dave Barry Slept Here: Assorted History of the United States,” by Dave Barry, was part of the Siren Encore! program. Shown in no particular order are Hannah Skold, Lizzie Stanford, Emily Stiemann and Allie Webster.

Alexi Gloodt performed “Love Leads to Battle,” by G. B. Buononcini.

Madisyn Jones’ “Recycled” project was a dress she created for the school’s FCCLA program.

Emily Stiemann performed a flute solo, “Sonata in F major,” by Georg Philipp, during the annual Encore! presentation at Siren on Tuesday evening, April 26. Becky Wicklund was the accompanist.

NOTICE OF FORFEITURE OF FUNDS HELD BY POLK-BURNETT ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE UNLESS CLAIMED BY OWNER Pursuant to Wisconsin Statutes Section 185.03(10), you are hereby notified that Polk-Burnett Electric Cooperative, of Centuria, Wisconsin 54824, has in its possession unclaimed funds belonging to you. You can claim these funds by contacting the Cooperative and furnishing proof of your legal interest in such funds on or before

July 15, 2016. You are further notified that unless you do claim such funds and provide satisfactory evidence of your right to receive the same by July 15, 2016, these funds will be forfeited to the Cooperative. Published this 4th day of May, 2016.

UNCLAIMED CAPITAL CREDITS Acct. # Name 43872.................................TETZLAFF, MIKE 49558........THE WILDCARD STEAKHOUSE 21618.............................THEES, ROBERT F. 35561......................................THEISEN, A.J. 31917.............................THESENGA, JON P. 36352............................THIBODO, JOHN W. 36318................................THIEL, DANIEL F. 16730.........THOENNES ESTATE, NORMAN 35516.............................THOMAS, DONALD 53974..............................THOMAS, JAYSUN 32857............................THOMAS, MICHAEL 31665...........................THOMAS, ROBERTA 33734.......................THOMAS, STEPHEN R. 26282........................THOMAS, WILLIAM A. 54974..........................THOMPSON, CALVIN 35255........................THOMPSON, CHAD A. 33207.........................THOMPSON, DEBBIE 42814.....................THOMPSON, DEBORAH 19434..........................THOMPSON, DON E. 23046........................THOMPSON, EUGENE 35398......................THOMPSON, FLOYD K. 21854..................THOMPSON, GORDON J. 10205.................THOMPSON, HOWARD M. 32598.......................THOMPSON, JERRY L. 31625.........................THOMPSON, LONNIE 11867....................THOMPSON, MARVIN D. 31698.........................THOMPSON, STEVEN 20967...........................THOMSEN, ESTHER 32482.....................THOMSEN, WARREN A. 30632....................THORNBURG, BETTY R. 11146......................THORNBURG, JOSEPH 16694......................THORNTON, JAMES O. 11818...................THORSBAKKEN, ELMER 24054.............................THURY, JOSEPH L. 33241...........................TIDMAN, RAYMOND 26507............................TIMM, DOUGLAS J. 54912.........................TIMMER, MICHAEL J. 35933...................................TODD, JUDY R. 55115..................................TODD, ROBERT 9973.......................TOLLEFSON, THERESA 54259............TOMMERDAHL, CHARLES B. 36253...........................TOOZE, JEFFREY J. 35603....................................TOSTON, RICK 14997............................TOTH, LEONARD E. 25957..................TOWNSEND, CONROY C. 35615.................................TRACY, GENE A. 9572........................TRAVIS, ELIZABETH D. 31328.....................................TRI, KENNETH 48461..........................TRUDELL, CHARLES 36910.............................TRUITT, LAUREL J. 36856...........................TRUMAN, MICHAEL 33512...........................TSCHIDA, JAMES G. 20764..........................TSCHIDA, KENNETH 29560...................TSCHIDA, MARCELLA C. 35437.......................TSCHURL, JEFFREY J.

Acct. # Name 33031.............................TURNQUIST, GARY 33003..................TURNVALL, MITCHELL B. 34426.................................TVETEN, DONNA 37387................................TYLEE, STEPHEN 12252..............................UBER, LOWELL D. 19851............................ULRICH, EVELYN G. 21300..................UNDIS ESTATE, HELEN T. 20674.........UNITED STATES POST OFFICE 35858....................UROSEVICH, STEVEN L. 14901...........................USSELMAN, GEO H. 37548............................UTGARD, BRADY J. 7003............................................UTOFT, ALF 14641......................UTOFT ESTATE, EVALD 16488............................VALLANT, BENIGNA 11858................VAN DE WALKER, ESTLEO 31426..........................VAN NEVEL, GARY F. 33767..........................VAN PELT, CRAIG W. 33665........VAN RUDEN ESTATES, ALFRED 21154...............VAN SOMEREN, EVELYN L. 17560.....................VAN STONE, DEBORAH 33738...............VAN VONDEREN, JEFFREY 22138.........................VANASSE, LEONARD 35670.............VANDER WYST, MICHAEL P. 12183.........................VANDERGON, DON L. 33531.............................VANGEN, LARRY F. 29092...............................VAUGHAN, MARY 30358........................VERNON, RICHARD L. 33343.............................VERSTEGEN, NICK 35862.............................VETERANS ADMIN. 17223..................VETTE ESTATE, FRANK J. 34910..............................VIDEEN, REVEY R. 37018..............................VIDERVOL, IGNAC 39130...........................VIEBROCK, HEIDI L. 32995...................................VILLA, ANDRES 25959........................................VIX, LONNIE 36128..........................VOBEDA, CHERYL L. 31923..................................VOGT, NORMAN 1086.......................VOGT ESTATE, MARTIN 35881.......................VOLKMANN, DAVID W. 38599.......................W & S TRUCKING INC. 14245.......................................WADE, REBA 35494..................................WADE, SANDRA 35387...........................WADE, SHANNON L. 53162.......................................WAHL, CURT 14452..............WAHLSTRAND, HAROLD D. 2400............................WAHLSTROM, CARL 21444...................WAKEFIELD, TERESA M. 17200.............................WAKEMEUP, FRED 27294......................WALBERG, FLORINE F. 30368..........................WALBERG, VERNON 31419.............................WALBY, CARDINAL 30799..............................WALDELAND, JON 28171..................WALDRON, DOROTHY M. 33991...........................WALKER, JESSIE B. 15414..........................WALKER, LONNIE R.

