Issuu on Google+

Leader

Historic fl fla ags on display

Law offi ficcers remembered Page 17

Memorial Day schedules Page 35

Currents feature

INTER-COUNTY

THE-LEADER.NET

Follow the Leader

WED., MAY 25, 2011 VOL. 78 • NO. 40 • 2 SECTIONS •

Readership: 13,800

An award-winning newspaper serving Northwest Wisconsin

Two die in Hwy. 8 accident

An ending and beginning

Longtime teachers retire from Luck, Frederic, Siren

Deaths

PAGES 5, 6, 7

Erik Severson covers myriad of topics PAGE 4

10th DUI

Man faces $25,000 in fines, 12.5 years prison PAGE 3

Early copy, please

Heartfelt hugs are part of every high school graduation ceremony as the emotion accompanying one of life’s milestones takes over. There were five area high school commencement ceremonies this past weekend, with coverage in our Currents section. Above, Mary-Francis “Frankie” Knuf is shown receiving a hug following the graduation of seniors at Frederic High School. - Photo by Sandra King

“The face of the company” celebrated

Don Erickson, longtime McNally Industries rep, courted politicos and defense industry professionals

In observance of Memorial Day, the offices of the Inter-County Leader will be closed Monday, May 30. The deadline for any news articles and advertising will be 4:30 p.m., on Friday, May 27, for the June 1 edition of the Leader. Thank you.

Huge numbers headed to sectional track meets

SPORTS

facebook.com/intercountyleader

How concerned are you about a tornado striking your community? 1. Very concerned 2. Slightly concerned - it’s a possibility 3. Not really concerned at all - they are rare where we live Go to our online poll at www.the-leader.net (Weekly results on page 8)

Retirements State rep. holds town hall

Find us on Facebook

Your opinion?

Third person seriously injured as car leaves road and strikes trees PAGE 3

Find out who in

$1

Don Erickson, an employee of McNally Industries in Grantsburg since 1981, affectionately became known as “the face of the company,” as he traveled across the world as spokesperson and salesman. He was honored in retirement last Friday, May 20. - Photo by Greg Marsten

by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer TOWN OF EUREKA – Longtime McNally Industries employee Don Erickson was celebrated in retirement on Friday, May 20, at the Chateau St. Croix, where a bevy of accolades were given on his behalf. McNally Industries is a renowned military and specialized equipment manufacturer based in Grantsburg, with a pedigree that goes back to World War II, and continues today with a full line of military-spec devices, pumps and support services. Erickson has worked for McNally since 1981 in many capacities, under four different owners, and affectionately became known as “the face of the company,” traveling across the world as both spokesperson and salesman. The guest list included owners past and present, as well as retired Rep. David Obey, who was one of Erickson’s governmental liaisons over the decades. “That Congressman Obey would show up (for a retirement party) says a lot about Don,” stated former McNally

See Erickson, page 4

• Ann Caroline Wike • Violet C. Johnson • Viola Anderson • John C. Taylor • Jesse Lee Smith • Emma Sears • Kathleen A. (Willette) Rivard • Brian Redmond • Hilma A. Marks • Myrtle M. Larson • Phillip H. Fisher • Anne Cook Riley • Joseph Juarez • Mavis Kittleson • Mary Poretti (p. 3) Obituaries on page 22-23B

Covering Burnett & Polk counties since 1933

INSIDE

Briefly 3A Letters to the editor 9A Sports 17-27A Outdoors 28A Town Talk 6-7B Coming Events Back of B Currents feature 1B Behind the Signpost 5B Letters from Home 3B Cold Turkey 3B Just for Laughs 3B River Road Ramblings 4B Obituaries 22-23B Students of the Week 27B Focus on the Family 24B Church directory 25B Copyright © 2011 Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association Frederic, Wisconsin

The Leader is a cooperative-owned newspaper • Since 1933


HOME PAGE

PAGE 2 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

E-mail story ideas, news tips and feedback to: the-leader@centurytel.net

New clinic proposal

National Christian speaker coming to Grantsburg

GRANTSBURG—National Christian speaker Midge Wietzema, daughter of Willy and Darlene Holmberg of Frederic, will speak at New Hope Lutheran on Wednesday, June 1, at 6:30 p.m. Wietzema is a pastor at Wonderful Mercy Church in Gilbert, Ariz. She is a licensed counselor and leads the discipleship and prayer ministry there. She will be talking about the miracles of recovery and a transformation in her life because of Jesus. Currently she is writing a book about “spiritual apathy.” For more informaMidge Wietzema tion call 715-463-5700.- Special photo

Joe Heller in color

Ground breaking is tentatively scheduled to take place later this year for a new $2 million St. Croix Regional Medical Center clinic on Main Street in downtown Frederic at the empty lot where the feed mill used to stand. SCRMC currently has a clinic in Frederic, located in the former hospital/nursing home building on the east side of Main Street. The proposed two-story community medical building would eventually offer more services and expanded staff than the current clinic. Projections by SCRMC show growth from 12-15 staff members to 20-25 staff members - possibly by the year 2013 - with the new clinic. That would include more health providers, therapists and specialists on duty, and more outpatient services. With more space and staff, expectations are that the clinic could double its patient and employment volumes. The village is working with SCRMC in terms of exploring options to help with financing, including tax increment financing through one of the village’s TIF districts. The village is working with the clinic on a business plan that would, among other things, promote the offering of more community education, wellness and other programs locally. Also proposed is the possibility of bringing other services to the site, such as Northland Ambulance. And SCRMC noted in its proposal it would like to work with the village to raise funds to allow the creation of a Gandy Dancer Trail rest stop area. - Special graphic

Tornado relay to start 10 th anniversary day

by Nancy Jappe Leader staff writer B U R N E T T / WA S H B U R N COUNTIES - Ten years ago, on June 18, 2001, starting at 8:06 p.m., an F3 tornado struck Northwest Wisconsin, going from the Town of Grantsburg in Burnett County to the Town of Bashaw in Washburn County. The tornado cut a swath a halfmile wide and 41 miles long through these two counties. Three people were killed – Tom Haseltine, Ruth Schultz and Sylvan Stellrecht – and at least 16 people were injured. The tornado was on the ground for about an hour. In remembrance of that occasion and observation of its 10thanniversary, a 10th-anniversary committee organized by the Siren Chamber of Commerce has planned a Day of Change - Day of Thanksgiving for Saturday,

June 18. The day will start in the Town of Wood River, with a group of representatives from the various towns that were affected, plus representatives of the St. Croix Band of Chippewa, following the tornado route from its beginning on Mike and Donna Chell’s farm on Hwy. 70 in Alpha to its end. The relay will start at 9 a.m. at the intersection of Williams Road and Hwy. 70 in the Town of Wood River. A representative of each of the affected areas will be officially riding in the relay. The public is encouraged to join them. Areas affected by the tornado include: The Burnett County Towns of Grantsburg, Wood River, Daniels, Siren, LaFollette and Dewey, the village of Siren and the Town of Bashaw in Washburn County. Cleanup and rebuilding took a good two

Leader

A pickup truck was crushed by a combine in the June 18, 2001, tornado that occurred in Burnett and Washburn counties. Have a story to share about the 2001 tornado? E-mail gbking@centurytel.net - File photo

years, with paperwork, insurance collection, etc., going on for at least four years. Volunteers came from all over the country to

help in the cleanup effort. A recorded 557 buildings–homes, businesses and outbuildings – were damaged, 205

of them totally destroyed. The damage estimate ran between $17 million and $21 million. The cost to remove debris from public infrastructures alone totaled $7 million. Other events planned for June 18 include: Arts Alive on 35 - an art show sponsored by the Burnett Area Arts Group (10 a.m. to 4 p.m.), a concert by the Northwinds British Brass Band at the band shell in Crooked Lake Park (2-2:45 p.m.), a try at hitting the world sunflower record (3-3:30 p.m. at the school), a memory art show at Siren School (3-7 p.m.), a free dinner of thanksgiving at the school (4-6 p.m.), an ecumenical prayer service (6-6:45 p.m. in the school gymnasium), a procession to the tornado memorial, remembrance and recognition at the band shell (7-8:20 p.m.).

The 2001 tornado followed a 41-mile, west-to-east path across Burnett County and into Washburn County. - Special graphic HOW TO REACH US

Inter-County

A cooperative-owned newspaper since 1933

Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association 303 N. Wisconsin Ave., Frederic, WI 54837 715-327-4236 • www.the-leader.net Doug Panek

Manager • dougpanek@centurytel.net

Gary King

Editor • gbking@centurytel.net

Board of directors Vivian Byl, chair Charles Johnson Merlin Johnson Janet Oachs Carolyn Wedin

A cooperative-owned newspaper, the Inter-County Leader is published every Wednesday by the Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association, Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837. Second Class postage paid at Frederic, WI 54837.

The Inter-County Leader is a qualified newspaper for the publication of legal notices, meeting the requirements as set forth in Chapter 985.03 of the Wisconsin Statutes. Every government official or board that handles public money should publish at regular intervals an accounting of it, showing where and how each dollar is spent. We hold this to be a fundamental principle of democratic government. Publisher reserves right to reject any advertisement or news release or letter of opinion at any time.

Web page: www.the–leader.net E-mail: the-leader@centurytel.net Subscription concerns: subscriptions@centurytel.net Advertisements: addept@centurytel.net Ad deadline: 10 a.m. Tuesdays Copy deadline: 4:30 p.m. Mondays

OFFICES

Frederic • 715-327-4236

P.O. Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837 (M-F, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.) Fax - 715-327-4117 (news copy) Fax - 715-327-4870 (ad copy)

Siren • 715-349-2560

24154 State Road 35, Siren, WI 54872 (M-F, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.) Fax - 715-349-7442

St. Croix Falls • 715-483-9008

Box 338, St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 (M-W, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. T-F, 9:30 - 4 p.m.) Fax - 715-483-1420

An award-winning newspaper

MEMBER

• National Newspaper Associan • Wisconsin Newspaper Association

HOW TO SUBSCRIBE

The Inter-County Leader [ISS No. 8750-9091] is published weekly. Subscription prices are $34/yr. in Polk and Burnett counties; $38/yr. in Barron, Chisago, Washburn, St. Croix counties; $41/yr. anywhere in the United States $23/yr. for servicemen or women; $23/yr. for students or schools (9 months). Payment is needed before we can start the subscription. No refunds on subscriptions. Persons may subscribe online at www.theleader.net, write us at Inter-County Leader, Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837, or stop by one of our three offices.

STAFF MEMBERS

Nancy Jappe njappe@centurytel.net Tammi Milberg tammi@centurytel.net

Marty Seeger mseeger@centurytel.net Brenda Martin brendals@centurytel.net Greg Marsten marscafe@lakeland.ws

Sherill Summer sherill33@gmail.com Gregg Westigard greggw@lakeland.ws Carl Heidel cheidel389@centurytel.net

Priscilla Bauer cilla@grantsburgtelcom.net Mary Stirrat marystirrat@hotmail.com EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Raelynn Hunter rael@centurytel.net


• Briefly •

ST. CROIX FALLS - Join the 180-mile Be Moved event and paddle of the full length of the St. Croix River, the centerpiece of the St. Croix River Association’s 100th-anniversary celebration. Unique community events and campsites every day of the 18-day experience are sure to provide an adventure of a lifetime. Registration is open now. In Solon Springs, the afternoon and evening of July 5 will include nature hikes, demonstrations, recognition, and a free bluegrass concert by Brian Wicklund and the Barley Jacks at Lucius Woods. When the paddle comes to an end 18 days later, the city of Prescott will host closing events at Mercord Park. Details of each stop along the way continue to unfold, but some additional communities with plans emerging are Danbury, Grantsburg, Marine on St. Croix, Stillwater, Hudson and Afton. The general public is encouraged to attend all community events and can learn more about the specifics online at www.scrapaddle.org. - submitted ••• SHAFER, Minn. - The Church of St. Francis Xavier of Franconia/Shafer, Minn. will be having an 8 a.m. Mass in the church on Monday, May 30, for Memorial Day before the Veterans Cemetery service in the St. Francis Xavier Cemetery. Coffee and fellowship to follow. submitted ••• ST. CROIX FALLS - The American Red Cross Bloodmobile is coming to St. Croix Falls on Wednesday, June 1. The blood drive will be held at American Legion Post 143, 807 Pine St., from 12:30-6:30 p.m. To make an appointment, call Terry at 715-483-3475 or for more information call the Red Cross office in Balsam Lake at 715- 485-3025 or 800-GIVE-LIFE. - submitted

Mary Poretti, community leader, dies at 87

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 3

Local memorial service planned for later date

WEBSTER/MINNEAPOLIS - Mary Poretti, a well-known figure in Burnett County, serving on the county board, as president of the Burnett Community Library Board and taking a lead role in the local chapter of the League of Women Voters, died Sunday, May 15, at the age of 87. Poretti had been Mary Poretti receiving care at the Mount Olivet Nursing Home in Min-

neapolis. Minn., since the beginning of the year, according to close friends. A celebration of life was held Sunday, May 22, at the home of Dan and Linnea Poretti. A memorial celebration is being planned to be held in Webster, with the date to be determined. In lieu of gifts or flowers, please consider a donation to the Community Referral Agency, Inc., P.O. Box 365, Milltown, WI 54858. Mary is survived by four sons: Tim (Kathie), Robert (Rhoda), David (Gaylene), and Dan (Linnea), and grandchildren, Rozalynn, Anthony (Aubri), Gina, and Dominic. She was preceded in death by her husband of 66 years, Paul, and their eldest son, Peter. - Gary King, with information from Minneapolis StarTribune

Tree falls on SCFalls home

Berry family of Grantsburg to benefit from fundraiser

GRANTSBURG - The Berry family members–Shirley, Steven and Scott – of Grantsburg have each recently undergone major medical emergencies, and because of this, they have incurred great out-of-pocket expenses and, as yet, are still unable to work. Bethany Lutheran Church of Grantsburg is hosting a fundraiser as a way of helping to defray these expenses during their recovery. The fundraiser consists of a spaghetti supper and silent auction that is to be held on Saturday, June 4, from 4:30 to 8 p.m. at the Bethany Lutheran Church at Grantsburg. The church is located three miles south of Grantsburg on Hwy. 48/87. The cost of the spaghetti supper will be a freewill offering. Many interesting and worthwhile items will be available at the silent auction during the supper. All are invited to come to this fundraiser to help the Berry family. For further information contact the Bethany church at 715-463-5746. Supplemental funding has been applied for from the Polk-Burnett Chapter of Thrivent Financial for Lutherans. - submitted

by Shawn Johnson Wisconsin Public Radio MADISON - Wisconsin’s election agency has signed off on the results of a state Supreme Court recount that showed Justice David Prosser defeating challenger JoAnne Kloppenburg by roughly 7,000 votes. The lead was about 300 less than what Prosser held when the recount began. Kloppenburg’s campaign now has a week to decide whether to challenge the results in court. Prosser campaign manager Brian Schimming said there’s no need for a lawsuit, which he says would be costly to taxpayers. “We’re hoping that doesn’t happen, we’re hoping against hope that doesn’t happen,” says Schimming. “But that’s a decision up to her. We just know that we’re happy today. The Government Accountability Board obviously is comfortable that the win is there.” Kloppenburg asked for the recount after the Waukesha County clerk announced she’d forgotten to include 14,000 votes from Brookfield in the total she released on election night. Those votes were the difference for Prosser, who had otherwise trailed Kloppenburg in preliminary numbers gathered by the Associated Press.

Troopers get man for 10th DUI

Murder trial set

by Jessica Beecroft Special to the Leader SHELL LAKE –The trial of a Sarona man charged with the shooting death of another Sarona man has been set for Aug. 1-10 at the Dunn County Courthouse in Menomonie. Jess R. Carsello, 49, is facing charges of firstdegree intentional homicide in the death of Michael Elliott, 31, Sarona. Carsello allegedly called 911 on Sunday, July 25, 2010, to admit to shooting Elliott, claiming self-defense following a drunken fight with the man he claimed was his friend. An autopsy showed Elliott had been shot six times in the back. The shooting occurred at Carsello’s home on Spur Road. When deputies arrived, they found Carsello in the woods and under the influence of alcohol. According to authorities, Elliott and Carsello had met just weeks before the incident and were hanging out quite frequently, according to friends of Elliott. Carsello told deputies that the two of them were drinking heavily just before the incident occurred. The courts granted the moving of the trial from Washburn to Dunn County because of publicity on the case in Washburn County. Judge James D. Babbit, Barron County, will preside over the trial. Washburn County District Attorney Mike Bitney will be representing the state of Wisconsin, and the defense attorney in the case is Harry R. Hertel.

GAB finalizes recount in Prosser’s favor

A large tree fell on the home of Gordon and Marion Fox on Sunday afternoon, May 22. The couple’s home is located on Alabama Street on the hill, just east of Interstate Park and South Washington Street. The tree fell on the back side (which faces West) of their home while storm warnings were sounding, but it was not windy at the time, they said. “We think that the ground is so saturated, that the roots let go, as it was from a steep bank west of our house,” noted Marion. “One even larger part of the tree fell to the west, down the bank. We did have a lot of wind for a short period of time on Saturday night, just before a downpour of rain.” - Photo submitted

Two die, one seriously injured Saturday accident brings Polk County traffic death toll to eight thus far in 2011

TOWN OF ST. CROIX FALLS - Two men lost their lives Saturday evening, May 21, when the vehicle they were in left the road and struck several trees. The driver of the vehicle, Jesse L. Smith, 32, Amery, and a front-seat passenger, Brian C. Redmond, 44, St. Croix Falls, were pronounced dead at the scene. A rear-seat passenger, Amanda E. Winkelman, 24, Osceola, received multiple injuries and is hospitalized at Regions Hospital in St. Paul. Witness statements indicate the vehicle was traveling at an extremely high speed just prior to the crash. Alcohol is also believed to be a contributing factor. According to the Polk County Sheriff’s Department, Smith was driving westbound on Hwy. 8 when the vehicle went off the paved portion of the road onto the right (north) shoulder near Sunset View Drive.The driver at-

tempted to take corrective actions but lost control, entered the north ditch and struck several trees. The driver was wearing his seat belt, but due to the violence of the crash, was ejected. Redmond was not wearing a seat belt and was also ejected from the vehicle. Winkleman was reported to be wearing her seat belt. Hwy. 8 was shut down for approximately 3-1/2 hours following the crash. Assisting the Polk County Sheriff’s Department at the scene were St. Croix Fire, St. Croix Valley EMS and the St. Croix Falls Police Department. These deaths are the seventh and eighth traffic fatalities of 2011, although one of those has been ruled a death as the result of medical issues prior to the crash. In 2010 Polk County had seven traffic fatalities for the entire year. Obituaries for the two men who lost their lives are published in this week’s Currents section. - Gary King, with information from Polk County Sheriff’s Dept.

Two persons died and one was seriously injured in a one-vehicle accident Saturday, May 21, just before midnight. - Photo from Polk County Sheriff’s Dept.

Amery man faces up to 12.5 years and $25,000 in fines if convicted

by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – A 43-year-old Amery man was arrested and charged with his 10th driving while intoxicated infraction by the Wisconsin State Patrol on Sunday afternoon, May 22, after he was reportedly driving erratically on Hwy. 8. When the troopers tracked Paul McKellar down a short time later, he had apparently ran into a another vehicle near the Apple River Motel, which was where they took the allegedly intoxicated driver into custody. According to the incident report, there was a citizen complaint of a man in a white pickup driving “all over the road.” The trooper was a short distance away from the incident and noticed a vehicle meeting that description stopped at the Apple River Motel at the intersection of CTH H and Hwy. 8. He observed a man standing nearby talking with the driver of the white truck, which was running and had its lights on. The trooper stepped in and talked with the man standing beside the truck, who said the driver had run into his vehicle. The trooper said he noticed a smell of intoxicants coming from the white truck, and said that the driver, later identified as McKellar, was slurring his speech and was unsteady on his feet. McKellar told the trooper that he “had two drinks,” and the officer began a series of tests to determine that the man was, indeed, highly intoxicated, so much to even properly take a breath test. He was taken into custody and brought to a local hospital, where he refused a blood test, and had to have his blood taken forcibly as evidence. McKellar has nine previous DUI convictions, and went before Judge Benjamin Proctor on Monday, May 23, for an initial appearance to determine bond. Proctor imposed a $25,000 cash bond for him to secure release. His preliminary hearing was set for Wednesday, May 25, where the the state will present evidence to possibly force a trial. If convicted of felony DUI 10th offense, McKellar faces fines up to $25,000, and between four and 12.5 years of jail time, as well as further restrictions, assessments and mandatory probation requirements.


Severson holds town hall in Luck

PAGE 4 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

Budget reflections, drinking water, the bridge and more discussed

by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer LUCK – District 28 Assemblyman Erik Severson, R-Star Prairie, held a town hall meeting Friday, May 20, at the Luck Village Hall, and while it was sparsely attended, he was able to clarify several issues, while also addressing and outlining several questions ranging from drinking water safety, conceal-carry legislation and budget issues, as well as his take on the controversial conflicts that grabbed headlines in Madison over several weeks. Severson addressed several Luck-specific concerns by village Administrator Kristina Handt, ranging form the prevailing wage issue, which reportedly made a proposed road extension project for the new United Pioneer Home project too costly, to unemployment insurance issues for seasonal golf course employees. On the prevailing wage issues, which applies to public works projects, and the pay scale of the workers on the project, Severson said there was sure to be some sort of adjustment, although the final figure was unclear. “It’s going to change one way or another,” he said. He also updated attendees on the progress of several bills, such as efforts to expand broadband access across the state, which he said was moving forward and would be considered by Gov. Scott Walker. The issue of handguns and so-called conceal-carry legislation was also front and center, and several attendees expressed their support for so-called constitutional carry provisions, which Severson said “had little chance of passing on its own.” He said the two types of bills would almost surely be combined into one piece of legislation, with a more stringent permitting requirement the likely bill to pass. “With the current makeup of the Senate and the Assembly, we’re just more likely to see a permit to carry,” he said. “It will eventually be one bill.” While he expressed support for a permitting process, he also stressed that he supported individual property rights on the issue.

State Rep. Erik Severson discussed matters from across the board after his town hall meeting in Luck Friday, May 20, as he made his way to another such event in Grantsburg. - Photos by Greg Marsten

“However, I think any place should be able to say ‘No, you can’t carry [a handgun] in here,” he said. The Stillwater Bridge/St. Croix Crossing Project also earned some attention, with Severson outlining legislation “trying to reach consensus on both sides,” he said, calling it a “safety issue,” and noting pictures of people holding bare chunks of concrete as reason for action to replace the structure “sooner rather than later.” “Something isn’t going to happen until it falls apart,” Severson said with a shrug. Severson stressed the need for a renewed reciprocity agreement with Minnesota, where workers one side or the other can file only home state taxes, a since-canceled agreement after Wisconsin got too far behind on their reimbursement payments, with Severson noting that the Badger state still owes Minnesota from the previous agreement. “A whole group of legislators got together and have asked to take care of it,” he said. “We need to get back to doing things the way we were doing it before ... but that $55 million has to be paid first.” Severson also clarified the so-called Voter ID Bill, which he said will not require photo identification for this summer’s recall elections, but that “they’re going to start to ask for it, to get used to it.” He also said that efforts to put exceptions into the bill, such as for nursing homes or other groups, were dialed back. “As soon as you start doing that, it’s illegal,” he said, adding that the bill has

Erickson/from page 1

owner Al Scheideler. McNally senior vice president and general manager, Jim Segelstrom, also praised Erickson for his community service, which includes working with the Burnett County Medical Center Foundation, the Gideons and various other groups. “He’s even giving the (Grantsburg High School) commencement address,” he said. Erickson was required to travel extensively for the firm over the decades, “He’d be home an hour, and we’d jokingly say, ‘enjoy your vacation?’” stated Paul Lombardi, a retired McNally vice president. Employees past and present noted Erickson’s commitment to the U.S. military, with several speakers saying he always kept the safety of the troops in mind, while also caring extensively about his local area and neighbors. “Don has made a difference to this company, the people in this room and to me,” said McNally co-owner Tom Bruntz. “He brought a passion for public service, as well.” Erickson praised his co-workers, his wife, Chris, and the company’s commitment to their cause. He also joked how he often had to sell a product that was not yet produced, that he often had to meet with international manufacturers, government officials and firms they were trying to win over as subcontractors. “I was always selling the quality, service and reliability of you guys at home,” he said with a nod. The Ericksons plan on staying in the Grantsburg area, but traveling extensively and expanding their volunteer work in the coming years.

forced the state to reconsider DMV service center hours, which have been cut in recent years. “Part of it is to make sure we have places to get voter ID.” Severson clarified his stance on the justpassed Drinking Water Bill, which would dial back DNR water treatment requirements for 66 municipalities across the state, after objections from several villages and cities on the possible costs of chlorination systems. “Many municipalities came forward,” he said. “They felt it was irresponsible for the Assembly to [force them to] put things in the their water.” Severson did not think his sponsorship of the bill went against his oath as a doctor “to do no harm,” and said that like when his advice goes unheeded by a patient, “it’s still his recommended treatment.” He also stressed that his problem was more with the safety of chlorine treatments and costs than with existing quality issues, noting that money spent on water treatment “wasn’t going to police, fire or other public safety issues.” Frederic Library Director Chris Byerly read a letter to Severson asking for his support of the so-called Maintenance of Effort legislation for municipal library systems. “We are getting increasing demand in this economy,” she said. “We’re not asking for more money, just to maintain existing levels.” Severson did not commit either way. Severson talked at length about the

Budget Repair Bill and the process around it, from the speed at which the legislation was passed to the current legal review under way. While he admitted the legislation “moved fast,” he also admitted that his few months in office left him little comparison. “They said it ‘doesn’t usually work this way,’’’ he said. “I’m too new. I didn’t know the difference.” He also shied away from suggestions that the issue was important enough to go to voters, or at least undergo more thorough public review. “Some would say it should be a referendum,” he said. “Why not every decision?” While Severson let some of the attendees disagree among themselves, he stressed that the “message needed to be communicated better,” and that the process and “the whole session was abnormal.” He also thinks teachers got “caught in the middle,” and admitted that many of them stressed that they can only afford to stay in that career with those benefits, due to pay limits. “I do think a lot of teachers felt victimized,” he said, while also noting that the legislation “gives municipalities the power to balance their budgets.” While Severson pointed out a recent poll placing Wisconsin higher up in business attractiveness, from “41st to 24th among the states,” he also said that “Minnesota, Illinois and Iowa are a little nervous,” pointing out that two-thirds of the state budget is salaries and benefits, making the issue “a fairly obvious place to start.” He also said that while the tension in Madison has hardly dialed back, he thinks it’s unfortunate that when people get together now, and “the one thing they don’t dare talk about is politics.” Severson said, “the fringes on both sides are polarizing the discussions ... about 80 percent of us are in the middle ... it needs to start with the people.” But he has had a few “bright spots” in his half-year as an assemblyman, although he has also had “his share of harassing phone calls” and conflict. “My son now wants to wear a tie!” He joked. “He’s only 3, so we bought him a little shirt and a tie, and he wore it around the house for about three days … with sweatpants!”

The Erickson party was held at the Chateau St. Croix, north of St. Croix Falls.

Don and Chris Erickson displayed the bounty of gifts and awards presented last week at Don’s retirement from McNally Industries. - Photos by Greg Marsten

Tom Bruntz and Jim Segelstrom prepare to present Erickson with a large “Don Erickson Award” for his years of service.


Ray Draxler, Diane Utley retire

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 5

Frederic school loses 72 years of experience

by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer FREDERIC – Two of the Frederic School District’s longest-serving employees, Ray Draxler and Diane Utley, are retiring. Ray Draxler, seventh- through 12th-grade principal, has spent his entire 39-year career in education at Frederic. He started as a seventh- and eighth-grade teacher

and has been principal for 15 years. Diane Utley has served as the administrative assistant to the district superintendent for 33 years. Utley has worked with six superintendents and two interims, starting with Wally Koel. She has been the district’s contact with the public and the school board. Jerry Tischer, Frederic administrator, in announcing their retirements, said that the two have made an undeniable and wonderful mark upon the district. “Our 7-12 school is distinguished under the leadership of Ray Draxler,” Tischer said in a message to the school staff. “We are all extremely grateful for his work and his

personal commitment to this school and this school district, to his students and to those who work with him. Our high school has the mark of a very special person. “Diane is the professional who welcomed thousands of people to our district – be it if they entered the district office, called on the telephone, or by letter,” Tischer continued. “She made people feel very welcomed and important. Diane’s work and personal commitment is to make certain that the work of the district office is always, and in every way, done with precision.”

positions, including administrator and kindergarten through sixth-grade principal, as full-time positions, with no savings. The other options included changing positions to part time, combining positions, and sharing positions with neighboring districts. Each option included an estimated price tag, ranging from the $25,000 range for a part-time administrative assistant to possibly saving up to the $125,000 range if the position of administrator and seventh- through 12thgrade principal were combined. The changes could be temporary, for the coming school year only, or permanent. Board member Troy Engen said the board needed to look at all possible administrative changes. Fellow board member Shari Matz said she needed to hear the views of each of the administrators, Tischer, Draxler, and kindergarten through sixth-grade Principal Kelly Steen, one at a time. The board went into closed session to discuss future plans. The football issue came up at the Monday, May 16, board meeting. Athletic director Troy Wink told the board

that seven or eight districts, including Luck and Siren, will be changing to eight-man football in 2012. He said that leaves Frederic with a need for a rearranged conference lineup if it is to continue with a full 11-man team. The present conference lineup would have Frederic in a three-team conference with Shell Lake and Turtle Lake. Wink said that options being considered include alignment by geography, with Frederic playing area teams, and by size, with Frederic playing teams with more equal enrollment but farther away. Each of these options would involve eight teams to a conference. A third possible option, preferred by Wink, would set up three conferences of five or six teams. Frederic’s high school enrollment will be declining over the next few years if the September 2010 student count continues. Frederic had 165 students in grades nine to 12 in the fall of 2010. That number drops to 160 next fall. After that, using the 2010 numbers, high school enrollment will be 147 in the fall of 2012 and 137 in the fall of 2013.

Frederic school looks at administration options

Dropping enrollments affect football conferences

by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer FREDERIC – The retirement of two Frederic school administrative employees and declining enrollments are giving the Frederic School Board opportunities to make decisions on the school district’s future. The board must decide how to fill the coming vacancies of sevenththrough 12th-grade principal and administrative assistant. And with a number of districts going to eight-man football, the board is looking at options for the football conferences. The board started its discussion of administration positions at a special school board meeting Tuesday, May 24. District Administrator Jerry Tischer presented eight options for filling the vacancies resulting from the retirement of Principal Ray Draxler and administrative assistant Diane Utley. The options started with continuing all

Habitat ReStore now offering free electronics recycling

ST. CROIX FALLS –The Habitat ReStore on Hwy. 8 in St. Croix Falls will be accepting used electronics free of charge, through a new partnership with Vintage Tech Recyclers. Local residents will be able to recycle outdated and unwanted electronics at the ReStore during all regular store hours. All personal data is guaranteed to be safely and securely destroyed through the Habitat ReStore’s partnership with Vintage Tech Recyclers. “Electronics recycling is a service that our community desperately needs, and we’ve been working toward a solution for this issue,” said David Sandmann, manager of the Habitat for Humanity ReStore. “We are excited to launch this partnership with Vintage Tech Recyclers. They’ve partnered with manufacturers to fund the recycling cost for our ReStore. So we’ve found a solution through this partnership that is affordable for both our nonprofit organization and for our customers.” Karrie Gibson, founder and president of Vintage Tech Recyclers, stated, “We are very excited to partner with the ReStore in St. Croix Falls to provide a responsible

electronic recycling program. This will be a great solution for the residents in that area.” The items that will be accepted include computers, laptops, monitors, LCDs, cell phones, printers, scanners, modems, CD drives, cables, keyboards, mice, TVs, VCRs, DVD players, camcorders, cameras, game players and joysticks, telephones, pagers, answering machines, typewriters, calculators, adding machines, fax machines, copiers, microwaves, toasters and postage meters. The ReStore is located at 2201 Hwy. 8 in St. Croix Falls in the former Fleet Supply building. Store hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday.

About the ReStore Opened in March, the ReStore accepts donations of new or used building materials and resells them to the public at discounted rates. Proceeds are directed to Habitat for Humanity to help build affordable housing for lower income families. For more information, visit www.wildrivershabitat.org/restore.

About Wild Rivers Habitat for Humanity Wild Rivers Habitat for Humanity, located in St. Croix Falls, is an affiliate of Habitat for Humanity International. WRHFH serves Polk and Burnett counties and has built 20 homes since 1997. Habitat raises funds and donated building materials, organizes volunteers, selects a family and builds a home. Habitat doesn’t give anything away. The family is required to help build the home, and they buy it from Habitat with a no- or low-interest mortgage when it is complete. For more information, call 715-4832700 or visit www.wildrivershabitat.org.

About Vintage Tech Recyclers Based in Romeoville, Ill., Vintage Tech Recyclers Inc. is an R2/ISO 14001 and WBENC certified company. For more information about responsible electronic recycling, visit Vintage Tech’s Web site at www.Vintagetechrecyclers.com. - submitted

Majority of Israelis “shocked” by Obama’s speech, says speaker

by Wayne Anderson Special to the Leader GRANTSBURG - President Barack Obama shocked listeners with a major speech at the state department last Thursday, May 19, when he suggested Israel surrender their land for “peace” and return its borders to where they were before the Six-Day War in 1967. The new policy ignited a firestorm locally in Northwest Wisconsin and around the world. “I think that was a terrible thing that Obama said,” said Pnina Ben Yaakov, a Christian-Jew who was born in Wisconsin and now lives in Israel. Yaakov was in Grantsburg speaking at New Hope Lutheran Church on Sunday, May 22, regarding her life and work in Israel. “There is no way to go back to the 1967 borders,” said Yaakov. “We (Israel) would only be nine miles from an indefensible border ... It’s a matter of security.” She said the vast majority of Israelis were shocked to hear such a plan. “The people of Israel are very disappointed in Obama,” Yaakov said. The Six-Day War occurred in June 1967. Several countries, including Egypt, Jordan and Syria, amassed troops and tanks on Israel’s border in preparation for an attack. But in a pre-emptive strike, Israel launched a swift counterattack and in six days defeated their enemies, while capturing lands which are now called the Gaza Strip and West Bank. The captured areas serve as a defensive strip of land between Israel and neighboring countries, who have publically expressed desire for Israel’s destruction. Not only are Jews here and abroad shocked by Obama’s policy shift, local non-Jews with ties to Israel have voiced disappointment as well. “Israel has to have borders that are defensible,” said Dr. Emory Johnson, pastor of New Hope who lived on a kibbutz (collective community) in Israel and has been to

God says, “The land is mine.” Israel is called the “promised land” that God gave to the Jews. One local serviceman, who participated in the Six-Day War, is also startled by the commander-in-chief’s new Mideast policy. “I would say it was absolutely unacceptable,” said Norm Peterson, who served in intelligence on a Navy ship during the war. He said then-President Richard Nixon ordered the Sixth Fleet into the Mediterranean Sea to supply and support and protect Israel. Why would Obama now change a long-standing U.S. commitment to Israel? Peterson said Obama sees Middle East policy with different eyes and wants to gain favor from Israel’s neighbors. “I think our president is misguided with the Muslim world,” Peterson said. “He said it (the policy) for a standing in the Arab world.” A Canadian, who is visiting her family in Grantsburg, said she and others north of the U.S. border are also amazed at Obama’s recent pronouncement. “Unbelievable!” said Anne Maslow, who lives in Nova Scotia. “This is just atrocious.” She said her sentiments are strongly echoed by Canada’s leader. “Stephen Harper put his foot down,” said Maslow. “Instead of hiding, he made a public statement.” Prime Minister Stephen Harper immediately issued a statement saying Canada will defend Israel at “whatever Pnina Ben Yaakov (left) joins Dr. Emory Johnson at New the cost.” And personally he is, “prepared to suffer any Hope Lutheran in their support of Israel and opposition to Pres- political backlash that comes his way.” ident Obama’s proposal that Israel return its borders to preIsraeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu also re1967 boundaries. - Photo by Wayne Anderson jected Obama’s new-border policy. He called the old borders “indefensible.” In a statement released late Thursday, Netanyahu said Israel a dozen times. “These borders are the borders of such a withdrawal would jeopardize Israel’s security and Israel today, which includes the West Bank and Gaza,” leave people living in the West Bank in harm’s way. he said. Johnson cited the Bible in this matter. In Leviticus 25:23


Longtime teachers retire from Luck

PAGE 6 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

Elementary test scores good

by Mary Stirrat Leader staff writer LUCK — Three Luck teachers, averaging more than 30 years each, are retiring at the end of this school year and the school board Monday evening, May 23, approved new hires to fill some of the void. Sheila Brom has taught high school math and physical education for 36 years, Gwynn Anderson has been a special education instructor for 35 years, and Shirlee Erickson has been an elementary teacher for 24 years. Hired as pre-K through sixth-grade special education instructor is Lisa Valentine, with Isaiah Miller hired as special education instructor for grades seven through 12. Megan Challoner was hired at 60 percent of full time as the K-12 physical education instructor, and Ryan Humpal was hired at 60 percent of full time as science teacher for grades seven through 12. The school is planning special recognition events for Brom, Anderson and Erickson during the last week of school, which ends Friday, June 3.

Test scores Results from the Wisconsin Concepts and Knowledge Exams for grades three through eight and 10 were presented to the board, showing Luck students scoring above the state average in many subjects at many grade levels. WCKE compiles scores into three categories, with minimal the lowest, basic the middle and proficient/advanced the highest. The goals are to move students from minimal to at least basic and to have at least 80 percent score proficient/ advanced. At least 80 percent of students in grades three through six did reach the proficient/advanced score in all areas that were tested, with the exception of sixthgrade math and fourth-grade language arts. In sixth-grade math, 75 percent of Luck sixth-graders tested reached that level, compared with 79 percent statewide. The numbers were turned

around for fourth-grade language arts, where 79 percent of Luck students scored proficient/advanced, while the state score was 75 percent. In all other subjects that third-, fourth-, fifth-, and sixth-graders were tested, Luck met the 80-percent goal while exceeding the state average. Third-graders were tested in reading and math, with 84 percent proficient/advanced in reading and 81 percent in math. State levels were at 79 percent and 73 percent respectively. Fourth-graders were tested in reading, math, language arts, science and social studies. In social studies, 100 percent of students tested were at the proficient/advanced level, compared with the state score of 91 percent. In reading, 97 percent of Luck students scored proficient/advanced, compared with a statewide score of 82 percent. In math, 82 percent of Luck students scored proficient/advanced, and in science 86 percent reached that level. State scores in math and science were 79 percent and 76 percent respectively. Fifth- and sixth-graders are tested in math and reading, and fifth-graders exceeded state scores on both counts. Fifthgraders scored 92 percent proficient in reading and 87 percent proficient in math, compared with 84 percent and 78 percent for the state as a whole. Sixth-grade math, as noted above, was below the state score, but reading came in at 89 percent proficient/advanced, compared with 86 percent for the state. Luck received its lowest score in seventh-grade math, where only 66 percent scored proficient/advanced, compared with the state score of 78 percent. Reading scores came in at 87 percent proficient/advanced, compared with 86 percent for the state. Eighth-graders are tested in reading, math, language arts, science and social studies. Luck failed to meet the state average in reading and math, but still scored above the goal of 80 percent proficient/advanced in reading. In reading, Luck eighth-graders scored 84 percent proficient/advanced, and 74 percent proficient/advanced in math.

State scores for these two subjects are 86 percent and 78 percent proficient/advanced. Luck scored 80 percent proficient/advanced in both language arts and science, and 90 percent in social studies. State scores were, respectively, 61 percent, 76 percent and 81 percent. Tenth-graders are scored in all the same subjects as eighth-graders, and while the 10th grade surpassed the state scores in all categories, they failed to meet the 80-percent mark in math, language arts and social studies. Proficient/advanced scores in 10th grade were 82 percent in reading, 77 percent in math, 76 percent in language arts, 82 percent in science and 79 percent in social studies. State scores for these subjects were 74 percent in reading, 70 percent in math, 71 percent in language arts, 73 percent in science and 79 percent in social studies.

Habitat for Humanity request Eric Kube, executive director of Wild Rivers Habitat for Humanity, met with the board to ask that the district consider hosting a TeenServe Workcamp for a week during the summer of 2012. TeenServe would be under the auspices of Habitat for Humanity’s new program, A Brush with Kindness. A Brush with Kindness, said Kube, is available to help low-income residents of Polk and Burnett counties with exterior repairs to their home. Volunteers conduct the work, making it possible to serve many families in a very cost-effective way. The camp would bring 300 students and 60 or more adults who would stay at the school while doing about 100 housing improvement projects for low-income residents in the two counties. Students who take part, said Kube, are “cream of the crop kids who are serious about coming to your community to build it up, not tear it down.” About 30 classrooms would be needed for sleeping rooms, the gym would be needed for evening programs, the locker and shower facilities would be used, and a shop or garage for storage. In addition, if possible, a kitchen worker

ALYESKA CONTRACTING, LLC

Roofing - Steel & Shingles New Construction & Remodels Decks • Siding Insured/Work. Comp./30 Years’ Experience

Meeting At A & H Senior Citizen Center (just south of A on H)

Join Us For:

Sunday Worship Service - 10 a.m. Wed. Bible Study - 7 p.m. Pastor Tryg Wistad 715-635-9222

536088 39-40L 29-30a

Jamie Booth/Sam Leggitt

Owners/Operators P.O.Box 296 St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 Jamie 651-308-5876 Sam 715-553-0278 AlyeskaContracting@yahoo.com Alyeska Lic. #1173158 536494 39-42Lp 29-32a,b,d,ep

and custodian would be utilized. TeenServe would pay the salaries and reimburse the district for supplies. District administrator Rick Palmer said the only concern he had with the idea is that the amount of space required by the group would mean that most of the school would be unavailable for summer maintenance, cleaning, and painting projects for next year. The board will discuss the request and make a decision at a future meeting. Anyone interested in more information on A Brush with Kindness program can contact Wild Rivers Habitat for Humanity at 715-483-2700. Funds and paint, donated by Velspar, are available, and applicants for help are needed.

SoberCruzin A grant awarded to New Paradigm Partners, a consortium of six rural school districts, including Luck, has provided the opportunity for Luck students finishing sixth, seventh, or eighth grade to join students from other communities for free — and alcohol-free — activities. The activities funded through the Schools and Households Alcohol Reduction Project grant are designed to build community bonding that will help students stand up for staying alcohol-free. Schools that are part of New Paradigm Partners are Birchwood, Bruce, New Auburn, Minong, Luck and Shell Lake. The summerlong activities began with a kickoff work day on the Ice Age Trail in Birchwood. The Luck Golf Course will host the second event, Thursday, June 9, which will include experience on the driving range, a picnic lunch and a trek on the Gandy Dancer trail. Other events include strawberry picking followed by games and grilling, a day of pontoon boating, fishing, swimming and barbecuing at Birchwood, and a tour of the agricultural center in Spooner followed by beach volleyball and swimming in Shell Lake. Anyone interested in more information can contact the school.

NOTICE

Early deadline for the June 1

News Releases 4:30 p.m. Fri., May 27 Advertising 10 a.m. Tues., May 31 536358 39-40L

537318 40L


Annual Garden Parties with Shirley Crowe and Becky Dickinson - Annual and perennial bedding plants, naturally raised, from seed to garden. - No pesticides or herbicides. - Only organic fertilizer used. - Plants are hardened off and ready for the garden. - Heirloom tomatoes, gourmet colored sweet peppers, ready-to-plant gourmet lettuces, herbs, hardy perennials, annual flowers and a wide selection of petunias, from mini to large. - For more information call 715-822-4229

Luck Lions Park

May 27......................3-7 p.m. May 28............9 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Natural Alternative, Luck

June 3..............Noon - 6 p.m. June 4.............9 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Amery Art in the Park

June 25.............8 a.m.-3 p.m.

Lucky Days, Luck July 22 & 23

Local Farmers Markets

535952 40Lp

by Nancy Jappe Leader staff writer SIREN - It will be with mixed feelings, and no doubt a tear or two, when Siren School health aide Sharon Richison leaves the building on the last day of school in early June. Richison is the last still-working member of a group of Siren staff who were referred to as “the old guard.” This year, however, will be the end of Richison’s 31 years with the district. She reachs retirement age Aug. 31, and her official retirement date will be Sept. 1. However, because she doesn’t work during the summer, some type of retirement celebration will take place in the school auditorium after the students leave the building on the last day of school. “It’s sad to go, but it is time to let someone younger do this job,” Richison said. Richison started with the disSharon Richison, the last member of what has been trict as a substitute early childcalled “the old guard” at Siren School, is retiring after hood teacher for an eight-week 31 years with the Siren School District. “It’s sad to go, period 31 years ago. When the eight weeks were over, she was but it is time to let someone younger do this job,” Richioffered a job, working for the next son said. nine years with Joyce Peterson in early childhood classes. Sometimes she phone and makes a call to 911. In addition to first-aid treatment, Richiworked full time, sometimes part time, depending on how many children were son fills in with other jobs, such as handling the school-based service billings, enrolled. “I liked the kids. They were funny and making sure the school defribillators are honest. There were so many things the in working order and handling secretarkids said,” Richison commented, adding ial work for the school nurse, who is on that stories she remembered about the duty two days a week. Her replacement kids in those days would take too long to is to be one of the existing aides, who will be trained as a health aide and will work retell in this article. With one year off to work on her college 2-1/2 hours a day. “I’m not sure who that degree, Richison went on to become the will be,” Richison said. When asked about changes she has district’s health aide, taking over when Darlene Groves retired. She was also sec- noted during her time with the district, retary to Bert Lund Jr., now-retired school Richison commented that parents expect guidance counselor. Four years ago, the more from the school staff than they used secretarial position was dropped from to, and that children need more attention Richison’s workload, and she went to than they did when she started working. working five hours a day five days a She reasons that the latter is occurring because, with more parents in the workweek. “There’s always someone to take care force, they spend as much time as they of,” Richison said, citing injuries that can with their children, causing the chiloccur during recess and in physical edu- dren to expect more attention from their cation classes. She gives medications to teachers. Richison mentioned the teaching staff’s students on a regular or as-needed basis, with permission from parents and med- ability to communicate with parents by eical doctors. She has had training in med- mail, reporting on things their children ical first aid, CPR and AED (defribrillator are doing, either good or bad. The physuse), training that is renewed every two ical layout of the school building, with the addition put on a few years ago, has years. Care is given to children with asthma, made a big difference for the students and diabetes and allergies to bee stings. At staff, with it taking longer to get around one time, in an early childhood class, the building. “Kids run, thinking they’ll Richison did tube feedings and catheteri- never get to the other end in time,” Richizations. “Whatever needs to be done for son commented. She has very positive things to say children, I do, as long as the paperwork is in order,” she commented. The classroom about the school staff. “I think we have a teachers have to be aware of conditions good caring staff. Under any circumthat need treatment because Richison has stances, they come up with doing their not been on a full-time schedule. If any- best,” she said. As far as future plans are concerned, thing happens that requires training beyond what she has, she reaches for the Richison and her husband, Jim, plan to play golf and do some traveling. One trip will be to New Hampshire to visit her family. She and two of her sisters plan on taking a 10-day trip to Ireland, their mother’s home country, this summer. She and Jim will play it by ear as far as other trips are concerned. The couple have two children, Jimmy (Mary Beth) and Jacey (Dan) Lea, and four grandchildren, two girls and two boys. “It won’t be just one thing I’ll miss (about school),” Richison said. “I’ll miss the kids because I love kids. I am going to miss the staff. I’ve had a really good relationship with everybody I have worked with. The staff has always been really good about biting the bullet and doing what they have to do. The children have always been very respectful to me. There are a lot of good kids here.” Armed with lots of good memIn the course of her workday, Siren School health aide ories, and shedding a few tears as Sharon Richison treats many cuts and bruises on stu- she goes, Sharon Richison will dents of all ages. She is shown here checking a long close the door to her office and scratch kindergartner Lindsay Liljenberg received while walk out of Siren School on the last day, another phase of her life out on the playground. – Photos by Nancy Jappe ready to begin.

FROM SEED TO GARDEN

In Observance of Memorial Day, Our Offices Will Be Closed Monday, May 30, 2011. We Will Reopen For Business As Usual On Tuesday, May 31.

Have A Safe Memorial Day!

Printers of the Indianhead, Wild Rivers North, Wild Rivers South, Tri-County North, Tri-County South Advertisers Inter-County Leader and Washburn County Register

536315 40L, 30a-e

Mixed feelings go along with school retirement

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 7

Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association

303 N. Wisconsin Ave. Frederic, Wis.

715-327-4236

24154 State Rd. 35N Siren, Wis.

715-349-2560

107 N. Washington St. St. Croix Falls, Wis.

715-483-9008

11 West 5th Ave. Shell Lake, Wis.

715-468-2314

537382 40L


PAGE 8 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

COMMUNITY

VIEWPOINTS

SEND YOUR VIEWS AND FEEDBACK TO: INTER-COUNTY LEADER, BOX 490, FREDERIC, WI 54837 OR E-MAIL the-leader@centurytel.net

• Words from the editor •

• Joe Heller •

In the background and the forefront

There’s an 84-year-old gentleman we know - you could call him the Bruce Springsteen of the trumpet scene for lack of a better analogy - who is ready to set aside his horn in realization that the energy level required for music gigs has danced away, perhaps in one last bittersweet waltz. He’s played countless proms, weddings and New Year’s Eve dances over the decades, into his 80s. His talent sometimes expanded to various odd requests, from playing a cavalry charge on some inebriated football fan’s bugle in the end zone of the old Met stadium to putting together a dixieland quartet to entertain participants in a cannonball run, a high-speed race that illegally wound through northern Wisconsin several years ago. His music varied from jazz to big band to the requested country songs - and oh yeah, those beloved polkas. But he never took his talent as seriously as when he played at military funerals - literally hundreds of them in his lifetime. And never was he more self-aware or self-analytical as when he finished playing taps, the simple, mournful, 24-note song that makes the spines of listeners stiffen by the third note. “It went good,” he’d say, or “I hope no one noticed that one note.” He felt that staying out of sight was important. Once, during a Memorial Day program decades ago, he hid in an old ice-fishing house on the shore of a local lake, with just the bell of his trumpet peeking out, knowing it would add to the mystique of the day, people wondering where those haunting notes were coming from. But a gust of wind blew the door to the shack shut, slamming the end of the trumpet into his mouth, just as the last volley of tribute shots were fired, the cue for the taps player. He managed to still play the song, his lips swollen painfully by the final note. He always laughed but afforded himself a moment of pride when telling that story. Taps got played that day. Of all the people in the audience at a memorial where taps was played, he would be the most sympathetic. He often commented on how bad he felt for the man who played taps at President Kennedy’s funeral in 1963 - the one bad note that stood out - but perhaps echoed how broken so many Americans felt at that time. To the players of taps on this coming Memorial Day: No one really knows the responsibility, honor and loneliness you may be feeling - perhaps all those emotions at the same time. But the truly patriotic appreciate your willingness to be part of a time-honored tradition - especially the young students who have volunteered for a big responsibility - playing in the background while offering the forefront of our special tribute on a very special day. Editorials by Gary King

• Web poll results •

Last week’s question

To take part in our poll, go to the-leader.net and scroll down to the lower left part of the screen • See front page for this week’s question

Find us online @ www.the-leader.net

• Where to write • President Barack Obama 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Washington, D.C. 20500 www.whitehouse.gov/contact/ Gov. Scott Walker Wisconsin State Capitol Madison, WI 53707 transition@wisconsin.gov

Congressman Sean Duffy (7th District) 1208 Longworth House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 202-225-3365

U.S. Sen. Herb Kohl 330 Hart Senate Office Bldg. Washington, D.C. 20510 715-832-8492 senator_kohl@kohl.senate.gov

Rep. Erik Severson (28th District) Room 6 North State Capitol Madison, WI 53708 608-267-2365 • 888-529-0028 FAX: 608-282-3628 rep.Severson@legis.state.wi.us Rep. Roger RIvard (75th District) State Capitol Room 307 North P.O. Box 8952, Madison, WI 608-266-2519 • 888-534-0075 rep.rivard@legis.wi.gov U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson 2 Russell Courtyard Washington, D.C. 20510 202-224-5323

Sen. Robert Jauch (25th District) Room 415 South, State Capitol P.O. Box 7882, Madison, WI 53707 Sen.Jauch@legis.state.wi.us Sen. Sheila Harsdorf (10th District) State Capitol, P.O. Box 7882 Madison, WI 53707 608-266-7745 • 715-232-1390 Toll-free - 800-862-1092 sen.harsdorf@legis.state.wi.us

Rep. Nick Milroy (73rd District) Room 8 North, State Capitol P.O. Box 8953, Madison 53708 rep.milroy@legis.state.wi.us

• Words from the editor • Checking the measurements

We wish to compliment the Leader for its fair and balanced coverage of our election day activities in Frederic regarding the recall of state Sen. Sheila Harsdorf (“Respect is the ‘only way out,’ says recall petitioner,” May 18, 2011). Comments attributed to village officials, however, seem to suggest, and incorrectly so, that we were somehow violating the law at Frederic’s village hall while soliciting signatures for the Recall Harsdorf campaign. The article states, “. . . There was some miscommunication initially when Haumant and Carlson were asked to move their table to the edge of the village hall property limits, noted village Administrator Dave Wondra.” Wondra’s statement not only is misleading and inaccurate but can be proven as such. Upon our arrival, we spoke with Frederic’s chief election official, Kristi Swanson, as a courtesy so that officials would be aware of our presence. We then set up our tray table and materials at the edge of the village hall property. Contrary to what Wondra claims, we were told to move across the street, not to the edge of the property limits. Not until village clerk Swanson learned of the misunderstanding, and not until a phone call was placed by us to the village’s attorney, were we allowed to return to our original location at the edge of the property. Next, the article quotes Wondra as saying, “The law says (petitioners, etc.) cannot be in the polling area and cannot block the entrance to the building or intimidate people — we just wanted them to move away from the door a little bit.” While Wondra is correct in characterizing the law on this point, his comment about

our moving “away from the door a little bit” is nonsense. He seems to suggest we were either blocking the entrance or intimidating people. Nothing could be further from the truth. Although some officials or voters may have been annoyed by our petition activities because of differing political views, Wisconsin law draws a fair and clear distinction between that and what constitutes interference with an election. Any number of voters could confirm our location and conduct prior to our being asked to leave. Police Chief Severude is even quoted as saying our manner was “very polite.” Surprisingly, the most accurate indication of our presence on election day might originate from the most unlikely of sources, the Rev. Jody Walter, whose comments in opposition to our activities appear in the article: “Walter told the Leader that he was 20 to 30 feet away from the petitioners at all times.” This is one point where we and Walter are in agreement. This distance,”20 to 30 feet,” it should be noted, is two to three times the minimum from the “path of travel” that the state election board had recommended in its memo to all local election officials on this point. We don’t mind that a misunderstanding occurred on election day. We all make mistakes from time to time. What raises our concern, and perhaps the concerns of Frederic residents, is when a village official fails to acknowledge a goof-up, apparently choosing instead to shift blame to those who simply are exercising their lawful right to engage in the political process. Eleanore Carlson Frederic Don Haumant Twin Cities (Frederic native)

Views expressed on these pages do not necessarily reflect the views of management or board members.

