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VOL. 25 NO. 13 MARCH 30, 2012

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LB Fire Chief Retires

FINAL RAYS

BY JONATHAN VAN DYKE STAFF WRITER

In the latter half of the 1980s, Alan Patalano saw fire and emergency services working an accident rescue scene on television. He was a man who liked a system, and he was floored by the organizational nature of the rescue amidst the chaos of the scene. About 30 years later, that same man will retire from the Long Beach Fire Department. He has given 30 years to emergency service, with 27 in the fire sector. He climbed the ladder of the LBFD for 22 years until he became Fire Chief in May 2010. “I think the reality for me is that there was no one thing on a day that made me say I have to retire,” he said, sitting in a conference room the LBFD headquarters Tuesday. “It just ends up being more of a cumulative thing.” Patalano, 53, was a journeyman glazer (“A glass guy”) before witnessing his future pro-

—Gazette photo by Kevin Oules

Casting a reflection on the water in Rainbow Harbor, the sun sets as a few clouds linger on the horizon last week behind the Lion’s Club Lighthouse in downtown Long Beach

(Continued on Page 8)

Future Bright At Fingerprints Hosts More Live Pulse Of The Port BY JONATHAN VAN DYKE STAFF WRITER

STAFF WRITER

INSIDE Y O U R DOWNTOWN

STORIES

Infrastructure, capacity and exports dominated talk during Wednesday’s annual Pulse of the Port. Port of Long Beach stakeholders met at the Hyatt Regency to listen to a number of leaders and top minds attempt to forecast where the industry is heading and how well it might do during peak season — the time between July and October each year. “It’s a real privilege for us to host this event,” said Susan Wise, port board president. “We plan on being the port of choice by being the port of the future, today.” Wise cited the fact that the port and companies there employ one in eight jobs in Long Beach and officials have committed to $4.5

billion in future capital expenditures for it. Port Executive Director J. Christopher Lytle said he sees positive economic signs for the future, and noted that the port was building its infrastructure to be able to handle bigger business. “I think overall we have a pretty good outlook,” he said. To help illustrate the need for that larger infrastructure, Erxin Yao, president of OOCL USA, noted that largest container ships that are being developed could carry the Empire State Building and were as long as six jumbo jets. His company’s shipping orders are now 50% ships that will be 10,000 TEUs (twenty-foot equivalent units) or larger and they will be phasing out the older (Continued on Page 5)

SARJEANT INTERIM POLICE CHIEF .............. Page 3 PARKING TICKET COLLECTION TROUBLE ..... Page 4 CITY COLLEGE ANNOUNCES CUTS ............ Page 9 PLAYS FIGHT DATING VIOLENCE ............... Page 13 BIKERS OUT TO SCAVENGE ...................... Page 16

FIND US ONLINE AT: WWW.GAZETTES.COM

—Gazette photo by Jonathan Van Dyke

LIVE FROM THE RECORD STORE. The band Lost in the Trees plays last week as Fingerprints, 420 E. Fourth St.

as it grows into the larger space. Foo Fighters caused a stir last year when the alternative rock band played the store during Record Store Day. In the last month, music legends Lou Reed and Brian Wilson have stopped by.

COLU M N S

BY JONATHAN VAN DYKE

Each member of the Lost in the Trees sextet could be seen shaking hands, chatting or signing — preaching to the newly converted. Just a day earlier, March 20, the band had released its second studio album, “A Church That Fits Our Needs.” That Wednesday night, they performed a good chunk of the album to a hushed crowd in Fingerprints Record Store. At one point, band point man Ari Picker got comfortable enough to ask the crowd if they had any questions. “We’re not from here, but it’s always awesome when you find places like this,” Picker said after the performance and some meetand-greeting. “They’re always rare, few and far between.” Fingerprints has been at its 420 E. Fourth Street location for more than a year now, and its in-store performances have built in stature

/gazette.newspapers

Building a reputation and relationships can be a big part of drawing big names to the record store, owner Rand Foster said. A good example of that was when the band fun. had its first record (Continued on Page 5)

A PINCH OF SALT ........................... Page 2 BUSINESS BEAT .............................. Page 15 CALENDAR .................................... Page 19 CLASSIFIED ADS ............................. Page 20 SO MOVED ................................... Page 11

/LBGazetteNews

/grunionlb

Please recycle this newspaper.


PAGE 2 | GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS | March 30, 2012

GAZETTE COMMENTARY

Youth Inspire Need To Push For Schools Did you go to the 2012 Most Inspiring Students Awards Dinner last night (Thursday)? You should have been there. In fact, everyone should see and get to know these amazing youngsters. It would be a good idea to video this event and send it to every legislator in the state. Better yet, let’s send it to every voter in the state. It’s important because these are the success stories of our public education system. And trust us, they don’t succeed because our schools are providing the Cadillac version of education. They succeed because they — and their families, teachers and school administrators — value a good education and are willing to work for it. We bemoan how our students today must battle larger classes, fewer alternatives, even a tougher environment — and we’re right. But that kind of obstacle pales in comparison to what these kids face on a daily basis. We’re talking about lifethreatening diseases, families torn apart by tragedies, profound learning disabilities and more. Yet these youngsters turn up day after day, asking only for a chance to learn. Watching them is a humbling experience. We should take a lesson here. The kind of perseverance these students demonstrate is a requirement in life today, let alone education. Where there’s a will, there’s a way. If Jose “Nacho” Cruz can overcome hearing loss, many surgical procedures and their aftermath to make it back to Cleveland Elementary School, surely we can overcome economic hard times to provide him with the learning he hungers for. If Jordyn Carpenter can fight and deal with Type I Diabetes, diagnosed when she was 5 years old, to become a dedicated, inspiring fifth grader, we should be able to deal with shifting revenue sources and even the need to pay a little more to make sure Gant Elementary is ready to help Jordyn succeed. Many, make that most, of the stories told Thursday night avoid specifics. There will be a lot of “despite obstacles she faced” and “overcoming adversities in his life.” Those generalities are part of a sometimes-misguided effort to spare the students, to not remind them of their particular situation. In reality, it spares the audience. Those youngsters don’t have to

be reminded of their situations — they live with them every day, and typically handle them with more calm and grace than the adults around them. But there’s another reason as well — the teachers and administrators who nominate these students do so primarily because of the focus their nominees put on education. They want to learn and succeed, and that is inspiring. Why? Well, just compare that attitude with the “it’s too much bother to attend, much less pay attention” approach there sadly is so much of these days. Those are the students who seem to expect to get an education through osmosis. Moreover, those kids usually come from families who believe they’re entitled to free education, lots of government services and more without paying taxes. It takes more work to help these inspirational students and those like them. More often than not, it takes the time for some one-on-one attention, and that is becoming harder and harder to do as resources dwindle.

“They succeed because they — and their families, teachers and school administrators — value a good education.” But educators make the time, because the students want so badly to learn. And when they do, the celebration is meaningful. We as a society clearly are facing challenges and obstacles to educating our next generation. It would be easy enough to succumb to those challenges, to give up and just get by. But if we do that, we will find ourselves in a never-ending spiral down through the malaise of mediocrity to the despair of failure. These youngsters, these Most Inspirational Students, had that choice as well. But they declined to take the easy way out, and their teachers and families agreed with that choice. So last night, we celebrated the triumph of the over-achiever, and applauded the ones who persevere. Let’s take a lesson from what we see. Let’s get up and get to work, no matter what obstacles stand in our way. These students, and all the rest, deserve no less.