Acct. # Name 8401..................................WALKER JR., L.T. 35914...........................WALKUP, ROGER C. 14864.............................WALLACE, JENNIE 34150....................WALLANDER, RICHARD 17465............................WALSH, GERALD A. 36973...........................WALSH, THOMAS E. 30383.......................WALSH ESTATE, JOHN 42797......................................WALTER, C.S. 33066........................WALTON, DERRICK E. 35825...........................WALTON, KELLEY J. 52493......................................WANG, DAVID 6713....................................WARD, JOHN E. 46319.............................WARD, LAURINE L. 33140........................................WARD, PETE 37320.................................WARLAND, JEFF 35595........................WARNER, CHARLENE 33196...................WASHBURN, PATRICK D. 13685..........................WATERMAN, ELAINE 33307..........................WATSON, DANIEL W. 7634.................................WATSON, ELOISE 34438.......................WATTERS, ROBERT N. 23547.............................WAUGEN, PHOEBE 36961..................................WEAVER, DAVID 36590............................WEAVER, JAMES R. 18785...........................WEBBER, ELVINA C. 15192.................................WEBER, LILLIAN 55250....................................WEBER, MARY 55013....................................WEBLER, RON 36970...........................WEBSTER, ROBERT 21540......................WEBSTER, WILLIAM R. 29120........................................WEEKS, RAY 35267..............................WEGNER, PAUL J. 32096......................WEGWERTH, ALLEN R. 52321...................WEINHOLZER, SCOTT A. 36957..........................WELCH, MICHAEL P. 11069............................WELKE, EUGENE E. 26852.............................WELLS, BONNIE K. 36222...........................WELLS, RICHARD L. 28693.............................WELTER, JAMES L. 23621...........................WENDT, HOWARD F. 27980.................................WENNER, LOUIS 28699................WENNERSTROM, JOAN E. 22800....................................WENZEL, RITA 4801........................................WERDIER, ED 31924........................WESNER, JOSEPH W. 35120...................WESSELS, PENELOPE L. 31385......................................WEST, MARIE 34960.........................WESTLING, STEVE P. 12514...........................WESTLUND, VALE I. 9660..................................WESTPHAL, W.E. 24047....................WESTREM, DOUGLAS J. 8118.......................................WEY, CECIL C. 35279.......................WHALEN, TERENCE J. 54238................................WHITE, MICHAEL 32201................................WHITE, VIRGIL S.

Acct. # Name 13478..............WHITE ESTATE, DONALD A. 37255......................WHITESELL, FRANK B. 54549......................................WIANT, JOHN 6012........................WICHELMAN, WALTER 34971................................WICKER, JARI R. 23672........................WICKER, WILLIAM M. 6175...................WIECHMANN, PEARLE M. 36999.......................WIECKS, GREGORY A. 9858........................WIKARSKI, EDWARD J. 9109...............................WILBER, WAYNE E. 16318.............................WILDES, SYLVIA A. 15309......................WILDHAGEN, DAISY B. 36786................................WILDMAN, ALAN 23965....................................WILEY, LESA T. 46924............................WILEY, MARGARET 38502.........................................WILKIE, TIM 5344..............................WILLE, GEORGE W. 34069...............................WILLES, MARK H. 25924...................................WILLIAMS, C.D. 31695...................................WILLIAMS, C.T. 53621......................WILLIAMS, CHRISTINE 35963...........................WILLIAMS, DAVID P. 35829.........................WILLIAMS, DONNA L. 34882...................WILLIAMS, FREDRICK B. 33103........................WILLIAMS, GLORIA A. 35357.................................WILLIAMS, JEFF 37448..........................WILLIAMS, KELLY R. 21130......................WILLIAMS, LORRAYNE 35152...........................WILLIAMS, TROY R. 54227......................WILLIAMS, WILLIAM C. 17134.........WILLIAMS ESTATE, WILBUR R. 53951........................WILLIAMSON, ELOISE 45845.............................WILNER, RICHARD 36067..................................WILSON, CHRIS 33389...............................WILSON, JACK B. 34936..............................WILSON, MARKUS 90426..........................WILSON, ROBERT B. 34382..................................WILSON, ROBIN 36247..................................WILSON, ROBIN 30686................................WILSON JR., TED 27578............WILSON ESTATE, HAROLD J. 37379..........WILSON/SWENSON/HETFELD 34543................WILTERMUTH, PATRICK G. 36375................................WINCH, GERALD 32364.....................WINCHELL, ROLAND H. 35730...................WINCHESTER, JAMES R. 55124................WINDBIEL, CHRISTOPHER 21327......WINEGARDEN EST., MARCELLA 32516.........................WINHOLTZ, MARK H. 22207........................WINSLOW, ERNEST L. 11224..........................WINTER, GEORGE A. 9416..................................WINTON, CRANE 55097..................................WISTAD, CALEB 52117................................WISTROM, MASA 30470......................WOESSNER, JAMES R.

