Page 1

New royalty at Milltown

Time for the tour

Milltown celebrates

Currents, page 16

Currents feature

Currents section

Leader

WED., JUNE 30, 2010 VOL. 77 • NO. 45 • 2 SECTIONS •

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New OWI laws July 1 marks first day of state’s new drunk driving laws PAGE 9

John Schneider, well-known local attorney, dies in building collapse

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Services Friday at Amery PAGE 3

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Unemployment improves

Your opinion?

I think Polaris is moving from Osceola because: 1. Labor is cheaper in Mexico 2. Overall business decision for better profits 3. Due to unfriendly business climate in state 4. Combination of 1-3 Go to our online poll at www.the-leader.net (Weekly results on page 8)

Burnett out of double digits PAGE 2

Speedway lost

Former Milltown Speedway fans and racers recall lost glory See SPORTS It’s almost time for tea, and this little one takes great care in her preparations during the annual Yellow River Echoes celebration held this past weekend, June 25 - 27, at Forts Folle Avoine Historical Park near Danbury. The annual event is hosted by the Burnett County Historical Society and offers visitors a glimpse of life during the fur trade era of the late 1700s and early 1800s along the banks of the Yellow River. More photos on page 2 of Currents section. - Photo by Carl Heidel

A proud mother’s refl fle ections Son graduates college and is commissioned into the Army by Anna Huebner Special to the Leader WEBSTER - On a Saturday in May, the old saying “once in a lifetime” was being said for the family of Theodore Huebner. He had completed four years of college and Army ROTC at St. Cloud State University. His family was there for his commission to second lieutenant. Back in October 2009, Teddy had asked his aunt Suzie and myself if we would do the honors of pinning his bars on when he was commissioned. Of course we agreed, not really knowing what we were in for. The ceremony was moving. There was a speaker who told about Army life and his career. Then each cadet was called on stage and the oath of office was administered to each, one by one. Then the people chosen by

Reasons to subscribe to the Leader’s

Huebner with proud members of his family. Photo submitted

the cadets to put on their bars were called to the stage to be introduced. Finally, each cadet was required to give a first salute to a member of the Armed Forces of his choosing. This person could be on active duty or retired. The choice for Teddy hadn’t been difficult; he had chosen his grandfather, Theodore Freymiller. His grandfather had served in the Army during WWII and the Korean War. Teddy had heard the stories since he was born about “the good old days” of being in the Army. His grandfather was enlisted and had reached the rank of sergeant. It is a tradition after the first salute for the cadet to give a coin to the person who receives the salute. The coin is tucked in the hand and given when they shake hands. For Teddy, he had found a 1923 silver dollar to give his grandfather. 1923 was the year his grandfather was born. A few of the cadets chose a family member

See Comissioned, page 2

Deaths

• Judith Anne Harder • John Schneider • Jon K. Ormson • Albert Ravenholt • Patricia Antonson • Michael Budge • Walter Sanford Jr. • Wayne Friel • Clifford Cockerham • Rodney Littlefield • Walter C. Nelson • Erich O. Bretschneider • Harry L. Bottolfson Obituaries on page 22-23B

INSIDE Letters to the editor 9A Sports 15-19A Outdoors 20A Town Talk 6-8B Obituaries 22-23B Classifieds 26B Coming Events 28B Copyright © 2010 Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association Frederic, Wisconsin

The Leader is a cooperative-owned newspaper • Since 1933


PAGE 2 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - JUNE 30, 2010

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Unemployment picture improves

On our Web site The Leader’s Web site (www.the-leader.net) offers this week a story from the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism that focuses on suicide and how suicides have been on the rise. A total of 737 state residents took their own lives in 2008, the highest level in at least 20 years. Interviews with mental health experts and an analysis of Wisconsin suicide data by the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism found: • A total of 6,513 people took their lives in the 10 years from 1999 through 2008. • The state's suicide rate continues to rise, exceeds those of neighboring states and has remained higher than the national rate for about a decade.

Vickie Eiden (R), pictured with father Raymond Eiden at UW-Madison's Camp Randall Stadium, found comfort in attending meetings at a local support group after her father's suicide. Talking openly about suicide helps to break down the stigma associated with suicide, prevention advocates say. - Photo submitted

by Sherill Summer Leader staff writer BURNETT and POLK COUNTIES - The Department of Workforce Development released the May unemployment rate for Wisconsin counties on June 23. Nearly all - 71 out of 72 Wisconsin counties saw decreases in the unemployment rate in May compared to April. Only one county - Grant - had its unemployment remain the same. This is the second month in a row that Wisconsin counties showed decreases in unemployment. In addition, 67 counties had unemployment rates lower than they were a year ago. In May, Burnett County moved out of the double-digit unemployment with a rate of 9.1 percent. Last month the rate was 10.7 percent and a

Storm via cell

year ago the rate was 10.3 percent. Burnett still has the highest unemployment rate in the area, however, and has the 14th highest rate in the state. Polk County’s unemployment rate was 8.4 percent in May, compared to 9.8 percent in April. Last April, Polk County also posted a 9.8 percent unemployment rate. This unemployment rate ranks 30th in the state. Wisconsin as a whole has an unemployment rate of 7.7 percent, the lowest rate since early 2009. The Department of Workforce Development said that over 40,000 jobs were added statewide in May. Seasonally adjusted, the unemployment rate statewide is 8.2. Nationwide the unemployment rate is 9.3 percent. The national seasonablly adjusted rate is 9.7 percent.

Commissioned/from page 1

Blueberry time!

who was retired or still on active duty to administer the oath of office. There were retired admirals and a general there for their grandsons. The only female in the group had her brother give her the oath. Instead of a handshake, she received a kiss. As I previously said, this is was an experience that won’t happen again. I am very proud of my son.

The blueberries are big and tasty now and ready for the picking. This looks like a record year. Take a day off, grab your buckets and head for the woods. Berry picking is a joy of living in our part of the world. Enjoy. Photo by Gregg Westigard

Katie Grey of rural Webster used her cell phone to take several dramatic panoramic photos of the storm system that moved across Burnett County earlier this month. The system moving through the county was the remains of a tornado that touched down in Minnesota. - Photo by Katie Grey

RIGHT: Theodore Huebner after his graduation and being commissioned into the Army and below with class members. - Photos submitted

Connect to your community

Now open 60 years ago in Balsam Lake

On a summer’s evening 60 years ago in Balsam Lake, a queen pageant was held in the village park, hosted by a well-known broadcaster from WCCO, Cedric Adams (far right). Among the contestants was longtime Leader employee Millie Erickson (center, dark top), who now lives in Frederic. She was Millie Rohde then, a single 19-year-old who was working at the Polk County Courthouse in Balsam Lake. She won first runner-up among the dozen or so contestants in the 1950 Miss Balsam Lake pageant. Adams, who was considered “the single most prominent reporter, journalist and broadcaster in the upper Midwest” in the 1930s, ‘40s and ‘50s by wikipedia.com, was also a busy man, doing 54 radio shows, eight television broadcasts and 15 newspaper columns a week. - Photo submitted

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Alliance Church of the Valley will hold the first service in its new building this Sunday, July 4, at 10 a.m. Work is still in progress, and attendees are asked to use the old entrance to the south of the former church building. Alliance Church of the Valley is located on Hwy. 35 just south of Hwy. 8 and Interstate Park. Starting July 11, services will be held at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. — Photo submitted

Board of directors Vivian Byl, chair Charles Johnson Merlin Johnson Janet Oachs Carolyn Wedin

A cooperative-owned newspaper, the Inter-County Leader is published every Wednesday by the Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association, Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837. Second Class postage paid at Frederic, WI 54837.

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The Inter-County Leader [ISS No. 8750-9091] is published weekly. Subscription prices are $34/yr. in Polk and Burnett counties; $38/yr. in Barron, Chisago, Washburn, St. Croix counties; $41/yr. anywhere in the United States $23/yr. for servicemen or women; $23/yr. for students or schools (9 months). Payment is needed before we can start the subscription. No refunds on subscriptions. Persons may subscribe online at www.theleader.net, write us at Inter-County Leader, Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837, or stop by one of our three offices.

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• Briefly • STATEWIDE - This coming week marks a milestone for tavern, hotel and restaurant owners and those who partake in drinking alcoholic beverages as the new smoking ban and tougher OWI laws take effect. The smoking ban for all indoor workplaces goes into effect at midnight, July 5. The new OWI laws, which will significantly strengthen deterrents and increase penalties for operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated in Wisconsin, will go into effect July 1. Some businesses have built outdoor accommodations for smokers but there’s a concern that the arrival of cold weather in the fall and winter will mean a drop in patrons. The new OWI laws include substantially increased jail time for many OWI convictions. First-offense OWI will be a criminal offense if there is a passenger under age 16 in the vehicle. The penalties will be the same as second offense OWI — five days to six months in jail plus a $350 to $1,100 fine. ••• OSCEOLA - This Thursday, July 1, the Vision 600 task force, which was established to create 600 job opportunities for the impacted Polaris workers, will be presenting a public report on their progress. The meeting will be held at the Osceola High School auditorium at 6:30 p.m. Some of the topics on the agenda include “What jobs can be retained?” “What facilities will become available and when?” and “What types of businesses are we seeking?” - with information from the village of Osceola ••• BALSAM LAKE - Matt Nikolay, regional coordinator for U.S. Sen. Russ Feingold, will hold office hours in Polk County on Thursday, July 8. Residents can meet with Feingold’s staff from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in the secondfloor north conference room of the Polk County Courthouse in Balsam Lake. No appointment is necessary. Feingold is holding his own, and separate, listening sessions in all 72 counties of the state at least once a year. He held his Polk County listening session earlier this year in Amery. - from Sen. Feingold’s office ••• BALSAM LAKE — The Polk County Historical Society has announced that it will hold a book sale at the museum in Balsam Lake July 3 and 4 during Freedom Festival. The sale will take place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and feature novels, history books, music, Blue Books, law books, old books, and various magazines, catalogs and vintage newspapers. – submitted ••• CORRECTION: Last week’s coverage on the donation of pillowcases contained misinformation. The article stated most of the pillowcases were sent to Pins ‘N’ Needles, however all of the pillowcases the students sewed were donated to the residents of Shady Knoll, none were donated to Pins ‘N’ Needles Quilt shop. “The only thing presented to the quilt shop was the number of pillowcases we made, so they could add that number into their overall total to send in to the Million Pillowcase Challenge,” notes Courtney Hawkins of Grantsburg Schools. “We, as an organization, wanted to make sure the cases were distributed into the Grantsburg community, so that’s why all of them were donated to the residents of Shady Knoll.” EARLY DEADLINE — The Wednesday, July 7, edition of the Leader will have an early deadline as the newspaper office will be closed Monday, July 5, in observance of the Fourth of July holiday. Deadline for all news copy and advertising will be noon on Friday, July 2.

JUNE 30, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 3

John Schneider dies in building collapse Services for former district attorney, judge, Friday at Amery POLK COUNTY - Balsam Lake attorney John Schneider, 59, died in a building collapse at his rural home at 1639 190th Ave., west of Balsam Lake. According to Lt. Steve Smith of the Polk County Sheriff’s Office, Schneider was apparently attempting to pull down an outbuilding that had suffered storm damage the week prior. “It looks like he just cut the wrong support beam, and it came down on him,” stated Smith. Schneider was last seen at the Milltown Fishermen’s Party Sunday around noon, but did not make a scheduled court appearance in Barron County Monday morning. His body was discovered beneath the fallen structure midmorning on Monday. Authorities believe his accident occurred sometime Sunday afternoon, but may not know for sure until an autopsy is per-

John Schneider was a former Polk County district attorney and judge. - File photo by Mary Stirrat formed to determine the cause and time of death. Firefighters from the Milltown Fire Department joined the Polk County Sheriff’s Office at the scene. Schneider was a longtime local attorney, being appointed assistant district attorney for Polk County early in his career and then being elected district attorney in 1979. He was appointed circuit court judge for Polk County in 1979, a position he held for one year. He then en-

tered private practice and served as the attorney for various municipalities over the years, including the City of St. Croix Falls. “He was truly one of the nicest people I have ever met,” noted Mary Tilton of Balsam Lake. “I was honored to have worked for him when he was a circuit judge. He will be greatly missed.” Polk County Chief Deputy Steve Moe said Schneider was “virtually known by everyone” in the county’s justice system. “He’s a Balsam Lake landmark, he truly is,” Moe told the St. Paul Pioneer Press. State Rep. Ann Hraychuck said Schneider was “highly respected” because he “always looked for the good in people.” She said Schneider’s integrity was beyond reproach. Schneider was born July 28, 1950, in Lancaster, the son of Stanley and Glendoris (Dersch) Schneider. He graduated from Lancaster High School in 1968, and then attended the University of Wisconsin-Platteville, graduating with a Political Science de-

gree in 1972 and then attended UW-Madison Law School and graduated in 1975 with his law degree. He then moved to Polk County, where he practiced law, owning and operating the Schneider Law Office in Balsam Lake. Schneider was involved in many organizations and enjoyed classic cars, attending car shows, motorcycling and many other activities. Schneider, who was divorced, is survived by his brother, three sisters and mother. A celebration of his life will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, July 2, at the Cricket’s Event Center (the old Tac Entertainment Center), 1361 100th St. in Amery. Visitation will be held Thursday, July 1, 4 – 8 p.m., at the Kolstad Family Funeral Home, Centuria, and again at Cricket’s from 10 – 11 a.m. on Friday morning. For more information or to express online condolences to the family, please visit kolstadfamilyfuneralhome.com. - Gary King/Greg Marsten

Economic stress has many faces

Has broad impact on many programs

by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – This week the Leader offers stories about the economic impact the recession is having on area residents and what two departments, veterans service and economic support, are doing to help residents meet their financial needs. (See stories, page 4). But the story does not stop with financial help. Economic stress is leading to an increase

in social stress. Several weeks ago we wrote about the increase in child abuse where caseworkers are attempting to handle caseloads of 45 children when they should be working with 15 kids each. Soon, we will be doing a series of stories about the increasing rise in mental health problems, with more at-risk persons asking for help. The economic problems are affecting young persons who can’t find work. And the child support office is dealing with an increasing number of parents who can’t make their

Power line work

New power line supports on the Wisconsin side of the St. Croix River were installed earlier this year as part of a power transmission line upgrade to electric customers in Northwest Wisconsin and eastern Minnesota. Next Tuesday, July 6, the installation of the final segment of conduit for the underground line will begin in the city of St. Croix Falls to upgrade an existing line between the Chisago County and Apple River substations. Trenching and pouring of concrete for the cable will start on the north side of East Louisiana Street and proceed south on Blanding Woods Road approximately 3,200 feet to Maple Drive. Xcel Energy has been working to inform area residents of the project, noting that construction may cause noise, dust and heavy truck traffic, as the excavated soils are hauled away. Completion of the transmission line conduit project is expected in mid- to late-August. - Photo by Linda Sandmann

child support payments because they lost their jobs. This is the time when governments start to work on their budgets for the coming year. Polk County and other counties, as well as the many area social agencies, will be dealing with an increasing demand for funds to help persons with immediate needs while they try to balance those needs with the other costs of government. Governments will be trying to fund these costs with an expected decrease in revenues. There is an expectation that

there will be less state and federal dollars available for local governments in both 2011 and 2012. In addition, the property tax base may be decreasing due to declining housing values. Polk County Administrator Dana Frey has said that the Polk County supervisors must set their priorities and give him the guidelines he needs to prepare a 2011 budget. That call to discuss the issues in our communities and set priorities applies to all government units, all candidates and all citizens.

Prospect of federal regulation of co-ops debated by Kirk Carapezza Wisconsin Public Radio MADISON - Dairy industry cooperatives could soon face increased scrutiny from the federal government, which is weighing whether to regulate such operations. Advocates say it would aim to prevent independent farmers from being driven out of business by increasingly large co-ops. At a hearing last week, several independent dairy farmers, including Jim Goodman, called on the USDA and U.S. Department of Justice to investigate the increasing consolidation of farms before it drives them out of business. “When you’re getting more money just because you’re big, that’s not operating for the mutual benefit for all members,” said Goodman. Goodman runs a 45-cow organic farm in Wonewoc. He says rapid consolidation in recent years has come at the cost of small farmers and their communities. But some co-op supporters argue they could actually fix a broken pricing system. Peter Kappelman operates a 440-cow dairy

farm in Manitowoc County. He’s also chairman of the Land O’ Lakes board, and says co-ops – no matter their size, help farmers to effectively bargain with mega-retailers. “I’ve been told that Land O’ Lakes is big,” says Kappelman. “One of the customers we deal with is called Wal-Mart. They are approximately 100 times bigger than we are. We do not feel the power of big, as they negotiate to bring down the price of food, and we are wrangling the best price we can for our members products.” The USDA has reported dairy market sales fell more than 30 percent last year, and though production cost steadied, the checks farmers got for milk were nearly cut in half, from $21 per hundred pounds to $11. Regulation of co-ops was just one of several topics debated among farmers and industry experts during a public hearing last week on the UW-Madison Campus. The event was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Members of the nonprofit group Farm Aid dressed in cow suits to demonstrate support for family farmers outside UW-Madison’s Union Theater on Friday, June 25. - Photo by Kirk Carapezza, WPR


PAGE 4 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - JUNE 30, 2010

Officer rescues woman from sinking car

Details emerge in heroic Amery river rescue by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer AMERY – Details have now emerged in a dramatic and decidedly heroic rescue effort by an Amery police officer in an incident involving an allegedly intoxicated Luck woman who accidentally drove her minivan into the Apple River in downtown Amery. The incident occurred Saturday night, June 19, at just after 11 p.m., when two women noticed an apparently intoxicated woman leave a downtown tavern, get into her minivan and drive into the river at the Birch Street boat landing. The women called 911, and Amery police officer Pete Krumrie was the first to respond. “I was about two minutes out [from the location], so it wasn’t long after she went in,” Krumrie said. “When I got there, the van was about three-fourths underwater.” Krumrie’s report understates the fervor and challenge of the situation. He recalled immediately jumping into the water, along with another, unidentified male bystander. That man apparently broke one of the driver’s side sliding-door windows to get into the Dodge Caravan. Krumrie stated that he dove under and tried to see if anyone was in the driver’s seat, but

Officer Peter Krumrie of the Amery Police Department is credited with saving the life of a Luck woman after her van went into the Apple River at the Birch Street boat landing. Krumrie dove into the river and pulled her from the van and onto shore. – Photo submitted found it empty. “That was when I heard her screaming,” he said. The screaming woman was later identified as 37-year-old Amy Halverson of rural Luck. Krumrie said she had crawled over the rows of seats and into the very back of the van, fighting for the last remaining bubble of fresh air in

the van. After the two men had broken the side window, the van began to equalize in pressure, and then sink even faster. “After we broke the window, it went down quick. Really quick,” Krumrie said, adding that the boat landing drops off fast and that the water was probably “about eight- to ten-feet deep there.” After diving down and into the quickly sinking van, Krumrie was able to pull Halverson from the rear window, and eventually got her out of the vehicle and onto the roof. As they tried to get their breath back, Krumrie noticed that the water was still up to his shoulders, even sitting on the van roof. He then worked with the other man to bring Halverson back to shore, but said she was still quite upset, and that she “was taking all three of us down.” Krumrie asked the man to let him take her back to shore, using a sort of cradling “rescue hold.” The other bystander left the scene without giving his name, but Krumrie said he would like to know who it was, since he did assist with saving the woman’s life. “In my opinion, if the two women that watched her leave the bar and get in the van and drive into the water hadn’t called us as fast as they did, we would have found her - and the van - the next time someone launched a boat,” Krumrie said

cryptically. Krumrie said Halverson was quite grateful for the rescue, and he said she apologized repeatedly. “She was hysterical at first,” he said. “But it was a pretty intense moment! It all happened so quick. I think she’s pretty lucky!” Halverson faces a municipal charge of operating while intoxicated, and registered a .22 blood alcohol content after the incident. She has no history of run-ins with the law. Krumrie thinks the incident was likely caused by her intoxication. “Between the alcohol and her nonfamiliarity with the area, I can see it happening ... possibly, I guess,” he said tentatively. “But again, I think she’s lucky to be alive.” The incident was captured in part on Krumrie’s squad car dash camera, but he said it’s tough to see anything, because so many people had flooded the shoreline to assist or just to see what was happening. Krumrie did not wait around long after the rescue, and had another officer drive Halverson to the hospital for assistance. He filed his report later, as his shift was about to end. “And I really wanted to take a shower!” he admitted. “The river there is kind of nasty!”

United Pioneer Home receives excellence award third year in a row LUCK — The residents and family members of United Pioneer Home in Luck have spoken. For the third year in a row, UPH has been awarded the Excellence in Action Award from My InnerView. According to a recent survey conducted for the nursing home, 98 percent of residents and families rate their willingness to recommend United Pioneer Home to others as “excellent” or “good.” These results come from United Pioneer Home’s recent satisfaction survey conducted by My InnerView, a third-party applied research company providing leaders in skilled nursing, assisted living and senior housing with tools to measure, benchmark and improve performance. Out of over 5,000 nursing homes participating, UPH was one of 519 nursing homes to receive the award. United Pioneer Home is also the only five-star rated nursing home in Polk County according to the federal government’s nursing home compare Web site. “We are committed to providing quality care to our residents,” said Dan Valentine, United Pioneer Home administrator. “This feedback allows us to identify our strengths and opportunities so that we can provide a safe, positive and caring environment for our residents.”

For the third year in a row United Pioneer Home in Luck has been selected to receive the Excellence in Action Award from My InnerView. Shown here are some of the staff with the three awards. My InnerView is a third-party applied research company specializing in performance measurement skills for skilled nursing, assisted living and senior housing facilities. — Photo by Mary Stirrat

The surveys were mailed to residents or their family members, assessing the perceptions of quality of more than 90 people. Surveys were returned to My InnerView for data processing. The report also shared that 98 percent of residents and families surveyed rated overall satisfaction as “excellent” or “good.” “By listening to the voice of the customer, United Pioneer Home has invalu-

able data to help them improve and deliver a higher quality of care to their residents,” said Neil Gulsvig, My InnerView chief executive officer. “United Pioneer Home’s survey results serve as a strong testimony of the good work they are doing. Certainly there is always room for improvement, but satisfaction is high and at the end of the day, the quality of care a resident receives is what matters.”

United Pioneer Home provides quality health care to 75 residents, including those needing short-term rehab services and long-term nursing care. The nursing home has been part of Luck community since 1953 and is located at 210 E Park Ave. in Luck. For more information about these survey results, contact Dan Valentine at 715-472-2164. — submitted

Wannigan requests, river cleanup week approved by Tammi Milberg Leader staff writer TAYLORS FALLS, Minn. – A proclamation by the city was passed for July 17-25 to be designated as St. Croix River Awareness and Cleanup Week at the Taylors Falls council meeting June 28. The council received a request for a donation for Wannigan Days by the commit-

tee that plans Wannigan Days. The council budgeted $500 for the fireworks and $100 for the parade. The council already approved the fireworks donation at a previous meeting. The council approved the $100 for the parade. It was also noted that Bill Scott has been designated by the city as the Taylors Falls grand marshal for the parade.

The council approved a request by the Lions Club to serve beer at the Lions Park for the fourth-annual Tug Across the River to be held during Wannigan Days. A request from Romayne’s for the Wannigan Days street dance to be held on the street was also approved with a fenced-in area for a beer garden and council direction for signage to point persons to a public rest

room. A grant application by the park and rec. commission for $381 for fencing at the Pumphouse Park Playground from the Chisago Lakes Area Community Foundation was approved by the council.

Student firefighter ride-along approved by Tammi Milberg Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – The city council for St. Croix Falls approved a proposal by the fire department for a student firefighter program which helps educate students on fire fighting as a career. The program is designed for students ages 16-18 to help them explore the area of fire fighting. If a student successfully completes the trainee period, students would be promoted to being student firefighter ride-along qualified. In other business, the council approved Wannigan Days requests from the Lions Club for the annual Tug Across the River

and from the St. Croix Tavern to close the street for a street dance during Wannigan Days. The council also discussed the results of a community forum including ideas by citizens to look at establishing a municipal utility and perhaps even reclaiming possession of the hydrodam. Other ideas from the forum included informational kiosks at trailheads to direct persons to trails and to promote community events. The next step for the forum ideas is for them to be brought to committees for further review and possible planning and action. The council debated the issue of gun

hunting in the Wert Nature Preserve and how to address that issue. The current deer herd management for the property is for bow season. The proposed new language would allow for eight hunters to hunt the property for herd management and that they be allowed to hunt based on hours volunteered and a lottery method, exempting disabled hunters from the volunteer requirement. The language would allow bow and gun hunting for youth, disabled and hunters who volunteered, who would be selected by a lottery method. The debate was how to track or log volunteer hours, who would log the time, who would conduct the lottery and

would this cost the city money to keep track? The debate also was that bow hunting was the method used in the past and that the bow hunting should continue and that gun hunting only be looked at if management of the herd needed to be addressed beyond the bow hunting. While several tangents of discussion on the issue took place, the idea to send the proposal back to the Wert management committee was discussed as well. The council tabled a presentation from the city VISTA program on food assessment until more information is gathered to be presented.


JUNE 30, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 5

Recession hitting the community County offers economic support by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – When Polaris announced it was pulling up stakes and heading for the border, leaving over 500 workers out on the street, Polk County was there with a First Response Team to offer economic assistance. The ongoing recession is hitting county residents, and many Polk County departments, including human services and its economic support unit, are there to help those residents meet their needs as they get back on their feet. The economic support unit gave a presentation on its many services at the June 22 meeting of the human services board. Many of the state programs offering economic help to low- and middle-income families are administered by EC. This includes FoodShare (formerly Food Stamps), medical programs for the unin-

sured, energy assistance programs, Wisconsin Works jobs programs and child day-care assistance. The caseload has grown for each program as the economic downturn affects more people. And while the caseload has increased, the number of employees in the EC unit has actually decreased from 14 persons in 2003 to the present 13. (Note: That cut was made when part of the unit duties transferred to two new inter-county agencies). Eight of the present 13 unit employees were working in the EC unit back in 2003. Each program has its own income guidelines for who can apply and who is qualified for help. In addition, there are other programs in other departments aimed at assisting county residents needing economic assistance. This includes programs for veterans (see separate story), programs offered by the new aging and disability resource center, health department programs for new mothers and for infant nutrition and the aging department services.

With all these programs, each with its own rules, enrollment and intake can be a problem for the departments as they try to eliminate duplicate processing and especially for the people in need of help. “People are scared,” economic support supervisor Sheila Falb said. “When they ask for help, they want an immediate response.” She echoed the words of veterans service officer Rick Gates in saying that the county is working across department lines to make the process as ease for the applicants as possible. This cooperation is working to making case management easier, attempting to guide people to the best place to go for help with the least amount of bureaucratic hassles. They and others talked to say the goal is directing limited funds to providing help with the least duplication of paperwork. The economic condition in Polk County is reflected in the numbers from the human services annual report. FoodShare recipients increased from 4,316 in 2008 to 5,968 in 2009. Those persons live in 2,236 households. Families receiving Wisconsin

Works programs help increased from 94 in 2008 to 113 in 2009, and payments increased over 30 percent from $60,073 to $84,616. The number of Medicaid program (such as BadgerCare) recipients increased from 8,191 to 9,201. And energy assistance payments went from $1,082,864 to $1,348,390. With the growing demand for services and an expectation that state and federal dollars for the programs will be decreased, human services Director Sherry Gjonnes told the HS board that the department goal is to expand cross training and “work smarter” to utilize resources for the best results. And Falb says the EC unit is stressing flexibility. That flexibility and working smart will be needed because an ongoing goal of economic support and all of human services (and of veterans service and other departments) is to continue to reach out to the public with the message that help is available.

Some veteran services at risk State money drying up by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – Polk County veterans received $20,684,473 in benefits during 2009, including $4.7 million in new benefits. While most of those funds were federal benefits paid by the Department of Veteran Affairs, $423,000 came from the Wisconsin DVA. That source of money is running out of funds, says Rick Gates, Polk County Veterans Service officer. As a result, some programs that benefited Polk County veterans in 2009 have all but disappeared in 2010. One program that has been cut locally

is the state funded primary home loans program. Polk County vets received $220,400 in these loans in 2009. For 2010, there will be zero state funded home loans. Also, in 2009, the county Veterans Service Office loaned out $115,000 from the personal loan program. Through March of this year, that program has been cut to $6,000 in loans. “The Wisconsin DVA’s Trust Fund is running out of money,” Gates told the county human services board on March 25. “The situation is dismal. No state tax money is going into the fund, which will run out of money by 2012.” “There have been decreases in program funding and continual efforts by the

WDVA to reduce the monetary value of specific benefits as well as measures to restrict eligibility for various benefit programs,” Gates states in his annual report to the county board. Gates says that everyone in Madison knows there is a problem but no one is talking about it. He said the “lame duck” governor has done nothing. With the money disappearing, the funds that went to the veterans through the counties are almost gone. But while the WDVA is cutting programs, it is not cutting staff at the top, Gates continued. Administration in Madison has increased. He cited the example of the state veterans hospitals. Each of the

two had its own commandant. Now they have created a new position of commandant over the two commandants. Gates said the state veterans program was self-funded and never asked for additional funds. But now the state will have to figure out how to fund the state veterans program and where the money will come from. Otherwise, the WDVA has the options of offering fewer programs or scaling down management. Gates added that while everyone in Madison knows about the problem, the message is not getting out to the community. HS board member Dr. David Markert said “not everyone knows about the problem.”

Polk Veterans Service Office meets growing demand Small staff serves increasing vet needs by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – The Polk County Veterans Service Office might be called the little department that delivers. The two-person office, the smallest of Polk County departments, helped the county’s veterans and their families receive over $20.7 million in benefits in 2009, a 21-percent increase in claims initiations over the previous year. And it accomplished its increasing work for 2009 while coming in 7 percent under operating budget. That was the 11th consecutive year the department operated within its budget, according to the VSO annual report to the county board. The department is seeing an expanding number of veterans from Middle East service, Veterans Service Officer Rick Gates told the human services board in May while presenting a quarterly on the department’s activities. It is seeing more women veterans and many vets who have served multiple deployments. He said the largest single group are Vietnam vets. Gates praised his assistant, Gail Wassberg. He said she has been classified as a secretary but in fact does much more. “Gail is my partisan,” Gates told the board. “We work as a team. I sometimes wonder who delegates to who. She is more than a secretary. She is a benefits specialist. She writes the grants. She

Rick Gates and Gail Wassberg are the two-person Polk County Veterans Service Office. In 2009, they helped county veterans and their families receive over $20.7 million in benefits.Photo by Gregg Wesrigard makes speeches to the public. Her job classification is not at a level commensurate with her tasks and duties.” (Gates told the Leader that her job has since been upgraded). The mission of the Veterans Service Office is to serve Polk County’s veterans (a population of over 4,200) and their families and beneficiaries (recorded at over 7,500). That service includes aid in receiv-

ing benefits such as pensions, health care, financial assistance and access to educational programs. Ultimately, those benefits include burial costs and grave markers. Gates told the Leader that a large part of the office’s work is to help veterans and their families understand the benefits they are entitled to because of their service work and then to assist them in working

through the application process to get those benefits. Gates says he and Wassberg do the paperwork with the information provided by the vets. They then help the vets get connected to the programs. “There is great cooperation among county departments,” Gates told the Leader. “We work with the other service departments to help the people. The best place to go might be another county office. We help the veterans make the connection.” Gates cited the working relationship with aging as an example. He says aging, which has a fleet of vans, helps vets get to doctor’s appointments, avoiding a duplication of services. And his department gives aging its entire yearly transportation grant in exchange for that service. Gates said that the cooperation among county departments includes working with human services, the aging and disability resource center, health, aging and other agencies. The goal of all of them is to get services to the clients with a minimum of duplicate bureaucracy. Gates sees the number of claims increasing as more veterans return from service and as more veterans from previous service become aware of their right to benefits. He says the cut in programs and aid from the state veterans office makes this increased demand more difficult (see separate story). The Veterans Service Office processed 470 claims in the first four months of 2010. That led to $589,123 in benefits received for the period.

Keep records currents with FSA BALSAM LAKE - The Farm Service Agency is asking producers to review their records and notify FSA of any changes. “Producers often forget to notify us of important changes, which adversely affects payment delivery and program eligibility” said Aaron Moore, county director of the Polk County FSA. The most common records producers

need to maintain accurately include: • Banking information (bank name and account changes) • Land ownership or operating changes • Membership changes with an dntity • Notifying of deceased individuals • Changes of mailing address • Changes in phone number Banking information is one of the most

common records not updated in a timely. Many producers receive benefits from FSA through electronic direct deposit. Producers with changes to either a bank name or account should complete a new SF-1199A Direct Deposit request right away to receive benefits into the correct account. Failure to notify FSA of changes may affect payment eligibility and may

delay payments up to a month. If you have recently made any of the above changes in your farming operation contact the Polk County FSA office immediately at 715-485-3138 or visit the office located at 941 Mallard Lane, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. - from FSA


PAGE 6 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - JUNE 30, 2010

Luck senior given OK to graduate early

Job opportunity in Alaska means an April finish to senior year by Mary Stirrat Leader staff writer LUCK — A student who will be a senior at Luck next year was given the OK to spend the end of the school year in Alaska, driving horses for tour. Karie Bartlett met with the Luck School Board of Education Monday evening, June 28, to discuss her request that she be able to graduate early in order to take advantage of the employment opportunity in Alaska, and the board approved her request. In order to make it happen, though, she will need to complete an English and a social studies class, possibly online at her own expense, and the rest of her senior classes. Her job, said Bartlett, will start in April, so she would like to leave Luck in early April to prepare. She said she already has 21 credits toward graduation, with a 3.4 GPA. She plans to continue her education in veterinary medicine, working with large animals. “This job would be paying for my college,” she said, “which I would like to start not this fall but next.” High school Principal Mark Gobler said that he and the high school counselor had talked and felt the details could be worked out to allow Bartlett to graduate early. “It’s kind of a unique circumstance,” he said. “It’s a very unique opportunity.” Bartlett said she would do whatever is necessary to make sure she meets graduation requirements and can finish her senior year early. “I strive for excellence,” she said in her letter of request to the school board, “and I do my best to have a promising future for myself. My parents fully support me in my goals. Graduating early is just the boost I feel I need to get started.”

Third-grade teacher Nancy Beduhn shows the school board a poster on Blanding’s turtle made by one of her students.

Karie Bartlett will be an early graduate of the class of 2011 in order to take a job in Alaska. – Photos by Mary Stirrat Field trip report Third-grade teacher Nancy Beduhn reported on her students trip to Crex Meadows and their study of turtles, thanking the board for providing the funding to make the day possible. “The trip was really amazing,” she told the board. The class was divided into two groups, she said, and each group was able to put on hip waders, take buckets, and go into the water to “collect critters.” Using a variety of microscopes, hand lenses, and other magnifying equipment, they were able to get a close look at the creatures they had collected. The students also researched turtles, finding out that Wisconsin has 11 native species. They developed posters with information about each species, which Beduhn passed around for board members to see. “The kids really enjoyed it,” she said. “They said it was one of the greatest field trips they’d ever been on.” Beduhn was also asked about her work last summer as a ranger at the St. Croix Scenic Riverway National Park. She said she was able to take part in all ranger activities, including maintenance, interpretation, administration and a bird survey. She said she would encourage everyone to take advantage of the national park that is right in their backyard. Class scheduling Gobler said the staff is working on scheduling that would provide a study hall each day for students in grades seven through high school. Struggling students would be assigned to a teacher in the subject area in which they need help, and would use the time for academic improvement. Those students who were not assigned a specific teacher would be able to use the

Curtain Calls!

time to work on projects or schoolwork, or go to the library. Right now, he said, they are looking at using third hour for the study hall for high-schoolers, and seventh hour for the study hall for seventh- and eight-graders. Saying that “parameters” still needed to be developed, Gobler told the board, “We’re looking forward to seeing how this will work.” Gobler also reported that the district has access to free training on treating concussions. The training is offered through the National Federation of High Schools Associations, he said, and it consists of a 40minute session designed to help coaches, teachers and others identify and treat concussions. Initially, he said, coaches and physical education teachers will be required to take the training. Playground supervisors may also be trained. “There is no messing around with a head injury,” said Gobler. “It might not be a bad thing to do (the training) districtwide.”

Other business • The board heard a request from Pete and Donna Johnson to consider changing the 2011 graduation date. The couple has one daughter who will graduate from Luck and one who will graduate from Grantsburg, and both are on the same date. The request will be on the agenda for a future board meeting. •Kyle James, student representative on the school board, reported that he recently attended Badger Boys State, where he honed his speech-making skills and had several cartoons published in the Badger Boys newspaper.

Luck School Board member Amy Dueholm and board President Bob Clifton look at posters made by Nancy Beduhn’s thirdgraders. The students studied turtles, and were able to take a field trip to Crex Meadows to study water critters. • The board voted to renew its membership in the Wisconsin Association of School Boards, and pay $2,700 for the year. • The board approved two appendices and some small language changes in the anti-bullying/anti-harassment policy. The changes are designed to provide better documentation of possible bullying and/or harassment incidences.

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Footlights!

The Village Players Community Theatre Presents

“ T h e G r a n d e s t C a nyo n ” By Burton Bumgarner

Produced by special arrangement with Eldridge Plays

Directed by Olivia Main Voyager Village Stables Theatre $13 ($15 at the door) (18 & under $11) All Seats Reserved

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Performances

Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays at 7 p.m. July 22, 23, 24 & 29, 30 & 31 Sundays at 2 p.m. • July 25 & August 1 Ice-Cream Social at 1 p.m. ($3)

For reservations, call Shirley at 715-259-7514 (credit cards accepted). Or e-mail: theatre VPCT@gmail.com

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JUNE 30, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 7

Fees set at Luck schools by Mary Stirrat Leader staff writer LUCK — Following the course of many schools throughout the state and nation, the Luck School Board Monday evening approved fees that will be charged to outside groups using the school. Also approved were fees for student participation in high school athletics and other activities such as Forensics, drama and solo ensemble. Nonprofit and education groups will not be charged the building use fee as long as an employee is on duty, the group is supervised by adults, and the activity does not conflict with school functions. Priority will be given to school functions, then community education activities, then youth groups such as Boy and Girl Scouts, youth sports that do not charge a fee, and other organizations that benefit the overall development of the district’s youth. All organizations using the school, however, will be required to pay an annual refundable $100 damage and cleaning deposit. Organizations and individuals wishing to use the facilities for “private gain,” including teams and clubs that charge admission or participation fees, will be required to pay the fee. The policy states, “Private gain shall be defined as any time admission is charged, a fee for participation is charged or concessions are sold. Users may petition the board for partial waiver of fees.” Requests by these groups to use the facilities must be made to the principal or district administrator. There will be a $30 fee for use of a classroom, $100 plus custodial costs for use of the high school gym, $75 plus custodial costs for use of the elementary gym, $50 plus the cost of one cook for use of the kitchen, and $20 for use of the cafeteria. A fee for the use of the school’s outdoor facilities will be considered at a future meeting of the board. “Our cost to maintain the facilities has

gone up,” district Administrator Rick Palmer said during the discussion on the new fees.

Student participation fees The board also approved participation fees for middle school and high school students involved in school athletics and other extracurricular activities. The fees are per sport or activity, with a maximum per student and a maximum per household. There will be no fee for students and families that qualify for free lunch, and reduced fees for those that qualify for reduced lunch. Cost per sport at the high school level is $25, with a maximum of $50 per year per student. Cost is $15 per sport for those who qualify for reduced lunch, with a maximum per student of $30. At the middle school level, cost per sport is $15, with a $30 max per student per year. Families qualifying for reduced lunch will be charged $10 per sport, with a maximum of $20 per student per year or $40 per family. The maximum cost for a family with any combination of high school and middle school students is $100, reduced to $60 for families qualifying for reduced lunches. Fees are lower for extracurricular activities such as Forensics, drama or solo ensemble, at $10 per activity, $20 maximum per student per year, and $40 maximum per family per year. Families qualifying for reduced lunch will pay a fee of $5 per activity, with a maximum of $10 per student or $20 per family each year. Again, no fee will be charged for students qualifying for free lunch. Fees will be handled by the district office to provide confidentiality regarding free and reduced lunches. “This is a very minimal fee compared to other districts,” said Principal Mark Gobler, who researched the fees and developed the proposed schedule. He added that Luck, unlike some other districts, continues to provide towel service and student insurance. “This is about on par with Frederic,” he said, adding that Unity School still does not charge any participation fee.

Gov. Doyle announces nearly $2.3 million in funding to assist displaced workers MADISON – Gov. Jim Doyle on Monday announced $2,274,814 in federal funding to help over 300 displaced Wisconsin workers find new jobs and improve their skills. The On-the-Job Training National Emergency Grants – awarded by the U.S. Department of Labor – are being made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. “This grant will help working families hit hard by the national recession to find new jobs and improve their skills,” Doyle said. “I want to thank Senator Kohl, Senator Feingold and Congressman Dave Obey, as well as Secretary Solis and the Obama Administration, for their work to help ensure that Wisconsin workers are job-ready as the economy recovers.” The OJTNEG will provide workers with an opportunity to develop critical job skills while also earning a paycheck. Employers participating in the projects will receive partial reimbursement to offset the cost of training these workers. The projects will help workers become proficient in necessary skills more quickly and encourage employers to hire workers sooner, improving employers’ bottom lines and spurring economic recovery. Since taking office, Doyle has worked hard to build Wisconsin’s economy and create new jobs, including last month’s signing of the Wisconsin CORE Jobs Act, which builds on successful manufacturing and worker training programs. The budget the governor signed last year enacted the most powerful economic development tools in the country to help manufacturers create and retain jobs. The governor’s administration has also helped workers struggling because of the national

recession by providing unemployment assistance and training, health care and food assistance. The Recovery Act has helped every state, including Wisconsin, deal with the most difficult national economic times since the Great Depression, while paving the way for future economic growth. In Wisconsin, the Recovery Act has been credited with creating or retaining more than 44,000 jobs. Since the program was created, Wisconsin has overseen nearly $1.1 billion in Recovery Act expenditures. Major projects in Wisconsin have included road construction projects, major water infrastructure, and a new high-speed rail line that will create thousands of jobs and benefit the state’s economy for generations. Under Doyle’s leadership, Wisconsin is also the only state to direct 100 percent of the Recovery Act’s state energy funds to help the state’s largest manufacturers find savings through energy efficiency and create jobs. Doyle encourages all affected workers to contact their local job center to inquire about services by visiting www.wisconsinjobcenter.org/directory or toll-free at 888-258-9966. The NEG program provides funding to states when significant events create a sudden need for assistance. National emergency grants are part of the Secretary of Labor’s discretionary fund and are awarded based on a state’s ability to meet specific guidelines. For more information, please visit http://www.doleta.gov/NEG. - from the office of Gov. Doyle

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LORAIN TOWNSHIP FIRE DEPARTMENT’S 26th-ANNUAL

FARM TRACTOR TRUCK PULL

Eliminator “THE WILD ROSE”

Plus

SUPER MODS held at

Indian Creek, WI 11 a.m. Sharp

SATURDAY, JULY 3, 2010 FARM STOCK

4,500 lbs. 5,500 lbs. 7,000 lbs. 9,000 lbs. 12,000 lbs. 15,000 lbs. Unlimited (FWA 4x4)

SUPER FARM STOCK

5,500 lbs. 6,500 lbs. 8,000 lbs.

10,000 lbs. 12,000 lbs. 15,000 lbs.

HOT FARM

9,000 lbs. 10,000 lbs.

12,000 lbs. 15,000 lbs.

TRUCKS

CARB - EFI - IMPROVED 5,500 lbs. • 6,500 lbs.

TRUCK OPEN MODIFIED

4,000 lbs. • 5,500 lbs. • 6,500 lbs. 100% Payback Plus $100 If 4 Pullers Or More Per Class

DIESEL

MODIFIED

Under 7,000 lbs. 7,000 lbs. and over

6,000 lbs. 100% Cash Payback 5-1/2 miles per hour speed limit on farm stock classes. Must have clevis with 3-inch or larger. 20” maximum drawbar height to top of pulling point. Must have solid drawbar. No duals except in unlimited class.

cept No Duals ex unlimited

Must have ket shatter blan

Tractor Entry Fee $

Trucks will run basically by western Wisconsin 4x4 truck pullers rules.

Truck Entry Fee Stock, Improved Stock and Diesel $

Scales open at 8 a.m., close at 2 p.m.

20.00 20.00

Truck Open Modified $

20.00

100% Cash Payback

Trucks Begin Pulling Approx. 2 p.m. Lunch And Refreshments On Grounds No Carry Ons No Use Of Alcoholic Beverages Allowed Before Or During The Pull By Drivers

HELD AT INDIAN CREEK, WI

Saturday, July 3, 2010

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Use of facilities, participation in activities now come with a cost

11 a.m. Sharp SION: ADMISs $10 For more information, lt u d A $5 contact: 11-15 FREE Larry Root, 715-653-2649 r e d n 10 & U Roger Owens, 715-653-2566


PAGE 8 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - JUNE 30, 2010

COMMUNITY

VIEWPOINTS

SEND YOUR VIEWS AND FEEDBACK TO: INTER-COUNTY LEADER, BOX 490, FREDERIC, WI 54837 OR E-MAIL the-leader@centurytel.net

A lot of hang time

• Joe Heller •

• Web poll results •

Last week’s question

On our site

Resign Be relieved of his duties Be reprimanded

To take part in our poll, go to theleader.net and scroll down to the lower left part of the screen • See front page for this week’s question

• Where to write • President Barack Obama 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Washington, D.C. 20500 www.whitehouse.gov/contact/ Governor Jim Doyle P.O. Box 7863, Madison, WI 53707 wisgov@mail.state.wi.us Congressman David Obey (7th District) 2462 Rayburn Office Bldg. Washington, D.C. 20515 or Federal Building, Wausau, WI 54401 (715) 842-5606 Rep. Nick Milroy (73rd District) Room 221 North, State Capitol P.O. Box 8952, Madison 53708 E-mail: rep.milroy@legis.state.wi.us

Rep. Ann Hraychuck (28th District) State Capitol, P.O. Box 8942 Madison, WI 53708 Phone: 608-267-2365 • Toll free: 888-529-0028 In-district: 715-485-3362 rep.hraychuck@ legis.state.wi.us Rep. Mary Hubler (75th District) Room 7 North, State Capitol P.O. Box 8952, Madison, WI 53708 or 1966 21-7/8 St., Rice Lake 54868 (715) 234-7421• (608) 2662519 rep.hubler@legis.state.wi.us U.S. Senator Herb Kohl 330 Hart Senate Office Bldg. Washington, D.C. 20510 (715) 832-8492 senator_kohl@kohl.senate.gov

The hang time of the political football that’s been kicked up in the air since the announcement Polaris would close its Osceola plant is impressive. Specifically, the reasons behind Polaris’ decision to dump Osceola in favor of a plant in Mexico. Polaris holds on to the position that their decision is pure business strategy the new plant will be better located to serve its customers and labor costs obviously will drop dramatically. There was no statement on the company’s part - that we can recall - that indicated they were unhappy in Wisconsin - for any reason. In fact, one Polaris official denied Wisconsin’s competitiveness regarding economic development played a role at all. Polaris’ longevity at Osceola seems to bear that out. And, of course, the upfront presentation of the company’s economic goals along with the lure of very cheap labor – would seem to put all the speculation to rest. But remember, we’re in election mode. Incumbents are bearing the brunt of a huge movement to discredit them for not doing enough to keep Polaris right here. Perhaps some of that political drive is behind a new effort to examine the state’s regional, national and global economic development competitiveness. A story this week in the Superior Telegram noted Douglas County is signing on to a plan by the Wisconsin Economic Development Association, Competitive Wisconsin Inc., Wisconsin Counties Association and Wisconsin Economic Development Institute to conduct a research project on Wisconsin’s competitiveness. Wonder if the Polaris announcement had anything do to with this? First on the agenda for the project will likely be a comparison of Wisconsin’s business success with those of other upper Midwest states over the past decade. And then questions about what makes companies locate where they do. What are the perks industries consider valuable enough to lure them - and keep them in one particular community or area? Lower taxes? Large pool of workers? Trained workers? Immediately available sites? Infrastucture and location? Someone said the U of M provided low-cost or free engineering to Polaris’ Minnesota plants. That’s a nice perk. The project’s goal and the impressive response to the Polaris plant closing in Osceola by local and state officials is telling us something positive is being generated in the wake of a catastrophic blow to our local community - economically and emotionally. If you can, attend Thursday’s public forum (see briefly, page 3) in Osceola regarding a plan of action to counteract the loss of jobs in the wake of Polaris’ departure. The agenda titles alone tell you that people are moving and thinking. The project to measure the state’s competitiveness is also a move in the right direction. And maybe we need to call for a fair catch of the political football being kicked around and call time out so we don’t lose sight of the important goal of creating long-term economic stability for our county and region. In the meantime, tell us why you think Polaris left Osceola for Mexico - via an e-mail (the-leader@centurytel.net) or by way of our Web poll at www.theleader.net.