Thoughts Of Spring Eternal Spring has sprung at the Saltzgaver spread. For a change, the growing period and the calendar has managed to coincide. I put the tomatoes in the ground on March 23, just two days after it said First Day of Spring on the picture-and-date thing hanging near the back door. I was in a hurry to plant because I wanted to take advantage of the rain forecasted for the weekend. (Have you seen the price of water lately? It’s not gasoline, but still.) And this time, they got it right. My newly-planted tomatoes, along with a baby blackberry bush and a few cute leaves promising a cantaloupe got the predicted soaking and were low enough they didn’t suffer from the wind. I have to admit, I was in a hurry though. The rest of the Saltzgaver plants had decided the last warm spell the first week in March was really spring. I have four different rose bushes that have bloomed out, and the apple tree already is past blossoms and has maybe a hundred little green apples on its twigs. I actually had to mow the lawn last week because of the grass instead of the blowing leaves – I use the mower to mulch them. And yes, I broke down and turned the sprinklers on. Five minutes for each zone, twice a week. (I did mention the cost of water, didn’t I?) I’ve said before how much I enjoy the spring — both the reality and the idea. The reality has always meant baseball, warmth, summer around the corner. The idea has changed a bit

Two Is Enough

To The Editor, Let me see if I can say this loud enough, so termed-out candidates

more over the years. It’s always meant the beginning of new life — chicks, ducklings, lambs, colts, calves. I’ve tried growing things on and off for the last 30 years or more. To go back to the baseball metaphor, it’s said that hope springs eternal, and every team has a chance on the first day of the season. Since I was a small child, Easter has been a part of spring. I still have memories of getting the new suit for church, the egg hunt, the ham dinner at Grandma’s house. Easter was the one Sunday a year my parents went to church. They’d tell me they believed in God, and in fact made sure I went to catechism, but they just didn’t have time for church. They heard no complaints from me. Sunday mornings meant no school and time to play. As I grew into adulthood, my ideas about Easter got a little more complex. I still remember an Easter with my son Alex’s mom. We were living in Colorado, and went down to a place called Chaco Canyon, on a Navaho reservation in New Mexico. There were ancient ruins there, and we got up in time to watch the Easter sunrise over them. There was no ceremony, only a few people. But it was a spiritual experience. After another 20 years or so, I discovered God. Or rather, He hit

for City Council hear it. Long Beach voters/residents want term limits for reasons that have been spelled out numerous

Corrections A story in the March 16 Uptown Gazette incorrectly said the North Long Beach Business Alliance meets on the second Wednesday of every month. The correct day is the last Wednesday of every month. Last week’s Uptown Gazette incorrectly stated that Eighth District City Council candidate Lillian Kawasaki graduated from California State University, Long Beach. She graduated from California State University, Los Angeles.

me over the head with a 2x4 and made me start paying attention to Him. I had learned my catechism well, and was sure I knew all the ins and outs of Palm Sunday, Good Friday and Easter Sunday. After all, I’d seen the movie. But a few years of study showed me I didn’t know as much as I thought I did (funny how it works that way). With help, I discovered what it really meant to sacrifice. Could I die for my fellow man? I’d like to think I could make that sacrifice for my loved ones. But could I extend that “loved ones” to all humankind, as Christ did? Somehow, I doubt it. Then there’s the greatest promise of all, the real reason we celebrate Easter. It’s called the resurrection, and we believe it promises eternal life. Yes, I’m well aware of the Reason Rally that took place last week in Washington, D.C. I’ve got no problem with that, and if you know me, you know I’m not trying to shove religion down your throat or claiming you are less because you are not a believer. I will say, though, that I’d like you to explore my side of the story over the next 10 days or so. I’m inviting you to my church, or a church near you, to explore the story of Palm Sunday, Good Friday and Easter Sunday. It’s spring, after all, and time for a new beginning. It won’t hurt. Promise. Think about it.

times. The sun will rise tomorrow if you are not on the council. Go on with your lives. Be glad you had the opportunity. Council is not your life. Your family, your occupation, your friends are. How arrogant does one have to be, to actually attempt to backdoor more terms on the City Council against the wishes of Long Beach voters? Good question. Robert Van der Upwich Long Beach


March 30, 2012 | GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS | PAGE 3

Sarjeant Tapped For Interim Fire Chief City Manager Patrick West announced Wednesday that Deputy Chief Mike Sarjeant has been named the Long Beach Fire Department’s interim fire chief. Fire Chief Alan Patalano’s last day will be April 6. Sarjeant, a 25-year veteran of fire services, will take over the next day. He currently is in charge of the Operations Bureau, a post he has held since June of 2010. “Deputy Chief Mike Sarjeant is a highly capable leader with a wide range of experience, and I am confident that he will do an excellent job in this role,” West said in a release. The City Manager’s Office currently is working on hiring his replacement — it will look at internal and external candidates, officials said, and the process will take about three months. Patalano said it was good to open up the search nationally, but that he was confident there likely would be no one who knew the department better than his command staff. “You are going to have to be acutely sensitive in balancing what you believe fire protection should be with what the citizens are able to afford,” he said. “The chief also has to be sensitive to his employees. This workforce has been under a lot of pressure for the last few years. The statement that we’re asking you to do more with less really is true.”

Rex Pritchard, president of Firefighters Association Local 372, said his union was looking for a good leader. “I think that is probably the most important thing,” he said. “The budget is the budget. The next fire chief won’t be able to increase revenue. As far as the next, we need someone who can rebuild morale with our membership and someone who can tap into their discretionary effort. They need to help lead firefighters who have somewhat been demoralized from what has occurred during the past few years.” Budget hearings begin in August. Should the new fire chief be chosen before then, he or she likely will deal with a projected $1.1 million budget deficit. Patalano said his staff would have no problem bridging the gap. “In this environment here with lots of stress on us and shrinking personnel, we’ve learned a really good collaborative responsibility,” he said. Until a new chief is chosen, Sarjeant will lead. He joined the LBFD in 1986 and has been a firefighter, paramedic/firefighter, captain and battalion chief. “I have enjoyed every assignment and position I have held in the fire service, and I will continue to do my professional and personal best for the Long Beach Fire Department in this role,” he said in a statement.

Zen Meditation Group Celebrates Anniversary With “Zazenkai” Day The Long Beach Zen Meditation Group will celebrate its second anniversary Saturday with a full day of Zen Meditation and a special lecture. The day, known as a Zazenkai, runs from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Neighborhood United Methodist Church, 507 Pacific Ave. During a Zazenkai, those attending remain silent and meditate for several half hour periods. The public is invited to the whole day or just parts. There is no charge, but donations will be accepted. For those staying for vegetarian lunch, registration is requested with a refundable $50 donation. Zen Master Charles Tenshin, Roshi, will speak at 11 a.m. on “Negotiating the Way” and answer questions after his talk. The Long Beach Zen Meditation Group is affiliated with Yokoji-Mountain Zen Center near Idyllwild. The public is welcome at regular weekly sessions at 7 p.m. Thursday and 9 a.m. Satur-

day at the Neighborhood United Methodist Church. Their website is www.zmc.or/longbeach.

First Books Presents Schipske As Guest Reader Fifth District Councilwoman Gerrie Schipske is the guest reader at First Books at First Fridays from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. next Friday, April 6, at the Dana Branch Library, 3680 Atlantic Ave.