T H E

I N T E R - C O U N T Y

L E A D E R

I S

A


• Letters to the editor • A song of the times

Wisconsin - My Home (sweet?) Home (Sung to the tune of the Battle Hymn of the Republic)

Verse 1 Mine eyes have seen the horror of the ruining of our state, Scott’s trampling on our voter rights with politics of hate, With brothers Fritz and brothers Koch, their motto and their plan, Is “do it ‘cause you can!” (Refrain) There are people here who care! They will fight and never rest. Scott, you’ll find out in the end, the last laugh is the best!! Verse 2 Soon guns in every pocket, and failing public schools, The elderly and poor ignored, our water poisoned, too, They laugh with glee while giving all our money to their friends, But their power grab will end! (refrain) Verse 3 From distant lands our forebears came, and carved out in this land, A home from the wilderness with just their two strong hands, Their politics progressive a good life for us they won, Their legacy lives on! (refrain for verse 3) We’ll undo the wrong they’ve done. We will fight and never rest. The wrong shall fail and the right shall prevail, Wisconsin’s still the best! Priscilla Fjorden Milltown

Excited about candidate

I’m joining Burnett County voters excited about Wisconsin Senate District 10 candidate Shelly Moore, following her introduction in Siren on May 17. Actually having a candidate I could speak with who listened to my concerns was truly refreshing. What impressed me most about Moore was her enthusiasm to represent the values of people who live in northwestern Wisconsin, not just the special interest groups in Madison. I found her to be very intelligent and well informed on current legislation in our state’s Legislature. It was impressing to finally hear a candidate that supports preserving our farmland, water, schools, forestlands and culture. Moore believes those friends and neighbors who serve us in government are an asset, not something to be scorned. Moore is a real Wisconsin resident who hails from a middle-class background. She has earned her right to represent voters. She is a third-generation teacher, nationally certified with a master’s degree in English education from UW-River Falls. Included in her education are studies in political science and constitutional law. She has personal experience in managing business while working her way through college and has served to protect families while on the board of the Turningpoint Domestic Violence Shelter in River Falls. Moore is an avid sportswoman who cherishes our heritage to fish and hunt in our great outdoors. We can all benefit by voting for her. Expect bipartisan representation from her as our elected representative. She will protect our seniors by defending programs that support their needs. Jobs are high on Moore’s agenda. She pledges to work to protect quality jobs that residents can depend on to raise families and grow our economy in this great state. Schools, of course, are high on her list of priorities. She has a wealth of experience in education with the personal tool kit to resolve the budget and quality issues facing our schools. Dismiss party-line politics and join the people of Burnett County who have found a candidate that supports what we stand for. Vote in the special election for progress, not the regressive power grab that will lead to big government in Wisconsin. Vote for Shelly Moore. Richard Costerisan Siren

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 9

Supporting Moore

When Jim Doyle was governor, Sheila Harsdorf seemed very concerned about limiting the power of the governorship. She wanted us to believe that she was acting on principle when she tried to strip all policy items from the Doyle budget and sponsored legislation to limit the governor’s veto authority. On her Web site she wrote, “A system of checks and balances will build confidence in the budgeting process.” Now that the Republicans are in complete control of state government, Sen. Harsdorf’s concern for those checks and balances seems to have evaporated. The positions she took two years ago are now revealed to have been based more on partisanship than on principle; how else to explain the fact that Gov. Walker’s proposed budget is chock full of policy issues? With Harsdorf’s support, our current governor has engaged in a power grab unprecedented in recent state history. A few examples: 1. Walker has expanded his executive authority by making over 50 percent of civil service jobs into political appointees. 2. Walker has required that new administrative rules go through him before they go for legislative approval, giving himself the authority to change or nullify rules. 3. Walker has eliminated the Department of Commerce, appointing himself to chair the new Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation, whose board he will also appoint. One-party rule is inherently undemocratic, as there are no checks on the power of the party in control. I am worried about the damage that could be done to our state if we don’t return some balance to the Legislature. That’s why I supported the recall of Sheila Harsdorf and why I’ll be voting for Shelly Moore in the special election on July 12. Bob Dueholm Luck

Dear thief

Did you ever stop to think about who your action would affect or the impact and message that you are sending? Your actions of breaking into our cabin shed in McKinley has been very upsetting to our twin grandsons. Many tears were shed, and so many questions are being asked regarding their safe surroundings and why anyone would do such a thing. These boys saved all their money for two years to purchase the Binli 90cc fourwheeler that you stole. I hope that you are trying to sell it and that someone will inform the authorities, so that you are caught. If anyone has a child’s size four-wheeler for sale, please contact us as we would like to put smiles back on these two little boys faces. Very disgusted, Rod and DeeDee Dague Town of McKinley

Don’t let special interests have fi fin nal say

A state budget with no deficit and all bills paid? It’s not only possible, but the norm in some places. Not here. In Wisconsin, you could liquidate all the assets of the entire middle class and still not have enough money to pay for all the programs. The majority of voters, who spoke on Nov. 4, 2010, understand that the budget is like a cup, with tax money flowing in the top and out through various holes; like DOT, Medicare, education, pensions, prisons, etc. Special interests have enlarged the holes here to the point of breaking the cup. There is no way to fill a cup with such big holes in it. You can raise taxes until you tax the elderly out of their homes, (oh, we already do that) and until no one else can afford a home. Wisconsin still won’t have enough money for their rapacious budget. Not until they shrink the holes. Who gave us the idea that we are entitled to have all the government programs we want? Where are the stone tablets that

say we as a people are entitled to smooth roads, air-conditioned, computerized education for all, health care on demand, full prisons and the rest of it? Wake up people. In Benjamin Franklin’s timeless words, “If you buy things you don’t need, sooner or later you will have to sell things you do need.” Unless our government starts living within the means given it, it will liquidate the assets of the entire middle class, and still be behind in the budget. It will not control itself of its own accord. There are too many special interest groups and lobbies. Just look at the hullabaloo recently. We need a constitutional amendment that requires a balanced budget every year, with some teeth in it that says if the Legislature does not present a balanced budget, without borrowing, to the governor, then he must be the one to make the cuts, but cuts must be made until the budget is balanced. This is called living within your means. Other states, such as Utah, have such an amendment. Utah hasn’t had a deficit in over a decade. They paid cash for their last highway road project. And yes, the streets are paved, the schools air-conditioned, and their university is excellent; it is possible. And business thrives in such an environment. Other states have done similar “live within your means” legislation. Imagine, no debt. Wisconsin too can have such fiscal responsibility. Vote to keep the process going. Vote for Sheila Harsdorf on July 12. Write your legislators and demand a “live within your means” amendment to the constitution. We can turn this around, people. Stand up and be heard. Don’t let special interest groups, outside money or union big shots have the final word about raising your taxes and continuing the handouts. Vote. Lydia Rennicke Comstock

A permit to vote … but not to carry a gun

We have an interesting situation developing in the Severson/Harsdorf legislature in Madison. If Senate Bill 93, also called the “constitutional carry law,” passes you will not be required to have a permit or training to carry a concealed weapon. This is based on the belief that the second amendment of the Constitution gives all citizens the right to keep and bear arms, and should not be infringed upon by federal or state government. Meanwhile the Severson/Harsdorf Legislature is passing a Voter ID law intended to curtail your constitutional right to vote. It should be noted that the right to vote is implicit within the following Constitutional amendments: 15th (vote shall not be limited by race), 19th (vote shall not be limited by gender), 24th (you will not have to pay poll tax to vote), and 26th (gave 18-year-olds the right to vote). But the Severson/Harsdorf Legislature is passing the Voter ID bill requiring specific voter identification in order to cast your vote. Even state university-issued photo IDs may not be accepted. No college ID used in the state, including the University of Wisconsin campus in Madison, now meets those standards. It should also be pointed out that the new rules will cost $5.2 million of unbudgeted dollars to implement, which will mean cutting back on existing government services to cover the costs. So folks if you want to vote, be sure to get a valid driver’s license, state issued ID card, military ID, or a U.S. passport. Otherwise you will not be allowed to vote in Wisconsin. It makes me wonder if Severson, Harsdorf and Gov. Walker are more afraid of an informed base of citizens voting, or a citizen carrying a gun ... if their ideas pass, you won’t need a permit to carry a gun, but you will need a permit to vote. Jim North Osceola

C O O P E R A T I V E - O W N E D

Respect a two-way street

I read last week’s full-page discussion of respect with regard to people’s opinion. I wholeheartedly agree that we should respect the rights of others to their opinions. I got the gist of the story to be that all people who disagreed with this person’s viewpoint were shouting, swearing, irrational people. I personally know many people who disagree with the recall vote that are not “raving maniacs” and do respect your right for a recall vote. Just a couple of weeks ago, a writer wrote in to the Letters to the Editor page stating that all of the recall petitioners were from the state of Wisconsin and most were from within the voting districts that they were gathering signatures from (except a few that may have been from the Green Bay area). It appears that the information they were stating was less than accurate. The person with the respect issue is no longer a resident of Wisconsin. Why are they involved getting signatures for a recall vote in Wisconsin? Just because they were once citizens, does that have some kind of “grandfathering” clause to vote in Wisconsin? It doesn’t matter if you lived here quietly for 50 years or singlehandedly built the Eiffel Tower. Once you leave this state, you give up your right to be involved with the voting process. I just ask this individual to respect the citizens of Wisconsin. We voted who we wanted in office. Just because you don’t agree with the Wisconsin voters does not give you the right to tamper with our voting results. After all, respect is a two-way street. You have the right to freedom of speech, but not the right to be involved with the voting in every state in the union. Dave Wilhelmy Siren

They’re fi fin nally getting us

As a veteran, a former military officer and covert operations specialist with the CIA, I write on this Veterans Day to urge you to continue to press the Obama administration and Congress to limit any further expenditure of American lives and resources in military operations in Afghanistan and to expedite the withdrawal of U.S. forces from Iraq. Bush’s Iraq war, history will reflect, was an obvious fiasco from beginning to whatever end may come. The history of military incursions in Afghanistan is one of tragedy and embarrassment for invading forces as I’m sure you are well aware. Our national security is not in jeopardy in either Afghanistan or Iraq. I still maintain contacts within the Pentagon and the CIA with active-duty and career officers. In my discussions with them, off the record, not one has a positive outlook with respect to our continuing involvement, militarily, in these countries. On the contrary, they, as I do, see our country repeating the debacle that was Vietnam. Please tell the president he should not be manipulated by those who have a special interest in the propagation of these wars of no end. He is walking into a minefield, the generals be damned. Pakistan is where the nuclear weapons are. Pakistan is where Islamic terrorists are based. These are realities that do, indeed, threaten our national security. Why then are we expending ourselves in a hopeless conflict with the Taliban in Afghanistan? The only mission(s) that make sense is that of reinforcing the Pakistanis and the countries that are adjacent to Afghanistan and establishing an operational and intelligence capability to enter Afghanistan to strike terrorist targets with drones and special-operations raids. This can be done with minimal forces as compared to what we’ve now or may commit with present in-the-box strategic thinking. Please try to prevent America from another military/strategic blunder. Brad Ayers Frederic

N E W S P A P E R


Duo caught in the act of church break-in

PAGE 10 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

Canine officer used in apprehension of burglars

at just before 4 a.m. on Sunday, May 15, at the Trinity Lutheran Church on Seminole Avenue in Osceola. The two witnesses had called 911 to report seeing two men on the roof, attempting to get in through a roof vent. When the police arrived, the duo apparently made a run for it, with the officer cutting them off by driving across the grass yard. One of the alleged burglars even ran into the squad car in the process. The officer was able to get the one suspect to give up quickly, and stayed lying on the ground, while the other man attempted to flee the canine officer. Once he saw the police dog in pursuit, however, the man quickly complied and the officer called the dog off, saving the man a potentially serious apprehension injury.

Both men were placed under arrest and, when questioned, claimed they liked to go on roofs and that they had no intention of breaking in and robbing the church. They were identified as Chad Miller, 23, of Shafer, Minn., and Keith Lauer, 23, of Taylors Falls, Minn. Both of the alleged burglars were arrested and charged with criminal damage to property, criminal trespassing, resisting arrest and disorderly conduct. They have both been released on bonds, with Lauer free on a $500 bond and Miller free on a $1,500 bond. They were also ordered to have no contact with the witnesses or the church. Their next court appearances are set for July 11 before Judge Molly GaleWyrick.

by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer CENTURIA – A Centuria man stands accused of attempting to take justice into his own hands after his wife was apparently flashed by a man while jogging. The woman said she was jogging on Thursday, May 12, when a man in a similar-looking vehicle stopped and

jumped out of the car, completely naked, flashing her. According to the Polk County Sheriff’s Department, the victim’s husband, Eric Dunsmoor, 50, had been told by his wife of the incident and then she saw a similarlooking car three days later. She said that when she saw the car, she told her husband, who stopped the man, got him to roll down his window and then he allegedly punched him in the face and then turned his steering wheel so the vehicle went into the ditch, which is where

police found it when they arrived a short time later on Saturday evening. The man behind the wheel of the car in the ditch apparently had a solid alibi at the time of the alleged flashing, and Dunsmoor was taken into custody and arrested for battery, although at press time he had yet to be officially charged, and there is no word on the identity of the actual flasher.

by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer CLEAR LAKE – A 17-year-old Clear Lake man is facing several charges related to allegedly driving into one of his parents vehicles, and then pointing a rifle at them. According to the Clear Lake Police Department, the incident occurred on the afternoon of Friday, May 13, near the Clear Lake High School, when Anthony Ninke allegedly ran his truck into his parents’ vehicle, causing

bodywork damage, and then pointed a 30-06 rifle at them a short time later. It all began when Ninke apparently got into a fight with another family member and had been away from the home for two weeks since. When police tracked Ninke down, he initially denied the rifle incident, but after the rifle was not found in the gun cabinet where he said it was being stored, police arrested him for disorderly conduct, reckless endanger-

ment and two counts of endangering safety with a firearm. Ninke had yet to be charged as of press time and, according to the report, the family was attempting to work the situation out.

by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer OSCEOLA – Two men were apparently caught in the act of attempting to break into an Osceola church over the weekend by using a plastic storage bin to get up onto the roof in the middle of the night, but two witnesses were able to steer police to the suspects, who tracked them down using the Osceola Police Department’s K9 officer, Smokey. According to the police reports, the incident occurred

Man accused of wrong flasher battery

Similar car does not mean identical features

Teen accused of hit-and-run and rifle threats

North Memorial donates ambulance to SWAT team

Mark Manning (left) of North Memorial is shown here with Burnett County Sheriff Dean Roland. North Memorial generously donated the pictured ambulance to the Burnett County Sheriff’s Department for use by the Burnett County SWAT Team. - Special photo

Lions Club extends gratitude to students

Severson said he’s committed to saving SeniorCare

MADISON – State Rep. Erik Severson, R-Osceola, is joining his Assembly colleagues in keeping SeniorCare intact. “Cutting SeniorCare has never been an option,” said Severson. “The program works, and thousands of seniors in the 28th District and across Wisconsin rely on it for affordable prescription drugs.” Gov. Scott Walker’s initial budget proposal called for shifting some of the costs associated with SeniorCare to the federally administered Medicare Part D program, though it never called for any cuts to service. In light of the governor’s proposal and unfounded attacks from third-party interest groups and partisan politicians, Severson is making it clear that he will fight to keep the benefits of SeniorCare intact for low-income seniors. “I was disappointed to see that our seniors were being scared into believing that Republicans were going to cut or eliminate the SeniorCare program,” said Severson. “The program was created by Assembly Republicans and has proven to be a huge success in helping our low-income seniors.” The Joint Finance Committee is expected to take up the issue of SeniorCare soon, with a target date of Thursday, June 2, for completion of their budget meetings. - from office of Rep. Severson

ENDLESS

POSSIBILITIES If you can dream it, we can print it. Stop in and see us for all your printing needs. You will be delighted at the quality, value and service. All 4 Locations

536293 29a,b,c,d 40r,L

INTER-COUNTY COOPERATIVE PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION

The Lions Club extends gratitude to the St. Croix Falls High School students who helped with the cleanup and brush removal from the Lions Park during Community Service Day. – Photo submitted

303 N. Wisconsin Ave. Frederic, Wis.

24154 State Rd. 35N Siren, Wis.

107 N. Washington St. Downtown St. Croix Falls, Wis.

11 West 5th Ave. Shell Lake, Wis.

715-327-4236 715-483-9008

715-349-2560 715-468-2314


Community Service Day

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 11

ST. CROIX FALLS – St. Croix Falls High School students and advisors pitched in and lent a helping hand at the Polk County Museum on Friday, May 13, in Balsam Lake. The staff and students helped out by organizing, dusting, boxing up and general cleanup as the museum prepares to reopen to

the public for the season in the coming weeks. They took a few minutes to pose for a photo in the museum’s famous “jail cell,” which really was used as a jail decades ago when it was the courthouse and sheriff’s department. – Greg Marsten

Alexis Erickson and Tanesia Bibeau showed the book organizing they undertook as part of the community service day at the Polk County Museum in Balsam Lake.

BURNETT COUNTY – Burnett County law enforcement officers along with Grantsburg, Siren, Webster and Webb Lake Police Departments, will intensify their enforcement of the mandatory safety belt law during the annual Click It or Ticket mobilization from until now to June 5. More than 300 law enforcement agencies in Wisconsin are expected to participate in this year’s Click It or Ticket, according to Sheriff Dean Roland of Burnett County. “All too often when responding to a crash, our officers find people killed or seriously injured because they were not buckled up. That’s why we’re serious about safety belt enforcement. To save lives and prevent injuries, our officers will stop a vehicle and issue tickets whenever they see a driver or passenger not wearing a safety belt. Our goal is not to write more tickets but to convince people to buckle up voluntarily, so that eventually we can reduce the number of preventable traffic deaths to zero in Wisconsin. But if voluntary compliance fails and people ignore the law as well as common sense, we will provide a very convincing reminder about wearing their safety belts,” said Roland. Law enforcement agencies throughout the state are cracking down on unbelted motorists, according to the Wisconsin Department of Transportation. Last year, there were nearly 120,000 convictions for failure to fasten safety belts, which was an all-time high. Among all traffic violations, safety belt convictions in Wisconsin were second only to speeding convictions. submitted

Literacy plan is presented to Siren School Board

by Nancy Jappe Leader staff writer SIREN - CESA reading specialist Kris Rangel appeared before the Siren School Board at its Monday, May 23, meeting. Rangel presented the board with a copy of a literacy plan prepared by the school district’s literacy committee. One of the recommendations calls for scheduling of a 90-minute time block for reading that is needed by all kindergarten through sixth-grade students. In actions taken by the school board, Liz Simonsen was approved as the district’s CESA 11 convention delegate. The convention will be held in Turtle Lake June 6. The board approved student handbook changes for the 2011-2012 school year. Those changes deal with permission for students to get off the school bus on the return trip to school (at the Hertel Turtle gas sta-

tion) and policies dealing with cell phones or electronic devices in school. Having these devices in school is a violation of school board policy and of Wisconsin State Statute 118.258. The board approved a bid for roofing from Paul’s Sheet Metal and Roofing at a price of $16,355 for reroofing over a section of the high school roof. One negative vote came from Dayton Daniels. Because the section to be done is a small section of roofing, Daniels favors waiting until next year and doing a larger section at that time. This is in light of the district’s financial situation and in the hope of saving money if a larger section is done. The board approved the installation of wireless infrastructure, the money for this coming from Microsoft Corporation, a cooperative agreement with Insight School of Wisconsin (making this program available to students who

request it) and a change for the student accident insurance to First Agency Inc. of Kalamazoo, Mich., at less cost than that provided by longtime carrier Student Assurance Services and with equal coverage. Signing of an agreement with St. Croix Regional Medical Center for provision of a licensed athletic trainer from Aug. 1 through the last student-contact day of the 2013-2014 school year was authorized. Upcoming committee meetings were set as follows: Budget and finance - Monday, June 20, 5 p.m. Building and grounds - Monday, June 20, 6 p.m. Personnel and negotiations - Monday, June 27, 5 p.m. Policy, planning and curriculum - Monday, June 27, 6 p.m.

537303 40-41L 31a,d

Officers to mobilize for Click or Ticket safety belt enforcement

Pictured (L to R) bottom row: Sharon Kobernick (aide), Heather Loomis, Joel Prazak (teacher), Alexis Erickson, Tanesia Bibeau, Alicia Graveson and Devin Orton. Top row on stairs: Haley Anderson, Emily Johnson and Dylan Norgard.– Photos by Greg Marsten


Historical society to host Luck woman among disarmament programs at Forts Folle Avoine activists convicted in Knoxville federal court

PAGE 12 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. — Twelve disarmament activists, including a Luck resident, were convicted of federal trespass following a three-day jury trial in U.S. District Court in Knoxville during which the activists, under an order issued earlier by the court which effectively stripped the defendants of any substantive affirmative defenses, were prevented from questioning or even mentioning the outlaw status of nuclear weapons. Bonnie Urfer, 59, Luck, and 11 others were charged after a demonstration July 5, 2010, at the Y-12 nuclear weapons complex in Oak Ridge, Tenn. They face up to one year in prison and a $100,000 fine. No sentencing date was set, but Ufer and seven other defendants were taken into federal custody after they refused to return to Tennessee for further proceedings. Urfer has worked on the staff of Nukewatch, a nuclear watchdog group, for 25 years. The April 29 order by U.S. Magistrate Judge Bruce Guyton prohibited the defendants from relying on justification defenses, specifically declared “irrelevant” their moral, political or religious beliefs, and declared, “Whether the production of nuclear weapons at the Y-12 National Security Complex violates international law is irrelevant to the present case.” The Y-12 facility processes uranium for new hydrogen bombs being built to replace W76 warheads on Trident submarine ballistic missiles. While Assistant U.S. Attorney Jeff Theodore and his prosecution witnesses made repeated references to nuclear weapons production at Y-12, the site fabricated the bomb used to incinerate 140,000 people at Hiroshima, Japan, Aug. 6. 1945, defendants Steve Baggarly, Bradford Lyttle, Sr. Mary Dennis Lentsch and Rev. Bill Bichsel were all interrupted by objections and prevented by the court from asking or testifying about whether the planning and preparation of massacres is legal. Lyttle, who defended himself, said in opening remarks, “These arsenals are not safe. A mathematical probability analysis shows that they will be used, accidentally or intentionally. That use will mean the end of civilization. What we did was not something that should be condemned, does not deserve a finding of guilt and

Bonnie Urfer does not deserve punishment.” Lentsch, of the Catholic order of Sisters of the Presentation, was asked by Theodore in cross examination if she recalled testifying at a March 4 hearing that “nuclear weapons are evil?” “Yes,” Lentsch answered, “because they are instruments of mass destruction.” Theodore presented two government witnesses, Ted Sherry, a Y-12 security officer, and Chris Seals, a captain of the private security firm Wackenhut that patrols the complex who both described the nonviolent action of the defendants. Theodore told the jury the case is “simple” and concerns only the uncontested fact that the activists walked onto Y-12 property and refused to leave. The jury deliberated just over one hour before delivering its verdict. Defendants taken into custody were: Sr. Jackie Hudson, 76, of Poulsbo, Wash.; Sr. Carol Gilbert, 63, and Sr. Ardeth Platte, 75, both of Baltimore, Md.; Baggarly, 46, of Norfolk, Va.; Jean Gump, 83, of Kalamazoo, Mich.; Bichsel, 82, of Tacoma, Wash.; Urfer; and Michael Walli, 62, of Duluth, Minn. The other defendents are Beth Rosdatter, 50, of Lexington, Ky.; Lentsch, 74, of Washburn, Tenn.; Lyttle, 83, of Chicago, Ill; and Dennis DuVall, 69, of Prescott, Ariz. (Ill health prevented a 13th defendant, David Corcoran of Chicago, from participating and the court scheduled an Aug. 22 trial.) - from Nukewatch

ATV complaint leads to arrest

SIREN – A complaint regarding illegally operated ATVs in the Town of Scott led to the arrest of Robert Standly, 28, of St. Paul, Minn. Standly was wanted on an outstanding warrant from St. Croix County for failure to appear in court on a charge of resisting arrest. Law enforcement was dispatched to CTH H in the Town of Scott Saturday, May 21, after receiving a report of ATVs being

illegally operated on the road. According to the report, a landowner called the sheriff’s department because the two ATV riders were recklessly speeding around the home and did not respond to the landowner concerns. Standly was taken into custody on the outstanding St. Croix County warrant. — Mary Stirrat with information from the Burnett County Sheriff’s Department

AMERY - The Polk-Burnett Beekeepers Association recently announced the crowning of Sarah Rushfeldt as the 2011 Northwestern District Honey Queen. She w a s crowned at the PolkBurnett Beekeepers meeting on April 28 at the Justice Center in B a l s a m Lake. She is the 22-year-old daughter of James and B o n n i e Sarah Rushfeldt has been R u s h f e l d t . crowned the 2011 NorthwestShe is a 2006 ern District Honey Queen. graduate of Photo submitted

Amery High School. She is currently a sophomore at Crown College in St. Bonifacius, Minn., pursuing a bachelor’s degree in nursing. Rushfeldt is an active beekeeper with her own apiary of 100 hives and has been keeping bees since she was 8 years old. Her hobbies include playing the violin, chess, soccer and traveling. One of her goals as honey queen is to connect new beekeepers with their local associations. For further information, or to invite Queen Sarah to speak to your organization, contact honey queen Chairperson Adela Mella-Lalane at 646-671-4115 or email adela.mellalalane@gmail.com The Polk-Burnett Beekeepers Association invites anyone interested in learning about beekeeping to attend their monthly meeting in the community room, at the Justice Center in Balsam Lake on the third Thursday of each month. The meeting begins at 8 p.m. - submitted

by Carl Heidel Leader staff writer DANBURY - What do sturgeons, quilting and mussels have in common? They will all be part of the Sunday programs the Burnett County Historical Society will present at Forts Folle Avoine this season. On May 29, The Knitwits present their crafts. This is a group of county women who knit, crochet, tat, and work on other crafts, many of which are becoming lost arts. Each woman will briefly present her craft, and then all of the presenters will move to different stations around the room to demonstrate the crafts and answer questions. June 12 will be the day for the sturgeon. Larry Dammen, retired DNR research biologist, will talk about the sturgeon of Yellow Lake. Dammen is the foremost authority on these sturgeon. Have you ever wondered which trees are native to the area and which are transplants? What are the best trees for building, burning and nesting? On July 10 Phil Stromberg, a retired forester, will talk

about the trees of Burnett County. Mussels are the topic Aug. 14, often called the “hidden treasure of the St. Croix Riverway.” Despite direct human threats in the past and more serious indirect human threats today, the diverse population of native freshwater mussels in the St. Croix Riverway is a reflection of the health of the rivers. This presentation by the National Park Service will talk about the more than 40 species of mussels that live in the Riverway, how they go fishing, and how people have used them for something to wear. Carole Fure will close the series Sept. 18, with a presentation about quilting. Fure is a premier quilter who has achieved national prominence because of the quality of her craftsmanship, and she has written a number of articles on quilting. For more information about any of these Sunday programs call Forts Folle Avoine at 715-866-8890.

Burnett County Board of Supervisors meeting

The Burnett County Board of Supervisors honored Donna Bennett (left), deputy register of deeds, for 10 years of service to Burnett County. The honor was presented at the board’s meeting Thursday, May 19. Don Taylor (right) presented the award and praised her faithfulness and hard work over the years. - Photos by Carl Heidel

Beekeepers crown honey queen

Clayton Jorgensen (left) made his monthly art presentation and Burnett County history lesson at the meeting of the Burnett County Supervisors Thursday, May 19. The print is a drawing of the village of Neshodana in 1854. The village was the first non-Native American village in what was to become Burnett County. After several years and several name changes, Neshodana was abandoned and burned down. Then in 1911 the present village of Danbury was built near the old Neshodana site.


2011Conservation Poster Contest Winner

BALSAM LAKE – The Polk County Land and Water Resources Department held the judging for its 2011 Conservation Poster Contest on May 10. They had a good response from the schools in Polk County. The theme this year was Forests For People – More Than You Can Imagine. All of the posters were excellent and had good conservation themes, which made it very difficult to select a few winners.

The first-place winners in each division received $15. Second place received $10 and third place received $5. All students with a poster received a participation certificate. The winning posters will be kept on display during the summer at the Government Center Building in Balsam Lake. The first-place posters will be sent to the regional contest in August. - submitted

St. Peter’s Lutheran Church happenings

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 13

Sunday school student Corinna Torres presents a check to Loaves and Fishes coordinator Vivian Brahmer. The money for this donation was collected by the St. Peter’s Sunday school students during the 2011 Lenten season. – Photos submitted

Winners in the Elementary Division were (L to R): First place – Amber Wetterau – Unity School; second place – Nakodah Tschida, Unity School and third place, Mackenzie Anderson, Unity School. Not shown: Casey Thaemert, Unity School, was the first-place winner in the Middle Division. – Photos submitted

The first-place winner in the Special Needs Junior Division (K-6) was Jonathan Lein, Unity School.

Pastor Robert Lubben blesses the seed during a special Rogation Sunday service at St. Peter’s Lutheran Church on May 15.

Wannigan Days button design winners announced

Two St. Croix Falls art students were the winners of the Wannigan Days Button Design Contest. Melissa Larson (L) and Alissa Norlander (R) are shown with art teacher Suzanne Imhoff (center). - Special photos

The Inter-County Leader An award-winning weekly newspaper


PAGE 14 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

Midnight train

This dramatic shot of the Dresser depot at night was taken by area professional photographer Erik Barstow (erikbarstowphotography.com).

And you thought they all went to bed at 7 ...

by Diane Dryden SPOONER - Monday, May 23, there was a 6:30 p.m. wedding in town and it was held at the Spooner Nursing Home. No, it’s not what you’re thinking; this was a young couple, one of whom has been a CNA there for three years. “My boyfriend and I had promised his grandmother, Alice Burmeister, who was a resident at the nursing home, that we would get married right there in the outdoor gazebo,” said the bride, Deanna Muller. “Unfortunately she died this past March, but we went ahead and had the wedding in the gazebo in her honor.” Muller started working as part of the kitchen staff at the Capeside Cove nursing home in Siren and when it closed several years ago she knew that her calling was working with the elderly. She went to school, became a CNA and has been happily working in Spooner ever since. New husband, Billy Allen, is employed by the Wisconsin Structural Steel Company in Barronett. The groomsmen wore camouflage vests that matched the bridesmaid’s dresses, one bridesmaid in brown and the other in green. Almost every resident attended the ceremony along with various family

A photo of Alice Burmeister, the groom’s grandmother, was present for both the wedding ceremony and the reception. She was looking forward to the wedding in the home’s gazebo but died in March.

members and the gazebo was overflowing with well-wishers. A reception followed immediately in the activities room where cake and coffee were served and bubbles and mints were handed out.

Newlyweds Deanna (Muller) and Billy Allen cut their cake, made by the Spooner Nursing Home residents, during the reception held in the activities room. - Special photos

SLAC dance instructor works with Prince, Beyonce

SHELL LAKE — Returning for her second summer with the Shell Lake Arts Center Dance Intensive Camp, dancer Shara Smallwood knows what it takes to make it in the world of dance. From her roots in the Twin Cities to her present career as a dancer and choreographer in Los Angeles, Calif., she has worked with stars such as Prince, Beyonce, Strickly Viral Productions, and the Lulu Washington Dance Theater. Beginning dance lessons at the age of 3, Smallwood credits her formal training to the Summit Dance Shoppe, where she received lessons in ballet, tap, jazz, lyrical, and hip-hop dance styles. She was a four-year letter winner with the esteemed Wayzata High School dance team, serving as its captain her senior year, and was selected to the Minnesota All State dance team her junior and senior years. At the University of Minnesota, she was selected as a freshman to be part of the reigning national champion University of Minnesota dance team, with which she

won national championship rings in 2005 and 2006. A gifted choreographer, Smallwood has choreographed for many universities across the Midwest, including UW-Eau Claire, Gustavus-Adolphus, Johnson County College and the University of Minnesota; four of these dances placed within the top three at nationals. Recent work by Smallwood includes choreography of singer Prince’s backup dancers for his Madison Square Garden show. About this project, Smallwood states “Working with Prince has been a fun and rewarding experience. Prince has always been a huge icon for me because of his talent and also because he’s from my home state of Minnesota.” Smallwood’s greatest accomplishment to date, she says, has been to be selected as one of hip-hop artist Beyonce’s backup dancers in her newest music video, “We Rule the World,” which will be released later this year. Smallwood says that she lives by a

number of inspiring quotes, her most favorite being by composer Maryanne Madmacher: “The jump is so frightening between where I am and where I want to be … because of all I may become I will close my eyes and leap.” She strives to teach all young dancers how to reach their highest potential. Dance Intensive Camp will take place July 24-29. For more information or to register for Dance Intensive Camp, visit www.shelllakeartscenter.org or call 715468-2414. — from Shell Lake Arts Center

Shara Smallwood will be an instructor at the Dance Intensive Camp held at Shell Lake Arts Center in July. — Photo submitted


Lyme disease cases on the rise years ago. Almost 3,500 cases were reported in 2010. Johnson says several factors are contributing to the rising numbers, including better reporting procedures and growing deer populations who carry the ticks, but also people who are moving to the suburbs, near wooded areas, where they then having daily exposure to tick-friendly environments. Johnson says most cases of Lyme disease

by Teresa Shipley Wisconsin Public Radio STATEWIDE - Wisconsin weather is finally warming, and that means bugs are on the way. Ticks can be a particularly bad problem in the state since they carry Lyme disease. And cases are on the rise. Diep Johnson, an epidemiologist for the Wisconsin Division of Public Health, says there was a 35-percent increase in Lyme disease cases in 2010 compared to a couple

Dems counter Walker’s education plan

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 15

occur in May through August, with most cases reported in the northwestern region and west central portion of Wisconsin. “However, we are seeing increases in by Glen Moberg cases throughout Wisconsin, even the eastWisconsin Public Radio ern part of Wisconsin.” WAUSAU - Democratic lawmakers conJohnson recommends homeowners get rid of tall grass in favor of mulch or gravel tinue to detail their response to Gov. landscaping where ticks aren’t as likely to Walker’s education budget, calling for more money for public schools and technilive. cal colleges, and an end to Walker’s voucher school expansion. At a series of news conferences around the state, Democrats pushed an initiative that they are calling “Save Our Schools.” At Wausau West High School, local Rep. Donna Seidel called for rollbacks in the governor’s proposed $1.68 billion cut for education. She says while Wisconsin is facing fiscal challenges like many other states, it is not broke. The Democrats choices would restore $346 million for public schools and $20 million for technical colleges. The plan would also stop the spending of $40 million on a private school voucher expansion. Sandy-Pope Roberts, the minority chair for the education committee, said Walker wants to force taxpayers to pay for rich kids to go to private schools. “It calls for the elimination of the voucher and independent charter expansion that Gov. Walker has proposed. Further, we will require all voucher schools to take the new statewide test. When schools are using taxpayer dollars, they should be held accountable for their work product.” Robert’s call for private school testing was supported by Michelle Schaefer, the president of the Wausau School Board. “The voucher issue has been a passionate one for me. I think all schools should be accountable, whether they’re public or they’re private.” The Democrats want to use Wisconsin’s higher-than-anticipated tax revenues to help fund the school proposal, while still restructuring the state’s debt and shoring up the Injured Patients Compensation Fund. Jorgas The legislators admitted that no Republicans have yet signed on to the plan.

! ! A A R R T T X E EX Pick Up Your Copy Of The

Amery

At these local businesses.

Chet Johnson Drug Amery Express

Balsam Lake

Jonzy Market Pap's General Store Balsam Lake Grocery Balsam Lake Hardware Balsam Lake Pharmacy Holiday Stationstore

Centuria

Centuria Stop

Clear Lake

Lake Magnor Store

Cushing

Holiday Stationstore

Danbury

Frederic

Frederic Grocery Frederic Liquor Holiday Station Frederic Stop Medicine Shoppe Inter-County Leader Office Sundown Saloon Trade Lake Store

Luck

Countryside Co-op Holiday Stationstore Luck Pharmacy Van Meter's Meats Wayne's Foods Plus

Milltown

Log Cabin Store Wayne's Foods Plus

Cheese & More Holiday Stationstore

Dresser Food & Liquor

Little Turtle Hertel

Dresser

Grantsburg

Burnett Dairy Feed Burnett Dairy Cheese Grantsburg BP Grantsburg Country Store Grantsburg Family Foods Holiday Stationstore Wood River Pharmacy

Hertel

Osceola

Cascade BP Cotter-Green Petro Dick's Market Holiday Stationstore Osceola Stop

Webb Lake

The Main Store

St. Croix Falls

Holiday Stationstore Inter-County Leader Office MarketPlace Foods Maynard's BP Tangen Pharmacy Super America Wayne's Cafe

Siren

Auto Stop Chattering Squirrel Fourwinds Market Holiday Stationstore Inter-County Leader Office Olsen & Son Drug Peggy's Fashion Rack Tom's Bar Yourchuck's

Taylors Falls

General Store

Webster

Connor's Station Holiday Stationstore Wayne's Foods Plus Wild Bill's Outpost Yellow River Pharmacy

Boat tours to support the arts

TAYLORS FALLS, Minn. - June is Arts Month in Taylors Falls, Minn., as the paddleboats start the 105th season of providing a view from the river of the world famous Dalles of the St. Croix River. Partnering with three regionally recognized arts organizations, Taylors Falls Scenic Boat Tours will donate a portion of each “I Support the Arts” excursion ticket purchased in June to support the arts in the St. Croix Valley. “It’s such a privilege to live in this beautiful and creative place,” said Amy Frischmon, vice president of Wild Mountain which operates the Taylors Falls Scenic Boat Tours, a fourth-generation family enterprise, “and we know that the arts play a huge role in making the St. Croix Valley a great place to live. We created the arts month project to test the waters of providing a novel fundraising opportunity to three organizations: ArtReach St. Croix, Festival Theatre and Franconia Sculpture Park.” When boat tour tickets are purchased online using a unique “I Support the Arts” group code, $5 for the dinner/picnic cruise and $1 for the daily cruise will be donated to a United Arts Fund in support of the arts organizations selected in 2011. The dinner/picnic cruise code is XBQT and the daily excursion code is BFMN. “We’re really excited about this opportunity,” said Danette Olsen of Festival Theatre. “It’s great to know that we can encourage everyone to do something that is really fun and the perfect way to enjoy the beauty of the St. Croix Valley, while at the same time they are supporting the arts. Hats off to Taylors Falls Scenic Boats for creating an inventive way to help strengthen the arts here in the valley.” To ensure a June “I Support the Arts” donation, all purchases must be made online at www.wildmountain.com/boat and the group codes must be entered at checkout. Questions about the June Arts Month program can be directed to Taylors Falls Recreation at 651-465-6315 or to Festival Theatre at 715-483-3387. - from Festival Theatre


PAGE 16 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

537532 40Lp

Clean quality goods; microwave; lawn chairs; Tupperware; books; CDs; DVDs; household goods; Harley apparel; adult clothing; jewelry.

579 Caneday St. Taylors Falls, MN

HUGE YARD SALE

537325 40Lp 30a,dp

9 a.m. - 2 p.m.

7457 North Shore Drive

Boys clothes, 0 - 10; jackets; boots, etc.; PSE youth bow; boys bike; toys; women’s clothing, med. - large; maternity clothes; hunting DVDs; rubber stamps; fabric; misc. household items; Whirlpool washer/dryer.

Friday, May 27, 4:30 p.m. - 8 p.m.

Saturday, May 28, 8 a.m. - 1 p.m.

1 mile north of 70, 3 miles east of Grantsburg.

GARAGE SALE

Fri. & Sat., May 27 & 28, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

536561 29ap 40Lp

Leather chairs; dining room table; TV set; Serger sewing machine; motor scooter; boat dock; bar; Kegmeister; many household items; Beanie Babies; and antiques.

4179 Green Trail Rd., Webster

Antiques, Gifts & Collectibles

715-648-5337

INTERFAITH CAREGIVERS RUMMAGE & BAKE SALE Come watch the Arborists cut up five semi loads of wood on Saturday, May 28.

7596 Hayden Lake Road, Danbury Call 715-656-7051 for directions.

7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Lots of great things at great prices. All proceeds go to the Osceola Royalty. 106 Kreekview Drive, Osceola. Take County Rd. M east past Polaris to cemetery, turn right and follow signs.

(Saturday Bag Sale - All the clothes and shoes you can fit in the provided grocery bag for $2.)

***Now Located At*** First Baptist Church Gymnasium 661B West Street Taylors Falls, MN 55084 651-465-3333

www.valley-christian.org Children’s clothes; adult clothes; toys; furniture; sporting goods; books; and many miscellaneous items! (See Valley Square - new & slightly used items.) Come for lunch - hot dog, chips & pop for $2. Popcorn - 50¢

LARGE GARAGE SALE Fri. & Sat., May 27 & 28, 8 a.m.

On Little Clam Lake, 24928

Lakeview Rd.

One block off Hwy. 70 East, Siren. Old drop-leaf kitchen table and two chairs; gas cookstove; metal wagon wheels; old wicker plant stand; books; baskets; dishes; chain saw; tools; flowerpots; pictures; large mirror; nightstand; many other misc. items.

THIS IS A BIG SALE!

537116 29ap 40Lp

Siren United Methodist Church

Garage on Bradley Street between Hansen and 1st Ave. Proceeds to support United Methodist Men’s local missions and church building fund. Includes tools, garden equipment, clothes, books, kitchen items, furniture and much more.

MOVING SALE Saturday, May 28 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

22745 Akermark Rd. • Grantsburg East side Big Wood Lake 536640 39-40L 29a

Many things are freewill offering. Some things are marked. The best Bake Sale anywhere! Friday, May 27, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 28, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Sat., May 28

Thurs., June 2 & Fri., June 3, 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sat., June 4, 8 a.m. - Noon

8 a.m. until 5 p.m.

536420 29a,dp 40Lp

Downtown Atlas • 2123 295th Ave., Luck, Wis. 9 miles north & west of Luck on Cty. Rd. B

OSCEOLA ROYALTY GARAGE SALE

VALLEY CHRISTIAN SCHOOL ANNUAL THRIFT SALE

Memorial Day Weekend Friday & Saturday, May 27 & 28, 2011

Opening Sat., May 28

Marjorie Mattson, Betty Wilson and friends

ALL THE USUAL YARD SALE ITEMS PLUS: New Big Buck Hunter Pro Games for Nintendo Wii New Lia Sophia Jewelry at half price, as 5 dealers quit. New and used Nintendo Wii games and remote controllers. 100s of books and movies; clothing, size 0 thru 4XL; vanity; table w/2 chairs; 2 matching china cabinets; red fiberglass sleigh/cutter; whole bunch of misc. REDUCED SPECIALS EVERY DAY!

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH MEN’S GARAGE SALE

“Downtown Atlas, Wisconsin”

Open Weekends & Holidays 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. We are in an old General Store building. Come and spend a leisurely visit with us.

1966 - 270th Avenue, Luck, WI From Hwy. 35, go west on Cty. Rd. B for 4 miles, left on 200th St., left again on 270th...FOLLOW THE RED, WHITE AND BLUE SIGNS.

7 a.m. to 4 p.m.

24050 N. Williams Rd.

10 miles out on County Rd. A. Right on Pratt Rd., left on Eagles Nest Rd., right on Green Trail.

MEMORIAL WEEKEND May 27, 28, & 29 & 30

Fri., May 27

537149 29a,dp 40Lp

536665 39-40Lp 29ap

Furniture; designer clothing; collectibles; antiques; tools; children’s toys; sports equipment; and misc.

Siren, Wis.

Fri., May 27, noon - 7 p.m. Sat., May 28,

MULTIFAMILY FAMILY GARAGE SALE

Thurs., May 26 Fri., May 27 Sat., May 28 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Furniture; gun cabinet; boys clothes; toys.

“SAVE YOUR GAS SALE” -28 SELLING AT ONE PLACE

1985 Model 950 John Deere tractor, 4WD with loader; 4’ brush hog; 30” dirt scoop; 2-wheel trailer; fishing equipment; cross-country skis; Lawn-Boy weed trimmer; old cameras; antique rocking chair; lawn chairs; chain saw sharpener; lots of pictures; rattan chair; couch; bread machine; household items and some clothes. 537314 40Lp

Nicholas A. Seeger, Grantsburg, snow removal parking violation, not guilty plea. Tyler N. Thompson, Webster, disorderly conduction, probation, sent. imposed, local jail, $243.00; possession of THC, probation, sent. imposed, local jail, $243.00. Russell S. True, Minneapolis, Minn., operate snowmobile while intoxicated, order for assessment, $641.50. Brian Weinhandl, South St. Paul, Minn., issue of worthless checks, restitution, $276.46.

C & J MINI STORAGE Milltown, WI

25.00 35.00 40.00 45.00 50.00 90.00

$

5x10................

$ 10x10.............. $ 10x16.............. $ 10x20.............. $ 10x24.............. $ 10x40..............

Call 1-800-919-1195 or 715-825-2335 & 715-646-2777 445914 eves. 9a,dtfc 20Ltfc

(May 4, 11, 18, 25, June 1, 8) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff vs. DAVID L. BOOS, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case Number: 10 CV 630 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on March 18, 2011, in the amount of $143,406.12, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: June 22, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin DESCRIPTION: Lot 4, Block 3, Baker’s Riverside Addition to the City of Amery, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 232 Central Avenue, Amery, WI 54001 TAX KEY NO.: 201-00138-0000 Dated this 11th day of April, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Russell J. Karnes State Bar #1054982 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 268949

Jose L. Chavarria, Webster, receiving stolen property, probation, sent. imposed, local jail, $243.00; possession of cocaine, probation, sent. imposed, local jail, $243.00. Trevor D. Demarre, Webster, operating motor vehicle without proof of insurance, $10.00. Angiee M. Frahm, Stacy, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Timothy O. Hollyday, Hudson, speeding, $175.30. Bernice K. Mixsooke, Webster, disorderly conduct, probation, sent. withheld, $243.00; underage drinking, possess – 17-20, $263.50. Daniel L. Olson, Prescott, operate snowmobile with PAC, order for assessment, $641.50. Steven M. Ranalls, Circle Pines, Minn., operating with PAC .08<.10, 6-month license revocation, $250.00. Dayna M. Shaffer, Grantsburg, disorderly conduct, $330.50.

FOR RENT 1-BR Apartment In Balsam Lake

Clean, quiet, manager on site. Water, sewer & garbage included. Garage available. No pets, no smoking. $

375/month

PARKWAY APTS. 715-485-3402 Cell: 715-554-0780 536569 39-40Lp 29-30a,dp

FOR RENT - NEW 2-BR Lower-Level Country House 1,100 sq. ft., Long Lake area.

450/mo. 550/Mo. + util.

1st Mo. -

$

$

2nd Mo. 6-month lease; references, deposit. Unity school, no smoking, no pets. Available May 21

715-646-1444 537451 40Lp 30dp

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-6699777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1800-927-9275.

HOME FOR SALE 623 So. Church St., Grantsburg, Wis. 54840 445101 8a-etfcp 19Ltfc

3 BRs, 1-1/2 baths, full basement w/1/2-bath, double attached garage.

Price

114,900

$

By appointment call 715-463-5357

Home includes refrigerator, stove, washer & dryer.

536557 39-40Lp 29-30ap

Sat., May 28, 8 a.m. - 3 p.m.

GARAGE SALE 3980 Hwy. 70, Hertel

Frank C. Hamer, Shell Lake, operating while suspended,

536309 29ap 40Lp

HUGE RUMMAGE SALE

NASCAR; Longaberger, crystal and more.

537552 40Lp

537294 40Lp

8 a.m. to ?

$200.50. Shane E. Miller, Cumberland, operate without valid license, $330.50. Richard K. Miller, Stillwater, Minn., cut shoreline vegitation in shoreline protection zone, costs, $127.50. Thelma L. Mitchell, Shell Lake, disorderly conduct, $330.50. Brian D. Moe, Danbury, operating with PAC .08<.10, $250.00, 6-month license revocation, $250.00. Janet R. Morgan, Cameron, issue of worthless checks, restitution, $415.92. Mary P. Raway, Cottage Grove, Minn., operating left of centerline, $515.50; operating left of centerline, $515.50.

534988 WNAXLP

Rain Or Shine

9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Sat., Sun. & Mon., May 28, 29 & 30

Tonyia L. Albee, Hudson, issue worthless checks, restitution, $343.70. Bill C. Chapman, Frederic, inattentive driving, $641.00. Daniel Goodremote II, Grantsburg, vehicle restriction on private property, other sentence, $185.00.

537284 40L 30d

24722 Clam Lake Dr. Siren, WI

Fri. & Sat., May 27 & 28

803 State Hwy. 35 Centuria, WI

Burnett County criminal and circuit court

536830 29d,ep 40Lp

ESTATE YARD SALE

537544 40Lp

GARAGE SALE

Notices/Real Estate/Garage Sales


Time to remember; time to honor

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 17

by Carl Heidel Leader staff writer SIREN - A small crowd gathered at the Burnett County government building in Siren May 19. Sitting and standing near the marker that memorializes law officers who died in the line of duty, they had come for the annual Law Enforcement Memorial Service, a time to remember and a time to honor. County Sheriff Dean Roland in his remarks paid tribute both to the fallen and

Deputy Stephanie Wedin (right) does some cleanup with her son who has managed to get cake frosting all over. Burnett County Sheriff Dean Roland (left) presented the Sheriff’s Cross and the Purple Star to Deputy Ryan Bybee (right) who was wounded last September during a shooting incident. – Photos by Carl Heidel

Officer Bybee’s daughter shared in some of the warmth shown to her dad by those gathered for the ceremony.

to those still serving in law enforcement. Since 1968, three officers have lost their lives while serving: Paul Gramer (Nov. 20, 1968), Richard Schinzing (Oct. 17, 1974), and Allen Albee (Jan. 19, 1991). “We are grateful to these three men,” said Roland, “and to the families. They all

gave much.” Roland then listed recent dangerous engagements in which officers acted at great peril to their own lives, but managed to survive, and he spoke of the questions, self-doubts and pressures that are just part of the job. “Always,” he said, “there are new fears. It’s possible they will not come home again.” He then continued, “Knowing this, they still serve with a sense of duty.”

Supervisor Gene Olson gave the invocation.

Heads bowed for the final prayer.

The cake at the reception reminded all of the purpose of the ceremony.

Officers in ranks saluted as the colors were presented.

Joyce Peterson, widow of slain officer Paul Gramer, carried a yellow rose in remembrance.

Medals presented to Deputy Bybee were the Purple Star (left) and the Sheriff’s Cross (right). Bybee also received the Military Order of the Purple Heart National Law Enforcement Citation.

Deputy Wedin (right) assisted the children who brought the wreath to be placed at the memorial monument.


SPRING SPORTS

PAGE 18 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

INTER COUNTY LEADER • INTER COUNTY LEADER • INTER COUNTY LEADER

F R E D E R I C • G R A N T S B U R G • L U C K • S T. C R O I X F A L L S • S I R E N • U N I T Y • W E B S T E R BASEBALL • BOYS GOLF • SOFTBALL • TRACK & FIELD

Unity boys snatch share of title with win over Pirates

Extra inning thriller!

Extra Points

Unity 4, Grantsburg 3 (nine innings)

by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – It took extra innings to accomplish, but the Unity Eagles were able to hold on and defeat the visiting Grantsburg Pirates, 4-3, in the regular season finale at Unity on Tuesday, May 24, earning the Eagles a share of the West Lakeland Conference title. The Pirates were perfect this season in conference play at 9-0, ranked atop the state in Division 3, and losing only one game all season - a nonconference thriller with Bruce - and marching solidly through every West Lakeland Conference opponent like Blackbeard through the Carolina inlets. Unity had struggled at times, only losing one conference contest all year - to Grantsburg, of course - but playing only .500 ball outside the West Lakeland. They lost three of their last four games, but came in with a fire, seeking vengeance and a share of the conference title, which they earned smartly before a large home crowd. The game was a pitchers duel between Pirate Jimmy Nelson and Eagle Brady Flaherty for the first four innings; they were both sharp and consistent, with good defense behind them. But the Eagles drew first blood, and they let it bleed out, exploding for three runs in the bottom of the fourth inning when three Eagles - Brady Turner, Nate Despiegelaere and Derek Campbell - all singled smartly off Nelson, scoring three runs, which stood as the only Eagle scoring until the bottom of the ninth inning. Grantsburg seemed flustered by Flaherty on the mound until the top of the seventh, when they found their groove, starting the frame with several Eagle miscues, culminating with a Gavin Meyer single, scoring Lucas Willis. The Pirates were suddenly alive again, with just two outs between them and a loss, they kept the rally alive. Kyle Roberts punched a one-out Flaherty fastball deep to right, with only a western breeze keeping it in the park, scoring Russ Thoreen to make it 3-2. Jake Wald pinch hit for the Pirates, and singled on cue, scoring Meyer for the 3-3 tie and a

Grantsburg shortstop Trevor Thompson tries to turn a double play on Unity's Derek Campbell, as second baseman Joe Engelhart looks on.

Unity's Brady Flaherty (No. 10) goes skyward with Alec Larson (No. 3), who hit the game-winning sacrifice fly for the Eagles in extra innings over Grantsburg, giving Unity a share of the conference title, as assistant coach Ryan Peterson offers his own congratulations. – Photos by Greg Marsten

A foul ball led to an Eagle logjam between pitcher Brady Flaherty, catcher Brady Turner and third baseman Jacob Ruck. Turner came up with the catch and the out. second chance at a Cinderella season. Luke Nelson came on in relief for the Eagles, and while the Pirates threatened again, the Unity infield stayed focused and stopped the bleeding, meaning extra innings were needed to determine either a shared conference title between the squads, or an undefeated, solo honor for the Pirates. Nelson stayed on for the Pirates, and remained in control, in spite of the pressure, pitching like a trooper until the very end. The Eagles surrendered several hits in the top of the ninth inning, loading the bases with one out, but Nelson kept his head, and forced two straight ground balls to end the inning, keeping it knotted at 3-3. Derek Campbell got the Eagles fired up in the bottom of the ninth with a Texas League bloop single, and then advanced to second on a Justin Mooney sacrifice bunt. That would be all for Nelson on the mound, as Trevor Thompson came on in

A strong play at the plate by Brady Turner kept the Pirates from scoring earlier in the game.

Pirate pitcher Jimmy Nelson made a tough catch on an infield fly, helping his own cause in a solid pitching performance. relief with one out and the winning run at second. Campbell surprised everyone by stealing third on the first Thompson pitch, leaving Eagle second baseman Alec Larson the task of only a sacrifice fly ball for a win and chance at heroics. That’s exactly what the junior Larson did. He clubbed it deep to right, as if on cue, and Campbell scored easily, with both players getting swamped by teammates on their way to the dugout. It was a clean ending to a dramatic, even-tempered contest that illustrated the parity among the conference, with the Pirates falling behind, then coming back in dramatic, last-second fashion, only to lose it to fundamentals and clutch hitting. Somewhere, Abner Doubleday likely cracked a little smile behind his handlebar mustache. Unity opens the Division 2 playoffs at home on Friday, May 27 against rival St. Croix Falls, while the Pirates drew a top seed in Division 3 and thus earned a firstround bye, playing the winner of Ladysmith and Chetek/Weyerhaeuser next Tuesday, May 31.

See Tuesday baseball/page 25

••• ST. CROIX FALLS – Former Saints athletes, and Division 1 volleyball players, Meredith and Anders Nelson, are once again hosting the Nelson Crush Volleyball Camp at the St. Croix Falls Schools from June 22-24. Meredith is a former All-American volleyball player for the Minnesota Gophers, and Anders just completed his senior season with Ball State. Anders made the All-American second team this season and runAnders Nelson ner-up for the inaugural “Off the Block” Blocker of the Year Award. Grades five through eight will run from 9 a.m. to noon every morning. Grades nine through 12 will be from 1 to 4 p.m. Meredith Nelson and 5 to 8 p.m., (no 5-8 session on the Friday, June 24, the last day). The cost is $60 for the younger kids and $120 for the older group. The camp coaches will all be former NCAA Division 1 volleyball players. T-shirts and awards will be given. If people are interested, they should contact Kelly Anderson at 715483-2507 Ext. 1406 or e-mail nelsonvolleyballcamp@gmail.com. Information is also provided on our Facebook page. – submitted ••• OSCEOLA – Former Braves and Twins minor league manager Ken Staples will be knighted by the St. Paul Winter Carnival's Queen of the Snows prior to the Braves game versus the St. Paul Roosters on Thursday, June 3, at Oakey Park, with the game beginning at 7:30 p.m., and knighting at 7:20 pm. – submitted ••• LEADER LAND – The Thursday, May 26, Prairie Farm at Luck baseball game can be heard on 104.9 FM beginning at 5 p.m. The May 27 St. Croix Falls at Unity baseball game can be heard on 104.9 FM beginning at 1 p.m. ••• LEADER LAND – In observance of Memorial Day, Rice Lake Speedway will have free grandstand admission for all personnel possessing a military ID or DD214 (with verifiable ID) on Saturday, May 28. In addition to the five regular classes the UMSS Sprint Cars will make a special appearance. Race time is 6:30 p.m. on Saturday with hot laps to precede the first race. For further information on the Rice Lake Speedway, check out the Web site at www.ricelakespeedway.net. – submitted ••• LEADER LAND – Local sports tidbits to share? Please contact the Leader by 4:30 p.m. on Mondays to go in Extra Points. – Marty Seeger ••• LEADER LAND – Leader Sports strives to follow the college careers of area athletes. If you know of an athlete who will be playing collegiate sports in 2011 and hasn’t been mentioned, send us an e-mail or call and we’ll take it from there. – Marty Seeger

SPORTS RESULTS DEADLINES: WEDNESDAY - MONDAY: 1 p.m. the following business day. TUESDAY: 7 a.m. on Wednesday. Missed deadlines mean no coverage that week! S P O R T S N E W S O R S C O R E S T O R E P O R T ? • P H O N E : 7 1 5 - 3 2 7 - 4 2 3 6 • FA X : 7 1 5 - 3 2 7 - 4 1 1 7 • E - M A I L : m s e e g e r @ c e n t u r y t e l . n e t


S

P R I N G

L

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 19

E A D E R

S

P O R T S

Vikings, Tigers take first at regionals

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer FREDERIC – The Frederic Vikings girls and Webster boys track teams did it again as they completed another successful regional with first-place team finishes. “I thought the track meet went very well. It is always nice to come up with a victory. I am excited my seniors ended with their fourth regional victory,” said girls track coach Jeff Larcom, who added that the Webster girls track team gave the Vikings some pretty stiff competition. Several Viking girls are advancing to sectionals this Thursday, May 26, in Colfax and are hopeful for the state track meet in La Crosse. The Vikings placed first in the 4x800meter relay with Samantha Nelson, Sarah Knauber, Leah Engebretson and Calla Karl getting a time of 10 minutes, 15.51 seconds. Other first-place finishers included Sage Karl in the 100-meter dash, and the 4x100-meter relay team with Allison Anderson, Amanda Blok, Tanesha Carlson and Sage Karl getting a time of 52.63. Calla Karl also took first in the 800meter run, and Sage Karl was first in the 200-meter dash. Other girls going to sectionals include the Vikes 4x200-meter relay team which include Allison Anderson, Rachael Poirier, Carlson and Blok. Calla Karl placed second in the 400-meter dash, and Engebretson took fourth in the 400-meter dash to move on to sectionals as well. Poirier will get to compete in the 200meter dash along with teammate Sage Karl. Poirier placed fourth in that event, and Sam Nelson took second in the 3,200meter run, while Knauber took third in the 3,200-meter run. Nelson will be competing in the triple jump at sectionals after her third-place finish in Frederic on Mon-

WIAA Division 3 Regional at Frederic May 23, 2011 Women Team Results Team Points Place Frederic 141.00 1st Webster 131.00 2nd 3rd Glenwood City 82.00 4th Clear Lake 81.00 5th Turtle Lake/Clayton 80.00 6th Prairie Farm 70.00 Siren 58.00 7th Shell Lake 50.00 8th Luck 3.00 9th

The regional champion Frederic girls track team is on their way to try and win their first-ever sectional title in Colfax this Thursday, May 26. – Photos by Becky Amundson

See Frederic Regional/page 21

The Webster boys track team won yet another regional championship on Monday, May 23, with their first-place finish. The Webster boys and girls are totaling over 30 athletes that will be traveling to Colfax for a chance to go to state.