Senator Robert Jauch (25th District) Room 19 South, State Capitol P.O. Box 788, Madison, WI 53707 E-mail: Sen.Jauch@legis.state.wi.us Senator Sheila Harsdorf (10th District) State Capitol, P.O. Box 7882 Madison, WI 53707 (608) 266-7745 • (715) 2321390 Toll-free - 1-800-862-1092 sen.harsdorf@legis.state.wi.us

U.S. Sen. Russ Feingold SDB 40, Rm. 1, Washington, D.C. 20510 or 1600 Aspen Commons Middleton, WI 53562-4716 (608) 828-1200 senator@feingold.senate.gov

Our Web site this week offers a story not in our print edition and it deals with a subject few of us want to read about due to its sensitive nature. The Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism has presented a story on suicides in the state - how they are on the rise and how they outnumber those in other area states. We know of two more alleged suicides in our area this past weekend, but we do not know the causes. We can only hope none of us experience the feelings and circumstances that lead to suicide - and that we can gain the insight to perhaps help prevent others from taking that way out of this world. And there are some who do not subscribe to prevention in some cases - arguing that there’s an individual’s right in ending his/her own life to prevent suffering. That’s another realm of editorializing. According to Helping Others Prevent and Educate about Suicide (HOPES), a nonprofit organization based in Madison, people considering suicide may: • Talk about killing themselves and become fixated on death. • Make statements of hopelessness and belittle their own worth. • Suddenly become happier or calmer. • Lose interest in hobbies. • Start visiting or calling loved ones. • Start putting affairs in order and making arrangements. • Start giving things away. More than 90 percent of those who kill themselves have treatable mental illnesses, such as depression or substance abuse. Some signs of depression: • Substance abuse. • Irritability, increased crying, anxiety and panic attacks. • Difficulty concentrating and remembering. • Disrupted eating and sleeping patterns. • Loss of interest in ordinary activities. • A persistent sad mood. The story on our Web site (www.the-leader.net) offers an insightful glance at the problem and is worth the few minutes it takes to read. Editorials by Gary King

Views expressed on these pages do not necessarily reflect the views of managment or board members.

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JUNE 30, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 9

• Letters to the editor • A message for K – 12 educators Seldom does a week go by when there’s not an article in the national print media and regional papers, including this publication, dealing with issues related to the failings of the K-12 public education system in America. Despite the persistent public relations agenda and boasts to the contrary by school officials and teachers, many schools continue to fall below the national median for student performance in math, reading and writing, the basic learning skills. I have a message for these education professionals: Wean teachers off the addiction to electronic gadgetry as an instructional crutch. An academic that must rely on artificial informational sources to create learning insights does not, themselves, truly understand their subject or are too lazy or intellectually incapable of communicating it the old-fashioned way. They should be fired, the unions be damned! The computer has become a counterfeit teacher. Get rid of the calculators, laptops and other electronic information devices now employed by students as a convenient substitute for thinking through and understanding the fundamental dynamics, complexities and beautiful historical evolution of a subject. This is particularly true in mathematics and the ability to assimilate knowledge and communicate. It is rare today to find a young person, even at college level, who can do simple arithmetic without a calculator, write a complete, cohesive paragraph or read and understand standard text in books, papers and common documents at the high school, college entrance level. The dependency on electronic information/communications devices has them speaking and reading in gibberish supplanting anything close to a rational level of functional human discourse as demanded for any kind of success in contemporary society. Typically, they are lost in space absent their electronic pacifiers. The current uninspired academic environment only encourages this intellectual vacuity. Bradley Ayers Clam Falls Editor’s note: The writer is a semiretired Army Ranger special operations and chemical warfare instructor. He was also a civilian aviation flight and ground instructor for many years. He holds a master’s degree in education and is a published author of several nonfiction books.

Great or foolish?

When I passed the second church sign in Siren advertising 9 a.m. service on July 4, it struck me. Our forefathers who gave us the freedoms we celebrate honored both God and country. But today we honor neither. I had thought to walk in the 5K race with my daughter as I did a couple of years ago - but not at the expense of church. This year I have to choose between praying for our nation and walking through the park. I have to choose be-

tween participating in the bed race or Sunday school. I can choose the kiddie parade and the grand parade or church service. Two churches chose to squeeze their service in between all the activities. Not mine. But why do I have to choose? Why weren’t the events scheduled on Saturday as in Danbury or Sunday afternoon as in Webster? Why did the Siren committee decide that a bed race was more important than church? What on earth are we telling our kids? We are telling them that foolish races and innocuous parades are more important than church. We are letting them know what our real values are. How do those events in any way in any year honor the heritage of freedom that our forefathers left for us? At least at 8 a.m. in church a small group of Christians will pray for our nation and the terrible straits we have gotten ourselves into. At least at 9:15 a.m. in church a small group of Christians will be learning more about Jesus in Sunday school. At least at 10:15 a.m. in church a larger group of worshipers will honor God and country, along with all who have gone before us to make this county great. Then I asked myself, “When I get the Leader next week, will I see a picture of the 5K race winner crossing the finish line or a small group of dedicated Christians praying for our beleaguered nation? Will I see crazily dressed people pushing beds down Main Street or a small group of dedicated Christians studying the Bible? Will I see kids and adults marching in parades or will I see dedicated Christians worshiping God and honoring our national heritage?” Will I see a picture of what makes our nation great or what makes our nation look foolish? Carolyn Marquardt Siren

The missing facts

Facts – they seem to be missing from some recent editorials and letters to the editor. I think we should focus on the facts of the situation. Fact: The Polaris closing is a tragedy. Fact: Polaris is moving to Mexico because they can make their product there for a fraction of the labor costs and still ship it back here and make a profit. Fact: The plant closing has nothing to do with anything the governor or Legislature has done, and Polaris officials have said that. Fact: This is the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. Fact: Rep. Hraychuck helped shepherd through legislation that created $200 million in job creation incentives to help attract and keep companies in our state. Fact: I will continue to support Hraychuck and her initiatives to help, not only the Polaris workers, but to continue to fight for hardworking Wisconsin families as she has proven to do as our state representative. Mary Drinkwine Osceola

New direction, please

Wisconsin needs to head into a new direction. The taxing, borrowing, raiding of

segregated funds to spend more has got to stop. The spending by the current Democrat majority in the state Senate and the Assembly is unsustainable. To think our representative could have helped curb the problem by a single no vote on the state budget, but she went with her liberal colleagues from Madison and her yes vote passed the state budget. Erik Severson will be a breath of fresh air in Madison as our representative to the Assembly. We can do our part in dismantling the liberal majority in the state Assembly by electing Severson to the state Assembly. We cannot afford to lose any more jobs in our area because of the irresponsible tax and spend policies of our current representation to the state Assembly. Liberal Gov. Doyle and David Obey, who were instrumental in getting Ann Hraychuck elected, are becoming private citizens; let’s help Hraychuck join them by voting for Severson. Mark Pettis Hertel

Sharing critters

Tamara Larson and her group organized and brought all the animals to the petting zoo for Frederic Family Days. I had the opportunity to spend quite a bit of time at the petting zoo with my grandchildren, and I was so happy to see all the children and adults enjoying picking up and petting the animals. I hope this wonderful contribution to the Frederic Family Days continues for a long time. Tamara and her group deserve credit for their hard work and sharing of their critters with all of us. Nancy Jensen Frederic

Respect farmers

In response to the letter from Scott and Kay Jacobson of Cushing (6-19-10). I grew up on a farm in Burnett County. It is no “clock out and leave it for tomorrow.” The hours are midnight to 11:59 p.m. There are no sick days or vacation days. Frankly, I couldn’t do it today! During harvesting time (not a festival) farmers may not even get six hours’ sleep. My dad worked the farm (with the whole family) all day long and then at night did custom combining and corn picking. He also had diabetes. Today, I enjoy - yes enjoy - the scent (not smell) of cow manure! The fresh stuff, not the stinky manure pits. I slow down just a bit so I can smell it longer. It brings back happy memories for me. Similar to how corn dogs remind people of state fair memories. It saddens me to see a home or three in the middle of a field. I know the economy forces farmers to sell off land. That’s unfortunate. Farmers don’t even earn minimum wage. When I come upon a tractor and machinery on the road, I just slow down and follow for a while. Everyone needs to slow down sometimes. Isn’t that why so many of you “escape” the city - to come to rural areas? As for “noise,” I’d take farming sounds

all night versus loud cycles, trucks, cars and stereos late at night. (But that’s another subject). So let’s respect farmers, enjoy the sounds (of nature and farming) of rural life and strive to keep our lovely countryside as country. Brenda Lee Tasker Luck Footnote: What about the septic trucks that spread “treated” wastewater from human feces? When we flush, it doesn’t just disappear. Hey Steve McCormack, remember to “grow local, buy local, thrive local.”

Great stuff

Wonderful newsprint from the Leader on the tables and chairs debacle ... re-up me for another year, love your paper. Who’s running the show at the Polk County Government Center? Larry, Curly or Moe? This stuff is almost as good as Stan and Laurel or the Keystone Kops. Think of it this way. Say you buy a new car and the day you drive it off the lot, its value goes down thousands of dollars. I would imagine once you purchase furniture, it’s the same. I honestly believe Ms. Gjonnes thought there was a need. She didn’t go through proper channels, bruised a few egos and now we have the fun part. Great reading. Hey, Larry, Curly and Moe, use some common sense. Instead of trying to sell the tables and chairs for pennies on the dollar, bite the bullet use it - feel good when you see it. But please, if not, keep entertaining us readers with your ineptness on this issue. Again, great stuff; fun reading. Phil Olson Oakdale, Minn. (formerly from Frederic)

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New state law increasing drunken driving penalties takes effect July 1 MADISON — On Thursday, July 1, a new state law takes effect that will significantly strengthen deterrents and increase penalties for operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated in Wisconsin. “Wisconsin Act 100, signed by Gov. Doyle in December, makes the most significant changes to the state’s drunken driving laws since 2003 when the prohibited alcohol limit dropped from .10 to .08,” says Dennis Hughes, chief of traffic safety programs for the Wisconsin Department of Transportation. The new law includes the following provisions:

Ignition interlock devices

First-time OWI offenders who were convicted with high alcohol levels and repeat drunken drivers will have to prove they’re sober in order to drive. Before starting their vehicle, these drivers will need to blow into a tube attached to an ignition interlock device that detects alcohol. They also must

blow into the IID tube periodically while driving. Courts will order installation of an IID for a minimum of one year on every vehicle owned by or registered to offenders who: Are convicted of first-offense OWI if their blood/breath alcohol was .15 or higher, are convicted of a second or subsequent OWI offense, or refused a chemical test to measure their alcohol level at the time of arrest. Convicted OWI offenders who do not comply with a court-ordered installation of an IID or who disconnect or tamper with an IID to avoid detection will be subject to fines of $150 to $600 and up to six months in jail as well as a six-month extension of the required IID period. Proof of IID installation will be required before an occupational driver’s license is issued. Offenders must pay the expense of installing and maintaining an IID as well as a $50 surcharge. For offenders with an IID restriction, their prohibited alcohol limit is .02 instead of .08.

OWI penalty increases

The new law will substantially increase jail time for many OWI convictions. Firstoffense OWI will be a criminal offense if there is a passenger under age 16 in the vehicle. The penalties will be the same as second offense OWI — five days to six months in jail plus a $350 to $1,100 fine. The mandatory minimum jail time for third-offense OWI will increase from 30 days to 45 days. Fourth-offense OWI will be a Class H felony if committed within five years of a previous drunken driving offense and will have a penalty of six months to six years in prison and a fine of $600 to $10,000. Seventh-, eighth- and ninth-offense OWI will require a minimum prison term of three years instead of the previous minimum of 48 consecutive hours. Tenth-offense OWI will require a mandatory minimum prison term of four years instead of the previous minimum of 48 consecutive hours. If the offender has a prior OWI conviction, an OWI causing injury conviction will be a

C O O P E R A T I V E - O W N E D

Class H felony, which carries a penalty of six months to six years in prison and a fine of $600 to $10,000. The new law also will increase the driver’s license reinstatement fee from $60 to $200 for revocations due to OWI-related offenses and will raise the court processing fee paid by OWI offenders from $20 to $163. Hughes says that strengthening OWI penalties and deterrents is needed to combat drunken driving in Wisconsin, which is prevalent and deadly. Last year, alcohol-related crashes in Wisconsin killed 238 people and injured 3,793, according to the Wisconsin Department of Transportation. Approximately 45,000 drivers—a number about equal to the population of the city of Fond du Lac — were convicted of drunken driving in Wisconsin in 2009. For more information about drunken driving laws, visit www.dot.wisconsin. gov/safety/motorist/drunkdriving/la w.htm. — from WisDOT

N E W S P A P E R


PAGE 10 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - JUNE 30, 2010

• Area news at a glance • Triple fatality CHETEK – Three people were killed, and three others injured, in a two-vehicle crash Sunday, June 27, on CTH D-F, east of Star Lake Road, Rusk County. According to the Wisconsin State Patrol report, Joseph Kaminski, 51, Chetek, was driving a 2010 Chevrolet Camaro west on CTH D-F, east of Chetek, when he was struck head-on by a 2001 Infiniti Carryall, driven by David Sandlers, 29, Victoria, Australia. Camaro passengers Karen Kaminski, 45, and Kyle Kaminski, 10, both of Chetek, were fatally injured. Infiniti passenger Barbara Kimball, 12, Marengo, Ill., was also killed. All were wearing their seat belts, according to the report. Kaminski was transported to Regions Hospital, Minn., for severe injuries. Sandlers suffered a fractured leg and was taken to Luther Hospital, Eau Claire, as was his passenger Sarah A. Oleskow, 24, Marengo, for a non-life-threatening injury. The report said alcohol use was not a factor. The State Patrol, sheriff’s, fire and highway departments, an ambulance, medical helicopter and the coroner all responded to the crash. It remains under investigation and reconstruction by the State Patrol. – with information from the Wisconsin State Patrol Northwest Region-Spooner Post Dump trucks destroyed SUPERIOR - Two dump trucks worth $160,000 apiece were destroyed when a fire broke out in the Superior city maintenance building early Saturday. June 26. Scott Gordon, battalion chief for the Superior Fire

Department, said the fire was reported at 12:48 a.m. An employee at the maintenance building, at 2301 Hill St., heard an explosion, and as the employee was calling for help the sprinkler system was activated automatically and an alarm sounded, summoning the fire department. Firefighters fought the fire for three hours and were able to save the building and the rest of the fleet, worth an estimated $10 million, Gordon said. Cause of the fire hadn’t been determined as of late Saturday afternoon, Gordon said, but the explosion occurred and the fire began in one of the two trucks that were destroyed. Foul play is not suspected, he said. - Superior Telegram/Duluth News-Tribune Rescued LADYSMITH - A 1-year-old child and his father were rescued from the water of Lake Holcombe following a boating accident Sunday morning, June 6. According to a Chippewa County Sheriff’s Department press release, the boy fell in and the father fell overboard during an attempt to grab the child. The boat kept traveling with two children — ages 3 and 5 — still on board. The man in the water suffered a severe leg laceration after being hit by the boat motor prop. Following the rescue, the man was airlifted to a medical facility due to his injuries. - Ladysmith news Man sentenced for robbery MADISON – A man who helped rob a Sawyer County bank last October of

TAP • JAZZ • BALLET • CREATIVE MOVEMENT • ZUMBA

$17,700 which resulted in a shoot-out with authorities was sentenced Thursday in federal court to five years and 10 months in prison. District Judge William Conley said that Steven R. Willard, 20, Phillips, warranted a sentence below the 6-1/2 to 8-year advisory guideline range because of his age, lack of prior violent convictions and cooperation after his arrest. - Sawyer County Record Prison goes into lockdown STILLWATER, Minn. - The Stillwater prison went into lockdown mode Sunday, June 27, after an inmate attacked another prisoner with a makeshift knife. The B West unit at the Minnesota Correctional Facility-Stillwater, located in Bayport, Minn., holds 280 inmates and was still on lockdown Tuesday, according to Minnesota Department of Corrections spokeswoman Shari Burt. This wasn’t the first incident coming from B West. As many as 70 or 80 prisoners in the 280-inmate housing unit were involved in a dispute on May 15, causing it to be in a modified lockdown. Warden John King increased the modified lockdown to a full lockdown in the unit after Sunday’s incident, revoking all privileges from the B West inmates for security and safety reasons until further notice. Stillwater Gazette Booty Cruise gets wild STILLWATER, Minn. - A fight broke out last Thursday during KDWB’s annual Booty Cruise, which was held on a paddle-

boat on the St. Croix River. Five women were cited for misdemeanor disorderly conduct, but no serious injuries were reported. Another woman was arrested for public urination on Main Street that same night, allegedly from that same event, according to the Stillwater Police Department. The Booty Cruise is an all-women event hosted by the radio station and held aboard a St. Croix Boat & Packet Co. vessel. The only way to attend the annual event is to win tickets from KDWB. - Stillwater Gazette Transplant survivor on journey BARRON - Traversing the width of the contiguous United States on a bicycle is no small feat. Making the coast-to-coast journey after enduring a heart transplant would undoubtedly make the venture even more remarkable. Some might even doubt the new heart recipient’s ability to handle the physically demanding journey. Yet Dan Olson has set out to prove those naysayers wrong. On Sunday, June 27, he began a 63-day bike tour that will take him from Seattle, Wash., to Boston, Mass. It was eight years ago when Olson, then age 37, was hospitalized due to a virus that had damaged his heart. The medical emergency not only put him in line for a heart transplant, but it also foiled plans Olson had in 2002 for a similar bike riding trip across the country. That tour was to begin in Anaheim, Calif., and end in Orlando, Fla. - Barron News-Shield

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JUNE 30, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 11

Fund balance to be tapped to cover end-of-year school debt by Nancy Jappe Leader staff writer SIREN – Siren School District Administrator Scott Johnson told the school board, at its June 28 meeting, the good news first. The good news is that it appears the district will stay well within its budget for the year ending June 30. How much within the budget, Johnson does not yet know. However, on the flip side, Johnson reminded the board that district voters have chosen the option of spending down the district’s fund balance to cover budget deficits rather than approving a $250,000 requested referendum. “There was a significant (budget) deficit predicted (for) the end of the year,” Johnson said. “We are very close to what was projected.” Johnson commented that there were no budget cuts during the school year that just ended. “We are in a two-year pattern of spending down the fund balance,” he said. “We will not be able to afford to do this three years in a row. We are working to keep expenses (from) exceeding revenues. This will take a lot of work by the staff.” The previous end-of-year deficit was predicted to be $366,000. According to Johnson, the final figure will be in this

Carol Larson, Burnett County public health supervisor, presented the Siren School District, represented here by school board President Jeff Howe, a check for $1,500 and a commendation certificate during the June 28 school board meeting. Larson commended administration, staff and students for the district’s response to the H1N1 pandemic in various ways, including public health use of the district’s phone system to notify parents. “The partnership that developed allowed many good things to happen,” Larson said. – Photo by Nancy Jappe ballpark. “We will be spending down the fund balance,” he said. Johnson asked for, and the board approved, having a midsummer open public forum to address the issue of the end-ofyear budget and forecast into the future. Wednesday, July 14, at 6 p.m. was set as the date and time for that open meeting.

Meetings on the district calendar for July include: Policy, planning and curriculum – Monday, July 19, 5 p.m. Building and grounds – Monday, July 19, 6 p.m. Budget and finance – Wednesday, July 21, 4 p.m. personnel and negotiations – Wednesday, July 21, 5:30 p.m. (tentative). Actions taken at the meeting included:

Approving the bid of Daniels Plumbing and Heating for $5,643 to put in a stainless steel hand-washing sink in the elementary school. Using a brass sink was not possible because of the low height of the sink. Dayton Daniels abstained from voting. Approving of a request for $1,500 for the CUE (Community Education) budget for the coming year, amount to be matched by Webster. Approval of the bid from Sara Lee to provide bread during the coming year. Approved taking three minutes from home room and adding these minutes to the curriculum schedule during the coming year. This would result in three earlyrelease days added to the six the district already offers. Daniels reminded the board that this could be an inconvenience to working parents who must provide child care for early releases. In open following closed-session discussion, the board approved the following new hires: William Hoefler as head high school football coach, Stephanie Manthei as educational interpreter, Elissa Hinze as sixth-grade teacher and Rochelle Erickson as district secretary.

Grantsburg Family Foods celebrates store remodeling with customer shopping spree by Priscilla Bauer. Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – Cindi Peer was ready; she had a strategy and with her husband, Greg, at her side, smiled confidently and said, “I’m lucky, he’s not.” Peer came to Grantsburg Family Foods last week to grab some groceries, as many as she could in one minute to be exact. She had won a speedy shopping spree in a drawing held during the store’s recent re-

modeling celebration and now it was time to test her shopping savvy. As soon as assistant manager Matt Fury gave her the signal to start Peer closed in on the candy aisle and was off and running, literally. Followed by Fury, pushing several empty carts just in case she filled her first, Peer made a quick stop at the cheese shelves. Then, showing no signs of frenzy, Peer

Cindi Peer was ready; she had a strategy and with her husband, Greg, at her side, smiled confidently and said, “I’m lucky, he’s not.” Peer came to Grantsburg Family Foods last week to grab some groceries, as many as she could in one minute to be exact. Peer won the speedy shopping spree in a drawing held during the store’s recent remodeling celebration and now it was time to test her shopping

Recent remodeling at Grantsburg Family Foods Store, including the expanded produce and deli areas, was celebrated recently with a customer appreciation drawing for a one-minute shopping spree.

made her way methodically to the meat section where she handled hams with ease. With seconds to go Peer piled a few more pounds of pork in her cart then was cheered on to the checkout. At the register Peer realized she’d racked up a hefty haul. The total tally was $284.87.

As store manager, Jeff Lehnen began the bagging; Fury finalized the feat, presenting Peer with her rewarding receipt. Note: Peer generously gifted her groceries to the Shady Knoll Home residential living and respite care facility in Grantsburg.

Expect boat inspectors in Burnett County over Fourth of July Effort aims to prevent spread of aquatic invasive species BURNETT COUNTY – Volunteers, citizens and state officials from the DNR, numerous lake associations, as well as Burnett County will be educating boaters and conducting free courtesy boat checks over the Fourth of July 4 weekend at several lakes in Burnett County, to assure the boaters do not accidentally spread Eurasian water milfoil, zebra mussels and other aquatic invasive species. The inspectors will be stationed at public boat landings to help boaters understand Wisconsin’s invasive species laws and what they must do before leaving. This service is to help remind people to remove all aquatic plants and drain all water from their boats to help prevent the spread of aquatic invasives. Failure to do

so may lead to a fine according to state and local laws. “Wisconsin is a great place for fishing and boating. By following simple steps, we can preserve the quality of our lakes for future generations to enjoy,” says Brad Morris, Burnett County’s aquatic invasive species coordinator. Invasive species can crowd out native species, disrupt lake ecosystems, and interfere with boating, fishing and other recreation. The main way that invasive species and fish diseases, such as viral hemorrhagic septicemia, spread to new waters is aboard boating and fishing equipment and live fish or water moved from one water body to another. The citizens, who have been trained through Wisconsin’s Clean Boats, Clean Waters program, will demonstrate the required prevention steps boaters must take, provide stickers for boaters to place on their trailer posts to remind them of these steps, and will talk about Wisconsin

invasive species and VHS laws. Boaters, anglers and others enjoying Wisconsin waters are required to: • Drain all water from vehicles, trailers, watercraft, containers, fishing equipment and gear when leaving any state waters or their shores. Two gallons may be kept for minnows. • Do not take live fish away from any lake or its shores. A fish is considered dead when it is no longer in water. This law applies to shore anglers as well as those who fish from a boat.

• Remove all aquatic plants, animals and mud from watercraft, trailers and vehicles before leaving a landing for the day. Do not transport a vehicle, boat, boat trailer, equipment or gear of any type on a public highway which has an aquatic plant or animal attached to the exterior. • Use minnows left over after a fishing trip again on the same water or on any other waters if no lake or river water or other fish was added to their container. – submitted

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PAGE 12 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - JUNE 30, 2010

Our Redeemer and Trinity Lutheran churches have new pastor

A number of pastors from the North Wisconsin District of the Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod participated in the ordination and installation of Pastor Gerald Heinecke, new pastor at Our Redeemer and Trinity Lutheran churches. His father, the Rev. Bradley Heinecke, preached for the ordination service. Shown front row, (L to R): the Rev. Kenneth Hinrichs from Trinity in Hayward, the Rev. John Miels from St. Paul Lutheran in Cumberland, the Rev. Gerald Heinecke, the Rev. Bradley Heinecki of Sidney, Neb., and the Rev. Reymond A. Smith from the Trinity Lutheran in Ortonville, Minn. Shown back row: the Rev. Burton Harger from Rice Lake, the Rev. Bill Plaute of Faith Lutheran of Chippewa Falls, the Rev. David Emmons from Zion Lutheran and Immanuel Lutheran of Turtle Lake and Clayton, the Rev. Jody Walter of Frederic and Vicar Gregory Becker.

Bear hunters donate time

On Wednesday, June 23, a local bear hunters group donated their time picking up trash and litter in the Polk County Forest in Sterling Township. This is a great partnership between the local bear hunters and the county. The amount of trash being illegally dumped on public land is a serious problem. Please contact the Polk County Forestry, 715-485-9265, or parks department, 715-485-9294, if you have any information regarding illegal dumping. – Photo submitted

Burnett County sheriff’s report Arrests and citations June 22: John Olson, 47, Webster, was arrested on a Burnett County warrant. June 22: Ryan E. Keith, 21, Siren was arrested in Polk County on a Burnett County warrant. June 24: Daniel J. Ellefson, 23, Pine City, Minn., was ar-

rested in Polk County on a Burnett County warrant. Other incidents June 24: Christina L. Allen, Webster, reported suspicious activity at the Clam Lake Cemetery. The incident is under investigation. June 25: Brenda Rachner, Webster, reported eight solar

lights taken from her driveway, and that many of them were destroyed and lying on the road. The incident is under investigation. June 28: The St. Croix Tribal Construction reported graffiti on several road signs. The incident is under investigation.

Burnett County criminal court Jeffrey T. Born, 37, Grantsburg, disposition of carcasses, $250.00. Jamie L. Booth, 41, Centuria, fail to transfer snowmobile registration, $127.50. Theresa Seto Alewine, 37, West St. Paul, Minn., speedometer violation, $175.30. Paul C. Schoening, 45, Plymouth, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Peter Varga, 54, St. Paul, Minn., operating with PAC greater than .08, license revoked six months, $250.00. Nicholas J. Damico, 30, Hinckley, Minn., sell alcohol to underage person, $127.50. Rene E. Belland Winkler, 41, Webster, sell alcohol to underage person, $137.50 Preston Mason, 18, Grantsburg, underage drinking, 20 hours community service, license suspended six months, alcohol assessment, $389.50. Brandon G. Schladweiler, 24, Maiden Rock, operate snowmobile while intoxicated, $641.50. Tyler J. Ingli, 22, Plum City, operate snowmobile while intoxicated, $641.50. James F. Boullt, 29, Englewood, Colo., operate snowmobile

while intoxicated, $641.50. Jeffery P. Hollen, 33, Chisage City, Minn., OUI, $691.50, license revoked six months, alcohol assessment. Patricia H. Bray, 68, Grantsburg, issue worthless check, $330.50. Cody L. Reindahl, 22, Clayton, resisting or failing to stop, one-year probation, may apply for expunction, alcohol assessment, $100.00. Duane F. Sam, 25, Spooner, disorderly conduct, one-year probation, sentence withheld, obtain GED during probation, obtain sex offender evaluation, no contact with victim, $100.00. John R. Olson, 47, Webster, disorderly conduct, one-year probation, sentence withheld, no contact with victim, maintain absolute sobriety, $200.00. Jordan M. Rogers, 20, Webster, disorderly conduct, one-year probation, sentence withheld, must complete GED, continue with treatment, maintain absolute sobriety, $200.00. Samantha C. Belisle, 37, Shell Lake, reckless driving, $375.00. Shawn P. Douglas, 41, Cumberland, operating while revoked,

$413.00, 10-day jail sentence, Huber and / or community service work granted. Gordon L. Kieger, 60, Saint Paul, Minn., theft of movable property, $88.00. Richard L. Kieger, 27, St. Paul, Minn., theft of movable property, $88.00. Robert H. Deal, 21, Centuria, theft of movable property, threeyear probation, sentenced withheld, $5,986.40 restitution, restitution joint and several, the court finds that he has the ability to pay $1,800.00, no consumption of alcohol, must write letter of apology to victim, provide DNA sample, $113.00. Derek L. Olson, 21, Grantsburg, lewd behavior - exposure, one-year probation, sentence withheld, no contact with victim, $100.00. Robert E. Phernetton, 24, Siren, possess THC with intent to sell, three-year probation, sentence withheld, six-month jail sentence, Huber release granted, drug treatment, $115.00. Melanie L. Imme, 24, Danbury, OUI, $803.00, license revoked eight months, alcohol assessment.

Pastor Gerald Heinecke was ordained and installed as the new pastor of Our Redeemer Lutheran Church in Webster and the Trinity Lutheran Church in Danbury. Heinecke will live in Webster. The family comes to the area from Indiana and describe themselves as an outdoors family who enjoy hiking, camping and sports. Shown (L to R): Erica, 2-1/2-year-old Zachary, Gerald and 4-year-old Malachi. – Photos by Sherill Summer

Peace group commemorating 30th anniversary with conference and protest LUCK - While President Obama speaks of seeking “a world without nuclear weapons” and his proposed budget for new warhead programs is actually getting a 14-percent increase over last year, Nukewatch - the Luck-based peace and environmental action group - is celebrating its 30th anniversary of uncompromising grassroots nuclear disarmament work. Along with The Nuclear Resister - the 30-year-old Tucson, Ariz.-based chronicle of anti-nuclear and anti-war civil resistance - Nukewatch is sponsoring a three-day conference on nonviolent opposition to nuclear weapons and reactors over the July 4 holiday weekend. The gathering is at Maryville College, in Maryville, Tenn., and Oak Ridge, Tenn., home to the Y-12 National Security Complex, a giant nuclear weapons materials production site established in 1945. (Y-12 is the factory where uranium was “enriched” for the atomic bomb that destroyed Hiroshima, Japan, on Aug. 6, 1945, killing an estimated 140,000 people.) The local Oak Ridge Environmental Peace Alliance is helping to host the event. Nukewatch, founded in Madison in 1980, is a nonprofit watchdog organization dedicated to the abolition of nuclear weapons and a phase-out of nuclear power. Its newsletter, Nukewatch Quarterly, publishes critical news and information about nuclear weapons, radioactive waste and reactor operations. “Today’s nuclear weapons can only produce massacres, and reactors spread cancer and birth defects. So we want the government to abolish these things forever,” said staffer John LaForge who edits the Quarterly. In 1988, Nukewatch became the first

group to publish an atlas of the landbased intercontinental ballistic missiles, 1,000 of which were positioned in underground launch pads in Missouri, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska and North and South Dakota. Since the publication of Nuclear Heartland and the slew of protests against the missiles that the book helped rouse, over 500 of the missiles have been removed. After 1990, Nukewatch also helped coordinate efforts to shut down the Navy’s Project E.L.F. the oversized radio transmitter that stretched across 28 miles of forest in Ashland County and sent secret, one-way messages to nuclear-armed submarines around the world. Over 40 individuals spent a combined total of about 11 years in jail for nonviolently protesting what they called the Navy’s “starter pistol for nuclear war.” It was closed in September 2004. In 1993, Nukewatch staff and others joined a public removal of survey stakes at a construction site for a new Ground Wave Emergency Network tower near Medford. GWEN was said by the defense department to allow military commanders to continue communicating during nuclear war by withstanding the “electromagnetic pulse” from nuclear bomb blasts that will have destroyed conventional communications. Four people served 60-day sentences for the action, and only weeks afterward the system (which was the object of nationwide protests) was cancelled by Congress. The 30th anniversary gathering will include nonviolent direct action too, this time in opposition to the Y-12 site’s selection for a new H-bomb materials facility said to cost at least $3.5 billion. - from Nukewatch

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OWI eighth-offense charged AMERY - Jon Grossenbacher, 48, Clayton, was arrested and charged with OWI, eighth offense on June 23. Another party had reported a possible drunk driver heading toward Amery from the east; the party said she had been run off the road. An officer intercepted the vehicle and stopped it. During the stop, Grossenbacher was reportedly uncooperative, refusing to stay in his vehicle, refusing to give his full name and refusing to put his

arms behind him to be handcuffed. After warning him several time, the officer used a taser on Grossenbacher. He was taken in for a blood draw and then to jail. Other charges included operating after revocation, obstruction/resisting an officer and nonregistration of an auto. — with information from the Polk County Sheriff’s Dept.


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Milltown’s 100th anniversary

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Beard contest

These three Milltown gentlemen were clean shaven in February, when the beard contest for the Milltown’s 100th-anniversary celebration began. From left are Mike Reed, who won the award for the grayest beard; Jeff Succo, who won the prize for the longest beard; and Danny Wheeler, who won the award for the best-groomed beard. Judging were Marie Sogge and Miss Milltown Brandi Larson.

Contestants in Milltown’s 100th-anniversary beard contest received a shaving kit in case they wanted to get rid of the whiskers they had grown since February. They each also received a “before” picture, and “after” photos were taken during the judging Wednesday evening. From left are Mike Reed, Jeff Succo and Danny Wheeler. – Photos by Mary Strirrat

Vets display in Bering Park A display of military items was part of the program to honor veterans held Tuesday evening in Milltown’s Bering Park. The display included uniforms, memorabilia, certificates, rifles and munition. — Photos by Mary Stirrat

Plaque presentation

The Wisconsin Legislature presented a citation to the village of Milltown in honor of its 100th-anniversary. The citation notes that the village was founded by Patrick Lillis on March 28, 1910, and named after his hometown in Ireland. The economic, industrial and infrastructure development of the village are commended, as are the modernization of public works. Finally, the 1,000 current residents were recognized for their pride in the community and compassion for each other. Presenting a plaque to Milltown Village President LuAnn White, left, and community club President Steve Quist were state Reps. Ann Hraychuck and Sheila Harsdorf.

From left are Rep. Ann Hraychuck, village President LuAnn White, community club President Steve Quist, and Sen. Sheila Harsdorf. – Photos by Mary Stirrat


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Milltown’s 100th anniversary

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Pie and ice-cream social

Milltown Village President LuAnn White, right, serves Homemade apple pie, like this one, was just one of many varieties served at the pie and ice-cream social in Milltown. Pie lovers had their choice of blueberry, cherry, lemon, pecan, up some ice cream with a piece of pie. rhubarb and more. – Photos by Mary Stirrat

Riley Carnes, left, and Colin Loehr took advantage of the homemade pies available at Milltown’s 100th-anniversary celebration. Both will be freshmen at Unity Schools this fall.

10 0 years of music and fashion

MILLTOWN – Music and fashion of the last 100 years was on parade in Milltown Thursday evening. Thanks to the Polk County Historical Museum, Elaine Cox and Cheryl Peper, among others, audience members were treated to everything from the cotton dresses of the early settlers to the T-shirts and jeans of the present day. Along with a look at the fashions, emcee Jackie Reynolds provided insight into the newest fads and most modern innovations of each decade. – Mary Stirrat

As the ‘40s transitioned into the ‘50s, mothers still stayed at home with their growing families. No matter whether she was doing laundry or cleaning house, the striped sundress on the right, worn by Charity Zabel, or the pink sleeveless number worn by Courtney Galle would have been the common uniform of the day.

Photos by Mary Stirrat

War bonds, blackouts and troop trains were common sights in the 1940s, when this dress with a cinched belt and padded shoulders was in fashion. Model is former Miss Milltown Janis Wonka Federer.

Women could expect to pay about $30 for this twopiece rayon dress, and another $5 for the hat, when this outfit was new in 1947. Penicillin had been perfected, TV invented, and Bob and Bing were wooing the ladies. Sports heroes like Joe Louis and Jackie Robinson began to chip away at the color barrier. Miss Milltown Brandi Larson is the model.

M o d e l Charity Zabel is a trendsetter of 1927 in this peach taffeta number that would have been perfect for a night out. During this year Charles Lindberg became a national hero by making the first New York to Paris solo flight. Babe R u t h slammed out 60 home runs, and Ford took for The roaring ‘20s, with flapper orders fashions and bobbed hair, was a 50,000 Model time of jazz, gangsters and the A cars. Charleston. This flapper model is Milltown Library Director Jen Feske.

The late 1950s brought in “The Cat in the Hat” by Dr. Seuss, Alaska as the 49th state, the launch of Sputnik and the innovation of the Barbie doll. Poodle skirts, neck scarves, bobby socks and saddle shoes were all the rage, modeled here by Norma Hauge, left, and Mary Sue Morris.


JUNE 30, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 15

SUMMER SPORTS INTER! COUNTY LEADER • INTER! COUNTY LEADER • INTER! COUNTY LEADER

F R E D E R I C • G R A N T S B U R G • L U C K • S T. C R O I X F A L L S • S I R E N • U N I T Y • W E B S T E R L E G I O N B A S E B A L L • A M AT E U R B A S E B A L L

Speedway Lost

racers started by cutting “a small narrow track” from the woods and fields, just north of Milltown, a block east of the current 170th Street/2nd Street NW, just outside village limits. “Sunday afternoons would be the time to race,” the program recalled, using cars that were assembled for “as little as $100 and as much as $500.” That same program honors the first feature winner, Don Langel of Luck, with Mary Ennis being the

Former Milltown Speedway fans and racers recall lost glory by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer MILLTOWN – They had nicknames like Scratch, Slim, Itch, Sonny and Lumpy. They wore T-shirts, jeans and grease, smoking straight cigarettes, generally with pretty dirty hands. They had their own language with words like “Isky,” “bored out” and “lockers.” They also drove hard, fast and seemingly without fear, in machines that most parents wouldn’t let their kids even sit in today, let alone drive at triple-digit speeds on dirt - with a dozen other cars beside them, doing the same thing. Somehow, they drove $100 cars at 100 mph and lived to tell about it - and do it all over again the next weekend. Between physics, chance and the law of averages, it’s amazing any of the stock car drivers of the past lived to see today. And frankly, many of them did not make it. A weekend reunion of the old Milltown Speedway fans showed that while there were a lot of fans, the actual participants are few and far between. “Yeah, I think a lot of ‘em are gone today,” stated Joan Peterson of Milltown, whose late husband, Cliff, ran cars at the Milltown Speedway, under No. 81. “But I know they had a lot of fun!”

Louise Schallenberger of Grantsburg posed with a trophy won by her late brother-in-law, Bob Holmquist, at a stock car race at the old Milltown Speedway. The date on the trophy says "8-6-1955."

This is apparently a copy of one of the original fabric patches sewed onto a racer's suit.

See Speedway/page 17

Some of the last surviving cars that raced at the former Milltown Speedway came together for the first time in almost have a century over the weekend in Milltown. – Photos by Greg Marsten

Money pits The racers were generally teams of buddies: from mechanics to farmhands to construction workers, all relying on each other to help keep their cars alive with willing sponsors like local taverns, junkyards, garages - and understanding girlfriends - to let them do it every weekend. “Man, that was like throwing money down a pit!” Dan Mosay of Balsam Lake said with a big laugh. He was a fan of the Milltown track in its heyday, but remembers it being an “expensive hobby” for his friends. He recalled some of the names of past local racers and pitmen like Phernetton, Larson, McKenzie and others, many names that still remain around the region. But Mosay was right: It took fans to make it worthwhile, since the prizes for winning barely covered the parts, fuel and grub. “I even had a picture of my first [winning prize] check. It was for 11 bucks!” stated Dale Dahl of Grantsburg, who raced from 1959-1963 at the Milltown track. “Yeah, that was pretty good dough back then.” But none of them did it for the money; it was a thrill, a risk, a way to kill time and hopefully not each other. “They had a real good time out there,” said Bob Johnston of El Paso, Texas. He was in high school at the time and called the Milltown races “a release” from the drudgery of canning work, farming and general labor of the day. “It was just a lot of fun to watch.” “I was there all the time!” said Louise Schallenberger of Grantsburg. “You bet,

every Friday night, I was there!” Others noted the cost, which was always reasonable. Larry Skow of Luck was only a kid at the time, but said weekend races at the speedway were good, clean fun, and a social gathering place for lots of kids his age. “Hey, for a buck? You couldn’t beat it!” he said.

“Milltown needs a racetrack!” It was 1954, and auto racing was slowly becoming one of the highest-paid attendance sports in the nation. A small group of local racing enthusiasts saw the possibilities, pulling together with one thought in mind: “Milltown needs a racetrack!” The Milltown Speedway lit up the weekends with a fever pitch of stock car racing for eight seasons, starting in 1955. Growing from the loins of Prohibition and the cat-and-mouse games of bootleggers escaping from the “revenuers,” or federal agents, southern stock car racing became a showcase of engineering, skill, nerves, money, dedication and busted knuckles. It helped having a love of the purgatory crescendo of straight exhaust headers that hammered the crowds, harmonizing with the announcer and the crowd noise across the towns of Milltown and Luck. One of the last Milltown Speedway programs credits those founders, who later went on to become the Milltown Racing Association. They elected officers, appointing Arnie Sorenson as the first president, Willie McKenzie as first vice president and Merlin Michaelson secretary-treasurer. The group of about a dozen

This actual Milltown Speedway sign is owned by C&J Auto owner Craig Peterson. He received it in trade years ago for some work on a "putsy old snowmobile.”

Extra Points

••• DULUTH, Minn., – Several Unity residents participated in the Grandma’s Marathon race held recently in Duluth, Minn., on Saturday, June 19. Running the full marathon were Unity coaches Lori Anderson, and Yvonne Sorensen, as well as Cory Tunheim, Debbie Dunsmore, Brad Hacker, Joey Peper, Sarah Broome and Chris Sondrol. Participating in the half marathon included Molly, Lisa and Mickey Muller. More race results and times can be found at grandmasmarathon.com. – submitted ••• LEADER LAND – Four area baseball players were honored this season on the the All-District, Wisconsin Baseball Coaches Association District 1 baseball team. Saints catcher Gus Koecher made first team as a catcher, and teammate Matt Vold made the second team as a DH/utility player. Both players are seniors. Junior Brady Flaherty of Unity was named as an honorable mention as a catcher, and junior Russ Thoreen of Grantsburg was also named as an honorable mention as a DH/utility player. All four players were named to the 2010 West Lakeland All-Conference first team. – Marty Seeger ••• MILWAUKEE – Milwaukee Brewers baseball can be heard on 1260 AM on the following dates and times. The Brewers at Cardinals games on July 1, 2, 3 and 4 begin at 7 p.m., 7 p.m., and 3 p.m., and 1 p.m. respectively. The Giants at Brewers games on July 5, 6 and 7 begin at 3 p.m., 7 p.m., and 7 p.m, respectively. – submitted ••• MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. – Minnesota Twins baseball can be heard on 104.9 FM on the following dates and times. The Devil Rays at Twins games on July 1, 2, 3 and 4 begin at 7 p.m., 7 p.m., 3 p.m., and 1 p.m., respectively. The Twins at Toronto games on July 6 and 7 both begin at 7 p.m. – submitted ••• LEADER LAND – Local sports tidbits to share? Please contact the Leader by 4:30 p.m. on Mondays to go in Extra Points. – Marty Seeger ••• LEADER LAND – Leader Sports strives to follow the college careers of area athletes. If you know of an athlete who will be playing collegiate sports in 2010 and hasn’t been mentioned, send us an e-mail or call and we’ll take it from there. – Marty Seeger

SPORTS RESULTS DEADLINES: WEDNESDAY - MONDAY: 1 p.m. the following business day. TUESDAY: 7 a.m. on Wednesday. Missed deadlines mean no coverage that week! S P O R T S N E W S O R S C O R E S T O R E P O R T ? • P H O N E : 7 1 5 - 3 2 7 - 4 2 3 6 • FA X : 7 1 5 - 3 2 7 - 4 1 1 7 • E - M A I L : m s e e g e r @ c e n t u r y t e l . n e t


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Heavy hitters highlight weekend volleyball camp Andy and Meredith Nelson bring talent and skills to home court in St. Croix Falls by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – It was another tough ending for the Ball State men’s volleyball season as rival Ohio State ousted them from the Midwestern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association Tournament back in April. Former St. Croix Falls athlete Andy Nelson is a starting middle hitter for the Cardinals, and despite the loss, he’ll get another shot at it next year as a senior. “I think it’s the fourth year in row that Ohio State has knocked us out of the tournament, so it’s frustrating to say the least,” Nelson said on the season overall, but he was in good spirits last Friday afternoon, as he paused for a break from a three-day volleyball camp he and his sister, Meredith, were hosting at St. Croix Falls High School. This is the second year of the successful camp, and despite a lower number of participants than last year it wasn’t short on talented instructors. Andy’s sister Meredith, a talented St. Croix Falls athlete, was a 2006 All-American middle blocker for the UM-Gophers. Also on hand the camp Christine Tan, another Gopher volleyball player who was a Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year, and Billy Ebel, a former Ball State volleyball player who earned First Team All-MIVA honors. Former Gopher Katie Vatterrodt also reported to camp the following Saturday.

Billy Ebel, a former libero for the Ball State men's volleyball team, instructs a group of students during the volleyball camp last week. – Photos by Marty Seeger Andy was the only athlete at camp still on an active roster in college, and despite a busy summer ahead for all involved, getting the camp together was a way they felt they could give back to the St. Croix Falls community. “I feel like the St. Croix Falls community gave me so many opportunities in athletics growing up, so it’s just a great opportunity to give back to them,” Andy said,

Former Saints standouts, and Division 1 volleyball players Meredith and Andy Nelson were all smiles at their second-annual volleyball camp in St. Croix Falls. Both were excited to be back on the court, and thrilled to be able to give something back to the community.