Seventh District Councilman James Johnson hosts First Books each month as part of First Fridays in Bixby Knolls. Johnson and his guests read their favorite children’s books and this month

there also will be scavenger hunt in the library with prizes. The Big Red Bus will make a pick-up outside the library at 6:30 p.m. to transport people to other First Fridays activities.


PAGE 4 | GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS | March 30, 2012

Outdated Parking Ticket System Costs Millions BY HARRY SALTZGAVER EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Long Beach’s software program is so antiquated it makes it virtually impossible to collect on unpaid parking tickets, costing as much as $6 million a year.

That’s the conclusion of the most recent audit of the system performed by City Auditor Laura Doud. She and Mayor Bob Foster conducted a press conference Tuesday to call on the City Council to spend the money necessary

to update the system as soon as possible. “It’s no secret we are looking for solutions, particularly in revenue,” Foster said. “We are operating (ticket collection) with very bad technology. We’re never go-

ing to collect 100%, but we can surely do much better than we’re doing now… Even if we could collect $2.5 million more a year, thats 21 more police officers on the streets.” Doud said this audit is a followup to an audit in 2008 that also showed $18 million in unpaid tickets, with $11.7 million owed by people with five or more unpaid tickets. The difference now is there is $18 million unpaid on tickets less than three years old — still considered collectable. “The main reason we aren’t collecting is that the city system is outdated and unreliable,” Doud said. “Our employees are working very hard, but they’re shorthanded and they are doing by hand what an updated system could do automatically… It’s not even compatible with the DMV (Department of Motor Vehicles). We did a test of 200 serial offenders and found that vehicle registration information was inaccurate in 86% of the cases.”

Doud said the city currently writes 345,000 citations in a year, and already collects about $13 million. Collections are handled by the Commercial Services Bureau in the Financial Management Department using software that dates to 2000. “We’re only one of two cities left using this system,” Doud said. “We must act swiftly to get a new, upgraded software… We are asking the City Council to begin the process to get a scope of work on what it will take to implement a new system.” Doud admitted that it likely would take a year or more to have a new system in place, but said it was important to start the effort quickly, without months of study by a council committee. After the 2008 audit, the city tried a “Denver Boot” system to incapacitate cars of scofflaws until tickets were paid. The trial showed that to be labor intensive and ineffective for collections, Foster said. “We’re not going to let this sit,” Foster said. “It’s not fair to all those who follow the rules and pay their tickets on time while others game the system. Every year, about one third of the tickets written aren’t collected. We just have to improve that.” Foster said this was another example of the city trying to find every efficiency in its operation, adding that he could not support requesting any form of tax increase from the public until those efficiencies were exhausted. There currently are 8.5 positions in the parking citation collection program. Last year, it cost $1.03 million to collect $13.07 million in revenue.

Police Seek Man Who’s Truck Killed One In Hit-And-Run Police are seeking a man for running over and killing another man shortly after midnight Friday. According to witnesses, a green Dodge pickup truck was travelling north in the 1100 block of Stanley Avenue at about 12:50 a.m. Saturday when it struck a parked car. A witness to the accident, Von Creng, 27 of Long Beach, tried to flag down the driver of the truck, described only as an adult male. Detectives say they believe that instead of stopping, the driver aimed the truck at Creng and accelerated. The truck struck Creng and dragged him for a short distance and struck three more parked vehicles. The driver left the truck and fled the scene on foot. Fire Department paramedics responded, but declared Creng dead at the scene of the accident. Accident detectives responded, then called in homicide detectives. Anyone with information about the incident is asked to call Homicide Detectives Hugo Cortes or David Rios at 570-7244. Anonymous tips may be submitted via text or web by visiting www.tipsoft.com. —Harry Saltzgaver


March 30, 2012 | GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS | PAGE 5

Fingerprints (Continued from Page1)

release in-store several years back. That same band returned this month, despite having every major radio station in Los Angeles playing their single “We Are Young.” “When they first came to us, they didn’t know this record was going to be as big as it was,” Foster said. “It was good karma that

Port Pulse (Continued from Page 1)

and smaller ships. “Economy of scale is key to survival,” he said. He also said that OOCL expects low, but sustainable growth in the U.S. this year and that they are moderately optimistic for the 2012 peak season numbers. Infrastructure for railway also was discussed at length, with experts emphasizing the need to make it easier to connect the San Pedro Bay area to the rest of the coast and inland America — much of the progress there is being driven by private investments. Right now, there are about 60 weekly train departures from the area, said Peter Peyton, vice president of ILWU 63. John Kaiser, vice president/ general manager of Intermodal, Union Pacific Railroad, said his company has invested $1.5 billion in rail during the last five years. In 2003, they had 32% double-track from San Pedro Bay to El Paso (which can move cargo to three other major markets), but by the end of 2012 that will have risen to 72%. “We have capacity available today for growth,” he said. Those concerned with the terminal and trucking industry both lauded and expressed concern moving forward. “Scaling up for seasonal demands can be done quickly,” said Bruce Wargo, secretary of West Coast Marine Terminal Operators Agreement. Wargo added that 88% of trucks take less than two hours in

we did so well with them the first time.” In-store performances weren’t foreign to Fingerprints when it was on Second Street, but Foster said it is easier to get permission for them now — and the new building is more suited to large crowds with two separate rooms for performances. “Because it is in a redevelopment area in the city, they are a lot more liberal with what they

can do and what the permit department’s comfort level is,” he said. The city’s Business Relations Bureau and Foster have been working on coming up with a permanent type of permit for the in-stores — right now he is operating with a temporary one. There isn’t much of a precedent for a business that only has music once in a while, and does not serve food or alcohol, he added.

the terminals, but that his industry was still looking for ways to improve that, including eliminating more trouble tickets. However, Robert Curry Sr., president of California Cartage Company, said his industry is still suffering under increased regulations — mainly the fact that drivers can only be driving for 11 straight hours. That puts an impetus to get in and out of terminals even faster, he said, as he showed a driver log that had a stay in a terminal of more than 6 hours. “Every driver we have in Southern California — we need them to make more turns,” he said, noting they will work with terminals and labor to help with the problem. For overall outcomes, Walter

Kemmsies, chief economist at Moffatt & Nichol, said he believes this year’s peak season will be better than last year’s. Last year, exports were up 7.3% and imports were up .7% — despite domestic sales increases that would have implied better import numbers. “It’s only the last few years that exports have become the in-thing,” said Peter Friedmann, executive director of The Agriculture Transportation Coalition. “We all need to understand the importance of the export.”

“It’s not our intention to compete with Alex’s or Harvelle’s, places like that — those other places that do such a good job,” he said. “We want to do this to help sell records for these guys who are coming through.” The idea of the in-store performance, however, is even more important than when the store was located on Second Street, Foster said. “On Second Street, there was such a built-in walk-in traffic,” he said. “We really wanted to make sure people had a reason to come here. It’s a good store, so if people come in, they’ll find something they like.” Big acts are fun, he added, but the bread and butter of the instore is the opposite of that. “We’ve always set out to make an impression,” he said. “We want you to find you new favorite band here.” The Fingerprints email list is more than 10,000 strong — which makes for a large number of people that can be exposed to a new

band. For an invite to an in-store performance, people are encouraged to sign up for the newsletter and call the store to RSVP. Foster often holds RSVPs for people who buy that band’s record first. The high ceilings and brick walls, with adjustable lighting, leaves plenty of room for patrons to sit up close or back off when the bands are performing. “This isn’t a place to come and walk out with your ears ringing,” Foster said. “That’s not how we listen to music. Come here, be in an intimate setting, be up close with the artists.” The setting can be a bit of a relief to artists, Picker said, as he and his band prepared to play the echoplex the next day. “It is not quite as overwhelming and you get to meet more people,” he said. “At the club, there are so many people, sometimes I just lock myself in the green room. I can talk to people here without screaming, which is nice.” For details, go to www.FingerprintsMusic.com


PAGE 6 | GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS | March 30, 2012

VERIZON AND THE LONG BEACH EDUCATION FOUNDATION ARE HONORED TO PRESENT

the 2012 Most In spir ing Students Awa r d s The Long Beach Education Foundation annually honors a most inspiring student from each school in the district. This year’s winners were honored last night, Thursday, at a banquet at the Hilton Hotel. Here are the 2012 Most Inspiring Students.