645888 38L

WNAXLP Acct. # Name 34039.....................WOHLFEIL, WILLIAM C. 2494...............................WOLD, VIRGINIA P. 37622....................................WOLDEN, M.A. 5568......................................WOLF, CARL J. 36612................................WOLF, MARTIN J. 31415...............................WOLSKE, ROGER 22607................WOLTER ESTATE, ALVIN R. 53954.......................WOLTMANN, SHIRLEY 36377...............................WOLVERT, JAMES 16816....................................WOOD, VERNA 21158..............WOODARD-TURCH, RENEE 46881................WOODRUFF LLC, HARVEY 32939...........................WOODS & ROBISON 37369..................WORACHEK, TIMOTHY L. 35872............................WORKMAN, MILLIE 31646......................................WRIGHT, DAN 55183.................................WRIGHT, JASON 40307..............WRIGHT ESTATE, SUSAN E. 29213....................................WRUCK, GARY 24457.........................WUKAWITZ, GARY A. 35529....................................WYLIE, JENNY 35482..............................WYMAN, ALLEN J. 54191.........................WYNVEEN, MICHAEL 34630.......................WYROSTEK, SHANE T. 28974.......................YAEGER, RICHARD M. 21005...................................YARES, ELAINE 34945.................................YODER, JACK E. 35673......................YORKS, MARSHALL C. 21107.........................YOUNG, BERNICE M. 34213............................YOUNG, LESTER A. 11889..........................YOUNG, ROBERT M. 35521................YOUNGFLESH, RAYMOND 24564.....................................YTZEN, IDA H. 20508.........ZACCO, JOSEPH F., #236 OR 2 34935............ZACHARY, CHRISTOPHER B. 34632...............................ZART, WILLIAM D. 36071.......................ZEALLEY, PATRICIA A. 35810.................................ZEHM, SUELLEN 49096....................................ZELINSKI, KIM 36664.............................ZEMKE, BONNIE J. 36249..........................ZEMKE, RONALD W. 4811.................................ZENK, ROBERT E. 43103..................................ZIEGLER, JOHN 35915............................ZIEMANN, GEORGE 29776.....................................ZIESKA, RETA 33534................................ZILLMER, ALLAN 29110.........................................ZINN, GARY 31505...............................ZIPOY, GREGORY 32828.................................ZOBEL, ROBERT 36619..................ZOLLICOFFER, MARC M. 9596.........................ZUEHLKE, ROBERT B.


PAGE 30 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MAY 4, 2016

The Leader

Connect to your community AGRICULTURAL/FARMING SERVICES OUR HUNTERS WILL PAY TOP $$$ TO HUNT YOUR LAND. Call for a free Base Camp Leasing info packet and quote. 866-309-1507, www. BaseCampLeasing.com. (CNOW)

HEALTH AND BEAUTY IF YOU HAD HIP OR KNEE REPLACEMENT SURGERY AND SUFFERED AN INFECTION between 2010 and the present time, you may be entitled to compensation. Call attorney Charles H. Johnson, 800535-5727. (CNOW)

MISCELLANEOUS

HELP WANTED - TRUCK DRIVER $1,500 SIGN-ON! Experienced CDL A drivers wanted! $50-$55K annually! Regional running lanes, home every week and great benefits package. Call 844-339-5444 Apply online, www.DriveForRed.com. (CNOW) MARTEN TRANSPORT, NOW HIRING DRIVERS FOR DEDICATED & REGIONAL RUNS! Dedicated fleet, top pay, new assigned equipment, monthly bonuses. Weekly hometime! CDL-A, 6 mos. OTR exp. req’d. EEOE/AAP. Limited positions! Apply today! 866-370-4476, www. drive4marten.com. (CNOW) HOME WEEKENDS CHOOSE THE TOTAL PACKAGE. Regional runs available. Auto detention pay after 1 hr! Top pay, benefits; mthly. bonuses & more! CDL-A, 6 mos. exp. req’d. EEOE/AAP. 866-322-4039, www.drive4marten.com. (CNOW)