A high school volleyball player goes up for a kill during one of several different live-action games at St. Croix Falls.

yet the camp went beyond the community of St. Croix Falls, as several high school athletes from all across the Leader Land area, and younger ones participated in the camp. Meredith echoed her younger brother’s thoughts about giving back to the community. She recently moved back to the Twin Cities area after spending her last few years working for General Mills in Austin, Texas. Due to her busy schedule she was unable to do any coaching, but after getting back to the area four months ago, she began coaching for the Northern Lights club volleyball team, which she played for during high school. “It’s good to be back home and closer to

my family. Nice to come back to [St. Croix Falls High] school and kind of bring some of these experiences that I’ve been really fortunate to have, and to teach as much as I possibly can. It’s been a really fun experience for us,” Meredith said, adding that camp helps to fuel her competitive nature. She can see that competitive nature in the athletes that participated in the camp as well. “They become a little wary about becoming friends of their enemies, but it’s nice to kind of bring all of these athletes together from these communities,” Meredith said. For Andy the camp has been a great way to not only bring something back to the community, but get back into the game of volleyball and work his way toward his final season at Ball State. Part of his reason for staying off the court lately has been due to a pair of herniated discs that have been slowly healing, but things are getting better and workouts will begin soon. As a senior for the 2011 season, Andy will assume a different role as not only a veteran senior, but team captain on a relatively young team. It wasn’t long ago that Andy himself was learning the ropes of what it takes to play volleyball at the collegiate level. Andy never played volleyball in high school, yet worked his way into a starting role with a high-level Division 1 school. “It’s been a really big learning experience since I’ve been there. I just try to be a sponge and soak up everything I can. My role has been reversed, and I’ll be the teacher instead of learning,” he said. Andy shouldn’t have any trouble in his newfound role. He started in all 29 matches for Ball State last season and he earned a spot on the All-MIVA second team, was an Academic All-MIVA player and nominated to ESPN The Magazine’s Academic All-District 5 Men’s At-Large First Team. The Ball State men’s volleyball season begins in January of 2011.

Ball State men's volleyball starter Andy Nelson was busy teaching the game of volleyball to several area high school athletes last Friday.

Christine Tan was just one of a handful of talented instructors at the Nelson volleyball camp. She was a former UM-Gopher libero who was a Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year.


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Hansen Farms milk tourney another success MILLTOWN – The 33rd-annual Hansen Farms Youth Milk Tournament was hosted in Milltown June 11-13, and was another success with 27 teams playing a total of 49 games. Winners of this year’s milk trophy was Northbound Sports on Friday and Saturday, with The Scoop winning the milk trophy on Sunday. A total of 150 gallons of milk was consumed over the weekend, along with 300 pounds of brats and 800 hot dogs. In the senior boys division, Balsam Lake Hardware took first place with a 7-5 and

6-3 win over Poirier Hardwood Flooring, who took second place. Troy’s Total Flooring placed third after losing 21-7 to Balsam Lake Hardware, who lost to Poirier Hardwood Flooring in the first game 7-4. They came through the losers bracket by defeating Wieser Concrete, The General Store, T-Dawgs and The Scoop. In the junior boys division 10 teams competed, with Olson Sewer defeating TDawgs 11-3 for the championship. TDawgs placed second with an 8-4 win over third-place Jolly Builders. Olson was

undefeated in the tournament with wins over Skol Bar, Hendrickson Heating and T-Dawgs. In the peewee division five teams competed, with Farmer’s Insurance taking the championship by defeating the secondplace Dream Lawn, 15-6 and 8-6. Third place went to Sterling Bank/Hack’s Pub. Farmers insurance lost to Dream Lawn in the last game, 9-6 and came back by de-

feating Balsam Lake Market and Sterling Bank/Hacks Pub 11-1 for the championship game. There were just three girls teams that competed in the milk tournament, with Olson Sewer/Northbound Sports taking first place, TL Enterprises coming in second and Burnett Dairy taking third. – Marty Seeger with submitted information

Balsam Lake Hardware was the big winner in the senior boys division at the Milk Tournament held in Milltown. – Photos submitted

The Farmer’s Insurance team took first place in the peewee division of the Hansen Farms Milk Tournament.

Dan and Dustin McKinney were honored for nine years of sponsoring the Hansen Farms Milk Tournament. Mike Johnson was also honored for eight years.

The Olson Sewer/Northbound Sports softball team brought home the firstplace trophy in the tourney that took place June 11-13.

Speedway/continued first woman winner. From there it took off, and became a staple from early May until midfall, originally just on Sundays but later in the evenings on Friday, as well.

The reunion Several dozen fans, drivers, pitmen, sponsors and even relatives of fans past came together for the Milltown Fishermen’s Party reunion of the old track on Friday, June 25. Showing off the old trophies, memorabilia, signs and even a few relic cars that once graced the muddy track; they still survive today. They reminisced, chatted and told stories of the heydays of local racing, when the evening feature events drew racers from around the region, even from Minnesota and occasionally the Dakotas. With that growth came improvements like lights for evening feature races, a better concession stand, and a heavier-duty water truck to keep the dust down. They

even improved the track skirting walls. They had no bleachers or specific seating outside the brick embankment; most of the people just sat on their cars or set up chairs. But with the growth came rules, and with those rules came enforcement of the rules, meaning an occasional challenge to a win. There were stories of late-night

In the junior boys division, the first-place trophy went to Olson Sewer. teardowns of winning cars reportedly ending as late as 2 a.m. with a bunch of tired, half-sauced drivers finally finding out if a car was legal or not.

Only a few photos of the track in action are still to be found. Although the details on this shot have been lost, it shows the old speedway in full glory, probably in the late 1950s. – Special photo

For those eight magical years, the sounds of those thunderous race cars filled many weekend nights, and the Milltown Speedway became an exciting stitch in the fabric of Northwest Wisconsin entertainment. And just like that, it all fell apart ... after one morose, sad accident that suddenly changed the whole sport.

Next week: In the final part of Speedway Lost, we’ll find out what happened that final year of racing at Milltown. Read about the crashes, mechanics, speed, snowmobiles, sponsors and racers that put the Milltown Speedway on the map ... and ultimately made it fade away into the farm fields that surrounded it.


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Three Pirates play senior fast-pitch all-star series Saints shortstop Racheal Hansen also competes in series STEVENS POINT – Michelle Lund, Annie Palmquist and Lauren Romanowski played in the Wisconsin Fastpitch Softball Coaches Association’s 2010 Senior All-Star Series on Tuesday, June 22, at Stevens Point. In the first game against Division 3 and 4 White, Michelle Lund pitched a complete game 2-0 shutout. Lund scattered four hits, two walks and had seven strikeouts over seven innings in the win. Lund had some great defensive help with Romanowski throwing out a runner attempting to steal second, and Palmquist making a diving catch on a line drive in the bottom of the seventh with a runner on second to end the game. Palmquist had two hits and scored the first run in the bottom of the fifth. In the second game against Division 3 and 4 Green, Romanowski went 2 for 3 with two singles and played right field. On defense, Romanowski threw out a runner trying to advance to second from first after an errant pick-off throw went wide of the first baseman. Lund did not pitch or play a position in this game and got on base with a walk. Palmquist made some nice defensive digs at first in the 8-1 loss. The winning Division 3 and 4 Green team featured St. Croix Falls shortstop Racheal Hansen, who went 1 for 4 at the plate. Hansen’s Green team played a second game that day against the Division 3 and 4 Blue, and pulled out a 12-3 victory under coach Barry Witkowski of Deerfield. Hansen went 0 for 4 in that game. At the WFSCA banquet on Monday, June 21, Green Bay Packer great Leroy Butler was the featured speaker and talked about his experiences as a Packer. The Wisconsin Fastpitch Softball Coaches Association, through the fundraising efforts of the players participating in the all-star series, donated $15,000 to the LeRoy Butler Foundation for Breast Cancer. – submitted

Grantsburg’s Annie Palmquist (back row, second from left), Lauren Romanowski (back row, third from right) and Michelle Lund (front row, far left) played in the Wisconsin Fastpitch Softball Coaches Association’s 2010 Senior All-Star Series Tuesday, June 22. The three were a part of the Division 3 and 4 Red team. The Red team defeated the White team, but lost to the Green team during the tournament. – Photos submitted

All-district and state teams The Wisconsin Fastpitch Softball Coaches Association announced its all-state and all-district softball teams for the season, with three earning all-state honors, and eight making the all-district team. Michelle Lund made first team all-state as a pitcher, and Romanowski made second team all-state as a catcher, while infielder Palmquist made third team all state. The all-district players included Romanowski, Lund, Palmquist, Heather Davison, Cody Crawford, Tiff Meyer and Kylie Pewe. Emily Cole earned an honorable mention on the all-district team. – Marty Seeger with submitted information

July 4 Sale

th

Grantsburg’s Lauren Romanowski played catcher for the Red team on Tuesday.

Annie Palmquist stretches for the ball playing first base during the tournament.

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St. Croix Falls Racheal Hansen played on the Division 3 and 4 Green team. Hansen and her team defeated the Red and Blue teams in the tournament. – File photo by Marty Seeger

HERB’S TEE TO GREEN GOLF 7706 Anderson St. (1 block S. of 35 & 70 lights)

Michelle Lund pitched against the White team scoring a 2-0 shutout win.

Siren, WI • 715-349-5566 515870 45L


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Siren Ballpark competition winners LEFT: Andrew Erickson, Zarek Kubesh, Trevor Cross and Nick Lunde were the fourth-place finishers in the AAA around the horn contest. RIGHT: The Siren Ballpark completed its 14th-annual 14U boys baseball tournament last weekend, in which 14 teams competed, including Grantsburg-White, Unity, GrantsburgPurple, St. Croix Falls and Siren. Some area youth did well in contests such as baserunning. Joe Gaffney of Grantsburg’s was the overall baserunning champion in the AA contest with a time of 9.2 seconds. For complete scores and overall winners visit www.sirenballpark.net. – Photos submitted

Ben Kopp and Brian Gilbert took second place in the AAA baserunning competition during the 14th-annual 14U boys baseball tournament held at the Siren Ballpark recently.

Special Olympics state track competition Wyatt Stenberg and Philip Sorenson competed in the AA baserunning championship and placed third overall.

LEADER SPORTS SCOREBOARD FALUN CHURCH LEAGUE SOFTBALL Standings

Team Overall Siren Assembly 5-0 Webster Baptist 4-1 Falun Churches 3-1 Trade Lake Baptist 3-2 Calvary Covenant 2-2 Trade River Free 2-2 West Sweden/Zion Lutheran 2-2 New Hope Lutheran 1-3 Faith Lutheran 1-4 Siren Covenant/Bethany 1-4 Frederic Free 0-3 Scores Thursday, June 17 Siren Assembly 10, Siren Covenant/Bethany 0 (forfeit) Trade Lake Baptist 15, Trade River Free 0 Friday, June 18 New Hope Lutheran 13. Faith Lutheran 11 Webster Baptist 15, Calvary Covenant 14 Thursday, June 24 West Sweden/Zion Lutheran 10, New Hope Lutheran 9 Trade Lake Baptist 10, Calvary Covenant 8 Falun Churches 13, Faith Lutheran 8 Friday, June 25 Siren Assembly 28, Webster Baptist 6 Trade River Free 13, Siren Covenant/Bethany 6

MEN’S SLOW-PITCH LEAGUE SOFTBALL Standings Team Overall Century 21 7-1 Pour House 6-2 Sundowners 6-2 Pheasant Inn 4-3 Chell Well 4-4 Fur, Fins & Feathers/Coyland Creek 3-4 God Squad 3-5 Grantsburg Sanitary 2-6 Da Crew 0-8

Scores Wednesday, June 16 Pour House 31, God Squad 15 Chell Well 30, Da Crew 3 Pheasant Inn 9, Fur, Fins & Feathers/Coyland Creek 7 Century 21 19, Pour House 14 Sundowners 20, Grantsburg Sanitary 1 Wednesday, June 23 Chell Well 17, Sundowners 16 Fur, Fins & Feathers/Coyland Creek 0, Da Crew 0 (forfeit) God Squad 12, Pheasant Inn 10 Century 21 17, Grantsburg Sanitary 2 Century 21 13, Pour House 10

STEVENS POINT – Despite cancellations to all of the nine state track and field events at the Special Olympics on Friday, June 11, runners were able to compete the following Saturday in Stevens Point. The opening ceremonies began Thursday, June 10, with Green Bay Packer linebacker, A.J. Hawk, speaking to the athletes. Results of the competitions are as follows: Becky Anderson, 100m walk – canceled; Crystal Fougner, shot – canceled, 200m – canceled, 100m – gold, 4X100 relay – silver, N.G. 4X100 relay – fourth; Dawn Hughes, softball – canceled, 100m – fourth; Brian Johnson, turbo jav – canceled, 100m – bronze, 4X100 relay – silver; Makinzie Miller, turbo jav – canceled, 100m – fifth; Jason Neidermire, 200m –

canceled, 100m – silver, 4X100 relay – fifth; Ben Olson, turbo jav – canceled, 100m fourth, 4X100 relay – silver; Brianna Paulson, 100m – bronze, 4X100 relay – fifth; Nik Schrantz, 400m – canceled, 800m – canceled, 4X100 relay – silver; Jarvis Warwas, 100m – bronze, 4X100 relay – fifth; Jordan Warwas, 100m – gold, 4X100 – relay fifth. In the aquatics competition it was Donnell Anderson, Milltown, 25 meters back crawl - third place; Heather Erickson – 100 meters second place; Marnie Meister, Osceola, 15 meters unassisted – first place; Angie White, Milltown, 25 meters freestyle third place. – Marty Seeger with submitted information

WOMEN’S SLOW-PITCH LEAGUE SOFTBALL

Standings Team Overall Coyland Creek 5-0 Chell Trucking/The Beehive 4-1 Maurer Power 2-2 Smith Family Eye Care 2-3 Chris Pheasant Inn 1-3 Indian Creek Tavern 1-3 Digger Nick 1-4 Scores Monday, June 21 Smith Family Eye Care 19, Chris Pheasant Inn 1 Coyland Creek 17, Maurer Power 9 Smith Family Eye Care 23, Indian Creek Tavern 6 Chell Trucking/The Beehive 29, Digger Nick 4 Monday, June 28 Maurer Power 8, Digger Nick 4 Chell Trucking/The Beehive 26, Chris Pheasant Inn 1 Coyland Creek 26, Indian Creek Tavern 0 Chell Trucking/The Beehive 33, Smith Family Eye Care 13

Special Olympics athletes and coaches are back row from (L to R): Assistant coach Scott Miller, Osceola; Jordan Warwas, Frederic; Jarvis Warwas, Frederic; Brian Johnson, Comstock; Ben Olson, Frederic; Jason Neidermire, Osceola and Makinzie Miller, Osceola. Front row: Coach Carol Fougner, Amery; Dawn Hughes, Amery; Becky Anderson, St. Croix Falls; Brianna Paulson, Crystal Fougner, Amery and Nik Schrantz, Osceola. – Photo submitted


O UTDOOR S PAGE 20 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - JUNE 30, 2010

I N T E R! C O U N T Y L E A D E R

ATVs • BIRDING • BOATING • CAMPING • FISHING • HIKING • HUNTING • RECREATIONAL VEHICLES

Going through the motions

Burnett County they’ve issued five citations to careless boaters, but have also handed out 10 gift certificates to those who cleaned their boats off at the launch. I-LIDS are capable of reading registration numbers and license plates as well. The ordinances in Burnett County and other counties across the state eventually led to a statewide no-transport law, making it illegal to leave a boat launch without first removing aquatic plants and animals that may be attached to trailers. “The goal here is to get people to kind of modify their behaviors before we lose our lakes to Eurasian water milfoil, zebra mussels and all the other nasty critters that can take over the lake,” Lindberg said, adding, “It’s designed to do education and also provide a tool for enforcement.” Along with the educational benefit and enforcement benefits, I-LIDS are helpful because they run continuously throughout the week. Volunteers for the Clean Boats, Clean Waters program generally work the busiest time of the week to educate people about invasive species. Josh Hutton, a high school junior, works at the Half Moon landing on the weekends and is paid by the lake association. But volunteers and cameras aside, the real responsibilities of keeping a lake free of invasive species rest on the general public. Lake associations, law enforcement, townships and volunteers can only do so much and it only takes a single boat or trailer to pollute a lake. It takes just a few minutes to pull off to the side and remove aquatic plants and animals from boats before leaving the lake. “The board is committed to keeping this lake clean,” said Half Moon Lake chairman, Pat McMahon, but added, “We have to be active, all of us.”

Lake district uses camera to stress importance of controlling invasive species by Marty Seeger MILLTOWN – With last year’s discovery of Eurasian water milfoil in Burnett County’s Little Trade Lake and the more recent finding of EWM in Pike Lake near Amery, the threat of EWM and other invasive species infecting more area lakes is very real. Over 430 of Wisconsin’s lakes harbor EWM, and once the pesky aquatic plant is found, the effort to eradicate it, or simply contain it is, well, not that simple. Take Beaver Dam Lake near Cumberland for example, which is one of Barron County’s best fisheries. According to the Beaver Dam Lake Management District‘s proposed budget for 2010, approximately $135,000 will be spent just to control and conduct surveys on EWM, and another $9,000 will be spent on an aquatic management plan. In some cases across the state, the township or county is forced to pick up the tab, making EWM just as harmful for those living off the lakeshore. For those on the lakeshore, EWM and other invasive species can drop property values by as much as 13 percent. Fishing can also be dramatically affected as EWM crowds out native aquatic vegetation and reduces fish habitat, and in many instances, the quality of the entire fishery. The Fourth of July weekend is one of the busiest times of the season for boaters in Wisconsin, and the Half Moon Lake Protection and Rehabilitation District in Polk County is ready to educate boaters on the importance of removing aquatic vegetation from boat trailers before backing into the lake. “It’s really interesting to see what people do here. They’re so curious about it, which is what we wanted,” said lake district treasurer Dan Leh, pointing to an angler checking out the landing’s newly installed motion camera last Saturday morning. Prior to glancing at the camera, the angler spent a couple of minutes checking his boat trailer for weeds in a staging area before backing into the lake.

Getting involved It was always a dream of mine to someday score a job with the DNR, working outdoors as a wildlife biologist, studying elk herds in the Rockies – or shockMarty ing fish as a fisheries biologist on a local Seeger lake – it all sounded good to me. After high school I actually purThe sued that dream for a Bottom couple of years while attending Vermilion Line Community College in Ely, Minn., but eventually realized that working with wildlife wasn’t my passion, or at least, understanding the math and science that comes with it, wasn’t

The Half Moon Lake Protection and Rehabilitation District and Milltown Township are committed to keeping the lake clean for future generations. Pictured (L to R): Lake district members Rick Miller and Mike McMahon, Harlen Hegdal (Milltown town chairman), Dan Leh (treasurer), Pat McMahon (chairman), Josh Hatton (Clean Boats, Clean Waters employee) and Laurie Leh. – Photo by Marty Seeger It’s difficult not to notice the camera, video, it gets immediately uploaded to a standing just over 2 feet and enshrined computer that is monitored daily by a in solid stainless steel case with a solid lake district member like Leh, Lindstrom base of concrete. When you walk in front or another volunteer. of it, it can trigger an audio message In the first year they caught at least 10 about removing aquatic plants, but more launches where they noticed obvious importantly, records video of the boat weeds on trailers backing into the lake, backing in and out of the lake. and the following year, an ordinance was “I designed the camera five years ago adopted in Burnett County that held the to provide an ongoing preventative tool boat owner liable if they were caught for the lake associations and districts,” backing a trailer with weeds into the said Eric Lindberg of Environmental lake. Sentry Protection, LLC. Since the ordinance was put in place in Last year, in cooperation with the Milltown Township, the lake district applied for a DNR grant to help pay for half of Great Northern Outdoors Bass Fishing League Standings the Internet-Landing Installed Device Co-sponsored by BLC Well Drilling in Milltown System, which is the first to appear on a Standings 9. A1 Construction, 36 lbs., 6 oz. 18. Hutton/Erickson 10 lbs., 2 oz. Polk County lake. A number of lakes in 1. Wiehl/Long, 51 lbs., 9 oz. 10. Harry/Leroy, 33 lbs., 13 oz. 19. Sinkers, 8 lbs., 7 oz. 2. Olson/Strizik 49 lbs., 12 oz. 11. BLC Well Drilling 32 lbs., 12 oz. Burnett County have already had I-LIDS 3. Laqua/Allee, 49 lbs., 11 oz. 12. Milltown Dock Marine, 30 lbs. 8 oz. Big bass weekly winners cameras for the past four years including 4. Luck Sport & Marine 48 lbs., 1 oz. 13. Mossey 25 lbs., 2 oz. Yellow Lake, which has three, and Lake 5. Bistram Boys 43 lbs. 4 oz. 14. Ones/Roberts 24 lbs., 4 oz. Week 8: 26 and Mud Hen Lake each have one. So 6. Cory/Jamie 41 lbs., 15 oz. 15. GNO, 23 lbs., 4 oz. Bistram Boys 4 lbs., 1 oz. 7. Grumpy Grandpas, 40 lbs., 12 oz. 16. Struck/Lonetti, 17 lbs., 2 oz., far Lindberg says the I-LIDS have had 8 Jenell’s Main Dish, 38 lbs. 11 oz. 17. Team Top Water 14 lbs., 8 oz. positive results. Once a camera takes for me. Fortunately, the love of the outdoors hadn’t left me, and writing eventually proved to be a great way to connect me with the outdoors. While I may never attempt employment for a job with the DNR, the itch to get involved comes back from time to time, or at least to get involved with the DNR in some fashion. Fortunately, there’s no shortage of ways to help study wildlife or get involved. The game bird brood observation survey is a good start. For those of you interested in the wild turkey, pheasant, ruffed grouse, gray partridge, sharptailed grouse, bobwhite quail or greater prairie chicken, you can help the DNR by recording all game bird broods seen in your area between June 13 through Aug. 21 of 2010. “This is sort of our effort to reach out to citizens to gather their input, and their observations from the field,” says Sharon Fandel, the DNR’s acting upland

wildlife ecologist. With such a small DNR staff size, Fandel says the more information they can get from the public the better in determining how populations are doing in the state. Although the bird surveys themselves have been going on for decades with landowners and DNR staff, this is relatively new in getting a large portion of public involved, and there’s still plenty of time to help out with the surveys. It takes little time and is a great way to get youth involved with the outdoors. To get started, and for more information on the surveys, visit http://dnr.wi.gov/org/land/ wildlife/harvest/brood.htm. “Also, it’s just an effort to capitalize on the citizen science that we can use. So if we can make it fun and interesting for people to help us do the work, that we’re trying to do with a limited staff, and be able to gather good data from that assistance, then why not?” Fandel

said. Although the brood surveys are not hard-core science, the general observations by the public provide the DNR with an index that can show how populations are doing. It creates a better database from which to work, and can help give a broader perspective to go along with other data that can contribute to wildlife numbers. Fandel says that the surveys have already been showing use online, but if you don’t have access to submit information online, you can also submit paper copies. For that, you may contact the survey database manager, Brian Duhey at 608-221-6342. For those not interested in the brood surveys, there are also opportunities to participate in online surveys that aim to help monitor deer reproduction. All of this information can be found on the DNR Web site at www.dnr.state.wi.us.


Burnett Co. marriage licenses

Burnett County civil court

Burnett County warrants Jonas A. Berheart, 29, Siren, warrant - failure to appear, June 21. Kelly J. Buskirk, 34, Danbury, failure to pay fines, June 21. Angela M. Dubois, 28, Grantsburg, failure to pay fines, June 24. Amanda L. Goepfert, 26, Milltown, failure to pay fines, June 23. Shari A. Marek, 61, Frederic, failure to pay fines, June 21. (June 30, July 7, 14, 21, 28, Aug. 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff, vs. MARIE DOYLE, et al. Defendants. Case Number: 09 CV 677 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on May 5, 2010, in the amount of $115,750.60, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: August 19, 2010, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Foyer area of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI. DESCRIPTION: Lot 17, Block 3, Resurvey of Syndicate Addition to the City of St. Croix Falls, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 110 North Madison Street, Saint Croix Falls, WI 54024. TAX KEY NO.: 281-00849-0000. Dated this 17th day of June, 2010. /s/Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County Benjamin J. Pliskie State Bar #1037985 Attorney for Plaintiff 13700 W. Greenfield Avenue Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. (197491)

NOTICE OF HEARING

The Polk County Board of Adjustment will hold a public hearing at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, July 20, 2010, at the Government Center in Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. The Board will call the public hearing to order at 8:30 a.m., recess at 8:45 a.m. to view site(s) and will reconvene at 11 a.m. at the Government Center in Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. At that time each applicant will inform the board of their request. (THE APPLICANT MUST APPEAR AT 11 A.M. WHEN THE BOARD RECONVENES AT THE GOVERNMENT CENTER.) ROBERT SHERRARD/SHERRARD’S TAVERN request a variance to Article 11C, Table 1 of the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance to build a deck less than 75’ from the ordinary high-water mark. Property affected is: 2049 90th St., Pt. of Gov’t. Lot 7, Sec. 22/T35N/R16W, Town of Georgetown, Big Blade Lake (class 1). DAVID LUNDGREN requests a Special Exception to Article 8D1(a) of the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning ordinance to operate a Tourist Rooming House. Property affected is: 763 S. White Ash Ct., Lot 45, White Ash Park, Sec. 11/T34N/ R16W, Town of Apple River, Apple River (class 2). JOHN & BARBARA COLLINS request a Special Exception from Article 8D1(a) of the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance to operate a Tourist Rooming House. Property affected is: 1899 Peer Ave., Lot 1, CSM #3589, Vol. 16/Pg. 102, Sec. 25/T34N/R18W, Town of St. Croix Falls, Deer Lake (class 1). 515862 45-46L 35a,d WNAXLP

Darby P. Meagher, no date of birth given, South Range, warrant - failure to appear, June 21. Jason A. Rainey, 28, Turtle Lake, warrant - failure to appear, June 24. Laurence D. Shearen Jr., 48, Spooner, warrant - failure to appear, June 25. Erica J. Stark, 32, Webster, warrant - failure to appear, June 21. (June 23, 30, July 7, 14, 21, 28) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY AnchorBank, fsb f/k/a S & C Bank, Plaintiff, vs. Wayne E. Neely et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Case No.: 10 CV 79 Case Code: 30404 Judge: Molly E. GaleWyrick PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on the 19th day of May, 2010, in the amount of $52,767.23, the Polk County Sheriff will sell the described real property at public auction as follows: DATE/TIME: August 24, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 10% of successful bid must be paid to the Sheriff at sale in cash or by certified check. Balance due within 10 days of court approval. Purchaser is responsible for payment of all transfer taxes and recording fees. Sale is AS IS in all respects and subject to all liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Foyer Area of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main St., Suite 900, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. DESCRIPTION:The South 52.28 feet of Lot 3, Park Addition to the Village of Milltown, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 416 Milltown Ave., Milltown, Wis. Timothy G. Moore Polk County Sheriff ECKBERG, LAMMERS, BRIGGS, WOLFF & VIERLING, P.L.L.P. Nicholas J. Vivian (#1047165) Attorney for Plaintiff 1809 Northwestern Avenue Stillwater, MN 55082 515342 651-439-2878 WNAXLP Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (15 U.S.C. Section 1692), we are required to state that we are attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf, and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose.

Michael W. Pearson, Grantsburg, and Carrie A. Mevissen, Midland Funding LLC vs. Zoe Pulver, St. Paul, Minn., Grantsburg, June 18. $1,534.59. Peter R. Knipperberg, Maplewood, Minn., and Megan L. Hjermstad, Maplewood, Minn., June 21. Charles S. Geonfert, Grantsburg, and Edith Rodriquez, Grantsburg, June 24.

Burnett Co. deaths

Theresa R. Chadwick, 89, Swiss, June 14. Carol A. Andrews, 70, Daniels, June 20. Christopher D. Brock, 28, Andover, Minn., June 19. Donald D. May, 60, Hinckley, Minn., June 28. (June 16, 23, 30, July 7, 14, 21) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY ANCHORBANK, FSB Plaintiff, vs. SHANYN R. MILLARD, et al. Defendants. Case Number: 09 CV 988 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on April 21, 2010, in the amount of $130,999.79, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: August 3, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Foyer area of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI. DESCRIPTION: Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 500 recorded in Volume 2 of Certified Survey Maps, Page 229 as Document No. 384891 being located in the Northeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4, Section 15, Township 32 North, Range 18 West, Town of Alden, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 349 202nd Street, Osceola, WI 54020. TAX KEY NO.: 002-01369-0000. Dated this 8th day of June, 2010. /s/Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County Christina E. Demakopoulos State Bar #1066197 Attorney for Plaintiff 13700 W. Greenfield Avenue Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. (196294)

POSITION AVAILABLE

Notices

(June 30, July 7, 14) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY AMERICREDIT FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC., a Delaware corporation 4001 Embarcadero Arlington, Texas 76014, Plaintiff, vs. BRYAN BERG 52 A. 75th Street Clear Lake, WI 54005, Defendant. SUMMONS Case No.: 10-CV-000387 Code No.: 30301 Hon. Robert Rasmussen THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, TO SAID DEFENDANT: You are hereby notified that the plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. The Complaint, which is also served upon you, states the nature and basis of the legal action. Within forty (40) days of June 30, 2010, you must respond with a written answer, as that term is used in Chapter 802 of the Wisconsin Statutes, to the Complaint. The court may reject or disregard an answer that does not follow the requirements of the statutes. The answer must be sent or delivered to the court, whose address is 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810, and to Plaintiff’s attorneys, Galanis, Pollack, Jacobs & Johnson, S.C., whose address is 839 N. Jefferson Street, Suite 200, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202. You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not provide a proper answer within forty (40) days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. Dated this 10th day of June, 2010. GALANIS, POLLACK, JACOBS & JOHNSON, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff By: Paul J. Galganski State Bar No. 1003453 Jerome C. Johnson State Bar No. 1016307 839 N. Jefferson Street Suite 200 Milwaukee, WI 53202 (414) 271-5400

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Karen Balsley, Danbury, $1,532.14. Capital One Bank vs. Robert L. Robinson, Webster, $978.17. Town of Dewey vs. Tom Brown, Shell Lake, $505.44.

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Marshfield Clinic vs. Matt L. Hergert, Spooner, $3,330.32. Midland Funding LLC vs. James Jolly, Webster, $3,703.46. Midland Funding LLC vs.

(June 30, July 7, 14, 21, 28, Aug. 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK, Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM E. MCCOY and CHERYL L. MCCOY, Defendants. Case No. 10 CV 18 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on February 12, 2010, in the amount of $148,684.33, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main St., in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wis., on Wednesday, August 18, 2010, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: Unit 7 in Deer Path Town Homes Condominium, being a Condominium created under the Condominium Ownership act of the State of Wisconsin, by a “Declaration of Condominium for Deer Path Town Homes Condominium,” dated 28th day of December, 2001, and recorded the 29th day of August 2002, in the office of the Register of Deeds for Polk County, Wisconsin, in Volume 913 of Records, at page 294, as Document No. 639375 and by a Condominium Plat therefore, together with an undivided interest in and to the common area and facilities of the Condominium, said Condominium being located in the Village of Osceola, Polk County, Wisconsin. PIN: 165-00839-0700, STREET ADDRESS: 400 Deer Path, Osceola, Wis. 54020. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wis., this 14th day of June, 2010. Timothy G. Moore, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson / #1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787 515652 WNAXLP

The following full-time position is available in the Shell Lake School District:

TOWN OF ST. CROIX FALLS Polk County, Wisconsin www.townofstcroixfalls.org PLAN COMMISSION NOTICE OF HEARINGS July 14, 2010

This position will provide English, Social Studies and History instruction in grades 7 - 12 in the Shell Lake High School. D.P.I. licenses, 21 Grades 6 - 12 300 English, 221 Grades 6 12, 701 Social Studies or 750 History will be required. Applicants with multiple certifications and D.P.I. licenses are preferred. To apply: Applicants must send the following: • Letter of application • Resume • Current D.P.I. license(s) • Three Letters of Recommendation • Copy of official transcripts Successful applicant must pass a criminal background check, drug screen and required medical exam. Application deadline: July 9, 2010 Submit application materials to: Mr. Donald Peterson School District of Shell Lake 271 Hwy. 63 S Shell Lake, WI 54871 The Shell Lake School District does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex or disability.

The Town of St. Croix Falls Plan Commission will hold a public hearing at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, July 14, 2010, at the Town Hall at 1305 200th Street & U.S. Hwy. 8, St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin. Written evidence, testimony or comments, if any, must be delivered in person or by mail to the Town Hall. The Town of St. Croix Falls is holding a public hearing to discuss amendments to the Town’s Driveway Ordinance. Drafts of the proposed changes are available at the Town Hall or on the town Web site, www.townofstcroixfalls.org. The Town of St. Croix Falls is holding a public hearing to discuss amendments to Chapter 3 of the Town’s Zoning Ordinance. Drafts of the proposed changes are available at the Town Hall. Josh Sebring requests a SPECIAL EXCEPTION for a small engine repair and sales business in the Commercial District. The property address is 2005 U.S. Hwy. 8, St. Croix Falls, WI. The property is located in Section 27; the parcel number is 044-00769-0000. Monarch Paving requests a SPECIAL EXCEPTION for a temporary asphalt plant in the Agricultural District. The property address is 1653 200th St., St. Croix Falls, WI. The property is located in Section 10; the parcel number is 044-00245-0000. Jim Alt, Zoning Administrator 515807 45-46L WNAXLP

7 - 12 English and Social Studies/ History Instructor

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TURTLE LAKE - Gregory Sillman, 38, Turtle Lake, was arrested and charged with OWI, fifth-offense, on June 27 after driving his truck into a power pole at about 2 p.m. The accident was phoned into the police. A witness there told the officer that Sillman had been doing a burnout when he crashed into the pole. Sillman had left the vehicle, and when the officer located him behind a nearby home, he admitted he was driving and said he hit the pole because he “is a retard.” He admitted to drinking beer, vodka and possibly other kinds of alcohol, and said he wasn’t sure when he had started drinking. He said he was in pain and couldn’t perform field sobriety tests. He was taken to the Amery hospital, where a blood draw was taken. A homemade marijuana pipe was found in his truck. Other charges included reckless driving, endangering safety and possession of drug paraphernalia. Other OWI arrests included: • Mark Koch, 46, Clear Lake, was arrested and charged with OWI, third offense, on June 27 after driving his vehicle into the ditch near Hwy. 8 and CTH H. Field sobriety tests were given and Koch was charged. His Breathalyzer registered .30, with a later evidentiary blood test reading of .25. • Robert Zacher, 50, OWI first offense on June 24 after crashing his motorcycle on North Avenue and Second Street in Luck. His PBT registered .208. • Annie Larson, 21, Milltown, was charged with OWI, first offense, and operating with prohibited blood alcohol content after hitting a parked car on Milltown Avenue near Bering Street. Her PBT registered .23. • Kyle Nybo, 24, Lindstrom, Minn., was charged with OWI, first offense, after being stopped for having a headlight out. His PBT registered .17. He was also charged with operating with prohibited blood alcohol content. — with information from the Polk County Sheriff’s Dept.

JUNE 30, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 21

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Truck crashes into power pole during burnout


Polk County marriage licenses

(June 30, July 7, 14, 21, 28, Aug. 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY EVERHOME MORTGAGE COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. MICHAEL A. KLENNERT and JANE DOE, unknown spouse of Michael A. Klennert, Defendants. Case No. 09-CV-995 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on February 17, 2010, in the amount of $108,280.42, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: August 18, 2010, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 West Main St., Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot Eleven (11) and the East 5 Feet of Lot Ten (10), all in Block One (1) of C.O. Danielson’s Addition to the City of Amery, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 144 Hyland Avenue, City of Amery. TAX KEY NO.: 201-00159-0000. Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 (414) 727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

(June 30, July 7, 14, 21, 28, August 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY M&I MARSHALL & ILSLEY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. PATRICK C. COLLOVA and LAURIE J. COLLOVA, husband and wife; and THE RIVERBANK; and GERALD LAVENTURE and JENNIFER L. LAVENTURE, Defendants. Case No. 09-CV-940 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on February 12, 2010, in the amount of $161,549.17, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: August 17, 2010, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 West Main St., Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot 32 in Cattail Coulee, in the Town of Farmington, Polk County, Wis. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 200 260th St., Town of Farmington. TAX KEY NO.: 022-01216-3200. Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 (414) 727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

509768 35Ltfc 25atfc

FOR RENT $

425/mo.

Olson Apartments

Tower Road, St. Croix Falls

715-483-9987

FOR RENT One-BR Apartment Downtown St. Croix Falls

425

$

per mo. Available now.

Water, sewer & garbage incl. On-site laundry. Background check. First month’s rent and damage deposit.

612-280-7581

(June 16, 23, 30, July 7, 14, 21) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT BRANCH 2 POLK COUNTY PROGROWTH BANK, Plaintiff, vs. S PINES, LLC, ROBERT J. ROLOFF, DAVID D. GRAF, TROUT HAVEN DEVELOPMENT, LLC, Defendants Case No. 09 CV 906 Code No. 30404 (Foreclosure) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment entered in the aboveentitled action on January 28, 2010, I will sell at public auction in the lobby of the main entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, on August 4, 2010, at 10 a.m., all of the following described mortgaged premises, to wit: Unit 13 Plat of Trout Haven Condominiums, Section 1737-16, Town of Clam Falls, Polk County Wisconsin. Parcel ID No. 014-003701300. Street Address: Lot 13, Trout Haven Condominiums, Clam Falls, WI. TERMS OF SALE: 1. This is a cash sale. A certified check or bank draft in the amount of 10 percent of the amount bid must accompany the bid, with the balance due upon confirmation of sale by the Court. 2. Sale is subject to all unpaid real estate taxes and special assessments. 3. Purchaser shall pay any Wisconsin real estate transfer fee. 4. The property is being sold on an “as is” basis without warranties or representations of any kind. 5. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining possession of the property. Dated this 25th day of May, 2010. Timothy G. Moore Polk County Sheriff John D. Leary Attorney for Plaintiff Ruder Ware, LLSC 402 Graham Avenue P.O. Box 187 Eau Claire, WI 54702-0187 Telephone: (715) 834-3425 Facsimile: (715) 834-9240 You are notified that we are attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

FOR RENT All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-6699777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1800-927-9275. 445101 8a-etfcp 19Ltfc

(May 26, June 2, 9, 16, 23, 30) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT BURNETT COUNTY AnchorBank, fsb,

Plaintiff, vs. Gerald G. Trepczyk and Kim A. Trepczyk, as husband and wife, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Case No.: 09 CV 17 Case Code: 30404 Judge: Kenneth L. Kutz PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on the 17th day of March, 2010, in the amount of $115,753.88, the Burnett County Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: DATE/TIME: July 27, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 10% of successful bid must be paid to the Sheriff at sale in cash or by certified check. Balance due within 10 days of court approval. Purchaser is responsible for payment of all transfer taxes and recording fees. Sale is AS IS in all respects and subject to all liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Main Lobby, Burnett County Government Center, 7410 County Road K, Siren, WI 54872 DESCRIPTION: Lot 5, Danielson Addition to the Village of Webster, according to the Plat thereof on file in the office of the Register of Deeds for Burnett County, Wisconsin. Said Plat being situated in the Northwest 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4, Section 9, Township 39 North, Range 16 West, Burnett County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 7390 Poplar St., Webster, WI 54893, Dean Roland Burnett County Sheriff ECKBERG, LAMMERS, BRIGGS, WOLFF & VIERLING, P.L.L.P. Nicholas J. Vivian (#1047165) Attorney for Plaintiff 1809 Northwestern Avenue Stillwater, MN 55082 651-439-2878 Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (15 U.S.C. Section 1692), we are required to state that we are attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose.

One-BR Apartment Downtown St. Croix Falls

425

$

per mo. Available July 1.

Water, sewer & garbage incl. On-site laundry. Background check. First month’s rent and damage deposit.

612-280-7581

514666 33-34a,d 44-45L

Quiet building and neighborhood. No pets. References & security deposit required.

town of Eureka, issued June 23, 2010. Tina L. Zeigler, town of Milltown, and Mark B. Vruno, town of Milltown, issued June 23, 2010. Mindy M. Guiher, city of Cottage Grove, Minn., and Seth C. Haukedahl, city of Cottage Grove, Minn., issued June 24, 2010. Ardis S. Lodermeier, village of Balsam Lake, and Allan G. Brown, town of Colburn, issued June 24, 2010. Kandis L. Smith, city of Lake Elmo, Minn., and Bradley A. Nelson, town of St. Croix Falls, issued June 24, 2010.

FOR RENT 1-BR Apartment in Balsam Lake

Includes: Water, sewer, garbage pickup, coin laundry.

425/mo.

$

Plus deposit.

No pets Management on-site.

515295 44-45Lp 34-35a,dp

2-BR Apartment

513132 WNAXLP

APPLICABILITY - Payments of claims against the town may be made from the town treasury under the procedures established that are of a routine nature, namely: payroll, including full-time and part-time employees, election workers, payroll taxes and tax settlements. PROCEDURE - A) Subject to the previous restrictions, the payment of a claim against the town treasury if the town clerk approves the claim as a proper charge against the town treasury: 1) Funds are available under the town budget. 2) The item or service has been authorized by the town board or authorized person. 3) The item or service has been supplied or rendered in conformity with the authorization. 4) The claim appears to be a valid claim against the town. B) The town clerk may require submission of proof to determine compliance with the conditions under subsection A prior to approval. C) The clerk shall indicate approval of the claim by placing his/her signature on the voucher. Upon approval, the clerk shall prepare and sign a check and have it countersigned by the town treasurer and the town chairperson, pursuant so s.66.0607, Wis. Stats. The treasurer, or designee, shall then mail or deliver the completed checks to the appropriate parties. D) At least monthly, the town clerk shall file with the town board a written list of claims approved pursuant to this ordinance. Adopted this 22nd day of June, 2010. Signed by the town board - Daniel King, Monte Tretsven, Bruce Paulsen. Attested by Town Clerk - Patsy Gustafson (The ordinance in its entirety can be received from the clerk). 515834 45L WNAXLP

715-566-3807

515866 45-46Lp 35-36dp

TOWN OF LAKETOWN ORDINANCE #06-10 (SUMMARY) ALTERNATIVE CLAIMS PROCEDURE ORDINANCE

Frederic & Siren

515786 45-46L 35-36a,d

$19.31/hr. (base) up to $20.67 credit for long-term care experience/ not including shift differential YOU MUST COMPLETE A POLK CO. EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION TO BE ELIGIBLE. For applications, complete job description and qualifications; please visit our Web site at www.co.polk.wi.us, Employment Opportunities, or in person at 100 Polk Co. Plaza, #229, Balsam Lake, WI 54810, 715-485-9176 or Golden Age Manor, 220 515783 45L Scholl Ct., Amery, WI 54001, 715-268-7107. AA/EEOC

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

Erin J. Fox, village of Dresser, and Michael G. Larson, village of Dresser, issued June 21, 2010. Sue A. Adams, village of Luck, and Brian R. Bottolfson, village of Luck, issued June 21, 2010. Diana L. Welling, town of Eureka, and Michael P. Runberg,

514641 WNAXLP

(June 30, July 7, 14, 21, 28, Aug. 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK, Plaintiff, vs. KIM L. BRAMAN and POLK COUNTY, Defendants. Case No. 10 CV 19 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on February 15, 2010, in the amount of $114,019.40, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on Wednesday, August 18, 2010, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: Lot 2, Block 2, Central Park Addition, Village of Luck, Polk County, Wisconsin. PIN: 146-00013-0000. STREET ADDRESS: 304 4th Street, Luck, WI 54853. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, this 17th day of June, 2010. Timothy G. Moore, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson / #1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787 515654 WNAXLP

LPN - Part Time 2:30 - 9/10:45 p.m.

515610 WNAXLP

515098 WNAXLP

Case No. 09 CV 928 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on February 4, 2010, in the amount of $123,056.49, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on: Tuesday, August 10, 2010, at 10 o’clock a.m. TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: Lot One (1), Block Nine (9), Original Plat of the Village of Centuria. PIN: 111-00295-0000. STREET ADDRESS: 201 5th Street, Centuria, WI 54824. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wis., this 11th day of June, 2010. Timothy G. Moore, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson No. 1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787

POLK COUNTY POSITION ANNOUNCEMENTS

515618 WNAXLP

(June 23, 30, July 7, 14, 21, 28) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK, Plaintiff, vs. CALEB T. HANCOCK and ADONNA J. HANCOCK, Defendants.

Parkway Apartments

715-485-3402

(May 26, June 2, 9, 16, 23, 30) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff, vs. REBECCA S. BROOME F/K/A REBECCA S. KISCH, et al Defendants. Case Number: 10 CV 7 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on April 14, 2010, in the amount of $172,205.21, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: July 15, 2010, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Foyer area of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main St., Balsam Lake, WI. DESCRIPTION: Lot 1 and Outlot of Certified Survey Map No. 3134 recorded in Volume 14 of Certified Survey Maps, Page 156, as Document No. 600897, located in the Northwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 22, Twp. 32 North, Range 17 West, Town of Alden, Polk County, Wisconsin. EXCEPT that part deeded to Polk County Highway Department in Warranty Deed dated October 1, 2003, Recorded October 1, 2003, in Volume 941 of Records, Page 222, as Document No. 667853. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1492 25th Ave., Amery, WI 54001. TAX KEY NO.: 002-00576-0100. Dated this 17th day of May, 2010. /s/ Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County Shannon K. Cummings State Bar #1033710 Attorney for Plaintiff 13700 W. Greenfield Avenue Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. (195508)

512527 WNAXLP

PAGE 22 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - JUNE 30, 2010


JUNE 30, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 23

HELP WANTED

TOWN OF MILLTOWN

Stylist For Busy Salon

Monthly Board Meeting Monday, July 12, at 7 p.m. Milltown Fire Hall Virgil Hansen, Clerk 515387 45-46L 35-36a,d

Apply in person at Shear Image Salon Hwy. 8, Glacier Drive St. Croix Falls, Wis. ask for Sherrie 515644 45-46Lp 35-36a,dp

(June 16, 23, 30, July 7, 14, 21) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff, vs. THOMAS T. SCHWARTZ, et al. Defendants. Case Number: 09 CV 690 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on January 28, 2010, in the amount of $16,533.95, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: August 3, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Foyer area of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main St., Balsam Lake, WI. DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land located in the E1/2 of the SE 1/4, Section 16, Township 32 North, Range 15 West, Town Of Clear Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, described as follows: Commencing at the SE Section Corner Of Section 15, then North on and along the Section Line and a Town Road 1,225 Feet to the point of beginning of land herein described; thence continuing on said Section Line 300 Feet; thence West at Right Angles 300 Feet; thence South at Right Angles 300 Feet; thence East at Right Angles 300 Feet to the point of beginning. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 325 30th Street, Clear Lake, WI 54005. TAX KEY NO.: 018-00340-0000. Dated this 8th day of June, 2010 /s/Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County Scott D. Nabke State bar #1037979 Attorney for Plaintiff 13700 W. Greenfield Avenue Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5712 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. (196502) 514426 WNAXLP

514422 WNAXLP

(June 16, 23, 30) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT DUNN COUNTY WESTCONSIN CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. ELIZABETH A. PEER, JOHN DOE PEER Unknown spouse of Elizabeth A. Peer, JAMES & JENNIFER MOONEN, Defendants. Case No. 10CV237 Code: 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage AMENDED SUMMONS To: Elizabeth A. Peer 2350A 210th Avenue St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 John Doe Peer Unknown spouse of Elizabeth A. Peer 2350A 210th Avenue St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 You are hereby notified that Plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. Within forty (40) days after June 16, 2010, you must respond with a written demand for a copy of the Complaint. The demand must be sent or delivered to the Court, whose address is Clerk of Circuit Court, Dunn County Judicial Center, 615 Stokke Parkway, Menomonie, WI 54751, Wisconsin 54016, and to Weld, Riley, Prenn & Ricci, S.C., Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 3624 Oakwood Hills Parkway, P.O. Box 1030, Eau Claire, Wisconsin 54702-1030. You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the Complaint within forty (40) days, the Court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. Dated this 9th day of June, 2010. WELD, RILEY, PRENN & RICCI, S.C. By: Christine A. Gimber State Bar ID #01020223 Attorneys for Plaintiff P.O. Box 1030 Eau Claire, WI 54702-1030 715-839-7786 This is an attempt to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

From Hwy. 35, go west on Cty. Rd. B for 4 miles, left on 200th St., left again on 270th. Follow the red, white and blue signs. More items still arriving, so canopies stuffed again.