LOGAN YIN

LESLIE ZAVALETA

KEELY-SHAE SAPIGA

JOSE ANGEL ARCHILA

Grade: 4 Addams Elementary

Grade: 3 Alvarado Elementary

Grade: 5 Barton Elementary

Grade: 4 Bethune Transitional Center

Leslie Zavaleta is a student who is intrinsically motivated toward success.

Keely-Shae goes the extra mile in her learning, loves a challenge, is an excellent role model, and is so caring and helpful to others.

Jaaron Oshitelu is a hard working student and he enjoys helping his classmates with their classwork.

With the passing of his mother who had been ill for years, Jose’s family finds inner strength to rebuild their lives one day at a time.

DANIIL SHAPLOV

MELANIE MORALES

LY-HORNG MUON

JENNIFER LEWIS

Grade: 1 Birney Elementary

Grade: 5 Bixby Elementary

Grade: 2 Bryant Elementary

Logan Yin, with his bright smile, inspires all of us who know him by his great attitude about life.

Jennifer Lewis is an exceptional scholar and leader who strives for excellence in all that she does.

Daniil is very focused and passionate about his education. He has become a role model for all.

KAYLA ERIKSEN

JAARON OSHITELU

JAYLEN MCWILLIAMS

JOSE CRUZ

Grade: 5 Burbank Elementary Melanie Morales has a great attitude and loves to learn.

JOEL DE JESUS FLORES-BARBA

Grade: 4 Burnett Elementary Ly-Horng Muon has faced the toughest fear of all, becoming a role model for everyone in her school.

ANDY BARRERA

Grade: 5 Carver Elementary School

Grade: 2 Chavez Elementary School

Grade: 5 Cleveland Elementary School

Grade: 5 Dooley Elementary School

Grade:3 Edison Elementary School

Kayla Eriksen is a kind and considerate young girl who brings a smile to everyone’s face.

Jaylen’s ability to keep a smile on his face and maintain a positive attitude is inspiring to everyone at Chavez.

Cleveland beams with pride at all that Jose “Nacho” Cruz has accomplished. He is our inspiration!

Joel’s hard work and efforts to reach grade level proficiency his first year in the country are awe-inspiring.

Andy Barrera has shown tremendous courage and is a great example of a Most Inspiring Student!

HANNAH-LYNN SAMANIEGO

GABRIEL GONZALEZ

JORDYN CARPENTER

RAELLE QUIÑONES

EMILEE WILLERFORD

Grade: 5 Emerson Elementary School

Grade: 5 Fremont Elementary School

Grade: 5 Gant Elementary School

Grade: 5 Garfield Elementary School

Grade: 5 Grant Elementary School

Raelle Quiñones empowers herself and is succeeding in school, becoming an inspiration to everyone around her.

Emilee has overcome so much. Her ever-positive personality and empathetic attitude are continually reaching out to those around her

Jordyn has proven to be inspiring to others and dedicated to success throughout her daily life.

Hannah is a model of a young scholar. She is self motivated, willing to work hard and set goals, then meets them at every turn.

Gabriel Gonzalez describes himself as a Phoenix because he came back to life!

ANTHONY GALVAN

VICTOR SALAS

LUIS DESANTIAGO

VERONICA JURADO

MICHELLE HOPKINS

Grade: 4 Harte Elementary School

Grade: 3 Holmes Elementary School

Grade: 5 International Elementary School

Grade: 5 Keller Elementary School

Grade: 2 Kettering Elementary School

Anthony has flourished to become a true scholar, a caring individual and a true inspiration to all!

Victor, keep your thoughts fixed on the positive aspects of life and with your inner strength, you will succeed at any task.

Luis DeSantiago is a shining star at International Elementary due to his passion for learning and his strong work ethic.

Veronica Jurado is a motivated leader willing to help others academically and serves on Keller’s Student Council and Safety team.

Michelle is the happiest child ever; full of enthusiasm, she does her best on everything and is always willing to help others.

MARIA TORRES

DALILAH GONZALEZ

CLAUDIA HIPOLITO

MAYBELINE VIANA

Grade: 5 King Elementary School

Grade: 5 Lafayette Elementary School

Grade: 5 Lee Elementary School

Grade: 3 Lincoln Elementary School

Claudia Hipolito’s strength and ability to carry on with a smile and determination is why she is our most inspiring student.

Maria Torres is a goal-oriented and hard working student who is always trying to achieve more.

Perseverance and pride has turned a wonderful student into a model of excellence, as hard work does pay off.

In just one year, Maybeline has taken advantage of every opportunity to help her learn and succeed in school.

DAVID BABATUNDE

TAYLOR BECKWITH

ZOE FARAG

JOSIAH HEGARTY-MANZANARES

DARO THY Grade: 4 Longfellow Elementary School A source of true inspiration and PRIDE, Daro Thy is undoubtedly a “HERO” in his own right.

KYLA WALKER

Grade: 5 Los Cerritos Elementary School

Grade: 5 Lowell Elementary School

Grade: 5 MacArthur Elementary School

Grade: 3 Madison Elementary School

Grade: 2 Mann Elementary School

David has overcome adversity to achieve academic goals and continues to show scholarly traits in class and at play.

Taylor is a young man with a very bright future who has made a conscious decision to live up to his full potential each and every day!

Zoe Farag is a most inspiring student because she’s giving, academically motivated and determined to do her very best every day.

Josiah Hegarty-Manzaners truly shines in class, and his sense of humor keeps us all smiling!

The definition of inspire is to motivate by divine influence and these are words one can use to describe Kyla Walker.

ANETT ESPINOZA

BAILEY JOHNSON

NOLAN O’BRIEN

JOHN HARDISTY

ELIZABETH HONORATO

Grade: 5 McKinley Elementary School

Grade: 5 Naples Elementary School

Grade: 1 Prisk Elementary School

Grade: 3 Riley Elementary School

Grade: 5 Roosevelt Elementary School

Anett’s enthusiasm for school sets an excellent example for others to follow. Nothing gets in her way.

Bailey Johnson inspires others with her smile, positive attitude, hard work, dedication and loving friendship to everyone.

Nolan has taken responsibility for his health and maintains a positive attitude

Gifted child-author, John Hardisty, is a hero to his family and his school.

Elizabeth is a very dedicated student, works beyond what is asked of her, and has nothing but a positive, helpful attitude.

JORDYNN LASSITER Grade: 5 Signal Hill Elementary School Jordynn Lassiter overcomes obstacles every day, yet has maintained a 94% attendance rate over six years at Signal Hill.

RUBEN RIVERA Grade: 2 Stevenson Elementary School Ruben Rivera is inspiring, resilient, and his extra effort has made him an extraordinary student.

HUGO SOLIS Grade: 4 Twain Elementary School Hugo Solis is Twain’s dynamic, resilient, most inspiring student.