Ben Jensen of Webster placed second in the pole vault with this personal best jump. – Photo by Marty Seeger

Greg McIntyre of Webster took fourth-place in the shot put. – Photo by Marty Seeger

Tanesha Carlson of Frederic had a successful day for the Viking girls team. – Photo by Marty Seeger

Area individual sectional qualifiers (For complete results visit www.pttiming.com) 100-meter dash – 1. Sage Karl, Frederic, 13.15; 3. Amber Moore, Siren, 13.69, 4. Melissa Gustavson, Webster, 13.71. 200-meter dash – 1. Sage Karl, Frederic, 26.62; 3. Amber Moore, Siren, 28.12; 4. Rachael Poirier, Frederic, 29.11. 400-meter dash – 2. Calla Karl, Frederic, 1:01.53; 4. Leah Engebretson, Frederic, 1:06.30. 800-meter run – 1. Calla Karl, Frederic, 2:27.38 1,600-meter run – 3. Kally Schiller, Webster, 5:42.48. 3,200-meter run – 1. Kally Schiller, Webster, 12:23.96; 2. Samantha Nelson, Frederic, 12:41.27; 3. Sarah Knauber, Frederic, 12:48.48; 4. Emma Kelby, Webster, 13:12.99. 100-meter hurdles – 2. Michelle Gibbs, Webster, 18.07; 4. Tami Quatmann, Webster, 18.96. 300-meter hurdles – 4. Danielle Dyson, Webster, 56.22. 4x100-meter relay – 1. Frederic (Allison Anderson, Tanesha Carlson, Amanda Blok, Sage Karl), 52.63; 2. Webster (Ashley Irvine, Angel Christianson, Melissa Gustavson, Shaina Pardun), 53.36. 4x200-meter relay – 2. Frederic (Allison Anderson, Tanesha Carlson, Rachael Poirier, Amanda Blok), 1:55.54; 3. Webster (Angel Christianson, Melissa Gustavson, Ashley Irvine, Michelle Gibbs), 1:55.64. 4x400-meter relay – 4. Siren (Taylor Hagen, Abigail Mitchell, Liz Brown, Brittany Coulter), 4:43.76. 4x800-meter relay – 1. Frederic (Samantha Nelson, Leah Engebretson, Sarah Knauber, Calla Karl), 10:15.51; 4. Webster (Danielle Dyson, Marissa Elliott, Molly Brown, Gabby Schiller), 11:47.16. High jump – 2. Amanda Blok, Frederic, 5-00; 3. Michelle Gibbs, Webster, 4-06. Pole vault – 1. Shaina Pardun, Webster, 7-06; 3. Mackenzie Koelz, Webster, 7-00. Long jump – 4. Tanesha Carlson, Frederic, 1407.25. Triple jump – 3. Samantha Nelson, Frederic, 3202.00; 4. Michelle Gibbs, Webster, 30-09.50. Shot put – 1. Ashley Guevara, Siren, 35-01.50; 3. Mary Johnson, Webster, 33-08.75. Discus throw – 2. Ashley Guevara, Siren, 112-01; 4. Mary Johnson, Webster, 98-07.

WIAA Division 3 Regional at Frederic May 23, 2011 Men Team Results Place Team Points 1st Webster 160.00 Glenwood City 97.50 2nd Clear Lake 89.00 3rd 4th Siren 88.50 5th Frederic 73.00 6th Luck 65.00 7th Shell Lake 60.00 8th Turtle Lake/Clayton 54.00 9th Prairie Farm 3.00

Area individual sectional qualifiers (For complete results visit www.pttiming.com) 100-meter dash – 2. Mason Kriegel, Webster, 11.81; 4. Dana Hubbell, Siren, 12.27. 200-meter dash – 1. Mason Kriegel, Webster, 23.89; 3. Landen Strilzuk, Luck, 24.53; 4. Isaac Wegner, Siren, 24.63. 400-meter dash – 2. Landen Strilzuk, Luck, 53.26; 4. Isaac Wegner, Siren, 56.02. 800-meter run – 1. Josiah Lund, Frederic, 2:04.81; 2. Devin Greene, Webster, 2:12.23; 4. Cody Isaacson, Webster, 2:13.23. 1,600-meter run – 1. Jack Taylor, Webster, 4:30.13; 3. Joey Erickson, Webster, 4:50.16; 4. Devin Greene, Webster, 4:59.27. 3,200-meter run – 1. Jack Taylor, Webster, 9:54.68; 3. Joey Erickson, Webster, 10:26.20. 110-meter hurdles – 1. Tony Peterson, Frederic, 16.79; 3. Matt Elmgren, Webster, 18.74; 4. Josh Baer, Webster, 18.98. 300-meter hurdles – 1. Tony Peterson, Frederic, 41.91. 4x100-meter relay – 4. Frederic (Robert Kirk, Ben Ackerley, Erik Stoner, Adam Chenal), 47.55. 4x200-meter relay – 3. Luck (Jacob Laduke, Brett Bartylla, Joe Christensen, Jan Rozumalski), 1:38.72; 4. Webster (Robert Buehler, Dan Dochniak, Cliff Benjamin, Taylor Heinz), 1:40.61. 4x400-meter relay – 1. Frederic (Tony Peterson, Robert Kirk, Ben Ackerley, Josiah Lund), 3:41.55; 3. Webster (Cody Isaacson, Dan Dochniak, Taylor Heinz, Cullan Hopkins), 3:51.29; 4. Luck (Jacob Laduke, AJ Walsh-Brenizer, Jan Rozumalski, Landen Strilzuk), 3:52.15. High jump – 2T. Ian Lexen, Frederic, 5-08; 2T. Austin Elliott, Webster, 5-08; 4. Adam Chenal, Frederic, 5-08. Pole vault – 1. Mason Kriegel, Webster, 13-00; 2. Ben Jensen, Webster, 12-06; 3. AJ Walsh-Brenizer, Luck, 11-00. Long jump – 1. Dana Hubbell, Siren, 20-03.50; 4. Isaac Wegner, Siren, 19-04.25. Triple jump – 1. Dana Hubbell, Siren, 40-07.25; 4. Isaac Wegner, Siren, 38-05. Shot put – 1. Roger Steen, Luck, 45-08.75; 2. Seth Stoner, Siern, 44-10.75; 4. Greg McIntyre, Webster, 41-04.50. Discus throw – 1. Roger Steen, Luck, 139-07; 2. Greg McIntyre, Webster, 134-07; 3. Will Haines, Siren, 132-09.


S

L

PAGE 20 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

P R I N G

E A D E R

S

P O R T S

Several Saints and Eagles headed to Cadott

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer SOMERSET – The St. Croix Falls and Unity track teams traveled to the regional meet in Somerset on Monday, May 23, and several athletes came in the top four to earn their trip to sectionals at Colby this Thursday, May 26. “I was very pleased with our girls team,” said Saints coach Steph Belisle. “They came out and performed very well, with athletes in five events advancing to the sectional. This is my third year coaching in SCF and this is by far the most girls I have ever taken to a sectional. It will be a great experience for them to compete at the next level, and I am looking forward to seeing how they perform on Thursday.” Starting with the 400-meter dash, sophomore Briana Wenell tied for third place with a time of 1 minute, 7.9 seconds. Freshman Erica Bergmann will also compete at sectionals as she took fourth in the 800-meter run with a time of 2:31.18. The Saints will be sending two relay teams to sectionals, including the 4x400, which took third overall with a time of 4:29.05. Making up that team were Jessica Rademacher, Autumn Erickson, Erica Bergmann, and Briana Wenell. In the 4x800-meter relay, the Saints finished fourth with a time of 10:35.22. Bailey Bergmann, Allie Holmdahl, Erica Bergmann and Rademacher make up the 4x800 team. Sophomore Samantha Jorgenson took third overall in the pole vault by hitting a mark of 7 feet, 6 inches.

Marek also had a solid finish in the long jump, as he became the Division 2 regional champ with a jump of 21 feet, 1/2 inch. He will also compete with the Saints 4x100-meter relay team, which took third place overall time of 45.33 seconds. Other teammates on the 4x100 include Marshall Dillman, Shane Swanson and Garrett Radinzel. Rashaud Kelash has been steadily improving on his distance running and his

See Somerset Regional/page 24

Samantha Jorgenson of St. Croix Falls is heading to sectionals. – File photos by Becky Amundson

St. Croix Falls boys results Saints junior Jace Marek took second in the 100-meter dash with a time of 11.43 seconds and will be headed to the sectional in Cadott, along with four other teammates. WIAA Division 2 Regional at Somerset May 23, 2011 Women Team Results Place Team Points 1st Osceola 168.00 2nd Somerset 108.00 3rd Ellsworth 95.00 St. Croix Central 72.75 4th Amery 62.50 5th Prescott 57.50 6th 7th Baldwin-Woodville 56.50 8th St. Croix Falls 45.75 9th Unity 35.00

Area individual sectional qualifiers (For complete results visit www.pttiming.com) 400-meter dash – 3. Briana Wenell, St. Croix Falls, 1:07.09. 800-meter run – 4. Erica Bergmann, St. Croix Falls, 2:31.18. 4x400-meter relay – 3. St. Croix Falls (Jessica Rademacher, Erica Bergmann, Autumn Erickson, Briana Wenell), 4:29.05. 4x800-meter relay – 4. St. Croix Falls (Bailey Bergmann, Erica Bergmann, Allie Holmdahl, Jessica Rademacher), 10:35.22. High jump – 4. Ashley Johnson, Unity, 4-08. Pole vault – 3. Samantha Jorgenson, St. Croix Falls, 7-06. Long jump – 2. Ashley Johnson, Unity, 15-09.50. Shot put – 2. Emily Gross, Unity, 37-02.

Rashaud Kelash of St. Croix Falls took first in the 3,200-meter run at the regional track meet in Somerset, Monday, May 26.

Ryan Nussbaum of St. Croix Falls celebrates a victory at an earlier track meet this season.

WIAA Division 2 Regional at Somerset May 23, 2011 Men Team Results Place Team Points 1st Osceola 120.00 2nd Unity 98.00 3rd Ellsworth 87.00 4th Prescott 73.00 5th St. Croix Central 71.50 6th Somerset 70.00 7th Amery 68.00 8th St. Croix Falls 65.00 9th Baldwin-Woodville 49.50

Area individual sectional qualifiers (For complete results visit www.pttiming.com) 100-meter dash – 2. Jace Marek, St. Croix Falls, 11.43. 400-meter dash – 4. Zach Cardot, Unity, 56.14. 1,600-meter run – 2. Rashaud Kelash, St. Croix Falls, 4:40.64. 3,200-meter run – 1. Rashaud Kelash, St. Croix Falls, 10:19.83. 100-meter hurdles – 1. Xavier Foeller, Unity, 15.94. 300-meter hurdles – 2. Xavier Foeller, Unity, 43.46. 4x100-meter relay – . St. Croix Falls (Marshall Dillman, Shane Swanson, Jace Marek, Garret Radinzel), 45.33. High jump – 2. Steven Krueger, Unity, 6-00. Pole vault – 1. Dylan Hendricks, Unity, 12-06; 3. Colton Sorensen, Unity, 11-06. Long jump – 1. Jace Marek, St. Croix Falls, 2100.50. Shot put – 2. Oliver Raboin, Unity, 45-11; 3. Joe Swanson, Unity, 44-09.5. Discus throw – 2. Joe Swanson, Unity, 145-09.

Colton Sorensen of Unity took third for the Eagles in the pole vault during the regional meet in Somerset. – File photo by Marty Seeger

The Unity girls will be represented in at least three different events at sectionals.


S

P R I N G

Frederic Regional/continued

L

S

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 21

E A D E R

P O R T S

day, while Blok will take part in the girls high jump after her third-place finish. Carlson finished fourth in the girls long jump, which earned her a chance to compete at sectionals in that event as well. “Sending a very strong team over to sectionals and I am hoping that we can bring home Frederic’s first female sectional championship. The main goal, though, is to get athletes on to state,” said Larcom. “As you can see, we have a large number of events covered with girls competing in them, this helps with scoring points. I have been very proud of my girls this year!”

Webster sends big numbers to Colfax FREDERIC – In at least 14 years of coaching Webster track, Roy Ward can’t think of a time where this area has sent so many competitors to the sectional track meet in Colfax, and with over 30 athletes heading to Colfax from Webster alone, there’s sure to be a lot of excitement. “This is the first year I can remember our girls doing so well as a team,” said Ward, who saw his Tiger girls finish second with 131 points, while Frederic had 141 points. The Webster girls 4x200-meter relay team, which consists of Danielle Dyson, Molly Brown, Marissa Elliott and Gabby Schiller, took fourth overall. Senior Michelle Gibbs and Tami Quatmann will represent the Tigers in the 100-meter hurdles with second- and fourth-place finishes respectively, and in the 100-meter dash, Melissa Gustavson took fourth. In the 1,600-meter run, Kally Schiller took second place, and also took first place in the 3,200-meter run. The Tiger girls 4x200-meter relay team went third overall with Angel Christianson, Ashley Irvine, Gibbs and Gustavson making up the team. The girls 4x200-meter relay team placed second with Irvine, Gustavson, Christianson and Shaina Pardun, and Daniel Dyson took fourth in the 400-meter hurdles. Emma Kelby took fourth in the 3,200meter run, and Mary Johnson finished strong in the discus with a fourth-place finish and third-place finish in the shot put. Pardun was first in the pole vault, and Mackenzie Koelz put up a personal best in the pole vault for third place. “There were lots of personal-best performances,” Ward said. Gibbs will also be running in the triple jump for the Tigers with her fourth-place finish, as well as the high jump.

Webster boys dominate FREDERIC – The Webster boys came out on top once again, getting two through to sectionals in the 110-meter hurdles including Matt Elmgren and Josh Baer. Mason Kriegel moved on to sectionals in three events with his second-place finish in the 100-meter dash, and two firstplace finishes in the 200-meter dash and the pole vault. Jack Taylor was first in the 1,600-meter run, while Joey Erickson and Devin Greene went third and fourth respectively in the event. Robert Buehler, Cliff Benjamin, Dan Dochniak and Taylor Heinz were fourth in the 4x200-meter relay and Devin Greene and Cody Isaacson took second and third in the 800-meter run. Taylor was the big winner in the 3,200 meter as well, and Erickson was third in the same event. In the 4x400-meter relay, Isaacson, Heinz, Dochniak and Cullen Hopkins ran their way to a third-place finish and sectional bid. In the boys high jump, Austin Elliott went third overall, and Greg McIntyre was fourth in the shot put. He also took second in the discus. While the pole vault was won by Kriegel, Ben Jensen hit a personal best to take second place overall. Frederic boys competing in six events FREDERIC – The Frederic boys track team will represent athletes in six events at Colfax sectionals including 110-meter hurdles, where Tony Peterson took first overall. The Vikings got their 4x100-meter relay team through with a fourth-place finish with help from Robert Kirk, Erik Stoner,

Webster’s Jack Taylor, Joey Erickson and Devin Greene were in good form during the boys 1,600-meter run. All three earned a spot in the sectional at Colfax this Thursday, May 26. – Photos by Marty Seeger

Josiah Lund of Frederic was way out in front of the competition during the 800-meter run. He took first place in the event.

The Frederic boys 4x100-meter relay team is heading to sectionals after they finished fourth overall.

Mary Johnson is on her way to sectionals for the Webster girls in the shot put.

Mackenzie Koelz hit her personal best jump in the pole vault, which helped her earn a spot at the sectional in Colfax. Ben Ackerley and Adam Chenal. Peterson also took first in the 300-meter hurdles, and helped the 4x400-meter relay team to a first-place spot along with Ackerley, Kirk and Josiah Lund, who was far ahead of the pack with his first-place finish in the 800-meter run.

Siren sends athletes in 10 events FREDERIC – The Siren boys and girls will compete in 10 different events at the Colfax sectional, starting with Amber Moore, who took third in the 100-meter dash for the girls. Moore also made it to sectionals in the 200-meter dash with a

sixth-place finish. Taylor Hagen, Liz Brown, Abigail Mitchell and Brittany Coulter placed fourth in the 4x400-meter relay, and Ashley Guevara took second in the discus and first in the shot put. For the Siren boys, Dana Hubbell had a solid day going fourth in the 100-meter dash, and first place in the triple jump and long jump. Isaac Wegner took fourth in the 400-meter dash, and fourth in the long jump. Seth Stoner was second in the boys shot put and Haines went third in the discus.

Luck in seven events at sectionals FREDERIC – The Luck Cardinals track team has seen better days, but they managed to get through to sectionals with seven events that will be represented, including the 4x200-meter relay, as they made it through in fourth place. Jacob Laduke, Brett Bartylla, Joe Christensen and Jan Rozumalski represented that team, and Landen Strilzuk had a good day by getting through in three different events. Strilzuk took second in the 400-meter dash, third in the 200-meter dash and helped the 4x400-meter relay team to a fourth-place finish along with Laduke, Rozumalski and A.J. Walsh-Brenizer. The Cardinals just missed in the 4x100meter relay with a fifth-place finish, but did get two first-place finishes in the shot put and discus with throws from Roger Steen. Walsh-Brenizer was the third-place finisher in the pole vault to move on to sectionals.


S

L

PAGE 22 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

P R I N G

E A D E R

S

P O R T S

Eagle golfers take second on way to sectionals

Saints golfer Alex Mikl earns trip as individual

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer OSCEOLA – The Unity golf team is headed to sectionals after their secondplace finish at the Krooked Kreek Golf Course in Osceola on Tuesday, May 24. “We did a great job as a team shooting a 311,” said coach Larry Stencil. “This course has its share of tight driving holes with a lot of swamp and water as hazards.” The Division 2 regional featured Osceola in first place with a team score of 297, followed by Unity’s 311 and Amery’s 333. Durand scored 346; Baldwin-Woodville, 348; Ellsworth, 361; St. Croix Falls, 368; Somerset, 373; St. Croix Central, 383; Prescott, 411; and Mondovi, 425. The medalists included Charlie Danielson of Osceola who shot a 66, followed by Unity’s Reed Sorensen with a 74 and Evan Lunda’s 75. “Reed Sorensen and Evan Lunda shot lights out on the tough Krooked Kreek Golf Course. Brandon Stencil did a great job on the very difficult back nine to recover from a tough front nine. Erik Nelson is battling a hip injury suffered in football to shoot an 82. We shot better than our average for 18 holes. If we do this next week at sectionals, we should be in good shape,” coach Stencil said. Brandon Stencil scored an 80, followed by Eric Nelson, 82; and Kyle Sorensen, 88. Junior Alex Mikl of St. Croix Falls qualified for sectionals as an individual with his score of 84. The sectional golf meet is set for the Hayward Golf Club next Tuesday, May 31, with an 11 a.m. tee time.

Evan Lunda had a great golf outing during regionals on Tuesday, May 24.

Erik Nelson eyes a shot on the green for the Eagles golf team.

Unity’s Brandon Stencil eyes a putt at the Krooked K r e e k G o l f Course in Osceola.

Alex Mikl of St. Croix Falls is heading to the sectional golf meet in Hayward as an individual. Mikl is a junior this season for the Saints. – Photos submitted

Kyle Sorensen on the greens at Krooked Kreek Golf Course.

Reed Sorensen has been a consistent leader for the Eagles this season and helped Unity to a second-place finish at regionals and a trip to sectionals.

Unity grabs conference title at Turtleback

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer RICE LAKE – The Unity boys golf team took complete control of the conference golf tournament at Turtleback Golf Course in Rice Lake on Thursday, May 19. “The boys came ready to play,” said Unity coach Larry Stencil. “Turtleback creates several problems if one does not hit fairways. The rough is thick and deep which does not allow you to hit an aggressive shot to the green. Several pins were put in places where the risk outweighed the reward.” Siren’s Luke Bollant was the medalist on the day followed by Unity’s Reed Sorensen, with a score of 75, and Brandon Stencil and Kyle Sorensen who both shot 76 on the day. “To have Reed, Brandon and Kyle finish in the top four was a tribute to their will to succeed and just plain grinding their way around the course. Each finished below their 18-hole average, which is very difficult at Turtleback,” coach Stencil said.

The Eagles have won the tournament for the second year in a row, with this year’s team score of 312 coming 47 strokes ahead of the second-place Saints, who finished with a team score of 359. Grantsburg came in third with a 361, followed by Siren, 367; Clear Lake, 367; Bruce, 374; Birchwood, 394; Turtle Lake, 401; Luck, 406; Cameron, 423; Frederic, 426; and Flambeau, 450. Chris Hopp led the Frederic Vikings with a score of 83, while Kyle Johnson led the Pirates with an 82. Luck’s Roger Steen led the Cards with a 90, and Taylor Sempf led the Saints with an 85.

LEFT: The 2011 All-Conference boys golf winners include bottom row: (L to R) Reed Sorensen, Unity; Luke Bollant, Siren; Brandon Stencil, Unity; Kyle Sorensen, Unity; Kyle Johnson, Grantsburg and Taylor Sempf, St. Croix Falls. Back row: Evan Lunda, Unity; Jake Bengtson, Unity; Jake Langevin, Grantsburg; Ben Davis, Grantsburg; Alex Mikl, St. Croix Falls; Roger Steen, Luck, and Chris Hopp, Frederic. – Photo submitted


S

P R I N G

L

S

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 23

E A D E R

P O R T S

Siren and Grantsburg golfers moving on to sectionals Roger Steen of Luck earns trip as an individual

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer FREDERIC – It was a great day for golf on Tuesday, May 24, as the Frederic Golf Course hosted the Division 3 regional tournament among 10 different teams. With the top four teams qualifying for the sectionals, Grantsburg and Siren rounded out the third and fourth spots respectively, as Spring Valley came through first, and Colfax in second. Spring Valley scored a 353; Colfax, 356; Grantsburg, 368; and Siren, 369. Glenwood City followed with a 375; Clear Lake, 375; Turtle Lake/Clayton, 386; Luck, 395; Frederic, 398 and Webster, 1,249. “I am proud of the kids,” said Siren coach Brian Webster. “Luke Bollant has been leading us all year as he did today. It is nice to have depth so when some kids can’t golf, others step up.

Jake Langevin eyes his next shot at the Frederic Golf Course during the regional tournament.

The Siren Dragon boys golf team is heading to sectionals after their fourth-place finish at the Frederic Regional on Tuesday, May 24. – Photos by Marty Seeger The kids are learning some things about teamwork this year.” Bollant led the Dragons with an 18-hole round of 79, followed by Justin Decorah with a 91; Jake Swenson, 93; Taylor Renberg, 106; and Jared Emery, 110. The Pirates were led by Kyle Johnson with 80, Jake Langevin, 91; Ben Davis, 93; Lars Thoreson, 104; and Sean Handy, 119. Individually, Roger Steen of Luck is heading to sectionals after being forced to do a tiebreaker in order to qualify. Steen led the four qualifying individuals with a score of 86. Chris Hopp also had a chance to qualify for sectionals but lost in the tiebreaker. Hopp finished with a score of 88. The Division 3 sectional meet will be held next Tuesday, May 31, near Chippewa Falls at the Lake Wissota Golf Course, with a 9 a.m. tee time. Roger Steen of Luck is heading to sectionals as an individual.

Kyle Johnson of Grantsburg chips the ball from the sand trap.

RIGHT: Chris Hopp of Frederic tees off on hole No. 1 during a playoff to break a tie. Hopp was defeated, just missing a chance to go to sectionals.

Eagle boys go deep over Saints

Pirates suffer first loss to a solid Bruce team Unity 9, St. Croix Falls 4

by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – The Unity Eagles baseball squad used the long ball to get past conference rival St. Croix Falls on Thursday, May 19, at home, winning 9-4 in what was also a first-round playoff preview. With the game tied at 1-1 in the bottom of the third inning, Unity’s Derek Campbell uncorked a Nick Johnson pitch deep over the right center field fence, with two runners on, for a 4-1 lead that would give the Eagle squad a lead they would hold for the remainder.

St. Croix Falls' Marcus Campbell reached high for a run-saving catch at shortstop against the Unity Eagles last week. – Photos by Greg Marsten Luke Nelson started on the mound for the Eagles and earned the victory in over five innings of work. Nelson also added a double and two RBIs to his own cause. Nate Despiegelaere came on in relief for the save. The Saints had their moments, including a strong Nathan Graveson double that gave them a brief comeback push in the top of the fourth inning, but Nelson and the Eagle defense held firm and did not surrender the lead. The Eagles slowly added five more runs in the next few innings, through a combination of clutch hitting and Saint miscues. Unity’s Zac Baxter went deep with a long double for the Eagles in the fifth inning, scoring two more, but was later caught stealing to end the rally. The Saints made a valiant comeback attempt, scoring a pair of runs in the top of the sixth inning, leading to the Unity pitching change. That change worked as planned, killing the potential rally and all The Eagles played solid defense against the visiting Saints making them pay for any misbut sealing the victory. cues.

Unity has picked up their offense in recent weeks, and seems to be poised for a strong playoff challenge with their fourth seed. They are also the only team within sight of a challenge for West-LakelandConference-leading Grantsburg, whom they played to close out the regular season on May 24 (results elsewhere). The Saints have had some hard luck and bad bounces at the same time, struggling to keep their leads and kill their opponents’ rallies, while showcasing some solid play at the same time. They have a fifth seed and open their playoff action on Friday, May 27, at Unity against these same Eagles, who earned the hosting rights with a fourth seed. If last week’s contest is an indicator, it should be a wellfought battle on Friday.

Bruce 5, Grantsburg 4 BRUCE – The Grantsburg Pirates took their first loss of the season to a very respectable Bruce Chieftains team during a nonconference battle on Thursday, May 19. The Chieftains had just one loss on the season before their game against the Pirates. Both teams are still ranked No. 1 in the state. The Pirates in Division 3, and Bruce in Division 4. No game stats were available by press time for complete roundup. – Marty Seeger

Siren/Webster 9, Prairie Farm 6 SIREN – The Siren/Webster baseball team capitalized on timely hits and headsup baserunning in a win against Prairie Farm. The Tigons scored three runs in the second inning on a leadoff single from Evan Oachs, who stole a base and reached third on a passed ball. Aaron Dietmeier also singled in the inning and went 3 for 3 in the game. Mycal Larson, Tadd Oachs, Shay Johnson and Josh Lemieux each had hits in the win. The Panthers had six runs on 10 hits, and despite a three-run inning in the seventh, they couldn’t pull out the rally. – Marty Seeger


S

L

PAGE 24 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

P R I N G

E A D E R

S

P O R T S

Two moving on to track sectionals from Grantsburg

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer RICE LAKE – The Grantsburg Pirates will have at least two athletes representing them at the sectional track meet at Colby on Thursday, May 26, after their performances at the Rice Lake regional. Senior Angela Gaffney will be competing in two events at sectionals including the 3,200-meter run, where she finished second overall and a time of 12 minutes, 50.84 seconds. She will also compete in the 1,600-meter run with her fourth-place finish and time of 5:56.84. Also competing at the sectional meet in Colby will be junior Saisha Goepfert, who took second in the high jump after hitting a mark of 4 feet, 11 inches. Junior Haley Burkhardt just missed going to sectionals with a fifth-place spot in the 400-meter dash with a time of 1:06.29.

Somerset Regional/continued

hard work paid off with a regional title in the 3,200-meter run, with a top time of 10:19.83. He also took second overall in the 1,600-meter run with a time of 4:40.64.

Unity boys qualify in three events The Eagle boys track team will be represented in seven different events at the sectional in Colby, as junior Zach Cardot took fourth place in the 400-meter dash with a time of 56.14 seconds. Xavier Foeller will be competing in two sectional

WIAA Division 2 Regional at Rice Lake May 23, 2011 Men Team Results Place Team Points 1st Rice Lake 143.00 2nd Northwestern 122.00 3rd Ashland 110.00 4th Hayward 109.50 5th Spooner 60.00 Cameron 56.00 6th Cumberland 42.00 7thT Barron 42.00 7thT 9th Grantsburg 13.50

For the boys, Jacob Ohnstad just missed an opportunity to go to sectionals with a fifth-place finish in the 3,200-meter run with a time of 10:59.90. He also took seventh in the 1,600-meter run. Sophomore Colton Tretsven missed sectionals by two spots with a sixth-place finish in the boys shot put, with a distance of 43 feet, 4-1/4 inches. events as he took first place overall in the 110-meter hurdles with a time of 15.94. He also placed second in the 300-meter hurdles with a time of 43.46. Steven Krueger landed a spot in the high jump with a jump of 6 feet, earning him a second place spot. Dylan Hendricks and Colton Sorenson will both be heading to sectionals in the pole vault as Hendricks took first place overall with a height of 12 feet, 6 inches. Sorensen placed third overall with a mark of 11-06. Oliver Raboin and Joe Swanson will get to compete together in the shot put, as Raboin took second with a mark of 45 feet,

WIAA Division 2 Regional at Rice Lake May 23, 2011 Women Team Results Team Points Place 1st Rice Lake 175.00 2nd Spooner 123.00 3rd Hayward 118.50 4th Northwestern 106.00 5th Ashland 50.00 6th Cameron 39.00 7th Barron 25.50 8th Grantsburg 25.00 Cumberland 18.00 9th

Area individual sectional qualifiers (For complete results visit www.pttiming.com) 1,600-meter run – 4. Angela Gaffney, Grantsburg, 5:56.84. 3,200-meter run – 2. Angela Gaffney, Grantsburg, 12:50.84. High jump – 2. Saisha Goepfert, Grantsburg, 04-11.

Angela Gaffney of Grantsburg is going to sectionals in the distance events. – File photo by Marty Seeger 11 inches, and Swanson took third with a mark of 44-04.50. Swanson also made sectionals in the discus with a throw of 145-09.

Unity girls qualify in three events The Unity girls track team is sending two athletes to Cadott for the sectional meet, as junior Ashley Johnson will be testing her skills in the long and high jump events. Johnson placed second in the long jump with a 7-foot, 6-inch jump, and fourth in the high jump with a mark of 15 feet, 9-1/2-inches. Freshman Emily Gross will compete in

the shot put at sectionals as she took second overall with a mark of 37 feet, 2 inches. “Happy for the girls going on, was hoping for a couple of more events,” said Unity coach Mike Bielmeier, who mentioned some close-call finishers including Johnson in the discus and Hayla Bader in the pole vault. Both took fifth overall, just missing a chance to qualify. “Happy with the season overall … just was one we had a hard time getting going (with) weather. Going to miss the senior group,” Bielmeier added.

More regional track action at Frederic

Seth Stoner in the shot put during the Frederic Regional meet. – Photos by Marty Seeger

Landen Strilzuk of Luck will compete in at least three events at the sectional in Colfax this Thursday, May 26.

Kally Schiller of Webster had a great day at the Frederic track meet in the distance events, and earned a spot in sectionals.

Isaac Wegner is heading to sectionals for the Siren Dragons in the long jump and several other events.


S

P R I N G

Tuesday baseball/continued

L

S

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 25

E A D E R

P O R T S

St. Croix Falls 3, Chetek-Weyerhaeuser 0 CHETEK – The St. Croix Falls baseball team picked up a win in a nonconference game against Chetek-Weyerhaeuser on Tuesday, May 24.. The Saints will be playing at Unity this Friday, May 27, beginning at 1 p.m. to start regional action. – Marty Seeger Somerset 4, St. Croix Falls 3 SOMERSET – The Saints boys baseball team took a tough loss at Somerset in eight innings on Monday, May 23. Down 3-0 in the top of the sixth inning, the Saints managed to pick up three runs to tie the game with the help of a three-run homer by Marcus Campbell, and eventually send the game into extras, where they lost in the bottom of the eight inning with two outs and an RBI single by the Spartans. Campbell was 2 for 4 in the game and Ben Clausen was also 2 for 4, as the Saints had six hits total in the game. – Marty Seeger

Bloomer 6, Unity 2 BLOOMER – The Unity Eagles had a hard time getting their bats in gear on the road against the Bloomer Blackhawks on Monday, May 23, losing 6-2 and managing just four hits off the Hawks hurlers. Unity’s Nate Despiegelaere got the call as starter, and pitched four innings, giving up six hits and six earned runs, getting tagged with the loss. However, the Eagles offered little in the way of offensive production to back up their starter, scoring a run in the third and fourth innings, but only after several fielders choices and good base running. The Eagles were outmatched at the plate, though, as the Hawks scored a pair of runs in the opening inning, added another in the second and batted through the order in the fifth frame, scoring three more for insurance. The Hawks kept the Eagles in check as the final innings rolled away, with Zac Baxter coming on in relief for the final two innings. The Blackhawks play in the very tough Heart of the North Conference, and while they’ve been in the middle of the pack this season, they showed they are a team to be reckoned with in Division 2 and could possibly be a sectional opponent for the Eagles, if the stars align in the playoffs. –

Luck's Tony Aguado gets caught leaning at first against Solon Springs. – Photos by Greg Marsten

Greg Marsten Luck 20, New Auburn 2 LUCK – The Luck Cardinal baseball squad had little trouble dispatching of the visiting New Auburn Trojans in a nonconference contest on Monday, May 23, at the Luck field, technically winning in three innings, but playing on as the nice weather allowed. New Auburn has struggled for some time, and while they had a tough time getting their pitches over, they did manage two runs off the Cardinals, who had emptied their bench by the third inning. Notables for the Cards included two hits each for Ben Kufalk, Brady Klatt and Brodie Kunze, as well as home runs for Cole Mortel and Devin Harvieux. Klatt also started on the mound for Luck and earned the win, pitching all five innings and striking out 10 Trojans in the victory, which was officially 20-2, but after several innings the Cards backed off and did not steal or come home on passed balls, in a commendable sportsmanship display that was duly noted by several New Auburn players, fans and parents. – Greg Marsten

Luck 8, Prairie Farm 7 LUCK – In a preview of the opening round of the playoffs for the Cardinals, Luck hosted the Prairie Farm Panthers on Tuesday, May 17, and came away with an 8-7 win in a decidedly close contest with several lead changes. “We had to fight hard for the win,”

Luck senior Brady Klatt pitched the entire game against New Auburn, striking out 10 on the way to a lopsided 20-2 victory.

stated Luck head coach Ryan Humpal. “Nice to get a win when we did not play our best.” The Panthers drew first blood, scoring a pair of runs in the first inning, with Luck returning the favor in their half of the second frame. Prairie Farm was able to get runs in the second, third and fourth innings, as well, while the Cards scored another pair in the third inning, and trailed 6-4 as they came to bat in the bottom of the sixth. The Cardinals manufactured three more runs to tie and then take the lead for the first time, 7-6. “Our timely hitting and patience at the plate came through in the late innings,” Humpal said. The Panthers added a tally in the seventh to tie the score, giving the Cards a chance for a walk-off win, which they did on a Ben Kufalk single, scoring Dylan Lemay for the 8-7 victory. Brodie Kunze got the win in relief for starter Brady Klatt, and Kunze added a pair of hits to his own cause. Cardinal Jesse Rennicke also added a pair of hits to the win, as well as scoring twice. LeMay had two RBIs, as did Klatt. The game was indeed a preview of the Thursday, May 256, first-round playoff contest in Division 4, which will take place at Luck again, starting at 5 p.m., and promises to be a close contest. The winner plays second-seeded Northwood on the road. – Greg Marsten

Solon Springs 9, Luck 6 LUCK – The Eagles of Solon Springs schooled the Luck Cardinals a bit on Friday, May 20, winning 9-6 at Luck in what could possibly be a sectional playoff preview in Division 4. The Cardinals were able to score a pair of runs in the first, mainly off of walks and fielder’s choices, but they also surrendered several runs in the early innings on a combination of miscues, passed balls and stolen bases. “We committed five errors to allow Solon to jump on us early,” stated Luck head coach Ryan Humpal. The Eagles exploded for five runs off

the Cards in the fifth inning, sealing their victory and yet firing up the Cardinals along the way. “It was nice to see our guys have the fight in them to be right there in the seventh inning,” Humpal stated. “This was another night when we did not play very good baseball.” Solon Springs held on for the victory, in spite of the late-inning charge, and won 96. – Greg Marsten

Bruce 16, Unity 8 BRUCE – The Bruce Red Raiders proved they are among the true elite in Wisconsin baseball on Friday, May 20, as they hosted Unity, continuing their winning ways with a strong, 16-8 victory over the visiting Eagles. Bruce lost just one contest all season, and was undefeated in East Lakeland Conference play, not even getting challenged in their conference. But Unity gave them a real run, at least to start. The Eagles started strong, scoring a respectable six runs on just three hits in the opening frame against the oh-sotough Raiders. They capitalized on errors and miscues, while also playing solid fundamental ball on the base paths. But the Raiders were not about to roll over, scoring in at least every inning except the first off the Eagles pitching battery, and racking up four runs in the second inning, five more in the fourth inning, and an additional four tallies in the sixth for insurance. Zac Baxter started for the Eagles, but was taken out in the third inning, replaced by Nate Despiegelaere, who was tagged for the loss. Brady Flaherty came on in relief but, realistically, every Unity pitcher gave up at least five runs against the hardhitting Raiders. Notables for the Eagles were few and far between, but show two hits for Justin Mooney, and Brady Turner scored twice, but other than the stars aligning in that first inning, the game was all Bruce’s, with the final score ending up as 16-8, very much in favor of the Red Raiders. Luckily for the Eagles, Bruce is in Division 4 for the playoffs. – Greg Marsten Northwood 5, Siren/Webster 1 SIREN – The Siren/Webster baseball team scored just one run in the bottom of the first inning in a 5-l loss against the Evergreens on Monday, May 23. A total of three hits from Tadd Oachs, Shay Johnson and Josh Lemieux was all the offense the Tigons could muster. Siren/Webster is scheduled to travel to Ashland in the playoffs this Friday, May 27. – Marty Seeger

Turtle Lake/Clayton 11, Frederic 1 TURTLE LAKE – The Frederic Vikings baseball team took a loss against a solid Turtle Lake/Clayton team on Monday, May 23, before entering the playoff scene. The Vikings are hosting the Birchwood Bobcats this Friday, May 27, beginning at 5 p.m. The Vikings drew a No. 4 seed in the first round, with the Bobcats posting just one win on the season. – Marty Seeger

Cardinal second baseman Brady Klatt waits for a throw from home on a steal attempt.


S

L

PAGE 26 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

P R I N G

Schmidt throws no-hitter against Turtle Lake/Clayton

E A D E R

S

P O R T S

Pirates down D1 Superior

Grantsburg 11, Superior 1

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – The Pirates appear ready for the upcoming playoffs next week, as they wrapped up their regular season with an undefeated record, defeating Division 1 Superior on Monday, May 23, followed by an easy win over Webster/Siren the following night. The Pirates received a first round bye and will take on the winner of the game between Unity and Turtle Lake/Clayton next Tuesday, May 31. Emily Cole had the hot bat for Grantsburg against Superior as she went 4 for 4 with five RBIs, which included a home run in the fourth inning. Kyle Pewe had a solid game in the leadoff spot against Superior, going 4 for 5 with an RBI, as the Pirates produced a total of 12 hits, with 10 walks. Superior had just two hits in the game. Grantsburg 14, Webster/Siren 0 GRANTSBURG – The Grantsburg softball team cruised to an easy win over Webster/Siren on Tuesday, May 31, with 14 runs on 13 hits. Sam Schweiger and Jessica Hoffman allowed just one hit in the game with

The Pirates softball team is poised to take another run at the state tournament this season. – File photo by Marty Seeger

Schweiger waking two and striking out six in 13 batters faced. Hoffman threw two innings allowing no hits, with one walk and four strikeouts in seven batters faced. Kylie Pewe, Schweiger, McKenzie Ryan and Wendy Roberts each went 2 for 2 in the game, with Roberts leading with three RBIs. Tiffany Meyer was 1 for 2 with a pair of RBIs.

Frederic 10, Turtle Lake/Clayton 0 TURTLE LAKE – Frederic pitcher Corissa Schmidt tossed a no-hitter against Turtle Lake/Clayton on Monday, May 23, in five innings.

The Vikings got on the board early in the top of the seventh inning with seven runs, and tacked on another two in the second, and one in the fourth. Schmidt had four strikeouts in facing 18 batters. Schmidt has a 1.51 ERA in 1800 pitches. In total the Vikings had just six hits and had three errors. Schmidt, Vanessa Neumann, Maria Miller, Tara Anderson, Kendra Mossey and Carley Gustafson each had hits. The Vikings have a No. 1 seed and will host the winner between Clear Lake and Bruce on Tuesday, May 31.

St. Croix Falls 16, Webster/Siren 6 ST. CROIX FALLS – Alexis Erickson went 3 for 5 with six RBIs for the St. Croix Falls softball team, as the Saints offense propelled them over Webster/Siren on Friday, May 20. Natalie Sempf was 4 for 4 with three RBIs, and Alicia Chelberg 3 for 4 with two RBIs. The Saints host Cumberland this Thursday, May 26, beginning at 5 p.m. Webster/Siren is headed to Ashland on May 20.

Former Saint plays football in Africa

Drake University plays first-ever collegiate football game on African soil

fensive tackle for the Bulldogs, and expected to get a lot more playing time this fall. During his senior season at St. Croix Falls, Larson suffered a season-ending knee injury that kept him on the sidelines for the entire football and basketball season. Prior to the knee injury, Larson was being seriously considered by top-tier schools, such as the Wisconsin Badgers, but decided on Drake University. At the time of publication, Larson was still on the team’s mission in Africa, which was to help build and repair schools and orphanages in and around the villages of Moshi and Arusha. Of course, the Bulldogs also brought American football to the continent for the first time ever, and organized football clinics for the kids to experience the game for the first time. Each player brought six deflated footballs along with them to hand out to as many kids as possible. The team also has plans to climb the 19,340-foot Mount Kilimanjaro, the tallest mountain Ryan Larson is currently on a once in a lifetime mission in Africa to bring football and goodwill to the country. – Photo submitted

Drake 17, CONADEIP All-Stars 7

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer TANZANIA, Africa – American football went further than any other American football team last Saturday, as the Drake University football team, and the CONADEIP All-Stars went head to head at the Sheik Amri Abedi Memorial Stadium in Tanzania, Africa. The Kilimanjaro Bowl had been featured in several news outlets over the past few weeks, including ESPN’s “First Take,” and highlighted more than just your typical football game. Among the persons participating in the journey were former St. Croix Falls athlete, Ryan Larson, who was a standout in basketball and track, but also in football. Larson is a sophomore de-

in Africa. “We’re very excited for him,” said Ryan’s mom Dawn Larson on her son’s trip to Africa. Dawn has been keeping in touch with her son via Facebook, and with post’s such as “Africa is Amazing!” It was clear that her son was in awe from the day they landed. Larson also said her son is great with children, and was already having fun showing them his sunglasses and watching their fascination with the cameras they brought along to document the momentous event. “Ryan loves kids and is very good with kids,”Larson said. The football game, which was played against a select group of student-athletes from eight Mexican institutions of higher learning, was won by Drake University 17-7. At least 11,781 fans were in attendance to watch the Kilimanjaro Bowl. More details from Larson’s experiences in Africa will be featured in early June when he returns from his journey in early June. – with information from www.drake.edu

City of Trails Races Set for June 4

ST. CROIX FALLS – Runners and walkers … time is running out to register for the seventh-annual City of Trails 5K run/walk and Rock ‘n’ River 10K trail run/hike. It’s taking place Saturday, June 4, in St. Croix Falls. You don’t want to miss this great fun event. “Celebrating National Trails Day with communities nationwide, the unique citylimit trails of St. Croix Falls have something for everyone,” said SCRMC’s Wanda Brown, a registered nurse, who’s been an active walker/hiker/runner for many years. “We are encouraging people of all ages to join in for some good-natured competition in one of the City of Trails fun racing events.” Featuring St. Croix Falls’ city-limits Ice Age Trail segments, the City of Trails 5K road race and spectacular Rock ‘n’ River 10K trail run/hike start simultaneously at 9 a.m. from St. Croix Falls Middle School. All races follow wooded and very

scenic courses finishing via Gaylord Nelson Riverwalk at the 1905 hydroelectic dam and Overlook Deck in downtown St. Croix Falls. Show up early with the kids for the Baby Mammoth 1K kids trail run. Kids ages 5-12 line up at St. Croix Falls Middle School and hit the trail at 8:30 am with an exclusive awards ceremony immediately following the race. The short, sweet and free-of-charge Lil’ Hiker Hustle for 2-4 –year-olds will get set at the Overlook Deck after the conclusion of the 5K and 10K runs. “We love these trails and so do our participants,” says race director, Amy Klein. “There’s something for every age and ability.” The annual team challenge spotlights participants of local businesses, organizations, families and friends. Teams step forward for a chance to win the Golden Boot, awarded in two categories: the fastest team (top three combined times) and the

largest team (most participants.) Individual prizes are awarded for overall male and female winners and age divisions up to age 60-plus. SCRMC’s sports medicine physician, Dr. Pat McDonough, offers these racemorning tips:

Take a hot shower It will help wake you up for an early start time, and passively warms your muscles, improving flexibility. Eat lightly After eight hours of sleep, your blood sugar is low. Two hours before your race, eat a breakfast that will take the edge off your hunger without leaving you bloated. Jog slowly For 15 minutes, jog at a pace that is three minutes slower than race pace.

Stretch lightly Complete the same stretching routine you do prior to track or tempo workouts. Listen to your body Oftentimes we need to rest our injuries to run some other day.

Online registration and detailed City of Trails racing event information is available at www.cityoftrails5k.com. Registration forms can be downloaded at this Web site or picked up at the St. Croix Falls City Hall. Race-day registration opens at 7 a.m. Racing events are designed and organized by the City of Trails 5K committee in partnership with the Indianhead Ice Age Trail Chapter, St. Croix Regional Medical Center and the city of St. Croix Falls. For more information, contact Amy Klein, 715-5570197. – submitted


S

P R I N G

L

S

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 27

E A D E R

P O R T S

Area golf courses hosting Pitch, Putt and Drive Competition

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – The Frederic Golf course, along with Cumberland, Luck, Siren and Amery courses, are teaming together to bring their first-annual Pitch, Putt and Drive contest for ages 8-18. Anyone interested in competing is asked to preregister before Monday, June 6. “We’re just trying to generate more kids to play, and get excited about the game,” said Joan Spencer, clubhouse manager at the Frederic Golf Course. Spencer is responsible for organizing the contest, which is free to all participants. No matter what the level of experience the event is meant to be fun for all the participants, and a great introduction to those who want to be introduced to the challenging aspects of golf. Participants will be competing on Monday, June 13, beginning at 12:30 p.m., on one of the five courses listed above. Spectators are welcome to watch kids compete in three different skill events, including driving, chipping and putting. In chipping, each competitor will get three tries to hit the ball as close to the pin as possible on a virtual dart board with four concentric circles that are premarked on the green with 2-foot increments. Points will be awarded depending on where the ball lands. Participants will also get three drives that will be scored on distance, as long as they remain within 40 yards of the fairway grid. They will also get two putts from 5 feet and 15 feet, with a maximum of four strokes per hole.

The Frederic Golf Course has been committed to getting youth more involved with the great game of golf, as shown here during one of their many events. – Photo submitted

The top three girls and top three boys in each age division will advance to a championship match based on cumulative scores. The championship will be held on Monday, Aug. 15, at the Frederic Golf Course. Volunteers are still needed, and registration forms can be found at the respective golf course where the competitions are being held. For more information, contact the Frederic Golf Course at 715-327-8250.

LEADER SPORTS SCOREBOARD BASEBALL

West Lakeland Standings Conf. Overall Team Grantsburg Pirates 9-0 16-1 Unity Eagles 8-1 11-9 5-5 10-7 St. Croix Falls Saints Luck Cardinals 5-5 8-10 1-9 3-13 Siren/Webster Frederic Vikings 1-9 2-13 Scores Thursday, May 19 Bruce 5, Grantsburg 4 Unity 9, St. Croix Falls 4 Siren/Webster 9, Prairie Farm 6 Friday, May 20 Bruce 16, Unity 8 Solon Springs 9, Luck 6 Monday, May 23 Bloomer 6, Unity 2 Somerset 4, St. Croix Falls 3 Luck 20, New Auburn 2 Northwood 5, Siren/Webster 1 Turtle Lake/Clayton 11, Frederic 1 Tuesday, May 24 St. Croix Falls 3, Chetek-Weyerhaeuser 0 Unity 4, Grantsburg 3 Upcoming - (Subject to change) Friday, May 27 (First round of regionals) 5 p.m. Siren/Webster at Ashland St. Croix Falls at Unity Birchwood at Frederic Prairie Farm at Luck Spooner at Grantsburg (not regional) Tuesday, May 31 (regional semifinals) 5 p.m. TBD at Grantsburg Wednesday, June 1 (regional finals) TBD

SOFTBALL LEAGUE

Falun Church League Team Record Calvary Covenant 0-0 Faith Lutheran 0-0 Falun Churches 0-0 Frederic Free 0-0 New Hope Lutheran 0-0 Siren Assembly 0-0 Siren Covenant/Bethany 0-0 Trade Lake Baptist 0-0 Trade River Free 0-0 Webster Baptist 0-0 W.Sweden/Zion Lutheran 0-0 Upcoming

Thursday, May 26 7 p.m. Faith Lutheran vs. Trade Lake Baptist 8 p.m. Siren Assembly vs. Trade River Free 9 p.m. New Hope Lutheran vs. Siren Covenant/Bethany Friday, May 27 7 p.m. Calvary Covenant vs. Frederic Free 8 p.m. Falun Churches vs. W.Sweden/Zion Lutheran

GOLF

Upcoming - (Subject to change) Tuesday, May 31 9 a.m. Sectional Meet at Lake Wissota Golf Course (Frederic, Grantsburg, Luck, Siren, Webster) Sectional Meet at Hayward Golf Club 11 a.m. (St. Croix Falls, Unity)

TRACK & FIELD

Upcoming - (Subject to change) Thursday, May 26 3 p.m. Sectional Meet at Colfax (Frederic, Luck, Siren, Webster) 3:15 p.m. Sectional Meet at Colby (Grantsburg, St. Croix Falls, Unity)

SOFTBALL

West Lakeland Standings Team Conf. Overall Grantsburg Pirates 9-0 16-0 Frederic Vikings 5-5 7-5 Unity Eagles 4-4 5-4 St. Croix Falls Saints 4-4 4-6 Luck Cardinals 3-7 5-12 Webster/Siren 1-6 1-12 Scores Thursday, May 19 Prescott 14, St. Croix Falls 0 Prescott 17, St. Croix Falls 11 Somerset 3, Unity 2 Friday, May 20 Luck 13, Solon Springs 8 St. Croix Falls 17, Webster/Siren 6 Monday, May 23 St. Croix Falls 13, Clear Lake 3 Grantsburg 11, Superior 1 Luck 15, New Auburn 0 Tuesday, May 24 Webster/Siren at Grantsburg Upcoming - (Subject to change) Thursday, May 26 (First round regionals) 5 p.m. Turtle Lake/Clayton at Unity Cumberland at St. Croix Falls Birchwood at Luck Webster/Siren at Ashland Tuesday, May 31 (regional semifinals) 5 p.m. TBD at Grantsburg TBD at Frederic Thursday, June 2 (regional finals) TBD

Check www.lakelandconference.org for schedule updates

Visit

www.wissports.net

for local scores and stats

Junior Golf Camp FREDERIC – The Frederic Golf Course is planning another Junior Golf Camp scheduled for June 6, 7 and 8, from 8 - 10 a.m., for ages 7-14. They are accepting the first 60 golfers who sign up. Some of the items included in the camp will be instruction on golf rules, etiquette, proper grip, stance and the basics of golf swing.

The cost is $25 per person, but no more than $50 per family. Golf instructors will include varsity boys golf coaches Rick Giller and Kelly Steen, as well as varsity girls golf coach Ron Steen and former Unity golf coach Chuck Holicky. Contact the Frederic Golf Course for forms or more information.

Lennartson hoping to compete in national tourney Unity sophomore wins two national titles in Greco and freestyle

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – Unity sophomore Alex Lennartson is a second-year wrestler at Unity, and during the 2010 season, he became a sectional heavyweight champion in Division 2, on his way to state. His father, Don Lennartson was one of only four state champions from Unity High School. During the offseason, Alex Lennartson continues to compete, as well as train three days each week for the Victory School of Wrestling through instructor Kevin Black, a four-time Wisconsin state champion with River Falls High School. Lennartson’s hard work and training paid off recently, as he earned national titles at the WWF Freestyle and GrecoRoman state championships in Wisconsin Rapids in the Cadet division, which is comprised of those born in 1995 and 1996 at 285 pounds. During the two-day event in Wisconsin Rapids, Lennartson wrestled on Saturday, April 30, in the WWF Freestyle tournament as a team member of the Victory School of Wrestling. He won three of his four matches by fall, and a 6-0 decision over Austin Clement of Kettle-Moraine. During the Greco-state tournament held the following day, Lennartson won all three of his matches by fall, and all came in under a minute. As a result of his two state titles in Greco and freestyle wrestling, Lennartson earned a spot on Team Wisconsin for the Cadet Dual National Tournament, which is scheduled for Daytona Beach, Fla., on June 13-18. “He likes wrestling, and it’s in his heart,” says Raeann Lennartson, Alex Lennartson’s mom. Lennartson has competed already at the national level. In early April, he took second place nationally during the Cadet Folkstyle National Tournament for the Victory School of Wrestling in Cedar Falls, Iowa. He pinned four of his five opponents before getting pinned during the fi-

Alex Lennartson of Unity is hoping he can compete in Daytona, Fla., in June for a chance at a national title. – Photos submitted

Alex Lennartson of Unity is shown at the top of the podium during the freestyle state championships in Wisconsin Rapids.

nals match. With training and traveling to various tournaments, however, the cost of competing has become a bit of a burden for the Lennartson family. Raeann is hoping that someone in the community might be able to help sponsor her son so he can reach Daytona Beach and compete for his firstever national title. The cost for a uniform package, camp costs and travel will exceed $800. Even still, the Lennartsons are hopeful he’ll be able to compete. ”We don’t want to lose the opportunity of him going. If worse comes to worse, we’ll find a way,” Raeann said. If you’d like to help, you can contact Raeann at 715-220-0665.


O UTDOOR S

PAGE 28 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

I N T E R C O U N T Y L E A D E R

ATVs • BIRDING • BOATING • CAMPING • FISHING • HIKING • HUNTING • RECREATIONAL VEHICLES

The turkey season ended too soon, but..

His eyes were pinched so tight with excitement I wondered if they were ever going to open, but in those brief few seconds after my nephew’s first-ever shot at a wild turkey, it wasn’t difficult to unMarty derstand why. We all get our start Seeger somewhere in the world of hunting, and I felt pretty blessed to be The a part of my nephew Bottom Riese’s very first turkey. It seems like a Line long time since Wisconsin’s first turkey season. The two-day youth hunt was held on Saturday and Sunday, April 9-10, but it’s as clear now as it was then. It began as a slumber party of sorts. Me picking Riese up the Friday before to give his dad the next day to finish filing some last-minute taxes. It was a last-minute ordeal too, when I found out I’d be escorting him on his second year of turkey hunting, but I was happy to meet them halfway in New Richmond. Since Riese is from River Falls, I don’t get to see him as often as I’d like, but every moment shared is something special, and in the world of hunting or fishing with him, the moments are magnified. We managed to get back to Balsam Lake at a respectable time that Friday evening, and the morning couldn’t have come soon enough. Neither of us had gotten much sleep, and I wondered who might be more excited, even though it was probably me. Riese had hunted the year before and witnessed his dad take a jake turkey, but he hadn’t been in position to take a shot

The turkey season is officially over in Wisconsin, but the memories shared with a first-time turkey hunter last forever. – Photo by Marty Seeger

for himself. Deep down, I knew the spot we drove 40 minutes to get to that Saturday morning was good. I’d taken several birds in the area near Prairie Farm before, but hadn’t scouted any of it prior to the season. The goal was to at least hear a bird first, and then either hope, or wait. We arrived a little late, but early enough not to spook any roosting birds. A few scant gobbles could be heard far to the south, but little else. “Ugh … my butt’s getting sore Mart,” Riese whispered. “Already?” I asked. “Well, we’ve been sitting forever!” We’d been sitting for roughly 20 minutes but, without any gobbles, turkey hunting can be tough, even for an 11year-old boy, and a grown man like myself. It is – to say the least – quite

Balsam Lake Rod and Gun Club hosts 4H Dinosaur Hunt

frustrating to sit out a turkey when your mind is telling you they aren’t there because you can’t hear them. I too was quickly losing a bit of hope that anything might be anywhere near us but, after about another 40 minutes, things changed. Riese picked up on some rustling leaves to our left, and after pleading with me that he really did hear something that I couldn’t – something louder than the swooshing of a squirrel – I turned my head, ever so slightly. And as if directly on cue, two jakes popped their bright red heads over the ridge and made haste toward our decoys. “Here they come Riese, get ready. Do you want to take a jake or wait for a bigger one?” I asked. “Yeah, I think I’d take a jake,” he

replied calmly. While he sounded quite calm, Riese explained afterward that he was far from it. The end of the barrel shook ever so slightly, but I noticed he was quite steady for the emotion that encircled us. After several whispers from me to get him to slowly and steadily bring his hand up toward the barrel and take his safety off for the shot, one of the jakes presented a clear target. It wasn’t an easy shot, but a perfect one, and something I won’t soon forget. I can still remember vividly, my first deer, turkey and other big fish tales, and I doubt Riese will ever forget his first either. The excitement of the roughly hourlong hunt ended rather quick, but the question of “can we go after more” came up frequently throughout the day. While I’m always a bit skeptical, I’m hopeful that he’ll continue to enjoy hunting as much as I do. During the previous fall, Riese took his very first buck during the rifle season, so he’s definitely off to a great start. As for my turkey season, the weather was quite miserable during period two, and despite seeing and hearing several different birds, my hunting partner and I couldn’t close the deal during the two days we were able to get out. During Wisconsin’s final turkey-hunting period, last weekend, I managed to go out again during some marginal weather, but it was great turkey hunting, even though I came up short once again. Mishaps, miscues, wrong moves and wrong spots seemed to doom me with every outing, and even on the final minutes on the final day, a strutting tom at merely 60 yards managed to slowly strut away with his prize hen. In previous years, not getting a turkey would have tormented me for a month or two. If we had just one more season, I’m confident I could fill my tag, but being unsuccessful is a big part turkey hunting too. And besides, the way it began this spring has meant a whole lot more to me than my own personal success.