9 a.m.-5 p.m.

(June 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, July 7) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, L.P. Plaintiff, vs. CLAYTON R. HENSCHKE, et al. Defendants. Case Number: 08 CV 769 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on February 18, 2009, in the amount of $433,985.50. the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: July 21, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Foyer area of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main St., Balsam Lake, WI. DESCRIPTION: Parcel 1: Lot 6 of Certified Survey Map No. 1813 recorded on February 28, 1995, in Volume 8, Page 161, as Document No. 527587, being part of Government Lot 4, Section 7, Town 35 North, Range 16 West, in the Town of Georgetown, Polk County, Wisconsin. Parcel 2: An Easement for the benefit of Parcel 1 for ingress and egress over that part of Government Lot 4, Section 7, Township 35 North, Range 16 West, in the Town of Georgetown, Polk County, Wisconsin, described as Outlot 1 of Certified Survey Map recorded February 28, 1995, in Volume 8 of Certified Survey Maps, page 162, as Document No. 527588. Parcel 3: A 66 foot wide private roadway easement for the benefit of Parcel 1 for ingress and egress as shown on the subject Certified Survey Maps over Government Lot 4, Section 7, Township 35 North, Range 16 West and Government Lot 1, Section 18, Township 35 North, Range 16 West, in the Town of Georgetown, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2222 117th St., Milltown, WI 54858. TAX KEY NO.: 026-00246-0060. Dated this 20th day of May, 2010. /s/Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County Chaz M. Rodriguez State Bar # 1063071 Attorney for Plaintiff 13700 W. Greenfield Avenue Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. (195995)

Friday, July 2 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

8 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Saturday, July 3

24722 Clam Lake Drive Siren

2104 230th St. St. Croix Falls, WI (Eureka Center)

9 a.m.-2 p.m.

Sporting goods; furniture; dishes; lots of household items; collectibles.

Baby swing; bouncy seat; walker; newborn boys to size 6; girls size 5 to 12; tons of women’s/juniors clothing; some men’s clothes; books; shoes; jackets; tons of misc.

(June 23, 30, July 7, 14, 21, 28) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK, Plaintiff, vs. MARK K. ELLINGSON and KAY L. ELLINGSON, Defendants. Case No. 10 CV 175 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on April 26, 2010, in the amount of $112,357.53, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on: Thursday, August 5, 2010, at 10 o’clock a.m. TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land located in the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4 of NE 1/4), Section One (1), Township Thirty-Two (32) North of Range Eighteen (18) West, described as follows: From the Northeast corner of said Section 1, go South 00º 22’ East a distance of 660 feet; thence North 89º 30’ West a distance of 418.3 feet; thence South 40º 00’ East a distance of 144.00 feet; thence South 42º 00’ West a distance of 60.00 feet; thence South 38º 52’ East a distance of 25.00 feet; thence South 42º 00’ West a distance of 100.00 feet to the point of beginning for the parcel to be conveyed herein; thence continue South 42º 00’ West a distance of 100.00 feet; thence North 38º 52’ West a distance of 190.15 feet to an iron pipe stake on the West edge of the public road, thence North 45º 08’ East along a meander line a distance of 99.3 feet; thence South 38º 52’ East a distance of 184.70 feet to the point of beginning, together with all land between said meander line and Big Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin. PARCEL I.D. No. 002-009360000. STREET ADDRESS: 1816 60th Avenue, Osceola, Wisconsin 54020. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wis., this 26th day of May, 2010. Timothy G. Moore, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson No. 1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787

(June 30, July 7, 14, 21, 28, Aug. 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, as purchaser of the loans and other assets of Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA, Plaintiff, vs. GREGORY D. SCHROCK and JANE DOE, unknown spouse of Gregory D. Schrock; and HEIDI L. SCHROCK and JOHN DOE, unknown spouse of Heidi L. Schrock, Defendants. Case No. 09-CV-1025 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on February 12, 2010, in the amount of $253,659.84, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: August 18, 2010, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 West Main St., Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot Two (2) and Three (3) of CERTIFIED SURVEY MAP NO. 4765, recorded in Volume 21 of Certified Survey Maps on Page 92, as Document No. 695720, being part of Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 2901 recorded in Volume 13 of Certified Survey Maps on Page 155, as Document No. 589726, being located in part of the Southeast One-Quarter (1/4) of the Southwest One-Quarter (1/4) of Section Thirty-two (32), Township Thirty-three (33) North, Range Eighteen (18) West, Osceola Township, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2264 60th Ave., Town of Osceola. TAX KEY NO.: 042-00808-0000. Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 (414) 727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

515621 45Lp

(May 26, June 2, 9, 16, 23, 30) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY EQUITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. GREGORY S. SCHMIDT, KAY L. SCHMIDT a/k/a KAY S. SCHMIDT, BRADLEY C. KREHBIEL, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BRADLEY C. KREHBIEL, and PRIME SECURITY BANK, Defendants. NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case No. 09 CV 554 Case Code: 30404 (Foreclosure) By virtue of and pursuant to the Judgment entered in the above-entitled action on January 7, 2010, I will sell at public auction in the lobby of the main entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, on July 14, 2010, at 10:00 a.m., all of the following described mortgaged premises, to wit: That part of the NE 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of Section 20, Township 33 North, Range 18 West, described as follows: Commencing at the Northeast corner of said Section 20; thence on an assumed bearing along the North line of said Section 20, South 88˚38’40” West a distance of 450.65 feet to the point of beginning of the parcel to be described; thence South a distance of 1,015.40 feet to the center line of a Town Road (90th Avenue); thence, the following course being along said center line, North 86˚21’01” West a distance of 98.58 feet; thence North 82˚06’48” West a distance of 91.02 feet; thence North 75˚11’09” West a distance of 48.75 feet; thence North 66˚36’16” West a distance of 72.55 feet; thence North 62˚07’22” West a distance of 67.35 feet; thence North 59˚17’39” West a distance of 67.71 feet; thence, leaving the center line, North 879.36 feet to the North line of said Section; thence along last said North line, North 88˚38’40” East a distance of 420.12 feet to the point of beginning; Township of Osceola, Polk County, Wisconsin. Subject to the Town Road along the South line of the above described parcel. TAX PARCEL NUMBER: 04200408-0000. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2213 90th Avenue, Osceola, WI 54020. TERMS OF SALE: 1. This is a cash sale. A certified check or bank draft in the amount of 10 percent of the amount bid must accompany the bid, with the balance due upon confirmation of sale by the Court. 2. The sale is subject to all unpaid real estate taxes and special assessments. 3. Purchaser shall pay any Wisconsin real estate transfer fee. 4. The property is being sold on an “as is” basis without warranties or representations of any kind. 5. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining possession of the property. Dated this 14th day of May, 2010. Timothy G. Moore Polk County Sheriff Christopher M. Seelen Attorney for Plaintiff Ruder Ware, L.L.S.C. 402 Graham Avenue P.O. Box 187 Eau Claire, WI 54702-0187 Telephone: (715) 834-3425 Facsimile: (715) 834-9240 This is an attempt to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

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10 a.m. to ?

25047 Leghorn Dr. Siren

Thursday, July 1

Sat. July 3

STARTING AT HALF PRICE! EVERYTHING NEW & USED 36 SELLING IN ONE PLACE 4TH OF JULY WEEKEND JULY 2ND, 3RD, 4TH & 5TH OPENS 8 A.M. EVERY DAY LAST SALE FOR THIS YEAR!

1966 - 270TH AVE., LUCK, WI

ESTATE SALE

GARAGE SALE

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Fri. & Sat., July 2 & 3

Notices/Garage Sale/Employment

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NOTICE

GARAGE SALE

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Dorla E. Davies, 77, Amery, died May 30, 2010. Lois A. Weaks, 93, Amery, died May 30, 2010. Gordon S. House, 77, Georgetown Township, died June 2, 2010. Gerald R. Larson, 84, Cumberland, died June 14, 2010. James N. McNaughton, 68, Marco Island, Fla., died June 18, 2010. Gladys K. Mullenbach, 92, Amery, died June 18, 2010. Wiltrude N. Tjaden, 88, Jackson Township, died June 18, 2010.

auto during a stop on Hwy. 35/70 and Park Street at 8:35 p.m. June 24: Maurice C. Andersen, 71, Siren, was cited for having an expired driver’s license and for having a vehicle with unauthorized registration plates during a stop on Hwy. 70 and Railroad Street at 1:51 a.m.

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Polk County deaths

Monday, July 5. All workplaces, including restaurants, bars and taverns in Wisconsin, must be smoke free to protect employees and the public from secondhand smoke. June 14: Adam M. Kedrowski, 27, Grantsburg, was cited for nonregistration of an

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Reminder: Wisconsin’s Smoke-Free Law goes into effect

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Siren police report


PAGE 24 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - JUNE 30, 2010

Notices/Employment Opportunities

PUBLIC NOTICE POLK COUNTY HUMAN SERVICES DEPARTMENT

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Public input is being sought for the 2010 Human Services Plan and Budget. The public is invited to attend two Human Services Board Meetings to provide input. We are seeking comments from clients, providers, interested citizens and community agencies as to the adequacy and need for services in such areas as services to Juveniles, Child Protective Services, Mental Health Services, Chemical Dependency Services, services to children with developmental or physical disabilities and any other services being or needing to be provided in the community. The first meeting will be held on Tuesday, July 27, 2010, 8:30 a.m., in the Lower Level Conference Room of the Government Center, 100 Polk County Plaza, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. The second meeting will be held on Tuesday, August 24, 2010, 8:30 a.m., in the Lower Level Conference Room of the Government Center, 100 Polk County Plaza, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. Written comments may also be submitted prior to 4:30 p.m. on Friday, August 27, 2010, addressed to: Sherry Gjonnes, Director Polk County Human Services Department 100 Polk County Plaza #50 Balsam Lake, WI 54810 The meeting site is accessible to the physically disabled.

TOWN OF SIREN SIREN SANITARY DISTRICT BOARD MEETING TOWN OF SIREN BOARD MEETING

The Siren Sanitary District meeting will be held on Thursday, July 8, 2010, at 6:30 p.m., at the Siren Town Hall. Immediately following the Sanitary District meeting the Town of Siren will hold a Board meeting at approximately 6:45 p.m. If you wish to be on the agenda please call Mary Hunter, Clerk. Mary Hunter, Clerk 514860 44-45L 715-349-5119

TOWN OF MILLTOWN L R I P BID

The Town of Milltown is seeking bids for BLACKTOPPING - WEDGE AND OVERLAY of approx. .05 mile of 160th Street from 195th Avenue to 190th Avenue to be 2.5 inches compacted. This is a L R I P Project to be completed this year. The bidder’s attention is called to the fact that this project is subject to a prevailing wage determination which has been issued by the State of Wisconsin. That the prevailing wage rates and hours of labor set forth in the determination shall be applicable to this project. Bids are due by and will be opened on Monday, July 12, at 7 p.m., at the Milltown Fire Hall. Bids can be sent to Virgil Hansen, Clerk, P.O. Box 100, Milltown, WI 54858. The Town reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Virgil Hansen Town Clerk 515812 45-46L 35-36a,d Town of Milltown

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SEEKING BIDS - TOWN OF SIREN

The Town of Siren is seeking bids for hot-mix blacktop. This is a L.R.I.P. program. The bidder’s attention is called to the fact that this project is subject to a prevailing wage rate determination which has been issued by the State of Wisconsin and that the prevailing wage rates and hours of labor set forth in this determination shall be applicable to this project. The hot blacktop must be 2” compacted by 20’ wide. 1. Gordon/Lynch Bridge Road intersection Approximately 300 feet. The road will be marked. Bids are due by 6:45 p.m., Thursday, July 8, 2010, at the Siren Town Hall. Must have proof of insurance. The Town of Siren reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Mary Hunter, Clerk, Town of Siren 514863 44-45L WNAXLP

SEEKING WARM BLACKTOP BIDS TOWN OF SIREN

The Town of Siren is seeking warm blacktopping bids for the following roads. Blacktop will be 2” compacted by 20-feet wide. Each section is to be bid separately. 1. Gordon Road - approximately 9/10 mile 2. Lynch Bridge Road - approximately 7/10 mile 3. Nyren Road - approximately 9/10 mile The bidder’s attention is called to the fact that this project is subject to a prevailing wage rate determination which has been issued by the State of Wisconsin and that the prevailing wage rates and hours of labor set forth in this determination shall be applicable to this project. Bids are due by 6:45 p.m., Thursday, July 8, 2010, at the Siren Town Hall. Must have proof of insurance. The Town of Siren reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Mary Hunter, Clerk, Town of Siren 514861 44-45L WNAXLP

(June 23, 30, July 7) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP. F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP 5401 N. BEACH STREET FORT WORTH, TX 76137 Plaintiff vs. DAVID FOUKS 2464 30TH AVENUE OSCEOLA, WI 54020 SHELLY FOUKS A/K/A SHELLY L. SWANSON 2464 30TH AVENUE OSCEOLA, WI 54020 Defendants PUBLICATION SUMMONS Case No. 10 CV 312 Judge Molly E. GaleWyrick Case Code No. 30404 THE STATE OF WISCONSIN To each person named above as Defendant: You are hereby notified that the plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. Within 40 days after June 23, 2010, you must respond with a written demand for a copy of the complaint. The demand must be sent or delivered to the court, whose address is Lois Hoff, Clerk of Courts, Polk County Courthouse, 1005 West Main Street, Suite 300, P.O. Box 549, Balsam Lake, WI 54810, and to Gunar J. Blumberg, Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 230 W. Monroe, Ste. 1125, Chicago, IL 60606. You may have an attorney help represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the complaint within 40 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. Dated: June 15, 2010. Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff Gunar J. Blumberg State Bar No. 1028987 Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC 230 W. Monroe Street Suite 1125 Chicago, Illinois 60606 Ph. 312-541-9710 Fax: 312-541-9711 Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (15 U.S.C. Section 1692), we are required to state that we are attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose.

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The Town of Siren is seeking double chip seal bids for the following roads. Each section is to be bid separately. 1. Gordon Road - approximately 9/10 mile 2. Lynch Bridge Road - approximately 7/10 mile 3. Nyren Road - approximately 9/10 mile The bidder’s attention is called to the fact that this project is subject to a prevailing wage rate determination which has been issued by the State of Wisconsin and that the prevailing wage rates and hours of labor set forth in this determination shall be applicable to this project. Bids are due by 6:45 p.m., Thurs., July 8, 2010, at the Siren Town Hall. Must have proof of insurance. The Town of Siren reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Mary Hunter, Clerk Town of Siren 514862 44-45L WNAXLP

(June 30, July 7, 14, 21, 28, Aug. 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Household Finance Corporation III, Plaintiff, vs. DENNIS J. MEYER, SHANNON K. MEYER, Defendants. Case No. 09 CV 635 Foreclosure of Mortgage 30404 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure in the amount of $196,402.28 entered by the court on September 24, 2009, the undersigned Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin, will sell the following described real estate. Lot 9 of Certified Survey Map No. 3874, recorded in Volume 17 of Certified Survey Maps on page 137 as Document No. 640833, being part of the Northeast quarter of the Southwest quarter (NE 1/4 of SW 1/4), Section thirty-one (31), Township thirty-three (33) North, Range eighteen (18) West, Osceola Township, Polk County, Wisconsin. TAX KEY NO. 42-782-0900. STREET ADDRESS: 2364 60th Ave., Osceola, WI 54020. PLACE OF SALE: Foyer of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI. DATE & TIME OF SALE: August 11, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS OF SALE: 1. Property is sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances, including but not limited to unpaid and accrued real estate taxes, special assessments, and other governmental charges, plus interest and penalties, if any. 2. A bid deposit of not less than ten percent (10%) of the bid amount shall be due in the form of cash, cashier’s check, or certified funds at the time of sale. 3. Successful bidder to pay the entire unpaid balance of bid within ten (10) days following confirmation of the sale by the court plus buyer to pay for buyer’s title insurance, document recording fees and Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. 4. Failure to make timely payment following confirmation of sale will result in forfeiture of bid deposit. Timothy G. Moore, Sheriff Polk County Law Offices of James E. Huismann, S.C. N14 W23777 Stone Ridge Dr. Suite 120 Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (262) 523-6400

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SEEKING DOUBLE CHIP SEAL BIDS TOWN OF SIREN

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(May 26, June 2, 9, 16, 23, 30) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC. Plaintiff, vs. JASON C. MORK and SHANNON D. MORK, husband and wife, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., Defendants. Case No. 09-CV-697 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on January 11, 2010, in the amount of $212,507.37, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: July 13, 2010, at 10 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 West Main St., Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: A certain tract or parcel of land in Polk County, in the State of Wisconsin, described as follows: Lot Ten (10), Plat of Hilltop Acres, located in the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter, (SW 1/4 of SW 1/4), Section Thirteen (13), Township Thirty-three (33) North of Range Nineteen (19) West; Osceola Township, in Polk County, Wisconsin. Subject to easements, restrictions and right of way of record, if any. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2489 91st Ave., Town of Osceola. TAX KEY NO.: 042-01312-0100. Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 (414) 727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

(June 9, 16, 23, 30, July 7, 14) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY AnchorBank, fsb f/k/a S&C Bank, Plaintiff, vs. Troy E. Thiele and Unknown Spouse of Troy E. Thiele, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Case No: 09 CV 664 Case Code: 30404 Judge: Molly E. GaleWyrick PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on the January 5, 2010, in the amount of $72,115.27, the Polk County Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: DATE/TIME: July 28, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 10% of successful bid must be paid to the Sheriff at sale in cash or by certified check. Balance due within 10 days of court approval. Purchaser is responsible for payment of all transfer taxes and recording fees. Sale is AS IS in all respects and subject to all liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Foyer Area of Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. DESCRIPTION: Lot 3 of Certified Survey Map No. 2911, recorded in Volume 13 of Certified Survey Maps, page 165, Document No. 590725 in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Polk County, Wisconsin, located in the NW 1/4 of the SE 1/4 and in the SW 1/4 of NE 1/4, Section 33, Township 34 North, Range 16 West, which replaces Lot 3 of Certified Survey Map No. 2893, recorded in Volume 13 of Certified Survey Maps, page 147, as Document No. 589500, in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Polk County, Wisconsin. Together with an easement for ingress to and egress from Lot 3 of CSM No. 2911 to 125th Avenue over Lot 4 of CSM No. 2911, all as more fully shown on CSM No. 2911. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 934 Mains Crossing Ave., Amery, WI 54001. Timothy G. Moore Polk County Sheriff ECKBERG, LAMMERS, BRIGGS, WOLFF & VIERLING, P.L.L.P. Nicholas J. Vivian (#1047165) Attorney for Plaintiff 1809 Northwestern Avenue Stillwater, MN 55082 (651) 439-2878 Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (15 U.S.C. Section 1692), we are required to state that we are attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. 513967 WNAXLP

POLK COUNTY HOUSING AUTHORITY REGULAR MONTHLY MEETING Thursday, July 15, 2010, at 9 a.m. Shoreview Apartments, Balsam Lake.

Agenda: I. Call to order. II. Opening of bids. III. Minutes. IV. Financial reports. V. Operations report. VI. Unfinished business: A. CDBG. VII. New Business. VIII. Adjourn 515386 45L

COACHING OPPORTUNITIES

The Frederic School District is accepting applications for the following coaching positions: • Head High School Volleyball Coach • Assistant High School Volleyball Coach Send letter of application, resume and credentials to: Jeff Carley, Athletic Director, Frederic School District, 1437 Clam Falls Drive, Frederic, WI 54837. Telephone, 715-327-4223. 515781 45L 35a All positions are open until filled. The Frederic School District is an Equal Opportunity Employer.


JUNE 30, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 25

Notices/Employment Opportunities

ACTIVITY DEPARTMENT POSTING

Let the Internet take you to your Leader. The entire paper online. • E-edition • Go to www.the-leader.net

The following part-time position is available in the Shell Lake School District:

Early Childhood Special Education Teacher Position

0.5 FTE, with benefits, for the 2010-11 school year. This position will involve providing services in a variety of settings. DPI license 809 Early Childhood Special Education license is required. Multiple certifications are preferred. Start Date: August 25, 2010. Description: This is a 0.5 FTE elementary position with the School District of Shell Lake. Successful applicants will be child centered, flexible and show evidence of collaborative practice. Shell Lake School District is located 80 miles northwest of Eau Claire, WI. May include some summer hours. To apply: Interested applicants must send the following: • Letter of application • Resume • Copy of current WI EC Special Education license(s) • Three letters of recommendation • Copy of official transcripts Successful applicant must pass a criminal background check, drug screen and required medical exam. Application deadline: July 16, 2010. Submit application materials to: Mr. Michael Werner, Elementary Principal School District of Shell Lake 271 Hwy. 63 S Shell Lake, WI 54871 514996 44-45r,L The Shell Lake School District does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex or disability.

Beginning the 2010 - 2011 school year.

HS Head Boys Basketball Coach

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(June 23, 30, July 7, 14, 21, 28) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK, Plaintiff, vs. SHANNON L. MITCH, Defendant. Case No. 09 CV 964 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on January 28, 2010, in the amount of $191,275.84, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on: Thursday, August 5, 2010, at 10 o’clock a.m. TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: Lot One (1) of Certified Survey Map No. 4444 recorded in Volume 19 of Certified Survey Maps, page 225, as Document No. 579065, being part of Lot Sixteen (16) of the Plat of Oak Hills Estates, located in the Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW 1/4 of NW 1/4), Section Eleven (11), Township Thirty-Four (34) North, Range Seventeen (17) West, Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin. PIN: 106-00668-1601. STREET ADDRESS: 116 Vadnais Lane, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wis., this 26th day of May, 2010. Timothy G. Moore, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson No. 1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787

VILLAGE OF SIREN NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS FOR PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS 2010 SIDEWALK ASSESSMENT PROJECT Please take notice that the Village Board of Siren, Wis., has declared its intention to exercise its police power in accordance with State Statutes 66.0703, to levy special assessments upon property within the following described assessment district for benefits conferred upon the property by the improvements of the following concrete sidewalks, aprons and curb & gutter: ASSESSMENT DISTRICT A. All property fronting upon First Avenue from its intersection with Main Street to its intersection with State Hwy. 70. B. All property fronting both sides of Johnson Street from its intersections with Hanson Avenue to its intersection with Fourth Avenue. C. All property fronting both sides of Bradley Street from its intersection with Hanson Avenue to its intersection with Fourth Avenue. D. All property fronting on the east side of Fourth Avenue from CTH B to Crooked Lake Park. E. All property fronting on the west side of Alden Road from South Shore Drive for a distance of 200 feet south of the intersection. A report showing the final plans and specifications, estimated cost of improvements and proposed assessments is on file in the Village Clerk’s office, 24049 1st Avenue, Siren, and may be inspected any business day between the hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. You are further notified that the Siren Village Board will hear all interested persons, or their agents or attorneys, concerning matters contained in the preliminary resolution authorizing the assessments and in the above-described report at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, July 7, 2010, at the Village Hall meeting room. All objections will be considered at this hearing and thereafter the amount of the assessments will be considered for final determination at the Village Board meeting July 8, 2010, at 2 p.m. Martin C. Shutt, Administrator/Engineer 515613 45L WNAXLP June 17, 2010

Coaching qualifications include: • Coaching experience preferred • Ability to work well with coaching staff • Plan for offseason involvement • Philosophy must agree with St. Croix Falls Activity Code, found online at www.scf.k12.wi.us Letter of application, resume and references to: Kelly Anderson Activities Director School District of St. Croix Falls P.O. Box 130 St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-2507, Ext. 1406 515897 45L Deadline: July 9, 2010

NOTICE OF EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY GRANTSBURG SCHOOL DISTRICT June 23, 2010

JobTitle Sixth-Grade Teacher Job Description 100% FTE Qualifications Appropriate Wisconsin Certification: Elementary Education Requirements Elementary experience preferred. Individual should have the skills to teach in an active, hands-on and student-centered approach. Background of teaching with Guided Reading and Literacy Circles and using data to individualize instruction is desired. Having the ability to differentiate instruction is a must. How to Apply Send letter of application, resume, credentials (Three current letters of recommendation and transcripts) and a copy of license by July 7, 2010. Contact Brad Jones, Principal Grantsburg Middle School 500 East James Ave. Grantsburg, WI 54840 715-463-2455 The School District of Grantsburg is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, 515553 45L color, national origin, sex, religion or handicap. (June 23, 30, July 7, 14, 21, 28) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK, Plaintiff, vs. DOUGLAS J. STRAIN and AMY T. OLCHEFSKE and CITY & COUNTY CREDIT UNION, Defendants. Case No. 09 CV 883 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on February 4, 2010, in the amount of $170,135.97, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on: Tuesday, August 10, 2010, at 10 o’clock a.m. TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: Parcel 1: A parcel of land located in the Southeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (SE 1/4 of SE 1/4), Section Eleven (11), Township Thirty-Two (32) North, Range Nineteen (19) West, Town of Farmington, Polk County, Wisconsin, being further described as follows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of Section Eleven (11); thence North 89º 14’17” West along the South line of said section a distance of 778.32 feet; thence North 334.60 feet; thence South 89º 14’17” East 67.38 feet; thence North 128.40 feet; thence South 88º 30’46” East 711.12 feet to the East line of Section Eleven (11); thence South along said section line 454.00 feet to the point of beginning.

Parcel 2: A parcel of land located in the Southeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (SE 1/4 of SE 1/4), Section Eleven (11), Township Thirty-Two (32) North, Range Nineteen (19) West, Town of Farmington, Polk County, Wisconsin, being further described as follows: Commencing at the Southeast corner of Section Eleven (11); thence North 89º 14’17” West along the South line of said section a distance of 778.32 feet to the point of beginning; thence continuing North 89º 14’17” West 130 feet; thence North 301.60 feet, more or less; thence South 89º 14’17” East 130 feet, more or less; thence South 334.60 feet to the point of beginning; subject to County Trunk X right of way over the Southerly 33 feet thereof. Parcel 3: A parcel of land located in the Southeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (SE 1/4 of SE 1/4), Section Eleven (11), Township Thirty-Two (32) North, Range Nineteen (19) West, Town of Farmington, Polk County, Wisconsin, being further described as follows: Commencing at the Southeast corner of Section Eleven (11); thence North 89º 14’17” West along the South line of said section a distance of 908.32 feet to the point of beginning; thence continuing North 89º 14’17” West 65 feet; thence North 301.60 feet, more or less; thence South 89º 14’17” East 65 feet, more or less; thence South 334.60 feet to the point of beginning; subject to County Trunk X right of way over the Southerly 33 feet thereof. PIN: 022-00268-0000. STREET ADDRESS: 2513 40th Avenue, Osceola, WI 54020. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wis., this 11th day of June, 2010. Timothy G. Moore, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson No. 1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787

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POSITION AVAILABLE

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(June 23, 30, July 7, 14, 21, 28) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff, vs. ESTATE OF GORDON A. BIBEAU, et al. Defendants. Case Number: 08 CV 574 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on April 28, 2009, in the amount of $281,522.74, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: August 12, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Foyer area of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main St., Balsam Lake, WI. DESCRIPTION: Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 2477, dated June 23, 1998, and recorded on June 24, 1988, in Volume 11 of Certified Survey Maps, page 185, as Document No. 569033, being part of the Southwest 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 27, Township 35 North, Range 16 West, in the Town of Georgetown, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1972 90th Street, Luck, WI 54853. TAX KEY NO.: 026-01157-0100. Dated this 15th day of June, 2010. /s/Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County Christina E. Demakopoulos State Bar #1066197 Attorney for Plaintiff 13700 W. Greenfield Avenue Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. (197059)

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(June 23, 30, July 7, 14, 21, 28) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY ANCHORBANK, FSB Plaintiff vs. LINDA L. MUSEUS, et al. Defendants. Case Number: 09 CV 769 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on February 10, 2010, in the amount of $112,751.96, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: August 12, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Foyer area of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI. DESCRIPTION: Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 3432, recorded in Volume 15 of Certified Survey Maps Page 199, as Document No. 616145, located in the Northeast 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4, Section 33, Township 35 North, Range 18 West, Town of Eureka, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2104 190th Avenue, Centuria, WI 54824. TAX KEY NO.: 020-00825-0000. Dated this 14th day of June, 2010. /s/Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County Scott D. Nabke State Bar #1037979 Attorney for Plaintiff 13700 W. Greenfield Avenue Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. (196995) 514859 WNAXLP

(June 23, 30, July 7, 14, 21, 28) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK, Plaintiff, vs. WADE M. HANSEN and LOUISA C. HANSEN, Defendants. Case No. 09 CV 905 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on January 26, 2010, in the amount of $101,824.23, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on: Thursday, August 5, 2010, at 10 o’clock a.m. TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: Lot One (1) of Certified Survey Map No. 4417 recorded in Volume 19 of Certified Survey Maps on page 198 as Document No. 677506, located in part of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4 of the NE 1/4), Section TwentyOne (21), Township Thirty-Five (35) North of Range Eighteen (18) West, Town of Eureka, Polk County, Wisconsin. PIN: Part of 020-00558-0100. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2104 210th Avenue, Centuria, Wisconsin 54824. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wis., this 26th day of May, 2010. Timothy G. Moore, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson No. 1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787

SCHOOL DISTRICT OF ST. CROIX FALLS


PAGE 26 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - JUNE 30, 2010

GRANTSBURG SCHOOL DISTRICT June 25, 2010

Job Title: Speech and Language Clinician Job Description: Grantsburg School District is currently seeking qualified candidates for the full-time position of a Speech/Language Clinician. Successful candidates must have a degree in Speech & Language. Qualifications: A Department of Public Instruction Certification/License is required. Requirements: The candidate will provide Speech/Language therapy, evaluate students, report writing, IEP writing, meetings and scheduling students. The ideal candidate will have CCC licensing. Applicants must have the ability to interact collaboratively with peers, dedication to self-improvement and professional development and be team oriented. How to Apply: Send letter of application, resume, credentials (Three current letters of recommendation and transcripts) and a copy of license by July 14, 2010. Contact: Dr. Joni Burgin, Superintendent Grantsburg School District 480 East James Ave. Grantsburg, WI 54840 715-463-5499 The School District of Grantsburg is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, national origin, sex, religion or handicap. 515751 45-46L (June 9, 16, 23, 30, July 7, 14) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT BURNETT COUNTY The RiverBank, 304 Cascade Street P.O. Box 188 Osceola, Wisconsin 54020, Plaintiff, vs. PTL, LLC 16205 280th Street Center City, Minnesota 55012, and Jerrold I. and Margaret A. Carlson 16205 280th Street Center City, Minnesota 55012 Defendants. Case No.: 09-CV-228 Case Code: 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered in the Circuit Court of Burnett County on January 12, 2010, in the total amount of $882,095.59 against PTL, LLC, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: July 27, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff at the sale in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds, payable to the clerk of courts (personal checks cannot and will not be accepted). The balance of the successful bid must be paid to the clerk of courts in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds no later than ten day after the court’s confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The properties are sold “as is” and subject to all liens and encumbrances. PLACE: In the Front Lobby of the Burnett County Government Center, 7410 County Road K, Siren, Burnett County. DESCRIPTION: Government Lot 1 of Section 13, Township 40 North, of Range 16 West, and that part of Government Lot 4 of Section 12, Township 40 North, of Range 16 West, lying Southerly and Easterly of the following described reference line: Commencing at the Southwest corner of Section 12-40-16, thence North 87 48; 57” East 2,582.94 feet to the South Quarter Section Corner of Section 12 with a Harrison Cast-iron Monument in position for this corner which is the point of beginning of the reference line, thence 17 16’ 56” East 287.03 feet to a 1 inch x 24 inch iron pipe monument, thence North 86 56’ 10” East 391.92 feet to a 1 inch x

30 inch iron pipe monument, thence continuing North 86 56’ 10” East approximately 43 feet to the water’s edge of Crooked Lake which is the termination point of said reference line; excepting therefrom Lot 1, Certified Survey Map No. 4191, recorded in Volume 22, Page 167 and 168 as Document NO. 389654, in the office of the Register of Deeds for Burnett County, Wisconsin. Said land being situated in Burnett County, Wisconsin. Part of Tax key #020-4312-02 800, Part of Tax Key #0204313-01 100 PROPERTY ADDRESS: No property address listed. DESCRIPTION: The W1/2 NE 1/4, and Government Lots 10 and 2, Section 19, Township 40 North, of Range 15 West, Burnett County, Wisconsin. Tax Key #012-4219-01 200, #012-4219-01 300, #0124219-02 100, #012-4219-02 900 PROPERTY ADDRESS: No property address listed, Town of Jackson. DESCRIPTION: Government Lot 2, Section 13, Township 40 North, of Range 16 West, Burnett County, Wisconsin. Tax Key #020-4313-01 200 PROPERTY ADDRESS: No property address listed, Town of Oakland. DESCRIPTION: Government Lot 3, Section 13, Township 40 North, of Range 16 West, Burnett County, Wisconsin. Tax Key #020-4313-01 300, #020-4313-01 400. PROPERTY ADDRESS: No property address listed, Town of Oakland. DESCRIPTION: Government Lot 11, Section 18, Township 40 North, of Range 15 West, Burnett County, Wisconsin. Tax Key #012-4218-01 800 PROPERTY ADDRESS: No property address listed, Town of Jackson. DESCRIPTION: Government Lot 1, Section 7, Township 40 North, Range 15 West, Burnett County, Wisconsin. Tax Key #020-4207-09-400 PROPERTY ADDRESS: No property address listed, Town of Jackson. Dean Roland Burnett County Sheriff MURNANE BRANDT Attorneys for Plaintiff 30 E. 7th Street, Suite 3200 St. Paul, MN 55101-4919 Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (15 U.S.C. Section 1692), we are required to state that we are attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. 514277 WNAXLP

Notices/Employment Opportunities REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

Sealed proposals will be received by the Owner, The Polk County Housing Authority, in the Shoreview Apartments Community Room at 108 Old Courthouse Drive, Balsam Lake, Wis. 54810 (located behind the County Museum), until 9 a.m., Thursday, July 15, 2010, at which time they will be opened and publicly read. If proposal is mailed or faxed, they must be received at the Housing Authority Office, 403 Second Avenue, Osceola, Wis. 54020, by Wednesday, July 14, 2010, before 3 p.m. The project consists of roof replacement at three separate facilities. All materials, except nails, will be purchased by the Owner. Project is to be completed by November 15, 2010. The three project sites are: Millside 20 unit, 403 2nd Avenue East, Osceola Hillcrest 14 unit, 724 East Maryland, St. Croix Falls Parkside 4 unit, 225 East 1st Avenue, Milltown Contractor is to submit one, two or three individual proposals for the three (3) individual project sites. Contractor may submit a combined proposal for all three sites. An estimated start and completion date must be included with each proposal. Include a copy of your Certificate of Insurance with your proposal submittal. Contractor may be asked to submit, to the Owner, a Qualification Statement (AIA A305), list of references and previous experience listing. Contractor may not withdraw their proposal within 30 days of date of submittal. The Owner reserves the right to reject any and all proposals and to waive any informalities and to accept the proposal most advantageous to the Owner. The Owner will have the right to accept proposal breakdowns in any order or combination. Drawings may be obtained from the Designer or Owner after June 22, 2010. Contractors are encouraged to visit the site(s) to determine existing conditions. Contact Eloise Heathfield at 715-294-4243 to set up an appointment. Owner: Designer: Polk County Housing Authority SJS Design 403 2nd Avenue East 2938 19-3/4 Street Osceola, WI 54020 Rice Lake, WI 54868 715-294-4243 715-296-7840 715-294-3840 fax 515370 44-45L WNAXLP

NOTICE OF THE BOARD OF REVIEW TOWN OF BONE LAKE Notice is hereby given that the Board of Review for the Town of Bone Lake will meet on Monday, July 19, 2010, at the Bone Lake Lutheran Church, from noon to 2 p.m. An Open Book session with the Assessor will meet preceding the Board of Review from 10 a.m. to noon. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board: No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the Assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact, or provide information to a member of the Board about the person’s objection except at a session of the Board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or contest the amount of assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent to file a written objection by appearing before the Board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48-hour notice requirement and files a written objection, that the person provides to the Clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any Board members and, if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the board, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are the subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or object to a valuation; if that valuation was made by the Assessor or the Objector using the income method of valuation; unless the person supplies the Assessor all the information about income and expenses, as specified in the assessor’s manual under Sec. 73.03(2a) of Wis. Statutes, that the Assessor requests. The municipality or county shall provide by ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the assessor under this paragraph which provides exceptions for persons using information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or the duties of their office or by order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determined that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under Sec. 19.35(1) of Wis. Statutes. The board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other persons may testify by telephone. Darrell Frandsen, Clerk 954 280th Avenue Frederic, WI 54837 715-472-8212 515304 45L 35a WNAXLP

CESA #11 HEAD START Polk County Early Learning Center (Balsam Lake) Center Assistant

QUALIFICATIONS: 18 yrs. of age and high school diploma/ GED; good oral/written communication skills; knowledge of Microsoft Office software; knowledgeable about general office procedure. RESPONSIBILITIES: Assists in the daily operation of the center. The position is 24 hours/wk. + summer days. WAGE RATE: Determined by the current union contract.

Family Partner Assistant

QUALIFICATIONS: 18 yrs. of age and high school diploma/ GED. RESPONSIBILITIES: Assist Family Partners in providing a socialization experience for 0- to 3-year-olds. The position is 12 hours/wk. WAGE RATE: Determined by the current union contract. Will consider combining positions for the right candidate. DEADLINE TO APPLY FOR BOTH POSITIONS: Thursday, July 15, 2010, 4 p.m. INTERVIEWS TO BE HELD IN TURTLE LAKE: Wednesday, July 28, 2010. Applicants selected for an interview will be contacted Tuesday, July 20, 2010 and Wednesday, July 21, 2010. To be considered for an interview, applicants must submit an agency application along with references to: CESA #11 Head Start Attn.: Human Resources 225 Ostermann Drive, Turtle Lake, WI 54889 To obtain an application and detailed job description, please see our Web site at www.cesa11.k12.wi.us/hs or call Head Start Central Office at 800-352-6283. For information on other employment opportunities, please see our Web site, call Head Start Central Office or visit your local Job Service Center. 515360 34-35a,d EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 45-46L

SECTION 00100 ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Boiler Replacement Burnett County Housing Authority Webster, Wisconsin 54893 Project Address: Cedarwood Manor West Apartments 7354 E. Main Street Webster, Wisconsin 54893 DESCRIPTION OF WORK Bids will be received by the Burnett County Housing Authority for a single prime contract including replacement of the boilers and water heater and related work. Proposals are to be in the form of a single lump sum price and submitted on the bid form provided. COMPLETION SCHEDULE The project will be awarded in mid-July; construction can start following contract award. Substantial completion of the project is to be within 60 days from the notice to proceed. DOCUMENTS Bid documents may be obtained from the Architect upon payment of $25 for each set. Checks are to be written to the Burnett County Housing Authority. Bidders returning complete bid documents in good condition within twenty-one (21) days of the bid award and Contractors awarded the Project will be refunded their deposit. No refunds will be made after 21 days. Electronic bid documents (PDF files) are available from the Architect at no cost. Partial sets or individual drawings or specification sections of the bid documents will not be issued. PREBID CONFERENCE A Prebid Conference will be held at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, June 30, 2010, at the project site, 7354 E. Main Street, Webster, Wisconsin 54893. The meeting will include discussion of the Bid Documents, scope of the work and bid requirements. Each bidding contractor shall visit the site and familiarize themselves with conditions and extent of work prior to the prebid conference. All bidding contractors and subcontractors are encouraged to attend the Prebid Conference. TIME AND DATE OF BID Submit sealed bid no later than 2 p.m., Thursday, July 8, 2010, to the Owner at 7350 E. Main Street, P.O. Box 41, Webster, Wisconsin 54893. Bids received will then be opened publicly and read aloud. Each bidder shall submit their bid on the approved Bid Form and include with their bid related information. Bids will not be accepted by fax or telephone. Bids received after the date and hour listed will be returned unopened. No bidder may withdraw his/her bid within sixty (60) days after date of bid opening. The Owner shall have the right to reject any or all Bids, to waive informalities or irregularities in a Bid received, and to accept the Bid which, in the Owner’s judgment, is in the Owner’s best interest. Date: June 10, 2010 Owner: Burnett County Housing Authority Mark Olsen, Executive Director Webster, Wisconsin 54893 715-866-8231 Architect: Craig Selander, Architect, LLC 216 South Oak Street Grantsburg, Wisconsin 54840 715-463-3151

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NOTICE OF EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY


JUNE 30, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 27

Milltown’s 100th anniversary

1910 -20 10

Brenda Voss Strilzuk shared a waltz with her father, Doug Voss.

People in all eras of fashion were at Bering Park in Milltown last Wednesday evening, June 23, to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the village. Pictured (L to R) are Kenny Nelson, Janis Wonka Federer, Steve Quist, Jackie Reynolds, Terri Palmberg, Marie Sogge and Mary Sue Morris. – Photos by Mary Stirrat

Six former Milltown queens took part in Wednesday’s festivities, celebrating the 100th anSteve Quist of the Milltown Community niversary of Milltown. From left are Norma Yourchuck Hauge (1966), Janis Wonka Federer (1968), LuAnn White (1967), Tammi Palmberg (1970), Mikki Tuma (1989) and Jackie Reynolds Club watches members of the Indianhead Chorus as they perform at Bering Park. (1965).

Although not taking part in the beard contest held during Milltown’s 100th anniversary party, Don Rovney sports facial hair and a hat that fit the historic theme.

The Indianhead Chorus performed at Milltown in honor of Jack Overby, a longtime member who passed away in December 2007. The hour-long performance included a variety of four-part songs that brought back memories of past days. The 1930s and ‘40s had the Andrew Sisters, and Milltown’s 100th anniversary had the Voss Sisters. Bringing favorites such as “Sentimental Journey” to Bering Park were (L to R): Barb Voss Wilson, Beth Voss and Brenda There was music and dancing from all eras at Bering Park in Milltown Tuesday Voss Strilzuk. evening, June 22. Shown here are a member of the St. Croix dance troupe from Hertel, and “twisters” Terri Palmberg, facing camera, with partner Kenny Nelson. Other numbers included Gary and Cheryl Parkins with the waltz and Marnie Meister tap dancing. A brief history of each dance was presented by emcee Marie Sogge.


PAGE 28 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - JUNE 30, 2010

Centuria Memory Days set for next weekend

CENTURIA – Centuria’s Memory Days celebration will be held next weekend, July 9 through 11, on Main Street and around town. Don’t miss the fun, the raffles and the community garage sales. Many events are scheduled starting at 7 p.m. Friday night with the start of a softball tournament that will run all weekend. The queen’s coronation also will take place Friday night, 7 p.m. at Unity School, as well as a garden tractor pull. There will be a pancake breakfast and the 10th-annual 5K run on Saturday

Full bloom

morning. The afternoon will see toilet bowl races and a battle of the bands. Saturday night there will be music by Rewind starting at 9 p.m. There will be an antique tractor show on Sunday and a chicken dinner at the Fristad Lutheran Church; the queen’s tea and an all-pastCenturia-royalty reunion will be held. The grand parade will be on Main Street at 1:30 p.m. Watch for medallion hunt clues through the parade. For more information and the complete schedule, go to www.centuria-wi.org. — submitted

Brittney Bublitz, Samantha Palmquist and Autumn Peterson will be vying for the title of Miss Centuria on Friday, July 9, at 7 p.m. at the Unity School. The theme of this year’s pageant is Mardi Gras Madness. Bublitz is the 16-year-old daughter of Brent and Twyla Bublitz; Palmquist is the 16-year-old daughter of Mark and Coreen Palmquist, and Peterson is the 16-year-old daughter of Scott Peterson and Terry Peterson. Each of the contestants attends Unity High School where they are involved in clubs and activities. - Photo submitted

Trumpeter pose

The field near the Grantsburg Airport was blue last week with bugloss, another of June’s blooming wildflowers. The flower’s name, bugloss, comes from the ancient Greek for ox-tongue, which its leaves were thought to resemble.

Spiderwort seems to be everywhere this summer. The wildflower, with its violet-blue blossoms, is so named because the angular leaf arrangement suggests a squatting spider. - Photos by Priscilla Bauer

These trumpeter swans were photographed north of Siren by Tracey Green. “Not the best (photo), but I love the posturing male,” noted Green. - Photo submitted

57th-annual Heart of the North Rodeo July 8-11 SPOONER – The 57th-annual Heart of the North Rodeo opens Thursday, July 8, running through Sunday, July 11, at the Washburn County fairgrounds, Spooner. Three all-new acts will be featured at Wisconsin’s oldest professional rodeo: Team Ghost Riders, Priefert Percherons and the Rodeo City Riders Drill Team. Tiny monkeys, enormous horses and precision riders will deliver the kind of unparalleled entertainment expected at the rodeo. This year, the Spooner Rodeo Committee is excited to present the unbelievable Tim “Wild Thang” Lepaard and his Team Ghost Riders, which are little capuchin monkeys riding Border collies and herding sheep. Lepard began his rodeo career as a bull rider, and later turned to bull fighting and clowning. His unique Team Ghost Riders act is fun for all ages. Gentle giants with incredible size, strength and capacity, Priefert Percherons, Mount Pleasant, Texas, are a living tribute to a time long ago, a time when real horse power moved America along cities and rural areas, taking pioneers to their new homes in the West. Watching the magnificent Priefert Percherons is a chance to see history. The Rodeo City Riders Drill Team, Manawa, is a patriotic and accomplished group of horseback riders. The team puts its mounts through an exciting program of pre-

cise and intricate patterns, a performance both awe-inspiring and entertaining. As always, the rodeo presents top competition, in seven exciting events at each performance Thursday through Saturday, beginning at 7:30 p.m. in the arena. Every night at 10 p.m., after the rodeo, there will be live country music by the Boogie Junction Band, in the arena This year’s royalty are Rodeo Queen Emily Byerly and Princess Jessica Hallstrom. Kelly Kenney returns as rodeo announcer, and events like the Exceptional Rodeo, for special-needs children, and the Nickel Scramble, are back. The Exceptional Rodeo is that Thursday, at 6:30 p.m., and the Nickel Scramble is held both Friday and Saturday, at the same time. The parade is Saturday, July 10, at 1:30 p.m. in downtown Spooner. The Lions Club barbecue follows at 4:30 p.m., at the fairgrounds. Sunday, July 11, is the rodeo breakfast, at 7 a.m., followed by the cowboy church service at 9 a.m. For ticket information, call Washburn County Tourism at 800-367-3306, or see www.spoonerrodeo.com. – with submitted information

LEFT: Action at the Spooner Rodeo from 2009. - Photo by Larry Samson


WED., JUNE 30, 2010 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER NORTHERN CURRENTS • SECTION B

Currents

THE-LEADER.NET

by Priscilla Bauer Leader staff reporter SIREN – It was a beautiful day for a walk in the woods of Burnett County. The sun was shining and a soft breeze touched the trees. Burnett County Forestry Department Administrator Jake Nichols was showing a group of visiting foresters and guests Burnett County forestlands. The 118 visitors coming to the Wisconsin County Forest Association Summer Tour came from all across Wisconsin, some of whom had never visited the area before. Burnett County and Polk County forestry departments, co-hosts of the tour, welcomed attendees from 25 of the 29

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Time for the tour

Polk County Board Chairman William Johnson visited with Burnett County Supervisor Brent Blomberg while the two county government officials took a moment to appreciate a view of the St. Croix Scenic Riverway. The two had a chance to compare county notes during a tour of Burnett County on June 17. – Photos by Priscilla Bauer

Burnett County Forestry Department Administrator Jake Nichols led the June 17 tour of Burnett County for the over 100 visiting foresters and guests who came from 25 counties for a visit to Burnett and Polk counties.

counties that are part of the WCFA to Siren for the June 16-18 conference. Counties belonging to the WCFA are those containing county forestland in Wisconsin. The last time Burnett and Polk counties hosted the tour was 25 years ago, in 1985. The tour began with a meeting of the WCFA board of directors at the Lodge at Crooked Lake, followed by members having their choice of a day golfing at Siren National Golf Course or shooting at Coyland Creek Sporting Clay and Game Preserve. On Thursday participants boarded buses for an all-day tour of Burnett County forestlands which included the Namekagon Barrens, a red pine planting area, the St. Croix Scenic Riverway, Forts Folle Avoine, the Crex Meadows Wildlife Area and other points of interest. Thursday evening the group enjoyed a banquet followed by entertainment by a

Wisconsin County Forest Association members made several stops looking at management practices on Burnett County forestlands during their daylong tour of the county. The group also saw the Namekagon Barrens, a red pine planting area, the St. Croix Scenic Riverway, Forts Folle Avoine, the Crex Meadows Wildlife Area and other points of interest.