TANU KAWSAR

EFRAIN LARA

Grade: 3 Webster Elementary School

Grade: 5 Whittier Elementary School

Tanu Kawsar is truly an inspiring example of how a strong desire to learn and a thirst for knowledge can ovecome any obstacle.

Efrain has overcome challenges to become a successful student and an inspiration to his peers and teachers.


March 30, 2012 | GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS | PAGE 7

VERIZON AND THE LONG BEACH EDUCATION FOUNDATION ARE HONORED TO PRESENT

t h e 2 0 12 Most Insp iring Students Awa rds KYLE DEGENEFFE Grade: 5 Willard Elementary School Kyle Degeneffe has overcome the many obstacles placed in front of him to become a model student at Willard Elementary.

CELESTINA DEL CID Grade: 8

Middle, K-8 Schools DANIEL MAGUIRE

MICHAEL PENULLAR

MIRANDA SPEIRS

STEPHANIE VILLASENOR

Grade: 8 Bancroft Middle School

Grade: 1 Burcham K-8 School

Grade: 8 Butler K-8 School

Michael’s positive attitude and perseverance helped him to overcome a serious illness and enjoy success in middle school.

Miranda is a very smart, vibrant, sweet and responsible first grader who faces life’s challenges with courage and grace.

Stephanie is an exceptionally bright, kind and loveable young lady who possesses all the skills needed to succeed.

PATRICK CHANSY

DERRICK CODY

JERMON HUMPHREY

Grade: 8 Cubberley K-8 School

Grade: 7 Franklin Middle School

Grade: 8 Gompers K-8 School

Grade: 8 Hamilton Middle School

Daniel has endured challenges in the last year that have left the Cubberley staff impressed by his resilience.

Patrick is a true scholar despite the adversities he has been faced with this past year.

Derrick Cody has successfully overcome obstacles and works to reach the highest levels of academic success

Jermon Humphrey is an inspiring success story, and is Hamilton’s Most Inspiring Student for 2012.

EMMANUEL TORRES

SAMANTHA CARR-RICHARDSON

NOAH LEWIS-CURRY

MARY RACHEL ALQUIZOLA

Grade: 8 Henry K-8 School

Grade: 8 Hill Middle School

Patrick Henry K-8 is proud to honor one of its most trustworthy, hard working bilingual scholars, Emmanuel Torres.

Through hard work and dedication, Samantha has overcome great academic obstacles to become a high achiever.

Grade: 8 Hoover Middle School

Grade: 8 Hudson K-8 School

Grade: 8 Hughes Middle School

Noah Lewis-Curry has impressed staff and students with his ability to grow, adapt and propel himself to success.

Mary Rachel Alquizola inspires the Hudson K-8 community with her dedication and perseverance toward school.

Maria Siadto has overcome great personal loss to achieve a 3.83 GPA in accelerated classes.

Constellation Middle School Celestina embodies Constellation’s Guiding Principles, has exemplary conduct and pursues excellence. She is truly an inspiration for her courage!

NATHANIEL BLAINE

JORGE LOPEZ

Grade: 7 Jefferson Middle School

Grade: 8 Lindbergh Middle School

Nathaniel is a diligent and hard working young man who puts forth his best effort on a daily basis.

Jorge Lopez does not let anything get in his way academically or socially. He is truly inspiring! Congratulations, Jorge!

JESUS REGALADO Grade: 5 Muir Academy Jesus Regalado is resilient, inquisitive, caring and certain to attain his goals in life.

SARAI MCKENZIE

ALEJANDRO RODRIGUEZ Grade: 8 Newcomb Academy

ALERO ARUEYINGHO Grade: 8 Lindsey Academy Alero Arueyingho deeply cares about her schoolwork and the feelings of others while maintaining high academic honors.

E’LAYAJA PERDUE Grade: 8 Powell Academy

Alejandro has proven that if one has an important goal in life and are dedicated to it, even exceeding that goal is possible.

E’Layaja exemplifies the Colin Powell traits of being respectful and courageous with integrity and honor while overcoming obstacles.

CANDANCE CANADA

DAVID KORZELIUS

EVELYN PICHARDO

Grade: 4 Monroe K-8 School

Evelyn has been an inspiration because even though she has had a difficult situation, she has continued to thrive academically.

Elizah Davis is successfully exceeding social and academic expectations through hard work and a great attitude.

YANCY ROLDAN

ROCIO REYES

Grade: 5 Robinson Academy

Grade: 8 Rogers Middle School

Through a difficult time, she always maintains a positive attitude and shows great enthusiasm as a scholar.

Rocio Reyes inspires us all with her eagerness to learn, willingness to change, determination to succeed.

ALEX ITEHUA

Grade: 8 Stephens Middle School

Grade: 8 Tincher Preparatory School

Grade: 8 Washington Middle School

Sarai continues to strive for excellence in all that she does despite personal adversity.

With perseverance and a positive attitude, Candance Canada has excelled beyond expectations.

David has grown tremendously as a scholar, always ready to listen and learn, and overcomes all challenges.

Alex, you are an amazing individual, keep up the good work! Thank you for your inspiration,

GIOVANNI ZARRAGA

DEYANIRA CENDEJAS

Grade: 12 Avalon High School

Grade: 10 Beach High School

Grade: 12 Cabrillo High School

Juan Chavoya’s spirit of perseverance has allowed him to thrive, proving to be one of Avalon’s most resilient students.

Giovanni Zarraga has near perfect attendance, is a determined and respectful student.

Deyanira Cendejas has had a period of obstacles. Her resolution to do well inspires her family and friends.

MICHAEL GARCIA

KAESEN WILSON

Grade: 12 Jordan High School

Grade: 12 Lakewood High School

Michael Garcia has overcome tragedies in his life to become a graduate of the Class of 2012 and a future student at CSULB.

Kaesen Wilson, a focused senior, has seen tragedy, but has overcome to become the successful young man he is today.

SAMANTHA GREULICH Grade: 12 PAAL Academy Sammy Jo enjoys learning and is incredibly pleasant. Students and staff alike always enjoy her positive attitude and enthusiasm.

JONATHAN FISK

CATHY RENEE CHEATHAM Long Beach School For Adults She has raised her family and returned to school to get her diploma. She is an inspiration to staff and students with her positive attitude and determination.

MARCOS RODRIGUEZ

Grade: 12 Polytechnic High School

Grade: 12 Reid Continuation High School

Jonathan Fisk is a young man who can find a positive in whatever situation he confronts. He sees life from many perspectives.

Marcos is an excellent role model for his peers, and is a hardworking, focused, determined young man.

ELIZAH DAVIS

Grade: 8 Marshall Middle School

Grade: 8 Stanford Middle School

JUAN CHAVOYA

MARIA SIADTO

KENDALL MELVIN Grade: 12 CAMS Kendall’s positive attitude and disposition provided the foundation for him to persist and achieve in academics and overcome personal challenges.

MARTY ROBINSON

High Schools MARLENE PEREZ Grade: 11 Educational Partnership High School (EPHS) Marlene Perez is dedicated, mature, resilient, bright, inspiring and a future leader of Long Beach.

NALA DAVIS

Grade: 12 Millikan High School

Grade: 12 Millikan High School

Marty Robinson is an inspirational leader who has overcome unbelievable obstacles with the greatest character and integrity.

Nala Davis’s creative abilities shine through in all she does, and is determined to become her very best self no matter what it takes.