G

646055 38Lp 28ap

ADVERTISE HERE! Advertise your product or recruit an applicant in over 178 Wisconsin newspapers across the state! Only $300/week. That’s $1.68 per paper! Call this paper or 800-227-7636, www.cnaads. com. (CNOW) BIG WOOD - THICK BAR TOPS, Sq. timbers, round logs, log siding, 1x8 pine car siding .56 cents linear foot. log wall kits. www.LogHomeMart. com, 800-426-1002. (CNOW)

HELP WANTED - SALES EARN $500 A DAY: Insurance agents needed • Leads, no cold calls • Commissions paid daily • Lifetime renewals • Complete training • Health & dental insurance • Life license required. Call 888-713-6020. (CNOW)

U DE CA R S ’ Y R A 10% OFF FE For Seniors Daily

OPEN MOTHER’S DAY 7 A.M. - 2 P.M. HOURS: 7 a.m. - 2 p.m. Daily Formerly Main Street Cafe

7721 West Main St. • Siren, WI

715-349-2536

for their loyalty and effort in supporting local contractors for their construction project.

Come on out and play golf early, then join us in the Country Club following your round! SATURDAY, MAY 7, at 3:00 P.M. HORS D’OEUVRES AND SNACKS PROVIDED Great opportunity for past & present members to get together, reconnect and have FUN! PUBLIC WELCOME

Ladies Best “Southern Belle” Hat Contest!

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Wishes to thank

PUBLIC AUCTION: Monday, May 9, 2016, 9:15 a.m. Balsam Lake Mini Storage, Balsam Lake, WI, 800-2363072. Personal effects, household goods and misc. items belonging to the following: Mike Gabele BA13. 3738Lc PUBLIC AUCTION: Monday, May 9, 2016, 9:50 a.m. Luck Mini Storage, Luck, WI, 800-236-3072. Personal effects, household goods and misc. items belonging to the following: Jackie Burns LK33. 37-38Lc CENTRAL BOILER CERTIFIED CLASSIC EDGE OUTDOOR WOOD FURNACE: The perfect combination of performance and value. Call today! Northwest Wisconsin Ent. 715-6353511 or 715-520-7477. 38-40Lc

1520 South Shore Drive Luck, WI

LUCK GOLF COURSE

10th Hole at Danbury

On County Rd. U 1 mile West Of Hwy. 35 between Danbury & Webster

Golf Course

*

Co. Rd. U

715-866-7107

ow Yell ke La

OPEN DAILY AT 8 A.M.

Webster

CHEF PAUL’S WEDNESDAY SPECIALS! 645169 26-27a-e 37-38L

KENTUCKY DERBY PARTY

Dr. Daniel C. Satterlund Family Eye Clinic 304 1st St. So. Luck, Wis.

Hours: Tues., Thurs., Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Phone (715) 472-2121 Eye health exams, glaucoma checks, foreign body removal, full line of street wear, safety and sport wear, contact lenses

• Commercial Printing • Office Supplies • Daily UPS Pickup • Fax & Copy Service See us for all your printing needs.

INTER-COUNTY COOPERATIVE PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION iccpaonline.com

AUSTIN LAKE GREENHOUSE & FLOWER SHOP • WEDDING BOUQUETS • FUNERAL DESIGNS • CUT FLOWERS • GIFTS • BALLOONS • BEDDING PLANTS • POTTED PLANTS • TUXEDO RENTAL BY SAVVI • ANTLER KING PRODUCTS Hwy. 35 & “FF,” Webster Flowers Phoned Anywhere

MOM’S BREAKFAST HALF PRICE ON MOTHER’S DAY AT THE LODGE 24226 1st Ave. No. Siren, WI Local Movie Line 715-349-8888 timberstheatres.com

SHOW TIMES FOR FRI., MAY 6 THRU THURS., MAY 12

GOD’S NOT DEAD 2 Rated PG, 120 Minutes Fri.-Sat.: 1:00 & 4:30 p.m.; Sun.: 1:00 & 4:30 p.m.; Mon.-Thurs.: 5:00 p.m.

Call 715-866-7261

Rated PG-13, 118 Minutes Fri.-Sat.: 1:00, 3:30, 6:00 & 8:30 p.m.; Sun.: 1:00, 3:30 & 6:00 p.m.; Mon.-Thurs.: 5:00 & 7:30 p.m.

THE JUNGLE BOOK

Dr. T.L. Christopherson Dr. B.A. Christopherson

Visit The Leader’s Website:

CAPTAIN AMERICA: CIVIL WAR

Daily: 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

“Distinctive Funeral Service”

Webster, Wisconsin

Rated PG-13, 146 Minutes Fri.-Sat.: 1:00, 4:30, 7:15 & 8:00 p.m.; Sun.: 1:00 & 4:30 p.m.; Mon.-Thurs.: 5:00 & 7:40 p.m.

All shows and show times before 6 p.m. $5.50. Shows and show times subject to change. For the most up-to-date show times, visit our website: www.timberstheatres.com. Show times listed on any other website may not be accurate.