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local barbershop quartet, Harmonic Balance. Burnett County Forest administrator from 1989-1999, Mike Leudeke, was honored at the banquet by WCFA President Elroy Zemke. Leudeke, who went on to be a DNR team leader and eventually the head forester for the northern region of Wisconsin, retired this spring. The Friday tour of Polk County included seeing the geography and geology of Sterling Township, the exposed varved clay area at Cowen Creek, Governor Knowles horse camp and the sand dunes. Bryce Luchterhand from Gov. Doyle’s office and Marjorie Bunce from Sen. Kohl’s office joined the tour of Burnett County on Thursday and Sen. Sheila Harsdorf attended the Polk County tour

Burnett County Forest Technician Tory Jeske pointed out a seedling during a stop at an aerial seeding planting site during the Burnett County tour on June 17. Friday. Participants commented how impressed they were with the area and how well the tour was organized. “It’s really beautiful here,” said firsttime visitor Dave Borisch, forestry foreman from Oconto County. “It was nice to see some forestry and land management sites back as a component. The facility, buses, and food were all great and it was very enjoyable,” said another forester. “The tour couldn’t have gone any better,” said Nichols.

The Crex Meadows Wildlife and Education Center was one of the stops WCFA members enjoyed while touring Burnett County last week. The group later observed sandhill cranes, Canada geese, trumpeter swans and deer during a driving tour of Crex Meadows.


PAGE 2 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 30, 2010

Yellow River Echoes

2010

History echoes along Yellow River Burnett County Historical Society celebrates annual event

by Carl Heidel Leader staff reporter DANBURY - The scene at Forts Folle Avoine the weekend of June 25 - 27 was much as it might have been in the late 1700s or early 1800s as historical re-enactors transformed the area into a small primitive settlement. It was all part of the Burnett County Historical Society’s annual Yellow River Echoes celebration. Period costumes were everywhere; old crafts were revived; men gathered to test their skills on the firing range; women sat with their handwork and visited; and the kids ... well, they were just kids having a lot of fun pretending. Wander through the camp with your Leader photographer, and enjoy the sights. Visiting over a cup of tea offers time to swap information about knives.

Photos by Carl Heidel

This young boy takes great care as he works with his draw blade.

With a little help from dad this young girl counts her cups.

Bark utensils wait to be put to use in cooking duties.

Children are wonderfully curious no matter what century they inhabit. A woman patiently braids a sash or a belt.

Sparks spit from the barrel of this muzzleloader as it’s fired.

It’s family time, and everyone has a project to keep busy.


This blonde

saw a sign that read YMCA and she said: “Look they spelt MACY’s wrong!”

JUNE 30, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 3

Just for

I am writing this on a camping trip with Daniel. This is our first vacation together, our first time camping, and certainly a stress test on our six-month-old relationship. Carrie Classon Camping is life conducted in miniature. Arcane and detailed systems must be devised for the most ordinary rituals in life. Keeping warm and dry, getting fed, and all the other daily rituals of life must somehow be reinvented. When they are done with another person, they must be perfectly synchronized or pandemonium ensues. Our sojourn into the wilderness did not begin auspiciously. The geriatric camper that I had taken out of storage had, in the three years since it had last been used, deteriorated alarmingly. The camper was built in 1983 – which is about 120 in camper years. It is a pop-up camper and rides in the back of my Ford Ranger. I knew there were holes in the netting and some mildew on the canvas. I did not know that the plywood frame had gotten wet and stayed that way for untold months. I didn’t actually comprehend the dreadful condition the camper was in until it was hoisted up out of the truck bed on its three little legs and it took a slow, inexorable nosedive straight into the soggy ground. Daniel spent an entire Saturday afternoon attempting to jack up the kowtowing camper, which appeared to be paying homage to the barn and showed no inclination to return to an upright position. Twelve hours and countless regrets later, the recumbent camper was upright and ready to head out to the north shore of Lake Superior for what would almost certainly be its farewell voyage. Before heading out on the voyage, I stopped by my parents’ home to deposit my dog and cat. I thought that a test of our compatibility in such tight quarters

Laughs

Letters from

Home

Joe Roberts

••• So this little girl comes home right? And she goes to daddy and says “I’m never going to school again.” So the dad replys “why?” She exclaims, “because my teacher said 5+5=10, 6+4=10, 7+3=10, 8+2=10 and that 9+1=10!” He again says, “and your point is what?“ She screams, “So she needs to make up her mind!” ••• There was a man walking down the street, and a security guard came up to him and said, “Why is there a penguin following you?” And the man said, “I don’t know, he just followed me.” And the security guard, “You take that penguin to the zoo right now.” And the man did. A couple of hours later, the man came out of the zoo with the penguin again and they were walking down the street again. And the security guard said, “I thought I told you to take that penguin to the zoo!” And the man said, “I did, he enjoyed himself, now I’m taking him to the library.” ••• An elderly lady was invited to her old friend’s country home for afternoon tea. She was impressed by the way her friend preceded every request to her husband with endearing terms calling him “Dear, Hubby, My Love, Darling, Sweetie Pie.” Amazingly, she had been married almost 70 years, and it seemed they were still very much in love. While the husband was off in the garden, the lady leaned over and said to her friend, “I think it’s wonderful that, after all the years you’ve been married, you still call your husband those loving pet names.” The old woman hung her head. “I have to tell you the truth,” she said, “I forgot his name about 10 years ago.”

TURTLE LAKE – The St. Croix Casino will honor America by hosting its second-annual flag-raising ceremony on Thursday, July 1. The ceremony will be held near the casino’s south entrance near Hwy. 8. The July 1 ceremony will feature music by trumpeter Al Young, songs by the Cumberland Singers and a presentation by George Allen, a Navy veteran and an employee of the St. Croix Casino. Allen’s presentation will include information on each of the four flags to be raised at the ceremony—the U.S. flag, the flag of the state of Wisconsin, the flag of the St. Croix Chippewa of Wisconsin and the POW/MIA flag. The public is invited to attend. The ceremony will begin at noon. - submitted

Cold Turkey

To fish or not to fish, what a silly question. I fish. When I am home I go fishing as much as possible, so when I go on vacation I John W. Ingalls try to get in some fishing. I am not locked into a focused pursuit on a single type of fish, much as trout or salmon are primary prey of fly anglers. I am an equal-opportunity angler enjoying the pursuit of wet slippery creatures large and small wherever they may swim. Early spring may find me drifting night crawlers in the rivers catching homely suckers. As the spring warms and the lakes are open I search for crappies and panfish as they come into the warming waters. Later I am after larger game fish, such as northern pike, walleyes and bass. My favorite is the smallmouth bass. Even the smallest members of the group have an attitude like a linebacker looking for a bar fight. I have even had the privilege of catching fish around the world including leaping brown trout in New Zealand and brilliant iridescent blue dorado off the coast of Cozumel, Mexico. Large northern pike on a fly rod in the subarctic along with lake trout in 60 feet of water on light tackle will challenge your strength and skill. Large king salmon in Lake Michigan, so strong that the line on your reel screeches in protest as the fish leaps out of the water hundreds of feet behind the boat. Trophy bass fishing in Mexico is exciting and challenging as well. Drifting on lakes as warm as bathwater, you fish for bass while vultures perched on dead trees cock their heads and gaze at you with vacant, hungry eyes. Largemouth bass, some of the biggest I have ever seen, their mouths as big as ice-cream buckets, blast out of the murky water and engulf your bait. As the fish comes to the boat, the vultures perk up, hoping for an easy meal. The bass released back to its tepid home, the vultures again refocus on the fisher-

Till next time, – Carrie

SCRMC hosts bloodmobile July 12

St. Croix Casino to host second-annual fla fl ag-raising ceremony

Fish Bait

would be sufficient without the addition of livestock. My cat Lucy loves to travel, however, and she apparently got wind of the plan to leave her behind. She insisted on sleeping directly on my mother’s head and (after she was evicted) wailed outside my parents’ bedroom door. Her ploy was successful. In the morning I decided the only way my parents’ would get a decent night’s sleep was if I took Lucy along. Lucy and her litter box were inserted into the tiny camper and I headed off to pick up Daniel. Our first night the weather was chilly, the firewood was wet, and Daniel got an inch-long splinter embedded deep beneath the nail of his big toe. I feared our little experiment in confined domesticity was not going well. Except that, in reality, it was. The camper was falling apart, but it appeared that it would survive this, its final adventure. The wood was wet, but Daniel still succeeded in building a lovely fire and never lost his temper, even when Lucy caught sight of his poor, injured toe and bit it. Daniel is now walking along the shoreline, searching for agates, and he is only limping a little. I am sitting in the sunshine, thinking about my concern over camping equipment and procedures, and how all my worries were foolish. All the planning in the world will not guarantee good weather, or keep everyone well. If camping is life in miniature, it must have the disappointments of life in miniature as well. It is not the way you do things that will make for a good camping trip, it is the person you are while camping that will make the trip good. And that is true for all our journeys.

ST. CROIX FALLS – The need for blood never stops. You have a chance to help in this valuable effort locally by giving blood Monday, July 12, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at St. Croix Regional Medical Center in St. Croix Falls. The summer months have been quite a challenge to the entire blood banking industry in the past couple of years, creating critical blood shortages throughout the United States. The bloodmobile bus will be located at the west employee parking lot on Adams Street in St. Croix Falls. Benefits of donating • It feels great to donate! • You get free juice and cookies. • It’s something you can spare – most people have blood to spare ... yet, there is still not enough to go around. • You will help ensure blood is on the shelf when

men, wondering which person will fall in the oppressive afternoon heat. One of my most exciting fish encounters ever experienced occurred in the Caribbean on the isMD land of Little Cayman. We enjoy vacations that allow us to be as unscheduled as possible. To properly celebrate one of my wife’s 29th birthdays we rented a small cottage on shore, with the Caribbean sea lapping just a stone’s throw distance from the door. The island is so small that only about 30-40 people live on it. There is one store that pulls extra duty as a hardware store, grocery, video rental and bait store. One small restaurant on the island, The Hungry Iguana, serves fresh food from the sea and whatever may have come in on the mail/delivery boat. The twin engine prop plane that delivered us there coasted to a stop on the gravel runway alongside a sign warning the pilots to watch out for iguanas on the runway. At least one of the locals knew to watch for us as a pickup truck soon appeared. The driver gathered our dusty belongings and delivered us to a quaint little cottage tucked in among the palms. Our transportation options for the week were limited to walking or two rusty bicycles leaning against the wall. The island is also known for two large birds that inhabit the island, frigate birds as large as eagles with pointed wings and sharp claws, and brown boobies. No I am not talking about topless sun worshipers, these are also large birds that gather by the hundreds, roosting in trees along a mangrove swamp near the cottage. We felt like Robinson Crusoe in a slightly more modern setting. Each morning we were challenged to choose between a variety of entertainment options. Often starting the day with hermit crab races that could take hours, we reclined in hammocks and read while glancing at the race participants to guess who would take the checkered flag. While Tammy rested on the

needed – most people don’t think they’ll ever need blood, but many do. • You will be someone’s hero – in fact, you may help as many as three people with just one donation. To schedule a time to donate blood, you may call Jan Globensky, SCRMC Volunteer Partner, at 651-465-5543 or online at www.redcrossblood.org, enter the zip code 54024 and follow the directions. Blood donation is a powerful gift that saves lives. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license, or two other forms of identification are required at checkin. Donors must be at least 17 years old (16 years eligible with parent consent) and must weigh at least 110 pounds. - submitted

shore reading I would wade in the shallow flats casting for unsuspecting fish. I caught colored fish, silvery fish, small fish and medium fish. I couldn’t name any of the fish except “jacks” which look like a small tuna and make a clicking noise like my grandpa did with his loose dentures. It was after catching a jack that I made my first mistake. Like any man proud of his catch I did my best “Me Tarzan, You Jane” imitation and held the fish up high for Tammy to see. She waved back, first with one hand and then with two. I grinned and waved the fish back at her. As I waved at her, I heard the sound of wings and felt a breeze develop around me. I looked up as a shadow covered the sun. A multitude of frigate birds as big as hang gliders hovered over me screeching and diving for the fish in my left hand! When I finally realized they were after the fish I dunked the fish, still hooked on the line, into the water and tried to beat the birds away with the fishing rod held in my right hand. I had reeled the line in too close to the rod so that when I swung at the frigate birds the fish would pop out of the water and frenzy would be renewed. Worried that I would soon be slashed and gashed by razor-sharp beaks and claws all because of a little fish, I frantically worked to keep the fish out of sight until I could get it unhooked. The fish, finally free of his mooring, swam away unscathed while I was still in hand-to-wing combat. The fishing rod, now free of the fish, became a more effective weapon and the birds finally tired of the game, returning to their perches to await the next unsuspecting catch. With my heart beating wildly and my fishing rod clutched tenaciously in my hand, I ran for the shore to hide beneath the palms. I spent the remainder of the day nursing a nervous twitch in my neck while looking for a return of my attackers. I had a newfound respect for the fish, knowing that their attackers can come from anywhere, land, sea or air. Now when my wife asks me why I have so many fishing rods, I explain that I need them for self-defense.

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PAGE 4 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 30, 2010

Rambling into summer by Russ Hanson I was out in the public, last Thursday at the Luck Historical Society meeting, Friday at the Eureka Farmers Market, Saturday at the Luck Museum and Sunday at the Sterling picnic and got some comments about last week’s column. By a margin of many to none, women told me it was a bad idea to visit an old girlfriend in Winnipeg when Margo and I head out on our trip west in August. They assured me if I wanted to keep my first wife happy, I should bypass the whole city, and I am inclined to take their advice, as it was very strongly given. I had started to think about college and the old days a couple of weeks back. I was feeling a little down after hearing that a friend from the old days, LeRoy Anderson, passed away. He grew up in West Sweden, went to Frederic HS and to River Falls College. I bumped into him at college and during the summers in those days when he and I worked at Stokelys. About two years ago, after a column in RRR reminiscing about working in the bean factory, he contacted me by e-mail and we got reacquainted as he battled cancer. LeRoy’s mother was Edith Anderson, the local newspaper correspondent for West Sweden for many decades. She was a local historian, collecting much information (pictures, stories, documents...) from the West Sweden area. At the time of LeRoy’s death, he was trying to figure out where to find a good home for her information. Hopefully his children will treasure it or pass it to a local museum. LeRoy’s e-mail address was dacrazyswede. He had a good sense of humor throughout his cancer treatments. He went to San Antonio, Texas, to try a new treatment at the cancer center there, and for a time seemed to be getting better. By early this year, he had lost his job, he was a truck driver, had to sell his van and was living hand to mouth, what happens in the U.S. when your health breaks and your insurance decides your treatments are experimental and not covered. A few weeks before he died, he sent me an e-mail telling me something special was coming in the mail. I got an envelope with a letter explaining that he had enclosed a coin, a copper penny that had been made as a souvenir by Doc Squirt (notorious Cushingite of the first half of the 1900s) with Doc’s likeness, something his mother had been given by Doc. LeRoy sent it as a thank-you for helping him out a little during his struggle to keep it together his last year. As I had put together a book on Cushing history and a booklet on Doc, he knew I would treasure it. Sadly, the envelope had been processed by machine, the end torn open and the coin missing. I didn’t tell LeRoy that, I just thanked him for the wonderful gift. That was the last I heard from him as his health failed rapidly and he died a few weeks later. LeRoy was a few years younger than me, only 60 years old. His death got me to thinking about the old days of Stokely’s and high school and college. What I remember most is not the countless hours of work and study, but the people I met and got to know. They leave a hole in your own being when they leave. LeRoy will be remembered locally Saturday, July 3, at 11 a.m. at East Lincoln Alliance Church, 735 70th Ave. CTH J, Amery and a graveside service at 3 p.m. at West Sweden Cemetery, 3446 CTH W, Frederic. I don’t remember calculus, but I do remember Annie, the friend I first met in that class, and for a time was a girlfriend. I told you about Anne and Brian last week, both friends from the ‘60s that I hadn’t heard from since. With Leroy’s passing, I felt bereft and thought about reconnecting with another old friend, Annie. The problem is that old girlfriends are in a special category with respect to current wives, so you have to tread lightly, it appears from the advice I

Message from Dick It’s easy to second guess, especially if you have the facts. The BP accident was probably caused by using a cheap design rather than the most risk averse. There is plenty of safety redundancy that can be designed into almost any project, but someone has to decide whether it is cost effective. In the 60 years of Gulf oil and gas drilling of variously 40,000 wells, there have been two major incidents. The most interesting media reaction has been the brief coverage of the deaths of the 11 rig workers and ad-nauseum coverage of bird washers and tar ball

River Road

Ramblings Collected by Russ Hanson

Chuck Adleman of the Luck Historical Society presents Eiler Ravnholt the Local History Award for his support of the museum and his research on the first Luck Co-op Creamery. – Photo submitted am getting. After writing a RRR story about a local neighbor, Walter Neufeldt, who as an oldtimer when I was young told us stories of the U.S. cavalry chasing Mexican bandit Pancho Villa back in 1915, I heard from his niece, Susan of Illinois. She sent me a couple of pictures of Walter. She remembers trips to the northwoods when she was young to visit Uncle Walter and asked me to e-mail her a photo of the graves in the Wolf Creek cemetery. Another one of the men I worked with picking beans at Stokely’s was Rex Cruthers from rural Luck. He was a semiretired farmer who ran one of the bean picker machines in the 1960s. He was nice to us young people on the crew. The first summer I was there, we started picking beans in July near Hastings, Minn. Stokely’s had us drive the tractor-pickers from Frederic to Hastings where we worked for two weeks before coming back to Farmington, and then gradually working our way up to Indian Creek followed by a couple of weeks back in Hastings for the second crop at the tail end of the season. My first two weeks for Stokely’s at Hastings, Rex, Conrad Medchill and I shared a room in the old Gardiner Hotel on Main Street. Each of us had a cot; the bathroom was down the hall; and we about died from the heat until Conrad bought a rotating table fan. He could have pointed it at his cot, but being a kind person, let it sweep across each of us a few times a minute, making it possible to sleep. We were at work from daylight to dark. We got up at 5 a.m., had a fast breakfast in the diner across the street, and were hauled to the field. At night we came back and ate supper at the same diner and fell into bed. Seven days a week, often 14 hours per day, we didn’t talk much. However, I did learn a little of what sophisticated hotel life was like. Conrad and Rex wrote letters home one evening when we got off a little early. “Russ, you should write to your girlfriend,” Conrad said teasingly. “Yeah, if she doesn’t see you all summer, you’ll probably lose her,” threw in Rex. So, I took a piece of paper and envelope from the drawer, next to the Gideon Bible, and wrote a short note to Anne. I drew a crude picture of the bean picker rather than try to explain it, and told her I would see her again when school started. Having no stamp, and no time to get one, I gave the letter and 10 cents (stamp price) to the bell boy (probably 70 years old in a purple uniform) and asked him if he could mail it for me. “Sure thing!” A week later, still at the hotel, I got a letter back. “Gosh Russ, are you so cheap you can’t afford a stamp,” began Annie in her note. That is how I learned that you are supposed to tip people

Irregular Columnist Brooke Biedinger pluckers. We’ve seen the president walking pristine white sand beaches picking up something that could have been a tar ball or brown pelican scat. Fifty-seven days into the catastrophe, the president met with the CEO of Beyond Petroleum and announced to the world that he (the president) had been in control of plugging the hole, from day one.

in hotels to do things for you. In those days, the post office delivered mail “postage due” so Anne got the letter, paid her dime and the bell boy kept mine for his tip. Since I was making only $1.15/hour, 10 cents probably was a decent tip. Annie told me to draw better if she was going to have to pay for my artwork. Anyway, Rex’s grandson, James, stopped into the Luck Museum when I was over there last week. He was up visiting his parents, the Max Cruthers. He was looking for information on local Odd Fellows Lodges. He is a member of the International Organization of Odd Fellows and said that many local branches were around the area up into the 1960s. So if you have any info on them, or the Rebeka’s, he is interested. We are too at the Luck Museum. I remember asking Dad what the initials “I.O.O.F” stood for on the old building in Cushing. Dad said “It’s the Odd Fellows Lodge.” It looked like an old school, and if I remember right, Gordy Lehman told me it was the old Alstad school (or maybe it was the Worth school), moved to Cushing to become the hall for the local Odd Fellows. However long I watched when I was in Cushing, I never saw anyone using the hall. We kids longed to see an Odd Fellow, but we just saw neighbors and townsfolk. I was over at Balsam Lake at the Polk County Museum two weeks ago, volunteering to get books ready for the upcoming book sale, July 3 and 4, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. They have a wide range of old books, magazines and catalogs that will be for sale. They are working with an archivist to save materials with local connections, and are selling those that don’t have local significance. Two weeks ago was their first sale. I bought nine bound volumes of the 1905 to 1910 Harper’s Magazine, two old books on farming, and a few old school texts. The price is low, the selection is wide and it is for a good cause. The museum is in the process of organizing its historical archive materials to make it accessible for local researchers. They have old school records, old tax and court records, some old newspapers, and some family histories that have been donated over the years. It should be great to try out when they get it finished. In the meantime, consider volunteering to help out!! The Polk County Fair is just weeks away. My squash, melons, pumpkins and gourds have been on hold for a few weeks, but should get back growing soon, or I will have to exhibit the squash and melon blossoms. The apples look better, but will be a very small crop this year. Our grapevines froze off and then restarted with very few blooms. The raspberries are just ripening and look to be a very good crop in Mom’s garden. She had to share the peas with

Three days after the accident the Dutch offered four oil skimmers, each capable of retrieving 36,500 barrels per day. The four skimmers collectively could remove 146,000 barrels, which exceeded the well output. The offer was rejected for two reasons, U.S. environmental regulations and the Jones Act. The skimmers retrieve the oil to tanker ships that store variously 90 percent of the oil and pump the seawater back into the ocean. The decision-impaired persons in charge thought retrieving 90 percent of the oil was too much of an environmental impact. The Jones Act of 1921 states that foreign registry boats cannot move from

some kind of squirrel or gopher that fits through the six-foot-tall mesh fence. She has volunteer dill growing all over the garden. For many years she has been the Dill Lady supplying most of the local groceries with their dill bundles. The dill is very early this year – way ahead of the cukes. The Eureka Farmers Market is picking up with lots of green leafy vegetables on hand along with carrots, radishes, strawberries, etc. I am still covering for Aunt Jemargo and have sold just enough syrup to cover the cost of what I buy from the other vendors. I buy a top sirloin steak or two to grill, a loaf of bread, some lettuce, spinach and broccoli, carrots and a few cookies. I bought some chives and basil to plant in the garden and think I will get one of the hardy shrub roses. It is rather fun to visit with the customers and the other vendors. I also have local history books for sale on behalf of the history society in Cushing. I would quit if it were for the money, but it has become the highlight of my social life each week. Facebook is a free social networking site on the Web. You create an account and share pictures, videos and stories with a set of friends, folks who mutually agree to allow each other to see their information (the old “I will show you mine if you will show me yours”). There are Facebook groups with mutual interests. The latest one I joined is “Cushing in the ‘50s” set up by Dennis Harv Olson. There are 21 of us old Cushingites sharing pictures and reminiscences of the ‘50s in the then-thriving little town. What a hoot! Another group I belong to are folks whose ancestors came from the Norwegian island of Vikna. There are nearly 300 of us all claiming this connection, many of them Norwegians living there now. We share genealogical information including hundreds of pictures. These social networking sites are wonderful at bringing geographically remote folks together. If you haven’t joined the Sterling Eureka and Laketown Historical Society, consider doing so. All yearly memberships are up as of July 1 each year. Ten dollars to SELHS, Box 731, Cushing, WI 54006. You should also join the St. Croix Falls, Frederic, Osceola, Luck and Polk historical societies too. They do wonderful work in preserving local history. I think we should get together and offer a $50 membership good for all societies at once. Then, of course, you might join the Polk County Genealogical Society too. We help people find their ancestors. Last week we had requests for information on Ivar Anderson of West Sterling and Walter Neufeldt. Stanley Selin gave up on me getting the Trade River Valley II book put together, so is taking on the assembly of it. He put together manuals for Honeywell for many years and not only is much more patient than I am, he is fussy enough to get an excellent-quality book result. Hopefully we will get it out soon! Margo is caught in the mess of moving her father while the bank delays the process by holding up the sale of his house. Hopefully she will be back early in July, or I will probably start thinking of other old friends. She reads the electronic Leader down there by West Bend, so catches up by reading RRR to see what is going on up here. Long distance is too expensive to talk that way on my retirement budget. Contact the River Road Rambler at riverroadrambler@gmail.com or Russ Hanson, 2558 Evergreen Ave., Cushing, WI 54006. We are thinking county fair and juggling aebleskivers at Lucky Days coming up soon!

port to port. The skimmers were to be flown in and I assume they could have been placed on any tanker/ barge. The governor of Louisiana wanted to build sand barriers but that was initially referred to government academicians for review. If I were governor of one of the threatened coastal states I would have told the “oil czar” what Dick Cheney told Sen. Leahy. My e-mail address is biedingerb @wildblue.net.


JUNE 30, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 5

Cherry Jelly Hungry birds discovered the cherry tree before we

did. Oh, we knew the tree was there in the apple orchard on our farm, but we didn’t realize the sour cherries were already ripe. The birds were having a feast. My sons climbed the tree and picked cherries as fast as they could, and the birds perched in the tree, too, scolding the whole time, as if saying, “What are you doing? You’re stealing our cherries.” There must have been some confusion there, as all the time we thought the lone cherry tree was ours. I wanted to make cherry pies or else I wanted to make cherry jam, but, no, my sons asked for jelly. That’s a lot of work, stemming the fruit, cooking up the berries, separating the pulp from the juice. That was accomplished in one morning and I refrigerated the juice. I had enough juice for two batches of cherry jelly. The jars were parafined and capped. Now I have to hide our precious spread until winter when we will appreciate it to the fullest. The birds harvested the rest of the cherries. Aside from leaves, the tree is bare. The sad part of our harvest is that the apple blossoms froze when they were setting, and not a single tree will bear fruit this fall. Last year one tree saved us, yielding several bushels of apples (countless pies and desserts and eating raw). Other years I was happy to give away apples, but this year is a big zero. I hope commercial orchards will have apples to sell this fall.

Copied off Nov. 2, 1980, church bulletin (Pastor Ed Zager) “People are like stained glass windows, sunny and bright but when the sun goes down, true beauty is only revealed if there is light within.” “If we are never as bad as we could be, neither are we as good as we could be.”

The last door Every time I have an appointment at the clinic, I register at the main desk and am told where to go. If I’m quick enough, I can almost parrot her words, “Go to the last door.” The waiting room of the clinic is as big as a football field. I’m not exaggerating. A round-trip back and forth must be an easy mile. I recently asked, “Whoever goes to one of the first doors?” It’s a mystery. “I suppose when I get to heaven I’ll be told, ‘Go to the last door,’” I said. I’m a perfect optimist. No, that’s not really true. I am not perfect, but I am an optimist. I had two appointments at the same clinic on the same day, scheduled an hour apart. I registered at the main desk. “Go to the first door,” she said. I was startled, “What did you say?” I asked. She repeated, “Go to the first door.” I was almost in shock. So I did, and do you know what? The layout is much the same as going to the last door, so I haven’t been missing a thing. That’s a relief!

Do you remember?

Behind the

Signpost

Compiled by Bernice Abrahamzon

50 Years Ago

Bernice Abrahamzon chilly day with a chilly wind so it was a good day for cuddling. In my experience, however, women like to cuddle but not men, as they want to get right down to serious business.

Molly Molly is our liver-and-white springer spaniel and I believe she comes from good hunting breeding, but you’d never guess it. She is either psychotic or a throwback. She gets nervous when one of my sons takes a gun outside to scare off the noisy ravens. If they shoot the gun to make a statement, Molly doesn’t like it. She certainly doesn’t like thunder and even wants to sit in my lap. As if I could help her. I’m ready to head for the safety of the basement. Molly is the sweetest, dearest, cuddliest dog she could be, but she is no hunter. It’s a good thing we didn’t get her to take hunting. She doesn’t like big noisy trucks either, although the milk hauler has helped spoil her by feeding her dog biscuits. He taught her to sit pretty and she plunks down her back end and sits as pretty as you please. She knows what we mean when we entice with, “Do you want a cookie?” (Of course she does) Molly gives us lots of laughs. She wants to be a chipmunk killer and these little creatures play hide ‘n’ seek with her on the back steps. Once in a blue moon she catches one and plays with it, but can’t understand why the play suddenly goes out of it. Perhaps Molly is part water spaniel. She gets hot in this humid weather and goes down to the barn and jumps in the stock tank. After several laps, she jumps out and comes up to us so she can shake water all over us. “No, Molly, you can’t come inside. You’re all wet!” Dolly died several summers ago and is followed by Molly and she will probably lead to Polly or Holly or, heaven forbid, Folly. It is unusual for us to have only one dog. At one time we had four at once, Skipper, Sissy, Benson and Hedges. Or was it Dulcinia and Sammy? We have been fond of all our dogs and they have had a place in our family circle. Molly, however, is different but still loved. One day I bought a framed picture of a springer at a yard sale. The liver-and-white dog has a real hangdog expression on her face and if you look at the picture, you can’t stay sad for long. You have to laugh right out loud. Until next week, Bernice

Cuddling One day this month we stopped at a petting zoo at Burnett Dairy and all the children were cuddling a pet of some sort. A little boy was cuddling a baby duck inside his shirt. A little girl was cuddling a kitten. Another one held an unidentified animal in her arms. It was a

40 Years Ago

The date of the grand opening of Wright’s TV Shop, Siren, was set for Saturday, Aug. 1.–Red Arrow Sports, St. Croix Falls, held a special showing of the new Pathfinder and Northern Star mobile homes ranging in price from two bedrooms at $4,495 to 14’ wide at $4,995.–Urban Olson, Grantsburg, wanted cucumber pickers.–Bookmobile stops were listed for July.–Traffic-stop violations were costly for motorists.–The Unity district approved a move toward new building program.–Northland Homes, Rice Lake, had a hail damage sale on 12-ft.- and 14-ft.-wide mobile homes.–There was increased participation in Advotech sponsored classes.–Specials at Route’s Super Market, Frederic, included Sizzlers pork links at 53¢ lb., big bologna at 59¢ lb., catsup at three bottles for $1, cherry pie mix at three tins for $1, and other vacation-time values.–Specials at the Frederic Co-op Super Market included margarine at 4 lbs. for $1, Crisco at 3-lb. can for 93¢, saltine crackers at 2 1-lb. boxes for 79¢ and homegrown green onions, radishes and cucumbers at 3 for 25¢ (mix or match).–The Frederic Mobilrama would hold an open house.-The Advotech board moved toward school name and site selection.–The Fire Association considered adding the McKinley areas.–The Bloodmobile will visit Polk County.

20 Years Ago

Burnett Area Arts Group awarded two grants by Hattie Landers Special to the Leader BURNETT COUNTY - The Burnett Area Arts Group has been awarded two prestigious arts grants: one from the Wisconsin Arts Board in the Creative Communities/Local Arts Agencies category, and one from the Wisconsin Humanities Council. BAAG competed with 41 other communities for the WAB grant. This is the second year BAAG has been awarded state arts grants. The grants help fund the upcoming Burnett Arts Festival on Saturday, Aug. 7, at the Lakeview Events Center in Siren. This year BAAG is partnering with the Burnett County Historical Society, blending art, heritage and history. The special exhibit theme is Burnett County Through Artists’ Eyes - Yesterday and Today. “We’re encouraging local residents to submit their own artistic interpretation of life in Burnett County, from new and old buildings, the natural beauty of lakes and pines, and to wildlife and everyday activities,” explained Harriet Rice, BAF director. “Their submissions will make up the exhibit.” She added, “Artists can work in many mediums and do not have to be members of BAAG. It’s not a contest. Our purpose is purely to inspire folks to be creative and express the beauty in their own surroundings in their own way through art.” Entry forms can be downloaded from the Web site, www.baagart.org or picked up at North Wind Arts in Siren. The deadline for submissions is July 16. At the BAF, the public will be invited to create a mosaic designed by Siren artist Jenny Goalen. “The mosaic will depict a historic scene in Burnett County,” said Rice. “When it’s finished, BAAG will donate it for permanent public display at the Burnett County Government Center. Again our purpose is to show people that art is for every-

The film “Flame Over India” was playing at the Auditorium Theatre, SCF.–Wisconsin’s Traveling Museum visited at Frederic on June 11.–Frederic Livestock Sales planned to build south of Frederic on seven acres of purchased land from Alfred Carlson.–Mrs. John Surbaugh lost her life in a farm accident.–A dance was held at Indian Creek Hall with music by Russ Voss and his orchestra.–Help was wanted at Stokely-VanCamp in the factory and also at viner stations.-Rudell’s car specials, Frederic, included used Plymouths, Buicks, Fords, Nashes, etc.–Frederic Community Motors, Frederic, had good clean cars priced to sell, too.–Burnett County planted a million trees this spring.–Carole Culbertson was chosen for Badger Girls State.–Walleye fishing at Clam Lake was pretty good according to Dean Darby who was catching them.–Many notices were published to destroy noxious weeds.–The June special at Our Own Hardware, Carlson Hardware, Frederic, was a pair of beach shoes for 39¢.–Many auction notices published.–Dr. R.G. Arveson, Frederic doctor for over 50 years, died at the age of 76 years.–A day of fun was promised on the Fourth of July in Frederic.–Southwest Iowa farm incomes dropped 56 percent in ‘59.–The Leader office was closed from July 15 to Aug. 1, as employees all took vacation at the same time.

one and is part of our everyday lives.” That purpose dovetails perfectly with the WAB Creative Communities program. Their grants fund projects that fulfill the WAB’s goals in three areas: arts education, folk and traditional arts, and local arts. The WHC supports public programs that engage the people of Wisconsin in the exploration of human cultures, ideas, heritage and values. To that end, BAAG has invited Grantsburg historian Clayton Jorgenson to share his tales about, and collection of vintage maps of, Burnett County’s first roads and trails. “Clayton is a most entertaining and engaging speaker,” said Rice, “He has so many stories about the historic, colorful characters that developed the first trails and roads in our county.” The BCHS will have replica maps for sale, along with reprints of the 1915 county plat book (the first) and books about local lore by local authors. The BAF is co-sponsored by North Wind Arts. For additional information, call 715-349-8448.

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Tom Moore resigned from the Luck Village Board.–A draft horse field day was held near Centuria.–Obituaries included Margaret Kirk, Philman Berntson and Russell Anderson.–Lynn Sommerfeld was the reporter for the Indian Creek 4-H Club.–Polk County had a possible hassle involving some tax deed property.–A conference would focus on growth in western Wisconsin.–The Lions would add to serving area and rest rooms to park shelter at Crooked Lake Park, Siren.–A Webster Arts and Crafts Extravaganza was held in late May.–Olympic runner Billy Mitts was going to appear at Forts Folle Avoine.–Captive Free was in concert at West Denmark.–Webster utility extensions cost less than expected.–The Grantsburg principal, Dr. Byron Kopp, planned to retire in June.–Grouse management area drew discussion at the forestry committee meeting in Burnett County.–The Siren Lionesses held a style show, and some of the models included Esther Nordin, Shelly Johnson and Dorothy Jo Goering.–The Evangelical Lutheran Good Samaritan Society, Siren, offered congratulations to all employees for doing a good job in “pride of caring.”–Frederic High School had 39 graduates.–The Frederic Board of Education discussed the possibilities of consolidation.

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PAGE 6 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 30, 2010

TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER Lewis

653-4281 How much rain will it take to bring our lakes and ponds back to normal? It seems we have had a lot of rain but the water level is still low. The trees appreciate all the rain and are responding to it. Wild raspberries were ripe in the woods but the rainy downpour knocked them off the bushes. (Too bad!) Mary Jane Johnson is still nursing some bruises and bumps from being in a car accident several weeks ago. She was a passenger in a car starting out on a vacation trip, but it ended before it got very far. (Wishing her well!) Some weeks bring a real dearth of news. My sons suggest I make something up, “You mean start a rumor?” That will be the day. I can get in enough trouble without half trying.

I won’t get in trouble if I say it has been a good year for asparagus and a nice long season. My father used to stop cutting it when June rolled ‘round. I won’t get in trouble if I say an experienced gardener friend said he has planted carrots three times so far this summer. One of these days he’d like to see some results. When you consider how small a carrot seed is, it’s surprising it produces a giant root vegetable. I used to cut my carrots in round circles but one of my best friends cuts them in chunky quarters so I’ve started that too. No one is ever too old to learn something new. Others say they have planted peas two times this year, waiting for results. Others say there is something wrong with leaf lettuce this year. Can it be not

Dewey - LaFollette Jan Myers of Eagan, Minn., was a guest of Donna and Gerry Hines from Sunday evening to Wednesday afternoon. On Wednesday, Jan took Donna out for lunch to celebrate her birthday. Nina Hines and Lida Nordquist went too. That evening, Karen and Hank Mangelsen visited Donna and Gerry. Sue and Roger Mroszak and Hank and Karen Mangelsen were Friday evening visitors of Don and Lida Nordquist. Brenda and Jessica Sweet of Vadnais Heights, Minn., came to visit Gerry and Donna Hines Friday and took them out to eat for Donna’s birthday. They went home Saturday. A Mangelsen family reunion was held Saturday at Coon Lake Park in Frederic. This was for descendants of Nick and Fannie Mangelsen. Over 100 people came for the get-together. The oldest direct

descendant there was Inez Pearson, who is 80, and the youngest person there was her great-granddaughter, Julia Inez Vollmuth, who is 8 weeks old. Patty and Mandy Close and Larry and Baxter Mangelsen were overnight guests Saturday of Karen and Hank Mangelsen. Hear By Faith, an instrumental and vocal group from Duluth, Minn., presented special music and Christian witness at Lakeview United Methodist Church Sunday morning. Lida and Don Nordquist were Sunday evening visitors of Lawrence and Nina Hines. Hank and Karen Mangelsen called on Byron and Sandy Wickman Sunday evening. Clam River Tuesday Club will meet July 7 at 2 p.m., at the home of Sandy Redding.

St. Croix Valley Senior Center Tuesday is our busy day. At 10 a.m., we had exercise; at 11 a.m., we played Skip-Bo. At 12:30 p.m., we played Dominos, Hand and Foot and 500 cards. There were 40 people that participated. Winners in Dominos were Gladis Weikert, Martha Lundstrom and Delores Benson. The winning team in Hand and Foot was Dottie Adams, Darlene Cross and Rita Boyle. Winners in 500 were Bruce Medchill, Mary Lou Lund, John Brown and Pete Schlosser. The 9bid winners were Cliff Qualle and Ray Nelson. On Thursday morning, we had exercises and played Skip-Bo. In the afternoon, several of the seniors enjoyed the play “To Fool The Eye” at the Festi-

Bernice Abrahamzon

enough sunshine? The monthly fellowship supper at church will be this Wednesday at 6 p.m. with potluck at church, followed by the 7 p.m. monthly board meeting. (I think I told you in Indiana it’s called a pitch-in dinner). On Sunday, Sylvia Schaetzel and Robin Peterson finished the month of June as Pastor Tom’s assistant with the service. We are fortunate to have a number of volunteers. The sign-up sheet is on the bulletin board. LaVonne and John Boyer celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary this past Friday (and other days as well). This is turning out to be a landmark year for them, being Frederic Citizens of the Year, married 50 years, etc. Happy anniversary to them.

Frederic Senior Center Monday, June 21, Spades was played with the following winners: Shirley Sandquist in first place, Holly Stonesifer in second place and Carmen Marek in third place. The rains have made our flower boxes look good. Pokeno group played at 1 p.m., on Wednesday and Friday. Thursday night 500 cards played at 6:30 p.m., with the following winners: Willis Williams in first place, Nina Vold in second place, Del Hansen in third place and Mildred Ihrig in fourth place.

Naturalist programs at Wisconsin Interstate Park Thursday, July 1

Nature story time, 10 a.m. Join naturalists Julie Fox and Barb Walker for a story and activity chosen especially for children pre-K through kindergarten Marian Edler and their parents. Check at the park office upon arval Theatre. In the evening, 500 cards were played rival for the program location within the park. and the winners were Phil Mevisen, Ann Case, Ray Nelson and Charlie Mevissen. The 9-bid winners Friday, July 2 If the River Could Talk…, 3 p.m. at the Summit were Bob Norlander and Roger Greenley. Rock Trail sign. Meet naturalist Barb Walker and Friday morning Bridge was played. Come and have a cup of coffee Monday through hear some of the fascinating history of the St. Croix Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. You could join us River Valley on this scenic hike to the summit. for exercises on Tuesday and Thursday at 10 a.m. They are low-impact exercises for all ages. If you Saturday, July 3 The Dalles – A Gift of the Glacial Age, 1 p.m. at the can’t do all of them, each person does as much as they are comfortable with. It’s more fun to exercise Pothole Trail sign. Meet our new naturalist, Nancy Frank, and hike the half-mile Pothole Trail to learn with a group than by yourself. Try us out. about the glacial history of The Dalles of the St. Croix River. Nature awareness program and hike, 4 p.m. at Barb the Ice Age Center. Join naturalist Nancy Frank for a Munger short discussion about how we can be more attuned to nature, then practice your new skills along the Ralph Severson, Lou Jappe, Don Oltman and Jeff Horizon Rock Trail. Hanson for taking care of this for all of the Siren senWildlife and What They Wear, 7 p.m. at the Ice iors. Needless to say, we can always use another Age Center. Stop by the interpretive building, talk helping hand, stop in and see what you can do to with the naturalist and get a chance to feel the differhelp the center. ent furs of our woodland friends. The greeting card crew is still asking for envelopes for the cards that they recycle. The larger greeting card envelope is especially needed, but Sunday, July 4, Independence Day Our Friends the Plants, 1 p.m. at the Ice Age Centhey are grateful for any that come in. Winners at 500 this week were Gerry Vogel, Flo ter. Meet naturalist Nancy Frank at the interpretive Antiel, Marie Bentley, Doris Knopik and Sylvia Pe- building, then go on a hike to learn some common terson. Treats were furnished by the center and plants and how they have been used. The location of D’ann Becker. We did have five winners at Spades the hike will be determined at the time. The Ice Age National Scenic Trail starts here! 4 on Friday, but I managed to lose the list of people p.m. at the Pothole Trail sign. Meet the naturalist at between the center and home, but I remembered, which was more important anyway, that the people the Pothole Trail and learn about one of only two nawho furnished the treats for the players were, Vir- tional scenic trails that are contained in one state. Whooooo’s That? 7 p.m. at the Ice Age Cenginia Martin, Cindy Yourchuck, Inez Pearson and ter. Join naturalist Nancy Frank at the Ice Age CenAnke Olesen. The center will be closed on Monday, July 5, no ter auditorium as she shares the secrets of the world dinner or activities but everyone will be back on of owls with a slide show. Summer Outdoor Family Adventure Series, 10:30 board on Tuesday. For any information please call the center at 715349-7810 and for luncheon reservations call 715Fran 349-2845. Have a great week.

Krause

News from the service COLUMBIA, S.C. – Army National Guard Pfc. Laurana K. Sveback has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C. During the nine weeks of training, the soldier studied the Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical fitness, and received instruction and practice in basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training, drill and ceremony, marching, rifle marksmanship, armed and unarmed combat, map reading, field tactics, military

courtesy, military justice system, basic first aid, foot marches and field training exercises. Sveback earned distinction as an honor graduate. She is the daughter of Terry Sveback of St. Croix Falls, and Dorothy Sveback of Centuria. The private graduated in 2007 from St. Croix Falls High School and received an associate degree in 2009 from Century Community Tech College, White Bear Lake, Minn. - submitted

Follow the Leader

Ardyce Knauber

Saturday we will have our birthdays for July observed with the following having birthdays: Delores Potter, Holly Stonesifer, Edna Utley, Willis Williams and David Peterson. On Monday, July 5, we will observe the Fourth of July with potluck – no Spades, cards of your choice can be played. Friday, July 2, will be the monthly meeting, at 1:30 p.m. Members are urged to attend. Have a safe Fourth of July.

Interstate Park

Siren Senior Center Apparently everyone knew that Bob was going to entertain all the folks at the Dining at Five dinner Thursday, July 1, except Bob. Well, as we all know, we seniors get our wires crossed sometimes so we can’t promise that he will be here to join us, just come and eat and we’ll all find out for sure. We promise a great dinner and will be happy to have Ralph and Nona Severson, who have been trekking around Alaska for the past two weeks, back in our midst and help serving the meal. The center has been bustling with activities in the afternoon all week, but not so in the morning. We have missed our coffee ladies who I understand are off vacationing. Remember our pool table is always empty in the morning looking for players and Don Oltman still has hope that someone will come out and play Cribbage with him on Wednesday mornings. Volunteers basically run our center; the only person who receives any compensation is our cleaning crew. The rest of the work is done from the goodness of the people who take the time out of their busy schedules to volunteer to make the center a pleasant place for all. Our lawn maintenance is handled by a handful of guys and they do a great job as it always looks like a park. Gratitude is extended to

The Boyers, assisted by daughter Kara Alden, served DQ cake following Sunday’s service and everyone enjoyed. Nice to see Mary Jane Johnson back in her usual pew. Anxious to have Judy feeling better, too, and back with her husband in church. Thinking of you both, Judy and Dave Mrdutt. LaVerne Leep had a wonderful week last week with relatives, eating out, celebrating her birthday every day, going to a quilt show and a pancake breakfast, etc. The new grass in the church yard has received its first mowing. Looks good.

a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Old-fashioned train ride from William O’Brien State Park. Join us for this fun, unique experience on the trails. This event involves a one-mile hike, and opportunities to get off the train to shop. The cost is $15 for adults, $10 for kids under 16, and children under 4 ride free. Call 651433-0500 x227 for more details. SOFAS will take area residents on a variety of hikes, paddles and fun activities. Join us just once or every week this summer to meet local families and make new friends as you explore some of the most treasured places in the St. Croix Valley. Attend seven programs to earn the 2010 SOFAS collectable pin and certificate.