MELISSA LEON

MANUELA COLONIA

Grade: 12 Renaissance High School for the Arts Melissa Leon is a model of perseverance as she has turned obstacles into opportunities.

Grade: 12 Wilson High School Manuela Colonia overcame a devastating childhood illness and other challenges to become a Distinguished Scholar.

a


PAGE 8 | GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS | March 30, 2012

Junior League Ladies Host Benefit Fire Chief The ladies of the Junior League of Long Beach will be kicking up their boots at the 2012 Rubies & Rhinestones Hoedown this Saturday, March 31, to raise money for Junior League programs. Rubies & Rhinestones is one of two annual fundraisers for the Junior League of Long Beach, which serves at-risk children in the Long Beach area. The event, which is open to the public, fea-

tures live music, poker, auction items, dinner, dancing and “luck of the draw” opportunity drawings. Participants are encouraged to wear western attire. The hoedown starts at 6:30 p.m. (VIP reception at 5:30 p.m.) at St. Joseph High School (5825 N. Woodruff Ave. in Lakewood) cost $50 (or $75 for VIP). Tickets are available at the door or online at www.JLLB.org.

(Continued from Page 1)

fessions. He ended up spending five years in Escondido as a paramedic and firefighter. He started with the LBFD on Oct. 16, 1989. “That just looked like the thing for me, just everyone went straight to work,” he said. “I really like systems and EMS is largely that … There is a procedure for each treatment, so I love it.” With retirement, he said it was not only time in his mind professionally, but that he probably more than owed it to his family, after working so many late nights and weekends. Patalano has two children, who in turn have produced three grandchildren — they all live in Southern California. Of course, there are other reasons too, he said. “I’ve been in the command staff for half my time in Long Beach — that’s a long, long road,” he added. “If you sat me down and had me list the 10 reasons I got into fire service, I would list all these things and almost none of

them I would have now… It’s been a tough road as chief.” During his time as chief, Patalano has dealt with large budget deficits — more than $5 million last year and a projected budget deficit of $1.1 million this year. He also has had to bury two friends and fellow firefighters — Hank Zavaleta and Darren Rockett. “That really wears on you,” he said. “Is it one thing (causing retirement)? It’s definitely not one thing. I’ve only managed in flat or reduced budgets in my entire time in command staff. If I was going to leave because of that, I would have done so years ago.” During his time in the department, Patalano has dealt with those budget cuts. He also helped develop and implement the Basic Life Support Transportation Program, which cut service times by 3-4 minutes in basic life support circumstances along with working on the reinstatement of the Joint Fire and Police Arson Investigation Task Force. A story that most came to his mind when talking about being

out in the field regarded a call Fire Station 9 received for help in Signal Hill when he was a firefighter paramedic. A mother had found her child drowning in a Jacuzzi. A joint effort — which included Zavaleta — led to saving the child’s life. He still sees the family here and there. “The entire system, from the phone call to when the person is stabilized — the system worked perfectly,” he said. “The best save you can make — a little life with a whole life ahead of them. We made that save. It was perfect teamwork.” Someone will have some large shoes to fill, city officials said. “Chief Patalano has given many years of great leadership and service to our fire department,” Mayor Bob Foster said. “I wish him well in his retirement.” “As far as working together and coming up with solutions for difficult budget issues, he was a pleasure to work with and an extremely brilliant man,” said Rex Pritchard, president of Firefighters Association Local 372. “We’re going to miss him greatly.” Patalano said he was just grateful to everyone else, whether he worked with them or helped them, for being a part of a system that has given him great pride in life. “The citizens of this city have employed me for 22 years,” he said. “I love the trust they have put in firefighters, specifically me, but all the firefighters.”


March 30, 2012 | GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS | PAGE 9

LBCC Proposes Layoffs LBCC Liberal Arts Campus Opens Bookstore To Fight Budget Cuts BY STEPHANIE MINASIAN STAFF WRITER

Long Beach City College administration has decided to propose staffing reductions due to the continuing decline in support from the state and high operating costs. The college will need to make a $5.1 million reduction for the 2012-13 school year, and is preparing to lay off 55 employees and reduce the assignment of 96 additional employees. The reduction also calls for the elimination of 43 classified positions, and management staff will be cut by 12 positions, according to officials. The staffing reductions will be considered at the Board of Trustees regular meeting set for April 24. “Long Beach City College is facing devastating budget cuts that have been imposed on community colleges in California,” said LBCC President Eloy Ortiz Oakley in a release. “Unfortunately, we have no choice but to focus virtually all of this year’s budget cuts on permanent reductions to the number of positions and the length of many staff assignments at LBCC.” This $5.1 million cut comes on the heels of an unanticipated $3.5 million mid-year cut that hit the college this fiscal year, due to property taxes and student fees being less than expected. There might be more to cut

from the budget if Gov. Jerry Brown’s tax plan fails to pass on the November ballot. If this happens, LBCC will need to prepare for additional $4.8 million reduction. “I am painfully aware of the human ramifications of the recommendations that are being forced upon us by declining support from the state,” Oakley added, “but LBCC will continue to serve our local community to the best of our abilities and provide an excellent and affordable college education to as many students as possible.” The last three years at LBCC have been tough, and has seen $7.2 million in reductions to the college, which amounts to a 7.4% reduction in overall allocation from the state, according to LBCC officials. LBCC has discontinued the search to fill the Dean of Career Education and Workforce Development, along with the suspension of two contract faculty positions. Also on the chopping block is the Digital Medical Imaging faculty search and the Cyber Security/Computer Forensics faculty search, since it is a new initiative that doesn’t have a funding source. Oakley added that he plans to work with LBCC’s College Planning Committee and leadership team, to come to the tough budgetary decisions in the coming months.

Long Beach City College students at the Liberal Arts Campus have a new place to get their textbooks, school supplies and Viking gear. LBCC’s new bookstore opened Tuesday at what was the City College Foundation building, at the corner of Faculty Avenue and Harvey Way. The work was paid for with the Measure E bond issue approved by voters for a number of campus improvements. The $2 million project doubles the size of the bookstore, from 4,000 to 8,999 square feet. A new

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entrance and loading dock was created to help screen residential neighbors from any potential noise or lights, according to LBCC spokesman Mark Taylor. “We are delighted that our students will now enjoy a first class bookstore with all the necessary amenities,” LBCC President Eloy Ortiz Oakley said in a release. “The new store includes data stations for book references and purchases, and is much more efficient and functional.” Everything inside and outside the store is new, Taylor said, from

the fiber-optic computer wiring to the landscaping. “It will carry primarily campus textbooks, school supplies and Viking-branded merchandise,” Taylor said. “There’s also a limited inventory of Apple hardware and software sold at the educator rate.” The bookstore is open five days a week — 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 7:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Friday. For more information or to search the bookstore online, go to www.lbccbookstore.com.


PAGE 10 | GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS | March 30, 2012

Gazette Staffers Nab Fellowships Two Gazette Newspapers staffers were selected this week to participate in a 2012 Education Reporting Fellowship through New America Media. Editor Ashleigh Oldland and Staff Writer Stephanie Minasian both will participate in the paid six-month fellowship, which is funded by the California Education Policy Fund (CEPF). There were six people chosen for the competitive fellowship. The two women will each write one major education story each month for New America Media as well as weekly blog entries. The articles will be published by New America Media and made available afterwards at Gazettes.com as well. New America Media, the country’s first and largest national collaboration and advocate for more than 2,000 ethnic news organizations, is based in San Francisco. The nonprofit Pacific News Service founded it in 1996.