Sponsor sign-up period open for Disabled Deer Hunts

Hunt set for Oct. 1 – 9

MADISON – Landowners interested in sponsoring a deer hunt for disabled hunters are reminded of the June 1 deadline for applications. In 2011, the disabled hunt will take place Oct. 1-9. Sponsor applications are available on Disabled Deer Hunting page of the Department of Natural Resources Web site and must be submitted to your local wildlife manager by June 1. A list of approved sponsors will be posted on the DNR Web site by July 1. Disabled hunters interested in participating in one of these hunts should contact sponsors directly to make arrangements. Sponsors are required to submit a list of participating hunters to DNR by Sept. 1. Hunters must possess a valid Class A Permit, a Class B Permit for People with

Disabilities issued for more than one year and that authorizes shooting from a vehicle, or a Class C Disabled Hunting Permit to be eligible to participate in the Disabled Deer Hunt. The DNR’s gun deer hunt for hunters with disabilities was started in 1990 to give disabled hunters an opportunity to hunt deer at a time of year when temperatures are generally milder and mobility is less of a problem. The hunts are sponsored by private individuals or organizations and almost entirely take place on privately owned lands. Interest in the program continues to grow. In 2010, there were over 100 participating sponsors enrolled and over 62,000 acres available for the hunt. For more information contact Linda Olver at 608-261-7588. – from the DNR

Great Northern Outdoors Bass Fishing League Standings Week 2 The Balsam Lake Rod and Gun Club played host to the 4-H Dinosaur Hunt on Saturday, May 14. Stacey and Chad Lutsey and family organized the event for local 4-H groups, along with the help of Rene Tendrup. Dave and Caroline Peterson were on hand to help members learn about archery. Gun and bow safety were covered, as well as learning to enjoy the sports associated with guns and bow and arrows. Twenty-two youngsters took part in the event. – Photos submitted

Standings

Co-sponsored by BLC Well Drilling in Milltown

1. Milltown Dock, 21 lbs., 14 oz. 2. 46 Store, 20 lbs. 2 oz. 3. Bistram Boys, 19 lbs., 10 oz. 4. Scott and Shawn, 17 lbs., 9 oz. 5. Luck Sport and Marine, 16 lbs., 12 oz. 6. Mossey, 14 lbs., 13 oz. 7. Cory/Jamie, 14 lbs., 9 oz. 8. Main Dish, 12 lbs., 12 oz.

9. Jim Duncan, 11 lbs., 9 oz. 10. GNO, 10 lbs. 7 oz. 11. Long, 10 lbs., 2 oz. 12. Dockmasters, 6 lbs., 10 oz. 13. Laqua/Allee, 5 lbs. 10 oz. 14. Grumpy Grandpas, 4 lbs., 10 oz. 15. Struck/Lonetti, 4 lbs., 7 oz. 16. Harry/Dave 4 lbs., 5 oz. 17. Ones/Roberts, 3 lbs., 13 oz.

18. BLC Well Drilling, 3 lbs., 9 oz. 19. A1 Construction, 0 lbs., 0 oz. Big bass/Big bag weekly winner: Big Bass: Bistram Boys, 4 lbs., 12 oz. Big Bag: Milltown Dock, 11 lbs., 13 oz.


Polk County deaths

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

(May 4, 11, 18, 25, June 1, 8) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY FINANCIAL FREEDOM ACQUISITION, LLC Plaintiff vs. ESTATE OF ARLENE E. PETERSON, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case No.: 10 CV 928 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on March 18, 2011, in the amount of $63,484.19, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: June 22, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: The South 295.160973 feet of the West 295.160973 feet of the Southeast 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4, Section 16, Township 34 North, Range 18 West, Town of St. Croix Falls, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2121 150th Avenue, St. Croix Falls, WI 54024. TAX KEY NO.: 044-00393-0000. Dated this 14th day of April, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Russell J. Karnes State Bar #1054982 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 269135

(May 18, 25, June 1, 8, 15, 22) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK, Plaintiff, vs. KEVIN D. LUND, and COUNTRYSIDE COOPERATIVE, Defendants Case No. 10 CV 850 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on December 28, 2010, in the amount of $111,661.05, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on Thursday, June 30, 2011, at 10 o’clock a.m. TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map 1517, recorded in Volume 7 of Certified Survey Maps on page 95, as Document No. 496917, being part of the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (NW 1/4 SW 1/4), Section Thirtyfour (34), Township Thirty-four (34) North of Range Eighteen (18) West. PIN: 044-00951-0000. STREET ADDRESS: 1249 208th St., St. Croix Falls, WI 54024. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wis., this 9th day of May, 2011. Peter M. Johnson, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson No. 1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787

(May 25, June 1, 8) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY JP MORGAN CHASE BANK N.A. 1820 E. Sky Harbor Circle S., Floor 02 Phoenix, Arizona 85034-4850, Plaintiff, vs. TIMOTHY A. BUZICK 2486 75th Avenue Osceola, Wisconsin 54020, Defendant(s) Case No. 11-CV-264 Daubert Law Firm File: 10-07624-0 SUMMONS THE STATE OF WISCONSIN To each person named above as a Defendant: You are hereby notified that the Plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. Within 40 days after May 25, you must respond with a written demand for a copy of the Complaint. The demand must be sent or delivered to the Court, whose address is Clerk of Court, Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810, and to plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is One Corporate Drive, Suite 400, P.O. Box 1519, Wausau, Wisconsin 544021519. You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the Complaint within 40 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. Dated: May 16, 2011 Daubert Law Firm LLC Attorneys for Plaintiff Melissa S. Spindler State Bar No.: 1060672 One Corporate Drive, Suite 400 P.O. Box 1519 Wausau, WI 54402-1519 715-845-1805 537207

WNAXLP

St. Peter’s Lutheran Cemetery Association

No burning is allowed from midnight until 6 p.m. from April 1 through June 1, 2011.

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

Monday, June 6, 2011 at St. Peter’s Lutheran Church 7:30 p.m.

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

WNAXLP

Application for Class A Retailer’s License to sell Fermented Malt Beverages. To the town board of the Town of Meenon, Burnett County, Wisconsin. The undersigned: Big Mike’s Outdoor Sports Shop Michael Henricksen 6659 State Road 70 Siren, WI 54872 Hereby makes application for Class A Retailer’s License to sell Fermented Malt Beverages to be used from July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012, at the place of business located at: 6659 State Road 70 Siren, WI 54872 Dated: May 22, 2011 Suzanna M. Eytcheson Meenon Town Clerk 537370 40L 30a WNAXLP

WNAXLP

Application for Class B Retail License to sell Fermented Malt Beverages and Intoxicating Liquors. To the town board of the Town of Meenon, Burnett County, Wisconsin. The undersigned: Loyal Order of Moose Lodge #1194 Kevin Swanson, President James M. Jaskolka, Agent 7330 State Road 70 Webster, WI 54893 Hereby makes application for Class B Retail License to sell Fermented Malt Beverages and Intoxicating Liquors to be used from July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012, at the place of business located at: 7330 State Road 70 Webster, WI 54893 Dated: May 22, 2011 Suzanna M. Eytcheson Meenon Town Clerk 537368 40L 30a

BURNING RESTRICTION

Patsy Gustafson Town Clerk

Application for Class B Retail License to sell Fermented Malt Beverages and intoxicating liquors. To the town board of the Town of Meenon, Burnett County, Wisconsin. The undersigned: Yellow River Saloon & Eatery, LLC Stephen Gary Yantes 27043 State Highway 35 Webster, WI 54893 Hereby makes application for Class B Retail License to sell Fermented Malt Beverages and intoxicating liquors to be used from July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012, at the place of business located at: 27043 State Highway 35 Webster, WI 54893 Dated: May 22, 2011 Suzanna M. Eytcheson Meenon Town Clerk 437366 40L 30a WNAXLP

NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING

536868 40L

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

TOWN OF LAKETOWN

Application for Retail Class B License to sell intoxicating liquors and fermented malt beverages. To the town board of the Town of Blaine, Burnett County, Wis., the undersigned: Hillside Inn Hiller Enterprises, Inc. Dean H. & Cindy L. Hiller, Officers 33595 Highway 35 Danbury, WI 54830 Hereby applies for Class B Fermented Malt Beverages and Intoxicating Liquor License from July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012. Dated: May 22, 2011 Town of Blaine Rita Ronningen, Clerk

Application for Retail Class B License to sell intoxicating liquors and fermented malt beverages. To the town board of the Town of Blaine, Burnett County, Wisconsin. The undersigned: Woodland Tavern Timothy Robertson, Owner 34002 Highway 35 Danbury, WI 54830 Hereby applies for Class B Fermented Malt Beverages and Intoxicating Liquor License from July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012. Dated: May 22, 2011 Town of Blaine Rita Ronningen, Clerk 537332 40L WNAXLP

(May 4, 11, 18, 25, June 1, 8) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CitiMortgage, Inc. Plaintiff vs. KEVIN R. GUMM, et al Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case Number: 10 CV 990 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on March 21, 2011, in the amount of $228,348.24, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: June 23, 2011, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot 6 of Certified Survey Maps No. 2196 recorded in Volume 10 of Certified Survey Maps, page 120 as Document No. 554503, located in part of the Northeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 and part of the Northwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4, Section 25, Township 34 North, Range 16 West, Town of Apple River, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1323 64th Street, Turtle Lake, WI 54889. TAX KEY NO.: 004-00678-0600. Dated this 28th day of April, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Russell J. Karnes State Bar #1054982 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 269979

(May 25, June 1, 8, 15, 22, 29) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK Plaintiff, vs. JULIE M. STEPHENS Defendant. NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case Number: 10 CV 740 By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on January 5, 2011, in the amount of $46,863.42, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wis., on Thurs., July 7, 2011, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: Lot 42 of Certified Survey Map No. 2181 filed in Volume 10 of Certified Survey Maps, page 105, as Document No. 553888, located in part of NE1/4 of SW1/4 and part of Government Lots 2 and 3, Section 21, Township 33 North, Range 18 West. PIN: 042-00457-4200 Lot 43 of Certified Survey Map No. 2181 filed in Volume 10 of Certified Survey Maps, page 105, as Document No. 553888, located in part of NE1/4 of SW1/4 and part of Government Lots 2 and 3, Section 21, Township 33 North, Range 18 West. PIN: 042-00457-4300 STREET ADDRESS: XXX 217th Street, Town of Osceola, WI 54020 Dated at Balsam Lake, Wis., this 11th day of May, 2011. Peter M. Johnson, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson No. 1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787

Free local news updates via e-mail: go to www.the-leader.net and click on “Local news via e-mail”

537289 WNAXLP

536329 39-40L

The Town of Luck, Wis., will accept bids for Crack Sealing about 5-1/2 miles. Bids must be received no later than June 13, 2011. Further details may be obtained by calling Eric Olson, 715-491-6079. The Luck Town Board reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Lloyd Nelson, Clerk 536633 39-40L WNAXLP

536866 40L

BIDS WANTED

The Town of Luck, Wis., will accept bids for 2 miles of Chip Seal Coating. Bids must be received no later than June 13, 2011. Further details may be obtained by calling Eric Olson, 715-491-6079. The Luck Town Board reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Lloyd Nelson, Clerk 536632 39-40L WNAXLP

537331 40L

The Next Regular Meeting Of The Board Of Directors Of The Frederic Rural Fire Association Will Be Tuesday, May 31 2011, At 7 p.m., At The Fire Hall

Arden J. Martinson, 91, Town of Garfield, died May 3, 2011. Evelyn L. Monette, 99, Town of Lincoln, died May 7, 2011. John M. Peterson, 83, Deer Park, died May 7, 2011. Frederick G. Schillinger, 66, Clayton, died May 10, 2011. Jay P. VanValkenburg, 53, Town of McKinley, died May 13, 2011.

535240 WNAXLP

BIDS WANTED

NOTICE

536629 WNAXLP

536339 WNAXLP

(May 18, 25, June 1) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF CHRISTINE B. AKERLIND Notice Setting Time to Hear Application and Deadline for Filing Claims (Informal Administration) Case No. 11 PR 32 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. An application for informal administration was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth May 19, 1928, and date of death April 5, 2011, was domiciled in Polk County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 3191 Benson Road, Frederic, WI 54837. 3. The application will be heard at the Polk County Courthouse, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, Room 500, before Jenell Anderson, Probate Registrar, on June 8, 2011, at 9 a.m. You do not need to appear unless you object. The application may be granted if there is no objection. 4. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is August 19, 2011. 5. A claim may be filed at the Polk County Courthouse, 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, Room 500. 6. This publication is notice to any persons whose names or addresses are unknown. If you require reasonable accommodations due to a disability to participate in the court process, please call 715485-9299 at least 10 working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the court does not provide transportation. Jenell L. Anderson Probate Registrar May 5, 2011 David L. Grindell Grindell Law Offices, S.C. P.O. Box 585 Frederic, WI 54837 715-327-5561 Bar Number: 1002628

Notices

534989 WNAXLP

(May 25) LEGAL NOTICE STATE OF WISCONSIN, CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT SMALL CLAIMS Case No. 11SC299 Claim Under Dollar Limit 31001 Eviction 31004 Applegate, Inc. P.O. Box 32 New Richmond, WI 54017 Plaintiff, vs. Kody Kneip & Sam Webwerth 226 No. Jefferson Ave. #8 St. Croix Falls WI 54024 Defendant(s). SUMMONS To the Defendant(s): You are being sued as described below. If you wish to dispute this matter: 1. You must appear at the time and place stated; 2. You may file a written answer on or before the date and time stated. (A duplicate copy must be provided to the plaintiff/attorney.) If you do not appear or answer, the plaintiff may win this case and a judgment entered for what the plaintiff is asking. When to Appear Date: 6/13/11. Time: 10:45 a.m. Place to Appear: Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main St., Rm. 1103, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. Plaintiff’s Demand: The plaintiff states the following claim against the defendant(s): 1. Plaintiff demands judgment for: Money $1,966.17 Eviction Unpaid Rents, Late Fees, Utilities, Pet Fees, Court Costs, etc. 537227 WNAXLP

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 29


Notices

PAGE 30 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

The Chairman, Supervisors, Patrolman and anyone else wishing to attend shall meet at the town hall. From there they will leave to inspect town roads. Town of McKinley 537178 40L Deborah Grover, Clerk

(May 11, 18, 25)

Application for Class B Retailer’s License to sell Fermented Malt Beverages. To the town board of the Town of Meenon, Burnett County, Wisconsin. The undersigned: Fishbowl Sportsmen’s Club Richard Doering, President 25490 Highway 35 P.O. Bpx 318 Webster, WI 54893 Hereby makes application for Class B Retailer’s License to sell Fermented Malt Beverages to be used from July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012, at the place of business located at: 25940 State Highway 35 Webster, WI 54893 Dated: May 22, 2011 Suzanna M. Eytcheson Meenon Town Clerk 537374 40L 30a WNAXLP

(April 27, May 4, 11, 18, 25, June 1) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY ANCHORBANK, FSB, Successor to S & C Band, Plaintiff, vs. DENNIS LARSEN a/k/a DENNIS R. LARSEN and AMY LARSEN a/k/a/ AMY K. LARSEN, husband and wife, ANCHORBANK, FSB, Defendants. Case No. 10-CV-708 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on December 10, 2010, in the amount of $146,235.11, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: June 14, 2011, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 2404 Recorded in Volume 11 of Certified Survey Maps on Page 111, as Document No. 565148, located in the Southwest 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 9, Township 33 North, Range 17 West. Said land being in the Town of Garfield, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1599 105th Ave., Town of Garfield. TAX KEY NO.: 024-00145-0000 Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 414-727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

(April 20, 27, May 4, 11, 18, 25) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP Plaintiff, vs. DAVID FOUKS; SHELLY FOUKS A/K/A SHELLY L. SWANSON; Defendants. NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case No. 10 CV 312 Case Code No. 30404 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on September 29, 2010, in the amount of $194,069.18, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: June 15, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax from the proceeds of the sale. PLACE: Lobby of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Lot 3 of Certified Survey Map No. 5460 filed July 23, 2007, in Vol. 24 C.S.M., Pg. 145, as Doc. No. 734549, being Lots 3 and 4 of Certified Survey Map No. 5336 filed December 28, 2006, in Vol. 24 of C.S.M., Pg. 21, as Doc. No. 726610, located in the NE 1/4 of the NW 1/4 of Section 24, Township 32 North, Range 19 West, Town of Farmington, Polk County, Wisconsin. Together with and subject to a driveway agreement/easement recorded in Vol. 1007 of Rec., Pg. 649, as Doc. No. 735962. TAX KEY NO.: 022-00576-0300 PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2464 30th Avenue, Osceola, Wisconsin 54020. Gunar J. Blumberg State Bar No. 1028987 Attorney for Plaintiff 230 W. Monroe, Ste. 1125 Chicago, IL 60606 Phone: 312-541-9710 Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC, is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

534357 WNAXLP

Application for Class B Retail License to sell Fermented Malt Beverages and Intoxicating Liquors. To the town board of the Town of Meenon, Burnett County, Wisconsin. The undersigned: Midtown Tavern Richard J. Belanger 25196 State Road 35 Siren, WI 54872 Hereby makes application for Class B Retail License to sell Fermented Malt Beverages and Intoxicating Liquors to be used from July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012, at the place of business located at: 25196 State Road 35 Siren, WI 54872 Dated: May 22, 2011 Suzanna M. Eytcheson Meenon Town Clerk 537376 40L 30a WNAXLP

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF Kathleen Lois Trakel Glunz Notice to Creditors (Informal Administration) Case No. 11 PR 29

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. An application for informal administration was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth Jan. 19, 1951, and date of death April 9, 2011, was domiciled in Polk County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of P.O. Box 38, Centuria, WI 54824. 3. All interested persons waived notice. 4. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is August 15, 2011. 5. A claim may be filed at the Polk County Courthouse, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, Room 500. Jenell L. Anderson Probate Registrar May 2, 2011 Sherrie Smith-Toland Personal Representative P.O. Box 385 Centuria, WI 54824 715-646-2552

Application for Class B Retail License to sell Fermented Malt Beverages and Intoxicating Liquors. To the town board of the Town of Meenon, Burnett County, Wisconsin. The undersigned: Whiskey Joe’s LLC Joseph J. Bilder 6699 State Road 70 Siren, WI 54872 Hereby makes application for Class B Retail License to sell Fermented Malt Beverages and Intoxicating Liquors to be used from July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012, at the place of business located at: 6699 State Road 70 Siren, WI 54872 Dated: May 22, 2011 Suzanna M. Eytcheson Meenon Town Clerk 537378 40L 30a WNAXLP

(May 25, June 1, 8) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Progressive Classic Insurance Company 5920 Landerbrook Drive Mayfield Heights, OH 44124 Plaintiff, vs. Heather Munson 107 U.S. Hwy. 63 Clayton, WI 54004 or 211 S. Main Street, Apt. 7 Woodville, WI 54028 Defendant/s PUBLICATION SUMMONS Case No. 11-CV-219 TO EACH PERSON NAMED ABOVE AS A DEFENDANT: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. The complaint, which is also served upon you, states the nature and basis of the legal action. Within forty (40) days after May 25, 2011, you must respond with a written answer, as that term is used in chapter 802 of the Wisconsin Statutes, to the complaint. The court may reject or disregard an answer that does not follow the requirements of the statutes. The answer must be sent or delivered to the court, whose address is Clerk of Courts, Polk County Courthouse, 1005 West Main Street, Ste. 300, Balsam Lake, WI 54810, and to Stupar, Schuster & Cooper, S.C., Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 633 W. Wisconsin Ave. #1800, Milwaukee, WI 53203. You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not provide a proper answer within forty (40) days, the Court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Complaint. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. Dated: May 16, 2011 Stupar, Schuster & Cooper, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff By: Jeffrey A. Cooper State Bar No. 1017249 Post Office Address 633 W. Wisconsin Ave. #1800 Milwaukee, WI 53203 414-271-8833

(May 4, 11, 18, 25, June 1, 8) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. AS SERVICER FOR THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS CWMBS, 2004-12 Plaintiff vs. INPONG LUANGRATH, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case Number: 10 CV 237 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on May 7, 2010, in the amount of $256,916.08, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: June 22, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot One (1) of Certified Survey Mall No. 1753 recorded in Volume 8 of Certified Survey Maps on Page 101 as Document No. 523410, being a part of the Southwest Quarter of the Northwest (SW 1/4 of the NW 1/4) of Section Twenty-Two (22), Township Thirty-Two (32) North of Range Nineteen (19) West, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 272 270th St., Osceola, WI 54020. TAX KEY NO.: 022-00533-0100 Dated this 13th day of April, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Chaz M. Rodriguez State Bar #1063071 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 269072

534987 WNAXLP

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

535550 WNAXLP

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

534650 WNAXLP

(May 18, 25, June 1) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY AnchorBank, FSB Plaintiff vs. Debra K. Krueger Robert L. Krueger Jr. CACH, LLC St. Croix Regional Medical Center, Inc. Midland Funding LLC by its Servicing Agent Midland Credit Management AnchorBank, FSB f/k/a S&C Bank Defendants SUMMONS Real Estate Mortgage Foreclosure Case No. 11 CV 182 Honorable Molly E. GaleWyrick Case Code: 30404 THE STATE OF WISCONSIN To the following party named as a defendant herein: Debra K. Krueger/Robert L. Krueger Jr. You are hereby notified that the plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. The complaint, which is also served on you, states the nature and the basis of the legal action. Within 40 days after May 18, 2011, you must respond with a written answer, as that term is used in Chapter 802 of the Wisconsin Statutes, to the complaint. The court may reject or disregard an answer that does not follow the requirements of the statutes. The answer must be sent or delivered to the court, whose address is: Polk County Clerk of Circuit Court, Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Suite 300 Balsam Lake, WI 54810-9071; and to Marie M. Flannery /Blommer Peterman, S.C., plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is: Blommer Peterman, S.C., 165 Bishops Way, Brookfield, WI 53005. You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not provide a proper answer within 40 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. Dated this 29th day of April, 2011. Marie M. Flannery/Blommer Peterman, S.C. State Bar No. 1045309 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. 270124 536097 WNAXLP

Tues., May 31, 2011 9:30 a.m. at the Town Hall

536862 WNAXLP

534533

WNAXLP

(April 27, May 4, 11, 18, 25, June 1) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Community Bank of Cameron d/b/a Community Bank of Cameron-Grantsburg Plaintiff, vs. Craig A. Jones and Kevin L. Jones, Defendants. Case No. 10-CV-202 Code Nos. 30301 and 30404 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on June 1, 2010, in favor of Plaintiff, Community Bank of Cameron, in the amount of $102,234.66, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: June 14, 2011, at 10 a.m. TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff at the sale in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds, payable to the clerk of courts (personal checks cannot and will not be accepted). The balance of the successful bid must be paid to the clerk of court in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds no later than ten days after the court’s confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold “as is” and subject to all real estate taxes, specials assessments, liens and encumbrances PLACE: At the front entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. DESCRIPTION: A parcel of Land in the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (NW1/4 NW1/4) of Section 31, Township 36 North, Range 18 West, Town of Laketown, Polk County, Wisconsin, described as follows: Commencing at a point that is 545 feet South of the Northwest Corner of Section 31, Township 36 North, Range 18 West, Thence running due East 178 Feet; Thence due South 131 Feet; Thence West 178 Feet; Thence due North 131 Feet to the Place of Beginning. Together with a 1/3 interest in the Well Agreement Recorded as Document No. 503224, Volume 596 of Records, Page 153, Polk County Register of Deeds. TAX KEY NO.: 030-00761-0000 PROPERTY ADDRESS: For informational purposes, it is believed that the property in question is located at 2488 240th Street, Cushing, Wis. Dated this 5th day of April, 2011. /s/ Peter Johnson Polk County Sheriff Benson Law Office LLC Attorneys for Community Bank of Cameron P.O. Box 370 Siren, WI 54872 715-349-5215

Application for Class A Retail License to sell Fermented Malt Beverages and Intoxicating Liquors. To the town board of the Town of Meenon, Burnett County, Wisconsin. The undersigned: Carder’s Clam Lake Resort & Grocery, LLC David L. Carder 6420 State Road 70 Siren, WI 54872 Hereby makes application for Class A Retail License to sell Fermented Malt Beverages and and Intoxicating Liquors to be used from July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012, at the place of business located at: 6420 State Road 70 Siren, WI 54872 Dated: May 22, 2011 Suzanna M. Eytcheson Meenon Town Clerk

WNAXLP

537333 40L 30a

WNAXLP

Application for Retail Class B License to sell intoxicating liquor and fermented malt beverages. Submitted to the Town of Clam Falls, Polk County, Wis. The undersigned: Patricia Pearl Fredericks, Agent Sundown Saloon Inc. 3508 Highway 35 Lewis, WI 54837 Hereby applies for a Retail Class B License to sell Intoxicating Liquor and Fermented Malt Beverages from July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012. Dated May 25, 2011 Betty Knutson, Clerk Town of Clam Falls

www.the-leader.net

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

537372 40L 30a

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

ROAD DAY NOTICE TOWN OF McKINLEY


Notices/Employment Opportunities

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 31

VILLAGE OF FREDERIC ASSESSMENT ROLL EXAMINATION

NOTICE

TOWN OF ST. CROIX FALLS ROAD DITCH CLEANUP

TOWN OF LORAIN BOARD MEETING Thursday, June 9, 2011, 7:30 p.m. Lorain Town Hall, 252 345th Ave., Cty. Rd. E

Agenda: Call meeting to order. Roll Call/Verification of meeting notice. Approve the minutes of the last meeting. Approve the treasury report. Motion to pay the bills. Motion to act on liquor applications. Reports: Road Review, Fire Dept., Ambulance. Cemetery, Comprehensive Plan Commission. Additional meeting items for future agendas. Motion to adjourn 537397 40L 30a Susan E. Hughes, Clerk

TOWN OF TRADE LAKE PAVING BIDS

The Town of Trade Lake is accepting bids for the paving of Carlberg Road at 20 feet wide and 2 inches thick. Bids are due by June 9, 2011, to the Clerk’s Office or hand delivered at the meeting. Any questions, contact James Melin at 715-4882261. These sealed bids will be opened on Thursday, June 9, 2011, at the Monthly Board Meeting at the Town Hall. Clerk’s Address: Town of Trade Lake 13361 State Road 48 537424 Grantsburg, WI 54840 40-41L 30-31a Deborah L. Christian, Clerk

BURNETT COUNTY HOUSING AUTHORITY Is Now Accepting Applications For A Full-Time Position:

MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN

A high standard of cleanliness and orderliness is crucial to our residents and the success of our organization. We are seeking a dependable, independent individual with a strong work ethic and dedication to maintaining these standards. We offer a great working environment and competitive wages. Call or stop in for more information. Job descrip535834 tions and applications can be picked up at:

7350 Main St. East Webster, WI 54893 715-866-8231

28-29a 39-40L

INVITATION TO BID ASPHALT ROAD PULVERIZATION WORK TOWN OF JACKSON

The Town of Jackson is seeking sealed bids for pulverizing existing asphalt surfaces on the length Briggs Lake Road (0.67 mile), from Mail Road to Town Line. Pulverizing shall render existing asphalt surface to fragment size passing a 2inch screening. Pulverizing work is to be coordinated with town representatives and must be completed by August 31, 2011. Bids are due on June 13, 2011, and will be opened at the monthly Town Board meeting, beginning at 7 p.m. that evening. Valid certificate of insurance must be presented with bids. The Town of Jackson reserves the right to reject any and all bids or portion thereof, to waive irregularities or informalities in any bid, and to accept any bid which will best serve its interests. For more information, contact Roger Larson at 715-866-7529. Sealed bids should be sent to Town of Jackson, 4599 Cty. 536876 40L 30a Rd. A, Webster WI 54893. ATTN.: Road Bid. WNAXLP

Monday, June 6, 2011, 4 to 6 p.m.

536865 40-41L

Village Assessor will be available for consultation.

Cleanup of roads and ditches located in the Town of St. Croix Falls has begun. Residents of the town can pick up garbage bags at the town hall located at 1305 200th Street and Hwy. 8. All garbage picked up from the ditches of town roads can be left on the shoulder of the road for pickup on Mondays. Many thanks go to all who volunteer as well as those who clean up the roadsides year-round. Janet Krueger, Town Clerk 537417 40-41L www.townofstcroixfalls.org

Environmental Services

Full-time hours working in Housekeeping & Laundry. Health, life and dental available for full-time employees with paid time off accrual and 401(k) with company match.

Frederic Nursing & Rehabilitation Community

205 United Way, Frederic, WI 54837 Phone 715-327-4297 • Fax 715-327-4950 537436 40L www.atriumlivingcenters.com

TOWN ASSESSOR The Town of Milltown, Polk County, is accepting proposals for a Town Assessor for 2011 and beyond. Estimated population of 1,275 and equalized valuation of $227,982,500. The parcel count 2,271 with 16 personal property. The assessor will be responsible for maintaining the assessment roll and individual property classifications within 10% of equalized value. Proposal shall include Open Book and Board of Review and be able to perform a future revaluation. Cope of certification, proof of insurance and resume can be sent to: Town of Milltown, Clerk Virgil Hansen, P.O. Box 100, Milltown, WI 54858. Due on or by June 13, 2011. Questions to Chairman Hegdal at 715205-7829 or Clerk at 715-825-2494. The Town of Milltown, reserves the right to reject any and all proposals. Virgil Hansen, Town Clerk 536321 39-40L 29-30a,d Town of Milltown

SCHOOL DISTRICT OF WEBSTER INVITATION TO BID ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Air Conditioning Unit: Replace current unit 16 ton, 3 phase, 208-230 Fencing: Replace and straighten sections of fence Carpeting: Replace carpeting in three classrooms. Approx. 26x26 Parking Lot/Playground: Crack seal, patch and line 5-12 SCHOOL: Flooring: Replacement of flooring in Cafetorium. Approx. 69x90 Please direct all questions, clarifications or bid specifications to Brian Sears at 715-866-4281 or bsears@webster.k12.wi.us. All bids are to be sealed and submitted no later than 4 p.m. on Friday, June 10, to the School District of Webster, P.O. Box 9, Webster, WI 54893. The Board of Education reserves the right to reject any part of a bid or all bids. 537421 40-41L

537506 40L WNAXLP

WNAXLP

The Board of Review of the Town of McKinley, Polk County, WI, will meet on Tuesday, June 7, 2011, at 7:30 p.m. at the Town Hall for the purpose of calling the Board of Review into session during the 30-day period beginning on the 2nd Monday of May pursuant to s70.47 910 WIS stats. Due to the fact that the assessment is not completed at this time, the Board of Review will be adjourned until further notice. 537179 40L Deborah Grover, Clerk

TOWN OF TRADE LAKE BIDS FOR HAULING GRAVEL

The Town of Trade Lake is accepting bids for the hauling of gravel from the Town Gravel Pit to Carlberg Road. Specs are 24 feet x 3”. If you have questions, please contact James Melin at 715-488-2261. These sealed bids will be opened on Thursday, June 9, 2011, at the Monthly Board Meeting, at the Town Hall. Clerk’s Address: Town of Trade Lake 13361 State Road 48 537422 Grantsburg, WI 54840 40-41L 30-31a Deborah L. Christian, Clerk

ALCOHOL BEVERAGE LICENSE APPLICATION VILLAGE OF LUCK

Notice is hereby given that the following application has been received by the undersigned Village Clerk for Alcohol Beverage License for the ensuing year ending June 30, 2012. Huppert Family LLC by Alfred Huppert for combination Class “B” Beer License and “Class B” Liquor License at the business known as Ben’s Northern Bar, 105 S. Main Street, Luck, WI. Notice is further given that the Village Board, Village of Luck, will meet in session June 8, 2011, at 7:30 p.m. to act on the above application. Kathy Hanson, CMC, CMTW, Clerk/Treasurer Village of Luck, WI 537534 40L WNAXLP

BIDS WANTED Reroof Lewis United Methodist Church Shingles Or Steel For scope of work, call

715-653-2337 Home - ask for Scott 715-225-1015 Cell - ask for Scott 386-793-2216 Cell - ask for Bob All bids must be in by May 31, 2011.

536548 39-40L 29-30a

The Town of Swiss requests bids for the (1) hook-up of water and sewer to the town shop in Danbury, WI. Project to include catch basin, installation of meter, 4” sewer line and 1” water line stubbed into shop for commode, sink and eye wash station and all cement work, trenching and backfilling. (2) Interior plumbing. Arrangements for a project walk-through and for other questions please contact the Town of Swiss, P.O. Box 157, Danbury, WI 54830 or call 715-656-3030. Bids will be received up to the bid opening on June 14, 2011, at 8:05 p.m. during the Town Board Meeting at the Swiss Town Hall, 7551 Main Street, Danbury. The Town of Swiss reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Provide proof of liability and worker’s compensation insurance with bid. Swiss Town Board 536467 39-40L WNAXLP

BOARD OF REVIEW

Application for Retail Class “B” License to sell intoxicating liquors and fermented malt beverages. To the Town Board, Town of Daniels, the undersigned: Siren National, Inc. Mark Kamish, Agent 8606 Waldora Rd. Siren, WI 54872 SE 1/4, Sec. 14, T38N, R17W Hereby makes application for Retail Class “B” Intoxicating Liquors and Fermented Malt Beverages License to be used from July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012. Dated May 23, 2011 Ellen Ellis, Clerk Town of Daniels

Application for a combination Class A Retailer’s License to sell fermented malt beverages and intoxicating liquors. To the Town Board of Trade Lake, Burnett County, Wis. The undersigned: Trade Lake Valley Store Daniel H. Milligan Hereby makes application for a Class A Retailer’s License to sell fermented malt beverages and intoxicating liquors to be served in original containers off premises. From July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012, at the place of business known as: Trade Lake Valley Store 11980 State Road 48 Grantsburg, WI 54840 Burnett County Dated May 24, 2011 Deborah L. Christian, Town Clerk Trade Lake

NOTICE OF MEETING TO ADJOURN BOARD OF REVIEW TO A LATER DATE TOWN OF MCKINLEY

NOTICE Monday, June 6, 2011, 6 to 8 p.m. Frederic Village Hall 107 Hope Road West, Frederic, WI

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

537364 40L 30a

WNAXLP

Application for Retail Class “A” to sell intoxicating liquors and fermented malt beverages. To the Town of Daniels, Burnett County, Wisconsin. The undersigned: Backwoods Beer and Bait Roger Wood, Agent 10561 State Rd. 70 Siren, WI 54872 NW 1/4, Sec. 19, T38N, R17W Hereby applies for a Retail Class “A” License to sell Intoxicating Liquors and Fermented Malt Beverages from July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012. Dated May 23, 2011 Ellen Ellis, Clerk Town of Daniels 537362 40L 30a

537337 40L 30a

REQUEST FOR BIDS LICENSED PLUMBERS

Application for Retail Class B License to sell intoxicating liquor and fermented malt beverages. Submitted to the Town of Clam Falls, Polk County, Wisconsin. The undersigned: Cynthia Beales Amberlang Lewis Hideaway 3474 115th St. Lewis, WI 54837 Hereby applies for a Retail Class B License to sell Intoxicating Liquor and Fermented Malt Beverages from July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012. Dated May 25, 2011 Betty Knutson, Clerk Town of Clam Falls

WNAXLP

Application for Retail Class B License to sell intoxicating liquor and fermented malt beverages. Submitted to the Town of Clam Falls, Polk County, Wisconsin. The undersigned: Len Chute, Agent Shooter’s Bar-N-Grill LLC 1161 Main Avenue Lewis, WI 54837 Hereby applies for a Retail Class B License to sell Intoxicating Liquor and Fermented Malt Beverages from July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012. Dated May 25, 2011 Betty Knutson, Clerk Town of Clam Falls

WNAXLP

537335 40L 30a

WNAXLP

Application for Retail Class B License to sell intoxicating liquor and fermented malt beverages. Submitted to the Town of Clam Falls, Polk County, Wisconsin. The undersigned: Keith & Michelle Schmidt Clam Falls Bar & Grill 647 335th Ave. Clam Falls, WI 54837 Hereby applies for a Retail Class B License to sell Intoxicating Liquor and Fermented Malt Beverages from July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012. Dated May 25, 2011 Betty Knutson, Clerk Town of Clam Falls

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

537339 40L 30a

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

POLK COUNTY POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Project Manager Jail Literacy Program $16.00/hr. Department: Library Limited-term grant position June 1 - December 31, 2011 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. (19.5 hrs./wk. flexible time) Benefits include: SS and retirement Deadline to apply: May 31, 2011 YOU MUST COMPLETE OUR POLK COUNTY EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION TO BE ELIGIBLE. For applications, complete job description & qualifications, please visit our Web site at www.co.polk.wi.us, Employee Opportunities, or in person at 100 Polk County Plaza, #229, Balsam Lake, WI, 715-485-9176. AA/EEOC 537515 40L


PAGE 32 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

536867 40L

WNAXLP

STATE OF WISCONSIN TOWN OF JACKSON BURNETT COUNTY Pursuant to Sec. 70.45, WI. Statutes, the Town of Jackson assessment roll for the year 2011 assessment will be open for examination on the 12th day of June, 2011, at the town hall, 4599 Cty. Road A, Webster, Wis., from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Instructional material about the assessment, on how to file an objection and about board of review procedures under Wis. Law will be available at that time. Notice is hereby given this 25th day of May, 2011. For The Town Of Jackson Lorraine Radke, Clerk Board of Review will be held at the Town Hall on Thursday, June 23, 2011, from 4 to 6 p.m.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY LAND INFORMATION & RECORDS TECHNICIAN Burnett County Land Information/County Surveyor’s Office Burnett County Register Of Deeds Office Burnett County is seeking applicants for a full-time Land Information & Records Technician position. This position provides technical support for the above offices for the county addressing program, support and backup to the Real Property Lister, works with the Register of Deeds assisting in indexing and recordkeeping for real estate, personal property and vital records plus performs a variety of standard clerical duties of wide and varying scope. Requires graduation from high school or GED equivalent plus an Administrative Specialist Degree from a vocational/technical college plus 2 years of experience in office administration in real estate or land related field/mortgage, abstract firm or title company or equivalent combination of experience and training. Excellent computer skills, proficiency in Microsoft Word, Excel, Access and Outlook needed. Type at least at 55 words per minute. Valid driver’s license. Training in real estate title is preferred. Starting Salary: $16.92 per hour plus excellent fringe benefits. For further information and application material contact the Burnett County Administration/Human Resources Office, Burnett County Government Center – Room #190, 7410 County Road K, #116, Siren, WI 54872 (www.burnettcounty.com or mthalacker@burnettcounty.org Phone: 715/349-2181, Fax: 715/349-2180). Applications accepted until 4:30 p.m., Friday, May 27, 2011. 536507 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 39-40L 29a,b,c

Notices/Employment Opportunities

WHITE BEAR MACHINE, INC. 920 Pine St. St. Croix Falls

Has 4 Positions: 1) CNC Operator 2) CNC Machinist 3) Production & Assembly 4) Welder Contact: Jim Ward 715-483-1757

537543 40Lp

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING DEPARTMENTS & POSITIONS Table Games Dealers Valet Staff 3rd-Shift Maintenance Supervisor

537517 40L 30a,b

NOTICE OF OPEN BOOK FOR THE TOWN OF JACKSON

HWYS. 35 & 77 • DANBURY, WI

Apply in person at HR, M - F, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. or online http://danbury.stcroixcasino.com/employment/

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY DISPATCHER/JAILER Burnett County Sheriff’s Department

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Review for the Town of Lincoln, Burnett County, will be held on Saturday, June 11, 2011, at the Lincoln Town Hall, 9110 Perida Road, Webster, Wisconsin, from 10 a.m. to noon. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board: No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the Assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact, or provide information to a member of the Board about the person’s objection except at a session of the Board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or contest the amount of assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent to file a written objection by appearing before the Board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48hour notice requirement and files a written objection, that the person provides to the Clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any Board member and, if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the Board of Review, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or object to a valuation; if that valuation was made by the Assessor or the Objector using the income method of valuation; unless the person supplies the Assessor all the information about income and expenses, as specified in the Assessor’s manual under Sec. 73.03(2a) of Wis. Statutes, that the Assessor requests. The Town of Lincoln has an ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the Assessor under this paragraph which provides exceptions for persons using information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or the duties of their office or by order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determined that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under Sec. 19.35(1) of Wis. Statutes. The Board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other persons may testify by telephone. Respectfully submitted, Wanda Washkuhn, Clerk 536860 40L 30a WNAXLP Town of Lincoln

The following full-time positions are available in the Shell Lake School District:

Grade 3 SAGE Teacher (1-year contract) Shell Lake Elementary School

Start Date: August 26, 2011 Description: This is a limited term, one-year elementary position with the School District of Shell Lake for the 2011 - 2012 school year only. Successful applicants will have a dynamic personality with excellent classroom leadership, instructional skills, and show evidence of collaborative practice. Applicants will also have excellent classroom management skills and experience with Comprehensive Literacy and Everyday Math. Shell Lake School District is located 80 miles northwest of Eau Claire, WI. Extracurricular coaching opportunities may be available. To apply: Interested applicants are to send the following: - Letter of application - Resume - Three (3) letters of recommendation. - Copy of transcripts. - Copy of current WI license. Must also successfully complete a criminal background check and drug screen. Application Deadline: June 3, 2011. Submit application materials to:

Mr. Michael Werner, Elementary Principal

School District of Shell Lake 271 Hwy. 63 S. Shell Lake, WI 54871 The Shell Lake School District does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex or disability.

Citibank, South Dakota NA vs. Barbara Finch, Grantsburg, $2,897.46. Indianhead Foodservice Distributor Inc. vs. Jean A. Waltzing et al, Webster, $625.55. Midland Funding LLC vs. Holly Elkins, Danbury, $2,233.57. Capitol One Bank vs. Richard M. Goepfert, Grantsburg, $1,412.15. Capitol One Bank vs. James A. Olson, Grantsburg, $1,335.03. Frederic Nursing & Rehab vs. Barbara J. Braynard, Grantsburg, $525.45. Spooner Health System vs. Tara L. Appleton, Webster, $3,522.00. LVNV Funding, LLC vs. Darla Barrett, Spooner, $4,879.25. Capitol One Bank USA NA vs. Michelle L. Kwiatkowsk, Grantsburg, $3,932.79. Capitol One Bank USA NA vs. Terry Sheffler Sr., Webster, $625.48. Discover Bank vs. James R. Taylor, Grantsburg, $2,178.90. Equable Ascent Financial LLC vs. Russ Funk, Luck, $1,865.12. Burnett Medical Center vs. Amanda Byers et al, Grantsburg, $976.55. Burnett Medical Center vs. Jane D. Jacobson, Danbury, $1,334.77. Burnett Medical Center vs. Ariel Balts, Plymouth, Minn., $926.74. Midland Funding LLC vs. Shane Gavin, Siren, $1,782.12. Capital One Bank NA vs. Gloria D. Meyer, Siren, $1,468.88. Capitol One Bank NA vs. Gloria D. Meyer, Siren, $1,829.66. The Medical College of Wisconsin Inc. vs. Patricia Feeney et al, $773.04.

BIDS WANTED - MOWING

The Village of Webster is requesting sealed bids for mowing all streets and ditches. Specifications are available from the Village Clerk’s office. Submit the sealed bids, marked “Bid Enclosed” to the Village Clerk, P.O. Box 25, Webster, WI 54893 by 4 p.m. Monday, June 6, 2011. Bids will be opened at the Wednesday, June 8, 2011, Regular Village Board Meeting to be held at 6 p.m. at the Village office. The Village Board reserves the right to reject any or all bids which are submitted. Patrice Bjorklund, Clerk/Treasurer 536466 39-40L WNAXLP

INVITATION TO BID ASPHALT RESURFACING PROJECT TOWN OF JACKSON

The Town of Jackson is seeking sealed bids for asphalt surfacing over existing asphalt on Sand Lake Road form County Road A to Termination (.67 mi.). Paved width shall be 16 feet and compacted blacktop surface is to be 2 inches thick. Length and width to be verified by contractor. State of Wisconsin prevailing wage rates will apply for this project #201101746. Surfacing work is to be coordinated with town representatives and must be completed by August 31, 2011. Bids are due on June 13, 2011, and will be opened at the monthly Town Board meeting beginning at 7 p.m. that evening. Valid certificate of insurance must be presented with bids. The Town of Jackson reserves the right to reject any and all bids or portion thereof, to waive irregularities or informalities in any bid, and to accept any bid which will best serve its interests. For more information, contact Roger Larson at 715-866-7529. Sealed bids should be sent to: Town of Jackson, 4599 County Road A, Webster WI 54893. Attn.: Asphalt 536874 40L 30a WNAXLP Bid.

LIQUOR LICENSE APPLICATION VILLAGE OF LUCK

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

536786 29-30b 40-41r,L

NOTICE OF THE BOARD OF REVIEW FOR THE TOWN OF LINCOLN

Burnett County is currently accepting applications to establish an employment register for the position of Dispatcher/Jailor in the Sheriff’s Department. These positions perform a wide variety of duties connected with the operation of the jail and a countywide emergency communication system. Requires High School Diploma plus experience in operating variety of computer applications and systems. Experience in corrections, telecommunications, law enforcement or security preferred. Eligibility for Wisconsin Law Enforcement Standards Board Certification as a Jailor, valid driver’s license. Additional training in corrections science, criminal justice or related field helpful. NOTE: SELECTION PROCEDURE MAY CONSIST OF WRITTEN AND ORAL EXAMINATIONS. EMPLOYMENT ROSTER ESTABLISHED AT THIS TIME WILL BE UTILIZED TO FILL FULL OR ON-CALL POSITION VACANCIES WHICH MAY OCCUR WITHIN THE NEXT 12 MONTHS. REQUIREMENTS MAY DICTATE APPOINTMENT OF EITHER MALE OR FEMALE CANDIDATES ONLY. Starting Salary $17.49 per hour. For further information and application material contact the Burnett County Administration/Human Resources Office, Burnett County Government Center, Room #190, 7410 County Road K, #116, Siren, WI 54872 (www.burnettcounty.com or mthalacker@burnettcounty.org, Phone: 715/349-2181, Fax: 715/349-2180). Applications accepted until 4:30 p.m., Friday, May 27, 2011. 536545 39-40L 29a,b,c AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

Burnett County civil court

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the following applications have been received by the undersigned Village Clerk for Liquor Licenses for the ensuing year ending June 30, 2012. Merlin Nelson for Combination Class “B” Beer License and Class “B” Intoxicating Liquor License at his place of business known as LUCK-E-TAVERN & SUPPER CLUB located at 211 Main Street, Luck, Wis. Cris Moore for Combination Class “B” Beer License and Class “B” Intoxicating Liquor License at his place of business known as BON TON LLC, located at 212 Main Street, Luck, Wis. Kent W. Petersen/Ash-Whit L.L.C. for Combination Class “A” Beer License and Class “A” Intoxicating Liquor License at his place of business known as THE BOTTLE SHOP, located at 100 South Main Street, Luck, Wis. Bob McCann and Chuck Torrance, for Class “B” Beer License at their place of business known as LUCK COUNTRY CLUB, INC., located at 1520 South Shore Drive, Luck, Wis. Candice H. Elliott for Combination Class “A” Beer License and Class “A” Intoxicating Liquor License at her place of business known as WAYNE’S FOODS PLUS located at 151 Butternut Avenue, Luck, Wis. Edward M. and Jody K. Seck for Class “A” Beer License at their place of business known as HOLIDAY STATIONSTORE, located at Highway 35 and 48 in Luck, Wis. Jeff Hulett for Class “B” Beer License and Class “C” Wine License at his place of business known as OAKWOOD INN, located at 10 Robertson Road, Luck, Wis. David Swenson for Combination Class “B” Beer License and Class “B” Intoxicating Liquor License at their place of business known as HOG WILD BBQ & GRILL, located at 129 and 131 Main Street, Luck, Wis. Notice is further given that the Village Board, Village of Luck, will meet in session on June 8, 2011, to act on the above applications. 537298 40L Kathy Hanson, WCMC, CMTW - Village Clerk WNAXLP


MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 33

Notices

NOTICE OF OPEN BOOK AND THE BOARD OF REVIEW FOR THE TOWN OF LUCK

Notice is hereby given that Open Book for the Town of Luck will be June 6, 2011, from 10 a.m. to noon and the Board of Review for the Town of Luck, Polk County, shall hold its first meeting on the 6th day of June, 2011, from noon to 2 p.m. at the Luck Town Hall. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board: No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact or provide information to a member of the Board about the person’s objection except at a session of the Board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or contest the amount of the assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent to file a written objection by appearing before the Board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48-hour notice requirement and files a written objection, that the person provides to the clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any Board members and, if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the Board of Review, the person shall specify in writing the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are the subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or object to a valuation; if that valuation was made by the Assessor or the Objector using the income method of valuation; unless the person supplies the Assessor all the information about income and expenses, as specified in the Assessor’s manual under Sec. 73.03 (2a) of Wis. Statutes that the Assessor request. The Town of Luck has an ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the Assessor under this paragraph which provides exceptions for persons using information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or the duties of their office or by order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determined that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under Sec. 19.35 (1) of Wis. Statutes. The Board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other persons may testify by telephone. Lloyd Nelson, Clerk 537533 40-41L WNAXLP

FREDERIC BOARD OF EDUCATION

Regular Meeting - Monday, April 18, 2011

The President, Mr. Nelson, called the regular meeting of the Frederic School District Board of Education to order at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, April 18, 2011, in the 7 - 12 School, Room 107. Board members present: Mrs. Amundson, Mr. Engen, Mr. Holicky, Mrs. Matz, and Mr. Nelson. Administration present: Mr. Tischer. Motion Amundson/Matz that this meeting was properly noticed. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Holicky/Matz to approve the 3-21-11, regular meeting minutes. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Engen/Holicky to approve the 3-30-11, special meeting minutes. Motion carried 5 - 0. Mr. Nelson provided a summary of the 3-21-11 (2 sessions), and 3-30-11, closed session minutes. Motion Matz/Engen to approve the 2-21-11, 2-24-11 and 2-2711 closed session minutes. Motion carried 5 - 0. The invoices for March 2011 were presented as follows: Regular invoices (#9253-9338 & 38576-38584)......$1,169,127.06 Payroll account...........................................................$205,537.20 Motion Amundson/Holicky to authorize and confirm the money payments of the invoices presented. Motion carried 5 - 0. Mr. Engen presented receipts for March 2011, totaling $756,360.62. Mr. Tischer reviewed the 2010 - 11 budget, and presented the 2011 - 12 budget. Mr. Nelson administered the oath of office to Chuck Holicky. The 5-16-2011 regular board meeting will begin at 4:30 p.m., to accommodate the middle school spring program that evening. Mr. Tischer presented the district report. The principals, food service, and buildings and grounds submitted reports. Motion Matz/Engen to approve the 2011 - 12 school calendar with possible changes for March 14, 2012. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Holicky/Amundson to approve contracts with Chrissy Chenal and Melissa Jensen, junior high softball coaches. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Holicky/Engen to approve a contract with CESA 5 for accounting software support services ($7,625.00). Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Holicky/Matz to schedule the organizational meeting at the regular May 16 meeting. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Engen/Holicky to not require the makeup of one day (323-2011) lost to inclement weather. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Holicky/Matz to approve the Medication Dispensation policy as presented. Motion carried 5 - 0. The following policies were reviewed: Fund 60-Activity Account, Technology and Youth Options. Mr. Nelson announced to members of the Board that they should consider adjourning to closed session for the purpose of negotiations, personnel matters and staffing patterns. Mr. Nelson informed the board that the closed session would be proper and is authorized by s. 19.85 (1)(c)(f)(i) of the WI Statutes. Motion Amundson/Engen to adjourn to closed session. Vote by roll call was unanimous to convene in closed session and the motion carried 5 - 0. Time: 7:50 p.m. The regular meeting reconvened at 8:55 p.m. Motion Engen/Matz to adjourn. Motion carried 5 - 0. Time: 8:55 p.m. Rebecca Amundson, Clerk 537197 40L

NOTICE OF HEARING

The Polk County Board of Adjustment will hold a public hearing at noon on Tuesday, June 7, 2011, at the Government Center in Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. The Board will call the public hearing to order at 8:30 a.m., recess at 8:45 a.m. to view each site and will reconvene at noon at the Government Center in Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. At that time each applicant will inform the Board of their request. (THE APPLICANT MUST APPEAR AT NOON WHEN THE BOARD RECONVENES AT THE GOVERNMENT CENTER.) TOM AASMUNDRUD requested a Special Exception from Section XC1 of the Polk County Comprehensive Land Use Ordinance and a hearing was held on February 22, 2011. The Board granted his request with 4 conditions. The Board will reconsider the number of vehicles left on property. Property affected is: 420 45th Ave., Lot 1, CSM #4823, V21/Pg. 150, located in NW 1/4, SE 1/4 & NE 1/4, SE 1/4, N & W of RR, Sec. 8/T32N/R15W, Town of Clear Lake. GERALD & TRISHA SZYKULSKI request a variance from Article 8C3(b) of the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance to have more than 2 accessory buildings within 300’ of the ordinary high-water mark. Property affected is: 1845 Pine Island Park Ct., Lots 4-7, Plat of Pine Island Park, Sec. 35/T35N/ R17W, Town of Milltown, Balsam Lake, (class 1). RICHARD & DAWN WALKER request a variance from Article 11F2(a)(2) & 11C, Table 1 of the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance to build a deck off to the side of preexisting dwelling which will be closer than 75’ from the ordinary high-water mark. Property affected is: 1734A Sunny Vale Ln., Lot 8, Plat of Sunny Vale, Sec. 6/T34N/R17W, Town of Balsam Lake, Long Lake (class 1). CHRIS HINIKER requests a Special Exception from Article 15B1-3 of the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance to excavate on 0-20% slopes and slopes greater than 20%. Property affected is: 1950 75th Ave./County Rd. Y, pt. of SE 1/4, NW 1/4 & pt of NE 1/4, SW 1/4, Sec. 26/T33N/R18W, Town of Osceola, Round Lake (class 1). LEHMAN CARLSON requests a Special Exception from Sec. 5B of the Polk County Small Wind Energy Systems Ordinance to build a small wind energy system within 1,000’ of two ponds. Property affected is: 134 220th St., NE 1/4, SE 1/4, Sec. 29/T32N/ 536567 39-40L 29a,d R18W, Town of Farmington, ponds (class 3). WNAXLP

CORRECTION NOTICE NOTICE OF OPEN BOOK - VILLAGE OF FREDERIC

Notice is given that the Open Book session for the Village of Frederic will be held Monday, June 6, 2011, from 4-6 p.m., at the Frederic Village Hall. This session gives the property owner an opportunity to meet with the assessor, ask questions of the assessor and look over the property assessments.

NOTICE OF THE BOARD OF REVIEW VILLAGE OF FREDERIC

Notice is given that the Board of Review for the Village of Frederic of Polk County shall hold its first meeting on the 6th day of June, 2011, from 6 to 8 p.m., at the Frederic Village Hall, 107 Hope Road W. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board: No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact, or provide information to, a member of the Board about that person’s objection except at a session of the Board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or contest the amount of assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent to file a written objection by appearing before the Board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48hour notice requirement and files a written objection, that the person provides to the clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any Board members and, if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the Board, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are the subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or object to a valuation; if that valuation was made by the assessor or the objector using the income method; unless the person supplies to the assessor all of the information about income and expenses, as specified in the manual under Sec. 73.03(2a) Wis. Statutes, that the assessor requests. The Village of Frederic has an ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the assessor under this paragraph which provides exceptions for persons using the information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or of the duties of their office or by order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determines that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under s.19.35(1) of Wis. Statutes. The Board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other person may testify by telephone. Respectfully submitted 536864 40-41L WNAXLP Kristi Swanson, Clerk

Polk County Board of Supervisors

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING AMENDED ILLEGAL TRANSPORT OF AQUATIC PLANTS AND INVASIVE ANIMALS ORDINANCE

Date of Public Hearing: Tuesday, June 21, 2011 Time: During the Regular Meeting of the County Board, 6:30 p.m. Polk County Government Center, County Boardroom 100 Polk County Plaza, Balsam Lake, WI 54810 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that during its regular business meeting on June 21, 2011, commencing at 6:30 p.m., the Polk County Board of Supervisors will hold a public hearing to present the proposed Amended Illegal Transport of Aquatic Plants and Invasive Animals Ordinance and to receive citizen input and commentary regarding the proposed ordinance. The proposed ordinance seeks to amend the existing Illegal Transport of Aquatic Plants and Invasive Animals Ordinance. Following the public hearing, the Polk County Board of Supervisors will consider and act to adopt the proposed ordinance. A copy of the proposed Amended Illegal Transport of Aquatic Plants and Invasive Animals ordinance is available on the Polk County Web site at http://www.co.polk.wi.us at the County Clerk’s Office, 100 Polk County Plaza, Suite 110, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. The public hearing is open to the public according to Wisconsin State Statute 19.83. Persons with disabilities wishing to attend and/or participate are asked to notify the County Clerk’s Office (715-485-9226) at least 24 hours in advance of the scheduled meeting time so all reasonable accommodations can be made. BY ORDER OF THE COUNTY CLERK Carole T. Wondra, County Clerk Date: May 18, 2011 537152 40-41L 30-31a,d

TOWN OF LAKETOWN NOTICE OF OPEN BOOK

Pursuant to s. 70.45, Wis. Stats., the assessment roll for the 2011 assessment year will be open for examination at the following time: Tuesday, June 7, 2011, from 4 to 6 p.m., at the Cushing Community Center. This session gives the property owner an opportunity to meet with the assessor, ask questions of the assessor, and look over their property assessments. Notice is hereby given this 22nd day of May, 2011, by Patsy Gustafson, Clerk.