Monday, July 5

Of Spider’s Webs and Dream Catchers, 10 a.m. in the classroom at the Ice Age Center. Join naturalist Nancy Frank to hear the legend of dream catchers and make one of your own to take home. Fun for the entire family, adults and children alike. Cactus Aren’t Just in Texas! 1 p.m. at the Eagle Peak Trail sign in the Pines Group Camp. Join the naturalist and hike to Eagle Peak to see Wisconsin’s own miniature cacti and learn about plant adaptations to live in various environments.

Wednesday, July 7

Ancient Abandoned Riverbeds, 10 a.m. at the Meadow Valley Trail sign near the beach parking lot. Meet naturalist Barb Walker for a beautiful hike up the valley and learn some ancient geology that makes the area look like it does today.

Thursday, July 8

Nature story time, 10 a.m. Join naturalists Julie Fox and Barb Walker for a story and activity chosen especially for children pre-K through kindergarten and their parents. Check at the park office upon arrival for the program location within the park. Interstate Park is located in St. Croix Falls, on Hwy. 35 just one-half mile south of Hwy. 8. For more information call Julie or Barb at 715-483-3747. Programs are free of charge, but a Wisconsin state park sticker is required to enter the park. Annual passes for 2010 are $25 for Wisconsin residents or $35 for nonresidents. Daily passes are $7 for residents or $10 for nonresidents.

Orange

Members of the Harmony HCE Club enjoyed their trip to the Duluth zoo on on Tuesday. They had lunch at The Shack in Duluth, Minn. John and Reeny Neinstadt were in Eau Claire Friday and Saturday. They also visited Sandy and Lamar Johnson at Cadott. Natalie Flagstad, Brianna and Brendon spent the weekend at Andover, Minn., with Bud and they celebrated their June birthdays at Valley Fair on Saturday. Each took a friend along. Kalie Freeborn and friend spent the weekend with Marvel Merriam. The installation service for Paster Heinecke at Our Redeemer Lutheran Church was well-attended. Tom and Becky O’Brien visited Jack and LaVonne Sunday afternoon.

LaVonne O'Brien

Jack and Jeri Witzany attended a funeral in Rosemount, Minn., for a family member on Saturday. The Webster Lions Club chicken barbecue on Sunday was well-attended. Dean and Mary Jo Peterson and family spent the weekend at their cabin. They are having it enlarged into a year-round home. Bryan and Brad Krause spent the week camping out and fishing in the Boundary Waters. They had a good time despite some rain. Mark and Fran Krause drove to Sartell, Minn., on Sunday for the Tomhave family reunion held at Fran’s cousin Sheelah and Gene Windfeldt’s home. Thursday, July 15, is the Webster all-school class reunion at Ike Walton Lodge. Make your reservations soon.


JUNE 30, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 7

TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER Sam is a basset-shepherd mix, neutered male. He has the head of the shepherd and body of the basset; very unique. Sam came to the shelter as a surrendered pet. His family lost their home to foreclosure. Sam is 7 years old and is a happy dog; happy to greet the day and happy to be in your company. Sam comes with a few lessons under his collar. He lived with kids for his entire life prior to the shelter, ages 1 to 12. He knows sit, stay and come;

Hi, everybody! Blacky here from Humane Society of Burnett County. If you noticed I was absent last week, it was because I was on vacation. I considered having my brother write my column, like my other brother did once, before his death. He did a good job filling in. However, after watching this brother get his head stuck in a hollow tree, and then seeing him try to bite at a swirling vortex of water circling over a culvert, I decided that it would be anyone’s guess what would wind up in the paper. So, I didn’t ask him. Right now he’s on cloud nine since we got so much rain. His swimming hole just got a whole lot bigger, and there are turtles coming out of the woodwork for him to sniff and investigate. Sadly, one turtle who was laying eggs alongside our gravel road got run over and squished. So did all her eggs. That made me both sad and mad; if you cannot avoid a turtle on the roadway, then maybe you shouldn’t be driving a car! Some people think it’s fun to run over critters, like it’s some kind of sport. Well, I don’t see how being in a giant metal box on wheels and running down a defense-

Happy Tails

Await

Arnell Humane Society he is house and crate trained. Sam has been known to chase cats, but he doesn’t harm them. He played well with a Border collie. Sam has a valuable maturity for a home in need of a dog with built-in manners. He has many years of companionship to share with a family. The shelter is brimming with adoptable kittens. View them online or visit the shelter for an upclose and personal interview. Also available are a handful of fantastic adult cats, two declawed and all spayed or neutered. Annie’s puppies are now 4 weeks old. They are walking and making their desires and personalities known. View them at our Web site under Happy Shelter Tales. Arnell Memorial Humane Society, 715-268-7387 (PETS) or see them online at arnellhumane.org.

Shelter

YAPpenings Blacky less animal is so sportsmanlike. I like to think that maybe in some parallel universe there’s a big turtle behind the wheel of a truck, chasing down a thoughtless human. I am told I didn’t miss a whole lot while I was away last week. Oh, we took in some stray dogs, but happily they were reunited with their owners and everyone went home happy. The only new friend I have to tell you about this week is a stray cat. His name is 007. He likes to disguise his meows so they are different each time he opens his mouth. He’s really quite a character. The Flower Girl pups are getting bigger, and they are all spoken

Sixteen members of the Youth Character Initiative from the New Richmond Area Center visited the shelter last week and presented a check for $138. The donated funds were raised when the group held a car wash on June 17 at Auto Tech Car Repair in New Richmond. After the presentation, the group enjoyed socializing sessions with our active kittens and sleepy puppies. They certainly lived up to the group’s name, showing character in their initiative to raise funds for the animals. for except Sweet Pea, I believe. They are such sweet little things that I just love them to bits, and I’m glad they are going off to loving families. I love my adult buddies, too, and there are quite a few of them at the shelter - both canine and feline. I hope they all get adopted soon but, if they don’t, you may see them out and about in the coming days. My friends will be in both the Siren and Webster Fourth of July parades (provided we have enough volunteer dog walkers), and on Thursday, July 8, they will be at the Crooked Lake Bandshell in Siren for Music in the Park. Music is from 7 to 9 p.m., and admission is free. My furry friends aren’t the headliners, but one or two might decide to sing backup. Wouldn’t that be a treat? If you don’t want to wait that long, you can visit my friends at the shelter and hear them “sing” there. You can walk a dog or two, spend time with some cats, or you can even shop. The shelter has T-shirts for sale as well as cool collars and leashes for your pet - ID tags too. All the proceeds go toward keeping the shelter doors open and helping

with expenses. You can also help out by donating your used cell phones, used ink cartridges and aluminum cans. You can even donate yourself. Errr, I mean you can donate your time and be a shelter volunteer, like me. I’m kind of a smelly volunteer, Mom says, so I am in line for yet another bath. She just doesn’t understand my philosophy: I stink, therefore I am. Besides, you have never heard anyone say, “Cleanliness is next to dogliness,” have you? No, you have not. I like to think that maybe in some parallel universe there’s a big, black, crazy-eared dog with a garden hose and a bottle of shampoo, sudsing up a human. I’ll be squeaky clean, but not for long, and then I’ll see you here next week! HSBC is saving lives, one at a time, www.hsburnettcty.org, 715-866-4096. Find us on Facebook, too.

Academic news STEVENS POINT – The University of WisconsinStevens Point honored more than 2,460 undergraduate students for attaining high grade point averages during the spring semester of the 2009-10 academic semester. Full-time undergraduates who earned grade points of 3.90 to 4.0 (4.0 equals straight A) are given the highest honors designation. High honor citations go to those with grade-point averages from 3.75 to 3.89 and honor recognition is accorded to those with grade-point averages from 3.50 to 3.74. Personalized certificates of scholastic achievement are being sent to those who earned highest honors distinction. Students who received honors include: Grantsburg Alison C. McKinley, highest honors; Carrie T. Myers, highest honors; Justin S. Rikkola, honors. Osceola Sarah M. Droher, honors. Unity Renee M. Haas, highest honors; Sabrina R. Roth, high honors. Webster Allison E. Didier, highest honors. – submitted ••• MENOMONIE – The following students received the Chancellor’s Award for the spring 2010 semester. The award is presented to students who have a grade-point average of 3.5 or above. Amery Andrew Bensen, Bachelor of Science Game Design and Development; Pauline Ceulemans, Bachelor of Arts Psychology; Tarisa Helin, Bachelor of Science Human Development and Family Studies; Codie Hillstead, Bachelor of Science Vocational Rehabilitation; Lucas Lee, Bachelor of Science Applied Science; Shannon Maanum, Bachelor of Science Retail Merchandising and Mgmt; Jennifer Monette, Bachelor of Science Business Administration; Meredith Satterlund, Bachelor of Science Golf Enterprise Management. Cushing Jordan Christensen, Bachelor of Arts Psychology. Frederic Alexandria Delosier, Bachelor of Arts Psychology; Julia Haas, Bachelor of Science Applied Science; Sarah Lexen, Bachelor of Fine Arts Art; Phillip Lundborg, Bachelor of Science Manufacturing Engineering; Nicole Paquette, Bachelor of Science Human Development and Family Studies.

Luck Margaret Langeness, Bachelor of Science Hotel Restaurant and Tourism; Jesse Schallenberger, Bachelor of Science Computer Engineering; Jacob Stonesifer, Bachelor of Science Business Administration. Osceola Matthew Ellwanger, Bachelor of Science Packaging; Daniel Hustad, Bachelor of Science Construction; Janelle Meyer, Pre-Early Childhood Education. St. Croix Falls Christopher Chelberg, Bachelor of Science Technology Education. - submitted ••• DES MOINES, Iowa – Courtney Daniels of Siren has been named to the dean’s list at Drake University. Daniels achieved this academic honor by earning a grade-point average of 3.5 or higher during the spring 2010 semester at Drake. Drake is a private, independent university in Des Moines, Iowa, with an enrollment of approximately 3,200 full-time undergraduate students from 45 states and 62 countries. Drake University’s mission is to provide an exceptional learning environment that prepares students for meaningful personal lives, professional accomplishments and responsible global citizenship. The Drake experience is distinguished by collaborative learning among students, faculty and staff and by the integration of the liberal arts and sciences with professional preparation. submitted ••• WACO, Texas – Over 2,700 Baylor University students were named to the dean’s academic honor list for the 2010 spring semester. To be named to the dean’s list, a student must be an undergraduate with a minimum grade-point average of 3.7, while enrolled in a minimum of 12 semester hours. The following student from your area was named to the dean’s list this spring. Amery Amanda L. Swenson. - submitted ••• ROCHESTER, Minn. – Rochester Community and Technical College is pleased to announce its spring semester 2010 graduates. RCTC congratulates these graduates who reside in your community for successfully completing the requirements for their program of study. Siren Stevan R. Lunde, high honors, Associate in Applied Science, health information technology. - submitted

••• ST. PETER, Minn. – The spring semester dean’s list at Gustavus Adolphus College has been released. The list comprises students who have earned a 3.7 grade-point average, based on a scale in which 4.0 = A, or higher for the semester ending in May 2010. The following local students were named to the dean’s list: Grantsburg Lydia Benge Briggs; Luck Elizabeth Bowman; Osceola Collin Lehman and Jessica Weber; St. Croix Falls Abbe Paulhe. - submitted ••• OSHKOSH – University of Wisconsin Oshkosh officials have announced the names of students who qualified for the university’s dean’s list and honor roll in the spring semester of the 2009-2010 school year. To qualify for the honor roll, a student must take at least 12 credits and earn a grade-point average of at least 3.3 (out of a possible 4.0, or all A’s). Those with a GPA of 3.75 or higher qualify for the dean’s list. Frederic Ashley Overby, honor roll; Grantsburg Lukas Olson, honor roll; Luck Ashley Valentine, honor roll; Osceola Chelsea Benitz, honor roll and Kelsey Hendricks, dean’s list. - submitted ••• MANKATO, Minn. – The academic high honor and honor lists (dean’s lists) for the past spring semester at Minnesota State University, Mankato, have been announced by Dr. Scott R. Olson, provost and vice president for academic affairs. Among the more than 14,500 students, a total 745 students qualified for the high honor list by achieving a 4.0 straight A average, while 2,283 students earned a 3.5 to 3.99 average to qualify for the honor list. To qualify for academic honors, undergraduate students must be enrolled for at least 12 credit hours for a grade. Amery Cady Morel, honors; Frederic Lisa Chelmo, honors;

Osceola Natasha Frank, honors and Kayla Wistrom, honors; Siren Melanie Chenal, high honors. - submitted ••• ELY, Minn. – Bobbie Durand and LaShawn Nohrenberg, both of Grantsburg, graduated honor graduates on May 11 from Vermilion Community College in Ely, Minn. Durand earned a certificate degree in taxidermy. Nohrenberg earned an applied science degree in watershed science. - submitted ••• RED WING/WINONA, Minn. - Minnesota State College-Southeast Technical, Red Wing and Winona campuses are pleased to announce the president’s list for spring semester 2010. To be eligible for this honor, students must complete a minimum of 12 credits at Southeast Technical during an academic term and achieve a GPA of 3.5 or above to be named to the president’s list. Osceola Crystal J. Rixmann. - submitted ••• LA CROSSE –The following local students have been named to the dean’s list at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse for the 2009-10 academic year spring semester, ending May 2010. Qualification for the dean’s list is limited to students who have attained outstanding academic achievement. To be eligible, students must have earned not less than a 3.5 semester grade-point average and have carried a minimum of 12 semester credits. Amery Matthew Rubenzer; Clear Lake Stephanie Morse; Grantsburg Alyssa Ryan; Osceola Kyle Burkhamer, Kevin McCusker, Amy Rohlman and Mandi Schmidt; St. Croix Falls William Kalmoe; Turtle Lake Jamie Becker; Webster Gregory Stanton. - submitted •••


PAGE 8 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 30, 2010

715-349-2964

Siren

We took off on a vacation from June 16 to June 23, hence the lack of one week’s column. While we were away those big black buggers had a heyday in bear country. They not only tore down both the poles for birdfeeders minus the feeders, but also spent some time checking out the patio area, as the screen on the patio door now has to be replaced. Maybe they were just checking to see if we were home, ya think? A friend of mine out on CTH N, Naomi Glover, said she has seen both Samson and Goliath around her place. As the crow flies she only lives about three miles and I’m told a boar has a range of about 20 miles. Siren has a lot going on this weekend over the Fourth. If you like the Dweebs band they will be playing on Main Street Saturday night from 8 p.m. to midnight with a $5 admittance. Sunday the Fourth is the popular bed races at 10 a.m., a kiddie parade follows, and the grand parade is at 11:30 a.m. on Main Street, a boat parade at 2:30 p.m., at Crooked Lake Park, Music in the Park at the band shell by the Bethany Lutheran youth group at 8 p.m. Finishing off the day will be our own Siren Lions Club’s great fireworks at Crooked Lake. These events are sponsored by the Siren Chamber of Commerce. Sympathy to the family of Glenwood A. Flodin who passed away on June 18. Heard through the grapevine that the ag dairy breakfast was a success again this year. Lots of wild rice pancakes and all the trimmings were served to a good-size crowd. The Siren Methodist Men’s Group will once again be selling brats, hot dogs and beverages over the Fourth of July weekend by the Holiday gas station. The United Methodist church ladies will hold their

traditional homemade pie with homemade ice cream on the Fourth of July from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the church. There will also be a book sale that day so come enjoy some pie then browse through the books. You just may want to pick up one or two. The town of Daniels monthly meeting is coming up on July 13. If you plan on attending, just remember the time has been changed to 7 p.m. at the town hall. Don’t forget the Webster Central Burnett County Fair is coming up on July 8 through July 10. Stop by and enjoy a good old country fair and while there, take a look at all the 4-H projects. These kids do a great job on them. We should be proud of these kids. We have a great bunch of kids in our county and I commend each and every one of them on the work they do in 4-H. 4-H creates good, solid citizens. Art and Bev Beckmark left on June 16 for Monroe, N.C., to visit her nephew, Craig Anderson and his family. The trip down was great. However, once there they roasted in temps of 97 to over 100 every day. Craig’s wife, Linda, said it was hotter than usual for this time of year, weather is crazy all over this year I guess. Did you know there are tree rats down there too, but because of the heat we didn’t see any. The only critters we saw on our trip were lots of rubber alligators along the roadsides. We thought we were going to miss their daughter Roxanne this year as she had headed up to Duluth, Minn., to see her grandmother, Lorraine Brazell. She, however, and her two sons, Harry and Anthony, and her boyfriend Josh Handy, stopped in at our home on Thursday, June 24, after we got home. They headed home after the visit, driving straight through. Oh to be young again and able to do just about anything.

Webster Senior Center We would like to express sincere appreciation to all who attended our open house. It was nice to see some new faces and hope they come back again. Several door prizes were given out and five grand prizewinners were drawn that each received two lunch tickets. Those winners were: Charles Scott, Dave Wardean, Darrold Doriott, Jan Cutler and Joanne Miehle. Several tried out the Wii bowling and had lots of fun and laughs. Last week 25 players for Dime Bingo enjoyed the treats furnished by Margel and Dorothy. This week there were 18 players and Abby and Bernie brought the goodies. Dime Bingo is every Wednesday at 12:30 p.m. Come in and join in the fun. Last Thursday, a few brave men played pool and two ladies played cards. The stormy weather kept most of them close to home. This week several men played pool and three ladies played cards. Sounds like the weather will be more cooperative this week. The next evening meal of turkey and all the fixin’s will be Thursday, July 8, at 5 p.m. Don’t forget to make your reservation.

Births

Bev Beckmark

Bernie Boelter

The center will be closed on Monday, July 5, because of the holiday. However, even though it is usually closed on Wednesday, it will be open on July 7. Mark your calendar for the senior picnic on Wednesday, July 14, at the Crooked Lake Park in Siren. Lunch will be served at 11:30 a.m. There will be a volunteer at the center on Tuesdays from 9 to 11 a.m., for anyone interested in the Wii. The Wii Fit is great if you are looking for an exercise that is not too difficult. Stop in and check it out. There is a sign-up sheet there if you are interested. There is also a sign-up sheet for anyone interested in playing cards. Be sure to stop in and pick up a lunch menu for July and sign up to enjoy some of Nikki’s lunches. Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, so today is the day to make reservations for lunch at the center and/or join in one or all of the other activities that are offered. Hope to see you there.

Born at Burnett Medical Center:

A boy, Brett Robert Lee Lindberg, born June 24, 2010, to Jesika and Mitchel Lindberg, Webster. Brett weighed 7 lbs., 11 oz., and was 21 inches long. He has four siblings, Conner, Aiden, Kendall and Faith. Grandparents are Pam and Dave Benner. Great-grandparents are Vern and Janet Patrin and Roger VanDoorne and Ann VanDoorne. …. A boy, Jackson Joseph Collins, born June 22, 2010, to Jennifer Kettler and Joseph Collins, Webster. Jackson weighed 10 lbs., 2 oz. and was 21-1/2 inches long. Maternal grandparents are Pat Robertson, Minneapolis, Minn. and Tony Kettler, Glen Flora. Paternal grandparent is Lyle Collins. •••

Born at Amery Regional Medical Center:

A boy, Brody Jacob Schadow, born April 27, 2010, to Christie McGrane and Ryan Schadow, Amery. Brody weighed 6 lbs., 10 oz. ••• A girl, MacKenzie Jo Nichols-Russo, born May 10, 2010, to Amanda Nichols and Timothy Russo, Amery. MacKenzie weighed 11 lbs., 4 oz. ••• A girl, Lila Anne Munson, born May 13, 2010, to Mari and Andrew Munson, Emerald. Lila weighed 6 lbs., 14 oz. ••• A boy, Carsyn Michael Yeske, born May 14, 2010, to Kaitlyn and Jordan Yeske, Clear Lake. Carsyn weighed 8 lbs., 14.5 oz. ••• A boy, Sawyer Memphis Madsen, born May 16, 2010, to Rachel and Nicholas Madsen, Turtle Lake. Sawyer weighed 6 lbs., 10.5 oz. ••• A girl, Zoe Linnea Troff, born May 18, 2010, to Jennifer and Rory Troff, Amery. Zoe weighed 7 lbs., 5 oz. ••• A boy, Joseph Elliot Maukstad, born May 18, 2010, to Wanda Pickett and Ricky Maukstad, Turtle Lake. Joseph weighed 9 lbs., 10 oz. ••• A boy, Luke Lester Wagner, born May 20, 2010, to Marcia and Aaron Wagner, Clear Lake. Luke weighed 8 lbs., 14 oz. ••• A boy, Jaxson Eli Robinson, born May 20, 2010, to Stacia Slama and Jeff Robinson, Inver Grove Heights, Minn. Jaxson weighed 9 lbs., 4.7 oz. ••• A boy, Hayden Thomas Leonard, born May 22, 2010, to Elizabeth and Chad Leonard, Amery. Hayden weighed 6 lbs., 12 oz. ••• A boy, Owen Wallace Reilly, born May 24, 2010, to Jaimee and Keith Reilly, Almena. Owen weighed 7 lbs., 4.5 oz. •••

A boy, Alex Edward Phillips, born June 2, 2010, to Christa Radman and Randal Phillips, Amery. Alex weighed 8 lbs., 9 oz. ••• A boy, Caden Charles Witscher, born June 3, 2010, to Stacy and Joseph Witscher, Almena. Caden weighed 7 lbs., 8 oz. ••• A girl, Lilly Shay Hanacek, born June 6, 2010, to Brittany Schnider and Timothy Hanacek, Amery. Lilly weighed 8 lbs., 14.5 oz. ••• A boy, Aidan Ray Brekke, born June 15, 2010, to Kimberly Mueller and Brandon Brekke, Clayton. Aidan weighed 7 lbs., 5 oz. ••• A boy, Karter Milan Roy Krohn, born June 18, 2010, to Brittany Toland and Jeff Krohn, Amery. Karter weighed 7 lbs., 14.5 oz. ••• A girl, Piper Endsley Bylander, born June 22, 2010, to Jennifer and Nathan Bylander, Clear Lake. Piper weighed 8 lbs., 8 oz. •••

Born at Aspirus Women’s Health Birthing Center, Wausau:

A girl, Jillian Katherine, was born June 18, 2010, to Aaron and Renee Wallin. Jillian weighed 8 lbs., 9 oz. and was 19 inches long. Grandparents are Don and Barb Sikma, Oconto, and Larry and Mary Wallin, Luck. •••

Born at St. Croix Regional Medical Center:

A girl, Cordelia Jhordis Anne Qualle, born June 15, 2010, to Jeffrey and Michelle Qualle, Osceola. Cordelia weighed 6 lbs., 10 oz. ••• A boy, Randon Leon Fickbohm, born June 16, 2010, to Chris and Jenna Fickbohm, Grantsburg. Randon weighed 8 lbs., 1 oz. ••• A boy, Jonah David Dyzak, born June 17, 2010, to Lindsay and Matthew Dyzak, Dresser. Jonah weighed 6 lbs., 15 oz. ••• A boy, Oliver Thomas Getts, born June 18, 2010, to Steve and Bridget Getts, Webster. Oliver weighed 6 lbs., 12 oz. ••• A boy, Jacob Richard Pickering, born June 18, 2010, to Sarah and Jason Pickering, Webster. Jacob weighed 6 lbs., 11 oz. ••• A girl, Grace Elizabeth Olson, born June 21, 2010, to Jason and Jennifer Olson, Chisago City, Minn. Grace weighed 9 lbs., 2 oz. ••• A boy, Johnathan Michael Scannapiew, born June 22, 2010, to Caroline Sanford and Michael Scannapiew, Centuria. Johnathan weighed 7 lbs., 11 oz. •••

THANK YOU

515649 45Lp 35ap

ACTION PLAN FOR A BRIGHTER FUTURE

To all my friends and family who sent me cards, letters and flowers during and after my recent two hospital stays, first for back surgery and then for pancreatic cancer. Most inpotant are the prayers for a complete recovery, “With God, all things are possible.” I love you all. Mary Jane Klar-Martin

As our nation celebrates its birthday on the Fourth of July, the Burnett County Republican Party proposes the following plan of action to lead our country to a brighter future: Protect individual and states’ rights Reduce government debt and spending Simplify tax code Preserve right to keep and bear arms Preserve right to life Maintain a strong national defense Secure our borders Attain energy independence by domestic production Enact cost saving health care reform Make English the official language of USA These principles define who we are and what we stand for. If you agree, stand with us. Find out more by coming to our meetings held at 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of every month at the Burnett County Gov’t. Center. Help take back our country!

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Paid for by the Burnett County Republican Party, Brent Blomberg, Treasurer 515666 45L


JUNE 30, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 9

Grantsburg Public Library

Academic news Jacqueline Bonneville, 1990 graduate of St. Croix Falls High School, received her education specialist degree in career and technical education this past December. This is the highest degree awarded by UW-Stout. Last fall, Bonneville was the recipient of UW-Eau Claire’s 2009 Excellence in Performance Award for administrative and professional academic staff. She has coordinated UW-Eau Claire’s new student orientation program for the past seven years, has served as advisor for undeclared students and was the associate dean of student development, assisting students in crisis. She is the daughter of Tom and Salene Bonneville, Grantsburg, granddaughter of Darlene (Carlyle) Sherstad, also of Grantsburg, and Eleanor (Ellwood) Bonneville, of Frederic. — Photo submitted

Jacqueline Bonneville

Frederic Brownie Troop

Cover to cover

Teen talk

New art display

Our library has a new art display. Burnett County Judge Ken Kutz has graciously allowed the library to display some of his amazing artwork. Stop in and take a look.

New July books

Check the Web site for a list of new books coming to the library in July; there is sure to be one you will enjoy.

Summer program

We are well into our summer program. On Wednesday, June 23, the Grantsburg Hockey Association’s Michelle and Angie helped us learn how ice works, and we found out it sure takes a lot of steps to make the hockey rink just right for kids to skate on. We also made snow globes and for a treat had Icees. Next week we will be hosting the St. Croix Scenic Riverway. Come see what interesting things they will know about water. Wednesdays at 1:30 p.m.

We had our second meeting—whoop. A dozen teens met for some games, snacks and discussion. We are reading science fiction/fantasy until Thursday, July 8. Most everyone finished a book in the week, some two. Some currently being read are the “City of Ember Series,” by Jeanne DuPrau, “Twilight,” by Stephanie Meyer, multiple books by Eoin Colfer and more. Sixth-graders and up through 12th grade are invited to join us from noon - 12:45 p.m. on Wednesdays.

Preschool creativity zone

From 1-4 p.m. on Thursdays preschoolers and their grown-ups are invited to come into the library for activities and crafts. Come in anytime and stay as long as you like. You provide the supervision and guidance, we provide the creative ideas and supplies.

Library hours

The library is open Monday, Tuesday and Thursday noon to 6 p.m., Wednesday 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Friday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Frederic Girl Scout Brownie Troop No. 53168 spent their final meeting of the school year completing two community service projects. The girls chose to pick up trash near the Gandy Dancer Trail to fulfill the community service requirement for their Brownie Quest Award. They also planted flowers in the flower bed on the south side of the Frederic Elementary School, which they set up last year as Daisy Girl Scouts. Shown (L to R) are Alexis Doyle, Megan Williamson, Haley Ennis, Elaine Lahti, Kaitlyn Peterson and Teresa Neely. – Photo submitted

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PAGE 10 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 30, 2010

LIBRARY NEWS

Frederic Public Library Mark your calendars for “This Water Goes North” The library welcomes Dennis Weidemann, author of “This Water Goes North,” at a special program on Thursday, July 15, at 7 p.m. Weidemann was one of four Iowa farm boys who paddled 1,400 miles from Minnesota to Hudson Bay during the summer of 1979 with nothing but old canoes and determination. Relive their adventure at this slideshow and book signing event. The program is hosted by Friends of the Frederic Library and refreshments will be served. What’s happening at the library? Bored? Looking for something to do? It’s not too late for kids of all ages to be part of the summer reading program at the Frederic Library. Choose your own activities, meet your own goals and you’ll receive a prize at the end of the program. Join a cool book group, learn a new hobby, watch movies, or chill out and read. Be sure to stop by the library to sign up for great programs, and bring a friend with you. Wednesday morning story time is the place to be Preschoolers and early elementary children are invited to story time at the library on Wednesday mornings at 10:30 a.m. for an hour of books, activities and fun. If you are interested in reading to the children this summer, we welcome you. Please talk to a librarian to choose a date, and we will supply the materials.

Book groups to meet The Thursday morning book group will meet July 15, at 10 a.m., to talk about “The Book Thief,” by Markus Zusak. The evening book group will meet Thursday, July 22, at 6:30 p.m., to discuss “Dog On It,” by Spencer Quinn. New members are always welcome and invited to join us for a lively conversation about books. Help keep our local food shelf filled Some customers regularly bring in a food shelf item when they return their books, and it’s a great way to teach children about compassion and community spirit. Do a good thing for the local food shelf this summer by donating items such as canned goods, flour, sugar, rice and pasta, cereals, and fresh vegetables and fruits each time you visit the library. Library board to meet July 5 The Frederic Library Board of Trustees will convene its regular monthly meeting Monday, July 5, at 6 p.m. New Trustees David Ammend and Lory Gustafson have been appointed to serve three-year terms. The library staff and trustees wish to commend Brian Rogers, who has retired after serving 14 years on the board. Hours and information Frederic Public Library, 127 Oak St. West. 715327-4979, e-mail fredericpl@ifls.lib.wi.us. Regular open hours are Monday through Friday 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.; and Saturday 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Story time for preschoolers is held every Wednesday morning at 10:30 a.m.

Marlene Nelson (L) and Carey Lillehaug (R) are getting to know Edward Cullen and Jacob Black, stars of the very popular "Twilight" series of books by Stephenie Meyer. Fans of the series will have photo opportunities with Edward and Jacob at a special showing of the third film, "Eclipse," at Timbers Theatre in Siren on Saturday, July 3, at 10 a.m. in a fundraising event for the Friends of the Frederic Pool. Tickets are on sale at the Frederic Library and also at Timbers Theatre Saturday morning. For more information, contact the Frederic Library at 715-327-4979. – Photo submitted

Dresser Public Library Dresser Village Library is located at 117 S. Central Ave., Dresser, WI 54009. The Dresser Village Library Board of Trustees will hold its monthly meetings on the second Tuesday of each month at the library from 6 – 7 p.m. Internet computers and Wi-Fi You must physically present a MORE library card to library staff and library fines must be under $10 to use a computer. We are now wireless. Log onto the Public Library icon on your laptop to access the Internet. Summer reading programs The summer reading programs begin Monday, July 5. Join this group for stories, songs, crafts, fingerplays and lots of fun. Make a Splash-Read! is for preschoolers through age 7 and will meet each Monday at 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. Make Waves – Read! is for ages 8 – 18 and Water Your Mind – Read! is for adults. New “That Perfect Someone” by Johanna Lindsey,

“Whiplash” (an FBI thriller) by Catherine Coulter, “The Missionary” by William Carmichael, “Traveling with Pomegranates: A Mother-Daughter Story” (unabridged audiobook on CD) by Sue Monk Kidd and Ann Kidd Taylor, “Storm Prey” by John Sanford, “The Innocent” by John Grisham. Book club July 6 at 3 p.m., we will be discussing Greg Mortenson’s “Three Cups of Tea.” Join the group for a lively discussion and refreshments. New members welcome. Contact us: 715-755-2944, telephone and fax number, e-mail us at dresserpl@ifls.lib.wi.us, or visit our Web site, www.dresserpubliclibrary.org, which has information about story time, days closed, reference links, library policy and community information. Library hours Monday 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Tuesday noon–5 p.m., Thursday 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Friday noon-5 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m.–1 p.m.

Milltown Public Library Underwater World Join us as sea creatures take over the library. Don’t miss this info-packed, nautical-filled presentation with live animals on Saturday, July 10, at 2:15 pm. It is sure to be a fun-filled event for all ages. Youth summer reading program There is still time to register and start reading your way to great prizes. There are weekly drawings for cool prizes from local businesses and a grand prize drawing for an iPod—not to mention the warm fuzzy feeling from reading a good book! There is no reason not to join in! All youths, birth – 18 years, are invited to participate! Watch for all the fun events in conjunction with this program. Computer classes The Milltown Public Library offers basic computer classes at three convenient times every Wednesday. You can learn how to create your own seasonal let-

ter to friends and family, develop an updated resume, or learn how to create an e-mail account! Call or stop in to sign up for a one-hour class at 1, 2 or 6 p.m. and let us help you better understand and utilize this technology. Preschool story time Preschooler and an accompanying adult are invited to partake in a half-hour of themed stories, a small craft and fun every Tuesday morning at 9:30 a.m. Library closed The Milltown Public Library will be closed all day on Monday, July 5. Library hours Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.; Friday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.; and Sunday closed. www.milltownpubliclibrary.org

Polk County Library Federation

Pictured from 2009 Polk County Fair are Nancy and Jerry Mansergh with their grandduaghter. – Photo submitted The Polk County Fair is just around the corner! Are you ready? The Polk County Fair this year is from July 29Aug. 1. The Polk County Library Federation will be having its annual book sale at the library booth at the fair. The location of the booth will be in the building next to the grandstand.

There will be a large selection of paperbacks; ranging in all genres and for all ages. Stock up on your winter reading while supporting the libraries. This year again many of the Polk County Library directors, friends of libraries and board of trustee members will be volunteering their time to help out at the library booth.

Balsam Lake Public Library Book sale Remember our annual book sale on Saturday, July 3, at 10 a.m. Bigger than ever. Summer reading program Summer reading program has started, please come in and pick up a brochure with all the great programs scheduled for the summer. Please, also come in and pick up a reading log for a chance to win prizes. Author visit “This Water Goes North,” by Dennis Weidmann. In 1979 four Iowa farm boys hatched a plan to paddle 1,400 miles from Minnesota to the polar bears of Hudson Bay. Join us for a slideshow and book signing. Wednesday, July 7, at 7 p.m. Story time Every Wednesday at 11 a.m., stories, crafts and snacks. All ages are welcome to join our lively group. New Books for July “Search” by Nora Roberts, ”Rembrandt Affair” by Daniel Silva, “Diamond Bay” by Linda Howard, “Ice Cold ” by Tess Gerritson, “Glass Rainbow” by James Lee Burke, “Spoken From the Heart” by Laura Bush. Friends of the Library Friends group meets every third Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. Friends group is an organization for all

who value the public library as a vital community resource. Book club Book club meets every third Wednesday at the library. Everyone welcome. “Stalag Wisconsin: Inside WWII Prisoner of War Camps,” by Betty Cowley is a comprehensive look inside Wisconsin’s 38 branch camps that held 20,000 prisoners of war during World War II. The author has done an excellent job in researching this book, and the topic is fascinating. Wisconsin in the 1940s was heavily German, and therefore, POWs could always find somebody who spoke German. Cowley wrote about the experience at specific camps, and interviewed local people, and also interviewed some former German prisoners. Book club meets every third Wednesday at 3 p.m. Hours Balsam Lake Library, (under the water tower) at 404 Main St., Balsam Lake. Hours are Monday 10 a.m. – 8 p.m., Tuesday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Wednesday 10 a.m. – 8 p.m., Thursday 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., Friday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. E-mail: balsamlakepl@ifls.lib.wi.us. Web site www.balsamlakepubliclibrary.org.

St. Croix Falls Public Library This Wednesday, June 30, join us in the library at 7 p.m. for a visit with Dennis Weidemann author of “This Water Goes North.” The story of four collegeage young men who embark on a two-month canoeing adventure, traveling 1,400 miles from Minnesota to Hudson Bay. More information, thiswatergoesnorth.com/index.html. Join us this summer at the library for great reads, fun activities and prizes. Sign up for summer reading - open to all ages. Programs June 24 — July 28 Wednesday, June 30, 10:30 a.m., NPS Sleepy River, St. Croix Clams Saturday, July 10, 10:30 a.m., Underwater Adventures Wednesday, July 14, 10:30 a.m. Martial Arts and Summer Safety Wednesday, July 21, 10:30 a.m., Fish Hatchery Tour Ladder Tank Hike Wednesday, July 28, 10:30 a.m., Water Science Fair Awards Picnic Story hour Listen to stories, create art and have fun with other kids and parents every Wednesday, 10:30

a.m. Plan ahead for our summer author visit: Thursday, Aug. 12, at 6:30 p.m. for a visit with PJ Tracy. PJ Tracy is the pseudonym of mother-daughter writing duo P.J. and Traci Lambrecht, winners of the Anthony, Barry, Gumshoe and Minnesota Book Awards. Their first three novels, “Monkeewrench,” “Live Bait,” and “Dead Run,” have become national and international best-sellers. Their most current book, “Shoot to Thrill,” came out in April. For more info on PJ Tracy visit www.pjtracy.net. Meeting room The community meeting room is available for your organization. Contact the library for details. Technology Free wireless and eight public computers are available at the library. Hours The library is open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 715483-1777. E-mail: scflibrary@ifls.lib.wi.us. Online: www.stcroixfallslibrary.org. St. Croix Falls Library will be closed Saturday, July 3. Happy Independence Day!

FREDERIC PUBLIC LIBRARY Main Street

Frederic, WI 54837

715-327-4979

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Webster Curves celebrates seven years' success The 2010 Webster Chamber of Commerce Citizen of the Year runner-up, Swenson has given much back to the community in seven years. In January of 2007, she organized and ran the first Community WellJanet Swenson ness Challenge in Webster, giving the public a chance to try Curves at no cost. Since then, local businesses, churches and schools sponsor staff teams that compete to see who can lose the most inches and pounds in a six-week period. Every March, Swenson participates in the Curves corporate national food drive. This year, members donated 2,010 pounds of nonperishable foods to the Indianhead Community Action Agency. In August, there is a drive for school supplies and October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. “New members can join for free when they show proof of a current annual mammogram,” she noted. “Curves is so much more than exercise,” She explains. “It targets the whole person: emotionally, spiritually, and physically. People come in because they want to improve their lives. If we can help them do that by being here for them and showing them how to exercise, they’ll feel better about themselves.” Swenson and her staff see real tangible results. “I’ve had members actually say Curves literally saved their lives,” she says. We have several members with pretty significant health challenges. They come, because they know if they don’t, they feel worse. I’ve had members get off different medications; their physicians tell them to keep on doing what they’re doing.” Curves is co-ed and for all ages. “I have several couples right now who come, and they really enjoy it,” notes Swenson. “We have seven mother-daughter members, and we have an 80s club – half a dozen ladies over 80 who are regulars. Seeing them exercise is inspiring to others and a testament to the value of lifelong fitness.” * The seven food groups include: 1) Fats, oils, sweets (yes, that includes chocolate!); 2) Dairy; 3) Veggies; 4) Fruit; 5) Bread/pretzels/pasta (carbs); 6) Meat, poultry, fish (protein) and 7) Water. For additional information, call Swenson, 715-866-8018.

SCRMC's Carol Chouinard closes door on 36-year career

ST. CROIX FALLS – Carol tioned just one. “The day I first Chouinard announced her restepped through the door and tirement from St. Croix Rebegan meeting people, I could gional Medical Center after a see that they were a group of 36-year career which began in good people, of ‘team players,’ 1974 with a position as a health in a great facility. I knew this unit coordinator in the nursing was where I belonged.” Still department. She next served as today, Chouinard feels she’s the admission coordinator for been “part of a team that can’t the business office, and then as be beat. I have appreciated the administrative assistant to the support and love that I have director of nursing until 1987, received from every departCarol Chouinard when she left SCRMC for other ment, not only as an employee, work. Chouinard rejoined the staff in Jan- but as a patient, too. Staff here has not only uary 2000, serving in various capacities in taken care of me all these years, but my the business office until her retirement. family, too. I have been very appreciative Looking back on her long career, of the time, effort, and respect that we have Chouinard remembers many changes at been given.” Chouinard also made a point SCRMC, both in the facility itself and in to thank her supervisor, Barb Kinny, and the range of services provided. “The the business office team for “the support changes just in the center’s physical plant that they gave me in the last 11 years, espehave been remarkable,” she said. “Today, cially when I lost my mother and brother.” our obstetrics unit is beautiful, the behavChouinard and “Blind Man,” her “speioral health unit is totally transformed, and cial guy,” hope to spend one or two of course there was the spectacular new months in Arizona during the “worst parts addition of the Lloyd Olson Surgery Cen- of our Wisconsin winters,” she said, “and ter! Other areas,” she continued, “have we look forward to many activities and also been remodeled, such as the med- much fun with children and grandchilical/surgical, intensive care, rehabilitation dren. We’ll see what activities we can aftherapy, and pharmacy.” The merger of the ford to miss before we really decide, hospital and clinic was probably one of however.” While working full time, the” biggest and boldest” changes, Chouinard pointed out, she never had had Chouinard believes, “and one of the best the time she wanted to be part of their steps we’ve ever taken.” Over the years, lives. “Perhaps most important in our fuChouinard also saw the departure of many ture plans will be the role we’ll play as excellent staff. “I have also seen physicians grandparents to all the grandkids” she who have moved on to what they consid- said. Chouinard and “Blind Man” have ered better facilities, only to find, as I did been dating since November of 1986 and in 1999, that SCRMC was the best place to engaged for 19 years. “Maybe we’ll have continue and finish a career!” time to get married now,” she said with a Because she had many unforgettable ex- laugh, “and it’s certain, too, that we will be periences at SCRMC, Chouinard found it on the road again!” - submitted difficult to list them all. Instead, she men-

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by Harriet Rice Special to the Leader WEBSTER – Strength, Exercise, Vitality, Energy, Nutrition – spells S-E-V-E-N, and Curves in Webster is celebrating its seventh anniversary. The party on Wednesday, July 7, from 3:07 – 6:07 p.m. at Curves is open to the public. A canopy out back will house food and beverages – healthy, tasty snacks from the seven food groups.* There will be games, a 50-50 drawing, prizes, a guest speaker, a hula hoop demonstration, and free circuit training by staff. “It’ll be an afternoon of fun, food and friendship. If you’ve been curious to see what goes on in that little brown building on Lakeland Avenue, here’s your chance to find out,” says Swenson, a twinkle in her eye. Curves is a fitness program that offers a proven 30-minute workout combining strength training and sustained cardiovascular activity through safe and effective hydraulic resistance. “The Curves mission is “to help people help themselves in their quest to attain a better quality of life.” There are more than 10,000 locations and 4 million members worldwide. Before she ever became a franchisee, Swenson experienced what Curves did for her own health. “I was a smoker and had a few health challenges. My father died young of a heart attack; my mother is a cancer survivor, so I started to look further into health and nutrition. When I quit smoking, I took up running to fill up that time and to put my efforts toward a healthier activity. “My older son, Daniel, recommended I do some cross training, “she recalled. “That’s when I found Curves in Frederic, joined, and really fell in love with the whole concept of the hydraulic machines that are easy to learn and very effective.” Living in Siren, Swenson found the Webster Curves closer to home. “The person who owned it was someone I knew,” says Swenson, “And she hired me shortly after I joined in 2002. I made a comment to her that if she ever thought about selling the business, to let me know. It was at a point in my life where I wanted to help other people.” When that opportunity arose, Swenson took it. Swenson and her husband, Mark, bought Curves and spent a week at training in Texas, where they met Curves founders Gary and Diane Heavin. “It was a pretty intense week of instruction. We both took the course and went through everything. We learned how to use the machines properly. We both took the test and passed.” Swenson is also CPR certified, which is a corporate requirement.

JUNE 30, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 11

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Webster Summer School Summer school in Webster provides fun and learning for 210 students by Nancy Jappe Leader staff writer WEBSTER – A total of 210 students attended summer school classes in Webster this year. The program, under the direction of Julie Merle, ran from 8 a.m. to noon each weekday from June 7 to June 25. Free breakfast and lunch were provided. Students going into kindergarten and first grade this fall stayed with the same teacher. The other students switched teachers as they took classes that interested them. According to Merle, the most popular classes were: Bubbleology, grossology, cooking, sports, Spanish, photography and activity in the school forest. Each Friday was designated as field-trip day. The stu-

2010

dents went to: Duluth Harbor for a harbor cruise, Duluth Omnimax Theatre, the Great Lakes Aquarium, the William A. Irvin Ore Boat Museum in Duluth, the St. Croix History boat cruise and Wild Mountain Water Park. Seventh- and eighth-graders got the chance to go canoeing on the Namekagon River. Funding for summer school came through the 21st century CSE grant awarded to the school. One advantage for the teachers was that they were able to meet ahead of time the students they will have in class when school starts again in September. “Each year the program keeps growing,” Merle commented. “We have more students this year than last year.” Summer school, she went on to explain, is an extension of Webster’s after-school program which runs four days a week during the regular school year from 3:30 to 6 p.m. for grades K-8. Merle also directs this program.

Savannah Varner (L) and Emily Slatten show the pinhole cameras they made from oatmeal boxes with a small hole covering a piece of metal. Susan Steffan was the teacher for this photography class. The cameras the upcoming sixth-graders made actually took photos that they later developed in the darkroom.

These four people, (L to R) Jayden Eckstrom, Miss Nutt, Melodi Liljenberg and Mrs. Gustafson, were using microscopes to examine fabric samples from items worn by three suspects in a crime-scene case. The Mrs. Pawlak is shown putting swatches of fake students in the class on crime-scene investigation were examining evi- blood onto Trevor Gustafson as part of the Webster dence to determine which of the suspects was the actual perpetrator. All Summer School class on grossology. suspects were equal until the investigation was completed.

(L to R) Hailey Hunter, Molly Turchi and Summer Varner showed off the hot dog wrap-ups they put together as part of Mrs. Hinks’ cooking class.

Camping was the theme for this year’s summer school in Webster. These kindergarten students in Jessica Monarski’s class were making a beach in their cups, starting with sand (crushed graham crackers), bluecolored whipped stuff for water, and a little pudding to make the whole beach more edible. Umbrellas were put on top for the extra beach touch.

ABOVE: Teacher Ashley Close showed her kindergarten students how to make ice cream, with June being Dairy Month. Ian Zelinski (R) and Hunter Tjepkes are shown here with Close. The students were from Mrs. Swenson's summer-school class. RIGHT: Mrs. Richison provided cucumbers for students to put over their eyes during spa time in her class. The students who chose to use the cucumbers as part of their facial were (L to R) Allie Wilcox, Alexia Knoll and Hannah Janssen.

Webster’s Fourth of July celebration set by Harriet Rice Special to the Leader WEBSTER – There’ll be lots for everyone to do as the Webster Area Chamber of Commerce lines up its downtown July 4 activities. This year, the Fourth falls on Sunday, with festivities capping a weekend of local activities celebrating our nation’s birthday. Sunday morning kicks off with Webster’s Fire Department hosting a brat feed starting at 11 a.m. at the fire hall on Main Street until late afternoon. For dessert, the Lionesses will serve pie and ice cream at the community center on Main Street from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. While enjoying the refreshments, folks can play Bingo after the parade. The Lioness ladies will hand out free tickets for kids to turn in for ice cream at the community center after the parade. The traditional annual July Fourth parade starts at 1:30 p.m. organized by Jim Olson and sponsored by the Webster Chamber of Commerce. Units line up on the east side of Hwy. 35 and proceed west down Main Street. Individuals, businesses and organizations that want to participate should contact Olson right away at 715-866-8644 to register. As a matter of children’s safety, parents are reminded to keep youngsters from running into the street to retrieve candy thrown from floats and vehicles during the parade.

The Orange 4-H Club will operate a dunk tank and other carnival games in the former Larson auto parking lot as a fundraiser for the Webster Library Building Fund. For a cool-off activity in the afternoon, the Webster Fire Department will hold its annual Water Ball Tug-of-War in which teams grab fire hoses to blast a ball across a line to win. These events and additional information are posted at

the Webster Area Chamber of Commerce: www.websterwisconsin.com. So come on to downtown Webster, bring the family and have some summer fun.