646062

Phone 715-268-2020

Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home

Rated PG, 105 Minutes Fri.-Sat.: 1:00, 3:30, 6:00 & 8:30 p.m.; Sun.: 1:00, 3:30 & 6:00 p.m.; Mon.-Thurs.: 5:00 & 7:30 p.m.

Like us on Facebook

38L 28a

341 Keller Ave. N. Amery, Wis.

leadernewsroom.com

AEbleskiver Dinner Saturday, May 7, 3:30 - 7 p.m.

MOTHER’S DAY

• Frederic, 715-327-4236 • Shell Lake, 715-468-2314 • Siren, 715-349-2560 • St. Croix Falls 715-483-9008

OPTOMETRISTS

West Denmark Lutheran Church

Cordially invites you to its annual

Christopherson Eye Clinic

1/16

Hwy. 35

645428 37-38Lp

Local classifieds

646064 38L 28a

FOLLOW THE LEADER.

“Like us on Facebook for upcoming deals.”

West Denmark Parish Hall Enjoy traditional Danish delights! • AEbleskiver (pancake balls) • Medisterpolse (sausage) • Sodsuppe (fruit soup) • Beverage and dessert

FEATURING A TICKET AUCTION & RAFFLE FOR

AEbleskiver Lover’s Gift Basket • Original Artwork • And More! West Denmark Lutheran Church is located 1.2 miles west of Luck off County Road N on 170th Street. 645849 27d 38L LOOK FOR SIGNS!


MAY 4, 2016 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 31

Students of the Week Frederic

Estelle Chenal has been chosen Frederic Elementary School’s student of the week. Estelle is in kindergarten and the daughter of Marie and John Gross. She is a great leader/role model and helps others whenever they need it. She is very detailed in her work and loves to read and write. In her free time, she loves to read books and play with her sisters. When she grows up, she wants to be a scientist.

Andrew Tinman has been chosen Frederic Middle School’s student of the week. Andrew is in eighth grade and the son of Jim and Amy Tinman. He does very well in his classes, earning excellent grades. He is a hard worker, polite and has a good sense of humor. When not in school, he likes to read, play video games and participate in sports. He plans to become a veterinarian.

Grantsburg

Trent Kuechenmeister has been chosen Frederic High School’s student of the week. Trent is a sophomore and the son of Nick and Mande Kuechenmeister. He is very active in his classes as well as in FBLA and other organizations. He is helpful and reliable and a great mentor to younger students. He is involved in FBLA, FFA and NHS. He enjoys hunting, fishing and playing basketball. He plans to attend college.

Luck

Caleb Nick has been chosen Luck Elementary School’s student of the week. Caleb is in sixth grade and the son of Earl Nick and Darla Nick. He is an attentive student. He is always polite and brings a positive attitude to each of his classes. He is involved in Friendship games and Sunday school. He enjoys spending time with his family, riding bike, reading and playing with his dog, Rocket.

Hunter Sellent has been chosen Luck Middle School’s student of the week. Hunter is in eighth grade and the son of Travis and Marie Sellent. He is a cheerful and engaged student who completes his work creatively. He is involved in band and choir, track and field, football and wrestling. In his spare time, he enjoys hunting, fishing, four-wheeling and trapping.

Olivia Nielsen has been chosen Luck High School’s student of the week. Olivia is a junior and the daughter of Steven and Joie Nielsen. She volunteers to help with After-School All-Stars and is an excellent role model for the younger students. She is involved in band/jazz band, NHS, After-School All-Stars and basketball. In her spare time, she enjoys playing basketball and reading. She plans to attend college.

St. Croix Falls

Miles Kelly has been chosen St. Croix Falls Elementary School’s student of the week. Miles is in kindergarten and the son of Christie Kelly. He has three brothers and one little sister at home. His favorite activity is playing ball tag during gym class. He enjoys art projects with his family. When he grows up, he would like to be a professional wrestler. He is a kind and cooperative student.

Ella Bobzin has been chosen St. Croix Falls Middle School’s student of the week. Ella is in seventh grade and the daughter of Erik Bobzin and Geta Lendosky and she has a brother named Henri. Her dog is named D.O.G. She is involved in basketball, volleyball and softball. She enjoys spending time with friends. Her favorite subject is language arts because she enjoys reading. She is a very bubbly student who is very polite and responsible.

Samuel Adams has been chosen Grantsburg Middle School’s student of the week. Samuel is in fourth grade and the son of Heidi and Donnie Spafford. He works very hard in class. He is a role model for his peers and is very responsible. He has a wonderful heart and is so caring. He is also a great math student and loves to learn new concepts. He’s great inside and out. His favorite class is reading and he likes to study graphic design after school.

Olivia Hinze has been chosen Siren Elementary School’s student of the week. Olivia is in third grade and the daughter of Jason and Elissa Hinze. She is a delightful student who is very respectful, responsible, hardworking and well-behaved. She puts forth a great deal of effort each day and she exceeds school expectations. She enjoys soccer, tennis, baseball, math, art and gym. This year she has taken part in the play “Robin Hood,” basketball, flag football and dance camp.