NOTICE OF BOARD OF REVIEW

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Review for the Town of Laketown of Polk County, will be held on Tuesday, June 7, 2011, from 6 to 8 p.m., at the Cushing Community Center. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board: No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the Assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact, or provide information to a member of the Board about the person’s objection except at a session of the Board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or contest the amount of assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board or at least 48 hours before the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent to file a written objection of appearing before the Board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48-hour notice requirements and files a written objection, that the person provides to the Clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any Board member and, if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the Board, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at the estimate. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or subject or object to a valuation; if that valuation was made by the Assessor or the objector using the income method; unless the person supplies the Assessor all the information about income and expenses, as specified in the manual under Sec. 73.03(2a), that the Assessor requests. The municipality shall provide complete confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the Assessor under this paragraph which provides exemptions for persons using the information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or of the duties of their office by the order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determined that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under Sec. 19.35(1) of Wisconsin Statutes. The Board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other persons may testify by telephone. Respectfully submitted, 537322 40-41L WNAXLP Patsy Gustafson, Town Clerk


Water System Information We’re pleased to provide you with this year’s Annual Water Quality Report. This report is designed to inform you about the quality water and services we deliver to you every day. Our goal is, and always has been, to provide you a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. Luck Water Utility routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State Laws. We are pleased to report that our drinking water is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. The Luck Village Board meets publicly the second Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. If you would like to know more about the information contained in this report, please contact Seth Petersen at 715-472-2038.

Health Information Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s safe drinking water hotline (800-426-4791). Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune systems disorders, some elderly and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their healthcare providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Envrionmental Protection Agency’s safe drinking hotline (800-426-4791).

Source(s) of Water Source ID Source Depth (ft.) Status 2 Groundwater 118 Active 3 Groundwater 115 Active To obtain a summary of the source water assessment, please contact Seth Petersen at 715-472-2038.

Educational Information The sources of drinking water, both tap water and bottled water, include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include: 1. Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife. 2. Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occuring or result from urban storm-water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming. 3. Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm-water runoff and residential uses. 4. Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are byproducts of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm-water runoff and septic systems. 5. Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which shall provide the same protection for public health.

Number of Contaminants Required to be Tested This table displays the number of contaminants that were required to be tested in the last five years. The CCR may contain up to five years’ worth of water quality results. If a water system tests annually, or more frequently, the results from the most recent year are shown on the CCR. If testing is done less frequently, the results shown on the CCR are from the past five years. Contaminant Group Inorganic Contaminants Microbiological Contaminants Radioactive Contaminants Synthetic Organic Contaminants including Pesticides and Herbicides Volatile Organic Contaminants

# Of Contaminants 16 2 3 2 20

INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS Contaminant (units)

MCL

MCLG Level Range Found

ARSENIC (ppb)

10

n/a

1

nd-1

BARIUM (ppm)

2

2

.040

.024-.040

CHROMIUM (ppb)

100

100

5

3-5

COPPER (ppm)

AL = 1.3

1.3

0 of 10 results 1.2000 were above the action level

FLUORIDE (ppm)

4

4

1.5

LEAD (ppb)

AL = 15

0

7.80

NICKEL (ppb)

100

NITRATE (NO3-N) (ppm)

10

.8-1.5

Sample Date Violation Typical Source of Contaminant (if prior to 2010) Erosion of natural deposits; Runoff from 4/30/2008 orchards; Runoff from glass and electronics NO production wastes. Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from 4/30/2008 NO metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits. Discharge from steel and pulp mills; Erosion of 4/30/2008 NO natural deposits. Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood NO 12/9/2009 preservatives. Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which 4/30/2008 promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer NO and aluminum factories. Corrosion of household plumbing systems; 12/9/2009 Erosion of natural deposits. *

1 of 10 results were above the action level 2.40004/30/2008 3.6000 3.6000

10

.70

.70

NO

Nickel occurs naturally in soils, groundwater and surface waters and is often used in electroplating, stainless steel and alloy products.

NO

Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.

4/30/2008 SODIUM (ppm) n/a n/a n/a NO 21.00 9.80-21.00 *Systems exceeding a lead and/or copper action level must take actions to reduce lead and/or copper in the drinking water. The lead and copper values represent the 90th percentile of all compliance samples collected. If you want information on the NUMBER of sites or the actions taken to reduce these levels, please contact your water supper operator.

RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINANTS Contaminant (units) RADIUM, (226 + 228) (pCi/I)

MCL

MCLG

Level Found

Range

Sample Date Violation Typical Source of Contaminant (if prior to 2010)

5

0

1.4

.9 - 1.4

3/23/2009

Contaminant (units)

MCL

MCLG

Level Found

Range

n/a

n/a

.19

.19

MCL

MCLG

Level Found

Range

n/a

n/a

1.60

1.60

NO

Erosion of natural deposits.

UNREGULATED CONTAMINANTS

CHLOROMETHANE (METHYLCHLORIDE) (ppb)

Sample Date Violation Typical Source of Contaminant (if prior to 2010) 9/25/2009

NO

n/a

UNREGULATED CONTAMINANTS Contaminant (units) METHYLTERTBTYLETHER (ppb)

Sample Date Violation Typical Source of Contaminant (if prior to 2010) NO

n/a

VOLATILE ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS Contaminant MCL (units) 1,1,1TRICHLOROETHANE (ppb) 200 1,2-DICHLOROETHANE (ppb) 5

MCLG

Level Found

200

.2

0

.2

Range

Sample Date (if prior to 2008)

Violation Typical Source of Contaminant

nd- .2

NO

nd- .2

NO

Discharge from metal degreasing sites and other factories. Discharge from industrial chemical factories.

DEFINITION OF TERMS Term AL MCL MCLG MFL mrem/year NTU pCi/1 ppm ppb ppt ppq TCR TT

Definition Action Level: The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Maximum Contaminant Level: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Million fibers per liter. Millirems per year (a measure of radiation absorbed by the body). Nephelometric Turbidity Units. Picocuries per liter (a measure of radioactivity). Parts per million, or milligrams per liter (mg/l). Parts per billion, or micrograms per liter (ug/l). Parts per trillion, or nanograms per liter. 537419 40L WNAXLP Parts per quadrillion, or picograms per liter. Total Coliform Rule. Treatment Technique: A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

Notices Polk County Board of Supervisors

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TENTATIVE SUPERVISORY DISTRICT PLAN

Date of Public Hearing: Tuesday, June 21, 2011 Time: During the Regular Meeting of the County Board, 6:30 p.m. Polk County Government Center, County Boardroom 100 Polk County Plaza, Balsam Lake, WI 54810 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that during its regular business meeting on June 21, 2011, commencing at 6:30 p.m., the Polk County Board of Supervisors will hold a public hearing pursuant to Wisconsin Statute Section 59.10(3)(b) to present the proposed Tentative Supervisory District Plan; to receive citizen input and commentary regarding the proposed Tentative Supervisory District Plan; and to review suggestions from municipalities regarding the development of an appropriate plan. The proposed Tentative Supervisory District Plan is based 2010 Federal Census data. Following the public hearing, the Polk County Board of Supervisors will consider and act to adopt the Tentative Supervisory District Plan. The plan may be amended after the public hearing. A copy of the proposed Tentative County Supervisory District Plan is available on the Polk County Web site at http://www.co.polk.wi.us at the County Clerk’s Office, 100 Polk County Plaza, Suite 110, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. The public hearing is open to the public according to Wisconsin State Statute 19.83. Persons with disabilities wishing to attend and/or participate are asked to notify the County Clerk’s office (715-485-9226) at least 24 hours in advance of the scheduled meeting time so all reasonable accommodations can be made. BY ORDER OF THE COUNTY CLERK Carole T. Wondra, County Clerk Date: May 18, 2011 537155 40-41L 30-31a,d

NOTICE OF THE OPEN BOOK FOR THE TOWN OF APPLE RIVER NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Open Book Session for the Town of Apple River, Polk County, Wisconsin, will be held on Thursday, June 2, 2011, at the Town of Apple River Town Hall, located at 1612 U.S. Hwy. 8, Range, Wis., from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. This Session gives the property owner an opportunity to meet with the assessor, ask questions of the assessor and look over their property assessments.

NOTICE OF BOARD OF REVIEW FOR THE TOWN OF APPLE RIVER Board of Review for the Town of Apple River will be Thursday, June 2, 2011, from 5 - 7 p.m. at the Town of Apple River Town Hall located at 1612 U.S. Hwy. 8, Range, Wis. (Next to the fire station) Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board: No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail for the Assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact, or provide information to, a member of the Board about the person’s objection except at a session of the Board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or contest the amount of assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of intent to file a written objection by appearing before the Board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48-hour notice requirement and files a written objection, that the person provide to the clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any Board members and, if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the Board, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are subject ofd the persons objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at the estimate. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or subject or object to a valuation; if that valuation was made by the Assessor or the Objector using the income method; unless the person supplies the Assessor all of the information about income and expense, as specified in the manual under Sec. 73.03(2a), that the assessor requests. The Town of Apple River has an ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expense that is provided to the Assessor under this paragraph which provides exemption for persons using information i the discharge of duties imposed by law or the duties of their office or by order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determined that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under Section 19.35(1) of Wis. Stats. The Board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other person may testify by telephone. 536390 29-30d Respectfully submitted by Katie Wingate-Sykes 40-41L WNAXLP Clerk, Town of Apple River

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

Application for Retail B License to sell intoxicating liquors and fermented malt beverages. To the Town Board of the Town of Lorain, Polk County, Wis., the undersigned: Michelle Malinovsky, Agent Indian Creek Tavern L.L.C. Indian Creek Tavern 3456 25th St. Frederic, Wis. Hereby makes application for Retail Class B Intoxicating Liquors and Fermented Malt Beverages License to be used from July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012, at the place of business located at 3456 25th St. & 3455 25th in designated area only, on dates listed: July 2, July 23/24, July 30/31, Aug. 6/7, Aug. 13/14, Aug. 20/21, Oct. 20, 2011, Frederic, Wis. (April 27, May 4, 11, 18, 25, Susan E. Hughes, Clerk June 1) Town of Lorain STATE Dated MayOF 20,WISCONSIN 2011 CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY KAREN E. MINUTELLO, as Assignee of M & I Marshall & Ilsley Bank, Successor by merger with Century Bank, Plaintiff, vs. DAVID J. DEHAVEN and JANE DOE, alias, his wife, if any, and ARDEN P. WILLIAMS and John Doe, alias, her husband, if any, Defendants. Case No. 04 CV 75 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wis., on Thursday, June 9, 2011, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: East Half of the Southwest Quarter (E1/2 SW1/4), Section 22-32-17, Town of Alden, Polk County, Except 1 square acre in NW corner of NE SW, Section 22; the North line thereof is the south line of CTH C and West line thereof is the West line of said NE1/4 SW1/4, Polk County, Wisconsin. PIN: 002-00574-0000, 00200578-0000, 002-00579-0000 The real estate shall be sold in parcels, as follows: Parcel 1: Northeast one-quarter of Southwest one-quarter (NE1/4 of SW1/4) Section 22-32-17, Town of Alden, Polk County, Except 1 square acres in NW corner of NE SW, Section 22; the North line thereof is the Southline of CTH C and West line thereof is the West line of said NE1/4 SW1/4, Polk County, Wisconsin. PIN: 002-00574-0000 Parcel 2: Southeast one-quarter of Southwest one-quarter (SE1/4 of SW1/4) Section 22-32-17, Town of Alden, Polk County, Wisconsin. PIN: 002-00578-0000 & 00200579-0000 Parcel 3: All real estate shall be sold as a single parcel. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wis., this 12th day of April, 2011. /s/Peter M. Johnson, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson No. 1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787

WNAXLP

LUCK WATERWORKS

537399 40L

2010 Consumer Confidence Report for 64903388

534535 WNAXLP

PAGE 34 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011


MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 35

28TH-ANNUAL

Memorial Day services

LEADERLAND – Memorial Day is a time to honor and show our appreciation for our country’s fallen wartime heroes. From the American Revolution to Operation Iraqi Freedom and the eras in between, hundreds of thousands of American men and women in uniform have selflessly given their lives protecting our freedom. This Memorial Day, take a few moments to reflect on the courage and patriotism of these proud Americans, and voice your appreciation for their efforts and the continued efforts of today’s dedicated troops. A&H and Jackson 9 a.m., Webb Lake Cemetery 10 a.m., Sacred Heart Cemetery, A&H 11 a.m., Town of Jackson Cemetery Memorial Day Service on Monday, May 30, 2:40 p.m., at the Post. Balsam Lake Ellis F. Hagler American Legion Post 278, Balsam Lake Honor Guard will honor the departed comrades of the area on Monday, May 30, at the following cemeteries: 9 a.m., Town of Johnstown Cemetery 9:15 a.m., Holy Rosary Catholic Cemetery 9:30 a.m., Town of Georgetown Cemetery 9:45 a.m., Georgetown Lutheran Cemetery 10 a.m., Bunyan Cemetery 11 a.m., Balsam Lake Cemetery The program at Balsam Lake Cemetery will feature a guest speaker, Polk County Sheriff Pete Johnson and music by the Unity High School band, Adam Bever, director. The annual Legion dinner will be served at the post headquarters at noon. Public welcome. Clam Falls/Lewis/Indian Creek The Indian Creek American Legion Post 396 will perform taps ceremonies at the following: McKinley, 9 a.m.; Corpus Christi, 9:30 a.m.; Lewis, 10:15 a.m.; Clam Falls Church, 10:45 a.m.; Clam Falls Flowage, 11 a.m. and Lorain, 11:30 a.m. Chisago County, Minn. The 2011 Memorial Day program will be conducted by Carl Linnel, Post 392 American Legion, and Chisago County Post 1678 VFW. Invocation by Sgt. Edward Szezepanski, address by Pastor Brian Bergin, roll call of the dead by Randy Johnson and taps by Tim Lindgren and Dalton Langer. Franconia Cemetery, 9 a.m.; Taylors Falls Cemetery, 10 a.m.; March to Interstate Bridge and salute to Maritime Dead, 11 a.m.; and Almelund Cemetery, 11:30 a.m. Dinner will be served at the Almelund Church. All veterans are urged to take part in these programs. Cushing Cushing American Legion Post 269 services. 10 a.m., Cushing Cemetery 11 a.m., Wolf Creek, lunch after at Wolf Creek Methodist Church. Danbury 11:15 a.m., Danbury Cemetery, WHS band will provide music. Frederic area Frederic Legionnaires, Auxiliary and friends, American Legion Post 249, will meet at the old Legion Hall at 7:45 a.m. 8:30 a.m., Union Cemetery, Trade Lake 8:45 a.m., Zion Lutheran, Trade Lake 9 a.m., Mission Cemetery, Trade Lake 9:20 a.m., Coon Lake, Frederic 9:45 a.m., Zion Lutheran, Bone Lake 11 a.m., Maple Grove Cemetery. Speaker: Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt of Clam Falls Lutheran Church and Zion Lutheran Church of Bone Lake Music: Frederic High School band. Grantsburg 6:30 a.m., first-annual Memorial Day Veterans Prayer Breakfast hosted at the American Legion Hall Post 185 Brask-Fossum-Janke. Invocation: Faith Lutheran Veteran Pastor Victor St. George; buffet-style breakfast

WEBSTER ARTS & CRAFTS EXTRAVAGANZA Saturday, May 28 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Webster Elementary School State Road 35 In Webster

The Largest Annual One-Day Arts & Crafts Event In Burnett County Over 150 Local And Regional Vendors Featuring Cabin/Garden Decor, Adult, Children’s And Doll Clothing, Gourmet Foods, Jewelry, Paintings, Carvings, Ceramics, Florals & More Brats, Burgers, Baked Goods & Beverages For Sale Free Admission And Parking 535968

served by Grace Baptist Men’s Group; spiritual message for veterans by Pastor Brad Moore; benediction by Pastor Victor St. George; Post Everlasting Ceremony for all posts and veterans organizations attending. 10 a.m., post officers meet at Legion Hall; assemble for parade to bridge on Oak Street at 10:15 a.m.; raise flag at bridge at 10:30; parade to Riverside Cemetery on Robert Street at 11 a.m. to conduct Memorial Day service at Veterans Memorial. Invocation by Chaplain Commander Kenneth Hyatt; placing of the wreath by the Legion Auxiliary; guest speaker Russell Stone, Vietnam veteran; firing squad and taps; benediction by Chaplain Commander Kenneth Hyatt. Parade back to American Legion Hall at 11:30 a.m. and Memorial Day luncheon served by the Legion Auxiliary at 11:45 a.m. Milltown American Legion George W. Melby, Post 254 will remember their beloved at Memorial Day services. 9:30 a.m., South Milltown Cemetery 10 a.m., Milltown Cemetery 10:40 a.m., North Valley Cemetery 11 a.m., New Home Cemetery 11:20 a.m., Pleasant Valley Cemetery 11:40 a.m., Granum Cemetery 12:15 p.m., Bone Lake Cemetery Please note that times may vary. Please be there early. United VFW Post 6856, Milltown, will hold a Memorial Day service on Monday, May 30, 2:45 p.m., at the post. Lunch will follow the service. Siren/Hertel Burnett County VFW Post 1256 ceremonies will be at the following places: 9 a.m., Viola Lake 9:30 a.m., Hertel/St. Croix Tribal Cemetery 10 a.m., Lakeview Cemetery There will be a Memorial Day ceremony and program at Hertel Lakeview Cemetery on Monday, May 30, 11 a.m. sharp. All are welcome. Military honors by the Lund-Brown American Legion and Auxiliary will be at the following places: 9 a.m., Burnett County Government Center 9:30 a.m., Mud Hen Lake Cemetery 10 a.m., West Sweden Cemetery There will be a Memorial Day program at the Siren High School auditorium at 11 a.m. with military honors at Lakeview Cemetery in Siren immediately following the program. St. Croix Falls 9 a.m., Pleasant Hill Cemetery 10 a.m., St. Croix Falls Cemetery Invocation: Roger Northquest, address: Rick Gates, taps: Durand Blanding, music: Boy Scouts. A flag disposal ceremony to be held at the post following the Memorial programs at approximately 11 a.m. Everyone welcome to a potluck picnic provided by Post 143 and auxiliary at 11:45 a.m. Webster 10 a.m., Oak Grove Cemetery, WHS

Sponsored By The Webster Area Chamber Of Commerce 29a-e 40L For information, call 715-349-7499 or visit www.websterwisconsin.com

537273 40L


FHS Fine Arts Concert

PAGE 36 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

FREDERIC - The Frederic Fine Arts Concert is held each spring to highlight the talents of art and music students of Frederic High School. At this year’s event held Thursday, May 12, students showcased their work under the guidance of instructors Pat Anderson (bell choir director) Pattie Burns (band/instrumental director), Greg Heine (vocal instructor and art display), Duane Krueger (woods, photography and metal) and Julie Goodrum (fabric arts display). Musical selections varied from “I’ve Got Peace Like A River” by the bell choir, to “Over the Rainbow,” by the high school show choir, to “Seventy-six Trombones” by the high school choir, “to “West Side Story” by the high school concert band. Band awards went to Allison Anderson (United States Marine Corps Semper Fidelis Award), Isabel Lexen (Most Valuable Player - voted on by fellow band members) and Karry Simpson (John Philip Sousa Award). Choral awards went to Isabel Lexen (piano accompanist and National School Choral Award) and to Daniel Halverson, Robert Kirk, Josiah Lund, Isabel Lexen, Calla Karl and Frankie Knuf (senior show choir recognition). Senior members of the bell choir - Joe Draxler, Isabel Lexen, Alli Anderson, Calla Karl and Sam Nelson- were presented with special awards by Pat Anderson.

April Halverson (L) and other bell choir members performed under the direction of Pat Anderson at the Fine Arts Concert.

Photos by Becky Amundson

Work by art students filled the hallway at the Fine Arts Concert.

Frederic

Greg Heine presents the National School Choral Award to Isabel Lexen at the Frederic Fine Arts Concert held May 12. Lexen also was honored for her work as piano accompanist. Chorus members wore red ribbons to commemorate National Stroke Prevention Month in memory of Heine’s wife, Kay, who died of a stroke earlier this year.

Allison Anderson (photo at left) and Karry Simpson (photo at right) were presented with band awards by director Patti Burns at the Frederic Fine Arts Festival.

The Frederic High School show c hoir performed three numbers at the concert: “Over the Rainbow,”I Will Always Love You” and “Jai Ho.” Shown (L to R) are members Leah Engebretson, Erik Stoner, Frankie Knuf, Timmy Lund, Calla Karl and Dan Halverson. At right, band members (L to R) Tanesha Carlson, Sarah Knauber and Isabelle Lexen perform as members of the high school band.

E i g h t I C C P A s c h o l a r s h i p s p re s en te d

Publisher of Register, Leader and Advertisers presents total of $6,000 to eight area graduates

FREDERIC - For the 12th consecutive year, the Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association, which produces the InterCounty Leader and Washburn County Register newspapers and the Advertisers, has presented scholarships to graduates at schools in the area. This year the cooperative presented $6,000 in scholarships to eight area schools - Frederic, Grantsburg, Siren, Webster, Luck, Shell Lake, St. Croix Falls and Unity. ICPPA has presented at least one scholarship to area graduates since 1989. In 1998, the cooperative began giving its $300 scholarship to a graduate at each of the seven public schools in Burnett and Polk counties and the cooperative’s board of directors voted that same year to raise the amount to $750, beginning with the 1999 scholarships. In 2005, Shell Lake became the eighth area public school to receive the cooperative’s yearly award. Recipients of the scholarships are chosen based on academic excellence, an interest in journalism or photography and on recommendation by scholarship committees. Receiving the Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association scholarships this year were: Elizabeth Otto, Siren; Mason

Kelly Stokes

Luck High School

Elizabeth Otto

Siren High School

Joe Draxler

Andrew Falk

Frederic High School

Grantsburg High School

Mara Martinson

Jacob Bengtson

St. Croix Falls High School

Kreigel, Webster; Joe Draxler, Frederic; Hannah Bartz, Shell Lake; Kelly Stokes, Luck; Jacob Bengtson, Unity; Andrew Falk, Grantsburg; and Mara Martinson,

Unity High School

St. Croix Falls. Members of the cooperative's board of directors are Vivian Byl of Luck, chair, Charles Johnson of Trade Lake,

Hannah Bartz

Shell Lake High School

Mason Kriegel

Webster High School

Janet Oachs of Grantsburg, Carolyn Wedin of Frederic and Merlin Johnson of Grantsburg. The manager of the cooperative is Doug Panek. - Gary King


Currents

WED., MAY 25, 2011 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER NORTHERN CURRENTS • SECTION B

Follow the Leader

An award-winning newspaper serving NW Wisconsin

THE-LEADER.NET

Historic fl fla ags part of Memorial Day celebration at TF

Rare Civil War flags to be on display at the Folsom House

TAYLORS FALLS, Minn. - Memorial Day weekend is the traditional opening of the Folsom House Historic Site in Taylors Falls. This year, the Folsom House is offering the public a historic opportunity. On display will be two recently rediscovered Grand Army of the Republic flags. Wyman Folsom, son of W.H.C. and Mary Jane Folsom, was a member of the GAR having served in the Union Army as a hospital steward during the Civil War. Alyssa Auten, site manager for the Folsom House Historic Site, explained, “The Grand Army of the Republic, a national organization, was established in April 1866. The GAR was a society of former servicemen who had served in the Union forces during the Civil War. To be eligible, one had to have served between April 12, 1861, and April 9, 1865, in ‘the war for the suppression of the Rebellion,’ although some of the early GAR badges state 1861 – 1866. At one time or another, about four dozen local men belonged to the Sherman Post No. 6 of Taylors Falls.” Few local GAR records are known to have survived. However, sketchy minutes of meetings in the late 1880s and 1890s indicated that their old flag was repaired in 1888 and a new flag was purchased in 1895. The flags that will be on display are thought to be these flags. One is a 43-star flag from the 1890s. The 43-star flag became the official United States flag on July 4, 1890. Five stars were added for the admission

Alyssa Auten, site manager for the Folsom House Historic Site, holding the 1867 flag with 37 stars. The flag will be on display starting Saturday, May 28, for the Memorial Day weekend. - Photos submitted

After the Civil War had ended and the soldiers who survived the war had gone home, some of these veterans began to miss the friendships and camaraderie that they had shared during the war. Veterans clubs began to spring up all around the country. Many were local and most did not last very long, but a few went on to become nationwide organizations. One of these was the Grand Army of the Republic. The Grand Army of the Republic, often referred to as the GAR, was founded at Decatur, Ill. on April 6, 1866. Dr. Benjamin Franklin Stephenson founded the organization on the three cardinal principles of fraternity, charity, and loyalty and these principles guided the GAR throughout its existence. To become a member of the Grand Army a man must have served in the United States Army, Navy, Marine Corps, or Revenue Cutter Service (today’s United States Coast Guard) between April 9, 1861 and April 12, 1865. Local organizations were called posts

and it was to a post that a man applied for membership in the GAR. The comrades or members of the post would vote to accept or reject each applicant and if a man was rejected from one post he was banned from joining the organization. Posts from a state or region joined together to form departments and the departments formed the national organization. As the veterans of the Civil War began to pass on, the membership of the Grand Army slowly dwindled away. Col. Samuel P. Town the last original member of Post No. 2, Philadelphia, the antecedent organization of the Grand Army of the Republic Civil War Museum and Library, passed away in 1937. The GAR held its last national encampment at Indianapolis,

of North Dakota, the 39th state on Nov. 2, 1889; South Dakota, the 40th state on Nov. 2, 1889; Montana, the 41st state on Nov. 8, 1889; Washington, the 42nd state on Nov. 11, 1889; and Idaho, the 43rd state on July 3, 1890; and was to last for just one year. The only president to serve under this flag was Benjamin Harrison (1889-1893). The other flag is a 37-star flag from 1867. The 37-star flag became the official United States flag on July 4, 1867. A star was added for the admission of Nebraska, March 1, 1867; and was to last for 10 years. The three presidents who served under this flag were Andrew Johnson (18651869), Ulysses S. Grant (1869-1877) and Rutherford B. Hayes (1877-1881). “These flags are a wonderful find and we want to share them with everyone on this important holiday,” Auten added. “The Folsom House will open Saturday, May 28, and will be open every day, except Tuesdays, until mid-October from 1 to 4:30 p.m.. The cost is $5 for adults and $1 for kids 17 and under. The admission price entitles the individual to a guided tour by trained tour guides. Come early, because the last tour begins at 4 p.m. and you don’t want to miss a thing,” Auten said. “During this Memorial Day holiday we want current service men and women and all veterans to get free admission. Simply identify yourself at the door. It’s our hope that families will attend one of the many Memorial Day Services and then come to the Folsom House for a guided tour and a look at these important and historic flags.” The Folsom House is located in the Historic Angel Hill District of Taylors Falls, just one block up the hill from the community center and the Town House School.

History of the Grand Army of the Republic Ind., in 1949. Six surviving comrades attended that encampment. The last member of the GAR, Albert Woolson, who died in 1956, was 107 years old. The traditions of the Grand Army did not die with comrade Woolson. Five Allied Orders of the Grand Army of the Republic were founded in the 19th century to carry on the work and traditions of the GAR and these organizations are still actively carrying on the traditions of the old comrades of the Grand Army. The GAR almost disappeared during the early 1870s, and many departments ceased to exist. About 1875, new leadership provided the platform for renewed growth. In 1890, the GAR reached its largest membership, with close

to 500,000 members and in 1949, six surviving members permanently closed the GAR. During the active years of the GAR, the organization had a great influence on politics, law, and social arenas of the United States. Memorial Day was established as a national holiday, five presidents were elected that were GAR members, most of the governors in the northern states were members, and veteran pensions were given to the Union veterans. Over onefifth of the national budget went toward veteran pensions at one point. The national encampments were yearly meetings that had attendance of over 25,000 veterans in the 1890s. In many cases it was impossible to be elected to public office if you were not a veteran of the Civil War. The GAR membership was often reminded that politics were not to be a part of the organization, but politics was a major issue throughout the history of the GAR. - from the Grand Army of the Republic Library and Museum, Philadelphia

537299 40L


Class of 2011

PAGE 38 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

Webster

“Anything attempted is worth it”

Webster graduates 50

by Carl Heidel Leader staff writer WEBSTER - Shaina Pardun, valedictorian of Webster High School’s Class of 2011, sent her classmates into their futures with strong words of encouragement at the commencement exercises May 21. “Anything attempted is worth it,” she said to the graduates in her valedictory address. “A stretched brain,” she continued, “is a brain improved.” Salutatorian Callan Brown also had

words of challenge for her classmates. After raising the question of what they would do with the rest of their lives, she pointed out that small choices add up to create a life and she encouraged purposeful living and careful choosing. And with those words still in their ears, the 50 members of the graduating class took the short walk across the stage to receive their diplomas. They began that walk as high school seniors, but when they stepped down at the other end, the tassel had been reset on their caps, and they had changed into alumni.

With a happy shout, the graduates of the Class of 2011 threw their graduation caps into the air. Salutatorian Callan Brown challenged her classmates to make good choices in life.

Valedictorian Shaina Pardun sent her classmates into the future to stretch their brains. To mark her graduation from student to alumna, Superintendent Jim Erickson moves Michelle Ritchey’s tassel to the other side of her cap.

Photos by Carl Heidel

Annie Kelby was all smiles as she processed into the ceremony.

School Board President Mark Elliott got a big hug from his son, Austin, when he gave him his diploma.

Speeches ended and the seniors lined up to receive their diplomas, their final act as Webster High School students.

The ceremony brought tears as the graduates remembered a former classmate who had died.


I once told my

Just for

Laughs

son, “When Abe Lincoln was your age, he was studying books by the Joe Roberts light of the fireplace.” My son replied, “Well when Lincoln was your age, he was president.” ••• I was at the supermarket and saw a man pushing a cart that contained a screaming child. This kid could scream. And all the time the guy kept repeating softly, “Don’t get excited Tommy; don’t scream Tommy; don’t yell Tommy; keep calm Tommy.” So I said, “You certainly should be commended for trying to soothe your son Tommy.” The man looked at me and said, “Mister, I’m Tommy!” ••• My dad told me once that to be happy you have to lay the law down with your wife. So one day I went home. Pointed a finger in her face, and said, “From now on, I want you to know that I am the man of this house and my word is law! I want you to prepare me a gourmet meal tonight, and when I’m finished eating my meal, I expect a sumptuous dessert afterward. Then, after dinner, you’re going to draw me my bath so I can relax. And when I’m finished with my bath, guess who’s going to dress me and comb my hair?” She frowned and said, “The funeral director,” and then everything went black. •••

Fifth of Seven Essays On Self-Reliance I live at an old crossroads,

Living

Simply

where Trade River makes a Ed Emerson northward twist and turn, in a humble abode, without modern conveniences, and unplugged from the distractions of television, cell phone, or the Internet. I do own a Grundig radio and enjoy listening to WOJB - an Ojibway radio station out of Lac Courte Oreilles. I tune in to Tribal Tuesdays to listen to the old drum songs and tremolo chants that echo back to days when we lived more in harmony with the rhythm of nature. As for cell phones and the like, I haven’t any use for them. Friends have tried to persuade me on their benefit, telling me, if nothing else, I should own one in the event my car may break down and I find myself trapped in a snowstorm. But I’d rather trust instincts and common sense than pay a monthly fee to carry a gadget-in-my-pocket in the event that fate may blow a harsh wind. All the inventions of modernity are sold to us for some importance, but in the end are used mostly for play. It will do good to remember that television was originally marketed as a great educational tool - even as it has served primarily to dumb us down. It is difficult for the discerning to watch those entranced in Google-ing and Twitter, and not be reminded that Pavlov’s dog was so well trained, that it salivated at the mere ringing of a bell. So trusting are we that technology is good that we think not about their radiating impact, nor the materials mined in having them, nor the energy consumed in using them; but consent instead to pay for them, and we grow dependent in hav-

A pain in the “You Know What”

Cold Turkey

Experiencing pain is something most of us hope to avoid. Physical John W. Ingalls pain can be limiting to our activities and emotional pain can literally cripple someone. We have an aversion to pain but actually life without pain would be devastating. Pain itself is a powerful motivator stimulating a quick learning curve. Without the pain we would be continually tempted to engage in activities with more serious consequences. Learning to enjoy the best life can offer, even when confronted with pain, is something we all need to do. The experience of physical pain has led us to form clichés to describe experiences, actions or people we encounter on a day-to-day basis. For example, at the beginning of each calendar year most people gather information to prepare an income tax statement for our friends the IRS. I have never once heard anyone declare this as a pleasurable experience but rather we call it a pain in the “you know what.” Sometimes the “you know what “ is the neck and sometimes it is something further south. Either way, we communicate our dislike for taxes as pain. Another facet of pain is trying to quantify the level of pain. In clinical work we utilize printed pain scales from one to 10 with 10 being the worst pain possible,

My friend, Nora, really likes

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 39

Letters from

Home

her stuff. Nora is a confirmed pack rat who’s had years to accumulate stuff. Now she is moving to another continent and faced with Carrie Classon loading her voluminous collection of stuff into containers to transport. I don’t envy her. Nora has a lot of stuff. Nora has large rocks, old tools, fabric, art, hundreds of books and lots of other stuff. I used to bedevil her with the annoying question: “What are you going to use that for?” and she would look at me like I was crazy. She was going to keep it, obviously. She was going to own it, cherish it and, occasionally, take it out and look at it. I don’t think Nora will be parting with her stuff anytime soon. I spoke with her mother, who plans to help her pack. I hoped she might assist Nora in letting go of some of her possessions and Nora’s mother cheerfully responded that Nora already was lightening the load— she did not plan to travel to Europe with her stove. Somehow, moving to Europe with a stove never even crossed my mind. But while I might not be making transcontinental trips with kitchen appliances, I really shouldn’t be tossing any stones. I like my stuff too. I open my cabinets and see cracked dishes, ancient spices and fraying towels. I hang onto books I am unlikely to read again (and could easily borrow from the library) and clothes I don’t wear (imagining exotic scenarios in which this particular garment would prove indispensable). It is frightening how quickly and completely clutter can take over. Since living in Africa, I am better than I used to be. I now believe that if a magazine is a year old and unread, it will likely remain unread and I send it to re-

cycling. I don’t keep clothes that are too small, on the off chance I should unexpectedly shrink in size. While in Africa, I learned to live with much less than I was used to and found I never missed a thing. It is easier for me to live a peaceful, focused life when I am not surrounded by stuff. As the weather warms, I see people are dealing with their stuff. Commuting back and forth to Daniel’s, I see the telltale yard sale signs and garage sale tables being set up. The change of season makes me aware of my own winter accumulation and the need to lighten the load. But when I get close to my stuff, ready to box it all up and take it away, the homogenous mass of clutter disappears and is replaced by individual memories and hopes. This candleholder (which I never use) was a gift. This cup has my dead dog’s name on it. This purse was a souvenir from a vacation in a really nice place. This bracelet was my grandma’s. These shoes match the outfit I imagine wearing to that imaginary event that hasn’t happened— and likely never will. I manage to find a few dozen old books, a pile of office supplies I will never use again, a lot of dishes that have outlived their usefulness and a few overly imaginative outfits. It’s not the great purge I was hoping for, but it’s a start. I load it all in a box and take it outside to my truck. Just then, my dog Milo returns from one of his tours of the neighborhood. He’s brought back a rubber hamburger, a flat football and a one-armed teddy bear. He looks really happy. Till next time, —Carrie

ing to plug in and charge up every night. I moved to my old shack because I want not the world at my fingertips. If I need to e-mail someone, or do an Internet search, it gives me justification to go into town - where I visit the last vestige of socialism in America - the public library - where I can while away the hours reading Homer or “Moby Dick” - even as there are fewer humans left to converse about such things as to be found in books. Our manifest destiny has been to replace the transcendent beat of ceremonial drums with the constant barrage of advertisement. Instead of sitting around a fire, we sit around our television - so great has been our progress. We keep the television on for the transcendentalism of Emerson, Whitman and Thoreau emerged from the staid conformity of a newly born nation. The country was moving inextricably toward Civil War. Manifest Destiny, with the emergence of the railroad, was trampling across the continent at a great pace. Progress was beginning to place its ugly scar upon the landscape - subjugating the Natives and taming the wilderness - and all the dregs and rowdies of society headed west in search of gold or quick riches. Emerson and his group sought to advocate a simpler, settled, more creative and self-reliant mode of living a sort of back-to-Earth Jeffersonian agronomy - one that grows deep roots, and a commitment to place. Just because the rush of the golddiggers won out, doesn’t mean the self-reliant life is unobtainable or without merit. The virtue of self-reliance is you gain control of your own destiny - as opposed to chasing paychecks, delusionary bubbles, or the latest gadgetry trend. We have become so robotically attached to technology that

the most common response from people, upon learning that I do not have television, cell phone, or Internet, is the asking of the question: How Do You Live? It seems our materialism stands in contrast with our spiritualism. We sit in our living rooms surrounded by gadgets, while recalling in The Great Book how the rich man was instructed to sell all of his possessions. And, as we cocoon ourselves in front of the screen, we become aliens from nature. We have lost our ability to navigate on faith. There is a story of a woman so trusting in her GPS unit that she drove her car smack into the middle of a passing train. It is still important to know where you come from, and where you are going. Our primordial heartbeat drums out a different message than that of the advertisers, namely: The love of possessions is a weakness to be overcome - as all of our gadgets appeal to the artificial and material, as opposed to that which is natural and spiritual. To unplug is to leave behind the chase, to escape from this want of materialism and possessions, and to cultivate, over time, the perfect calm of solitude. While to adopt a gadget-unintensive lifestyle is to march to the beat of a different drum, it seems a beat that calls to our original essence. There is something inside us that longs to be downloaded, and a deeper calling seeking application. To live the simple life is not just a prudent and frugal necessity, but also a mode of living that brings one in closer communion with that which is sacred. If we allow the jittery screens in our life to go blank, we find within that stillness and quietude the unique drumbeat of our heart. It is within this rhythm and contentedness that transcendence takes place.

something near death. It isn’t uncommon for many to describe their level of pain as off the charts somewhere near 15 or 20. If the number scale doesn’t work we also have a range of facial expressions ranging from happy MD to sad to grim. I have found descriptions of ailments better ways to help determine pain levels. Gout is a terrifically painful condition. Somewhere back in the 1600s a physician tried to describe the pain of gout. If you were to put your toe into a vise and tighten the screw down until it brings tears to your eyes that would be an accurate description for arthritis. For gout, give the vise another half turn. Now that is a description of pain we can understand. There are two other afflictions we use to describe pain. Kidney stones may be one of the most painful events to affect men. Usually it hits as a sudden stabbing pain in the side radiating into the stomach or groin. Many present with severe writhing pain, completely unable to get into any comfortable position. For women, childbirth is the ultimate pain. Even the Bible uses the pain of childbirth as an apocalyptic analogy. Carol Burnett tried to describe the pain of childbirth to those who have never experienced the process of labor and delivery. “The pain of childbirth is like taking your lower lip and forcing it up over your head.” I

have had the privilege to share some of these painful moments with women in labor. One young lady was particularly memorable. While in my training days in the University of Wisconsin health system I was attending the labor of a first-time teenage mom. It was clear that she was in pain but any and all attempts to assist her were rebuffed. She would scream at the top of her lungs in pain with each contraction. So loud and piercing were the screams that some of the nurses stuffed cotton in their ears to dampen the noise. When the screams died down the litany of colorful language would quickly fill in the gaps. All men within hearing distance were verbally castrated including the father of the child. He cowered in the corner uncertain he would survive the evening. Finally during the early morning, after enduring nearly 19 hours of torturous pain the staff was able to rest. A healthy baby was born and the entire wing of the hospital had a moment of silence. Other than the lusty cry of the newborn child, no one spoke for nearly 10 minutes until the new mother took a deep breath and with a great sigh she announced, “Well that wasn’t so bad.” Everyone in hearing range burst out laughing in a great comic release. We laughed until we reached for tissues to dry the tears. For a few brief moments we celebrated the joy of the new birth but we all knew that the previous 18 hours were a real pain in the “you know what.”


PAGE 40 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

Toward a more perfect country

When the world didn’t end last Saturday night as predicted by Californian Harold Camping, I sighed and took the mower out in the late evening light and mowed the lawn for the first time this year. It was deep, but I hadn’t wanted to waste the gas if it wasn’t really going to be necessary. Those predicting the end of the world do so based on Biblical prophesies. As the end of the world nears, there will be more natural disasters, more wars and more wickedness (Matthew Chapter 24). So is the world getting worse as these doomsayers preach? I think the opposite is true. I think that, overall, things are improving, not getting worse. I agree with an essay I read in college by a Frenchman, the Marquis de Condorcet, written in 1795, who argued that that with our reasoning abilities, mankind could and would continually improve. “The perfectibility of man is truly indefinite; it is independent of any power that might wish to halt it, has no other limits than the duration of the globe upon which nature has cast us. This progress will doubtless vary in speed, but it will never be reversed as long as the earth exists.” The complete article is at www.historyguide.org/intellect/sketch. html where he makes the argument for his view. The feeling that many folks have that things are “going to heck,” is, I think, an artifact of television, radio and the media in general, especially television where newscasters scour the world and U.S. to find disasters, murders, and mayhem to bring to us every night. It makes us think these things are going on around us all the time, when in fact, here in Polk County we are pretty much untouched. An occasional tornado, fire, or crime, but so low that most of us are personally touched only once or twice in our whole lives. Wikipedia, the online encyclopedia, when searched for “U.S. crime trends” states “The crime rate is measured by the number of offenses being reported per 100,000 people. While the crime rate had risen sharply in the late 1960s and early 1970s, bringing it to a constant all-time high during much of the 1980s, it has declined steeply since 1993.” Some of my more conservative friends try to tell me that things were better sometime in the past. “We worked together and got along better as a nation during World War II,” comments my father-in-law (actually a soldier then). Well, that may be true, but at the same time, thousands of people were being killed; the world was being bombed decades into the past. I can’t imagine us wanting to go back to world war just to get a feeling of togetherness! The hardest time for the average person during the last century was the Great Depression of the 1930s. Only our oldest citizens are left who lived through it. Banks, big and small, went broke. Farmers lost their farms; working people their jobs and homes. The economy crashed and for much of a decade, 25 percent of the people were without work. The government gradually stepped in with help, but it took World War II to finally get people back to work. It has never been so bad since. When, three years ago, economists warned we would drop into another great depression, with the failure of banks, Wall Street firms, auto companies,

To mark the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War, we will be singling out Charles Nick as the veteran to be especially remembered this Memorial Day at the Wolf Creek Cemetery. The traditional program begins at 11 a.m. and lasts about 40 minutes before moving to the old Wolf Creek School for lunch.

etc. President Bush and later President Obama with Congress stepped in quickly with a then unpopular “bailout” that stabilized things with unemployment at 10 percent. We are already seeing a gradual improvement. The banks are again sound. Wall Street continues to work. The American auto companies are back making good profits and paying back the loans with interest and expanding and hiring more Americans to work in the plants. Big Oil is back gouging us the same as always. Unemployment is down to 8 percent and we are optimistic it will gradually decline. New laws were passed with the intent of preventing another collapse. We handled this crash much better than the last; hopefully learned from it and will continue to improve to prevent or handle future problems of this type. What are other signs that the world is getting better? In the 60 years I can remember, our overall quality of life has improved. The things I buy are actually better. The medical care I have is vastly better than what was available in the 1950s. The air I breathe is cleaner; the water in our U.S. lakes and streams is cleaner; the wildlife I see is vastly more varied and plentiful. On the average, we will live longer, more active and comfortable lives that did our grandparents. My 1999 car has been amazingly more durable than my first new one in 1967. Dad figured a new car needed a ring job at 50,000 miles and would be pretty much totally worn out at 100,000 back in the 1950s. Nowadays you don’t even change the spark plugs for the first 100,000 miles and the engines often last from 200,000300,000 miles. They are much safer, much more efficient, much more comfortable and generally better all around. Electronics are amazing. We have grown to expect every year more features in everything with the price actually dropping. We bought a 22-inch flatscreen color TV for our camper this winter (to watch the Packers in the playoffs). It cost $199 and has an amazingly crisp, bright screen that takes only 30 watts of electricity. In 1972, as our wedding gift

Tall Ships & Other Lifeboats A Photo Show and Book by MJ Springett

537037 29a,bp 40Lp

June 4 - 30, 2011 Artist’s Reception & Book Signing June 4 from 4 - 8 p.m. See the show at:

Black Iris Gallery 410 N. River Street Spooner, Wisconsin

to ourselves, we splurged and bought a 19-inch color 500-watt RCA TV for $350 (back when that was a month of my pay). It lasted for 10 years—a good TV, but it is nowhere comparable to the new one. Before the 1940s, antibiotics were not yet available. People died from infected cuts; surgeries were very dangerous; mothers and children died at childbirth; children died in scores as diphtheria, polio, whooping cough, etc., raged through the schools and communities. The U.S. life expectancy for a white male born in 1850 was 38; in 1900, 48; 1932, 60; 1960, 67; and in 2000, 75. Medicine has improved enormously even in my lifetime where things like heart operations, transplants and most medicines we use now have been invented. Progress continues at a tremendous pace as we as a society debate how to pay for the ability to prolong our lives almost indefinitely. People like to complain about schools and education. Right now, our education system is vastly superior to what it was 100 years ago, and better than it was just 50 years ago when I was in school. The St. Croix School District had only three persons who didn’t graduate from high school over the past five years. In my class of 1965, we had 10 dropouts. Society has decided to take on education of the learning disabled and the handicapped. The current No Child Left Behind initiative insists it is not acceptable to let any kid flunk. The controversy we hear is not whether we should give everyone a sound education, but about the best way to do it—applying our reason to perfect education. Most of our ancestors came from countries ruled by a king where they probably had no say in their government and were severely oppressed by the state church and local officials. They came to America to free themselves from a government that tried to run their lives completely. So far, since 1776, over 230 years, we have managed to keep our country running and improving. Of course, we argue about the best way to proceed, but we all know that we are only two years to four years away from being able to completely replace our government whenever we think someone has better ideas. Right now we are making a big adjustment as the rest of the world begins to come up to our standard of living and for a time it looks like ours may stagnate, but in the long run we hesitate, discuss and then figure out what direction to go and forge ahead successfully. When things get bad enough, we manage to scrape together a majority of politicians to act, then we adjust our action to try to perfect it. It is not just in the U.S. that progress is happening. Look at the folks in the Middle East deciding to improve their own countries by dumping the kings and dictators and hoping for better things in the future. Their countries have been stuck for decades as they allowed a few superrich, superpowerful people to take over and run things for their own benefit rather than for the average person. That happened in the U.S. by 1900, but a popular Republican president, Teddy Roosevelt, came in and broke up the big monopolies and soon an income tax was instituted on the rich to equalize society again. Last Saturday evening I watched the Minnesota House proceedings as they debated whether or not to send an amendment to the voters next year banning gay marriage in the Constitution. Public opinion has been gradually changing and polls this year show a slight majority favoring gay marriage. Being an

River Road

Ramblings Collected by Russ Hanson

openly gay person 50 years ago could get you arrested and jailed. Now, the discussion is whether gay people should be allowed to marry. One of the speakers talked about the progress of our society. I am paraphrasing what she said. “We have moved from a country that allowed slavery, outlawed mixed racial marriages, prevented women from voting or holding office, segregated schools, etc., in the gradual direction where people have gained rights rather than lost them. Sure there are times when it seems as if we go backwards for a while, but overall our country is a much better place when we add to the rights of minorities rather than take them away.” Rep. Kriesel, from Stillwater, Minn., a Repbublican and a veteran of Iraq who lost both of his legs there gave an impassioned speech favoring gay marriage. With the wonderful improvements modern technology has provided you can hear it for yourself at www.youtube.com/watch?v=0WyYRA4 aZSI . He said. “Everything changed. I went to Iraq. I was in an incident. I nearly died. I remember laying there, looking down and seeing my legs mangled, and pretty much guaranteeing that I was done. I was a done deal. I thought that was where my life was going to end. “And I remember thinking of my wife. And my kids. That’s what crossed my mind. And that’s what kept me fighting; the love I have for them. “It woke me up. It changed me. Because of that, it’s made me think about this issue. And say, ‘You know what, what would I do without my wife?’ She makes me happy. Life is hard. We’re in a really tough time in our history. Happiness is so, so hard to find for people. So they find it, they find someone that makes them happy, and we want to take that person away. We want to say, ‘Oh no, you can be together, you can love that person, but you can’t marry them.’ You can’t marry them. That’s wrong.” As a Minnesota citizen, I will be voting on this issue in the 2012 election. Representative Kriesel helped me make up my mind how to vote. I like to think that I would have voted differently than did the majority of folks in Wisconsin and Minnesota when early in their statehood, given the chance to allow blacks, and later, women, the right to vote, repeatedly they voted it down. On this Memorial Day, go to a cemetery and join the folks remembering the veterans who fought for our freedoms. On this 150th year since the Civil War started, Charles H. Nick will be singled out as a veteran of that war to learn more about at Wolf Creek. The traditional Memorial Day service starts there at 11 a.m., with a program, a veterans honor guard, followed by a lunch at the old Wolf Creek School (now the Methodist Church) next to the cemetery. When I am listening to the names of the nine Civil War veterans there amongst the nearly 100 veterans buried there, I will remember them volunteering to go to war to give freedom to an oppressed minority, the slaves in the South, trying to make our country a more perfect union.

AMERY TRAILS FUNDRAISER

MOTORCYCLE & ATV RIDE FOR A CURE Saturday, June 4, 2011 University of Minnesota Brain Cancer Research Fundraiser Find us at www.amerywisconsin.org or contact Oliver Aune, Clear Lake

715-268-7864

536243 28a-ep 39-40Lp 537136 29a,d 40L


Planting a garden

First plant five rows of peas

1. Prayer 2. Perseverance 3. Politeness 4. Promptness 5. Purity Next plant three rows of squash 1. Squash gossip 2. Squash doubt 3. Squash indifference Then plant five rows of lettuce 1. Let us be faithful to duty 2. Let us be unselfish 3. Let us be gentle 4. Let us follow wisdom 5. Let us love life No garden is complete without turnips 1. Turn up for church 2. Turn up with a smile 3. Turn up with new ideas 4. Turn up with determination to make everything count for something good and worthwhile The above are free things for your garden. Plant happiness.

Weather Rock Place a rock outside and observe If rock is hot, the sun is shining. If rock is wet, it’s raining. If rock is white, it’s snowing. If rock is moving, it’s windy. If rock is gone, there’s been a tornado. (The above was heard on the radio) Think, too, how many expressions contain the word “rock.” Rock concert Rock ‘n’ roll Rock around the clock Rockin’ chair Traprock Rockbound coast Rock candy Marriage on the rocks Rock bottom Rock Club Yes, there’s an Indianhead Gem and Mineral Society that meets the first Monday night of each month at 1 p.m. at the Luck Senior Citizens Center. It’s open to any rock hound or pebble pup (kid) in the area. Displays, programs and food. Rock on by and see what it’s all about. Have your rocks identified. Sell them if that’s what you want or horde them forever. Wisconsin offers good pickin’s. Agates, chert, jasper, quartz, flint, etc. A long time ago I cut the following clipping out of a newspaper. I remember how excited we were when we bought a farm here on the edge of Lewis. It introduced us to a long list of first-time experiences: Our first Jersey cow – Princess, a 4-H cow Our first tractor – F-20 Our first sheep Going to the Sales Barn in Frederic Milk from our farm going to the West Sweden Creamery Picking up sacks of farm supplies at the Lewis Feed Mill Buying farm machinery so we could plant, watch a crop grow and harvest it. I couldn’t help thinking when I looked at a freshly

Behind the

Signpost

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 41

Bernice Abrahamzon plowed field, how much it looked like a piece of brown corduroy. A relative in Superior named his place “Weather Ridge” and we named our farm “Bittersweet Ridge Farm.” Back in the woods we had one tree wreathed with bittersweet at the top, but it fell during a storm and is no more. With all the wild winds this spring, perhaps we should rename our farm and make it Windy Hill Farm. We were recently reminiscing about the small family farm that has come and gone in our lifetime. As one man said, “I’m glad I wasn’t born one year later.” At least we can remember and relate to the small family farm. The following paragraphs are romanticized, a far cry from the big farms these days.

Why is he a farmer? Why does he farm? That’s the question posed by JoAnn Markway in an issue of Farmland News. Her article contains some pertinent comments we think bear repeating. Here they are: Why is he a farmer? Ask him. He stands looking at his land, searching for words, wanting to explain it to you. The music of the meadowlark and rushing stream you hear are but snatches of melody in the symphony that wells up and surges over the land to him. The beauty of frisking calves in a spring green meadow or of golden sun on golden grain that you see are faint brush strokes on the masterpiece that he sees spilled across the canvas of his land. “Why don’t you get a job with shorter hours and longer paychecks?” you ask. In asking, you admit that you will never know. If you must ask a man why he would climb Mt. Everest, then you will never know, for he cannot give an answer that you will understand. It is an answer that is found in his soul. It is akin to the force that compels some artists, composers, writers to struggle a lifetime to give meaningful expression to their feelings through their work, even when their work is not given recognition. A farmer cannot hope for recognition. No one will ever discover his perfect corn crop or flawless steak and enshrine the name of the man who produced it. It doesn’t matter. A farmer is a farmer because he must be. The spirit of a man is in his work. The spirit of a farmer is restless unless it is merged with the spirit of the land, and together they became an extension of the work of Creation. Until next week, Bernice

Bike Polk County state trails free June 4 and 5 Polk County celebrates National Trail Day

POLK COUNTY – In recognition of National Trail Day, Polk County will not require trail passes for bike riders on the Stower 7 Lakes and the Gandy Dancer State Recreation Trails, Saturday and Sunday, June 4 and 5. Part of the state trail system, passes are normally required for bike riders on the trail 16 years of age and older. The Stower 7 Lakes Trail, the newest trail in Wisconsin, opened last August and offers a very scenic 14-mile ride from the trailhead in Amery to just outside of Dresser, passing next to Nye and Wanderoos. The Gandy Dancer State Trail has been operating for 14 years and offers a longer 47-mile route from its trailhead at the Polk County Information Center in St. Croix Falls to Danbury. Two events are planned in Amery that coincide with

the free pass weekend. On Saturday, June 4, the Friends of the Stower 7 Lakes Trail are sponsoring the Seven Lakes Fun Adventure triathlon/duathlon. The run/walk portion will be on the trail. On Sunday, June 5, the Friends are hosting a Fun Trail Ride starting at 1 p.m. More information on these two events can be found at www.amerywisconsin.org The Gandy Dancer Trail follows the Soo Line railroad corridor that founded and served the small towns in Polk County. In Frederic, the 1901 Soo Line Depot was refurbished and serves as a rest stop for the trail as well as the museum of the Frederic Area Historical Society. The Frederic Depot is the last remaining depot of this rail line and is open weekends from Memorial Day through leaf season. Trail maps and more information for both trails are available at the Polk County Information Center 800222-POLK www.polkcountytourism.com and the Polk County Parks Office 715-485-9294. - submitted

Siren Community Band rehearsals to begin

SIREN - The Siren Community Band will begin rehearsals to prepare for a concert to be played at 8 p.m. on the Fourth of July at the Crooked Lake Park band shell. Rehearsals will be on Mondays, June 6, 13, 20, and 27, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in the Siren School band room. All band instruments and players are needed. All individuals living in Siren and surrounding areas are welcome to play. This is a great time to dust off that case and start playing again. The music played will be lighter concert band

selections with lots of patriotic songs and marches thrown in. They hope you will join in the fun and rediscover how much fun playing in a band is. They are also looking for people to help with music organization, advertising, equipment moving, etc. If you have any questions or would like more information please contact Bryn Anderson at the Siren School 715-349-2277, Ext. 239, or at home 715-349-2658 or by e-mail at banderson@sirentel.net. - submitted

Do you remember? Compiled by Bernice Abrahamzon

50 Years Ago

Jotblad Music Center, Grantsburg address, advertised the Lowrey organ.-Carl Rowan was the commencement speaker at Frederic on May 21. He was the deputy assistant secretary of state for public affairs in the Kennedy administration.-Cold and wet kept farmers out of fields.-Iverson Implement & Motor Co., Amery, was the Rambler dealer in this area.-Specials at Route’s Super Market included aged cheddar cheese at 59¢ lb., pork sausage at 3 rolls for $1, oranges at 3 dozen for $1, cranberry sauce at 19¢ can, peas at 8 cans for $1 and soda crackers at 19¢ lb. box.-Specials at Hagberg’s, Frederic, included men’s work shoes at $5.88, children’s shoes at $2.88, ladies nylon hose at 55¢ or 2 pairs for $1 and men’s fleece work gloves at 3 pairs for $1.-Specials at the Frederic Co-op Market included pork loins at 45¢ lb., roasting chickens at 39¢ lb., round steak at 69¢ lb., dried beef at 45¢ for 4 oz. and 100 lbs. potatoes at $1.49.-Hundreds attended the open house at the Grantsburg bank.-Ill health led to the listing of Pagh’s Footwear in Luck with living quarters upstairs.-The Dairy Queen, Frederic, had a special on banana splits for only 29¢.

40 Years Ago

The June special at Carlson Hardware, Frederic, was a good bargain on trash can liners at package of 20 for 77¢.-A field demonstration of International Harvester hay machines was set for Thursday, June 10, at the Bevan Branstad farm south of Grantsburg.Free Land O’ Lakes milk and cheese were served until June 4 at Farmers State Bank and Farmers State Bank Insurance Agency, Frederic, for June is Dairy Month.-Frederic Community Motors, Inc. advertised the Chrysler Royal, Ford LTD Brougham and Chevy Caprice.-An early-bird sale could buy brand-new models 1971 Mighty to Mini, Honda has it all with all models in stock at Link Bros. Motors, Inc., Main St., Rice Lake.-Summer school at Siren would begin June 14.-A third tragedy along the St. Croix River, a drowning at Nevers Dam.-A 50-year reunion was set for July 10 at the Luck school.-A line said, “Your autograph is worth lots of money at Thorp.”-It was said, “New gas air conditioning is cleaner.”-Ensenbach Barber Shop, Frederic, was opening June 1.Real estate transfers in Polk County were listed in this newspaper.-Dependable weed killers were available at the Frederic Farmers Union Co-op.-4-H softball leagues were organized in four Polk County areas.