Smitty’s Saloon float was one of many Webster businesses represented in the Chamber of Commerce-sponsored 2009 Fourth of July parade. – Photos by Raelynn Hunter

Clowns are a favorite with kids at the Webster July 4 parade. Sunday’s parade begins at 1:30 p.m. and moves from east to west across Lakeland Avenue, down Main Street.


JUNE 30, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 13

Fishermen's Party 20 10 The temporary Milltown Museum gave Piper, 4, and Hallie Nelson, 5, a chance to see what CDs and iPods used to look like.

The 2010 Fishermen’s Party Kiddie Parade had fishermen, dancers, fairies and newspaper delivery kids - all in honor of Milltown’s 100th anniversary.

Photos by Greg Marsten

Bering Park was full of kids during the Fishermen’s Party. These youngsters prepared for their life as possible astronauts - with some of them paying the price.

Local musician Jim Armstrong entertained the crowds on Saturday as dozens of snowmobile show trophies sat in waiting. The firstever Fishermen’s Party snowmobile fashion show gave John Klopfer of Luck a chance to show off his stylish, vintage 1981 Ski-Doo leather clothing. He was also the winner of the contest. Other contestants are pictured behind Klopfer.

Mike Dau (foreground, with bacon) and Tom Larson cooked up some vittles for the Unity Area Ambulance Breakfast on Saturday, June 26.

“Business is kinda slow.” These kids tried to sell some cool relief during the Fishermen’s Party on Saturday. Pictured (L to R): Calvin Young, 13, Chyanne Gordon, 7 and Tyler Nelson, 9.

“Is it a car? Or a snowmobile?” This vintage “sled” was one of the most perplexing - and popular - vehicles in the snowmobile show.

Kris Opitz spent some quality time with her grandkids, Ava MullerOpitz (L) and Johanna Tretsven (R).

This trio enjoyed the music and shows of the Fishermen’s Party on Main Street Saturday. Pictured (L to R): Esther Anderson, Kathy Armstrong and Millie Jennison. (Anderson is 97 years old and has lived in the same Milltown home for 68 years.)


PAGE 14 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 30, 2010

Fishermen's Party parade

2010

Almost two dozen former Milltown queens - going back to 1956 - used a vintage 1938 Howe fire truck as their float. The truck is owned by Woody Cater of Balsam Lake. – Photos by Greg Marsten Sunglasses automatically increase the “cuteness factor” of kids in parades. – Photos by Greg Marsten

Giant cowboy or tiny wagon? Local attorney James Renneke drove the wagon for the Bone Lake Beavers 4-H Club.

A lot of effort - and calories - went into this outfit.

The Unity Girl Scouts showed some major enthusiasm on their float.

A little water can be a blessing in the heat of a June parade.

It was a great day to be a biker in the Fishermen’s Party The Fishermen’s Party draws some pretty cool vehicles, parade, as these two fans of wanna-be-sheriff Pete Johnlike this classic Chevy. son can attest.

Proud Grandpa Jerry Wonka prepares for his stint on the American Legion float, posing with his grandson, Noah Martinson, 4.


JUNE 30, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 15

Fishermen's Party parade

2010

Candy rush - these kids scored big on the Tootsie Rolls.

Photos by Greg Marsten

Fishermen’s Party 2010 Grand Marshal Lois Voss is a lifelong resident of Milltown.

Luck FFA members are spooling up for their big events in July, right up the road in Luck.

These Harley riders brought up the rear with their coordinated maneuvers during the Milltown parade.

Kids and puddles seem drawn to each other.

The Unity marching band was in fine form for the Fishermen’s Party parade.

The bagpipers were one of the highlights of the parade. Who doesn’t like plaid?

This youngster’s candy bag was near empty early in the parade. That changed pretty quickly.


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Fishermen's Party pageant

2010

New Milltown royalty crowned

Two girls were given the title of Little Miss Milltown for 2010 at the coronation ceremony Thursday evening. At left is Aaliyah Bowers, receiving her crown from 2009 Little Miss Milltown Myah Nelson. At right, Brynn Thier is crowned by Miss Milltown Brandi Larson. Milltown’s new royalty poses for a picture after the coronation Thursday night. In back is Miss Milltown Brandi Larson, and in front are Aaliyah Bowers, left, and Brynn Thier. Both girls are 7 years old, and both were given the title of Little Miss Milltown for 2010.

There were no candidates for the 2010 title of Miss Milltown, so the 2009 queen, Brandi Larson, right, agreed to represent Milltown for another year. With Larson from left are 2009 Princesses Taylor Lee Loken and Krystal Beckwith and 2009 Little Miss Milltown Myah Nelson.

Polk County’s SHARE food buying club

SHARE brings savings of 30 to 50 percent on high quality food to nearly 200 communities, including Polk County. All of the food distributed through SHARE is obtained through wholesale markets - none of it is donated or government surplus. SHARE’s savings on food are open to everyone. There are no eligibility requirements or income guidelines. It works much like a food co-op where members pay when placing orders at the beginning of the month. Quest Cards are accepted. Members pick up their food orders on a Saturday toward the end of the month. The next dates to order are July 13 by mail or July 18 online to be picked up July 31. In August the dates are Aug. 10 by mail or Aug. 15 online to be picked up Aug. 28. To order or find out more about SHARE’s savings on food in Wisconsin, visit their Web site at sharewi.org or call toll-free 800-548-2124. You can also mail your order to the local SHARE site at Holy Trinity UMC, 1606 165th Ave., Centuria, WI 54824 or call Connie at 715-641-0773. The pickup site is located at the Holy Trinity United Methodist Church located on CTH I, between Balsam Lake and Centuria on a Saturday from 1 to 2 p.m. Please note the change of pickup times. Volunteers (families, church groups, 4-H, Scouts, etc.) are needed once a month to help with unloading the truck and filling orders. Call 715-485-9500 if you can help from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the Saturday delivery date. - Photo submitted


JUNE 30, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 17

Polk County Horse Camp held at fairgrounds in St. Croix Falls Horse project members of the Polk County 4-H and their horses participated in a horse camp at the Polk County Fairgrounds on June 14-18. This year KARE 11 was on hand to talk about the weather, and Purina had a speaker to talk about horse nutrition. Kids ages 9-19 learned several disciplines on riding styles, handling and much more.

Bethany Mangine rides a horse while getting instruction from one of many volunteers who helped at the Polk County Fairgrounds June 14-18. 4-H members ages 9-19 participated in the horse project and spent an entire week learning about different styles of riding, horse nutrition and more.

The horse camp held at the Polk County Fairgrounds gave kids a chance to bond with their horses and try different disciplines they may have never tried. Guest trainers also taught kids lessons on reining, English riding and barrel racing. They also played a game of soccer on horseback.

Frederic Lioness Club news

Christine Schreck is hoisted up from the ground after a successful camp held for 4-H horse project members. Schreck was instrumental in organizing the camp, as well as several adult volunteers who stayed at the fairgrounds to help the kids. – Photos submitted

Neighborhood Mass

Nancy Morten and Joan Funne with paintbrushes in hand. – Photo submitted FREDERIC – The club offered to help the village park board with painting some of the picnic tables that belong at Coon Lake Park. Nancy Morten and Joan Funne assisted with the painting of the tables. Lion Phil Knuf had previously sanded the five tables that needed painting, as well as inserted some screws and nails in some of the tables to make them more stable. After a fresh coat of paint, these tables will last for several more years. The club’s next meeting will be Thursday, July 15, at 5 p.m. at Café Wren in Luck. All members have been asked to bring a friend to share supper with and then the group will listen to Karla Jenkins talk about the Festival Theatre in St. Croix Falls. If you would like more information about the Frederic Lioness Club, please call President Roxi White at 715-327-4892. - submitted

Father Ryan celebrated a “neighborhood Mass” at the Coon Lake Park in Frederic in June. Parishioners of Frederic’s St. Dominic and Grantsburg’s Immaculate Conception Catholic churches meet in backyards and parks on selected Wednesday nights throughout the summer for fellowship and food. Join them on July 14 at Siren’s Crooked Lake Park at 6 p.m. for Mass with a potluck dinner and fun to follow. Bring a dish to pass. - Photos by Colleen Draxler

Siren Lioness Club installed officers Kajsa and Tati, grandchildren of Judy Marek of Grantsburg, enjoyed a sampling of the food at the Neighborhood Mass and potluck at Coon Lake Park.

During the June meeting, the Siren Lioness Club installed their officers for the upcoming 2010-2011 year. Pictured, top row (L to R): Evelyn Weber, membership chairman; Shari Kult, director; Pat Doseth, director; John Carlson, Lion liaison; Judy Roe, Lioness tamer and Bev Beckmark, skirt twister. Bottom row: Mary Jo Bierman, immediate past-president; Judy Baker, first vice president; Marilyn Lemieux, president; Joan Chapman, second vice president and Char Hyslop, club secretary. Not pictured are: Nancy Tamminga, director and Anke Olesen, treasurer. The Siren Lioness Club is looking forward to another year of serving the community. – Photo submitted


PAGE 18 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 30, 2010

Green your Fourth of July This Fourth of July, please remember to keep Mother Earth in mind while you celebrate. Here’s how to throw a little green into your red, white and blue. Get outside! The best way to reduce your gathering’s footprint is to calculate its energy usage. The best way to avoid added costs to your electric bill is to utilize the outdoors – perfect lighting, temperature and truly natural green setting. You could host your barbecue at midday when the light is bright and fills your crowd with energy. Or fight soaring temperatures and take advantage of the cooler evening weather. It’s a great way to enjoy nature and reduce the energy costs of using indoor facilities.

Ditch the disposable party ware Disposable plates, cups and utensils are convenient for parties with a lot of guests. The downside, they’re not so convenient for the environment. To avoid this, do your best to use normal tableware that can just be washed and reused. If you must go the disposable route, clean them up and use them at your next

Earth

Notes Jen Barton big gathering.

Use propane for grilling Before diving into this one, I want to mention that I am not trying to step on any grill master’s toes. The debate between charcoal and propane is a tough one: Which one produces more flavor? Which is cheaper, faster? And most importantly, which is more eco-friendly? I consulted a recent study by Environment Impact Assessment Review to answer this one. According to the study, “the overwhelming factors are that as a fuel, LPG (liquefied petroleum gas) is dramatically more efficient than charcoal in its production and considerably more efficient in cooking.” The two grilling methods were defined by their overall footprint, with charcoal using 998 kg of CO2, almost three times more than propane, which weighed in at 349 kg. In

addition, Science Daily reports that as fuel, LPG is “dramatically more efficient than charcoal in its production.” When purchasing a propane tank, make sure there is a trade-in option. Most retailers will let you bring in an empty tank in exchange for a discount on your next tank.

put out less smoke into the environment. Another option is to gather your group and go see your local fireworks display. It’s a great way to see a much bigger fireworks show and negates you from harming the environment with your own personal display.

Reuse your decorations If you’ve hosted Independence Day celebrations before, you know the décor is often the same: streamers, party favors and table toppers all in bold red, white and blue. Sadly, most people often use these decorations once and then throw them out. What? But they can be reused year after year. So, this year, after the party’s over, take the time to store and save your decorations. You or someone you know can use them again next year, which helps to save on a bit of unneeded trash.

Use large water containers Plastic water bottles are convenient, but like other disposable goods, they can add up fast. Instead of individual plastic bottles, store water for your family or guests in large containers so they can refill their reusable water bottles or reusable cups. If you must use plastic water bottles, be sure to encourage your guests to recycle them.

Choose greener fireworks Fireworks are hardly an environmentally friendly activity, but they’re an unwavering Fourth of July tradition. If you’re setting off your own fireworks this year, be sure to use fireworks rich in nitrogen. They often cost a bit more but

Don’t forget to recycle One of the easiest ways to go green is to recycle your waste. So be sure to put a clearly marked bin out at your party. Paper plates will have to be thrown out or composted due to food residue. If you’re unsure about recycling specific materials in the area of Burnett or Washburn counties please call Jen at 715-6352197, or e-mail her at jbarton@nwrpc.com.

Siren Summer School Space was the theme for this year’s summer school held at Siren School June 14 through July 2 for students going into kindergarten up through those going into sixth grade in the fall. The session was under the direction of school counselor Jessica Ebner. Each day included time for both breakfast and lunch, work in classrooms on age-related space projects, outdoor recess, physical education and a cultural time about Native American culture (not space related). – Photos by Nancy Jappe

Siren students in grades K-6 studied material regarding space during their summer school session running from June 14 to July 2. The special activity for Tuesday, June 22, was the setting off of rockets on school grounds. Teacher Darrell Imhoff was in charge of the rockets, assisted here by his son, incoming kindergartner Nolan Imhoff, and fellow student Savanna Staples.

A singing session was held in the Dragon Room at Siren Elementary School following each day’s summer school activities. The songs were about space travel, such as blasting off to the moon and flying back to Earth.

Siren summer school students watched as a rocket was shot off into the air. After its short flight, the rocket came down on the school field, to be picked up by the waiting students.

Siren summer school students watched as a rocket came down on the school field Tuesday, June 22. About 20 rockets were shot off into the air that day, with the loud noise and size of the final one coming as a surprise after the much-quieter rockets had gone up.


JUNE 30, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 19

Feeding the hungry

2010 Coins for Cans food drive nets 17,000 pounds of food BURNETT/POLK counties – The Coins for Cans food drive, co-hosted by the St. Croix Casinos, has lent a helping hand to food pantries in Northwest Wisconsin since 1993. This year’s drive, held June 712, was no exception: Thanks to 6,327 generous guests, the three casinos—the St. Croix Casino Turtle Lake, the St. Croix Casino Danbury and the St. Croix Casino Hertel—collected 17,000 pounds worth of food donations June 7-12. Over the past 18 years, the Coins for Cans program has distributed more than 357,000 pounds of food—178.5 tons —to food pantries in the six-county area surrounding Turtle Lake. That’s more than a pound and a half of food for every resident of those counties. So much for the statistics. Statistics are interesting, but they don’t begin to explain what the Coins for Cans program is really about. It’s all about people, starting with the casino guests who donate the food and the casino personnel who box and de-

Russ Merrill and Wayne Rogers delivered a donation from the Coins for Cans food drive to LaVonne and John Boyer of the Frederic Food Pantry. – Photos submitted

liver it. Everyone from management on down to security, guest services and maintenance gets involved with the collection process. Then the food is loaded on a truck for the three-day delivery. This year’s delivery men, Russell Merrill and Wayne Rogers of the St. Croix Casino, distributed the food to 21 charities in Barron, Burnett, Polk, Sawyer, St. Croix and Washburn counties June 14-16. That’s where more people get involved—the staff and volunteers at area food pantries. People like Chick Stauffer of We Share Food Pantry in Rice Lake, Janice Ebert of the Cameron Food Pantry, Pat Nielsen and her volunteers at the Cumberland Food Pantry, Melissa Wyss of West CAP in Glenwood City and Gordon Weber of the Lifeline Food Russ Merrill and Wayne Rogers (front) of the St. Croix Casino Pantry of Clear Lake, to delivered 20 boxes of food to Vivian and Gary Brahmer of name a few. “We’re thankful for the Loaves and Fishes in Luck.

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Indianhead Community Action in Spooner received more than 700 pounds of food from the Coins for Cans drive. Pictured (L to R) are Wayne Rogers, volunteer Joe Divis, Russ Merrill and Indianhead Community Action Director Dawn Wagner.

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support the casinos and the St. Croix tribe give us every year,” said Pat Nielsen of the Cumberland Food Pantry. “It’s just great to have all this food delivered to us every summer. We look forward to seeing that

casino truck every June.” Getting all that food out to people who need it is a significant contribution to the community, but almost as important is the contribution the Coins for Cans food drive makes toward furthering public awareness about the ongoing need for support of local food pantries. “It probably would be easier for the casino to make a cash donation to each food pantry in the area instead of hosting a food drive, but the food drive is a much more effective and personal way of getting food to individual charities,” said Wyss of West CAP in Glenwood City. “More important, the casino food drive helps to drive two important facts home to people: There are hungry people in every community, and local food pantries need everyone’s help.” More help is on the way from the St. Croix tribal casinos and the St. Croix Tribe. The casino truck will be rolling into food pantries again next summer: Plans are already being made for the 2011 Coins for Cans drive. And that’s good news for everyone. – submitted

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PAGE 20 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 30, 2010

Luck honor roll Seniors

Sophomores

Brett Alsaker, Derek Buck, Samantha Fenning, Taylor Horsager, Kassi Ingram, Mitch Larson, Mary Maiden Mueller, Alecia Ouellette, Taryn Pilz, Alex Smith and Rachel Virkus.

Tony Aguado, Taylar Anderson, Alysha Dalbec, Julie Franzel, Michael Jenssen, Summer Johnson, Laurie Jorgenson, Maia Lehmann, Morgyn McGinnity and Krystal Ouellette.

Juniors

Freshmen

Morgan Denny, David Franzel, Karissa Giller, Logan Hacker, Kyle James, Melissa Kielty, Brady Klatt, Megan Moore, Alec Mortel, Ashlyn Petersen, Tabitha Pilz and Lindsey Stapel.

Evan Armour, Jordan Bazey, Eric Blaser, Jaimee Buck, John Denny, Ashley Dexter, Katelyn Dinnies, Cole Engstrand, Gabe Hendrickson, Tatia Hibbs, Kyle Hunter, Taylor Joy, Hannah Karl, Brodie Kunze, Dylan LeMay, Leah LeMay, Geoffrey Maiden Mueller, Jillian Peterson, Logan

Potvin, Kylie Rich, Alex Richey, Avery Steen and Cayel Wesenberg.

Eighth grade

Megan Bartylla, Haley Dikkers, Lillian Klatt, Camille Marsten, Abbie Otlo, Chase Overby, Karsten Petersen, Whitney Petersen, Alicia Sund and Katie White.

Seventh grade

Hailey Foeller, Reilly Giller, Jordan Hendrickson, Jenni Holdt, Samuel Nelson, Tanner Nielsen, Jes Pedersen, Katelyn Pfaff and Farrah Welch.

St. Croix Falls honor roll Jessica Adam, Mitchell Alden, Ben Anderson, Brian Backes, Jenna Brousil, Tryn Bryant, Katherine Burns, Marissa Campeau, Nathan Casler, Crysta Chock, Kyle Christensen, Kristina Cipelli-Stelmalch, Abby Culver, Kim Culver, Jordan Fehlen, Kristina Flandrena, Cory Gebhard, Alicha Greenlee, Jedidi Gustafson, Racheal Hansen, Tyler Harrison, Danielle Heilig, Cassondra Hoyt, Alexander Huttner, Nicholas

Juniors

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THANK YOU

The Milltown Community Club would like to thank all of the various businesses & people who worked & volunteered for our Annual Fishermen’s Party Weekend. This year was an extra busy one since it was Milltown’s 100th Anniversary Celebration & we had 9 days of events. We had many individuals & businesses who donated prizes for our giveaway this year & we would also like to thank all of the people who donated items for the Milltown Museum that the village had open this year to commemorate the 100th Anniversary. It takes a lot of time & energy to put on these community festivals & we truly appreciate everyone for their help. Thank you for a very successful weekend!!

Congratulations to the lucky winners of the 2010 Fishermen’s Party Raffle.

This year we had 100 prizewinners so we are only listing the top 4 prizes. You can check out the other prizewinners at the Milltown Community Club Web site at www.milltown-wi.com.

GRAND PRIZE $13,000 Cash Mike Davis, Luck, WI

Sophomores

Taylor Ader, Crystal Anderson, Haley Anderson, Nathan Barry, Jessica Berganini, Alex Bertram, Benjamin Clausen, Chad Cochran, Nicholas DeConcini, Christopher Eisen, Samantha French, Alexander Frey, Elliott Frokjer, Alicia Gravesen, Natasha Helbig, Maura Higgins, Ahna Hoefler, Zachary Horn, Emily Johnson, Erin Kessler, Kyle Kinzer, Lauren Koschmeder, Brenna Loen, Allyson Mahler, Nichole McPherson, Alex Mikl, Samuel Nichols, Alissa Norlander, Ryan Nussbaum, Caitlyn Olson, Sarah Petznick, Jake Rademacher, Joseph Reddy, Matthew Rude, Nicholis Siltberg, Erik Swenson, Jenna Van Soelen, Trina Wallin and Brittany Whittier.

Freshmen

Paige Appel, Phillip Bayle, Zoey Carney, Noah Casterton, Michael Chernyaev, David Cole, Brandan Collins, Autumn Erickson, Courtney Ewald, Dustin Findlay, Kevin Fisk, Gabriel Francis, Sydney Geisness, Matthew Gjovig, Jesse Gray, Amyrose Herrick, Alexandra Holmdahl, Nicholas Holmes, Jessica Houliston, Jordan Johnson, Jerrica Jones, Samantha Jorgensen, Andrea Kalpin, Laina Kaskinen, Nathan Krenz, Cheyanne Krueger, Brittani Krych, JoVonna Leske, Brandon Loiselle, Dylan Lynch, Jacqueline Manoppo, Stephanie Melin, Bryan Nelson, Madisen Neuman, Samantha O’Brien, Taylor Orton, Jesse Rich, Natalie Sempf, Maggie Singerhouse, Jacob Sommer, Anthony Stelton, Madelaine Sullivan, Shane Swanson, Briana Wenell and Taylor Woller.

Breast Cancer 3-Day Run/Walk fundraiser held ST. CROIX FALLS - Although not many turned out for the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer 3-Day Run/Walk fundraiser, members of the 3-Day team putting together the event appreciated the support from six runners and walkers. Kelly and Kendra Nelson, Missy Sherrard and Kelsey Jensen organized a four-mile run/walk for Saturday morning during the Fishermen’s Party. Four runners and two walkers crossed the finish line. Joel Anderson ran the route in 25 minutes, 24 seconds. Soon after Anderson finished, Rush Hickethier and Dylan Hendricks crossed the finish line. The first and only female runner, Lisa Muller, finished shortly after the boys. Both Karen Muller and Katy Johnson walked All four runners - Lisa Muller, Joel Anderson, Rush Hickethier and Dylan the route and finished together. The donations Hendricks after the race. – Photos submitted to the Breast Cancer 3-Day and the support

2nd Prize.........Ballards Resort Fishing Vacation Ron Carlson Jr., Milltown, WI 3rd Prize..........$1,000 Mary Ann Sloper, Milltown, WI 4th Prize..........Autographed Packer Football Howard Blanski

The start of the Breast Cancer 3-Day Run/Walk fundraiser on Saturday, June 26, in Milltown.

FISHING CONTEST WINNERS

Northern Pike. . . . . .Mitch Carlson Walleye.................Tim Nelson Sunfish..................Scott Lane Crappie.................Bryan & Aaron Schmidt Bass........................Tyler Christensen 515883 45L Thank you to all the people throughout the year that participate in the Fishermen’s Party Fishing Contest.

HUGE BOOK SALE

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JUNE 30, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 21

CHURCH NEWS Local pastor's home is destroyed in recent Minnesota tornado by Nancy Jappe Leader staff writer WADENA, Minn. – Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt’s family was to have moved completely into the parsonage for the Clam Falls and Zion Lutheran of Bone Lake churches by the end of June. The pastor has been the spiritual leader of the churches since October 2009. That date has now been moved up into July. The reason: The Rokenbrodt home in Wadena, Minn., was one of 62 homes that were total losses after the tornado of June 17 struck. Three family cars, which were sitting in front of the house, were also destroyed. Rokenbrodt spent this past week in Wadena, helping his wife and four of their five children clean up the debris. He was back at the local parsonage Saturday to prepare for Sunday services at the two

churches, bringing his youngest daughter with him. Then it was on the road again, back to Wadena for more cleanup. “The main thing is that my family in the house is safe,” the pastor said Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt during a phone call Sunday, June 27. He explained that his 21-year-old twin sons and 13-year-old youngest daughter were in the basement when the tornado struck. His wife was upstairs, monitoring the storm’s progress on television. When she heard the words, “When you hear the tornado siren, get

into the basement,” she went downstairs immediately. The basement includes a designated tornado shelter. They heard the deck first, then the living room break off of the foundation. Then a picnic table came into the living room and hit the chair in which Rokenbrodt’s wife had been sitting just minutes before. “She knows she had a guardian angel (watching her),” he said. As was the reaction when a tornado hit Siren and the surrounding area nine years ago, the people in Wadena mourn the loss of their trees, many, many of them. They were able to see over to neighboring houses, something that hadn’t been possible before. Since the tornado, the Rokenbrodt family (all but the oldest daughter who is in Idaho for the summer and oldest son who lives near Wadena) have been staying

with friends and going in and out of motel rooms that have become available. Luckily, a parishioner from one of their new churches had lent vehicles to go to Wadena at an earlier time, allowing the family to bring over a load of important things. Things like the dining room set, wedding gifts from over 25 years ago, and grandma’s china are already safely in place in the new parsonage. A Balm of Gilead tree that Rokenbrodt brought home from a memory retreat center still sits, undamaged, in the yard at the home in Wadena. The pastor plans to leave it there to grow, putting up a sign and letting it represent for the people in the devastated town, a balm in their current Gilead.

New Hope Lutheran ratifi fie es constitution, elects board By a unanimous vote, the congregation of New Hope Lutheran Church ratified its constitution and bylaws last Sunday, June 27. The 18-page document lays out the civil and religious guidelines of the new independent Lutheran church. Also by unanimous vote the congregation elected its board of worship: (L to R) Mark Dahlberg, Pat Johnson, Kobi Phillipps, Caren Sundquist, Ron Wilhelm and Lois Carlson (not pictured); and its board of trustees: Robert Berg, Doug Panek, Dr. Larry Pederson, Mitch Ryan, Mike Thoreson and Bob Thorsbakken. Pastor Emory Johnson is standing center. - Photo Wayne Anderson

Family bluegrass coming to Birchwood Beach Resort

Bone Lake Lutheran Church news

FREDERIC – Family bluegrass/gospel band is coming to Birchwood Beach Resort Sunday, July 4. Mike and Jayne Otterson, along with their children, from Colfax, will be sharing musical talent and a message this Sunday at 10 a.m. They play many instruments, including upright bass, fiddle, guitar, mandolin, etc. Everyone is welcome. There will be a freewill offering for their expenses. – submitted

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The new 2010 Burnett County Plat Books are in!

Trapper Adam Schleusner was baptized into the Christian faith on Sunday, June 13. Celebrating with him are sponsor Allie Peterson, dad and mom Joey and Errin Schleusner, and sponsors Brooke and Joe Wilcox and their children Griffin and Nelson.

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S’more Worship on Wednesday nights is fun for all ages at Bone Lake Lutheran Church. The campfire worship on the lawn features Scripture, skits, camp songs … and s’mores at the end of worship. The S’more Worship nights in July are July 7 and 21, at 7 p.m. Bring your lawn chair and some friends. Sunday worship is at 9:30 a.m. Please join for worship and fellowship at any time. Bone Lake Lutheran Church is located at 1101 255th Ave. in rural Luck. For information please call 715-472-2535. – Photos submitted


PAGE 22 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 30, 2010

CHURCH NEWS Eternal

Perspectives Sally Bair

The visitor Remember the days when visitors dropped in without calling first? Nowadays that’s considered rude, because we may need time to empty the living room of strewn newspapers and comb our hair. Or finish canning beets, painting the walls, or kneading bread. For some, it may be embarrassing to entertain unexpected guests. Like the wife who feels socially obligated to empty her husband’s ashtrays and hide his beer cans or porn magazines because the pastor will show up in five minutes. Or the mother whose teenage son has his CD player blaring, or the woman who’s tired and crabby from dealing with her youngsters all morning. The Bible tells about a man whom Jesus confronted with a surprising statement. Zacchaeus, a hated tax collector and a short man, climbed a tree in order to view Jesus over the crowd. When Jesus stopped and looked up, he said, “Zacchaeus, make haste and come down, for today I must stay at your house.” (Luke 19: 5) Imagine Zacchaeus’s surprise! His response could be compared to that of someone today who encounters Jesus. First Zacchaeus received Jesus with joy. Then he repented of his sin. “Look, Lord, I give half my goods to the poor; and if I have taken anything from anyone by false accusation, I restore fourfold.” Some might say that Zacchaeus already did that, and he was merely telling Jesus about his honesty. But Jesus’ response says otherwise. “Today salvation has come to this house … for the Son of Man has come to seek and to save that which was lost.” (v. 9-10) The Bible says that Jesus stands at the doorway of our hearts, ready for us to let him in. He’s not like an unannounced visitor, but a gentleman, who makes himself known by calling us first. How we respond to his call determines our relationship with him. Some may tell Jesus to wait until they get their house in order – stop drinking or carousing, finish remodeling our house or our life, wait until we have more time. Others may turn him away, believing his company is too boring, or too restrictive and heavyhanded for our lifestyle. Let’s respond as Zacchaeus did. Let’s receive Jesus into our hearts and lives with joy, followed by repentance of—the turning away from—our sins. His visit will become more than that of a houseguest; he will become a permanent resident. Lord Jesus, forgive us when we’ve turned you away. With joy, we welcome you into our hearts and lives. Amen. Mrs. Bair may be reached at www.sallybair.com.

New Hope confirmation

OBITUARIES Walter C. Nelson

Rodney Ray Littlefield

Walter C. Nelson, 86, Siren, died May 28, 2010, at St. Croix Regional Medical Center. Walter was born March 23, 1924, in Siren to Clarence and Susanna Nelson. He married Mavis on June 4, 1949, at the Siren Methodist Church. Walter built and owned/operated the Pinewood Motel for over 12 years. He remodeled and also owned/ operated the Perry’s Supper Club for 10 years. He was a master carpenter, building many fine homes in the area. He served his country during World War II. He was a charter member of the Siren Fire Department and a member of the Siren Legion. He was a master carpenter with the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners Local Union No. 7 of Minneapolis, Minn. He was preceded in death by his wife, Marvis; brother Ralph; and son Scott. He is survived by his daughter, Gail (Bob) O’Shell; grandchildren, Scott and Corey; great-grandchildren, Darrick, Sammantha and Tyler; brother, Stan (Edna) Nelson; along with other relatives and friends. Funeral service were held Wednesday, June 2, at the Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home, Siren Chapel with Pastor Steve Ward officiating. Music was provided by Joan Daniels and Fran McBroom. Interment followed at Lakeview/Mudhen Lake Cemetery in Daniels Township. Casket bearers were Mike Duncan, Tim Mulcare, Cheryl Mulcare, Corey Nelson, Sean Mulcare and Scott Nelson. Online condolences can be made at www.swedberg-taylor.com. The Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Homes, Webster, was entrusted with arrangements.

Rodney Ray Littlefield, 69, Turtle Lake, died Wednesday, June 23, 2010, at United Hospital in St. Paul, Minn., after a courageous two-year battle with cancer. He was born July 23, 1940, in Beaver Township of Polk County, the son of Ray and Mathilda (Peterson) Littlefield. He was baptized and confirmed at the Elim Lutheran Church in Range where he was a lifetime member. At the age of 10, his family moved to the farm where he grew up and was still residing. Rodney served in the United States Army from 1960 until 1963. He attended school at UW-River Falls where he received his bachelor’s degree and then went to Iowa State University where he received his master’s in agronomy. Rodney was united in marriage to Karen Whitner on Sept. 26, 1964, and to this union three children were born. Rodney was employed as a professional agronomist by Northrup King and the University of Wisconsin Extension. When he retired from professional employment in 2002, he “retired” to full-time farming. Rod was a member of American Legion Post 137 in Turtle Lake. He was preceded in death by his parents; son, Bryan; and sister, Carol. He is survived by his wife, of almost 46 years, Karen; children, Michael (Susan) Littlefield of Surprise, Neb., and Karalyn Littlefield of Roseville, Minn.; three grandchildren, Bryan, Morgan and Paul Littlefield; sisters, LaVonne (Bob) Watkins, Ardala Littlefield and Delayne Green; brothers, Frederick (Jerre) Littlefield and Max (Barbara) Littlefield, as well as nieces, nephews and other relatives and friends. Funeral services were Tuesday, June 29, at Elim Lutheran Church in Range, with Pastor Jean Pierre Appel officiating. Casket bearers were Lynn Johnson, Don Dipprey, Chuck Thompson, Jim Munson, Larry Henck and Gerry Cardinal. Interment will be at the Elim Cemetery in Range, with military honors preformed by the Turtle Lake American Legion. Friends may sign online guest book at www.williamsonwhite.com. The Williamson – White Funeral Home and Cremation Services in Amery, was entrusted with arrangements.

Erich O. Bretschneider Erich O. Bretschneider, 85, Siren, died June 24, 2010, at Indianhead Medical Center. Erich was born July 7, 1924, in Milwaukee to Oskar and Martha Bretschneider. Erich married Shirley on April 13, 1946, in White Fish Bay. To this union, three children were born. Erich and his wife, Shirley, also played an important role as foster parents to many infants during adoptions. Erich worked as a machinist rising to a foreman position for 40 years at TelSmith Manufacturing in Milwaukee. He was a member of the AIW Local No. 681, where he was the local and regional union president. Erich was a member of the Webster Lions Club and a former member of the Loyal Order of the Moose in Siren. In his free time he enjoyed hunting, fishing, playing golf and bowling but most of all spending time with his best friend and wife, Shirley. Erich was preceded in death by his parents, and his sisters Gertrude and Eleanor. He is survived by his wife, Shirley; their children, Erich O. (Jeanne) Bretschneider, Corinne (Mike) Ulrich and Robin (Mark) Weinhold; grandchildren, Travis (Sarah), Megan (Mike), Kenrich (Jessica), Bretta, and Robyn; great-grandchildren, Sam, Ava and Emily; his sister, Margot Heuser; along with other relatives and friends. Memorial services were held Monday, June 28, at Bethany Lutheran Church in Siren with Pastor Andrew Hinwood officiating. Music was provided by Joan Daniels, Fran McBroom and his granddaughter, Megan Jonas. Interment followed at the Northern Wisconsin Veterans Memorial Cemetery in Spooner where military honors were rendered. Online condolences can be made at www.swedberg-taylor.com. The Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Homes, Webster, was entrusted with arrangements.

Confirmation at Clam Falls Paige Johnson and Brady Thompson celebrate their confirmation last Sunday, June 27, at New Hope Lutheran Church of Grantsburg. Alma Karels presents them with gifts of love with Pastor Emory Johnson officiating the service. Dr. Johnson reminded the congregation of the Judaic roots of the Lutheran practice. When Jewish children come of age, they too are confirmed, in the celebration of bar mitzvah for boys or bat mitzvah for girls. - Photo by Wayne Anderson

Clifford Merle Cockerham Clifford Merle Cockerham was born May 30, 1937, in Dairyland, to William and Sadie Cockerham. Clifford grew up in Frederic. He was the fifth child out of 13 children. Clifford was a carpenter and handyman all his life until arthritis forced him to retire in 1991. In 1964, he was united in marriage to Corrine Frisenshan. To this union two daughters were born. On Oct. 22, 1983, he was united in marriage to Sharon K. Taylor of Frederic and three more children were added to his life. He was preceded in death by his parents; brother, Boyd Cockerham; and sister, Linda Noe. He is survived by his wife, Sharon; children, Susan Cockerham, Segnin, Texas; Julie Mudd, New Braunfels, Texas, Debby Sauder, Gilbert, Ariz., David Taylor, Siren, Duane Taylor, Frederic; grandchildren, Haleigh Mudd, Emily Mudd, Toby Lind, Melissa Lind and Lynnette Lind; great-granddaughter, Sophia Zepeda; sisters, Dorothy Richter, Siren, Shirley Kimes, New Braunfels, Texas, Sandy Cole, New Braunfels, Texas; brothers, Don Cockerham, Polson, Mont., Orville Cockerham, New Braunfels, Texas, Wesley Cockerham, Frederic, Russell Cockerham, Luck, Harold (Doug) Cockerham, San Antonio, Texas, Richard Fredericks, Frederic and Ronald Fredericks, Frederic; and numerous nieces, nephews, relatives and friends. A memorial service will be held at Broadway Christian Church on Saturday, July 3. Another service is scheduled for later in the month in Wisconsin, where his ashes will be buried alongside his family in Dairyland.

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RIGHT: There were two separate confirmations on May 2. Sawyer Tietz was confirmed at Clam Falls Lutheran Church and Derek Hutton and Colton Branville were confirmed at Zion Lutheran Church of Bone Lake. Pictured (L to R) are: Hutton, Tietz, the Rev. Gary Rokenbrodt and Branville. – Photo submitted

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Po l k County’s Polk C o u n t y ’ s ONLY O N LY Crematory: C re m a t o r y :


JUNE 30, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 23

Patricia L. Antonson Patricia L. Antonson, 48, St. Croix Falls, died unexpectedly June 24, 2010. Patricia Louise Antonson was born Feb. 10, 1962, in Little Falls, Minn., the daughter of Leonard and Delores (Schwartz) Levinski. She grew up in Rice, Minn., and graduated from Sauk Rapids High School in 1980. Patricia attended the Rasmussen School of Business and later worked and lived in Kansas and Arizona before moving to Balsam Lake. On Oct. 4, 1998, she was married to Richard Antonson and together they raised their son, Eric, and stepdaughter, Jessica. Patricia was a devout Christian and an active member of the Alliance Church of the Valley in St. Croix Falls. She was also active in helping others in her community and provided meals to Serenity House in Balsam Lake. Patricia was an avid Minnesota Twins fan and loved watching “The Andy Griffith Show.” She also enjoyed fishing, gardening and crafts. Patricia had been battling with Parkinson’s disease for the past 10 years. She was preceded in death by her parents, Leonard and Delores Levinski; brother, Richie Levinski; father-in-law, Roy Antonson; and brother-in-law, Tim Antonson. She is survived by her husband, Rick Antonson of St. Croix Falls; son, Eric Antonson of St. Croix Falls; stepdaughter, Jessica Antonson of Luck; stepmother, Elizabeth Levinski of Rice, Minn.; mother-in-law, Marian Antonson of Balsam Lake; brothers and sisters, Len (Brenda) Levinski Jr. of Avon, Minn., Diana (Brian) Asmus of Gaylord, Minn., Linda Dahler of Menagha, Minn., Victoria Levinski of St. Cloud, Minn., John Levinski of Sartell, Minn., Mike (Debra) Levinski of Little Falls, Minn., Paul (Laura) Levinski of St. Cloud, Minn. and Ray and Betty Sufka of Minnetonka, Minn.; and many relatives, family and friends. Funeral service was held at Alliance Church of the Valley in St. Croix Falls on Tuesday, June 29. Pastor Bob Morton officiated the service. Music was provided by Joannie Morton, Jeff Naegelen and Marsha Scheuermann. Casket bearers were Donald Ellefson, Mike Levinski, John Levinski, Paul Levinski, Len Levinski Jr. and Ray Sufka. The Scheuermann-Hammer Funeral Home and Cremation Services of Clear Lake was entrusted with arrangements.

Michael P. Budge Michael P. Budge, 70, Webster, died June 28, 2010. Memorial service will be held Friday, July 2, at 11 a.m., with visitation from 10 – 11 a.m., at Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Homes, Webster. A full obituary will be published in a later edition. Online condolences can be made at www.swedberg-taylor.com. The Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Homes, Webster, was entrusted with arrangements.

Walter E. Sanford Jr. Walter E. Sanford Jr., 71, died June 19, 2010, at his home in Luck. Walter achieved many things in his life. He had several companies: AAA Tool and Die, Glacier Plastics, Wonder Industries, Aladdin International and consulting work. He also owned and operated a grocery store in the Ponderosa Resort in Indian Creek on Spencer Lake. Walter was the first administrator for St. Croix Falls. Walter loved hunting and playing softball and was an avid fisherman and golfer. He loved Montana. Walter will be missed by his family and friends. Walter was preceded in death by his father and mother, Walter Sr. and Louise Sandford; sisters, Carmen Schultz and Carmel Roy. He is survived by his wife, Jeanette; daughters, Debbie Dakota, Laurie Morgan; son, Walter Sanford; grandchildren, Justin and Matthew Morgan, Christine and Steven Anderson, Weston and Stephanie Sanford; and greatgranddaughter, Callie.

OBITUARIES Jon K. Ormson

Carol A. Andrews

Jon K. Ormson, 45, St. Paul, Minn., son of Al and Mary Ann Ormson of Luck, died Saturday, June 26, 2010. He is survived by his parents; siblings, Dave (Sandy) Ormson and Krista (Darren) Varley; niece, Sarah Ormson and nephew, Ryan Ormson; many family members and cherished friends. Memorial services will be held at Luck Lutheran Church, 510 East Foster Ave., Luck, on Thursday, July 1, at 11 a.m. Time for visiting with the family will begin at 10 a.m. and continue until the time of service. In lieu of flowers, please contribute to the charity of your choice. As information is updated it can be found on the following Web sites: www.rowefh.com and www.wicremationcenter.com or call Bruce Rowe at 715472-2444. Rowe Funeral Home of Luck and the Northwest Wisconsin Cremation Center in Milltown have been entrusted with funeral arrangements.

Carol A. Andrews, 70, Siren, died June 20, 2010, at her home. Carol was born Jan. 21, 1940, in Minneapolis, Minn., to Edwin and Evelyn Davis. Carol and her husband, Robert, owned and operated Andy’s Body Shop in St. Paul Park, Minn., for over 20 years. After moving to Wisconsin, Carol was a volunteer at the Frederic Senior Citizen Center for a number of years. She spent many years caring for her mother. Carol was preceded in death by her husband, Robert; parents, Edwin and Evelyn; and her brother, Edwin Davis Jr. Carol is survived by her children, Ralph Loeken Jr., Terry (Rose) Loeken and Sandy (Scott) Long; her eight grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren; brother, Lyle (Gloria) Davis; along with other relatives and friends. Memorial services were held Friday, June 25, at Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home, Webster with Pastor Cindy Glocke officiating. Interment followed at the Siren Lakeview Cemetery. Online condolences can be made at www.swedberg-taylor.com. The Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Homes, Webster, was entrusted with arrangements.

John Schneider John E. Schneider, 59, Centuria/Balsam Lake, died accidentally at his residence on Monday, June 28, 2010. John was born July 28, 1950. John was a longtime resident of the Centuria/Balsam Lake area and a well-known attorney in Polk County. Services will be held 11 a.m. Friday, July 2, at the Cricket’s Event Center (Tac Entertainment Center), 1361 100th St. in Amery. Visitation will be held Thursday, July 1, 4 – 8 p.m., at the Kolstad Family Funeral Home, Centuria, and again at Cricket’s from 10 – 11 a.m. on Friday morning. A complete obituary will be published in a later edition. For more information or to express online condolences to the family, please visit www.kolstadfamilyfuneralhome.com. The Kolstad Family Funeral Home of Centuria has been entrusted with arrangements.

Albert V. Ravenholt Albert Victor Ravenholt, 90, formerly of Milltown, died April 25, 2010, at his home in Seattle, Wash. He was preceded in death by his parents, Ansgar and Kristine Ravenholt; wife, Marjorie Severyns Ravenholt; and brother, Halvor. He is survived by four sisters, Johanne Fremont, Gerda Bune, Agnes Nussle and Astrid Ravenholt; three brothers, Eiler, Reimert and Otto Ravenholt; 26 nieces and nephews; his devoted housekeeper, Segundina Lotilla; and many friends and acquaintances both professional and personal around the world. Funeral services will be held on Monday, July 5, at 2 p.m., at West Denmark Lutheran Church of Luck. Visitation will begin at 1 p.m. and continue until the time of service. Interment will follow at West Denmark Cemetery. Rowe Funeral Home of Luck has been entrusted with funeral arrangements.

Wayne Friel Wayne Friel, 80, Webster, died June 25, 2010. Funeral services will be held Thursday, July 1, 2 p.m. Visitation will be held from noon – 2 p.m., at the Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home in Webster. Interment will follow at Oak Grove Cemetery in Webster. A full obituary will follow in a later edition. Online condolences can be made at www.swedberg-taylor.com. The Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Homes, Webster, was entrusted with arrangements.

Certain times in life require a personal touch Jack Swedberg, Monument & Marker Sales Patrick L. Taylor, Owner, Director Dennis W. Christianson, Director

Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Homes and Crematory

Webster, WI • 715-866-7131

Siren, WI • 715-349-4800

515076 34a,45L

We can help with • Prearrangements • Traditional Services • On-Site Crematory • Cemetery Monuments

Judith Anne (Roman) Harder Judy Anne Harder, 66, was born Aug. 21, 1943, to George and Irene Roman in Minneapolis, Minn. With family at her side, she died June 27, 2010. Judy was raised in Minneapolis and graduated from Edison High School. During her school years, she was active in dance, student government and was a Campfire Girl. Her parents had a lake home on Balsam Lake, and this is where she spent many weekends with her family. During her time in Wisconsin she met Byron Harder. On June 8, 1963, Byron and Judy married in Minneapolis, Minn. To this union two children were born, James and Michelle. Shortly after, Byron and Judy made the Balsam Lake area their permanent home. In 1997, Judy was blessed with her first grandchild, Austin, and in 2000 her second grandchild, Tyler. Judy retired from the Unity School District in 2005, after 32 years of service. When her health was good, Judy enjoyed bowling and pitching horseshoe. As her health began to fail, she was happy enjoying and supporting her grandsons in school and as martial artists. She is survived by her husband of 47 years, Byron Harder; son, Jim Harder; daughter, Michelle (Jamie) Thayer; grandsons, Austin and Tyler Thayer; sister, Jean Giller; mother-in-law, Louise Hromatko; brothers-in-law, Gerald (Sandra) Harder, Lester (Susan) Harder; sister-inlaw, Charlene (Dennis) Guesford; many nieces and nephews; and special friends, Kim Smith, Scott and Shelly Lowe, Debbie Korsan and Brandee Seifred. A celebration of her life will be held on July 6, 7 p.m., at the St. Croix Valley Funeral Home and Polk County Cremation Society Chapel in St. Croix Falls. A gathering of remembrance will be from 5 to 7 p.m., on Tuesday, July 6, two hours prior to the service. The St. Croix Valley Funeral Home and Polk County Cremation Society, St. Croix Falls, was entrusted with arrangements.

Harry LeRoy Bottolfson Harry LeRoy Bottolfson, 84, Wanderoos, died of complications from Crohn’s disease at the Amery Regional Medical Center on June 21, 2010. He was born in Amery, on June 10, 1926, the son of Hans and Carrie (Henrickson) Bottolfson. He attended school until the 10th grade and then enlisted in the Army. He served overseas during World War II. He was discharged from the service in 1946. On June 14, 1947, he was united in marriage to Lenora Aune in Deronda, and together they raised two children. Harry was a custodian at Southwood Elementary School from 1960 to 1982, then worked at the Oak Grove Elementary School for two years before retiring in 1984. He was a member of Post 550 American Legion in Bloomington, Minn., and served as its commander. In retirement he lived in Wanderoos. He was preceded in death by his parents; wife, Lenora; brothers, Cliff and Carney; sisters, Anna and Jane. He is survived by his children, Lynn and Dawn; brother, Paul Bottolfson; sisters, Ida Martinson and Jen Peichel; as well as other relatives and friends. Funeral services were held Friday, June 25, at the Deronda Lutheran Church with Pastor Jerry Schultz officiating. Organist was Debbie Teig. Casket bearers were Chris Martinson, Marlyn Bottolfson, Gerald Jorgenson, Terry Waalen, Bob Heltemes and Philip Jorgenson. Interment was at the Deronda Cemetery. The Williamson-White Funeral and Cremation Services, Amery, was entrusted with arrangements.