Nicholas Mulroy has been chosen Siren Middle School’s student of the week. Nicholas is in eighth grade and the son of Heidi and Roger Mulroy. He is currently working on an advertising project in English and has demonstrated a unique talent for packaging design. His favorite subject area is science because he enjoys completing the labs for the class. He enjoys fishing and playing soccer.

Hannah Heinen has been chosen Unity Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in third grade and the daughter of Pamela and Nick Heinen. She is a great role model for her classmates. She is polite and respectful to adults, as well as her peers. She tries hard to always do her best and is always willing to help someone in need.

Jadyn Calhoun has been chosen Unity Middle School’s student of the week. Jadyn is in seventh grade and the daughter of Jay and Tashia Calhoun. She was chosen because of her positive attitude and strong work ethic. She is an awesome role model to her peers and a joy to have in class each and every day.

Siren

Unity

Webster

www.polkburnett.com

Julisa Bearhart has been chosen Webster Middle School’s student of the week. Julisa is in sixth grade and the daughter of Nikki Bearhart and Greg Nelson. She is a responsible, topnotch student. She is well-known for being friendly to everyone. Her favorite subjects are reading and math. She puts great value on education and her friends. When she has spare time, she likes to read and make jewelry.

Paige Maslow is Siren High School’s student of the week. Paige is a junior and her father, Alan Maslow, is supportive and her inspiration. Her academic success is blossoming this year. Her English class assignments have piqued her creative mind and resulted in wonderful submissions. Her future plans include a degree in dairy herd management. She is an asset during small-group activities due to her ability to keep things moving. She has a refreshing demeanor and inspires innovative ideas.

Dylan Kern has been chosen Unity High School’s student of the week. Dylan is a sophomore and the son of Richard and Nora Kern. His favorite subject is biology. His hobbies include Boy Scouts, running and music.

Proudly Supporting Our Students Electricity • Propane 1-800-421-0283

Jamison Mogen has been chosen Webster Elementary School’s student of the week. Jamison is in second grade and the son of Melissa and Jim Mogen. He is a hardworking student and always gives his best effort. His favorite class is keyboard. In his free time, he likes to play football and video games.

Brett Anderson has been chosen Grantsburg High School’s student of the week. Brett is a senior and the son of Dean and Barb Anderson. He is working on an exceptional fish house in tech ed. He takes pride in what he does. He is respectful, helpful, well spoken and hardworking. He is involved in baseball, football and math team. He mows lawns and enjoys fishing, hunting and playing sports. He plans to go to South Dakota School of Mines and Technology to get an engineering degree.

Ian Burkman has been chosen Grantsburg Grade School’s student of the week. Ian is in third grade and the son of Jason and Tricia Burkman. He is very responsible and strives to get his work done. He is very friendly and likes to include others in activities and group work. He is a polite young man who is a pleasure to have in class. His favorite thing about school is math class. He is a talented football player and enjoys playing catcher’s up and dodgeball on his trampoline with his brothers.

Brianna Bray has been chosen Webster High School’s student of the week. Brianna is a sophomore and the daughter of Natalie Flagstad. She is quiet, nice and considerate of others. She is well organized and always concerned about getting her work done. She is a great helper in the band room and she has a talent of playing many different instruments. She is involved in band, solo and ensemble, and soccer.

Supporting our area students and their accomplishments.

Stop In or Call Us Today

2547 State Road 35, Luck, Wis. (in the Evergreen Plaza)

www.sterlingbank.ws

Helping young people reach towards their goals and promote kindness in a world that sometimes doesn't remember the significance of it. Helping people find their way in back in life.

LEADERNEWSROOM.COM

wingsontheweb.org


PAGE 32 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B • MAY 4, 2016

MAY

NOW THRU TUES., MAY 31 Amery • “Love of the Land” art show at Amery Community Food Hub, 715-268-4500.

THURS.-SAT./5-7 Dresser • Areawide garage sales.

THURSDAY/5 Amery • Bingo at the VFW post, 6:30 p.m. • Ladies Night Out, 4:30-7 p.m., amerychev.com, 715268-7676. • Book sale at the library, 4-7 p.m., amerywi.gov.

Events Coming

SEND YOUR COMING EVENTS ITEMS TO: INTER-COUNTY LEADER, BOX 490, FREDERIC, WI 54837 OR EMAIL leadernewsroom@gmail.com

Northwest Passages InANewLight featured photo

“FLOWER”

by Michael, 12

• “Norm of the North” movie, rated G, at the library, 4:30 p.m., 715-485-3215. • Unity 5th- and 6th-grade spring concert, 7 p.m., unity.k12.wi.us.

FRIDAY/13 Balsam Lake • Poco Penners meeting at the library building, 1 p.m., 715-483-9738. • Unity 1st- and 2nd-grade musical, 2:30 p.m., unity.k12.wi.us.

Grantsburg • Container garden workshop at Wood River Garden Store, 6 p.m., 715-463-2426 to register.

Falun

Milltown

• Free bread distribution, every Friday until further notice at Trinity Lutheran Church, 10 a.m.

• Friends of the Library meeting at the library, 6 p.m., 715-825-2313. • Domestic violence family group, 5-6 p.m., 800-2617233. • Domestic violence support group, 6-7 p.m., 800-2617233. • VFW meat raffle, 5 p.m., one mile north of Unity on Hwy. 46, home of the tank.