20 Years Ago

Seven percent of Wisconsinites receive energy assistance.-A Swedish tour group planned to visit McKinley church.-Medic first aid was offered at St. Croix Falls.-Gardening seminars were offered at WITI.-There was a radio auction every Saturday at 8:35 a.m., WCSW 940 AM, WGMO 95.3 FM.-The Luck Public Schools needed to hire a high school secretary/general office.-A canoe builder’s designs were tried and true. His name was Don Johnson.-A land use forum was held at Amery.-Grantsburg food store has new management team, Russ Erickson, Steve Bartheidel and Jack Sando.-Burnett Republicans announced Lincoln Day dinner.-Gov. Tommy Thompson offered $40 million increase in aid to schools.-The Burnett County Board leased the Barrens to the DNR for another year.-The Webster fire chief planned to enforce the burning rule.-Moms for Kids sponsored a carnival at Siren.-A St. Croix Tribal Health Fair was held.-Newspapers were called the most current textbook available.-A Siren student, Jamie Rivard, was hoping to raise money for a trip to Soviet Union.-A deputy, Mike Seversen, battled for his life after a shooting.-The Frederic Eastern Star intended to hold a benefit for student Peggy Lee.March temperatures averaged 41 degrees.

Brought to you by

OLSEN & SON DRUG

Serving the community since 1882

24106 St., Hwy. 35 • Siren, WI Phone 715-349-2221 • Fax 715-349-7350

Tom Moore, Owner Brian Johnson - RPh


TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER

PAGE 42 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

Borderline news

Bob Brewster

The Cloverton Garden Club met last week to discuss summer landscaping plans for the town hall grounds and the cemetery. Clint Elliott, Mandy Fornengo and Fran Levings will spiffy up the town grounds while Robin Fornengo, Cheryl Fornengo and Peggy Coveau are in charge of the cemetery. The Annual Duxbury Volunteer Fire Department Pancake Breakfast will be held at the Duxbury Town Hall on Sunday, May 29, with serving starting as early as 6 a.m. See you there. Tuesday, five ladies met at the Homestead Cafe for their monthly get-together. Though small in number, they had a good time. Saturday, May 21, 50 students graduated from the Webster High School. Cody Dreier, son of Donna Dreier Sullivan of Dairyland, was one of the graduates. Beth and Casandra Baer are home from college for the summer.

Mary and Frank Schaaf met up with former Markville residents Jerry and Shirley Blokzyl for breakfast at Freddies in Mora, Minn. The Blokzyls now live in Cambridge. Gene and Cheryl Wickham attended a wedding down in Apple Valley, Minn. They had a great time visiting with family and friends. They are expecting a big crew for Memorial weekend as many of them are planning to come up for the annual Memorial Weekend four-wheeling ride. Just a reminder, the planning commission will meet on Wednesday, June 1, at 7 p.m., and the town board will meet on Wednesday, June 8, also at 7 p.m., both at the Markville Town Hall. All Arna property owners are invited. Remember, if you have news for Markville, please call Cheryl at 320-2423409.

Tuesday started with exercise. At 11 a.m., we had the potluck lunch, which was well-attended. Then we held the monthly meeting. We had the election of officers with Bren Nel Ward as the new president. Ray Nelson, vice president and Marian Edler, historian, were elected for another two years. New activities, fundraisers and recruiting new members will be the goal for the coming year. After the meeting, games were played. Winners in Dominos were Ione White, Martha Lundstrom and Don Anderson. We had two teams for Hand and Foot. The winners were Dottie Adams and Bill Mc-

Grorty, Cora Swenson and Irene Campbell. Winners in 500 were Pete Schlosser, Helen Dagestad, Ray Nelson, Don Benson and Roger Greenly. Thursday morning, we held the exercises followed by Skip Bo. In the evening, 500 cards were played. Elroy Petzel, Bob Norlander and Dareld Lundgren were the winners. Anyone in the area is invited to come join in the activities at the St. Croix Senior Center. You do not have to live in St. Croix Falls. Everyone is welcome.

Friends of the Library

be eligible to receive a free pass to any of the 11 Wisconsin historical sites or museums.

St. Croix Senior Center

The used book sale to be held Saturday, May 28, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Books are 25 cents each or $2 for a bagful. Donations are welcome. Pick up your copy of “Nature’s Gifts: Wild Rice and Berries from the Folle Avoine” - a cookbook fundraising project of the Friends. The cost is $12 and the book is full of recipes for appetizers, breads, breakfasts and brunches, soups, salads, main dishes, side dishes and desserts. Stay tuned for more information on the Michael Perry Event, which will be part of the grand opening of the new library facility on Lakeland Avenue and Main Street in Webster later this fall.

Burnett County Literacy Council

The Burnett County Literacy Council, which served us for many, many years, has formally disbanded. On May 11, they presented our library with a check for $5,000 to use toward the building of the new facility scheduled for grand opening on Friday, September 9. Many thanks to Lyle Johnson, Wanda Flanigan and Don Lemire for all that they did for adult literacy and for the donation to our building fund.

Preschool story time

Join us every Wednesday morning at 10:30 a.m., for good stories, treats and fun.

Summer reading program

We will begin our summer reading program for grade-school students (first through sixth grade) on Wednesday, June 15, at 12:30 p.m. Registration forms are available at the library, but we will also make them available at the elementary schools. Our theme this year is One World, Many Stories. One study indicated that just reading four to six books over the summer will help maintain your children’s reading skills and reading 10-20 books will improve their skills. This year, children participating in the summer reading programs at their local libraries will

Fran Krause

Adult book club

At 10 a.m., on Tuesday, June 28 at 10 a.m., we will discuss “Lincoln’s Melancholy: How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled his Greatness” by Joshua Wolf Shenk. “Based on careful research, this book unveils a wholly new perspective on how our greatest president brought America through its greatest turmoil. By consciously shifting his goal away from personal contentment (which he realized he could not attain) and toward universal justice, Lincoln gained the strength and insight that he, and America, required to transcend profound darkness.” – From publisher description.

Mystery book club

June mysteries will focus on “Father’s Day Mysteries.” A list of available mysteries where dad is centered will be available at the library for anyone interested in joining us, at the June meeting, for a fun discussion of the book or books we have read. Monday, May 9, we discussed the crime stories that we found centered on mom. Join the invitation to our new book club, which meets at 10 a.m. on the second Monday of each month on the lower level of the library. Each month we will have a different holiday theme. Please call the library for more details.

New adult fiction books

• “Southern Comfort” by Fern Michaels • “Queen of the Night” by J.A. Jance • “The Devil’s Light” by Richard North Patterson • “10th Anniversary” by James Patterson • “The Dressmaker of Khair Khana” by Gayle Tzemach Lemmon • “Dead Reckoning” by Charlaine Harris • “A Heart for Home” by Lauraine Snelling • “Throne of Fire” by Rick Riordan (Young Adult)

Bernie Boelter

was a huge success. We send our gratitude to all the businesses and individuals that donated, those who came to eat and shop and to the volunteers that made it work. Look for a complete list and a large thank-you in next week’s paper. Our condolences go out to the family of Mary Poretti who passed away this week. Hope to see you at the center.

Orange

Karen Brooks, Pat Johnson, Amy Kopecky, Diane Medaglia, Fran Krause, Adeline Ingals and LaVonne O’Brien from Harmony HEC attended the spring meeting and awards program at the Pour House in Siren on Tuesday. Congratulations to all the graduates. Fran Krause attended the graduation parties for Samantha Kopecky and Shauna Pardun on Saturday.

Await

Arnell Humane Society of Polk County

Bruno is a 1-1/2-year-old German shorthair – pit bull terrier, neutered male. He has a sleek deep chocolate coat with four white paws, nose and chest. Handsome as he is, Bruno has a loving nature, offering the best of both worlds. Bruno likes walks in the park, family reunions and an afternoon nap. His exuberant friendly nature is the force to be reckoned with. His rugged good looks can be intimidating, but his personality will win you over and, given the chance, Bruno could be your next best friend. Summer is finally here and that means garage sales and fundraising at festivals. The Arnell Humane Society garage sale fundraiser will be Saturday, June 11. Donations of lightly used household treasures in need of new homes are being collected at the shelter through June 8. That means you have two weeks left to help the animals at the Arnell shelter with your garage sale donations. Bring your household items, yard tools, small appliances, pet supplies, extra furniture and more. Get rid of that storage unit bill and bring it on down. Our sale accepts everything but clothing, computers, TVs and refrigerators. If you wish to donate large items, please call ahead so we can help you unload. Shelter hours are: Monday – Friday, noon to 5 p.m., and Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. If those hours aren’t convenient for you, give us a call and we will make arrangements to meet you by appointment, 715 268-7387 (PETS).

Burnett Community Library

Webster Senior Center

The monthly meeting was held with only two people attending other than the executive committee. It is unfortunate that more seniors do not participate. Nominations were made for president, secretary and treasurer and will be voted on at the June 21 meeting. There were great attendance at Dime Bingo and Thursday cards and pool. The pancake breakfast/silent auction/yard sale

Marian Edler

Happy Tails

• “Buried Prey” by John Sandford • “In the Garden of Beasts” by Eric Larson • “Murder in Passy” by Cara Black • “Room: a Novel” by Emma Donoghue • “To Win Her Heart” by Karen Witemeyer

New adult nonfiction books

• “The Complete Guide to Greenhouses and Garden Projects” by Black & Decker • “Heaven is for Real” by Todd Burpo • “If You Ask Me and of Course You Won’t” by Betty White • “Top Stories 2010: Behind the Headlines • “The Opposite of Cold: the Northwoods Finnish Sauna Tradition” by Michael Nordskog

DVDs

• “The Rabbit Hole” • “Ancient Civilizations: Letters from the Roman Front”

Children’s books

• “Curious George Visits the Library” by Margaret Rey • “Charlie the Ranch Dog” by Ree Drummond • “The Sixty-Eight Rooms” by Marianne Malone • “The Broken Blade” by William Durbin

Bruno

Osceola student Casey Sajna is hosting an Arnell Memorial Humane Society benefit event with her 4-H group during Rhubarb Days. On June 4, from noon to 1 p.m., Casey and her 4-H group will perform a concert and play at the gazebo in Mill Pond Park in Osceola. Goodwill donations for Arnell will be accepted, homemade dog treats, bandanas and raffle baskets will be available for purchase, as well as a drop-off site for large dog biscuits and Tidy Cat kitty litter donations. Enjoy the Rhubarb Days celebration and help the animals at the same time. Every kennel in the cat adoption room is full. All of our adoptable cats are friendly and putting their best paw forward in hopes that you will pick them to go home with you. Why not make a donation for the Arnell garage sale and meet our available cats at the same time? You are sure to fall in love with one or two. Get a preview of our felines at Arnellhumane.org and meet them in the fur at the shelter. Arnell Humane Society, 185 Griffin St. E., Amery.

• “Wintering” by William Durbin • “Bowhunting” by Thomas K. Adamson • “Deer Hunting” by Thomas K. Adamson • “What Did the Vikings Do For Me?” by Elizabeth Raum • “A World of Recipes: Mexico” by Barbara A. Somervill • “Machu Picchu” by Gillian Richardson • “The Voyageur’s Paddle” by Kathy-jo Wargin • “Betty Bunny Loves Chocolate Cake” by Michael B. Kaplan • “The Clue in the Recycling Bin” by Gertrude Chandler Warner • “Leonardo’s Horse” by Jean Fritz

Adult audio books

• “The Snowman” by Jo Nesbo • “Buried Prey” by John Sandford • “10th Anniversary” by James Patterson

Hours and information

Monday-Thursday 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.; Friday 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. For more information, contact the library at 715-866-7697, Web site: webster.wislib.org. Online catalog: merlin.nwls.lib.wi.us/search.

Dewey - LaFollette

Lida and Don Nordquist went out to eat with Nina and Lawrence Hines Wednesday evening to celebrate Don and Lida’s 48th wedding anniversary. Brian, Justin and Mark Hines visited Donna and Gerry Hines Friday. Duane and John Otis and Maynard and Ronda Mangelsen were guests at the home of June and Lloyd Anderson Friday evening. They helped Becky Anderson celebrate her birthday. Kay Krentz, Connie Quam and Kathy BarrettStoylen attended the historic fashion show and tea at Spooner United Methodist Church Saturday afternoon. It was part of the ongoing celebration of the 125th anniversary of the Spooner church. Gerry and Donna Hines went to Vadnais Heights, Minn., Saturday and stayed with Brenda and Tim Sweet. They congratulated their granddaughter, Kristie Sweet, on her college graduation. On Sunday, Donna and Gerry had lunch with Barry, Sue, Alex, Josh and Olivia Hines before they came home.

Karen Mangelsen

Ronda and Maynard Mangelsen visited Mike and Nancy Longhenry Saturday. They celebrated birthdays of Nancy and Mike’s son, Dylan, and two of their grandchildren, Jackson and Jayden Brown. Karen and Hank Mangelsen were Saturday evening visitors of Wayne and Marie Romsos at the Romsos Farm. Terry, Jean and Bryce Williamson called on Maynard and Ronda Mangelsen Saturday evening. Weekend visitors of Lawrence and Nina Hines were Nancy and Steve Hagen and Emily and Josh Henniger. On Sunday, they helped Nina and Lawrence celebrate their 57th wedding anniversary. Don and Lida Nordquist visited Joleen and Richard Funk and family Sunday. Ken and Tyann Otis and Jake were Sunday afternoon visitors of Ronda and Maynard Mangelsen. There will be a Memorial Day ceremony and program at Hertel Lakeview Cemetery on Monday, May 30, at 10 a.m. sharp. All are welcome.

LaVonne O'Brien

Bryan Krause finished his first year of college at Eau Claire. Kathryn Krause is working the summer in Red Wing, Minn., Congratulations to Tylyn O’Brien. She had the top score in the shooting competition for 17 and under on Saturday at the shooting range in Balsam Lake. She won a gun. She also won last fall and was the only girl competing.

536555 39-41L


TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 43

Born at Burnett Medical Center:

Births

A boy, Finn Ian Kelly Spitzer, born May 18, 2011, to Sarai Spitzer, Grantsburg. Finn weighed 8 lbs., 11.5 oz. and was 21 inches long. Grandparents are Mike and Kelly Mortitz, Grantsburg. Great-grandparents are Ray and Carol Yerigan, Grantsburg, Del Roy and Sharon Christenson, Grantsburg, and Eileen Spitzer, Fort Atkinson. ••• A boy, Matthew Michael Mead, born May 20, 2011, to Paul and Ashley Mead, Pine City, Minn. Matthew weighed 6 lbs., 6 oz, and was 20-12 inches long. He has one sibling named John. Grandparents are John and Dawn Mead, Brooklyn Park, Minn., and Michael and Mary Tubbs, Sandstone, Minn. Great-grandparents are Dennis and Lois Long, Rock Creek, Minn., and Martha Mead, Pine City, Minn. •••

Born at Amery Regional Medical Center:

A girl, Asha Eve Balog, born May 1, 2011, to Jessica and Bryan Balog, Osceola. Asha weighed 8 lbs. 5.5 oz. ••• A boy, Marshal Taylor Lloyd Drakenberg, born May 3, 2011, to Amanda LaMere and Jacob Drakenberg, Shawano. Marshal weighed 7 lbs., 6 oz. ••• A boy, Ethan Lee Bazille, born May 4, 2011, to Holly and John Bazille, Baldwin. Ethan weighed 7 lbs., 10 oz. ••• A boy, Lucas Steven Johnson, born May 9, 2011, to Danielle Reindahl and David Johnson, Clayton. Lucas weighed 8 lbs., 2 oz. ••• A boy, Robert Kenneth Lee Riebe, born May 9, 2011, to Kendra and Kenneth Riebe III, Clear Lake, Robert weighed 8 lbs., 11 oz. ••• A girl, Andi May Lentz, born May 10, 2011, to Crystal Carlson and Harley Lentz, Amery. Andi weighed 8 lbs., 1/2 oz. ••• A girl, Kaylena Lariah Kitson, born May 10, 2011, to Amber Merrill and Keith Kitson Jr., Luck. Kaylena weighed 8 lbs., 5 oz. ••• A boy, Mason Thomas Higgs, born May 13, 2011, to Amber Paulson and Thomas Higgs, Clear Lake. Mason weighed 7 lbs., 10 oz.

••• A girl, Evangeline Grace Johnson, born May 17, 2011, to Jamie and Andrew Johnson, New Richmond. Evangeline weighed 7 lbs., 10 oz. •••

Born at St. Croix Regional Medical Center:

A boy, Jaydon Lee Simon, born April 26, 2011, to Jolly and Amber Simon, Webster. Jaydon weighed 8 lbs., 5 oz. ••• A girl, Gretchen Marie Otterness, born May 4, 2011, to Nissa and Christopher Otterness, Becker, Minn. Gretchen weighed 7 lbs., 7 oz. ••• A boy, Felix Justin Hikel, born May 4, 2011, to Kevin and Kaija Hikel, St. Croix Falls. Felix weighed 7 lbs., 14 oz. ••• A boy, Grant Richard Hansen, born May 4, 2011, to Richard and Jennifer Hansen, Shafer, Minn. Grant weighed 8 lbs. ••• A boy, Carter James Schwartzbauer, born May 5, 2011, to Shana Kurkowski and Greg Schwartzbauer, Siren. Carter weighed 7 lbs., 5 oz. ••• A girl, Isabella Marie Fenton, born May 5, 2011, to Bridget Fenton and Shane Rossow, Luck. Isabella weighed 7 lbs., 15 oz. ••• A girl, Myia Renee Aaron, born May 5, 2011, to Nicole and William Aaron, Frederic. Myia weighed 5 lbs., 13 oz. ••• A girl, Raelyn Nicole Mathison, born May 7, 2011, to Samantha Bush and Derek Mathison, Somerset. Raelyn weighed 6 lbs., 9 oz. ••• A boy, Gavin Lee Nelson, born May 8, 2011, to Jared and Rachel Nelson, Frederic. Gavin weighed 8 lbs., 14 oz. •••

Born at Osceola Medical Center:

A girl, Ruby Joy Barbato, born May 20, 2011, to Molly and Nick Barbato, Scandia, Minn. Ruby weighed 6 lbs., 14 oz. •••

Lewis

Bernice Abrahamzon

Charles and Alice Ford celebrated their 64th wedding anniversary on Sunday by serving the coffee and treats after services. The anniversary cake was chocolate and inscribed in frosting on top, the words were “Live, Love, Let God,” a sermon by itself. Ray and LouAnn Gackle also have a wedding anniversary in May. Confirmation will be held for two girls, Nicole Nelson and Taylor Alseth, on Sunday, June 5. That is also Communion Sunday. Someone is in residence at the former home of LeRoy and Arleen Jones. LeRoy passed away a few weeks ago and Arleen lives in an apartment in Amery. The caretaker is taking care of living quarters, the cats, dog and caged bird, etc. During the graduation service at the Siren school, it was announced that the late Vernon Peterson was named to the Siren Wall of Honor. Family members were present to note the honor. At one point in the graduation ceremony, students handed out flowers to those they thanked for special help and encouragement through the years, a nice bit. Some early lilacs made it to church on Sunday for decorating the sanctuary, along with fruit tree blos-

soms. So it rained over the weekend? Don’t despair. It was bringing out the asparagus and, hopefully, encouraging the rhubarb plants. The next meeting of the Indianhead Rock and Mineral Society is Monday, June 6, at 7 p.m., at the Luck Senior Citizens Center. Program not decided so will be a surprise. Open house was held Saturday, May 21, at a neighbor’s house for the 80th birthday of Dan Beal. Greetings to you, good friend. The next meeting of the NW Regional Writers will be held Friday, June 10 (second Friday of the month) at Espresso Cabin, Grantsburg. The assignment is to write fiction, somewhere using the word “injury.” Phil Schaetzel is having his second cataract surgery this week. Wishing you good results and good healing. The Lewis Cemetery Association members met last Wednesday for their annual dinner meeting at the Pour House, Siren. A business meeting was held after the meal. Members volunteered to tend the cemetery grounds each season. Never mind the rain. It’s part of spring.

MILWAUKEE - The following individuals were among the more than 3,600 prospective candidates for degree attending University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee commencement exercises Sunday, May 22, in Milwaukee. UWM is the second largest university in the state of Wisconsin, with more than 30,500 graduate and undergraduate students. Grantsburg Michelle Nordrum, Master of Science, College of Letters and Science. - submitted

••• ST. CLOUD, Minn. – St. Cloud State University has announced the names of 1,514 students whose academic achievement placed them on the spring semester dean’s list. To be eligible for the honor, students must have a grade-point average of 3.75 or higher on a 4.0 scale Among them is Natalie N. Gubrud, Luck, College of Fine Arts and Humanities, majoring in communication studies, with a GPA of 3.78. - submitted

Academic news

The Inter-County Leader Connect to your community

www.the-leader.net

715-349-2964

Siren

Bev Beckmark

Last Monday morning I saw my first family of bears for this season. There have been several bears in bear country but loners. Miss Prissy has grown up, both in size and as a mom. I know it was her as she has a slit in the top of her left ear. She probably got it going through a barbed-wire fence as a cub, I’m guessing. I think this is her second round of raising cubs. Two years ago she would come through with a single small cub and would spend most of her time in bear country just looking for food and not her cub that would get into all sorts of problems. He tried to climb the garden fence and got a paw stuck, lots of bawling for mom that time. He even got stuck in the deer waterer, without water, and put up a real ruckus bawling for mom. Last year, as a yearling, he poked and snooped into just about everything possible, no correcting, she just ignored him. This year, however, her tiny cubs, yes she has two this year, seem to be very well-mannered. They follow her every move. Seems like most of us moms, after the first try at motherhood, get a pretty good handle on mothering.

Don’t forget the Food and Friends community dinner is coming up on Tuesday, May 31, at the Siren Methodist Church. Come and enjoy a great meal, serving at 5 p.m. Come early as food goes fast. Freewill offering. Sympathy to the family of Norma L. Carmon who passed away April 21. Sympathy to the family of Kevin J. Surrell who passed away April 28. Art and Bev Beckmark attended the annual American Cancer Society Relay for Life Burnett County survivors dinner Saturday evening at the Grantsburg Bethany Church. They shared a table with Dennis and Brenda Christensen and enjoyed a nice conversation over dinner. Sunday found the Beckmarks on the road to Cambridge, Minn., for an afternoon dinner with Bev’s sister, Mary Lou Olson, and her husband Mark at Perkins. During dinner they caught up on family news. Later Sunday evening they attended the graduation party for John Chelmo at the Siren Lakeview Event Center. Good luck, John, at college.

When the new slate of officers took office in January it was decided that, as most senior centers in our area, we would collect and sell our aluminum cans. At that time, Grace Haines volunteered to do this for the center and with contributions from Anke Olesen, Jackie Myrmel and cans from the center she has managed to help our finances by bringing in over $25 for the cans collected. We realize that this amount doesn’t set the world on fire, but every little bit helps. If anyone out there would like to donate to our collection we would really appreciate it, just drop them off at the center or give us a call and we will find someone to pick them up. The recycling sites that purchase the cans prefer that they not be crushed. Memorial Day will be honored on Monday, May 30, so be sure and check your papers for programs honoring them. We owe so much to all of our veterans, the freedoms that you enjoy were made possible by them so when you see someone you know who has served in the armed forces, thank him or her. The card crew wants to thank Annabelle Pearson for the large bag of large envelopes that she donated to the center this week. I think that was the fastest delivery we ever received for a request. She brought them a day before the papers were delivered and anyone knew we needed some. I know we have angels in disguise and this alone speaks for itself. The June Dining at Five dinner will be held on Thursday, June 2. In anticipation for summer, CeCe

is planning on serving your choice of either tuna or chicken salad. She also said that she is going to have an open bar. Now before you get really excited she corrected herself and said she meant that she would have her usual, all-you-can-eat, mega salad bar. Strawberry shortcake is on the agenda for dessert. The sign-up sheet is out so you may stop in or call and make your reservation. The Siren Senior Center had its first brunch this week on Thursday. The response was very good as people could come and dine anytime from 10 a.m. to noon to eat. A suggestion sheet was handed out to the diners so they could express their feelings and the majority said they should have it twice a month or more if the kitchen staff could handle it. Our foot lady will be here on Monday, June 13, and she still has some openings, so stop in or call for an appointment. Winners at 500 this week were Gerry Vogel, Flo Antiel, Bea Gorven, Barb Munger, Shirley Doriott and Inez Pearson. Anke Olesen and Sylvia Peterson furnished treats for the players. Sorry I can’t announce the winners at Spades as I was under the weather and didn’t get to join in the game. I promise to report the winners next week. If anyone desires the days and times for our activities, call 715-349-7810 or to make dinner reservations call 715-349-2845. Hope to see you at the center.

Siren Senior Center

Barb Munger

Interstate Park news

Naturalist Programs at Wisconsin Interstate Park

Friday, May 27 Hiking the Ice Age Trail, 3 p.m., at the Pothole Trail sign. The Pothole Trail is the western terminus of the 1,200-mile long Ice Age National Scenic Trail that spans the state of Wisconsin. Join naturalist Barb Walker and learn about the unique geology of Interstate Park, a unit of the Ice Age National Scenic Reserve.

Saturday, May 28 The Owl and the Mouse, 1 p.m., at the grassy area in the center of the North Campground. Meet Aztec, a live spectacled owl, and play a game that illustrates the exceptional hearing of some nocturnal animals that have the best hearing of any on Earth. A fun activity for the entire family. The Secrets of Eagle Peak, 4 p.m., at the Eagle Peak Trail sign in the Pines Group Camp. Join the naturalist for a hike up the trail and learn the secrets of the peak and see a beautiful view of the St. Croix River Valley. Owls: Silent Hunters of the Night, 7 p.m., at the Ice Age Center. Owls are among the most successful predators of the night because of their wonderful adaptations. Learn all about them with Walker and enjoy a close encounter with Aztec, her live South American spectacled owl

Sunday, May 29 Summer Outdoor Family Adventure Series. Antique train ride, 10:45 a.m., at William O’Brien State Park. Take a mile walk out to the train tracks for a tour of the history and landscapes of the St. Croix Valley. At Osceola, you can hop off the train to do lunch or antiquing, or continue on the train to Dresser. The train turns around at Dresser, makes another brief stop at Osceola, and will bring you back to William O’Brien State Park. The cost is $15 for adults, $10 for kids under 16, and children under 4

ride free. Call William O’Brien State Park at 651-4330500 with questions. Throughout the summer, SOFAS will take area residents on a variety of hikes, paddles and fun activities. Join the club and enjoy time with your family, meet new friends and discover the St. Croix Valley. A Billion Years on the Pothole Trail, 1 p.m., at the Pothole Trail sign. Join Walker and hike back in time to see the geological wonders created over the last billion years. If the River Could Talk, 4 p.m., at the Summit Rock Trail sign. Meet Walker and hear some of the fascinating history of the St. Croix River Valley on this scenic hike to the summit. Reptiles from Here and Afar, 7 p.m., at the Ice Age Center classroom. Reptiles are some of the most misunderstood and feared creatures on Earth. Stop by and visit with naturalist Barb Walker to learn more about these amazing animals and get a chance to meet Copper, Bintu, Puff and Gizmo – up close and personal.

Monday, May 30, MEMORIAL DAY Hike to Horizon Rock, 10 a.m., at the Horizon Rock Trail sign across from the Pothole Trail. Join the naturalist for a relaxing hike to Horizon Rock – appropriately named because of the incredible view. Watchable Wildlife Around Lake O’ the Dalles, 1 p.m. at the lake side of the Beach House. Join Walker for a 1-mile hike around Lake O’ the Dalles. Discover what makes the lake unique and watch for signs of wildlife that live there.

Thursday, June 2 Nature story time, 10 a.m. Join naturalists Julie Fox and Walker for a story and activity chosen especially for children pre-K through Kindergarten and their parents. Check at the park office upon arrival for program location within the park. Interstate Park is located in St. Croix Falls, on Hwy. 35 just one-half mile south of Hwy 8. For more information call Fox or Walker at 715-483-3747.


PAGE 44 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

Polk County

May is always Spring Fling party time. The southeast center clubs did such a great job on May 6, that they will be putting together a guide for future centers to use when planning for the Spring Fling! The following awards were made during the evening program: Cultural arts entries were judged and there will 11 blue ribbon winners entered at the state conference this fall. The winners are: Karen Ellefson-cross-stitch pillow, and hand-crafted doll; and Mary Lou Porter-Hardanger doily; Ruth Ann Riley- Swedish-weave afghan; Vivian Byl-painting; Cindy Wilson-rug-hooked purse; Betty Wilson-quilt; Carol Mofitt-poem; Marilyn Wendt-handmade bag and applique/embroidery wall hanging; Joan Talmadge-knit mittens; Julie Wassberg-crocheted doily; Trest Andren-black/white photo. Fifty-year members Marilyn Wendt-Joel Club, Karen Ellefson-Laketown, Julaine Berglund-Shiloh/Goose Lake and Beatrice Stoddard-Neighborly Nites, were all honored as well as 25-year members: Evelyn Larson and Brenda Strilduk of Roundabouts Club. Thanks for your years of service to HCE. The next program is on street drugs; it will be at the Government Center in Balsam Lake on June 7, at 6:30 p.m. This program is open to everyone, posters are up

(Home and Community Education)

HCE Happenings

around the county or you can call the Extension office at 715-485-8600 for information. Bookworm Readers read and delivered the last set of books for the Head Start program this month. There were a few chocolate faces after having the wonderful treats made by staff and a little help from students? The end of a fun year for everyone. We’re looking forward to next fall and if you would like to be a reader, call Pat at 715-488-2729. You do not have to be a member of HCE to read. The Sterling Club is featured this month; members are mostly from Sterling, Eureka, and Anderson, townships. Last month Cindy Wilson demonstrated dyedwool artwork, very creative fun to do! They have taken on a summer project to dress up the “Old Settler’s” Cemetery where the Cowan Creek and Trade River meet on Evergreen Avenue, by planting a few shrubs

Summer fun at Wisconsin Interstate Park

ST. CROIX FALLS – Memorial Day weekend traditionally marks the beginning of the summer season at Wisconsin Interstate Park. Whatever outdoor activities you enjoy, you’ll find that a variety of recreational opportunities await you at the park. Interstate Park has two campgrounds with a total of 85 family campsites and a primitive group camp that accommodates 60 people. Advance reservations are recommended and can be made by calling toll-free 888WI-PARKS (888-947-2757). Visitors may picnic in several different areas of the park. Picnic tables and grills are available as well as open shelters that can be reserved for group picnics. There is an excellent swimming beach and Beach House at scenic Lake O’ the Dalles. The best way to discover all that Interstate has to offer is by hiking some of the nine miles of trails found throughout the park. Scenic overlooks provide the hiker with views of the spectacular scenery, while along the way Interstate’s abundant wildlife, wildflowers and birds may be seen. To enhance your visit to the park, join the naturalist for a nature program. Summer naturalist programs are offered beginning Friday, May 27, of Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day. Explore the trails, ponder the potholes or hear the colorful history of the St. Croix

Remembering a son

River Valley during a guided hike or activity. The Wisconsin Explorer program offers another opportunity for adults and children (ages 3 and up) to learn about nature together. Activities are clearly described in the free Wisconsin Explorer booklets, available at the park office and the Ice Age Center. Children completing a variety of activities will receive a free embroidered patch. At the Ice Age Interpretive Center, open daily, visitors can view exhibits to learn about the frozen history of Wisconsin and the gifts of the glacier. In the auditorium a 20-minute film, “Night of the Sun,” tells the story of glaciation in Wisconsin. The film is shown daily upon request. Shop for a souvenir in the Glacier’s Gifts gift shop in the lobby. Visit Wisconsin Interstate Park this summer; everyone is welcome. The park is located in St. Croix Falls on Hwy 35 just one-half mile south of Hwy. 8. The park is open from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. every day. A vehicle entrance sticker is required. Daily stickers are $7 for Wisconsin residents or $10 nonresident. Annual stickers are $25 for Wisconsin residents or $35 nonresident. If you have a second vehicle at home, a second annual sticker can be purchased for half price. National Park Service passes are also accepted. For more information call the park at 715-483-3747. - submitted

Potpourri

Indian teepee on the beach in front of our house. He told us he was going to live in it for the Memorial Day is a time for summer. However, his plan was remembering those who’ve gone short-lived due to weather and before. the lure of our more comfortable My son John was a free spirit. Pat Solomonson house. Like many who grew up in the Off and on throughout that ‘60s, John spent his young adult summer John introduced the years exploring different lifestyles. With few ties to family and others to the sweat lodge experience. anything or anyone, he lived a nomadic existence. First came the gathering of just-the-right-size rocks, Music, drama and art were among his many interwhich were slowly heated in a nearby fire, then careests. fully transferred to a pit in the center of the structure. John was also a nature boy. His pursuit of all Then we were invited into the sweat lodge, where he things natural led him into the then newly emerging splashed water onto the rocks, creating saunalike area of natural organic foods. conditions. I was both reluctant and curious when I agreed to Sitting there in the moist heat and mesmerized by visit a natural foods co-op in the company of my the fire in the center of the sweat lodge, we were furgentle, bearded son. There in the crowded aisles of ther caught up in the mood with John strumming what resembled the corner grocery store from my melancholy tunes on his guitar. childhood, he introduced me to raw bran, wheat When nature boy felt we were all getting a bit too germ, bulgur and all sorts of other healthy ingrediimmersed in the mood, he would whip out his harents in large serve-yourself bulk containers. John frequently dropped in at our place, the roar of monica, all in preparation for a group dash from the steamy interior into the shockingly cold lake water. his cycle announcing his arrival. He was always John Derk Bloemers died in 1993 of bone marrow eager to sample whatever I happened to be cooking cancer. He succumbed, despite a bone marrow transor baking. I had also become interested in the attributes of natural foods and on one of those unexpected plant, nine months after the initial diagnosis. He had just turned 39. visits I had tried a cookie recipe using a variety of We honored his Native American bent by burning healthy grains. sage at his funeral. Leaving the church on that warm Showing up one day at lunchtime, John told me he and sunny September day we lingered there on the was “just passing through” and didn’t need any lunch. “But if you don’t mind” he said while munch- sidewalk. Suddenly one of those free-spirited bald eagles circled above our heads, as if to get our attening on a cookie, “I’ll just throw a bunch of these dytion, then swooshed back up into the heavens. namite cookies in my knapsack and call it lunch.” John’s spirit lives on in the soaring of those freeWhen he learned that I had not even thought spirited eagles, in the haunting call of the loons on about a name for the cookie, he suggested we just call them Truckin’ John’s Lunch Cookies. Then, as he our lake and in the pleasant memories we all have of adjusted the pack of essential belongings strapped to our beloved free spirit. John’s legacy continues through his two great kids. his back, my free-spirited son set off for more advenHis son Derk was 8 when his father died and daughture. ter Jonnie was 6. Now 25 and 23, they are both makJohn was fascinated with Native American lore. He ing their grandmother very, very proud. But that‘s had labored long and hard setting up an authentic another story.

by Pat

Try our e-edition. Every page in color. www.the-leader.net

and flowers around the little church and flagpole. The other summer project will be to have homemade treats at the Eureka Farmers Market on June 17 this summer. Be sure to stop by! You can call Pat at 715-488-2729 or Kay at 715-648-5614 if you would like to join the Sterling Club; they meet once a month, usually Friday afternoons or Monday evenings. The Christmas Fair is held at Unity School the first Saturday in November, which is Nov. 5 this year. Applications for vendors are now available. Call Carol at 715948-2323 for information. September will be election of officers; the fall meeting hosted by the central clubs, food presevation program, and the state conference September 12,13 and 14. Busy month, so make plans to attend all that you can. HCE has pledged to work for the preservation and improvement of home and community life and to enjoy ourselves while doing this. Join us by joining one of the several clubs in the county; there is one near you. The next board meeting will be June 20, at the Government Center at 1 p.m. For information call Carol at 715-648-5817. – Pat Willits, publicity chair

Earth Notes

I think spring is finally here. I just wanted to provide you with some updates and happenings going on in Jan Burnett and Washburn Barton counties. If you have any questions about anything you see here please call or e-mail Jen at 715-635-2197, or jbarton@nwrpc.com. ••• We celebrated Earth Day in April with a wonderful luncheon, speakers and displays at the fourth-annual Shell Lake Earth Day celebration. A Welcome Back the Spring ceremony at the butterfly habitat started off the day, followed by guest speaker and author of “Monarch of the Butterflies,” Ken Parejko, New Editions band entertained the crowd throughout the day and a wonderful local and organic lunch was complete with biodegradable and compostable dinnerware. There were displays on solar, land and water conservation, composting, rain barrels, recycling and hazardous-waste collections, a kids craft table where sun catchers were made out of old CDs and the Shell Lake Arts Center and Happy Tonics Monarch Butterfly Habitat displayed many homemade items and sold milkweed seeds. ••• The Lilacfest in Siren was May 20-21. RCC hosted a booth with recycling and hazardous waste disposal information and again made sun catchers with the kids! Trash Trivia was a popular attraction with folks answering recycling/hazardous waste and other questions related to the environment for a prize of either a globe keychain or a RCC coffee mug. The weather was rainy, but that didn’t stop nearly 500 people from filing through the new Sustainable Living Expo at The Lodge Center Arena. ••• Other happenings in the Recycling Control Commission two-county program include: the now free disposal of appliances and computers, the cancellation of the garden pot recycling program, and tribulations in the state government resulting in reductions to the state of Wisconsin recycling grant. If you have any questions please call Jen at the above number. Please do not drop off garden pots and trays for recycling, there is no longer a market for this material. If another viable market becomes available RCC will consider starting this popular collection program again. We are still accepting used shoes for recycling. This program has been tremendously popular and will continue until further notice. ••• Burnett and Washburn counties will be hosting their first set of hazardous waste collections on Tuesday, June 14. Washburn County collections will be held in Minong, at the transfer station, from 10 a.m.-noon, and Shell Lake School parking lot from 2:30-4:30 p.m. Collections will also in be held in Burnett County, in Webster at the fairgrounds from 10 a.m.–noon, and Grantsburg fairgrounds from 3–4:30 p.m. Some examples of items considered hazardous are: nonlatex paints, old gas and antifreeze, corrosive cleaners, acids, pesticides, fluorescent light bulbs, greases and oils and many other items. Businesses wishing to rid themselves of hazardous wastes are welcome to attend but must register and a small fee will be imposed. If you have any questions regarding the above collections, or to register, please call Jen at 715-635-2197. Area farmers wishing to dispose of hazardous agricultural chemicals are invited to attend these events as well. The service is free to farmers, but all are also asked to register. Also, as a reminder, no waste oil, electronics, appliances, latex paint, fluorocarbons, recyclables, asbestos, alkaline or vehicle batteries, explosives, and medical or radioactive waste will be accepted at the above events. Latex will be accepted by your waste hauler if properly dried out and placed with regular trash. If you have any questions regarding this please call the recycling office. Please note that later this summer there will be collection events in Siren at the Burnett County Highway Shop, Aug. 6, and Spooner at the Hazardous Waste Facility, Sept. 10. At these Saturday collection events only, electronic items will also be accepted, as well as pharmaceuticals. Both of these events are from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Please watch papers for further details. Let’s make this year’s collection events better than last year’s.


Restorative Justice

AODA Youth Educational Program

BURNETT COUNTY – This is the sixth in our series of educational articles about what restorative justice is and what our agency does within the communities of Northwest Wisconsin. The folks of Restorative Justice of Northwest Wisconsin are concerned about the challenges that youth face day to day. Some of these choices may lead youth down a very slippery slope and set the pattern for their adult lives. This article includes information provided from the most recent Youth Risk Behavior Survey (March 2010) – and includes local data from middle and high school students in schools throughout this area. Please note that this information is not necessarily more – or less – concerning of an issue in Polk County or any other neighboring communities of Northwest Wisconsin. We believe that it is representative and is given as example of the magnitude of these issues in our communities based on the information from this valuable survey that the Burnett County Adolescent AODA Prevention Coalition was kind to provide us with. For purposes of example, the information provided in this article is a breakdown of even more specific data pertaining to the three Burnett-area school districts: Here are some current morsels to dwell on as we explore the problem of alcohol and other drugs of addiction in our local communities… Of middle school (sixth- through eighth-grade) students: 17.8 percent reported that they have tried cigarette smoking. Interestingly enough, 12.5 percent of students reported sniffing glue, inhaling paint and breathing the contents of spray cans – which was double the amount of students reported to have used marijuana at least one time. 9.4 percent of students surveyed reported taking prescription drugs such as Ritalin, Adderall, or Xanax, without a doctor’s prescription. 37.9 percent reported they have had at least one drink of alcohol in their life. 4.4 percent of middle school students stated they had consumed more than five drinks in a row within a couple of hours during the past 30 days prior to the survey. 37.9 percent of students reported having ridden in a car or other vehicle with someone who had been drinking alcohol. As for high school (ninth- through 12thgrade) students: 72.7 percent reported having at least one drink of alcohol in their lives while in grades nine through 12. 27.7 percent of students reported within the past 30 days riding in a car or other vehicle with someone drinking alcohol one or more times. 11.1 percent reported driving a vehicle after drinking alcohol within the past 30 days prior to taking the survey. 24.8 percent reported having one drink of alcohol before the age of 13. 37.8 percent of surveyed high school students stated that they had consumed at least one drink of alcohol within the past 30 days. 22.6 percent of these students reported binge drinking five or more drinks in a row within the past 30 days prior to the survey. 36.6 percent said that people their age would say it was OK to binge drink at least once or twice each weekend. 42.3 percent reported trying cigarette smoking. 19.9 percent said they had smoked a cigarette within the past 30 days prior to taking the survey. 3.6 percent have smoked at least one cigarette every day during the past 30 days. 11.7 percent have used chewing tobacco, snuff, or dip in the past 30 days. 25.3 percent of surveyed high school students reported using marijuana at least one time.

12.5 percent reported using marijuana within the past 30 days. 22.2 percent have taken prescription drugs such as OxyContin, Percocet, Vicodin, Adderall, Ritalin or Xanax without a doctor’s prescription at least once. 12.5 percent reported taking an overthe-counter drug at least once to get high. 9.4 percent of students reported being offered, sold, or given illegal drugs on school property in the last 12 months of the survey. The Restorative Justice of Northwest Wisconsin’s AODA Youth Educational Program works with the youth involved in these issues by using a journaling educational program that allows youth to explore their abusive and addictive behaviors. Youth also receive important facts on the effects of alcohol and other drugs and explores areas such as the drug abuse roller-coaster ride, their relationship with alcohol and drugs today, use vs. abuse vs. addiction, and offers information on the central nervous system and the body’s delivery network. It also looks at the battle between youth and drugs – alcohol, binge drinking, marijuana, the social consequences, stimulants, inhalants, opioids, prescription drugs, designer drugs, hallucinogens, drug interactions, along with tobacco and other tobacco products. It guides the youth through looking at the risks taken and the personal consequences that result from use of alcohol and other drugs. Local law enforcement agencies, county human services workers, and municipal courts can also refer youth with AODArelated offenses to this program. What this means for youth and their future, is that youth receive the education and help that they need to look at and identify whether their choices are abusive or addictive behavior. Please contact us if this seems like a program that might benefit you or a youth you know of who could benefit from taking this journey with us. Our agency is proud to be an active member of the Burnett County Adolescent AODA Prevention Coalition who are a diverse community of organizations and individuals dedicated to preventing youth substance abuse by promoting a healthy environment and supporting safe choices. The coalition’s vision is to build a safe, strong and healthy community. Restorative Justice of Northwest Wisconsin, Inc. is a nonprofit 501(c)3 agency that consists primarily of volunteer community members who work in many ways to help those affected by crime to find peace and healing. Please contact us at our office at 715-349-2117 for any information about this program or to make a tax-deductible donation. The Restorative Justice of Northwest Wisconsin Board of Directors, volunteers, and staff would like to invite the public to our newly established Bingo Extravaganza. This monthly event will be held in Grantsburg at the Crex Convention Center on the 3rd Sunday each month, with the next session on June 19, at 5 p.m. It’s fun for the whole family – kids are welcome to play with parents. Prizes galore! Bingo!

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 45

537589 40-41Lp

537306 40-41L 30d


PAGE 46 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

Ultimate Trail Building set for June 2 - 5

POLK COUNTY - June 4 is National Trails Day. On that day the Ice Age National Scenic Trail section through Straight Lake State Park will be completed and officially opened. The volunteer trail builders will be able to take a celebratory walk without tools. Walking east to west, the footpath shows off the Straight River Tunnel Channel. Underneath a glacier one mile thick, a river of melt water carved the channel, 12,000 years ago leaving a long valley between steep walls. It is the central feature of the park and this IAT section. The IAT flows like a ribbon up and down the hills,

around the many seeps, through undisturbed old forest. Below, the Straight River gurgles and shines, running east where during the Wisconsin glaciation it went west. Volunteers sought What is left to do includes constructing elevated boardwalk, about half a mile of tread (that is the walking surface and its edges), rock work, trail signage and some finishing touches. The mobile skills crew brings the expertise, leadership and equipment to the project. The Indianhead Chapter prepares to host the crowd. Camping space and three meals daily are provided no

charge to volunteers. Feeding the almost unlimited appetite of hardworking volunteers is a challenge, but the local chapter is up to it. They have hosted three previous events in the last two years. Most people who helped then plan to be back and bring a friend. There is work to suit all ages and abilities. Ways to become a legacy builder and for info call 715472-2248, e-mail edgelong@lakeland.ws or visit the Web: iceagetrail.org, click on calendar, click on Mobile Skills Crew Event – Straight Lake State Park, Polk Co. – submitted

These photos show (from left) the work by the girls of Northwest Passage in Frederic (fall of 2010), the trail waiting for the trail builders, and a section of trail roughed in two weeks ago by juniors and sophomores from St. Croix Falls High School, ready for the finishing touch. - Photos submitted

Jerry Apps is coming to the Luck Library

LUCK – Wisconsin author Jerry Apps will be speaking at the Luck Library, Thursday, June 2, at 7 p.m. He will introduce his newest book, “Campfires and Loon Calls” in his talk titled “Remembering Our Rural Heritage.” During his 25 years of canoeing in the wild, Apps has experienced it all—wicked thunderstorms, inquisitive bears, swamping a canoe, night skies filled with more stars than imaginable, and falling asleep to the lullaby of water lapping at the water’s edge. In his latest book, Apps generously shares his seasoned advice, from how to set up camp and protect food from hungry bears to minimalist cooking and appreciating a rainy day, all the while weaving in the incredible history of the Boundary Waters region. Through beautiful prose and photos from award-winning photographer Steve Apps, Jerry also reflects on how the Boundary Waters is a place to connect with nature. Jerry Apps, born and raised on a Wisconsin farm, is professor emeritus at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the author of more than 30 books, many of them on rural history and country life. His nonfiction books in-

BALSAM LAKE – UW-Eau Claire was the site of the annual WSMA state music contest Saturday, May 7. Unity had 45 students participating, many in more than one event. Several unique happenings this year: The jazz ensemble used a vocalist at this level for the first time (Kayla Johnson) and Nate Dorrance received Unity’s first known exemplary rating on his classical trumpet solo. This was the sixth year Unity’s jazz band has received a first at state contest. Also of note for this area there were three exemplary ratings: David Franzel, sax, Luck; Lucas Sletten, tuba, Osceola; and Nathan Dorrance, trumpet, Unity. Way to go northwestern Wisconsin music programs and directors. The first entry began at 8 a.m. and the last entrant performed at 3:50 p.m. The students had a full day of playing, listening and preparing. Accompanists during the day were Dana Paulson and Karen Eitland, gratitude is extended for all their help. The Unity High School music directors are Adam Bever and Dana Paulson. Justin Moore and Eric Kuske were extra busy making certain the speaker system and large pieces of equipment were in place for soloists and groups. The students then prepared for the spring concert, baccalaureate and graduation ceremonies. The summer will include the band marching at various local events. These groups/individuals were awarded firsts at state: Jazz combo members are: Brittney Bublitz, Beau Davison, Nathan Dorrance, Katherine Ebensperger, Dylan Hendricks, Ethan St. Amand and Sam Tonnar. Jazz band I members include: Brittney Bublitz, Beau Davison, Nathan Dorrance, Anna Ebensperger, Katherine Ebensperger, Kasey Heimstead, Dylan Hendricks, Kayla Johnson, Josh Kreft, Mitchell Krueger, Steven Krueger, Connor MacKinnon, Dawn Michaelson, Mickey

clude: “Living a Country Year,” “Every Farm Tells a Story,” “When Chores Were Done,” “Humor from the Country,” “Country Ways and Country Days,” “OneRoom Schools,” “Cheese, “Breweries of Wisconsin,” “Ringlingville USA” (History of Ringling Brothers circus), “Old Farm: A History,” “Barns of Wisconsin,” “Horse Drawn Days: A Century of Farming With Horses,” and Jerry Apps “Campfires and Loon Calls.” His children’s books include: “Stormy,” “Eat Rutabagas,” “Tents, Tigers and the Ringling Brothers,” and “Casper Jaggi: Master Swiss Cheese Maker.” He has an audio book, “The Back

Porch and Other Stories.” Jerry has published four novels, “The Travels of Increase Joseph,” “In a Pickle: A Family Farm Story,” “Blue Shadows Farm” and “Cranberry Red.” He is a former publications editor for UW-Extension, an acquisitions editor for the McGraw-Hill Book Company, and editor of a national professional journal. Apps has won awards for his writing from the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, the Wisconsin Library Association (the 2007 Notable Authors Award), American Library Association, Foreword Magazine, Midwest Independent Publishers Association, Robert E. Gard Foundation, The Wisconsin Council for Writers (the 2007 Major Achievement Award), Upper Midwest Booksellers, and Barnes and Noble Bookstores, among others. In 2010 he received the Distinguished Service Award from the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. The public is invited for an evening of memories and humor in recollecting their rural roots. - submitted

Muller, Morgan Peterson, Ethan St. Amand, Sam Tonnar and Ben Zahler. Solos instrumental: Nathan Dorrance, trumpet and jazz improv; and Katherine Ebensperger, E flat baritone sax. High school brass choir: Nathan Dorrance, Anna Ebensperger, Jessica Katina, Neil Kline, Mitchell Krueger, Steven Krueger, Eric Kuske, Connor MacKinnon, Dawn Michaelson, Justin Mooney, Maddie Ramich, Ethan St.

Amand, Matt Schultz, Ben Zahler and Kathryn Zahler. Solos and small groups vocal: Brittney Bublitz, alto, music theater – female role; Kayla Johnson, soprano; Megan Jones and Anna Luepke, duet. Girls barbershop quartet: Brittney Bublitz, Rebecca Garvey, Kaitlyn Johnson and Anna Luepke. - submitted

Unity students at state May 7


Summer arts for kids and youth at Lamar

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 47

ST. CROIX FALLS – Are you looking for fun and positive activities for the kids and youth in your life this summer? Lamar Community Center in rural St. Croix Falls has rolled out its summer classes and along with its annual kids art camps and School of Music, there’s hip-hop, beat boxing, and some big events for the whole family. “We’re dedicated to offering affordable participatory arts activities for rural children and youth who have limited access to the array of arts available in urban areas,” says Lamar Director Kathleen Melin. Courses are offered on a sliding fee scale and people self-select low, medium or high. “With the vision of the board and funding from the Wisconsin Arts Board, the St. Croix Valley Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and individual donors, we’re able to ensure that our courses are accessible to everyone. It’s an exciting way to promote community vitality,” says Melin.

Classes The summer starts out with Hip-hop for Everyone, Wednesdays, June 8-29, from 67 p.m. Hip-hop, known for its compelling beats and signature movements, returns to Lamar with star instructor Jae Haile Phillips, who taught for the first time at Lamar in 2010. In this guaranteedgood-time class you’ll learn locking, popping, crumping, and how to move into improvisations of your own. This is a multigenerational class recommended to anyone age 8 and up. It is family friendly. Participants in last year’s class ranged in age from 6 to 62. Fee range is $20, $40 or $60 per person. Great activities for youth continue on Wednesday with beat boxing. Get your friends together and be a part of this

amazing first-time-ever course at Lamar. Beat Boxing, the art of producing drum beats, rhythm, and musical sounds using only the mouth, lips, tongue and voice has a long history as a world music tradition and has recently become connected with hip-hop culture. This innovative seminar is led by award-winning beat boxer Nick Wishard. The course runs Wednesdays July 6-27, from 6-7:30 p.m. and participants self-select fees of $15, $30 or $45 per person. The Lamar School of Music is back for the third year. If you want to be part of a band, you can. This five-week seminar for musicians ages 12 and up culminates in performance on stage at the Lamar Festival August 6th. Groups will form depending on participants’ preference of genre – rock, jazz, blues, country western, old-time, bluegrass – and will write two songs. Composition and practice is under the guidance of artist-instructors Tony Berning, composer, guitarist and vocalist from Juizy Blazz, and Brian Liggett, a music innovator who has played in punk, progressive rock, funk, Latin, reggae, metal, and blues bands. The camp runs Thursdays, July 7, 14, 21, 28 and Aug. 4, from 7 -9 p.m. The band performs on stage Saturday, Aug. 6, at the Lamar Festival. The cost is $50, $75 or $100. The Lamar Kids Art Camp returns for another successful year with exuberant artist-instructor Tiffany Paige Meyer who’s created an art-o-rama for kids in three age groups over three weeks. Kids can let their creative genius out to play with a plethora of exploratory art projects created just for them and their friends during this summer day camp. Each session lasts one week and runs from 1-4 p.m. Campers can bring a snack for the afternoon.

Kids show their creative talent during the summer art for kids during last year’s event.

SIREN DENTAL CLINIC Sheldon A. Olesen, DDS Jon E. Cruz, DDS 24164 State Road 35, Siren, Wis.

DOCTOR IS IN ON FRIDAYS!

NEW PATIENTS WELCOME 529877 25Ltfc

S. A. OLESEN, DDS JON E. CRUZ, DDS

* Preventative Care * * Crowns, Bridges, Cosmetic Dentistry * * Dentures, Partials, Relines * * Fillings, Root Canals and Extractions * GENTLE DENTAL CARE FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY

715-349-2297

FREE SAMPLE YOGA CLASS!

twinchies, and much more. Show up and see what these are.

The summer starts out with Hip-hop for Everyone, Wednesdays, June 8-29, from 6-7 p.m. Hip-hop, known for its compelling beats and signature movements, returns to Lamar with star instructor Jae Haile Phillips.

At the end of the camp sessions, campers can have their own genuine art show as part of the eighth-annual Lamar Festival Aug. 5-7 with fun for the whole family. Fees for the whole week are $45, $60 or $75 + $10 materials fee. DaVinci, Monet, Picasso – Oh My! for kids ages 5-7 runs Monday-Friday, July 18-22, from 1-4 p.m. Campers explore a different artistic style each day of camp from ancient art to Renaissance, Impressionism to Modernism. After getting inspired by the masters, they create stunning masterpieces in their own unique style using a broad range of media. This camp is guaranteed to be filled with general messiness and fun! Art, Books, Creativity is offered for kids 8-10 on Monday-Friday, July 25-29, from 1-4 p.m. Campers will explore simple bookmaking techniques with a different artistic focus each day: portraits, narrative art, landscapes and still life, abstraction and artist books. Besides making the coolest handmade books ever, they’ll be painting, drawing, sculpting and exploring mixed media stuff too! Upcycled and Eco-Friendly offers art and awareness for kids ages 11-14 Monday-Friday, Aug. 1-5, from 1-4 p.m. Kids will create one-of-a-kind works of art with items otherwise destined for the trash, immersing themselves in weeklong projects – metal box assemblage and altered books – while keeping creativity fresh, with other upcycled projects introduced daily, i.e. bottlecap inchies, coin sleeve

Want A Brighter Smile?

Events Bring the whole family for Midsummer Day, a classic Nordic celebration held on the longest day of the year throughout Scandinavia and much of Europe. Ar du Svensk? Even if you’re not, you’ll love participating in this outdoor celebration that revolves around music, dancing, food, making flower wreaths, and decorating a huge maypole, in Swedish called a Midsommerstang. Lamar along with the Polk County Master Gardeners and Forever Swedish are working together to re-establish this important part of the area’s cultural past. Festivities for all ages are June 25, from 2-6 p.m. and the event is offered by donation. The eighth-annual Lamar Festival returns Aug. 5-7, with two days of music, dance, art and spoken word in a sustainable extravaganza in the lovely countryside at Lamar. Saturday is especially fun for families with free arts activities throughout the afternoon including minilessons, face painting, a costume box and games. You can frolic under the big parachute, move to the music, or play some checkers. Live music on the outdoor stage features regional and national acts. It’s a festival by people for people and a highlight of the summer. Keep checking the Web site for details and updates. The season at Lamar closes on Saturday, Oct. 1, when Squib Celebrates Solar with an all-ages concert from 9 p.m. – 12 a.m. in honor of the National Tour of Solar Homes and Businesses. Squib is back together and performing its signature brand of original music fusing eclectic artistry and creative antics. Tickets are $10 at the door. Register at least one week in advance by calling 715-553-2116 or e-mailing lamar.community@gmail.com. All classes take place at Lamar, 1488 200th St. in rural St. Croix Falls. Lamar School, on the National Register of Historic Places, was built in 1905 at a time when the state mandated a schoolhouse on every section. At the height of the country schoolhouse days, Polk County was home to 144 country schools. Lamar is now one of only five schoolhouses still in existence in the county that is open to the public. The organization is dedicating to building community through education and the arts from this unique property. For further information, check the Web site at www.lamarcommunity.org or visit on facebook at Lamar Community Center. submitted

Receive a FREE Crest Professional Whitestrips Kit! New Patients Welcome! Crowns • Bridges Partials • Dentures Fillings • Extractions Root Canals

New adult patients, at their new patient appointment which includes: • Examination • Cleaning • X-Rays , will receive a free Crest Professional Whitestrips kit.

We now haveDIGITAL X-RAYS (very low exposure to X-Ray & no waiting for developing) Emergency patients call before

Open Mondays ‘til 8 p.m. 10 a.m. for same day appointment

Gary Kaefer, D.D.S. Family Dentistry Webster Office

715-866-4204

507637 21a,btfc 32Ltfc

Grantsburg Office

715-463-2882

Milltown Karate, Milltown

Come to a free, no-obligation class to experience how you may benefit from yoga to: Increase: Decrease: * Flexibility * Anxiety * Strength * Depression * Balance * Menopausal symptoms * Well-being * Body stiffness/weakness Class size is limited. To reserve your space, please contact Jane at: 715-557-1940 or janem007@centurytel.net

P.S. You don’t have to be “in shape” to take a yoga class. Any body can benefit from yoga no matter what shape it is in.