Fremont Elementary Girl Inspires With Attitude BY STEPHANIE MINASIAN STAFF WRITER

Emilee Willerford’s beaming smile and positive mindset makes it hard to believe that the fifth grader at John C. Fremont Elementary School has had a rough, emotional year. The 10-year-old recently was named Fremont’s Most Inspiring Student, and was honored Thursday night alongside 90 other Long Beach Unified School District students who have shown exemplary strength and bravery in the face of extraordinary life challenges at the annual Most Inspiring Student Awards. Willerford is no exception. She’s spent several years moving around Long Beach and Orange County, until she eventually settled at Fremont Elementary to start third grade nearly two years ago. Things took an unfortunate turn for the worse, and Willerford’s mother passed away last summer. To help give her strength, Willerford keeps a photograph of her

mother by her bedside, she said. “It is hard, but the best thing to do when you’re going to sleep or just waking up, is to just say a prayer,” Willerford said. “I have this picture by my bed of her, and I will sit there and talk to the photo and feel closer to her — like’s she’s not gone anymore.” Despite the hurdles she’s cleared during the last year, Willerford has not let her grades slip, and she believes that staying focused in school and being close with her teachers also helps her get through hard days. “My teachers have inspired me so much,” she said with a smile. “They’ve inspired me to become a teacher or possibly a psychologist. I want to help other kids out with tough times, and solve problems and educate.” She claims her favorite subject is math and enjoys playing the clarinet in her spare time. Willerford said that she finally found a core group of friends to trust and have fun with — something that was hard to find when she was

moving around as a youngster — and is looking forward to starting sixth grade next year at Rogers Middle School with all of her friends. “Emilee was chosen because through her young life, she’s had these difficult challenges in her family life,” said Fremont Principal Matt Hammond. “But, she’s found people who really love and care for her. Through it all, she’s remained positive. She’s a positive friend to others, and you would really never notice that she may be having difficulties because she has the right attitude about things.” The young lady, whose smiling cheeks are dusted with freckles, said that she hopes other students experiencing tragic challenges will remain upbeat and continue doing the things that make them happy. “Keep studying,” she advised. “Try to find things to get it off your mind. Make sure to talk about things, because if you don’t, it gets kept inside and it

EMILEE WILLERFORD

could explode.” The Long Beach Education Foundation presents the Most Inspirational Student Awards each year to recognize those students who have found ways to conquer their hardships, said Long Beach Foundation Executive Director Judy Seal. “They’ve gone through so much, yet they make it look easy,” Seal said. “They inspire their friends, teachers and families. They show tremendous strength and continue with their education.” The evening, themed “Superheroes,” included dinner and music from the Wilson High School jazz band and soloists Diana Michel and Jennifer Rockett. The Masters of Ceremonies were Mike Murray, Vice President of the Long Beach Education Foundation, and Frank Mottek, anchor for KNX 1070 news radio. Former NFL player Damon Dunn also shared his inspiring story about hope and courage during the evening. Mayor Bob Foster and his wife, Nancy, handed out the awards.


March 30, 2012 | GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS | PAGE 11

Cesar E. Chavez Festival, Fair Coming Saturday Tuesday, April 3

City, LBUSD Joint Group Explores Resource Merge BY HARRY SALTZGAVER EXECUTIVE EDITOR

There has been just one meeting of a newly-formed committee to explore joint uses between the city and the Long Beach Unified School District, but three City Council members think they may have found a way to save money already. Long Beach’s Parks, Recreation and Marine Department has shared some fields and facilities with the school district for decades, and long has had a joint use agreement for such uses. But last year, Seventh District City Councilman James Johnson suggested forming a joint committee between council members of school board members to work more closely together to use dwindling resources. Last month, Johnson was named chair of that committee, and the first meeting took place two weeks ago, with topics including the Cabrillo High School swimming pool and working together to stop school bullying. Now there is an agenda item on next Tuesday’s City Council agenda asking for some serious joint efforts. Councilwomen Gerrie Schipske (Fifth) and Rae Gabelich (Eighth) were joined by Ninth District Councilman Steven Neal in sponsoring a request to explore joint purchasing agreements between the two entities as a way to cut costs. In particular, the proposal seeks savings through an economy of scale with health care benefits. Purchases of office supplies, equipment and materials such as asphalt and concrete also should be studied, the council members said. The recommendation is just that, and does not require any ac-

Downtown Hosts Formula DRIFT The season kick-off of Formula DRIFT racing comes to Long Beach Friday, April 6, and Saturday, April 7, on the street course near the Convention Center. The Long Beach event is just one of two events in Formula DRIFT that takes place on a street course. (The other is in Singapore). The Long Beach course uses turns 9, 10 and 11 of the Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach street course. DRIFT drivers are judged on execution and style, rather than who finishes first. Defending Champion Daijiro will be back, as will drivers Justin Pawlak, Chris Forsberg, Darren McNamara and Matt Powers. The two-day event also includes the Slammed Society Car Show, a vendor fair, sponsor giveaways, driver autograph sessions and open pits for spectators. Tickets start at $28. Visit http://formulad.com.

tion. But, the letter said, “Since both organizations face deficits and both organizations purchase similar items, including health care benefits, there may be an opportunity to reduce costs for both government agencies due to bulk purchasing agreements.” There is no time element in the recommendation, and no set meeting schedule for the joint use committee. In other business Tuesday, the council is scheduled to: • Authorize an agreement with the Long Beach Unified School District for food preparation and sponsor/site agreements to allow the city to operate the Summer Food Service Program. • Consider a recommendation to purchase the Next 10 budgeting software program to allow residents to participate directly in the budgeting process. • Submit a grant application for $321,500 from the state Department of Housing and Community Development for housing-related parks program money to rehabilitate parts of 14th Street Park and Seaside Park. • Increase the contract with Bellingham Marine Industries, Inc., by $541,847 to cover change orders and finish Phase 1 of the Alamitos Bay Marina rebuild project (Basin 4). • Cancel the April 10 City Council meeting due to the Municipal Primary Election.

The annual Cesar E. Chavez Festival and Community Resource Fair runs from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, March 31, in Cesar E. Chavez Park, 401 Golden Ave. Entertainment will include

Chile-Music Organization, Clara Ballet Folklorico and the winners of a student poetry contest. There will be food, drinks, vendors and a children’s play area. In addition, there will be information on job assistance, recre-

ation services, public safety and Latino college access. Also during the Cesar E. Chavez Festival and Community Resource Fair, there will be a Citizen Application Completion Workshop.


PAGE 12 | GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS | March 30, 2012

Leadership Long Beach Applications BRING IT ALL TOGETHER Leadership Long Beach is now accepting applications for its adult programs. Leadership Long Beach is a nonprofit which provides programs to develop community leaders through increasing their knowledge of Long Beach and creating networks of individuals who can help each other solve community problems. The first program, called The Institute, is a series of 10 monthly meetings that take place throughout the city and provide topical information on current issues and

topics. The cost is $3,000 and some scholarships are available. The deadline is June 4. The second program, the Executive Quick Start program, is one-month program with four weekly meetings and a bus tour. It is designed to give participants the opportunity to meet and interact with government officials, business executives and community leaders. Cost for the EQS program is $1,250 and the deadline to sign up is April 9. For applications and more, visit www.leadershplb.org.

—Photo courtesy Molina Healthcare

Molina Healthcare officials unveil a new sign christening the Molina Center at what was formerly known as the Arco Towers, which the company purchased late last year.