Frederic • Head injury support group at the library, 2 p.m. • Northwest Wisconsin Regional Writers meeting at the Ridge Eatery, 1 p.m.

Grantsburg • Crex Bird Club meet at the visitors center, 8-10 a.m, 715-463-2739, crexmeadows.org.

Siren • Burnett County National Day of Prayer service at the government center, Room 165, 7-8:30 p.m., 349-8005.

Siren • Powwow at the school, 715-349-2277.

Webster

St. Croix Falls

• Lions & Lioness food distribution at Connections, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., 715-866-8151.

• Kindergarten spring concert at the elementary gym, 2 p.m., scf.k12.wi.us.

FRI. & SAT./6 & 7

Falun • Free bread distribution, every Friday until further notice at Trinity Lutheran Church, 10 a.m.

Frederic • Primetimers pie & ice-cream social at Crosswalk Community Church, 12:30-2:30 p.m.

Grantsburg • Outdoor Skills Cordage Workshop at Crex Meadows, ages 6-plus, 4-5 p.m. RSVP required, 715-463-2739, crexmeadows.org.

Jackson • Fish and smelt fry at the town hall, 5 p.m. until gone.

Leader Land • RSVP deadline for Twins vs. Blue Jays game on Sat., May 21, 715-327-4868, ext. 1117. • RSVP deadline for Twins versus Blue Jays trip on May 21, 715-463-4701..

Luck • Free movie at the museum, “The Philadelphia Story,” 7 p.m.

“This flower really caught my eye, so I took this picture. I like taking photos because it helps me to improve my behavior.” InaNewLight is a therapeutic nature photography project at Northwest Passage. To see more of the kids’ photos, visit the gallery one mile south of Webster, or the website inanewlight.org.

Lewis

Grantsburg

• Gospel music at Lewis Methodist Church, 6-9 p.m. • Rummage sale at the Lewis Methodist Church, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m.

• American Legion Post 185 meeting, 7 p.m., 715-4635724.

Luck

• Classic Movie Monday at the library, 1 p.m., 715-4831777. • Middle school band/choir spring concert at the MS gym, 7 p.m., scf.k12.wi.us.

• Cancer society’s Sole Burner Walk/Run at the school. Register 8 a.m., start 9 a.m. • AEbleskiver Dinner at West Denmark Hall, 3:30-7 p.m., 715-472-2383. • Spaghetti dinner benefit for Tracy Vail at the Lions (DBS) Hall, 1-6 p.m.

Milltown • River’s Rally 5K & Fun Day at the community center. Register 8 a.m., breakfast, race, etc., 715-553-3490, riversrally.org.

Siren • Drop-off day for Lions yard sale at Lions building, 9 a.m.-noon, 715-349-2400.

St. Croix Falls

TUESDAY/10 Amery • Red Cross Bloodmobile at Kyuki-Do-Martial Arts, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., redcrossblood.org, 800-733-2767.

• The Falls Sampler at the fairgrounds, 5-8:30 p.m., fallschamber.org.

SAT. & SUN./7 & 8

SUNDAY/8

Upper St. Croix Valley

Garfield

SATURDAY/7 Amery • Stower Seven Lakes half-marathon. Register online or 7:30-8:30 a.m., start 9 a.m., fwspstowerlaks.blogspot.com. • Book sale at the library, 4-7 p.m., amerywi.gov.

Danbury • Ruby’s Pantry at the town maintenance shop, $20 donation. Open 9:30 a.m., distribution 10-11:30 a.m.

• The Big Gig Fundraiser concert for the Siren Music Dept. $5/seat, 2 p.m., 715-349-2277.

St. Croix Falls • Song Circle at the library, 4:30 p.m., 715-483-1777, stcroixfallslibrary.org.

MON.-SAT./9-14 Danbury

Dresser

• Cleanup at Forts Folle Avoine, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., 715-8668890.

• Lions Club plant sale 8 a.m.-2 p.m. at Boyd’s Outdoor Power.

MON.-FRI./9-13

Duluth, Minn.

Frederic

• History & brew tour, 715-327-4868, ext. 1117.

Frederic • Cancer society’s Sole Burner Walk/Run at the elementary school. Register 8-9 a.m., walk 9:15 a.m., 715653-2684. • Pancake breakfast at Landmark Lodge 244, 7-10:30 a.m., 715-472-8356, 715-244-3403.

Grantsburg • Adults wild edibles luncheon at Crex, 10 a.m.12:30 p.m., 715-468-2739, crexmeadows.org. • Bird tour at Crex Meadows, 8-10 a.m. Sign up, limited space, 715-463-2739, crexmeadows.org.

• Village cleanup week, 715-327-4294 for info or pickup.

Grantsburg • Village cleanup week, 8 a.m.-3 p.m., 715-463-2405.

MONDAY/9 Frederic • Grades 6-8 spring concert at the high school, 7 p.m., frederic.k12.wi.us.