Jane F. Meinz, M.A., Certified Kripalu Yoga Instructor 537553 40Lp

ST. CROIX TRIBAL SMOKE SHOP ALL YOUR TOBACCO NEEDS

715-349-2195 Ext. 5171 * Full-Service Smoke/ Tobacco Shop * Drive-Up Window (CASH ONLY) * Lower Cigarette Prices * Open Daily 7 a.m. - 9 p.m. 4380 State Road 70 Webster, WI 54893 Across The Parking Lot From St. Croix Casino Hertel

536350 39-40L

First Presbyterian Church, St. Croix Falls

Tues., May 31, 10:30 - Noon • Thurs., June 2, 5:30 - 7 p.m. Preregister by May 29 & May 31

537199 40L 30a,b,c

Sat., June 4, 10 - 11:30 a.m., Preregister by June 2


Lilacfest

PAGE 48 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

Siren

United Methodist Women from Siren United Methodist Church put on a Scandinavian Bake Sale Saturday, May 21, as part of Syren Lilacfest. (L to R): Shirley Bloom, Donis Taylor and Darlene Jackson are shown making a sale during this fundraiser, which brought in over $1,100. Methodist United Men from Siren United Methodist Church prepared a Swedish buffet breakfast, a Frukost, as part of Syren Lilacfest this past Saturday. One of the men, Dave Close, is shown here watching as Karen and Orlin Anderson dished out their food. Many people were waiting in line outside the church when the doors opened at 8 a.m. The men took in over $1,000 as a result of their efforts.

FOR SALE

Lester and Ruth Johnson On Saturday, May 28, from 2 - 4 p.m. At Comforts of Home in Frederic

Duane Lindh

715-472-2717

715-491-1861

Mark D. Biller

R & S TRUCKING You Y o u Call Call We We Haul Haul

Formerly Lindh Trucking Sand & Gravel

Specializing In Criminal, Traffic and OWI Mark D. Biller Trial Lawyer P.O. Box 159 Balsam Lake, WI 54810

Owners: Rick & Sonya Morse Frederic, WI

715-566-2927 or 715-554-0526

536833 29-30a 40-41L

Will Work Late & Saturdays To Suit Your Schedule

POLK COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY HONORS CIVIL WAR VETERANS Program:

Saturday, May 28, 11:30 a.m.

537313 40L

Special music, taps, 21-gun salute by Balsam Lake VFW, Civil War wall with over 500 Polk County soldiers names. New display room with many Civil War artifacts to see. 537296 40L

No gifts, please.

536568 39-40Lp

Photos by Nancy Jappe

• Gravel • Sand • Rock • Topsoil • Dig Basements • New Culverts • We Build Driveways 537315 40L 30a

60TH ANNIVERSARY

Lilacfest tent sales in Siren were set up by several merchants during the Syren Lilacfest celebration Friday and Saturday, May 20 and 21. The tent sales were part of the Buy Local promotion by the Siren Chamber of Commerce.

Root Beer To Sale

120 Main St., Balsam Lake, WI

536354 39-40L

Telephone 715-405-1001 Fax 715-405-1002 billerlaw@lakeland.ws

317350 36Ltfc


Class of 2011

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 49

Luck

“...our lives grow in different directions, but our roots remain firmly planted.”

LUCK - The Luck High School Class of 2011 held their commencement on Sunday, May 22, at the school gymnasium. The theme of branches and trees was framed by a Kyle James designed backdrop, following their class motto: “Like branches on a tree, our lives grow in different directions, but our roots remain firmly planted.” Salutatorian Morgan Denny gave a welcome address noting the teachers in their lives, thanking them for “sharing their knowledge with us.” She also noted that while the ceremony is often seen as the last thing the class will pursue together, it is much more, both the beginning and the end, meaning change, responsibilities and freedom. She also referenced dandelion seeds, and how students follow many paths, that the wind may take them to the military, college or to just keep sailing along. James and Sarah Elert took a humorous approach in the commencement address,

comparing recess, chick hatching, cirrus clouds, the onset of puberty and how suddenly “boy cooties started to sort of wear off,” Elert joked. James and Elert also mused about the schools’ cell phone policy and got the whole class involved when it came to dress codes and lessons learned, such as pushing your chair in when leaving class. They also praised teachers and other staff, with James saying if pressed on a game show for an answer, he would no doubt call retiring teacher Marty Messar. Valedictorian David Franzel noted how the class has fluctuated over the past dozen years, with additions and sad losses, with several people noting the death of classmates Curtis Donald this past January, and Kelsey White in an auto crash as an elementary student. “We are a good class,” Franzel confirmed, “in large part because of our extraordinary teachers and faculty.” - Greg Marsten

Luck 2011 Salutatorian Morgan Denny and Valedictorian David Franzel led the procession.

Hugs were the rule after the ceremony.

Seniors Kyle James and Sarah Elert gave a humorous commencement address.

LEFT: The mortar board toss has become a standard tradition at Luck. Photos by Greg Marsten

Graduation memories were noted in many ways, including cell phone portraits.

The Luck High School Class of 2011.

R I G H T: P o d i u m flowers were in honor of the late Curtis Donald, a LHS 2011 classmate who passed away this past winter.

Roger Steen wore his football jersey under his gown.


Class of 2011

PAGE 50 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

Grantsburg

“Remember your roots”

by Priscilla Bauer Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – When Don Erickson asked all those Grantsburg alumni present to stand during his commencement address the large portion of the audience who did so was impressive. Erickson, a 1965 Grantsburg graduate who taught junior and senior high for the district before going on to a career at McNally’s Industries, becoming their vice president of marketing in 1991, senior vice president of marketing and sales in 2003 and senior vice president and general manager in 2007, asked the 2011 graduates to look around the room. “Look around graduates, these are your peers and your encouragers,” Erickson told the seniors. “You may think of Grantsburg as a sleepy little town in the north woods, but I assure you it has produced some of the finest citizens you could hope for. If you had the opportunity to review the graduating class members of this fine educational institution over past years, you would find some remarkable things to be true,” continued Erickson. Erickson then spoke of the many accomplishments Grantsburg alumni have made and are continuing to make in the community. “You would discover just how successful your fellow alumni have been. You would find men and women in medicine, law, education at all levels, political careers, businessmen and women, farmers who are great stewards of the land, world-class engineers and manufacturers and some great moms and dads,” Erickson told the gradu-

Is my cap crooked? Grantsburg senior Derek Bertelsen just had to give his cap a little adjustment during the graduation ceremony last Sunday afternoon.

Caught in the moment - Grantsburg grads began the much-anticipated walk Sunday afternoon, May 22, from the high school commons to the school’s gymnasium to their awaiting diplomas. – Photos by Priscilla Bauer

ates. Erickson told the graduates, as they embark on their future paths, to remember how special their community has been in their lives. “I have traveled the world over and discovered things you may not yet realize for many years to come and that is just what a special community this is,” commented Erickson. “Have you ever looked around the crowds at your school sports events, musicals and talent shows? These people are here not just to be entertained but they are your family and friends who are here supporting you and this school and investing in you, our future.” Erickson asked graduates, as they sat waiting to receive their diplomas, to think about how they arrived at this special day. “You are probably thinking, “It is graduation day, I have arrived.” So, you have arrived, but do you know how you got here? You got here not only on your own merits but also with the incredible love, support, pain and tears of your family and this amazing group of people who make up the teachers, coaches and support staff of GHS. You were also encouraged and supported by the many citizens and leaders of this community. ”Whether or not you realize it, many sleepless nights were spent in thought and prayer on your behalf by people concerned with your well-being. In fact, as the years roll by, you will be amazed how much wiser your parents and this staff will become.” Erickson then gave an example of how he, as a young man growing up on a farm, was told by his father he was ready to plow a field on his own. “I sat on the tractor with my father and we made some rounds together before he said ... you are on your own! But before he left me he told me it was critical I keep my focus on having the big tractor wheel in the furrow and if I were breaking the first soil in a field I keep my eye on a distant point or tree on the other end of the field so my furrows were straight and true and not wavering all over the field. “How much of life is like that example for each of us,” Erickson reflected. “We need to remain focused on the important

1965 Grantsburg graduate Don Erickson told the 2011 graduates as they embark on their future paths to remember how special their community has been in their lives.

things in life and make sure we are unwavering in certain principles and truths.” Erickson told graduates ensuring success in life, regardless of our goal choices and fields of endeavor, comes from making wise and seriously considered choices in every aspect of life. “Most of you don’t really realize the importance of your decisions or understand that the choices you make today shape the path you (and others) will walk tomorrow. Good, well-considered choices will prepare you for greater and better things ahead.” “Define your objectives, Erickson advised. “Failure often creeps into a person’s

Grantsburg High School Valedictorian Brent Myers gave the welcome message to his classmates and to those attending the school’s May 22 graduation ceremony. life when you are not sure why you are on this earth or you have no goals.” Erickson talked to the graduates as to how they will gauge and handle success. “What defines success? Some people think of success as being rich, powerful and successful in a career. While careers are very important, success is also measured in how well you experienced and conducted your life. Being a successful parent or friend is extraordinarily important. “When you are successful, keep it in perspective and don’t let your head get too big for your hat. Always remember where you came from and that we are all on this journey together. Focus on caring for yourself, your family, friends and give back to the community. Make it a better place for future generations just like these people in the crowd at your school events have done for you.” Erickson left the graduates with his hopes for their future as Grantsburg’s newest alumni. “I hope many of you will become active members in your church or townships, and most importantly, caring responsible parents. The possibilities are endless; you were each created for a specific purpose. We look forward to watching you come forward and use your talents and unique personalities to make our community and our world a better place. Do us proud. Congratulations from our generation to yours and on becoming a member of the GHS alumni.”

Grantsburg seniors sang their last song as part of the high school choir during the graduation ceremony held on May 22.

Alexa-Jo Maslow smiled as Grantsburg Superintendent Joni Burgin turned her tassel after the senior received her diploma at Sunday’s graduation ceremony.

Emily Swenson, Kyle Johnson and McKenzie Ryan shared class memories of humorous moments and best accomplishments from kindergarten through high school, bringing laughter and a few tears from their fellow classmates.


Class of 2011

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 51

Frederic

40 seniors move out into the wider world

FREDERIC - It was smiles, hugs and memories as the Frederic High School Class of 2011 graduated Sunday, May 22. The 40 members of the class received their diplomas from school board member Becky Amundson and a handshake from Administrator Jerry Tischer before longtime teacher Robert Peterson turned their tassels. This was the last graduation ceremony for high school Principal Ray Draxler who has announced his retirement. Draxler spent his entire education career at Frederic. He taught seventh and eighth grade before becoming principal 15 years ago. Valedictorian Sarah Knauber and Salutatorian Tanesha Carlson joined classmate Krysta Laqua on the stage to share memories with the graduates and their many family This is the last graduamembers and friends. tion for high school PrinciMusic was provided pal Ray Draxler. He will by the concert choir retire in June after 39 years under the direction of with the Frederic schools. Greg Heine and the Draxler taught seventh and high school band di- eighth grades before berected by Patricia coming principal 15 years Burns. ago. Scholarships were awarded to the graduating seniors who are moving on to higher education opportunities and new careers. The class motto “Life brings us tears, smiles and memories - the tears dry, the smiles fade, but the memories last forever” summed up the mood as the new graduates emerged to a sunny sky for last goodbyes. - Gregg Westigard

Old friends still stay involved with the school. Phil Schneider and Marlys Spencer are active with the Citizens Scholarship Fund. The group gave out $27,000 in financial help to graduates.

Valedictorian Sarah Knauber will also study nursing at UW - Eau Claire. She had perfect attendance this year and missed only four days of school in the past four years.

Salutatorian Tanesha Carlson encouraged her classmates to be different. Carlson will attend UW - Eau Clarie for nursing.

Smiles on the faces of seniors were evident following the graduation ceremony at Frederic High School on Sunday, May 22. Shown (L to R) are Allison Anderson, Marcus Tuyman and Tara Anderson.

Frederic graduates Ben Ackerley (photo at left) and Raif Poirer (photo at right) posed for photos with family and friends following Sunday’s commencement ceremony.

A lighter moment on stage as Master of Ceremonies Krysta Laqua and Principal Ray Draxler react to Tanesha Carlson’s comments. Photos by Gregg Westigard

Administrator Jerry Tischer and school board member Becky Amundson handed out the diplomas to the 40 graduates.

After the ceremony, the graduates and their families and friends gathered outside the Frederic High School gymnasium for last farewells and photos.


Class of 2011

PAGE 52 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

Siren

“Prepare yourself to know who you are”

by Nancy Jappe Siren staff writer SIREN - “Today is the beginning of your life after school. Celebrate, but respectfully. We want you around for a long time,” Siren School Principal Joe Zirngible advised members of the Siren Class of 2011 who gathered in the school gym for graduation Friday evening, May 20. The class this year included two exchange students, Niklas Andersson from Sweden, host parents Mark and Janet Swenson; and Lezhi Tang from China, host parents Gary and Juli Kannenberg. Andersson’s parents, Ulf and Anette Andersson, made the trip from their home in the north of Sweden to see their son receive a certificate of attendance during the graduation ceremony. His goal is to return home to Sweden to finish his education and then pursue a career in music. Tang’s goal is also to return home to China.

Siren High School mistresses of ceremonies for the 2011 graduation ceremony were seniors Jessica Morris (L) and Ashley Bjornstad.

Siren Middle School teacher Jodi McLainRichards was chosen by the Class of 2011 to present their graduation address. The class was special to her, McLain-Richards said, because she was “pregnant and grumpy” when she had them as students during their seventh-grade year.

The Siren graduating Class of 2011 included the following students (L to R): Row 1: Carley Emery, Daphne Hubbell, Jessica Morris, Elizabeth Otto, Brittani Hopkins, Coty Reh and Samantha Rosado. Second row: Kelsi Pluff, David Tomberlin, Brittany Moose, Ashley Bjornstad, Lezhi Tang, Danielle Keller, Jeremy Wikstrom, Cody Spafford and Nathaniel Larson. Third row: Rhiannon Honeysett, Stephanie Taylor, Kristen Sexton, Ashley Guevara, Christopher Honeysett and Tadd Oachs. Fourth row: Cody Maslow, Niklas Andersson, Brad Maslow, Joshua Tills, Jacob Stiemann, Seth Stoner, Michael Wampfler, Hans Dahlberg and Makayla Reynolds. – Photos by Nancy Jappe

RIGHT: Lezhi Tang, an exchange student from China for the past year at Siren High School, walked down the aisle at the start of the graduation ceremony at the school Friday, May 20. While attending classes at the school, Tang lived with Gary and Juli Kannenberg and their daughter, Laurel. Stephanie Taylor (L) is the valedictorian and Tadd Oachs the salutatorian for the Siren High School Class of 2011. Stephanie Taylor earned the honor of valedictorian of this year’s class. In her address to the class, Taylor talked about all those who helped the class during their 13 years of schooling - parents whose patience, help with homework and advice were there for them, friends who helped to make school “almost bearable” and teachers who were there to help them before and after school, and “even during lunch.” “Now, as we are preparing to move forward to the future - military, college, the workforce - we can no longer expect our parents to take care of all of our problems. We will make mistakes, but will learn from them,” Taylor commented. Taylor was recognized by the Native American Nation for all her hard work during high school with the gift of an eagle feather, a good luck symbol, presented by Michael Taylor. At the start of his remarks, sallutatorianTadd Oachs commented: “Wow, who would have thought it would have gone by this fast. It seems like yesterday we couldn’t wait for this day to come yet we are (now) anxious for the next step to come.” Oachs advised his classmates to

Michael Taylor, on behalf of the Native American Nation, presented an eagle feather, a symbol of good luck, to Siren graduate Stephanie Taylor at the graduation ceremony Friday, May 20.

carry with them good memories from high school but not to let high school days be the best days of their lives. “Try for better than that,” he said. “Make the best of every situation and truly enjoy life.” The Siren Class of 2011 chose middle school teacher Jodi McLain-Richards as its graduation speaker. McLain-Richards started out by talking about a late-night weekend phone call she had received from a man who startled her by saying, “I’ve got your chickens.” It turns out that the man worked at the post office and had taken delivery of a box of 24 newborn chickens, chickens he knew wouldn’t make it if they weren’t picked up right away. “You never know what life is going to throw at you – even in the middle of the night, about chicken deliveries,” McLain-

Richards said. “If I would have hung up, 24 innocent chicks would have died. Give people the benefit of the doubt.” McLain-Richards also built on a phrase coined by former Siren teacher Carol Kline - “Remember who y’are.” “Doing so is a substantial task,” she said. “Who do you want to be known as and what will be your legacy when you walk away, beyond home and family who know you. Prepare yourself to know who you are.” McLain-Richards also advised the class, who she acknowledged was her special class, to remember what is really important - to remember the chicken story when they are in the deep, dark spaces of their life.

Ulf and Anette Andersson from the northern part of Sweden were in Siren Friday, May 20, to attend the 2011 graduation ceremony. They came to see their son Niklas walk across the stage to get his certification of completion for one year as an exchange student at Siren High School. While attending school this past year, Niklas lived at the home of Mark and Janet Swenson (shown on the right in the photo).


FREDERIC – The American Red Cross encourages Americans to observe Memorial Day, a day to honor those who died serving our country, by donating blood in Frederic at the Frederic Area Blood Drive. For more than 50 years, the Red Cross has been an innovator and a leader in transfusion medicine and research. Started as a relief effort to provide lifesaving plasma and blood for soldiers during World War II, the Red Cross Blood Services has grown, collecting and distributing nearly half of the nation’s blood supply. The Frederic Blood Drive is scheduled for Thursday, May 26, from 1-7 p.m., and Friday, May 27, from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. It will

537380 40L

be held at the St. Luke’s Methodist Church. If you are interested in scheduling an appointment please call Phyllis Wilder, 715-327-8951 or Phyllis Meyer, 715-327-8972. Walk-ins are always welcome. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license, or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 16 years of age, (with parental permission) weigh at least 110 pounds and are generally in good health may be eligible to donate blood. - submitted

LAKESIDE GREENHOUSE, LANDSCAPING & NURSERY Quality Plants & Friendly Service

Beautiful Hanging Baskets. Prices Vary Evergre We Have Waves & & Ornam en ental Proven Winners Trees Shrubbery, New Variety Bedding Plants, Herbs And Veggies

Hours: Monday Closed; Tuesday thru Saturday 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Sunday 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Location: 4 miles north of Balsam Lake on Hwy. 46, east on 200th Ave., 1/8 mile on the right.

715-825-2202 Business • 715-554-2542

537557 40L 30a,d

Observe Memorial Day by donating blood through the American Red Cross

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 53


36th-annual Elementary Band Festival concert

The 36th-annual Elementary Band Festival concert at Unity Middle School was performed on Tuesday, May 3.

BALSAM LAKE – This is the 25th year that Aleta Anderson, Unity Middle School band director, has been involved in the Elementary Band Festival concert. When she began working on the festival she was the only female band director in the area. Now many area schools are represented by women: Frederic by Patti Burns, Luck by Jennifer Gilhoi, Siren by Bryn Anderson and Unity by Aleta Anderson. Tuesday, May 3, found over 90 sixth-grade band students from Frederic, Luck, Siren and Unity working together to prepare a concert for the 12:30 p.m. presentation. The sixthgrade bands each played two prepared pieces, then joined together under the direction of Ken Dado, this year’s guest conductor, to play the four selections they had practiced all morning for the audience. Dado is a retired band director of the Elmwood School District. He has over 30 years of teaching experience. He is an adjudicator, clinician and music presenter. Dado has been chairman of the Wisconsin Music Association honors project. The students worked together as a “family” with the goal to create music as well as they can in the short practice time they had. He hopes that they became friends after beginning the day as strangers. Dado reminded

Bremer Bank in Frederic taking action against hunger

Guest conductor Ken Dado directed the sixth-grade band members from Frederic, Luck, Siren and Unity at the concert on Tuesday, May 3. – Photos submitted the students to not take their dedicated directors for granted. The audience found the music to be wonderful. If you missed this year’s event, put it on your calendar for next spring. – submitted

FREE SAMPLE CHAIR YOGA CLASS! First Presbyterian Church, St. Croix Falls

Tuesday, May 31, 10:30 a.m. - Noon Preregister by May 29

Chair Yoga is ideal for seniors and those with physical limitations who find it challenging to sit on the floor. Come to a free, no-obligation class to experience how you may benefit from yoga to: Increase: Decrease: * Flexibility * Anxiety * Strength * Depression * Balance * Arthritis symptoms * Well-being * Body stiffness/weakness Class size is limited. To reserve your space, please contact Jane at: 715-557-1940 or janem007@centurytel.net P.S. You don’t have to be “in shape” to take a yoga class. Any body can benefit from yoga no matter what shape it is in. Jane F. Meinz, M.A., Certified Kripalu Yoga Instructor 537554 40Lp

E-edition

Every page in color. Go to www.theleader.net

Bremer Bank in Frederic is taking action against hunger during June Hunger Awareness Month. Bremer Corporation is matching donations up to $50,000 raised throughout the communities they serve. Bremer’s Frederic staff has set the goal to raise $2,500, locally, to fill the food shelf. A campaign food-shelf board will be displayed and, as donations are received, a can will be added to the board for every $100 raised. The names of individuals or businesses able to donate $100 can have their name displayed on a can. A few generous donations have kicked off the campaign already with over $300 raised. Stop by the Bremer Bank to help fill the food shelf. All donations are kept local for local residents. – Photo by Marty Seeger

The Bridge earns WNA award

During difficult time, it’s easy to feel like things are out of your control. So it’s essential to consider every financial decision carefully, especially when it comes to your retirement savings.

Edward Jones can help. We’ll start by getting to know your goals. Then we’ll sort through your current situation and work with you face-to-face to develop a strategy that can help you keep your retirement on track.

CALLTODAY TODAYFOR FORAAFREE FREE REVIEW CALL REVIEW OF OFYOUR YOURRETIREMENT RETIREMENT ASSETS. ASSETS. Rebecca A. Berg Financial Advisor 102 N. Washington St., Ste. A St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-1103 www.edwardjones.com

531802 19-30a,dp 30-41Lp

Member SIPC

For the second year in a row, the Webster High School newspaper, The Bridge, has received recognition in statewide competition sponsored by the Wisconsin Newspaper Association Foundation. The paper was given Third Award for General Excellence in group A. Pictured with the advisor to The Bridge, Marleana Rank (front row center) holding the award, are the paper’s staff members. Front row (L to R): Ashley Irvine, Rank and Ali Becvar. Second row (L to R): Mike Bambery, Sam Perius, Gabby Schiller, Aleah Heinz and Cody Kruse-Hilt (kneeling). Back row: Brittany Elgin, Nathan Puttbrese, Kristina Minion-Bryant and Garrik Zabel. Missing from the photo are Miranda Burger, Ciara Stadick, Matt Elmgren and Zach Holmstrom. - Photo by Carl Heidel


Habitat holds ground breaking for second Amery home

by Jackie Thorwick Special to the Leader AMERY - A group of people from Wild Rivers Habitat for Humanity met on Laconie Street in Amery Saturday morning, May 21, to break ground for the home they will build there this summer. The Rev. Keith Ruelow of Our Savior’s Lutheran Church in Amery led the service, dedicating the land and the home that will be built there, asking for guidance and for the protection of the volunteers. Eric Kube, executive director of Habitat, introduced the family, Jen and Joe Olander and their children, Allie, 2, and Cole, 9 months. The Olanders will build the home with Habitat volunteers, putting in a minimum of 500 hours of “sweat equity.” The Olanders have already begun putting in sweat equity hours by helping to clean,

paint, and set up Habitat’s new ReStore in St. Croix Falls. When their home is complete, they will purchase it with a no-interest mortgage from Habitat. Through the use of volunteers and donated or discounted materials, their home will be affordable to buy. It will also be affordable to live in, as the home will be very energy efficient. Jen Olander thanked the group for selecting their family for this home. She said, “This will make a huge difference in our lives,” and then joked, “So, are we putting up walls today?” Kube also introduced the newest member of the Habitat team, Robert Babel of Osceola, who was recently hired as the construction manager for the nonprofit

Robert Babel of Osceola, newly hired as the construction manager for WRHFH, was present at the ground-breaking service.

The Olander family dug the first shovels of earth on the lot where their new Habitat home will be built this summer. From left, they are Joe, Jen holding Cole, 9 months, and Allie, 2.

The Rev. Keith Ruelow led the groundbreaking service of the a Habitat home to be built in Amery this year.

The Leader

FREDERIC PUBLIC LIBRARY Main Street

Connect to your community

Frederic, WI 54837

715-327-4979

HOURS: Monday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Friday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Tuesday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Wednesday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sunday Closed 445673 19Ltfcp Thursday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

536554 39-41L

AMERY - Joe and Jen have been married for three years and have two children, Allie, 2, and Cole, 9 months. When they met, they were both struggling. Jen was a certified nursing assistant, working hard just to make ends meet. Joe had learned HVAC while in the service and had started his own company, but it hadn’t taken off. They were both merely surviving, they say, living moment to moment. Eventually they realized, they say, that they’d need to start from the bottom to get to the top. Today they are investing in their future, as Jen is a college student and Joe works in a stable career at Springpoint Project, an organization working to cure diabetes. “You can’t hold yourself back with excuses,” says Jen, “because if you do, you could end up behind in life, without the things you wish you had, and most importantly, without a real home of your own.” The Olanders have faced the same challenges many renters do. Their last home was expensive to rent and, because it was poorly insulated, to heat. Though there were three bedrooms, two of them were too cold in the winter, so they all shared one bedroom. They are now living in part of Joe Olander’s parent’s second home – still without enough room. Allie has the one bedroom and the other three share the porch. Heating costs have been overwhelming, said Jen. One bill was over $400. “I know there are times when the kids were colder than they should have been,” she admitted, adding, “We’re really looking forward to having a place to call home. When you rent, it’s not really home, it’s not really mine. It’s always someone else’s.”

builder. Kube said volunteers will be starting to work on the home in early June. People or groups who are interested in helping build this home may contact the Habitat office at 715-483-2700. Monetary donations are gratefully received at WRHFH, PO Box 736, St. Croix Falls, WI 54024. They may be submitted online at www.wildrivershabitat.org.

Burnett Community Library

Monday through Thursday 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Closed Sunday Main Street

Webster

460220 43Ltfc

• FAMILY FUN FOR EVERYONE • FAMILY FUN FOR EVERYONE •

DRIVERS & COMMERCIAL BOOTH VENDORS WANTED! Something To Squawk About ... Central Burnett County Fair, Webster, WI

Thursday - Saturday, July 7 - 9, 2011 July 8 - Truck & Tractor Pull Contact Charlie, 715-246-7826, deerekrazy@hotmail.com

July 9 - Demo Derby Contact Justin, 715-338-2324, micki_anderson23@yahoo.com More information & all rules & regulations available at: www.centralburnettcountyfair.org Free fairbooks available online & at Burnett County businesses. Please visit our Web site to get a complete list. Contact information: Renelle Sears at 715-866-8261 evenings or e-mail: CBCfair@centurylink.net 537282 40L 30a

• FAMILY FUN FOR EVERYONE •

536856 40r,L

FREE WIRELESS INTERNET ACCESS

• FAMILY FUN FOR EVERYONE •

A place to call home

Allie Olander, 2, was delighted to meet and play with with her soon-to-be neighbor, Norman Springett, who with his mom and brothers attended the ground-breaking service of the Olander home in Amery on Saturday, May 21.

Wild Rivers Habitat for Humanity volunteers and supporters held a ground-breaking service on Saturday, May 21, at the lot on Laconie Street in Amery where they will build a home this summer. From left, they are Amery Mayor Michael Karuschak Jr.; Eric Kube, executive director; David Weiss, Habitat board president; Judge Jeff Anderson; and the Olanders: Joe, Jen, Cole and Allie. – Photos submitted

• FAMILY FUN FOR EVERYONE • FAMILY FUN FOR EVERYONE •


PAGE 56 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

MarketPlace Foods recognized for energy effi ficciency

CENTURIA –MarketPlace Foods in St. Croix Falls was the first business to receive an Energy Efficiency Award from Polk County Economic Development Corporation. The award was presented by Al Bohl, energy advisor for Polk-Burnett Electric Cooperative, during PC EDC’s Business Awards Night at Amery Golf Club Tuesday, May 10. Polk-Burnett is the electric service provider for MarketPlace Foods. MarketPlace Foods was recognized for incorporating energy-saving measures into their recently completed renovation and expansion project. Highlights of the project included upgrading interior lighting with high-performance, low-wattage lamps; replacing exterior neon signs with LED technology and replacing interior

signs with foam lettering for zero-energy use. The store also replaced old, inefficient coolers and freezers with modern state-of-the-art models. The new display cases use high-efficiency fan motors and compressors, no-heat doors, LED lighting and motion sensors. As a result of these measures, MarketPlace expects to save more than 600,000 kwh of electricity per year and is projecting a nearly 20-percent reduction on its monthly energy bill, for an annual savings of about $40,000. Beyond saving energy and money, the upgrades are also environmentally friendly. In addition to being recognized with an Energy Efficiency Business Award, MarketPlace Foods also earned rebate checks from Polk-Burnett Electric Coop-

MarketPlace Foods in St. Croix Falls was recognized for energy efficiency with a $32,000 rebate check from Focus on Energy. An additional $10,000 in rebates will also be awarded by Polk-Burnett Electric Cooperative for the store’s energy-saving measures during its recent renovation and expansion. (L to R): In front of the store’s new high-efficiency coolers are: Al Bohl, Polk-Burnett energy advisor; Donna Betts, MarketPlace executive assistant; Art Wisner, MarketPlace general manager; Joleen Jensen, Focus on Energy; and Bill Schmidt, Polk-Burnett general manager. - Photos submitted

Polk-Burnett Electric Cooperative nominated MarketPlace Foods of St. Croix Falls for the first Energy Efficiency Award presented by Polk County Economic Development Corporation. Shown (L to R): At the May 10 awards presentation are: Al Bohl, Polk-Burnett energy advisor; Art Wisner, MarketPlace general manager; Stacy Noll, Polk-Burnett customer services manager; and Bill Schmidt, Polk-Burnett general manager. MarketPlace is a commercial member of the co-op and receives electricity from Polk-Burnett.

erative and Focus on Energy for its commitment to energy efficiency. The store will receive $10,000 from Polk-Burnett’s EnergySense program and $32,000 from Focus on Energy, Wisconsin’s statewide program for energy efficiency and renewable energy. MarketPlace also received smaller rebates from the co-op and Focus on Energy for energy-saving measures completed last year. “Grocery stores are one of the most energy-intensive commercial businesses per square foot. They use a lot of refrigeration, lighting and equipment that operates 24 hours a day,” said Joleen Jensen, energy advisor for Focus on Energy.

“From the beginning of the project, MarketPlace took full advantage of the resources available through the electric cooperative and Focus on Energy to ensure the greatest return on its investment for energy conservation,” said Bohl. “Store Manager Art Wisner, executive assistant Donna Betts and all involved in the project should be commended for their commitment to energy efficiency.” For more information about energy efficiency savings and incentives for your home or business, contact Polk-Burnett Electric Cooperative, 800-421-0283. ~ from Polk-Burnett

www.the-leader.net

WHAT’S FOR LUNCH???

Menu LOCATION

FREDERIC GRANTSBURG Each building will have their own breakfast menu.

LUCK

SIREN ST. CROIX FALLS UNITY WEBSTER

MAY 30 - JUNE 3

MONDAY NO SCHOOL MEMORIAL DAY

NO SCHOOL MEMORIAL DAY

NO SCHOOL MEMORIAL DAY

NO SCHOOL MEMORIAL DAY

NO SCHOOL MEMORIAL DAY

NO SCHOOL MEMORIAL DAY

NO SCHOOL MEMORIAL DAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

BREAKFAST Cook’s choice. LUNCH Cook’s choice OR ham salad.

BREAKFAST Cook’s choice. LUNCH Cook’s choice.

BREAKFAST Cook’s choice. LUNCH Cook’s choice.

BREAKFAST Cook’s choice. LUNCH Cook’s choice.

LUNCH Cheese fries, baked rice, green beans, pineapple tidbits, apples, oranges, bread basket.

LUNCH Taco salad w/fixings, baked rice, refried beans, mandarin oranges, apples, oranges, bread basket.

LUNCH Cheeseburger w/fixings, french fries, baked beans, banana, apples, oranges, bread basket.

LUNCH HS - MS: Rib tickler, pasta salad. Elem.-Nel.: Ravioli, mini carrots, dip, ice-cream treat, apples, oranges, bread basket.

BREAKFAST Cereal/??????????. LUNCH Mozzarella pizza dippers, dipping sauce, green beans, fruit sauce. Alt.: Hot dog, 7-12.

BREAKFAST Cereal/??????????. LUNCH Mini corn dogs, corn bread, baked beans, fruit sauce. Alt.: Hamburger, 7-12.

BREAKFAST Cereal/??????????. LUNCH Chicken nuggets, rice, corn, fruit sauce. Alt.: ??????????.

BREAKFAST Cereal/??????????. LUNCH Chef’s choice.

BREAKFAST Cook’s choice. LUNCH Cook’s choice.

BREAKFAST Cook’s choice. LUNCH Cook’s choice.

BREAKFAST Cook’s choice. LUNCH Cook’s choice.

BREAKFAST Cook’s choice. Assorted cereal and toast, juice and milk. LUNCH Cook’s choice.LUNCH Pizza dippers, rice, corn, carrots, celery, pineapple tidbits, banana. Alt.: Cook’s choice.

BREAKFAST Breakfast pizza. LUNCH Hot dogs, baked chips, baked beans, veggies & dip, watermelon.

BREAKFAST Pretzel and cheese. LUNCH Chicken nuggets, tater tots, peas/ carrots, applesauce. Alt.: Cook’s choice.

BREAKFAST Scrambled eggs and toast. LUNCH Hamburgers, french fries, corn, peaches. Alt.: Cook’s choice.

BREAKFAST Cereal bar and 1 slice of toast. LUNCH Pepperoni pizza, lettuce salad, green beans, pears.

Waffles.

BREAKFAST

LUNCH Hamburger and potato wedges.

LUNCH Chili with toppings, corn bread muffin with honey butter, coleslaw, pears.

Omelets.

BREAKFAST

Pancakes.

BREAKFAST

Long johns.

BREAKFAST

LUNCH Mini corn dogs and parsley potatoes.

LUNCH Sub sandwich, cottage cheese and chips.

LUNCH Piiza, corn and cookie.

LUNCH Cook’s choice OR BBQ, bun, potatoes, California blend veggies, mandarin oranges.

LUNCH Chicken nuggets, scalloped potatoes, green beans, peaches.

LUNCH Flat-bread pepperoni pizza, fresh veggies, fresh fruit.

EARLY RELEASE DAY


CHURCH NEWS

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 57

Eternal

Perspectives

Luck Lutheran confirmation

Sally Bair

Keeping the veil open

I recently wrote about the curtain, or veil, of the temple being torn in half when Jesus died on the cross, allowing total access to God. No more blood sacrifices are required for our sins, since Jesus sacrificed his own blood on our behalf. The veil has been opened. But sometimes we close our hearts to that fact. For instance, when we plan our day—and our future—without asking God what he wants us to do, we draw the veil closed. God tells us, “Do not put your trust in princes, nor in a son of man (nor in ourselves, I add), in whom there is no help. His spirit departs, he returns to his earth; in that very day his plans perish.” (Psalm 146:3-4) When we hurry into the day without feeding on God’s Word and communing with him, we draw the veil closed. Psalm 37:5 says, “Commit your way to the Lord; trust also in him, and he shall bring it to pass.” “Direct my steps by your Word ….” (Psalm 119:133) Refusing to believe that God can bring something good out of our terrible situation closes the veil over our heart. “And we know that all things work together for good to those who love God, to those who are the called according to his purpose.” (Romans 8:28) If we believe we don’t deserve God’s love or aren’t good enough to be accepted by him, the veil closes. The Bible says, “For God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have everlasting life.” (John 3:16) Conversely, if we believe someone else doesn’t deserve God’s love and salvation, we’ve closed the veil. “Judge not, that you be not judged … why do you look at the speck in your brother’s eye, but do not consider the plank in your own eye?” (Matthew 7:1, 3) When we simmer and stew and take offense to what someone said to or about us, the veil closes. “Let all bitterness, wrath, anger, clamor and evil speaking be put away from you, with all malice. And be kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God in Christ forgave you.” (Ephesians 4:3132) Lord, you’ve opened the veil so we can have fellowship with you. Help us to keep it open every day, regardless of our circumstances and feelings. In Jesus’ name, amen. Mrs. Bair may be reached at sallybair@gmail.com

New Hope graduate

Trevor Thompson (L), a graduating senior at Grantsburg High School, was honored at New Hope Lutheran last Sunday, May 22. He was presented two gifts from the congregation, one of which was a quilt to take to college. The Class of 2011 listed 72 graduates. - Photo by Wayne Anderson

Contemporary worship

Recent confirmands at Luck Lutheran Church were Casey M. Ekholm, Dakota G. Ward, Hunter C. Ward and Katie A. White. – Photo submited

Clam Falls Lutheran Quilting Group

The Clam Falls Lutheran Church Quilting Group has been busy this year with a total of eight graduates. Every year each graduate receives a homemade quilt. This year is the most quilts the group has made. Following the presentation of the quilts, everyone was invited for cake and coffee fellowship. Shown (L to R) are Donna Moody, Beverly Sederlund, Roberta Johnson and graduates, Zachary Tietz, Trae Gehl, Tanesha Carlson, Carl White and Kyle Simonsen. Graduates not pictured included Robert Kirk, Jesse Sanchez and Logan Evenson. – Photo by Jeanine Moody

Busy Sunday at Bone Lake Lutheran

RURAL LUCK - Sunday, May 22, was a busy day at Bone Lake Lutheran Church. Worship began with two baptisms. Sylas Bossingham and Michaela Luterbach were welcomed as the newest brother and sister in Christ. The Sunday school children led worship with “The Fruits of the Spirit” pageant highlighting God’s gifts of patience, kindness, love, peace, joy, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control. Twelve high school students celebrated their graduation on Sunday, May 22, at Bone At the close of worship there Lake Lutheran Church. Front row (L to R): Ethan Thomas, Ashlyn Peterson, Pastor Mary was a blessing service for 12 Ann Bowman, Sammi Schallenberger and Jason Vlasnik. Back row: Jimmy Richter, Morgraduates. Each of the graduates gan Denny, Megan Moore, Stacie Buck, Karie Bartlett and Neal Mellon. Missing from the was wrapped in a prayer blanket picture: Sam Tonnar and Paige Hacker. – Photos submitted that was embroidered with this verse that Jesus shared with his disciples: “And remember, I am with you always ...” Matthew 20:28b. Please join Bone Lake Lutheran Church for worship. Worship time during the summer is at 9:30 a.m. which starts on Sunday, May 29. The church is located at 1101 255th Ave. in rural Luck. For more information call 715-472-2535. - submitted

The Bone Lake Sunday Sunday school children presented “The Fruits of the Spirit” pageant during worship on Sunday, May 22. The children also made fruit kebobs for fellowship time after worship for all to enjoy.

LUCK – Luck Lutheran Church, 510 Foster Ave., Luck, is offering a Monday evening contemporary worship opportunity this summer, June through August. This will be an informal evening worship opportunity beginning at 6:30 p.m. The Monday service is held in the fellowship hall at Luck Lutheran. The Monday evening worship is an especially good opportunity for those who are away for the weekend or unable to be present for Sunday morning worship. The public is welcome. – submitted

Sylas Joseph Bossingham was baptized at Bone Lake Lutheran Church on Sunday, May 22. Sylas’ parents are Jessica and Seth Bossingham. His godparents are Jeremy and Sasha Buck and Derek Buck.

On Sunday, May 22, Michaela Ann Marie Luterbach was baptized into the Christian faith. Michaela’s parents are Dana Skow and Jack Luterbach. Her godparents are Krystal Ewer and Kali Langer.


OBITUARIES

PAGE 58 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

Viola Anderson

Viola Anderson, 92, Glenwood City, died Saturday, May 14, 2011, at the Red Cedar Medical Center, Menomonie. Viola was born Feb. 25, 1919, the daughter of Henry and Susanna (Schmitt) Hagel at Farm Hill, Elmwood. She grew up and attended school there. On June 12, 1940, Viola married Lester Anderson. They were married at Cresco, Iowa. After marriage, they lived in Rock Elm Township, Martell and Wildwood. They moved to Elmwood and lived there over 20 years. After Lester’s death, Viola lived at Baldwin, Elmwood and Knapp and eventually moved to Milltown where she lived until 2008. Viola lived in Glenwood City for the past three years. Viola and Lester were blessed with eight children. Over the years, she worked as a housecleaner for a number of families in the Spring Valley area. She worked at Duffy’s Cleaners in Spring Valley and worked a short time in the Twin Cities. She enjoyed needlework, quilting and gardening. She loved doing jigsaw and word find puzzles. She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband; son, Roger Anderson; grandson, Jeffrey Anderson; sonin-law, William Kitchner; brothers, Clarence, Ernest, Lawrence and Elroy Hagel; and sisters, Arlene Costello and Ethelrita Kaufhold. She is survived by her children, Lester “Jerry” (June) Anderson of Martell, Louis “Tom” (Barb) of Baldwin, Stanley (Bev) Bev of Wilson, Al (Sue) of Glenwood City, Cleo Kitchner of Woodville; Becky (Arlan) Smith of Elmwood and Linda (Andrew) Anderson of Milltown; 22 grandchildren; 27 great-grandchildren; brother, Romey (Eileen) Hagel of St. Paul; sister, Cecelia Bechel of Plum City; brother-in-law, Don Costello of St. Paul; sister-inlaw, Hannah Gregory of Neenah; many nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. Funeral service was held Wednesday, May 18, at Gilman Lutheran Church with the Rev. D. Peter Friberg officiating. Carole Lynum was organist and nephew Mark Hagel was vocalist. Burial was in the Gilman Lutheran Cemetery. Pallbearers were Christy Lyons, Amy Anderson, Cody Eggen, Scott Anderson, Brent Anderson, Craig Anderson and Billy Hudson. Keehr Funeral Home, Spring Valley, was entrusted with arrangements.

Violet C. Johnson

Violet C. Johnson, 95, Clear Lake, died Monday, March 28, 2011, at the Angels Care Center in Cannon Falls, Minn., where she had been a resident for the past six years. Violet Corella Johnson was born Nov. 21, 1915, in the Town of Black Brook, the daughter of Rudolph and Jennie (Moberg) Benson. She grew up in the Clear Lake area, was baptized and confirmed at the Swedish Congregational Church and graduated from Clear Lake High School in 1934. As a young women, Violet worked at Ogren’s Grocery Store in Clear Lake and at the Clear Lake Creamery. She was married to Lynn G. Johnson on Aug. 24, 1938, at the Swedish Congregational Church. Together they operated a dairy farm in the Town of Clear Lake and raised three children, Romelle, Reynold and Darleen. In 1952, they moved to Clear Lake, where Lynn bought and operated with his partner, Quentin Anderson, Anderson Johnson Motors. In 1959, Violet began working as a cook at the Clear Lake Schools where she was employed until her retirement. In her spare time, she enjoyed cooking and baking, crocheting, flower gardening and traveling. Violet had been an active member of Moe Lutheran Church for many years. Violet was preceded in death by her husband, Lynn Johnson; infant daughter, Romelle; parents, Rudolph and Jennie Benson; and brother, Sherman Benson. She is survived by her children, Reynold (Mary) Johnson of Green Valley, Ariz., and Darleen (Dennis) Kalow of Cannon Falls, Minn.; grandchildren, Tyler (Shelly) Johnson of Orange, Calif., Seth Johnson of Minneapolis, Minn., Benjamin (Molly) Kalow of Jordan, Minn. and Anne Kalow of Minneapolis, Minn.; great-grandchildren, Samuel Kalow, Owen Kalow and Sarah Johnson; sisters and brother, Ardell Brihn of Amery, Crystal Hanson of Clear Lake and Bob (Mary) Benson of Clear Lake. Funeral Service was held at Moe Lutheran Church in Clear Lake on May 23 with Pastor Margaret Grant and Pastor Phil Rudd officiating. Music was provided by Carol VanHeuklom. Interment was at the Moe Lutheran Cemetery in Clear Lake. Casket bearers were Anne Kalow, Mary Johnson, Ben Kalow, Seth Johnson, Dennis Kalow and Tyler Johnson. Scheuermann-Hammer Funeral Home in Clear Lake was entrusted with arrangements.

Ann Caroline Wike

Ann Caroline Wike, 75, died Sunday, May 15, 2011 at Region’s Hospital in St. Paul, Minn. Ann was born Oct. 1, 1936, in Cushing, to Melvin and Ena (Andrewson) Nelson. The family lived on a farm in Milltown, and she attended school in a one-room schoolhouse. Later the family bought a farm north of St. Croix Falls, where she continued her schooling, graduating from high school in 1954. She enjoyed school, especially typing, shorthand and bookkeeping courses, and was involved in band and choir. After high school, Ann worked for a real estate office in St. Croix. In the fall of 1956, she went to work for an office in the College of Education at the University of Minnesota. She met her future husband, Orville, rollerskating in Rush City, Minn., in September of 1959. They were united in marriage on June 4, 1960, and to this union two children were born. In 1963 they moved to Amery. Ann started working at the Union State Bank (now Bremer bank) for the president in April of 1964 and retired from there in 1995. She enjoyed working there part time so she could see her children get on and off the bus. After retiring from the bank, she went back to work, again part time, for an accounting firm, Kubnick and Warren. She was active in the VFW auxiliary, the Amery Senior Center, and Redeemer Lutheran Church where she was also a member of the choir and was involved with the local food shelf. She enjoyed quilting, sewing, spending time with her grandkids and was a great historian of her family and her community. She loved her Scandinavian heritage and enjoyed making Lefse and pepper nuts with her grandkids. Ann was preceded in death by her parents. She is survived by her husband, Orville; daughters, Susan (Dan) Heathfield and Julie Wike; and grandchildren, Stephanie and David Heathfield, as well as many other relatives and friends. Funeral services were held Thursday, May 19, at Redeemer Lutheran Church in Amery with Pastor Ryan Barnes officiating. Interment was at the East Immanuel Cemetery. Friends may sign an online guest book and view a video tribute at www.williamsonwhite.com. The Williamson-White Funeral Home and Cremation Services of Amery was entrusted with arrangements.

Brian Charles Redmond

Brian Charles Redmond, 44, St. Croix Falls, died instantly in a motor vehicle accident Sunday May 22, 2011. He was born in Minneapolis on May 24, 1966, to Arthur and Carol Redmond. He grew up in St. Paul, Minn., and attended St. Bernards High School. He joined the Army and got his GED. He served eight years, mostly in Korea, as a communications specialist. His last job was at White Bear Machine in St. Croix Falls. He was preceded in death by his father, Arthur Redmond. He is survived by his three children: Jessica, Brian Jr. and Elijah; two sisters, Terri and Rebecca Redmond; and two brothers, Michael and James; his mother, Carol and stepdad, Dave McInnes; and many aunts, uncles and cousins and friends. Funeral services will be at 7 p.m. on Thursday, May 26, at the Williamson - White Funeral Home in Amery. Visitation will be from 4 to 7 p.m. , on Thursday prior to services at the funeral home. Interment with military honors will be on Friday, May 27, at Fort Snelling National Cemetery. Family and friends may leave condolences, sign an online guest book and view a video tribute by visiting www.williamsonwhite.com. In lieu of flowers memorials are preferred to the Redmond Memorial Account at Bank Mutual, P.O. Box 607, St. Croix Falls, WI 54024, an education fund for Brian’s children. The Williamson-White Funeral Home, Amery, was entrusted with arrangements.

Hilma A. Marks

Hilma A. Marks, 88, Bloomington, Minn., died May 4, 2011, in Minneapolis, Minn. She was born Jan. 5, 1923, in Siren, the daughter of Hulda and Exel Erickson. Hilma grew up in the Siren area, graduating from the Siren High School. She was preceded in death by her husband, A. Alvin Liljegren; her parents, Hulda and Exel Erickson; three sister, Mildred Hakseth, Ella Anderson and Tekla Gorney. She is survived by her children, Jane (Bob Caulkins) Liljegren, Dennis Liljegren, Amy (John) Ellefson and Ken Liljegren; 10 grandchildren; 15 great-grandchildren; nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held Monday, May 9, at Cross Point Church in Bloomington, Minn. Interment was private.

John C. Taylor

John C. Taylor, 83, Amery, died Wednesday, May 18, 2011, at Golden Age Manor. John was born on June 4, 1927, to Fred and Dulcie (House) Taylor in Rochester, Minn. John spent his early years farming in southern Minnesota with his family. In 1958, he moved to St. Paul, Minn., where he took a job with a plastic molding company. He later worked for Henry’s Shoe Service in St. Paul and eventually opened his own shoe shop in the Midway Shopping Center. In 1979, he bought a farm in Clayton, sadly he ended losing the farm and he took a job with UFE, Inc. in Dresser. John stayed with UFE, Inc. until 1992 when he retired due to health reasons. His last few years, he spent weekends at the Pea Pickin’ Flea Market in St. Croix Falls. He is survived by his wife, Delores; children, Randi Taylor, Dale (Neng) Taylor, Marie Taylor, Shawn Taylor, Brenda (Paul) Candle, Tammy Soler, Kim Soler, Tonee (Joe) Campbell, JoDee (Ron) Stoffel, Melanee (Kevin) Miner, Andrew (Patty) Pregler, DuWane (Sue) Snyder, Colette (Robert) Gale, Tina Taylor and Leonard Taylor; many grandchildren, great-grandchildren, as well as other relatives and friends. A memorial service will be held at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, May 25, at the Williamson ~ White Funeral Home in Amery. Visitation will be two hours prior to the service from 5 to 7 p.m. on Wednesday. Friends and family may send condolences, sign an online guest book and view a video tribute by visiting www.williamsonwhite.com The Williamson ~ White Funeral Home and Cremation Services in Amery was entrusted with arrangements.

Solveig Utoft Jensen

Solveig Utoft Jensen, 98, Luck, died Saturday, May 14, 2011, at the Luck United Pioneer Home. She was born in Milltown, the daughter of Henrik and Jenny Utoft. Solveig attended the Little Butternut School in West Denmark, graduated from Luck High School in 1931, attended Grand View College, Des Moines, Iowa (1931-1932), and received a degree in elementary education with a minor in art from the University of Wisconsin-River Falls. Solveig taught in Milltown, Askov, Minn., Neillsville, and, for 23 years from 1954-1977 in St. Croix Falls, as a kindergarten teacher. Solveig also was a lifelong, active member of the West Denmark Lutheran Church. Solveig valued the rich spiritual, intellectual and educational life of the West Denmark community. Solveig married Ove Jensen of Nysted, Neb., on Dec. 28, 1946. They settled in West Denmark, living in a house that her father built on Little Butternut Lake, and had two children, Mary and John. After Ove’s death in August 1986, she married George Schlagenhauf in December 1987. Activities that Solveig enjoyed included travels to Scandinavian countries, in particular visits with relatives and friends in Denmark. She also enjoyed the arts, including music and singing, picnics and nature walks, reading and hearing about current ideas and events, entertaining family and friends, and playing Bridge, 500 and other card games. In retirement, Solveig taught children’s crafts and Danish language. In addition, she collected, recorded and created stories of family and community history. She was an active contributor to both the Danebod Family Camp of Tyler, Minn., and the West Denmark Family Camp. She treasured spending time with and visiting her children and grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband, Ove; her husband, George; and three brothers, Alf, Evald and Svend. She is survived by her daughter, Mary; her son, John (Cathy); granddaughters, Karn Brown, Kirsten Jensen and Marta Jensen; son-in-law, Eric Brown; great-grandson, Evan James Brown; stepdaughter, Ruth Crandall; and stepson, George Schlagenhauf Jr. On May 18, Solveig was buried at the West Denmark Lutheran Church Cemetery. Gifts in memory of Solveig can be sent to either West Denmark Lutheran Church, 2478 170th St., Luck WI 54853 or Church and Life, P.O. Box 9, Trout Creek, MI 49967. Rowe Funeral Home of Luck was entrusted with funeral arrangements, www.rowefh.com 715-472-2444.

Services set for Joseph Juarez

BALSAM LAKE - Graveside services for Joseph Juarez of St. Paul, Minn., will be held Saturday, June 4, at 2 p.m. at the Balsam Lake Cemetery with Pastor Bruce Tanner officiating. Juarez died Jan. 19, 2011, at the age of 39. He is survived by his mother, Shirley Juarez of Milltown, children, Benjamin, Joe Jr., Dakota, Tianna, Amanda, granddaughter, Christina, brothers, Michael, David, Angel and many cousins, uncles and other family and friends. The Kolstad Family Funeral Home of Centuria has been entrusted with arrangements.


OBITUARIES

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 59

Corinne Barr, 73, Danbury, formerly of Hudson, died peacefully Saturday, May 14, 2011, at her residence surrounded by her family. Corinne was born Aug. 30, 1937, in St. Paul, Minn., the daughter of Hubal and Georgine (Warling) Trudeau. She attended St. Patrick’s Parochial School prior to graduating from Hudson High School in the Class of 1955. On June 11, 1955, she was united in marriage to Bernard Barr at St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Hudson. This union would be blessed with seven children. Although she was a devoted homemaker, she worked a short time for the Hudson High School as a teacher’s aide. Corinne cherished her family. There was nothing better than being surrounded by them; whether it be watching her grandkids swimming off the pontoon, cheering her beloved Packers or Badgers to victory, or preparing a feast over the holidays. She loved spending time with her best friend and soul mate Bernie vacationing at Fort Myers Beach, dune buggying in northern Wisconsin or a trip to the casino. She also enjoyed sewing or knitting wash towels/clothes; which all of her children were recipients of. Furthermore, she took pleasure in the challenge of 1,000-piece jigsaw puzzle. She is survived by her husband, Bernie; children, Michael (Tracy) Barr of Hudson, Gerald Barr of Hudson, Richard Barr of Hudson, Jeffrey (Jennifer) Barr of Bloomer, Jacqueline (William Jr.) Franklin of Hudson, Teresa (Mark) McDaniel of Hudson and Kathryn (Daryl) Lindstrom of Hudson; 15 grandchildren; three greatgrandchildren; sister, Diane Ponath; as well as many nieces, nephews and countless friends. She was preceded in by her parents, Hubal and Georgine (Warling) Trudeau; siblings, Harold, Roland and Elaine Preston. Mass of Christian Burial was Wednesday, May 18, at St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Hudson with Fr. Gene Murphy. Burial was in the parish cemetery with active casket bearers being Jesse Barr, James Franklin, Alex McDaniel, Bryan Lindstrom, David Barr and John Barr. Memorials are preferred. The O’Connell Funeral Home, Hudson, was entrusted with arrangements.

Jesse Lee Smith

Jesse Lee Smith, 32, Amery, died Sunday, May 22, as a result of an automobile accident in the Town of St. Croix Falls. Jesse was born in St. Paul, Minn., on March 22, 1979, to Edward and Debra (Osborne) Smith. Jesse grew up and attended school in the St. Paul and Amery area. After school, he worked various jobs in the construction trade and also was employed for a few years at Polaris in Osceola. Jesse was an avid outdoors person and enjoyed hunting and fishing, but the one thing that Jesse loved more than being in the outdoors was spending time with his daughter, Jadelyn. He was preceded in death by his grandparents, Walter and Doris Osborne and Donna Smith; and his sister, Jeri Jo Smith. Jesse is survived by his daughter, Jadelyn; father, Edward Smith; mother, Debra (Steven) Stewart; brothers, Justin and Joel Smith; sisters, Jalee Smith and Ronda and Kayla Stewart.; grandfather, LeRoy Smith; nephews, Braden Smith and Bret Johnson; as well as other relatives and many friends. Funeral services were held Wednesday, May 25, at West Immanuel Lutheran Church in rural Osceola, with Pastor Rex Brandt officiating. Family and friends may leave condolences, sign an online guest book, and view a video tribute by visiting www.williamsonwhite.com. The Williamson ~ White Funeral Home and Cremation Services in Amery was entrusted with arrangements.

Kathleen A. (Willette) Rivard

Kathleen Ann (Willette) Rivard, 68, Frederic, died May 18, 2011. She is survived by husband, William (Bill); sons, Mike (Lisa), Joe (Angie) and Billy (Renee); daughter, Jennifer (Chad); grandchildren, Tanisha, Mac, Sam, Taylor, Joey, Justin, Jake, Jessica, Will, Grace, Jackson, Savannah, Chloe and Morgan; brothers, Lyle, Jim, Tom, Tim, Bob, Dan, Gerard and Mike; sisters, Therese, Mary, Ellen, Bonnie and Susan; and many dear friends and family. Kathleen was preceded in death by her father, Ted; mother, Theresa; and brothers Ted, Greg and Mark. Mass was held on May 24, at St. Genevieve Church, 7087 Goiffon St., Centerville, Minn. In lieu of flowers, memorials to family preferred.

Mavis Kittleson

Mavis Kittleson, 77, Shell Lake, and formerly of Chetek, died May 18, 2011, at the Indianhead Medical Center in Shell Lake. Mavis was born March 15, 1934, in Chetek, the daughter of Victoria (Grey) and Henry Kittleson. Mavis loved to flower garden and bird watch, and she adored her cats, Karl and Lena. Flowers were her passion. If you had a question about a blossom, she knew the answer. She loved to make pressed flower pictures and enjoyed all kinds of crafting. She was preceded in death by her mother, Victoria; her father, Henry; and brother Erwin. Mavis leaves to celebrate her memory, son Jon (Karry) Davis, Shell Lake; son Dan (Roxanne Cornwall) Davis, Dallas; daughter Jolene Davis, Barron; brother Curt (Annette) Kittleson, Manitowac, brother Darrell (Rosalie) Kittleson, Amery; nine grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; several nieces, nephews, and other loving family and friends. Funeral serviced was held May 23 at the BurnhamOurs Funeral Home in Chetek. Mavis was laid to rest next to her parents at the Pleasant Plain Cemetery in rural Chetek. The Burnham-Ours Funeral Home, Chetek, was entrusted with arrangements. To sign the online family guest book or for more information, please visit www.burnhamours.com.