PAGE 24 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 30, 2010

CHURCH NEWS Kids misbehave in public, testing parents composure QUESTION: My 3-year-old can be counted on to behave like a brat whenever we are in the mall or in a restaurant. He seems to know I will not punish him there in front of other people. How should I handle this tactic? DR. DOBSON: Let me answer you with an illustration from nature. They tell me that a raccoon can usually kill a dog if he gets him in a lake or river. He will simply pull the hound underwater until he drowns. Most other predatory animals prefer to do battle on the turf of their own choosing. So do children. If they’re going to pick a fight with Mom or Dad, they’d rather stage it in a public place, such as a supermarket or in the church foyer. They are smart enough to know that they are “safer” in front of other people. They will grab candy or speak in disrespectful ways that would never be attempted at home. Again, the most successful military generals are those who surprise the enemy in a terrain advantageous to their troops. Public facilities represent the high ground for a rambunctious preschooler. You may be one of the parents who has

Focus on the Family Dr. James Dobson fallen into the trap of creating “sanctuaries” in which the old rules aren’t enforced. It is a certainty that your strong-willed son or daughter will notice those safe zones and behave offensively and disrespectfully when there. There is something within the tougher child that almost forces him to “test the limits” in situations where the resolve of adults is in question. Therefore, I recommend that you lay out the ground rules before you enter those public arenas, making it clear that the same rules will apply. Then if he misbehaves, simply take him back to the car or around the corner and do what you would have done at home. His public behavior will improve dramatically. ••• QUESTION: I have a very fussy 8month-old baby who cries whenever I put her down. My pediatrician says she is healthy and that she cries just because she wants me to hold her all the

time. I do give her a lot of attention, but I simply can’t keep her on my lap all day long. How can I make her less fussy? DR. DOBSON: The crying of infants is an important form of communication. Through their tears we learn of their hunger, fatigue, discomfort or diaper disaster. Thus, it is important to listen to those calls for help and interpret them accordingly. On the other hand, your pediatrician is right. It is possible to create a fussy, demanding baby by rushing to pick her up every time she utters a whimper or a sigh. Infants are fully capable of learning to manipulate their parents through a process called reinforcement, whereby any behavior that produces a pleasant result will tend to recur. Thus, a healthy baby can keep her mother hopping around her nursery 12 hours a day (or night) by simply forcing air past her sandpaper larynx. To avoid this consequence, it is important to strike a balance between giving your baby the attention she needs and establishing her as a tiny dictator. Don’t be afraid to let her cry for a reasonable period of time (which is thought to be healthy for the lungs), although it is necessary to listen to the tone of her voice for the difference between

random discontent and genuine distress. Most mothers learn to recognize this distinction very quickly. When my daughter was 1 year of age, I used to stand out of sight at the doorway of her nursery for four or five minutes, awaiting a momentary lull in the crying before going to pick her up. By so doing, I reinforced the pauses rather than the tears. You might try the same approach. ••• Dr. Dobson is founder and chairman emeritus of the nonprofit organization Focus on the Family, Colorado Springs, Colo. 80995 (www.focusonthefamily.org). Questions and answers are excerpted from “Complete Marriage and Family Home Reference Guide” and “Bringing Up Boys,” both published by Tyndale House. COPYRIGHT 2009 JAMES DOBSON INC., DISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK, 1130 Walnut St., Kansas City, Mo. 64106; 816-581-7500

Brought to you by:

Webster Area Catholic Churches Webster

Together with Friends Day Camp is for kids TAYLORS FALLS, Minn. – Kids who have finished first through fifth grades are invited to join the fun at Together with Friends Day Camp each Tuesday and Thursday morning 9 a.m. to noon through July 27. Kids come as often as their schedules will allow and are invited to bring their friends of this same age to join them. Together with Friends is a cooperative outreach of churches in Taylors Falls. The day camp will meet at First Evangelical Lutheran Church July 1, 20 and 22, United Methodist Church July 6, 8, 13 and 15, and at First Baptist Church July 27. Parents may register their child(ren) at each session. Kids are asked to wear tennis shoes. A per session donation of $2 a child is suggested. Together with Friends Day Camp is in

its 14th year. For specific information, please call Pastor Kevin Schumann, day camp director, at 651-465-6792. Funding for the camp is supplemented by Thrivent Financial for Lutherans, Chisago County Chapter. - submitted

Fun is an important goal for Together with Friends Day Camp. This is one of the three groups showing off their craft “frogs” who love to fish. This year’s theme is Hooked on Jesus. The day camp has a great staff of highschoolers and adults. Camper kids are encouraged to bring their friends who have finished first through fifth grades. Kids can come as often as they are able. - Photo submitted

Church listings sponsored by the following area businesses: BREMER BANK, N.A. Full-Service Banking Member FDIC Frederic - Danbury - Siren

DAEFFLER’S QUALITY MEATS, INC. Wholesale & Retail Meats Custom Butchering & Processing Phone 715-327-4456

INTER-COUNTY CO-OP PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION Printers & Publishers Office Supplies

Frederic, Wis. - 715-327-4236 Shell Lake, Wis. - 715-468-2314 Siren, Wis. - 715-349-2560 St. Croix Falls, Wis. - 715-483-9008

STATE FARM INSURANCE COMPANIES

Corey T. Arnold, Agent Frederic, Wis. Phone 715-327-8076

BEAN’S COUNTRY GRIDDLE Hwys. 35 & 48 Downtown Frederic Phone 715-327-5513

NORTHWESTERN WISCONSIN ELECTRIC CO.

“Your Electric Servant” Serving Polk & Burnett Counties “Use Energy Wisely”

WEBSTER

ALPHA

CASHCO BUILDING SUPPLIES

BASS LAKE LUMBER

Complete Lumber & Building Supplies

CARLSON-ROWE FUNERAL HOME

Phone 715-866-4238 Hwy. 35 N. Webster, Wis. Tom & Becky O’Brien, Owners

MEDICINE SHOPPE

HOPKINS SAND & GRAVEL, INC.

Frederic, Wis. 715-327-4475 110 Oak Street Frederic, Wis. 715-327-4208 Monday - Friday 8:30 - 5 Not Open On Saturday Duane Lindh

HAULING

Sand, Gravel, Ready-Mix, Concrete, Black Dirt, Dozer Work, Landscaping & Septic Tanks Installed Hwy. 35 North Webster, Wis. Phone 715-866-4157 M.P.R.S. #03059

• Gravel • Sand • Rock • Top Soil • Trackhoe 715-472-2717 Mobile 715-491-1861 1065 290th Ave. Frederic, Wis.

SWEDBERG-TAYLOR FUNERAL HOME

LUCK

BRUCE’S AUTO REPAIR & TOWING

VAN METER’S MEATS

Government Inspected Slaughtering and Processing, Sausage making • Ham and Bacon Cured and Smoked Sides and Quarters of Beef and Pork Available Old-fashioned Fresh Meat Counter Tim Van Meter and Ross Anderson, Owners Luck, WI 54853 Plant 715-472-2141

• Complete Line of Building Supplies & Lumber • Cabot’s Stains Grantsburg, Wis. 715-488-2471 or 715-327-8766

BURNETT DAIRY CO-OP 1988 World Champion Cheesemaker Earl Wilson, Cheese Plant Mgr. Clif Gipp, Ag. Supply Mgr. for Feed, Propane & Fertilizer Alpha, Wis. 715-689-2468 • 715-689-2467

SIREN OLSEN & SON

Your Full-Service Drugstore Siren, Wis. Phone 715-349-2221

D & L FINANCIAL SERVICES 10022 Elbow Lake Road Siren, Wis. 54872 715-689-2539

Webster, Wis. Phone 715-866-7131

Churches 5/10

FREDERIC

Wrecker - Flatbed Air Conditioning & Computerized Car Service - Cold Weather Starts

Webster, Wis. 715-866-4100 Days • 715-866-8364 Eves.

CUSHING CUSHING COOPERATIVE SOCIETY Feed Mill - Grain Dept. Cushing, Wis. 715-648-5215

Any area business wishing to help sponsor the church listings should contact the Leader at 715-327-4236.


JUNE 30, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 25

ChurchDIRECTORY Directory CHURCH ADVENTIST

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST - FREDERIC

609 Benson Road; Pastor Curtis Denney Sat. Worship 11 a.m.; Sabbath Schl. 9:30 a.m. ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE CHURCH OF THE VALLEY

Senior Pastor Bob Morton 1259 Hwy. 35 S., St. Croix Falls Sunday Worship: 9 & 11 a.m.

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

WORD OF LIFE CHURCH

Meeting in homes. Elders: Cliff Bjork, Jon Zens, 715-483-1357 and 715-755-3048 Sun. Fellowship - 10 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. LUTHERAN

LUTHERAN

BALSAM LUTHERAN CHURCH

1115 Mains Crossing, 1/2 Mile South Hwy. 8 On 110th St.; Pastor Matt Faarem Sun. Worship 9 a.m.; Sun. School 10:15 a.m. Wed. Bible Study 8:30 a.m.; Wed. LOGOS 3:20 p.m.

BEAUTIFUL SAVIOR LUTHERAN (WELS)

Gene E. Jahnke, Pastor, 715-635-7672, Hm. 715-354-7787, Hwy. 70 at 53, Spooner Sun. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School & Bible Classes For All - 10:45 a.m.

BETHANY LUTHERAN - BRANSTAD

Pastor Jay Ticknor, 715-463-5746 3 miles So. of Grantsburg on Hwy. 87 Sun. Schl. - 9:30 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

BETHANY LUTHERAN - SIREN

Hwy. 35, 1/2 blk. N. Main St. Interim Pastor Andrew Hinwood Pastoral Serv. 715-349-5280 Sun. School 8:15 a.m.; Sun. Worship - 9:30 a.m.

BETHESDA LUTHERAN - DRESSER (LCMC) www.bethesdalutheran.ws

Pastor Mark Richardson, 715-755-2562 Pastor Mike Winick 1947 110th Ave., Dresser Contemporary Serv. 8:00 a.m.; Sunday Traditional Service 9:30 a.m.; Outdoor services by Sand Lake last Sunday of the month.

BONE LAKE LUTHERAN bllc@lakeland.ws

Pastor Mary Ann Bowman, 5 mi. E. of Luck on Hwy. 48, 1/2 mi. S. on I; 715-472-8153, Office/Kit. - 715-472-2535 Exploring Prayer 8:15 a.m.; Adult Bible Study 8:30 a.m.; Wor. 9:30 a.m.; Fellowship 10:30 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

CHRIST LUTHERAN (LCMS)

Pipe Lake CTH G & T, 715-822-3096 Pastor Steve Miller Sun. Serv. 10:45 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m. during schl. yr.; Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sun. www.christlutheranpipelake.com

CLAM FALLS LUTHERAN (AALC)

Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt - 715-653-2630 Communion 1st Sun.; Wor. 9 a.m.; Sun. School 9 a.m.

FAITH LUTHERAN - BALSAM LAKE

faithlutheran@lakeland.ws Pastor Diane Norstad 715-485-3800; CTH I & Mill Street Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:40 a.m.; Holy Communion 1st & last Sundays

FAITH LUTHERAN - GRANTSBURG

Pastor Victor St. George, 715-463-5388 Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School 10:45 a.m.

FIRST EVAN. LUTHERAN

5561 Chestnut St., Taylors Falls, MN 651-465-5265 Traditional Worship 8:30 a.m.; Sunday School & Youth 9:45 a.m.; Adult Learning 10 a.m.; Contemp. Wor. 11 a.m.

FIRST LUTHERAN - CUSHING

Pastor Dorothy Sandahl, 715-648-5323 or 715-648-5324 Sun. Wor. 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9 a.m.

FRISTAD LUTHERAN - CENTURIA

ELCA - 501 Hwy. 35, 715-646-2357, Mel Rau, Pastor Sun. Wor. & Holy Communion - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:40 a.m.

GEORGETOWN LUTHERAN - ELCA

Rt. 1, Balsam Lake, WI (Fox Creek) Pastor Neal Weltzen; GT Office - 715-857-5580, Parsonage - 715-822-3001, TR Office - 715-822-3001 Wors. Serv. 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m.; Holy Communion - 1st Sun. of each month

GRACE LUTHERAN - WEST SWEDEN

Phone 715-327-4340, 715-327-8384, 715-327-8090 Interim Pastor Julie Brenden Worship 9:15 a.m.; Sun. School 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st & 2nd Sundays

IMMANUEL LUTHERAN - FREDERIC

(Missouri Synod) Pastor Jody R. Walter, 715-327-8608 Sun. Schl. - 8:45 a.m.; Service - 10:45 a.m. Communion - 1st & 3rd Sun.

LAKESIDE COMMUNITY LUTH. - ELCA

CTH H, 1/2 mi. N. of CTH A & H on H Church Off. 715-635-7791 Roger Pittman, Pastor Worship Serv. 9 a.m.; Sat. Worship. 7 p.m.

LAKETOWN LUTHERAN - CUSHING

Pastor Dorothy Sandahl Sun. Wor. 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:30 a.m.

LUCK LUTHERAN

510 Foster Ave. E. Office 715-472-2605; Home 715-472-8424 Sun. Wor. Serv. 10:30 a.m.; Mon. Wor. Serv. 6:30 p.m.

MILLTOWN LUTHERAN

113 W. Main St.. W., Phone 715-825-2453 Pastor Danny G. Wheeler 9:15 a.m. Worship

NEW HOPE LUTHERAN CHURCH

Pastor Emory Johnson 685 W. State Road 70, Grantsburg Sunday Worship Service 9:30 a.m.

NORTH VALLEY LUTHERAN

METHODIST

METHODIST

ATLAS UNITED METHODIST

Pastor Carolyn Saunders, 715-463-2624 Sunday School - 11 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

ST. FRANCIS XAVIER

Pastor Father Daniel Bodin, 651-465-7345 25293 Redwing Ave., Shafer, MN Sunday 9 a.m.

ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST

Pastor Carolyn Saunders, 715-463-2624 Worship - 9 a.m.; Sunday School - 10:30 a.m.

Pastor Michael J. Tupa, 715-866-7321 Cedar & Muskey Ave. - Webster Mass Sun 10:45 a.m., Wed. 5:45 p.m. (SeptMay), Fri. 9 a.m. (Summer) Sat. 8:15 p.m. on Sept. 1

DANBURY UNITED METHODIST

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC

CENTRAL UNITED METHODIST GRANTSBURG

Pastor Maggie Isaacson, 715-825-3559 3 mi. W. of Milltown on “G” Sunday Worship - 9:15 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

Cindy Glocke, Pastor, 715-866-8646 Sunday Worship - 9 a.m.

OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN, (LCMS) WEBSTER

Cindy Glocke, Pastor, 715-866-8646 Sunday Worship - 10:30 a.m.

404 Wis. Ave., Amery, 715-268-7717 Father John Drummy, Pastor Sat. Mass 4 p.m., Sun. Mass 8 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Sacrament of Reconciliation Sat., 3:30 p.m. or by appt.

Pastor Gerald Heinecke Phone 715-327-8608; Church Phone 715-866-7191 Sunday Worship - 10 a.m.; Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

HOLY TRINITY UNITED METHODIST

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC

PEACE LUTHERAN - DRESSER (ELCA)

LAKEVIEW UNITED - HERTEL

2355 Clark Road, Dresser, WI, 715-755-2515 Web site: plcdresser.org Pastor Wayne Deloach, Intern Lori Peper Sun. Wor. 8:30 & 11 a.m., Sun. Schl. 9:35 a.m.

PILGRIM LUTHERAN - FREDERIC (ELCA)

Pastor Catherine Burnette 507 Wisconsin Ave. N., 715-327-8012 Sunday Worship - 9 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 2nd Sundays www.pilgrimlutheranfrederic.org

REDEEMER EV. LUTHERAN

(Wisconsin Synod) Pastor Gene DeVries 200 N. Adams St., St. Croix Falls Sun. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 8:30 a.m.

ST. JOHN’S EV. LUTHERAN (Wis. Synod)

350 Michigan Ave., Centuria Sun. Worship - 10:45 a.m.; Sun. School - 10 a.m.

ST. PETER’S LUTHERAN - LUCK 1614 CTH, North Luck Office Ph.715-472-2605; Dial-A-Devotion 715-472-2345 Sunday Worship - 9 a.m.

SHEPHERD OF THE VALLEY LUTHERAN

(Missouri Synod) 140 Madison St. South, St. Croix Falls Pastor Mark K. Schoen Sun. Service - 9 a.m.; Sun.School - 10:30 a.m.

TRINITY LUTHERAN - ELCA

10 mi. W. of Cumberland on Hwy. 48 (McKinley) - Pastor Neal Weltzin GT Office 715-857-5580, Parsonage 715-822-3001, TR Office - 715-822-3001 Wor. Serv. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:15 a.m. Holy Communion - 1st Sunday

TRINITY LUTHERAN LCMS, DANBURY

Pastor Gerald Heinecke Home 715-327-8608; Church 715-866-7191 Sunday Worship Service - 8 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

TRINITY LUTHERAN - FALUN

Hwy. 70 East, 715-689-2271, Pastor: Carl Heidel Worship 9 a.m.; Sunday School 10:15 a.m. Communion -Every Sunday

TRINITY EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN OSCEOLA

300 Seminole Ave. (CTH M) Mark Kock, Pastor, 715-294-2828 Sunday Worship at 9 a.m.; Fellowship Bible Class at 10:15 a.m.

WEST DENMARK LUTHERAN

Pastors Mike & Linda Rozumalski 1 mi. west of Luck on N, 2478 170th St., Luck Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m.; Fellowship following service

WEST IMMANUEL LUTHERAN - ELCA

Rev. Rexford D. Brandt 447 180th St., Osceola, 715-294-2936 Sunday Worship 9 a.m. Communion 1st & 3rd Sunday of the month

YELLOW LAKE LUTHERAN

1/2 mi. W. of Hwy. 35 on U, 715-866-8281, Pastors Douglas Olson and Roger Kampstra Services begin at 9:30 a.m.; Communion 1st & 3rd Sunday

ZION LUTHERAN - BONE LAKE (AALC)

Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt - 715-653-2630 5 mi. E. of Frederic on W, 2 mi. south on I; Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st Sunday

GRACE UNITED - WEBSTER

Holytrinity@wisconsinumc.org 1606 165th Ave., CTH I, Centuria Paul Foulke, Pastor, 715-485-3363 Sunday Worship - 9 a.m.

Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-294-2243 255 E. 10th Ave., Osceola Masses: Sun. 10:30 a.m., Tues. 5 p.m. Thurs. at 10 a.m. at Osc. Nursing Home

ASSEMBLY

Pastor Jack Starr Wor. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - during worship hour

ASSEMBLY

LEWIS MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST Tom Cook, Pastor Worship 8:45 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 10 a.m.

Pastor Don Wiltshire, 715-640-6400 Centuria - Phone 715-646-2172 Sunday Service: 10 a.m.

McKINLEY UNITED METHODIST

OSCEOLA COMMUNITY CHURCH

Pastor Annie Tricker Sun. Worship 11 a.m.; Sun. School 11 a.m. Potluck dinner 1st Sunday

OSCEOLA UNITED METHODIST

CENTURIA ASSEMBLY OF GOD

Pastor Larry Mederich, 715-294-4332 www.occconnect.org Mtg. @ St. Croix Art Barn; Sun. Serv. - 9 a.m. Nursery and children church

SIREN ASSEMBLY OF GOD

oumc@centurytel.net 306 River Street, Osceola, 715-755-2275 Pastor Mark Gilbert Adult Class - 8:30 a.m.; Sunday School 10 a.m. Sunday Worship - 10 a.m.; Holy Communion 1st Sunday

Pastor Andrew Bollant Sun. Schl. - 9:15 a.m.; Morn. Serv. - 10:15 a.m.; Supervised Nursery; Wed. Evening - Worship Serv. 6:30 p.m.

ST. CROIX FALLS UNITED METHODIST

EVANGELICAL

Rev. Mike Weaver Sunday Worship Service - 10 a.m. Sunday School is at 9 a.m., Nursery available

EVANGELICAL

TRADE RIVER EVAN. FREE

Pastor Arveda “Freddie” Kirk, 715-327-4436 Early Wor. 8:30 a.m.; Sunday Wor. 10 a.m. Souper service Wed. 5:15 p.m.

Pastor Dale VanDeusen, 715-488-2296 or 715-488-2653 20296 Hwy. 87, Grantsburg Morning Worship - 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School - 10:45 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services

SIREN UNITED METHODIST

APPLE RIVER COMMUNITY (EFCA)

ST. LUKE UNITED - FREDERIC

Tom Cook, Pastor Sunday School 9 a.m. Worship - 10:15 a.m. (Nursery available)

TAYLORS FALLS UNITED METHODIST

Pastor Bruce Tanner, 715-268-2176 942 U.S. Hwy. 8, Amery Sun. Schl. 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible study 7 p.m.

WOLF CREEK UNITED METHODIST

Pastor Greg Lund, 715-327-8767 700 Churchwood Lane; 505 Old CTH W Sun. Schl. - 9 a.m.; Morn. Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services

290 W. Government Street, 715-294-4436 Reverend Dr. Rolland Robinson Sunday Service - 10 a.m. with nursery Sunday School - Sept. - May at 10 a.m. Rev. Mike Weaver Sunday Worship - 8:15 a.m. COVENANT

COVENANT

CALVARY COVENANT - ALPHA

Pastor Scott Sagel, 715-689-2541 Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Worship 10:30 p.m.; Elevator provided, welcome

SIREN COVENANT

Pastor Dave Guertin 7686 Lofty Pines Drive, Siren, 715-349-5601 Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m.

UNITED COVENANT - CLEAR LAKE

Pastor Gary Tonn Praise Time 8 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Sunday School 9:20 a.m. CATHOLIC

CATHOLIC

ASSUMPTION OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-247-3310 255 St. Hwy. 35, East Farmington Mass Friday 9 a.m.; Sacrament of Penance Sat. 3:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF ST. JOSEPH

Pastor - Father Daniel Bodin 490 Bench St., Taylors Falls, 651-465-7345 Sat. Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Sun. 7:30 & 10:30 a.m. Tues. - Thurs. 7:30 a.m.

OUR LADY OF PERPETUAL HELP

FREDERIC EVAN. FREE CHURCH

BAPTIST

BAPTIST

EAST BALSAM BAPTIST - BALSAM LK. Pastor David Sollitt 715-857-5411 or 715-268-2651 Worship Service - 9 a.m.; Sunday School-10:15 a.m.

EUREKA BAPTIST

2393 210th Ave., St. Croix Falls Pastor Willis Christenson, 715-483-9464 Sunday School - 10 a.m.; Worship Service - 11 a.m.

FAITH FELLOWSHIP

Hwy. 35 and CTH N., Luck Bill McEachern Pastor, 715-485-3973 Sun. Bible study - 9 a.m.; Sun. Wor. - 10 a.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - AMERY

131 Broadway St., 715-268-2223; www.fbcamery.org Pastor Charlie Butt, Lead Pastor; Nick Buda, Assoc. Pastor of Family Ministries 1st Sunday Service: 9 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.; Nursury available; Sun. School for Pre-K to 5th; Sun. School for Jr./Sr. high meet in teen center 2nd Sunday Service: 10:30 - 11:45 a.m.; Nursery available; Children’s church ages 3-4

FIRST BAPTIST - FALUN

Pastor Kevin Miller Associate Pastor Roger Inouye Sunday School - (all ages) - 9:30 a.m. Church Serv. - 10:45 a.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - MILLTOWN

Danbury - 7586 St. Rd. 77, 715-866-7321 Pastor - Father Michael J. Tupa Mass - Wed. 5 p.m. (Summer), Fri. 9 a.m. (Sept.-May). Reconciliation as per bulletin & by appt.

Pastor Marlon Mielke, 715-825-3186 Sunday School 9:45 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m., 7 p.m.

OUR LADY OF THE LAKES

FIRST BAPTIST - TAYLORS FALLS, MN

Pastor Martin Weigand - 715-294-3489 Sun. Schl. 9 a.m.; Adult Bible Class 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m.

Balsam Lake - Rev. John A. Drummy, Pastor - 405-2253 Mass: Sat. eves. 6 p.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m.; Tues. 5:30 p.m.; Fri. 9 a.m.Sacrament of Reconciliation 7:30 a.m. Sun. or by appt.

Located across from elemen. school on West St., Pastor, Dr. Kevin Schumann; 651-465-7171 Sun. Morn. - Sun. School for all ages - 9 a.m. Morn. Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided.

ZION LUTHERAN - MARKVILLE

SACRED HEARTS OF JESUS & MARY

FIRST BAPTIST - WEBSTER

ZION LUTHERAN - EAST FARMINGTON (WELS )

Pastor Tim Faust Worship - 11 a.m.; Sun. School - 10 a.m. Holy Communion - 1st & 3rd Sunday

ZION LUTHERAN - TRADE LAKE

Interim Pastor Julie Brenden 715-327-8384, 715-327-8090 Fellowship - 10:30 a.m., Sun. Schl. 9:45 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m., Communion - 1st & 2nd Sundays

PRESBYTERIAN

PRESBYTERIAN

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN

Rev. Bruce Brooks - 715-483-3550 719 Nevada St. , (between Simonson & Tower Roads) , St. Croix Falls Worship - 10 a.m. (Nursery provided) Sun. Schl. - Child.- 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - Adults 8:45 a.m.; Communion 1st Sunday

Pastor Father Michael J. Tupa CTHs A & H - 715-866-7321 Crescent Lake Voyager Village area. Mass Sun. 8:15 a.m., Thurs. 11:30 a.m. Reconciliation as per bulletin and by appt.

ST. DOMINIC - FREDERIC & IMMACULATE CONCEPTION - GRANTSBURG CATHOLIC MASS SCHEDULE

Pastor: Rev. Dennis M. Mullen, 715-327-8119 St. Dominic: Sat. 4:30 p.m.; Sun. 10:30 a.m. Immaculate Conception: Sat. 6:30 p.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m. Call the office for daily & holy day Mass times

ST. ANNE PARISH

Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-247-3310 139 Church Hill Rd., Somerset Mass Sun. 8:30 a.m.; Wed. 9 a.m. Sacrament of Penance Sun. 8 a.m.

Church Phone 715-866-4111; Rev. Merrill Olson - Pastor Sun. School - 9:30 a.m.; Wor. - 10:45 a.m (Nursery Provided)

GRACE CHURCH OF OSCEOLA “The Cure for the Common Church”

LIVING HOPE CHURCH

Pastor Doug McConnell Youth Pastor Chris Radtke At Grantsburg High School, 715-463-5794 Sun. Serv. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m.

TRADE LAKE BAPTIST

Pastor Andy McDaniel, 715-327-8402 Sun. Schl. - 9:15 a.m.; Wor. Serv. - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided.; www.tradelakebaptistchurch.org

CHURCH OF CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST - WEBSTER

Minister Garret Derouin, 715-866-7157 Musky & Birch St., Avail. in office 9 a.m. - noon, Tues.-Fri.; Sun. Bible Study 9:30 a.m. Worship 10:30 a.m. WESLEYAN

WESLEYAN

WOODLAND WESLEYAN

Dairyland - Rev. Andrea Wittwer 715-244-3649 Sunday School - 10 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

FULL GOSPEL

FULL GOSPEL

WOOD RIVER CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP

Pastor Dan Slaikeu 4 mi. SE of Grantsburg on Williams Rd. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m.

HOPE FELLOWSHIP OF SOMERSET

231 Bluff Drive, 715-247-2435 Services are Sundays at 10:30 a.m.

CHRISTIAN CENTER

CHRISTIAN CENTER

EL SALEM/TWIN FALLS CHRISTIAN CENTER

1751 100th Ave., Dresser Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship 10:30 a.m. Evening Services Sun. 6 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. Call Pastor Darryl Olson at 715-755-3133 for information and directions

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN

CHRISTIAN ORTHODOX

HOLY TRINITY ORTHODOX

523 1st St., Clayton, 715-948-2493 Fr. Christopher Wojcik, Pastor Saturday Vespers - 5 p.m.; Sunday Liturgy - 9:30 a.m.

HOLY CROSS ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN Meeting at Zion Lutheran Church, 28005 Old Towne Rd., Chisago Lakes, MN hcomm.org Sunday Worship Service 9:30 a.m. NAZARENE

NAZARENE

CALVARY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE

510 S. Vincent, St. Croix Falls Pastor Lori Ward, 715-483-3696 Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:45 a.m. & Wed. 6:30 p.m.

FAITH COMMUNITY

7535 Peet St., Danbury, 715-656-4010 Adult Bible Service 9 a.m.; Services: Sun. 10 a.m.; Sunday School during church service.

NONDENOMINATIONAL

NONDENOMINATIONAL

CENTERPOINT CHURCH “Come as you are”

Pastor Dick Enerson, www.centerpointstcroix.com, 715-294-1833, Meeting at SCF High Schl. - Main entrance 740 Maple Drive, St. Croix Falls Sunday Worship 10 - 11:15 a.m.

NEW LIFE COMMUNITY - AMERY

Interim Pastor Craig Jorgenson Sunday Worship 10 a.m.; Children’s Church: K to 6th Grade

NEW LIFE CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY

Meets at Dresser Elem. School, Dresser Pastor Michael Brand, 715-417-2468 Adult Class 9 a.m.; Sunday School 9:45 a.m.; Worship Service 9:45 a.m.; Nursery available

NEW WINE CHURCH - CENTURIA 309 5th Street, , 715-338-2751 Pastors Randy and Pam Stone Sunday 10 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m.

NORTHERN PINES FRIENDS WORSHIP GROUP 715-733-0481 or 715-733-0480 for time of meeting.

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

722 Seminole Ave., Osceola Pastor Dr. Kent Haralson; 715-294-4222 or 715-755-3454; info@gracechurchosceola.com Sun.: Praise & Worship Serv. 9 am., Adult Bible Study 10:45 a.m., Children’s Sun. School 10:45 a.m.

RIVER VALLEY CHRISTIAN

GRACE BAPTIST - GRANTSBURG

ST. PETER’S COMMUNITY CHURCH

716 S. Robert St., Grantsburg, 715-463-5699 Sr. Pastor Brad Moore David Ahlquist, Assoc. Pastor Sun. Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School 11 a.m.

1289 160th St. (Hwy. 65), St. Croix Falls, 715-483-5378 Pastors Dan and Claudia Denissen Sunday Adult Bible Class 9 a.m. (No child care available) Worship and Children’s Sunday Schl. 10 a.m. “Faith on Purpose” (Love God, Love People...period) faithonpurpose.org CTH F, Dresser, 715-483-2911 Pastor’s res./office Sunday Worship 10 a.m.

church directory

ADVENTIST


PAGE 26 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 30, 2010

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Dr. Daniel C. Satterlund Hours: Tues., Thurs., Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Phone (715) 472-2121

715-463-2370

WEBSTER EYE ASSOCIATES 715-866-4700

SEE US FOR ALL YOUR VISION CARE NEEDS. Exams, Glasses & Contacts, Foreign Body Removal, Treatment of Eye Disease www.stcroixeye.com

Mon.-Fri. • 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home Webster, Wisconsin

“Distinctive Funeral Service”

Saturday, July 10, 4 p.m Coon Lake Park

Picnic supper with beer and soft drinks, $20 per person. Members of neighboring classes welcome; call 715-472-8356 to reserve. Faculty and staff, be our 515815 guests! 45-46Lp

715-483-1471

AT THE LODGE 24226 1st Ave. No. Siren, WI Local Movie Line 715-349-8888 Timbers1@starwire.net SHOW TIMES FOR FRI., JULY 2 THRU THURS., JULY 8

GROWN UPS

2179 E. Hwy. 8 Between Tractor Supply and Wal-Mart www.evergreen-entertainment.com

SHOWS AND SHOW TIMES July 2 - July 8

SHOWS AND SHOW TIMES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL SEATS $6.50 UNTIL 6 P.M.

THE LAST AIRBENDER (PG-13)

Rated PG-13, 102 Minutes. Fri. - Thurs: 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00 & 9:00 p.m.

Sorry, no passes or reduced admission tickets.

KNIGHT AND DAY

TWILIGHT ECLIPSE

Rated PG-13, 130 Minutes. Fri. - Thurs: 1:00, 3:30, 6:00 & 8:30 p.m.

TOY STORY 3

Rated G, 103 Minutes. Fri. - Thurs: 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00 & 9:00 p.m.

Daily: 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 9:00

(PG-13)

Sorry, no passes or reduced admission tickets.

Rated PG-13, 124 Minutes. Fri. - Thurs.: 1:00, 3:30, 6:00 & 8:30 p.m.

Daily: 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 9:30

GROWN UPS (PG-13) Daily: 1:15, 3:15, 5:15, 7:15, 9:15

KNIGHT AND DAY (PG-13) Daily: 1:25, 3:25, 5:25, 7:25, 9:25

All shows and show times before 6 p.m. $5.00. Shows and show times subject to change. Visit us on our Web site: www.timberstheatres.com

TOY STORY 3

(G) Daily: 1:05, 3:05, 5:05, 7:05, 9:05

THE KARATE KID (PG) Daily: 1:20, 4:15, 7:05, 9:35

KILLERS

(PG-13) Daily: 1:10, 3:10, 5:10, 7:10, 9:10

SHREK FOREVER AFTER (PG) Daily: 1:00, 3:00, 5:00

JONAH HEX (PG-13) Daily: 7:20, 9:20

CHECK WEB SITE FOR SHOW TIMES: www.evergreen-entertainment.com 515844 45L 35a

CENTRAL BURNETT COUNTY FAIR

Robert L. Nelson New York Life Insurance Company Box 313 Luck, Wis. 54853 Phone

715-472-2502

NEW YORK LIFE

Daily: 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

See us for all your printing needs.

INTER-COUNTY COOPERATIVE PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION • Shell Lake, 715-468-2314 • St. Croix Falls 715-483-9008

Visit The Leader’s Web Site:

www.the-leader.net

West of Hwy. 35 on Fairgrounds Rd.

Webster, Wis.

AUSTIN LAKE GREENHOUSE & FLOWER SHOP • WEDDING BOUQUETS • FUNERAL DESIGNS • CUT FLOWERS • GIFTS • BALLOONS • BEDDING PLANTS • POTTED PLANTS • TUXEDO RENTAL BY SAVVI • ANTLER KING PRODUCTS Hwy. 35 & “FF,” Webster Flowers Phoned Anywhere

Call 715-866-7261

THURSDAY, JULY 8 - SATURDAY, JULY 10 MAKE TRACKS TO THE FAIR! Animals • Beer • Exhibits • Food • Games • Judging • Music • & More

SPECTRUM CARNIVAL RIDES & GAMES

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GRANDSTAND EVENTS Thurs., 7 p.m.

Horse Pull

Thurs., 7:30 - 11:30 p.m.

Fri., 6:30 p.m.

OLDER THAN DIRT

Reg. $20

Truck/Tractor Pull

Fri., 7:30 - 11:30 p.m.

Sat., 7 p.m.

INTENSIVE CARE

SATURDAY

DEMO DERBY HORSE EVENTS

7:30 - 11:30 p.m.

Horse Judging - 6:15 p.m. Horse Pull - 7 p.m.

INTENSIVE CARE Great Cover Band! Families Welcome!

• Commercial Printing • Office Supplies • Daily UPS Pickup • Fax & Copy Service

• Frederic, 715-327-4236 • Siren, 715-349-2560

Call 1-800-919-1195 or 715-825-2335 & 715-646-2777 445914 eves. 9a,dtfc 20Ltfc

Phone 715-268-2004

Eye health exams, glaucoma checks, foreign body removal, full line of street wear, safety and sport wear, contact lenses

GRANTSBURG EYE ASSOCIATES

FHS CLASS OF 1970 40TH REUNION

All Stadium/Digital

OPTOMETRIST 119 Arlington Drive Amery, Wis.

304 1st St. So., Luck, Wis.

$ 10x10.............. $ 10x16.............. $ 10x20.............. $ 10x24.............. $ 10x40..............

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25.00 35.00 40.00 45.00 50.00 90.00

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ID required to drink. Everyone appearing under 30 will be carded.

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Horse Showdeo

LIONS BINGO NIGHTLY - 7:30 p.m. FAMILY FUN FOR EVERYONE!

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 715-866-8261, FAIR SECRETARY, 715-866-7635, FAIR OFFICE • E-MAIL: CBCFAIR@SIRENTEL.NET

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*Advance carnival wristbands available at: U.S. Bank, Webster & Siren, Bremer Bank, Siren, Connor’s Marathon Gas, Austin Lake Greenhouse and Wayne’s Foods Plus, Webster In accordance with state law, only animals entered for exhibit are allowed on the fairgrounds. Please keep other animals/pets off the fairgrounds.

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200700115 12/09


JUNE 30, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 27

SCF Relay for Life

Relay pushes ahead through the storm

by Tammi Milberg Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – The Polk County Relay for Life was held in St. Croix Falls on Friday, June 25. The opening ceremony was to begin at 6 p.m. on the track, but storm sirens began to blast throughout the city at 6 p.m., and people were told to go inside the elementary school to seek shelter. The safest place of the building was the commons/cafeteria area. Determined people gathered there to pledge their time and efforts to cancer research. While bodies crowded the cafeteria waiting for the all-clear to go back outside and walk the track for the relay, the opening ceremony was held. Michelle Gullickson Moore and Debbie Hills led the ceremony. The honorary chair was Susie Jasperson. Susie and her friends started a team called Refuse to Lose, which was started when Susie first was diagnosed with cancer along with her friend and co-cheerleading coach Sarah Campbell. The Refuse to Lose team has walked and raised money every year for cancer research since that first year. Susie spoke briefly at the ceremony, stating that this was her second round with cancer and that she received word that her treatment is shrinking the cancer. “I wasn’t going to be naïve enough to think it would just disappear,” she said. “They told me it wasn’t getting any bigger or smaller, but was staying the same, then this week they told me the cancer is shrinking.” The cafeteria packed with supporters applauded and Susie indicated she is a private person. As she was choked up by her story, she said that it was hard for her to ask for help and share things with people, but she said she couldn’t have come this far without her community. “I can’t thank these people enough, my husband, my kids, my friends, the school,” she said. “It takes a community to help you survive this. Thank you to all

The theme for the Relay for Life this year was Happy Birthday. The song “Happy Birthday” to survivors was sung by the group gathered to participate in the cafeteria that evening to celebrate another birthday for each cancer survivor.

20 10

Cancer survivors gathered in a circle during the opening ceremony while the “Happy Birthday” song was sung to them, celebrating more birthdays by cancer survivors. – Photos by Tammi Milberg those people who were calling me, helping me and being there for me.” Those people who know Susie understand her personality and sense of humor. She closed her speech at the opening ceremony stating, “Those of you who have prayed for me, continue to say prayers for me, and if you don’t like me, please don’t say anything.”

Susie Jasperson was the honorary chair for the Polk County Relay for Life in St. Croix Falls.

Debbie Hills and Michelle Gullickson Moore led the Relay for Life opening ceremony for the Polk County American Cancer Society chapter on Friday, June 25. 515554 45L


PAGE 28 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 30, 2010

Coming events Photo by Gary King

JULY

SATURDAY/10

Mellow yellow

THURS.-SUN./1-4

Balsam Lake

• 20th-annual BLHS all-class reunion at the American Legion Hall. Potluck lunch at noon, 715-949-1471, 715405-3471.

Balsam Lake

• Freedom Festival. Thurs. pageant, Fri. & Sat. Our Lady of the Lakes garage sale; Sat. craft fair; boat parade. Sun. car show, parade.

Centuria

• Interfaith Caregivers I Care Concert at Fristad Lutheran Church, 7 p.m., 715-485-9500.

THURSDAY/1

Danbury

Siren

• Learn how to build & bake in an authentic clay oven at Forts Folle Avoine Historical Park, 8 a.m.-2 p.m.

• Northland Beekeepers meeting at the government center, 7 p.m., 715-866-8816 or 715-327-5525. • Country Classic at Crooked Lake Park orchestra shell, 7-9 p.m., 715-349-8399, www.visitsiren.com. • Dining at Five dinner at the senior center, 5 p.m., 715349-2845.

Frederic

• Class of 1970 40th reunion at Coon Lake Park, 4 p.m., 715-472-8356.

Milltown

FRIDAY/2

• Underwater World presentation at the library, 2:15 p.m.

Siren

Cumberland

• Siren Lion/Lioness yard sale donation drop-off day at their building, 9 a.m.-noon, 715-349-2400.

• Dale’s Twin Pines tractor pull, 7 p.m.

Siren

SUNDAY/11

• Fish fry at Burnett Moose Lodge, 5:30-7:30 p.m., 715349-5923.

Centuria

St. Croix Falls

• Atlantis Quartet at the Overlook Deck, 6:30 p.m., music ontheoverlook.com.

SAT. & SUN./3 & 4 Balsam Lake

• Book sale at the Polk County Historical Museum, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Siren

• Freedom Day Celebration, street dance Sat.; parade and fireworks Sun., 715-349-8399.

SATURDAY/3 Balsam Lake

• Freedom Fest craft fair. • Annual book sale at the library, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. • White elephant sale and bake sale at Faith Lutheran Church, 8 a.m.-1 p.m.

Centuria

• Holy Trinity United Methodist Church’s ice-cream social, 1-4 p.m..

Clam Falls

• Pancake breakfast at the Clam Falls Lutheran Church, 8-11 a.m. Bake, craft & plant sale 8-11 a.m.

Danbury

• Ruby’s Pantry at the town maintenance shop, $15 donation. Open 9:30 a.m., distribution 10-11:30 a.m. • Danbury Days parade on Main Street.

Indian Creek

• Lorain Fire Department’s Farm Tractor, Truck Pull, Super mods. 11 a.m.; trucks 2 p.m., 715-653-2649/2566.

Milltown

• Fireworks show at Half Moon Beach, dusk.

• Chicken dinner at Fristad Lutheran Church, 11 a.m. -1 p.m., 715-646-2357.

Yellow mushrooms are growing along the Yellow River at Forts Folle Avoine Historical Park near Danbury. - Photo by Marilyn Blake

Frederic

• Ruby’s Pantry at Danbury maintenance shop, 5-6:30 p.m.

Siren

• Potluck supper at St. Luke’s United Methodist Church, 5:15 p.m. Every Wednesday. • Blood pressure screening at Bremer Bank, 9 a.m.1 p.m.

• Homemade pie & ice cream at the United Methodist Church, 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

Webb Lake

• Firemen’s picnic at the fire hall.

Webster

• Parade on Main St., 1:30 p.m., www.webster wisconsin.com.

Wolf Creek

• Truck/tractor pull at Little Swede’s, 11 a.m., 715-4839255.

MONDAY/5 Balsam Lake

• Indianhead Barbershop Chorus meets at the government center every Monday, 7:30 p.m., 715-483-9202.

TUESDAY/6 Amery

• The Swedish Club meets at Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 7 p.m., 715-269-5307, www.foreverswedish.org.

Clam Falls

• Coffee hour at Clam Falls Lutheran Church, 9 a.m.

Frederic

SUNDAY/4 • Music by Northern Lights at Skonewood Christian Retreat Center, 7 p.m.

• Nature’s Little Explorers at Crex, 10-11:30 a.m., 715463-2739, Alison.Cordie@wisconsin.gov.

Danbury

• Wild rice pancake breakfast at the Fort, 8 a.m.12:30 p.m., 715-866-8890, www.theforts.org.

Falun

• Pie & ice-cream social at Trinity Lutheran Church, 1-3 p.m.

Danbury

• Family bluegrass/gospel band at Birchwood Beach Resort, 10 a.m.

• Frederic Area Historical Society meeting at the Soo Line Depot, 6:30 p.m., 715-327-4892, 715-327-4271.

Cushing

Happenings in the Upper St. Croix Valley communities

Grantsburg Luck

• Music in the Park - Wilson Family Singers, 6:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY/7 Balsam Lake

• Author Dennis Weidemann - “This Water Goes North” slide show & signing at the library, 7 p.m.

Frederic

THURS.-SAT./8-10 Spooner

• Heart of the North Rodeo.

Webster

• Central Burnett County Fair. Horse pull, Thurs. 7 p.m.; truck/tractor pull, Fri. 6:30 p.m.; demo derby, Sat. 7 p.m., 715-866-8261, www.centralburnettcountyfair.org.

THURSDAY/8

Eureka Center

• Alumni and Friends of the Pleasant Valley School picnic, on the school grounds. Potluck lunch at 1 p.m. Please bring lawn chair.

Siren

• Head Injury Support Group at Siren Covenant Church, 1-2:30 p.m., 715-349-8985.

St. Croix Falls

• Friends of Kent’s 2nd-annual Garden Tour, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., www.kentsplants.com, 715-483-1775.

MONDAY/12 Osceola

• Indianhead Barbershop Chorus guest night at United Methodist Church, 7:30 p.m.

St. Croix Falls

• Bloodmobile at the SCRMC west employee parking lot, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., 651-465-5543.

TUESDAY/13 Grantsburg

Siren

• Nature’s Little Explorers at Crex, 10-11:30 a.m., 715463-2739, Alison.Cordie@wisconsin.gov.

Webster

• Music in the Park - Danville Singers Contemporary Folk, 6:30 p.m.

FRI. & SAT./9 & 10

WEDNESDAY/14

• Burnett County Relay for Life at the high school, 5 p.m. start.

• VFW Ladies Auxiliary will meet at the VFW Hall, 715656-4040. • Senior picnic at Crooked Lake Park, 11:30 a.m.

• Crossed Paths at Crooked Lake Park orchestra shell, 79 p.m., 715-349-8399, www.visitsiren.com. • Dining at 5 at the senior center, 5 p.m., 715-866-5300.

Webster

FRIDAY/9 Danbury

• Dinner at the Fort, 5:30 p.m., 715-866-8890, www.theforts.org.

Luck

Siren

Webster

• Fibromyalgia meeting at Burnett Community Library, 5-7 p.m., 715-866-7697.

Grantsburg

THURSDAY/15

Siren

• Author Dennis Weidemann - “This Water Goes North,” at the library, 7 p.m., 715-327-4979.

St. Croix Falls

• Kevin McMullin & Chris Clemments at Crooked Lake Park orchestra shell, 7-9 p.m., 715-349-8399, www.visitsiren.com.

• Stargazing at Crex Meadows, 7:30-11 p.m. • Fish fry at Burnett Moose Lodge, 5:30-7:30 p.m., 715349-5923. • Summertime Folk Singers at the Overlook Deck, 6:30 p.m., musicontheoverlook.com.

Frederic Siren

Creativity Camp for ages 5 - 12 ST. CROIX FALLS - Space remains available at Creativity Camp for youth ages 5 to 12. This unique day camp is hosted at two locations in Polk County and one site in Minnesota. Creativity Camp is a weeklong day camp experience that immerses youth in arts exploration with environmental themes. The camp is an arts education initiative designed by Festival Theatre. “Our philosophy is focused on building arts skills while encouraging individual creative growth,” says Amy Klein, education director at Festival Theatre. “Teaching artists in the disciplines of performing, visual and literary art work together around a single theme and campers are invited into the process of making art rather than a product-based approach.” With funding support from the Hugh J. Andersen Foundation, The RiverBank, the Xcel Energy Foundation, Polk-Burnett

Project Round Up, Wal-Mart and individual donors, Creativity Camp prices are kept affordable at $85 per child per week of camp. Festival Theatre has four more weeks of camp remaining this summer in three sites: St. Croix Falls Elementary School (July 12-16 and/or July 19-23); Camp Ojiketa in Chisago City, Minn. (July 26-30) and Clear Lake Community Center (Aug. 16-20). Participating teaching artists include Christian DeMarais and Kaija Pellinen from the cast of “To Fool the Eye” as well as Amy Klein and Tibbe Luell from the Festival Arts program. For additional information or to register for Creativity Camp, please call the Festival Theatre box office at 715-483-3387 or 888-887-6002 or visit festivaltheatre.org Web site where you can read more about camp, download a registration form, or complete an online order. - from Festival Theatre

June 30  

Newspaper serving NW Wisconsin

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