Comstock • “To Dream in 2016” music by Manfred & poetry by Traun at the Pipe Dream Center, 8 p.m., 715-822-8401, manfredsmusic.com.

Cushing • Benefit breakfast & silent auction for Michael Coen-Nelson at the community center, 8:30 a.m.-noon, 715554-2121.

Dresser

• “Uncorked” painting class at the arts center. Sign up/ info at 715-327-4743, 4-6:30 p.m., fredericarts.org.

Luck

Siren

Clam Falls • Free Community breakfast at Clam Falls Lutheran Church, 8-11 a.m.

Frederic

• Free Beauty Salon Day at Home & Away Ministries. For details, 715-472-7770.

• Pancake breakfast at the fire hall, 8 a.m.-1 p.m.

Amery • Ruby’s Pantry at Congregational Church. Doors open 8:30 a.m. Dist. 9 a.m. $20 donation, 715-268-7390. • Bird walk in York Park, 8:30 a.m., amerywi.gov. • Rummage, bake & plant sale at St. Joseph Catholic Church, 7 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

• Frederic Area Historical Society’s May meeting. 6:30 p.m. at the Soo Line Depot/Museum. 715-327-4892 or 715-327-4158.

St. Croix Falls

• Earth Arts Spring Art Tour, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., earthartswi. org.

SATURDAY/14

• Yard & garden sale at Bethesda Lutheran Church, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Breakfast items 7 a.m.

• Family wildflower saunter on the Ice Age Trail. Meet at Lions Park, 10 a.m., 715-472-2152, ext. 103. • Bird walk, 7 a.m. at Pines Group Camp, Interstate Park, 715-483-3747.

St. Croix Falls

Webster • St. John’s/Our Lady’s CCW salad luncheon and garden seminar at St. John’s Catholic Church, 9:30 a.m., 715-866-7321.

Luck

Dresser

FRIDAY/6

Siren • Northwoods Flyers Experimental Aircraft Assoc. Club meets at the government center, Rm. 165, 7 p.m.

• Village cleanup days, Fri. & Mon. 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Sat. 8-11:45 a.m.

• GriefShare, support group for those grieving a death, at New Life Christian Community in Dresser, 6:30-8 p.m., 715-557-1431.

• Spring sale & lunch at Zion Lutheran Church. Fri. 8 a.m.-3 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.-noon.

Milltown • Domestic violence family group, 5-6 p.m., 800-2617233. • Domestic violence support group, 6-7 p.m., 800-2617233.

FRI., SAT. & MON./ MAY 13, 14 & 16

Balsam Lake

Bone Lake

Grantsburg • Livestock & consignment items pasture sale at the Burnett County Fairgrounds, 6:30 p.m., 715-488-2472, 715-491-4111.

Milltown • Red Cross Bloodmobile at Milltown Lutheran Church, 12:30-6:30 p.m., redcrossblood.org, 800-733-2767.

St. Croix Falls • “Oh What Love” live tour at the Alliance Church of the Valley, 7 p.m.

Webster • Friends of the Library meeting at the library, 9:30 a.m., 715-259-3219.

WEDNESDAY/11 Webster • Fall prevention workshop at Grace United Methodist, 9-11 a.m., 877-485-2372, Carrie.

THURS.-FRI./12-20 St. Croix Falls • Students artwork on display for public viewing weekdays 8 a.m.-6 p.m. in the elementary school lobby, 715483-9832, ext. 1170.

THURSDAY/12 Amery • Bingo at the VFW post, 6:30 p.m.

Baldwin • St. Croix Valley Beekeepers meeting at Peace Lutheran Church, 6 p.m., stcroixbeekeepers.org.

Frederic • High school fine arts festival, 7 p.m., frederic.k12. wi.us.

Frederic Grantsburg • Adventure Triathlon at area lakes & Crex, bikepaddle run.com. • Crex Meadows Nature Photography Club meets at Crex, 10 a.m.-noon, youth photo club 1-3 p.m., 715-4632739. • Fairy garden workshop at Village Floral, 2 p.m., 715463-5695 to register.

Luck • Herbalist Dr. Kelly Hagenbuch discusses natural remedies for Lyme disease at Natural Alternative Food Co-op, 11 a.m., doctorweedmaster.com.

Milltown • Chicken fry at the United VFW, 4:30-7 p.m.

Sarona • Prairie Fling at Hunt Hill Audubon Sanctuary, music, ect., 10 a.m.-4 p.m.,715-635-6543, hunthill.org.

Siren • Siren Nationals Radar Run & Car Show at the airport. Gates open 7 a.m. Starts 10 a.m., 715-468-4451. • Cleanup day, ice arena is collection site.

St. Croix Falls • Flea market & craft fair at the fairgrounds, 9 a.m.3 p.m., polkcountyfair.com. • Bird walk at Pines Group Camp, Interstate Park, 715483-3747.

Webster • Used book sale at the library, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., 715-8667697.

SUNDAY/15 Frederic • Citizens/volunteer/business of the year banquet at Hacker’s Lanes, 6 p.m. 715-371-0034 for info on early tickets.

Send event information (include contact information) to news@leadernewsroom.com


Leader | May 4 | 2016