Emma Sears

Emma Clara Bertha Sears, 88, Webster, died Friday, May 20, 2011, at the Frederic Nursing Home, in Frederic. Emma had been a resident there for the past five years. Emma was born Feb. 21, 1923, in the Dunbar Township of Faribault County, Minn. Emma was one of seven children born to Jesse and Gertrude Rasmusson. She graduated from the eighth grade in Blue Earth, Minn. At age 14, Emma first went to work as a nanny and housekeeper. Emma was adventurous and liked to travel. While working in Minneapolis, she stayed with an elderly friend, who lived across the street from a greenhouse where she met her future husband, Douglas Sears. They were married on June 26, 1943, in Minneapolis, Minn. After Douglas was discharged from the Army during WW II, they moved to Webster. She loved to sew little dresses and coats for her nieces. After 13 years of marriage, Emma and Doug were finally blessed with children of their own, Kevin, and two years later, Darrell. She was involved in the community as a den mother for Cub Scouts, member of the local homemakers group, a Sunday school teacher and exhibited at the fair in Webster. She loved her hobbies of reading, gardening, knitting, crocheting and refinishing wooden furniture. In 1977, Emma was baptized into the Burnett County Church of Christ, of Webster, where she was a devoted and faithful member. Emma was preceded in death by her husband, Douglas; parents, Jesse and Gertrude; brother, Helmer; sisters, Gladys, Alice, Marion and Donna; and dear friends. Emma is survived by her sons, Kevin (Eileen) of Eagle and Darrell (Renelle) of Webster; grandchildren, Jennifer (Dustin) Hoyland, Aaron (Wendy) Sears, Bethany (Sebastian) McGean and Andrew (Jessica) Sears; great-grandchildren, Hannah, Hunter, Mallory and Connor; sister, Ethel; and many nieces, nephews and friends. Funeral services will be held at the Swedburg-Taylor Family Funeral Home in Webster on Saturday, May 28, at 11 a.m. with a visitation from 9:30-11 a.m. The luncheon will follow the funeral at the Webster Fire Hall. Emma will be interred at the Northern Wisconsin Veterans Cemetery in Spooner on Tuesday, May 31, at 9:30 a.m. Online condolences can be made at www.swedberg-taylor.com. The Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Home, Webster, was entrusted with arrangements.

Phillip H. Fisher

Phillip H. Fisher, 69, Grantsburg, died May 19, 2011. Phillip was born on Nov. 9, 1941, in Cincinnati, Ohio, to Horace and Yvonne Fisher. Phillip moved from the Twin Cities area to Grantsburg to be closer to his children. He enjoyed camping, fishing and hunting. Phillip was preceded in death by his father, Horace. He is survived by his children, Mike Fisher, Doug (Bonnie) Finava, Jenny (Melvin) Anderson; his grandchildren, Matt, Heather, Britany, Nate, Nicholas and Travis; his brother, Hank Kennedy; and his mother, Yvonne Kennedy. Private family services to be held. The Edling Funeral Home, Grantsburg, was entrusted with arrangements.

Anne Cook Riley

Anne Cook Riley, 56, Chisago County, Minn., died on May 18, 2011, after a courageous battle with cancer. Anne was born July 12, 1954, raised in St. Paul, Minn., and graduated from Macalester College. She worked in social work at the Haight Ashbury Clinic in San Francisco, Calif., Welcome Home Group Home, Brooklyn Center, Minn. and Ramsey County, Minn., and 19 years as a probation officer in Chisago County, Minn. Anne’s interests were wide and varied. She loved reading, cooking and gardening; her vegetables and flower beds were well known by many of the locals. Anne loved fishing and went on an annual fishing trip with her closest girlfriends. Anne and her husband traveled extensively and visited Mexico every year. She was preceded in death by parents, Kathleen and William Cook. She is survived by husband of 29 years, Brian Edward Riley; daughters, Kathryn Lynn and Jennifer Ann Riley and special daughter JennaRae Taber; sister, Julia (Brian) Coe; nieces, Jessica and Tess Riley and Elizabeth Coe; nephews, Robert, Adam and Hugh Riley and Jeffrey Coe; numerous friends. Visitation will be held Thursday, June 2, from 4 – 6 p.m. A brief memorial service will be at 6 p.m., followed by a light super at St. Croix Valley Funeral Home, 2012 U.S. Hwy. 8, St. Croix Falls. Memorials preferred to the American Cancer Society. The St. Croix Valley Funeral Home and Cremation, St. Croix Falls, was entrusted with arrangements.

Myrtle M. Larson

Myrtle M. Larson, 80, Luck, died Sunday, May 22, 2011, at her residence. She is survived by her sons, John (Terri) Larson, Daryl Larson, David (Jeanette) Harder, Aaron (Monica) Larson; grandchildren, Cody, Cassie, Ashley, Chad, Heather, Dean, Matt, Shane, Mike, Brett and Mitchell; seven greatgrandchildren; sisters, Dorothy (Ellery) Vollrath, Ardyce, Marian (Fred) Jorgensen. Memorial services will be held at the Rowe Funeral Home in Luck on Thursday, May 26, and visitation will begin at 10 a.m., followed by the service at 11 a.m. Burial will be at St. Peters Cemetery, North Luck immediately following the service. Refer to the Web sites for updated information or call Bruce Rowe at 715-472-2444. Rowe Funeral Home of Luck, www.rowefh.com, and the Northwest Wisconsin Cremation Center in Milltown, www.wicremationcenter.com, have been entrusted with funeral arrangements.

ROWE FUNERAL HOME AND CREMATION SERVICES Luck – Frederic

Cremation Society Of Northwest Wisconsin

www.rowefh.com Large Chapels, Lounges, Modern Facilities For Traditional And Memorial Services • Preplan & Customize: Caskets, Urns, Vaults or Services • Monument Sales

“Affordable Options For Every Family” Now Serving: Burnett, Polk, Washburn & Surrounding Counties (Crematory Located In Webster, Wis.)

715-349-7200 P.O. Box 408 • 7697 Johnson St. 536300 29a 40L Siren, WI 54872

Contact:

Bruce Rowe Or Ray Rowe Generations Of Trusted Service

715-327-4475 Or 715-472-2444

536863 40L

Corinne Barr


CHURCH NEWS

PAGE 60 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

Parents of recent grad not sure if he should move back home

Q: Our 22-year-old son is graduating from college this month. He doesn’t have a job lined up and has no idea what he’s going to do. My husband and I don’t know what our role is in this new stage of parenting. Do we let him live at home? Juli: Your question is a common one. Gone are the days when a college graduate was ready and willing to dive into all of the responsibilities of financial and personal independence. Due to the tough economy, among other factors, most 22year-olds find themselves in a delayed stage of adolescence. They want the freedom of adulthood, but feel paralyzed by the complexity and pressures that accompany independence. This puts parents, like you, in the awkward position of actively parenting an adult child. Your ultimate goal is to help your son launch into the full independence of adulthood. If you choose to let him live at home after graduation, don’t allow that time to be wasted. Set boundaries and requirements up front that will help him grow toward maturity and responsi-

Jim Daly

Focus on the Family

Juli Slattery

bility. It is reasonable to expect that he hold down a full-time job and/or pursue additional schooling or training. It may also be wise to set a departure date so that you do not enable him to avoid that next step of independence. Some parents charge their adult children rent for living at home. They put some of the money paid into a savings account that will be seed money for a deposit or down payment on a future living arrangement. Even more than a roof over his head, your son needs your wisdom and encouragement as he looks toward the future. Help him think long term about his goals for vocation, family and financial independence. As long as you see him making good decisions, actively moving toward these goals, your help is a good thing. ••• Q: I was laid off more than a year ago, and I still feel stunned. I don’t even know how to look for a job after being

steadily employed for six years. How do I get out of this rut? Jim: Being let go from a job is one of the toughest things a person can face. But consider this: Unemployment also represents a unique opportunity. When you’re gainfully employed, all of your time and energy goes into just keeping up. But when you lose your job, suddenly there’s time and energy to spare. Most people don’t know what to do with it. They become paralyzed with fear, worry and anger. That’s a natural reaction, but if it’s all they experience while they’re unemployed, something is missing. After a job loss, you’re motivated to see clearly and honestly, perhaps for the first time in years. Your assignment isn’t merely to search for financial security in a new job. It’s to rediscover who you are. Use this time to ask yourself some serious questions. “What gifts and talents do I possess that I didn’t have a chance to use in my former job? Are there educational opportunities I should explore? What am I learning about myself through this job loss that I didn’t know, or didn’t want to know, before? What do I really want to do with my life?” Once you’re employed again, this window will close. Life will once again be overwhelmed with work responsibilities and day-to-day cares. You won’t have

“downtime” like this again. As hard as it is to lose your job, it’s harder to find genuine opportunities to take stock of who you are and where you want to go. Many people wonder how they get stuck in ruts along the way. Perhaps your job loss is God’s way of helping you find a better path. ••• Jim Daly is president of Focus on the Family, host of the Focus on the Family radio program, and a husband and father of two. Dr. Juli Slattery is a licensed psychologist, cohost of Focus on the Family, author of several books, and a wife and mother of three. Submit your questions to: FocusOnTheFamily.com. Copyright 2010 Focus on the Family, Colorado Springs, CO 80995. International copyright secured. All rights reserved. Distributed by Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St. Kansas City, MO 64106; 816-581-7500. This feature may not be reproduced or distributed electronically, in print or otherwise, without written permission of Focus on the Family.

Brought to you by:

Luck and St. Peter’s Lutheran Churches

News from the Pews at Pilgrim Lutheran

FREDERIC – A special worship service was conducted on Sunday, May 22, honoring those members of Pilgrim that graduated from Frederic High School. Each graduate received a quilt to take with them on their special journey of life and the quilts were made by Rhoda Jensen, Betty Fenton, Jan Berg, Bryn Anderson, Rae Lynn Neumann and Karen Swanberg. After worship everyone gathered in the fellowship hall to meet and greet the graduates and to celebrate the big event with homemade cinnamon rolls, coffee and juice. On Wednesday evening, May 18, young and old alike gathered in the park at Coon Lake and had an old-fashioned family potluck picnic. There was food, fellow-

A service was conducted on Sunday, May 22, honoring those members of Pilgrim that graduated from Frederic High School. Pictured (L to R): Yasemin Ulusahin from Turkey, host family Glenn and Shari Matz; Krysta Laqua, daughter of Mike and Lori R.; Frankie Knuf, daughter of Scott; Jade Johnson, daughter of Terry and Tara Siebenthal and Larry and Jen Johnson; Allison Anderson, daughter of Dave and Pat, and Vanessa Neumann, daughter of Rae Lynn Johnson and Wally Neumann. – Photo submitted

ship and games for those that wanted to participate in them. A good time was had by all. Pilgrim invites everyone to join them for Sunday morning worship at 9 a.m., and the time change of summer worship hour begins Memorial Day Weekend, Sunday, May 29. For more information about the church or coming events, please call the church office at 714-327-8012 and leave a message and someone will call you back. You can also go to their Web site www.pilgrimlutheranfrederic.org or check out other activities on Facebook. submitted

Church listings sponsored by the following area businesses: BREMER BANK, N.A. Full-Service Banking Member FDIC Frederic - Danbury - Siren

DAEFFLER’S QUALITY MEATS, INC. Wholesale & Retail Meats Custom Butchering & Processing Phone 715-327-4456

INTER-COUNTY CO-OP PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION Printers & Publishers Office Supplies Frederic, Wis. - 715-327-4236 Shell Lake, Wis. - 715-468-2314 Siren, Wis. - 715-349-2560 St. Croix Falls, Wis. - 715-483-9008

STATE FARM INSURANCE COMPANIES Corey T. Arnold, Agent Frederic, Wis. Phone 715-327-8076

BEAN’S COUNTRY GRIDDLE Hwys. 35 & 48 Downtown Frederic Phone 715-327-5513

NORTHWESTERN WISCONSIN ELECTRIC CO. “Your Electric Servant” Serving Polk & Burnett Counties “Use Energy Wisely”

CARLSON-ROWE FUNERAL HOME Frederic, Wis. 715-327-4475 Duane Lindh

HAULING

WEBSTER

ALPHA

CASHCO BUILDING SUPPLIES

BASS LAKE LUMBER

OLSEN & SON

• Complete Line of Building Supplies & Lumber • Cabot’s Stains Grantsburg, Wis. 715-488-2471 or 715-327-8766

Your Full-Service Drugstore Siren, Wis. Phone 715-349-2221

BURNETT DAIRY CO-OP

10022 Elbow Lake Road Siren, Wis. 54872 715-689-2539

1988 World Champion Cheesemaker Earl Wilson, Cheese Plant Mgr. Clif Gipp, Ag. Supply Mgr. for Feed, Propane & Fertilizer Alpha, Wis. 715-689-2468 715-689-2467

CUSHING

Complete Lumber & Building Supplies Phone 715-866-4238 Hwy. 35 N. Webster, Wis. Tom & Becky O’Brien, Owners

HOPKINS SAND & GRAVEL, INC.

• Gravel • Sand • Rock • Top Soil • Trackhoe 715-472-2717 Mobile 715-491-1861 1065 290th Ave. Frederic, Wis.

Sand, Gravel, Ready-Mix, Concrete, Black Dirt, Dozer Work, Landscaping & Septic Tanks Installed

R&S TRUCKING

SWEDBERG-TAYLOR FUNERAL HOME

• Gravel • Sand • Rock • Topsoil • Track Hoe 715-554-0526 Frederic, Wis.

LUCK VAN METER’S MEATS Government Inspected Slaughtering and Processing, Sausage making • Ham & Bacon Cured & Smoked Sides and Quarters of Beef and Pork Available Old-fashioned Fresh Meat Counter Tim Van Meter and Ross Anderson, Owners Luck, WI 54853 Plant 715-472-2141

Hwy. 35 North Webster, Wis. Phone 715-866-4157 M.P.R.S. #03059

Webster, Wis. Phone 715-866-7131

BRUCE’S AUTO REPAIR & TOWING

SIREN D & L FINANCIAL SERVICES

CUSHING COOPERATIVE SOCIETY Feed Mill - Grain Dept. Cushing, Wis. 715-648-5215

WILD RIVER FLAGS Jerry & Pat Willits 2815 285th Ave. Sterling Township St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-488-2729

Wrecker - Flatbed Air Conditioning & Computerized Car Service - Cold Weather Starts Webster, Wis. 715-866-4100 Days 715-866-8364 Eves.

Any area business wishing to help sponsor the church listings should contact the Leader at 715-327-4236.

Churches 5/11

FREDERIC


CHURCH ChurchDIRECTORY Directory

MAY 25, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 61

ADVENTIST

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST - FREDERIC 609 Benson Road; Pastor Curtis Denney Sat. Worship 11 a.m.; Sabbath Schl. 9:30 a.m. ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE CHURCH OF THE VALLEY Senior Pastor Bob Morton 1259 Hwy. 35 S., St. Croix Falls Sunday Worship: 9 & 11 a.m.

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

WORD OF LIFE CHURCH

Meeting in homes. Elders: Cliff Bjork, Jon Zens, 715-483-1357 and 715-755-3048 Sun. Fellowship - 10 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. LUTHERAN

LUTHERAN

BALSAM LUTHERAN CHURCH 1115 Mains Crossing, 1/2 Mile South Hwy. 8 On 110th St.; Sun. Worship 9 a.m.; Sun. School 10:15 a.m. Wed. Bible Study 8:30 a.m.; Wed. LOGOS 3:20 p.m.

BEAUTIFUL SAVIOR LUTHERAN (WELS) Gene E. Jahnke, Pastor, 715-635-7672, Hm. 715-354-7787, Hwy. 70 at 53, Spooner Sun. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School & Bible Classes For All - 10:45 a.m.

BETHANY LUTHERAN - BRANSTAD Pastor Jay Ticknor, 715-463-5746 3 miles So. of Grantsburg on Hwy. 87 Sun. Schl. - 9:30 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

BETHANY LUTHERAN - SIREN Hwy. 35, 1/2 blk. N. Main St. Interim Pastor Keith Radiske Pastoral Serv. 715-349-5280 Sun. School 8:15 a.m.; Sun. Worship - 9:30 a.m.

BETHESDA LUTHERAN - DRESSER (LCMC) www.bethesdalutheran.ws Pastor Roger Kastelle, 715-755-2562 1947 110th Ave., Dresser Contemporary Serv. 8:30 a.m.; Adult Ed & Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Traditional Service 10:45 a.m.;

BONE LAKE LUTHERAN bllc@lakeland.ws Pastor Mary Ann Bowman, 5 mi. E. of Luck on Hwy. 48, 1/2 mi. S. on I; Office - 715-472-2535 Pastor - 715-472-8153, Adult Bible Study 8:30; Worship 9:30 a.m.; Fellowship 10:30 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

CHRIST LUTHERAN (LCMS) Pipe Lake CTH G & T, 715-822-3096 Pastor Steve Miller Sun. Serv. 10:45 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m. during schl. yr.; Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sun. www.christlutheranpipelake.com

CLAM FALLS LUTHERAN (AALC) Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt - 715-653-2630 www.clamfalls-zion-aalcparish.net Communion 1st Sun.; Wor. 9 a.m.; Sun. School 9 a.m.

FAITH LUTHERAN - BALSAM LAKE faithlutheran@lakeland.ws Pastor Diane Norstad 715-485-3800; CTH I & Mill Street Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:40 a.m.; Holy Communion 1st & last Sundays

FAITH LUTHERAN - GRANTSBURG Pastor Victor St. George, 715-463-5388 Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School 10:45 a.m.

FIRST EVAN. LUTHERAN 561 Chestnut St., Taylors Falls, MN 651-465-5265 Traditional Worship 8:30 a.m.; Education Hour 9:45 a.m.; Contemp. Wor. 11 a.m. Sun., May 29: One Worship Serv. 9 a.m.

FIRST LUTHERAN - CUSHING Pastor Dorothy Sandahl, 715-648-5323 or 715-648-5324 Sun. Wor. 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9 a.m.

FRISTAD LUTHERAN - CENTURIA ELCA - 501 Hwy. 35, 715-646-2357, Mel Rau, Pastor Sun. Wor. & Holy Communion - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:40 a.m.

GEORGETOWN LUTHERAN - ELCA Rt. 1, Balsam Lake, WI (Fox Creek) Pastor Neal Weltzen; GT Office - 715-857-5580, Parsonage - 715-822-3001, TR Office - 715-822-3001 Wors. Serv. 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m.; Holy Communion - 1st Sun. of each month

GRACE LUTHERAN - WEST SWEDEN Phone 715-327-4340, 715-327-8384, 715-327-8090 Interim Pastor Julie Brenden Worship 9:15 a.m.; Sun. School 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st & 2nd Sundays

IMMANUEL LUTHERAN - FREDERIC (Missouri Synod) Pastor Jody R. Walter, 715-327-8608 Sun. Schl. - 8:45 a.m.; Service - 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st, 3rd & 5th Sun.

LAKESIDE COMMUNITY LUTH. - ELCA CTH H, 1/2 mi. N. of CTH A & H on H Church Off. 715-635-7791 Roger Pittman, Pastor Worship Serv. 10 a.m.; Sun. School. 9 a.m.

LAKETOWN LUTHERAN - CUSHING Pastor Dorothy Sandahl Sun. Wor. 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:30 a.m.

LUCK LUTHERAN 510 Foster Ave. E. Office 715-472-2605; Home 715-472-8424 Sun. Wor. Serv. 10:30 a.m.; Mon. Wor. Serv. 6:30 p.m.

MILLTOWN LUTHERAN

113 W. Main St.. W., Phone 715-825-2453 Pastor Danny G. Wheeler 9:15 a.m. Worship ; 10 a.m. Sunday School

NEW HOPE LUTHERAN CHURCH Pastor Emory Johnson, 715-463-5700 685 W. State Road 70, Grantsburg Sun. Wor. Serv. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m.

NORTH VALLEY LUTHERAN

METHODIST

METHODIST

ATLAS UNITED METHODIST

Pastor Carolyn Saunders, 715-463-2624 Sunday School - 11 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

ST. FRANCIS XAVIER

LIVING HOPE CHURCH

Pastor Father Daniel Bodin, 651-465-7345 25293 Redwing Ave., Shafer, MN Sunday 9 a.m.

Pastor Doug McConnell Youth Pastor Chris Radtke At Grantsburg High School, 715-463-5794 Sun. Serv. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m.

ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST

Pastor Carolyn Saunders, 715-463-2624 Worship - 9 a.m.; Sunday School - 10:30 a.m.

Pastor Father Michael J. Tupa, 715-866-7321 Cedar & Muskey Ave. - Webster Mass Sun 10 a.m., Wed. 5:30 p.m. (Sept-May), Fri. 9 a.m. (Summer)

DANBURY UNITED METHODIST

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC

CENTRAL UNITED METHODIST GRANTSBURG

Pastor Maggie Isaacson, 715-825-3559 3 mi. W. of Milltown on “G” Sunday Worship - 9:15 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

Cindy Glocke, Pastor, 715-866-8646 Sunday Worship - 9 a.m.

OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN, (LCMS) WEBSTER

Cindy Glocke, Pastor, 715-866-8646 Sunday Worship - 10:30 a.m.

1050 North Keller Ave., Amery 715-268-7717 Father John Drummy, Pastor Sat. Mass 4 p.m., Sun. Mass 8 a.m. Mass Wed. & Thurs. 9 a.m.

Pastor Gerald Heinecke Church Phone 715-866-7191 Sun. Schl. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Wor. - 10:30 a.m. Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

HOLY TRINITY UNITED METHODIST

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC

Holytrinity@wisconsinumc.org 1606 165th Ave., CTH I, Centuria Pastor Freddie Kirk, 715-485-3363 Pastor Tammy Clausen Sunday Worship - 8:30 a.m.

Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-294-2243 255 E. 10th Ave., Osceola Masses: Sun. 10:30 a.m., Tues. 5 p.m. Thurs. at 10 a.m. at Osc. Nursing Home

PEACE LUTHERAN - DRESSER (ELCA) 2355 Clark Road, Dresser, WI, 715-755-2515 Web site: plcdresser.org Pastor Wayne Deloach, Intern Courtney Young Sun. Wor. 8:30 & 11 a.m., Sun. Schl. 9:35 a.m.

GRACE UNITED - WEBSTER

LAKEVIEW UNITED - HERTEL

ASSEMBLY

Pastor Jack Starr Wor. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - during worship hour

ASSEMBLY

PILGRIM LUTHERAN - FREDERIC (ELCA)

LEWIS MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST

Interim Pastor Andrew Hinwood 507 Wisconsin Ave. N., 715-327-8012 Sun. Parents & Toddlers 9:15 a.m.; Sun. Worship - 9 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 2nd Sundays www.pilgrimlutheranfrederic.org

Tom Cook, Pastor Worship 8:45 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 10 a.m.

Pastor Don Wiltshire, 715-640-6400 Centuria - Phone 715-646-2172 Sunday Service: 10 a.m.

REDEEMER EV. LUTHERAN

OSCEOLA UNITED METHODIST

(Wisconsin Synod) Pastor Gene DeVries 200 N. Adams St., St. Croix Falls Sun. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 8:30 a.m.

McKINLEY UNITED METHODIST Pastor Annie Tricker Sun. Worship 11 a.m.; Sun. School 11 a.m. Potluck dinner 1st Sunday

CENTURIA ASSEMBLY OF GOD

SIREN ASSEMBLY OF GOD

EVANGELICAL

1614 CTH B, North Luck, Pastor Rob Lubben Sunday Worship - 9 a.m. Contact Leslie Valentine, 715-646-2390; E-mail: leslie56@centurytel.net

Rev. Mike Weaver Sunday Worship Service - 10 a.m. Sunday School is at 9 a.m., Nursery available

APPLE RIVER COMMUNITY (EFCA)

SHEPHERD OF THE VALLEY LUTHERAN

Pastor Arveda “Freddie” Kirk, 715-327-4436 Pastor Tammy Clausen Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.

10 mi. W. of Cumberland on Hwy. 48 (McKinley) - Pastor Neal Weltzin GT Office 715-857-5580, Parsonage 715-822-3001, TR Office - 715-822-3001 Wor. Serv. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:15 a.m. Holy Communion - 1st Sunday

TRINITY LUTHERAN LCMS, DANBURY Pastor Gerald Heinecke Home 715-327-8608; Church 715-866-7191 Sunday Worship Service - 8 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

TRINITY LUTHERAN - FALUN

Rev. Rexford D. Brandt 447 180th St., Osceola, 715-294-2936 Sunday Worship 9 a.m. Communion 1st & 3rd Sunday of the month

YELLOW LAKE LUTHERAN

WOLF CREEK UNITED METHODIST Rev. Mike Weaver Sunday Worship - 8:15 a.m. COVENANT

COVENANT

CALVARY COVENANT - ALPHA

Pastor Dave Guertin 7686 Lofty Pines Drive, Siren, 715-349-5601 Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m.

UNITED COVENANT - CLEAR LAKE Pastor Gary Tonn Sunday School 9:00 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. CATHOLIC

CATHOLIC

ASSUMPTION OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-247-3310 255 St. Hwy. 35, East Farmington Mass Friday 9 a.m.; Sacrament of Penance Sat. 3:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF ST. JOSEPH

Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt - 715-653-2630 5 mi. E. of Frederic on W, 2 mi. south on I; www.clamfalls-zion-aalcparish.net Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st Sunday

Danbury - 7586 St. Rd. 77, 715-866-7321 Pastor - Father Michael J. Tupa Mass - Sat. 4 p.m., Fri. 9 a.m. (Sept.-May). Reconciliation as per bulletin & by appt.

ZION LUTHERAN - EAST FARMINGTON (WELS ) Pastor Martin Weigand - 715-294-3489 Sun. Schl. 9 a.m.; Adult Bible Class 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m.

Balsam Lake - Rev. John A. Drummy, Pastor - 405-2253 Mass: Sat. eves. 6 p.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m.; Tues. 5:30 p.m.; Fri. 9 a.m.Sacrament of Reconciliation 7:30 a.m. Sun. or by appt.

ZION LUTHERAN - MARKVILLE

SACRED HEARTS OF JESUS & MARY

PRESBYTERIAN

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN

Rev. Bruce Brooks - 715-483-3550 719 Nevada St. , (between Simonson & Tower Roads) , St. Croix Falls Worship - 10 a.m. (Nursery provided) Sun. Schl. - Child.- 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - Adults 8:45 a.m.; Communion 1st Sunday

231 Bluff Drive, 715-247-2435 Services are Sundays at 10:30 a.m. CHRISTIAN CENTER

EVANGELICAL

Pastor Bruce Tanner, 715-268-2176 942 U.S. Hwy. 8, Amery Sun. Schl. 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible study 7 p.m.

CROSSWALK COMMUNITY CHURCH

HOPE FELLOWSHIP OF SOMERSET

CHRISTIAN CENTER

EL SALEM/TWIN FALLS CHRISTIAN CENTER

1751 100th Ave., Dresser Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship 10:30 a.m. Evening Services Sun. 6 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. Call Pastor Darryl Olson at 715-755-3133 for information and directions

523 1st St., Clayton, 715-948-2493 Fr. Christopher Wojcik, Pastor Saturday Vespers - 5 p.m.; Sunday Liturgy - 9:30 a.m.

OUR LADY OF PERPETUAL HELP

PRESBYTERIAN

Pastor Andrew Bollant Sun. Schl. - 9:15 a.m.; Morn. Serv. - 10:15 a.m.; Supervised Nursery; Wed. Evening - Worship Serv. 6:30 p.m.

HOLY TRINITY ORTHODOX

ZION LUTHERAN - BONE LAKE (AALC)

Interim Pastor Julie Brenden 715-327-8384, 715-327-8090 Fellowship - 10:30 a.m., Sun. Schl. 9:45 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m., Communion - 1st & 2nd Sundays

Pastor Dan Slaikeu 4 mi. SE of Grantsburg on Williams Rd. Worship 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:30 a.m.

Pastor Dale VanDeusen, 715-488-2296 or 715-488-2653 20296 Hwy. 87, Grantsburg Morning Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:45 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services

Pastor - Father Daniel Bodin 490 Bench St., Taylors Falls, 651-465-7345 Sat. Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Sun. 7:30 & 10:30 a.m. Tues. - Thurs. 7:30 a.m.

ZION LUTHERAN - TRADE LAKE

FULL GOSPEL

TRADE RIVER EVAN. FREE

290 W. Government Street, 715-294-4436 Reverend Dr. Rolland Robinson Sunday Service - 10 a.m. with nursery Sunday School - Sept. - May at 10 a.m.

1/2 mi. W. of Hwy. 35 on U, 715-866-8281, Pastors Douglas Olson, Roger Kampstra and Myron Carlson Services begin at 9:30 a.m.; Communion 1st & 3rd Sunday

Pastor Tim Faust Worship - 11 a.m.; Sun. School - 10 a.m. Holy Communion - 1st & 3rd Sunday

Dairyland - Rev. Andrea Wittwer 715-244-3649 Sunday School - 10 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

TAYLORS FALLS UNITED METHODIST

SIREN COVENANT

WEST IMMANUEL LUTHERAN - ELCA

WOODLAND WESLEYAN

CHRISTIAN ORTHODOX

TRINITY EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN OSCEOLA

Pastors Mike & Linda Rozumalski 1 mi. west of Luck on N, 2478 170th St., Luck Sunday Wor. 10 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 9 a.m. Fellowship 11 a.m.

WESLEYAN

Tom Cook, Pastor Sunday School 9 a.m. Worship - 10:15 a.m. (Nursery available)

Pastor Scott Sagle, 715-689-2541 Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Worship 10:30 p.m.; Elevator provided, welcome

WEST DENMARK LUTHERAN

WESLEYAN

Pastor Greg Lund, 715-327-8767 700 Churchwood Lane; 505 Old CTH W, Frederic Sun. Schl. - 9 a.m.; Morn. Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services Sat. Worship - 6 p.m., Luck Senior Center

SIREN UNITED METHODIST

Hwy. 70 East, 715-689-2271, Pastor: Carl Heidel Worship 9 a.m.; Sunday School 10:15 a.m. Communion -Every Sunday

300 Seminole Ave. (CTH M) Mark Kock, Pastor, 715-294-2828 Sunday Worship 8 a.m. & 10:30 a.m.; Summer, 9 a.m.

Minister Garret Derouin, 715-866-7157 Musky & Birch St., Avail. in office 9 a.m. - noon, Tues.-Fri.; Sun. Bible Study 9:30 a.m. Worship 10:30 a.m.

WOOD RIVER CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP

ST. CROIX FALLS UNITED METHODIST

TRINITY LUTHERAN - ELCA

CHURCH OF CHRIST - WEBSTER

FULL GOSPEL

ST. PETER’S LUTHERAN - LCMC

(Missouri Synod) 140 Madison St. South, St. Croix Falls Pastor Mark K. Schoen Sun. Service - 9 a.m.; Sun.School - 10:30 a.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST

Pastor Larry Mederich, 715-294-4332 www.occconnect.org Mtg. @ St. Croix Art Barn; Sun. Serv. - 9 a.m. Nursery and children church

350 Michigan Ave., Centuria Sun. Worship - 10:45 a.m.; Sun. School - 10 a.m.

ST. LUKE UNITED - FREDERIC

Pastor Andy McDaniel, 715-327-8402 Sun. Schl. - 9:15 a.m.; Wor. Serv. - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided.; www.tradelakebaptistchurch.org

OSCEOLA COMMUNITY CHURCH

oumc@centurytel.net 306 River Street, Osceola, 715-755-2275 Pastor Mark Gilbert Adult Class - 8:30 a.m.; Sunday School 10 a.m. Sunday Worship - 10 a.m.; Holy Communion 1st Sunday

ST. JOHN’S EV. LUTHERAN (Wis. Synod)

TRADE LAKE BAPTIST

OUR LADY OF THE LAKES

Pastor Father Michael J. Tupa CTHs A & H - 715-866-7321 Crescent Lake Voyager Village area. Mass Sun. 8 a.m., Thurs. 9:30 a.m. Reconciliation as per bulletin and by appt.

ST. DOMINIC - FREDERIC & IMMACULATE CONCEPTION - GRANTSBURG CATHOLIC MASS SCHEDULE Pastor: Rev. Dennis M. Mullen, 715-327-8119 St. Dominic: Sat. 4:30 p.m.; Sun. 10:30 a.m. Immaculate Conception: Sat. 6:30 p.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m. Call the office for daily & holy day Mass times

ST. ANNE PARISH Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-247-3310 139 Church Hill Rd., Somerset Mass Sun. 8:30 a.m.; Wed. 9 a.m. Sacrament of Penance Sun. 8 a.m.

BAPTIST

BAPTIST

EAST BALSAM BAPTIST - BALSAM LK. 715-857-5411 Worship Service - 9 a.m.; Sunday School-10:15 a.m.

EUREKA BAPTIST 2393 210th Ave., St. Croix Falls Pastor Willis Christenson, 715-483-9464 Sunday School - 10 a.m.; Worship Service - 11 a.m.

FAITH FELLOWSHIP Hwy. 35 and CTH N., Luck Bill McEachern Pastor, 715-485-3973 Sun. Bible study - 9 a.m.; Sun. Wor. - 10 a.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - AMERY 131 Broadway St., 715-268-2223; www.fbcamery.org; E-mail: churchoffice@fbcamery.org Pastor Charlie Butt, Lead Pastor; Nick Buda, Assoc. Pastor of Family Ministries Sunday Service: 9 a.m.; All ages Sunday School 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. Nursery available

FIRST BAPTIST - FALUN Pastor Kevin Miller Associate Pastor Steve Ward Sunday School - (all ages) - 9:30 a.m. Church Serv. - 10:45 a.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - MILLTOWN Pastor Marlon Mielke, 715-825-3186 Sunday Schl. 9:45 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m., 7 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - TAYLORS FALLS, MN Located across from elemen. school on West St., Pastor, Dr. Kevin Schumann; 651-465-7171 Sun. Morn. - Sun. School for all ages - 9 a.m. Morn. Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided.

FIRST BAPTIST - WEBSTER Church Phone 715-866-4111; Interim Pastor Ken Hyatt; Youth Pastor Jerry Scheumann Sun. School - 9:30 a.m.; Wor. - 10:45 a.m (Nursery Provided)

GRACE CHURCH OF OSCEOLA “The Cure for the Common Church”

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN

HOLY CROSS ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN Meeting at Zion Lutheran Church, 28005 Old Towne Rd., Chisago Lakes, MN hcomm.org Sunday Worship Service 9:30 a.m. NAZARENE

NAZARENE

CALVARY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 510 S. Vincent, St. Croix Falls Pastor Tom Reaume, 715-483-3696 Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:45 a.m. & Wed. 6:30 p.m.

FAITH COMMUNITY 7535 Peet St., Danbury, 715-656-4010 Adult Bible Service 9 a.m.; Services: Sun. 10 a.m.; Sunday School during church service.

NONDENOMINATIONAL

NONDENOMINATIONAL

CENTERPOINT CHURCH “Come as you are”

Pastor Dick Enerson, www.centerpointstcroix.com, 715-294-1833, Meeting at SCF High Schl. - Main entrance 740 Maple Drive, St. Croix Falls Sunday Worship 10 - 11:15 a.m.

CROSSROADS CHRISTIAN 28313 CTH H, A&H Pastor Tryg Wistad, 715-635-9222 Sunday Worship: 10 a.m.

NEW LIFE COMMUNITY - AMERY Interim Pastor Craig Jorgenson Sunday Worship 10 a.m.; Children’s Church: K to 6th Grade

NEW LIFE CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY Meets at Dresser Elem. School, Dresser Pastor Tony Minell, 715-417-1982 Sun. Wor. 9:45 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:45 a.m.

NEW WINE CHURCH - CENTURIA 309 5th Street, , 715-338-2751 Pastors Randy and Pam Stone Sunday 10 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m.

NORTHERN PINES FRIENDS WOR. GROUP 715-733-0481 or 715-733-0480 for time of meeting.

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

722 Seminole Ave., Osceola Pastor Dr. Kent Haralson; 715-294-4222 or 715-755-3454; info@gracechurchosceola.com Sun.: Praise & Worship Serv. 9 am., Adult Bible Study 10:45 a.m., Children’s Sun. School 10:45 a.m.

1289 160th St. (Hwy. 65), St. Croix Falls, 715-483-5378 Senior Pastors Paul and Sonja Hanson Sunday Adult Bible Class 9 a.m. Worship and Children’s Sunday Schl. 10 a.m.

GRACE BAPTIST - GRANTSBURG

ST. PETER’S COMMUNITY CHURCH

716 S. Robert St., Grantsburg, 715-463-5699 Sr. Pastor Brad Moore David Ahlquist, Assoc. Pastor Sun. Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School 11 a.m.

“Faith on Purpose” (Love God, Love People...period) faithonpurpose.org CTH F, Dresser, 715-483-2911 Pastor’s res./office Sunday Worship 10 a.m.

RIVER VALLEY CHRISTIAN

church directory

ADVENTIST


PAGE 62 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 25, 2011

FullCenter Time. • $7,500/mo. Family Resource St.TrainCroix ing provided. Valley, 715-684-4440, www.frcscv.org. www.KTPGlobal.com or call • Farm Crisis, information, 800-9421-888-304-2847. (CNOW) 2472. • Gam-Anon, 715-268-6829, Joan. MISCELLANEOUS • Place Gamblersa Anonymous, Amery - 71525 word classified 268-6829, Mark;180 Cameron - 715-234ad in over newspapers 3301. in Wisconsin for only $300. calling • Find MOPSout formore momsbyand their 800pre227-7636 or this newspaper. schoolers, www.mops.org, 715-554(CNOW) www.cnaads.com 1220, • Multiple Sclerosis support group, Amery area, 715-268-9126 or 715-28SUPPORT GROUPS AND RESOURCES 2361. Family Resource Center St. Croix • Parent-to-Parent Coalition, parents of children with disabilities or speValley, 715-684-4440, www.frcscv.org. cial needs, 715-472-2002. Farm Crisis, information, 800-942• Pregnant? Free help. Osceola Life 2472. Care Center, 715-755-2229. Gam-Anon, 715-268-6829, Joan. Gamblers Anonymous, Amery - 715- • Student Assistance Program, Amery School District, personal or family prob268-6829, Mark; Cameron - 715-234lems, 715-268-0303, 715-268-0214. 3301. • TEEN CARE help line, 800-491-8336 MOPS for moms and their preor 715-235-8882. schoolers, www.mops.org, 715-554• Basic Education for Adults, job cen1220, ter, Balsam Lake, 715-485-3115. Multiple Sclerosis support group, Amery area, 715-268-9126 or 715-282361. Parent-to-Parent Coalition, parents of children with disabilities or special needs, 715-472-2002. Pregnant? Free help. Osceola Life Care Center, 715-755-2229. Student Assistance Program, Amery School District, personal or family problems, 715-268-0303, 715-268-0214. TEENCARE help line, 800-491-8336 or 715-235-8882. Basic Education for Adults, job center, Balsam Lake, 715-485-3115.

SAWMILLS Band/Chainsaw - SPRING SALE - Cut lumber any dimension, anytime. MAKE MONEY and SAVE MONEY In stock ready to ship. Starting at $995.00. www.NorwoodSawmills.com/ 300N 1-800-5781363Ext.300N (CNOW)

SUPPORT GROUPS AND RESOURCES

• • • • • • • • • • •

WANT ADS

WE HAVE PARTS for tractors, combines, machinery, hay equipment and more. Used, new, rebuilt, aftermarket. Downing Tractor Parts, Downing, Wis., www. asapagparts.com 877-5301010. 32Ltfc

Sammie Jo Schallenberger

OPEN HOUSE Sat., May 28

Hours: Tues., Thurs., Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Phone (715) 472-2121 Eye health exams, glaucoma checks, foreign body removal, full line of street wear, safety and sport wear, contact lenses

Dr. T.L. Christopherson

1 - 4 p.m. 986 250th Ave. Luck, WI 54853

OPTOMETRIST 119 Arlington Drive Amery, Wis.

Phone 715-268-2004 Daily: 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home Webster, Wisconsin

“Distinctive Funeral Service”

Box 313 Luck, Wis. 54853 Phone

715-472-2502

NEW YORK LIFE

Sat., May 28 12:30 p.m.

Building West Side Of LTHE $4.00 Early Bird $5.00 Bingo Pack

SHOW TIMES FOR THURS., MAY 26 THRU THURS., JUNE 2

THE HANGOVER PART II

536160 39-40Lp

Rated R, 102 Minutes. Thurs.: 4:15, 7:15 & 9:15 p.m. Fri.-Mon.: 1:15, 3:15, 5:15, 7:15 & 9:15 p.m. Tues.-Thurs.: 4:15, 7:15 & 9:15 p.m. Rated R policy - Photo ID required and children under 6 not allowed.

KUNG FU PANDA 2

Rated PG, 90 Minutes. Thurs.: 5:00, 7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Fri.-Mon.: 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Tues.-Thurs.: 5:00, 7:00 & 9:00 p.m.

AUSTIN LAKE GREENHOUSE & FLOWER SHOP

PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES Rated PG-13, 137 Minutes. Thurs.: 5:30 & 8:15 p.m. Fri.-Mon.: 1:00, 3:30, 6:00 & 8:40 p.m. Tues.-Thurs.: 5:30 & 8:15 p.m.

SOUL SURFER

Rated PG, 106 Minutes. Thurs.: 5:00 p.m.; Fri.-Mon.: 1:00 & 6:00 p.m. Tues.-Thurs.: 5:00 p.m.

FAST FIVE Rated PG-13, 130 Minutes. Thurs.: 7:10 p.m. Fri.-Mon.: 3:00 & 8:00 p.m. Tues.-Thurs.: 7:10 p.m.

Hwy. 35 & “FF,” Webster Flowers Phoned Anywhere

Robert L. Nelson New York Life Insurance Company

537381 40Lp

24226 1st Ave. No. Siren, WI Local Movie Line 715-349-8888 Timbers1@starwire.net

• WEDDING BOUQUETS • FUNERAL DESIGNS • CUT FLOWERS • GIFTS • BALLOONS • BEDDING PLANTS • POTTED PLANTS • TUXEDO RENTAL BY SAVVI • ANTLER KING PRODUCTS

304 1st St. So., Luck, Wis.

2 - 8 p.m.

1665 300th Ave. Frederic, WI 54837

AT THE LODGE

Stay connected to your community.

Family Eye Clinic

Sat., May 28

HERTEL BINGO

GRADUATION PARTY

www.the-leader.net

Dr. Daniel C. Satterlund

at her home 3572 115th Street • Frederic, WI

Chase Dodds

537134 29a,b 40L

SUPPORT ATTN: COMPUTER WORK. GROUPS AND Work from anywhere 24/7. RESOURCES Up to $1,500 Part Time to

DONATE VEHICLE Receive $1000 GROCERY COUPON. NOAH’S ARC Support NO KILL Shelters, Research To Advance Veterinary Treatments. Free Towing, TAX DEDUCTIBLE, Non-Runners Accepted 1-866-912-GIVE. (CNOW)

Saturday, May 28, 2 - 6 p.m.

for

Call 715-866-7261

All shows and show times before 6 p.m. $5.00. Shows and show times subject to change. Visit us on our Web site: www.timberstheatres.com Find us on Facebook

“Like us on Facebook for upcoming deals.”

537032 29a,b 40L

HELP WANTED MISCELLANEOUS

AUTOMOBILE DONATION

Tanesha Carlson

Graduation Open House

Let’s Thrive.®

Cris A. Moore, FICF, FIC Senior Financial Consultant

Joel L. Morgan, FIC Assistant Financial Associate

Matt P. Bobick Financial Associate 201 Main St. S. • Luck, WI 54853

715-472-8107 office 800-500-2936 toll-free 22854A N1-07

200700115

• Commercial Printing • Office Supplies • Daily UPS Pickup • Fax & Copy Service See us for all your printing needs.

INTER-COUNTY COOPERATIVE PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION • Frederic, 715-327-4236 • Shell Lake, 715-468-2314 • Siren, 715-349-2560 • St. Croix Falls 715-483-9008

Visit The Leader’s Web Site: www.the-leader.net

4/11

536753 39-40rp,Lp 29-30a-ep

FOR SALE MISCELLANEOUS

Morris Grain Company offers the lowest wholesale AG Chemical prices around! Great shipping rates to your door! Call 1-800-872-2501 or w w w. m o r r i s g r a i n . c o m (CNOW)

for

537343 40L 30a

Never used 3 bedroom singlewides for only $28,900 built in 2005 prior to the State requirements. foundation Perfect cottages and farm hand homes. Several to choose from at Town & Country Housing Bus Hwy 53 between Eau Claire & Chippewa Falls (715) 8341279 (CNOW)

AGRICULTURAL/ FARMINGSERVICES

GRADUATION OPEN HOUSE 537416 40Lp

MANUFACTURED HOMES

Driver- ARRIVING NOW 2012 Volvos and Internationals. Plenty of miles! LOCAL Orientation. DAILY or WEEKLY Pay! CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. 800-414-9569. www.driveknight.com (

537418 40Lp

HELP WANTED TRUCK DRIVER


Students of the Week GRANTSBURG

FREDERIC

Shelbi Root has been chosen Frederic Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in fifth grade. Shelbi excels in school and is very helpful to her teachers, including extra time working in the library. She loves to eat pizza, and her favorite subjects in school are social studies and science. In her free time, Shelbi enjoys hanging out with friends. She also plays softball and basketball. Shelbi wants to be a doctor or vet after she graduates.

Kendra Erickson has been chosen Frederic Middle School’s student of the week. She is in seventh grade and the daughter of Rex and Heidi Erickson. Kendra is a hard worker, is polite and respectful and has a pleasant personality. She is involved in Girl Scouts, church group, basketball, soccer and track. Kendra enjoys cooking, reading and hanging out with friends. In the future she plans to go to a culinary institute in Minnesota.

Tony Evans has been chosen Frederic High School’s student of the week. He is a junior and the son of Julie and Robert Evans. Tony is a very hard worker, will always do what is asked of him and is a very giving person. He is involved in FFA, choir, football, track and wrestling. Tony enjoys helping is sister, fishing and hanging with friends. He plans on going to school for construction or mechanic. The greatest influence in his life is his uncle, Roger.

Noah Kapp has been chosen Grantsburg Elementary School’s student of the week. He is in first grade and the son of Scott and Christine Kapp. Noah is an independent worker who follows directions and does his best. He loves to go outside and play with his friends and enjoys gym class. Noah has a twin brother, Cashton. He enjoys going on vacations with his family and visiting the Mall of America where he likes the SpongeBob ride.

LUCK

Preston Lane has been chosen Luck Elementary School’s student of the week. He is in sixth grade and the son of Tammy Eley and Isaac Lane. Preston is willing to help out with anything and is well-respected by his peers. Preston is involved in Peacemakers, safety patrol, basketball, football and track. In Preston’s spare time he enjoys playing basketball, PlayStation and talking on his phone.

Jaxon Jones has been chosen Grantsburg Middle School’s student of the week. He is in fifth grade and the son of Brad and Sherri Jones. Jaxon always has a good attitude in school and is always striving to do his best. He is a solid student who always works hard at everything he does. Jaxon’s favorite class is social studies. He enjoys baseball, band, reading and church.

Rebekah Curtin has been chosen Grantsburg High School’s student of the week. She is a junior and the daughter of Tim and Penny Curtin. Rebekah’s hardworking, dedicated and helpful. She is involved in band, choir, jazz band, brass band, youth group and school plays. Rebekah enjoys music and drama. She plans to major in nursing and then use that education in the mission field. Her mom is the greatest influence in her life.

ST. CROIX FALLS

Jordan Hendrickson has been chosen Luck Middle School���s student of the week. He is in eighth grade and the son of Wayne and Marney Hendrickson. Jordan is friendly and gets along with his classmates. He is in Boy Scouts, soccer, track and field and helps with drama productions. Jordan enjoys making artwork, playing piano, golfing and movies.

Michael Jenssen has been chosen Luck High School’s student of the week. He is a junior and the son of Steve and Lucie Jenssen. Michael is a good student who is well-organized, cooperative and courteous. He has a positive attitude and usually has a smile on his face. Michael is involved in NHS, FCCLA, drama club, forensics, band, quiz bowl and 4-H. He enjoys reading, listening to music and watching movies.

Ella Berens has been chosen St. Croix Falls Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in fourth grade. Ella likes to play baseball and catch. Her favorite subjects are art and reading. Ella loves going to the library. When she grows up she would like to be a zoologist because she loves learning about animals. Ella has a twin brother and one younger brother.

Louis Sellman has been chosen St. Croix Falls Middle School’s student of the week. He is in eighth grade and the son of Chris Sellman and Steve Sellman. Louis is involved in baseball and soccer and enjoys playing guitar, riding dirt bike, hanging out with friends and working at Subway. His favorite subject is math. Louis is great to have in class. He really likes to think deeply about his math.

Jessica Berganini has been chosen St. Croix Falls High School’s student of the week. She is a junior and the daughter of Steve Berganini. Jessica has a sister, Nicole. She loves to read, write, swim, sing, shop and hang out with friends. Jessica is a member of the concert choir.

WEBSTER

Congratulations students for a job well done!

Abagail Elkins has been chosen Webster Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in the Tiny Tiger 4K program. Abagail enjoys playing outside with her friends at school, and at home she likes to draw pictures for her mom. Her favorite color is blue. When Abagail grows up she wants to take care of animals.

Mary Wilson has been chosen Webster Middle School’s student of the week. She is in eighth grade and the daughter of Jerome and Bonnie Wilson. Mary is a great student academically. She is always prepared for class and ready to learn. Mary has a reputation as someone who can be trusted and every so often brings goodies to class. After moving here this year, she has fit in just fine. Mary enjoys volleyball and music.

UNITY

Ashley Irvine has been chosen Webster High School’s student of the week. She is a junior and the daughter of Ricky Daniels and Nicole Irvine. Ashley is very motivated to do well inside the classroom as well as in extracurricular activities. She has a great attitude, strong character and a competitive mentality. Ashley gets along well with others and always puts forth her best effort. She is involved in track and basketball and enjoys running and listening to music.

Proudly Supporting Our Students Stop In or Call Us Today

Electricity • Propane 1-800-421-0283 www.polkburnett.com

Supporting our area students and their accomplishments. INTER-COUNTY

Serving Northwest Wisconsin

2547 State Road 35, Luck, Wis. (in the Evergreen Plaza) 715-472-4088

www.sterlingbank.ws

If You Would Like To Be A Sponsor Of

STUDENT OF THE WEEK Please Call 715-327-4236

Sophie Reed has been chosen Unity Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in third grade and the daughter of Nicole and Jeff Reed. Sophie is an amazing student who is an exemplary role model, incredibly hardworking, always cheerful and friendly and respectful to peers and staff. This lovely girl makes teaching a true joy.

Tanner Amrhien has been chosen Unity Middle School’s student of the week. He is in eighth grade and the son of Julia and John Amrhien. Tanner works hard and has a positive attitude. He is polite and has a smile on his face. Tanner is punctual and is willing to help out.

Jacob Johnson has been chosen Unity High School’s student of the week. He is a senior and the son of Nancy Anderson and Mike Johnson. Jacob loves to be involved in sports, especially football and wrestling. He enjoys hunting, fishing and being outdoors. Jacob is active in FFA and Skills USA. His favorite subject is agriculture. Jacob always adds to the discussion in class. He plans to attend WITC to become a diesel technician.


Coming events

MAY

THURS. & FRI./26 & 27

Webster

THURSDAY/26

JUNE

WEDNESDAY/1

Amery

• Lyme disease education and support at Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 7 p.m., 715-268-2856, 715-268-2035.

Amery

• Early-stage Alzheimer’s support group at the senior center, 10 a.m., 715-268-6605.

Luck • Bill Schramer to speak on Civil War history at the library, 7 p.m.

Frederic • Blood pressure screening at Bremer Bank, 9 a.m.1 p.m.

Siren • Ruby’s Pantry at 24534 Hwy. 35/70. Open 1:30 p.m. Distribution 2 p.m.

FRI. & SAT./27 & 28

St. Croix Falls • Bloodmobile at American Legion Post 143, noon-6 p.m., 715-485-3025.

THURS.-SAT./2-4

Danbury

Siren

FRI.-SUN./27-29 Cushing

• Dugout fast-pitch tournament, 715-648-5275.

Voyager Village • Auditions for “Don’t Mention My Name” for Village Players. Fri. 4-8 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.-noon, Sun. 1-4 p.m., 715566-0626.

FRI.-MON./27-30 Dresser

• Off-Road Rally at Trollhaugen. Truck pull Fri. 6:30 p.m., mud racing Sat. 4 p.m., rock crawl Sun. 5 p.m., 651-2808282, www.memorial4x4.org.

Luck • Garden and art sale at Cafe Wren. Fri. & Sat. 9 a.m.5 p.m.; Sun. & Mon. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., www.cafewren.com.

FRIDAY/27 Balsam Lake

• High school graduation at Unity School, 7 p.m.

St. Croix Falls

SAT. & SUN./28 & 29

• High school graduation, 7 p.m.

Taylors Falls, MN

These barred owl babies hatched just over two weeks ago. This photo was obtained by a camera on a tripod, duct taped to a pole near the nest box. These babies will be branching in a couple of weeks. - Photo by Sue Herwig Folle Avoine Historical Park, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. • Support the Troops Ride & Fundraiser at Cozy Corner Inn, 715-244-3041, 715-244-4030.

SATURDAY/28 A&H

• Ladies spring luncheon at Lakeside Community Lutheran Church, noon, 715-866-7547.

Balsam Lake • Program to honor Civil War veterans at the historical society, 11:30 a.m.

Frederic • Soo Line Depot/Museum opens. Sat., Sun. & holidays 11 a.m.-4 p.m., 715-327-4271.

Siren • Jane Wisse Wellness Scholarship Walk at Crooked Lake Park. Registration 9 a.m.; walk 10 a.m.

Webster • Friends book sale at the library, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., 715-8667697. • Arts & crafts extravaganza at the elementary school, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., www.websterwisconsin.com, 715-349-7499. • Boy Scout Troop 564 pancake breakfast at the community center, 6-11 a.m.

SUNDAY/29

Danbury • Wild rice pancake breakfast at Forts Folle Avoine Historical Park, 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Knitting, crocheting and tatting class/demonstration at Forts Folle Avoine Historical Park, 1-3 p.m., www.theforts.org.

Duxbury • Pancake breakfast at the town hall, 6 a.m.-?.

Milltown • History Center open, at 107 Milltown Ave. N., old telephone co. building, 1-4 p.m.

MONDAY/30 Webster

• Legion Auxiliary roast beef dinner at the community center, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

Wolf Creek

• Valley Christian School thrift sale at First Baptist Church gym. Thurs. & Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.-noon, 651-465-3333.

ONGOING

Every Day, AA &/or AlAnon, Polk & Burnett counties, 715-931-8262 for time/location. Amery, 715-268-8431.

Divorce care support group at Apple River Community Church, 715-268-8360, 715-268-2176.

Every Monday Indianhead Barbershop Chorus meets at the Balsam Lake Government Center, 7:30 p.m., 715-483-9202. Baby and Me class - Amery Medical Center, 1-2 p.m. Grief Share support group at Centennial Hall, Amery, 715-268-2176 or 715-268-8360.

Every Tuesday Bingo - Burnett County Moose Lodge, Siren, 6 p.m. Survivors of domestic violence & sexual assault support group, Polk Co., 800-261-7233, 6-7:30 p.m. Anger management group at Amery Regional Medical Center, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 715-268-4094.

Every Thursday

• Wolf Creek United Methodist Church will be serving lunch immediately following the Memorial Day Services.

Breastfeeding support group at the St. Croix Regional Medical Center, 2-3:30 p.m., 715-483-0431. Narcotics Anonymous meets at the Serenity House (old jail), Balsam Lake, 7 p.m., 612-205-2321.

Balsam Lake

Moms In Touch International, First Baptist, Amery, 8:15 a.m., 715-268-5408.

TUESDAY/31

• Polk County Alzheimer’s support group at social services building, 715-483-3133.

Siren

Wall of Honor honoree Vern Peterson Danbury

• Opening weekend plant sale, exhibits, tours at Forts

St. Croix Falls

• Ravishing Ruby Red Hatters luncheon at Yellow River Saloon and Eatery, 1 p.m.

• Bloodmobile at St. Luke Methodist Church. Thurs. 1-7 p.m.; Fri. 9 a.m.-2 p.m., 715-485-3025.

• United Methodist Church men’s garage sale at church garage, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Happenings in the Upper St. Croix Valley communities

• Alzheimer’s support group at the medical center, 1-3 p.m., 715-483-0431.

Frederic

• Interfaith Caregivers rummage and bake sale at 7596 Hayden Lake Rd. Fri. 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.-3 p.m., 715656-7051.

PAGE 64 -

• Food & Friends Community Dinner at Siren United Methodist Church, 5-6 p.m.

Every Friday Every Friday and Saturday The Balsam Lake American Legion Auxiliary and Post 278 members will be distributing The Memorial Poppy.

Siren

LEFT: A plaque containing a photo of and information about Sirenarea resident Vernon Peterson has been hung among other photos on the Siren School Wall of Honor. Peterson, who died last year at the age of 91, was a lifelong farmer and resident of the Town of Dewey. He took the area to wide fame through his rock collecting and his knowledge of rocks, lumbering and history in general. Family members shown here with the plaque (L to R) are: Ron and Carol (Peterson) Potvin, Larry Peterson and Peterson’s granddaughter, Michelle Lysdahl. Introduction of Peterson as this year’s Wall of Honor honoree was made during the Siren High School graduation ceremony Friday, May 20.

Photos by Nancy Jappe RIGHT: The picture of 2011 Siren Wall of Honor honoree Vernon Peterson was painted by a niece but shows, better than a photograph could, the true essence of Peterson, a man who loved rocks of all kinds, educating people of all ages, but especially the young, and the good solid ground of his Town of Daniels farm. Peterson died in 2010 at the age of 91, but left behind a legacy of risk-taking, forward-thinking and hard working. 536757 39-40L 29a


May 25