March 30, 2012 | GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS | PAGE 13

Plays Put Teen Domestic Violence On Center Stage BY STEPHANIE MINASIAN STAFF WRITER

Long Beach nonprofit Trade & Row will set domestic violence and abusive teen relationships center-stage this weekend in three short plays called “Vignettes,” aimed to spark discussion on social issues with teens. The “Vignettes” performances will be from 3:30 to 5 p.m. Saturday at BodySport Capoeira, at 2236 E. Seventh St. Doors will open at 3:15 p.m. Trade & Row co-founder and executive director Karin Pleasant said the mission behind the “Vignettes” is to use the element of live theater as a tool to discuss the social issues that plague teenagers. “Some people don’t really understand how volatile some things can be with people,” Pleasant said. “We want to use all dif-

ferent forms of art as a segue to talk about social issues. It can be hard to start a conversation about certain things, but visuals, music and theater have an entertainment element, and allows people to think about things in a different way.” Graduates from the Theatre Arts Department are the writers and directors behind the three plays, with some of the actors including CSULB alumni and high school graduates from the South Bay area, according to Pleasant. Break the Cycle, a Los Angeles nonprofit, acted as the advisors to the project. The organization’s goal is to educate and empower youngsters to build lives and communities free from domestic violence. They also worked alongside Stop-Gap, which is an organization that emphasizes the importance of using theater per-

formances to educate and inspire change. To give a first-hand perspective of domestic violence, the WomenShelter of Long Beach connected the writers and actors with survivors of abuse, who told chilling accounts of violence and helped guide the writers’ work and offered support. “We did a writing exercise with the women at the WomenShelter,” Pleasant said. “They gave us an insight into the different levels of domestic violence. If you say violence, people may only think of physical abuse. Also, Break the Cycle taught us that it is also emotional and verbal abuse that leads up to the more obvious violence in relationships.” After the three performances, a facilitated discussion led by Harry Davidow, MSW, will engage the audience in talking about the

Grand Prix Golf Tourney, Banquet Benefit Charities The dates have been set for two of the signature charity events for this year’s Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach. The golf tournament will begin at 11 a.m. Monday, April 9, at the Old Ranch Country Club in Seal Beach. Since the creation of the foundation in 1991, it has contributed more than $2.75 million to area charities. This year’s recipients include Miller Children’s Hospital and

Action Sports Kids to Skate At Prix As part of the upcoming Formula DRIFT festivities on April 6 and 7, the ASK Foundation will stage a drift skate demo on the event grounds near the Convention Center. The skate demo allows Action Sports Kids (ASK) to demonstrate their talent while raising awareness of the need for safe environments, activities and education for youth. ASK provides youth an alternative to the streets and gangs through sports, education and arts.

Children’s Hospital of Orange County, the Long Beach Area Special Olympics and the Robert E. Leslie Scholarship Foundation. For tickets and more information, call 490-4509 or visit www. gblb.com. “The Grand Prix Foundation is very proud of the work we do in support of local charities while at the same time playing an active role in the overall experience that is the Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach,” Rick Duree, president of

the foundation. said in a release. A volunteer base of more than 200 people and low administrative costs allow the foundation to donate 90¢ of every dollar raised directly to the charities selected by the foundation’s board of directors. Golf activities begin at 9 a.m. on April 9 and include golf, a cocktail reception, awards banquet and live auction. The charity ball, April 13, includes a cocktail reception, dinner, dancing and a live auction.

issues within the works. A follow-up support group also will be offered for those interested in further help or information about domestic violence. “Some people don’t really understand how volatile things can be with people in relationships,” Pleasant added. “I wanted to work with younger people because they’re starting to form

strong opinions about the world around them.” In addition to the performances this Saturday, the group also will host a show from 3:30 to 5 p.m. Saturday, April 7, at the Long Beach Community Action Partnership, located at 3012 Long Beach Blvd. For more information, visit www.tradeandrow.org.


PAGE 14 | GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS | March 30, 2012

Annual Maintenance Causes FRESH AIR AEROBICS 710 Freeway Closure Sunday Parts of the 710 Freeway in Long Beach will be closed this Sunday for annual maintenance. The project will supplement the maintenance work that is done throughout the year. It will focus on traffic signs, traffic lights, pavement markings, tree trimming, weed abatement, graffiti removal, rail repairs, landscape improvements, street lighting, street repairs and street sweeping.

The southern terminus will be closed below Anaheim Street from 6 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Sunday, April 1. The southbound offramps that access Sixth Street, Broadway and Golden Avenue exits will be closed. The northbound on-ramps from Shoreline Drive, Ocean Boulevard, Third Street and Seventh Street will be closed. Harbor Scenic Drive will not be affected.

—Gazette photo by William Johnson

Councilman Robert Garcia is front and center during Zumba at his Health and Wellness Fair for the Let’s Move Long Beach initiative that is encouraging residents to get fit.


March 30, 2012 | GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS | PAGE 15

EASTER

Restaurants Honored More than 20 restaurants in Long Beach have received awards for 2011 from the Southern California Restaurant Writers, a nonprofit that has been recognizing excellence in food and service since 1974. Here are the Long Beach restaurants that were honored this year, in alphabetical order: Alegria Cocina Latina, Baba Ghanouj, Buono’s Pizzeria, Cafe Ambrosia, Cafe Piccolo, Chelsea’s Chowder House at the Queen Mary, Elise’s Tea Room, Fuego at The Maya, George’s Greek Cafe, The Grand Salon at the Queen Mary, L’Opera, The Madison, Open Sesame, Parkers’ Lighthouse, Phil Trani’s, The Promenade Cafe, Queensview Steakhouse, Roscoe’s House of Chicken and Waffles, Sevilla, Sir Winston’s on the Queen Mary, Utopia and Vintage Tea Leaf. For more details about specific awards given to these restaurants, more information will be available soon at www.SouthernCaliforniaRestaurantWriters.net. Not Essential, Essencial A new studio specializing in skin care and waxing services celebrated its grand opening last week in Bixby Knolls. Essencial Studio (essencial is Portuguese for essential) skin treatments include mini facials,

microdermabrasion and chemical peels. Also the studio features a variety of waxing services. Essencial Studio is located at 3550 Long Beach Blvd. Lights Out At 8:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 31, businesses around the

world will switch off the lights for 60 minutes for Earth Hour 2012. Businesses (and residents, too), are invited to turn off the lights for one hour and operate by candlelight from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. Long Beach businesses and residents who participate will join hundreds of millions of people around the world who unite each year to support the largest environmental event in history, according to EarthHour.org.

at the Museum


PAGE 16 | GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS | March 30, 2012

EASTER

Bikes, Art Merge For MoLAA’s Scavenger Hunt BY JONATHAN VAN DYKE STAFF WRITER

Many in Long Beach fancy the city as an up-and-comer (or already there) biking and art com-

munity. This Sunday, those two activities will merge in a special event. Long Beach Bike For Art’s First Annual Bike Scavenger

Hunt will take place all around the city with a home base at the Museum of Latin American Art. The event will raise money for The Collaborative, a joint venture

of MoLAA and the Arts Council for Long Beach. “I’ve always liked MoLAA as a location and the work they do there, and I thought there had to be a way to raise money through cycling while partnering with them,” said Tony Cruz, event coordinator and Long Beach Bicycle Ambassador. “This is a scavenger hunt about having fun on your bike and exploring the public art all around the city.” To that end, people will be split up into teams of between two and four people. They can participate in a 12-stop hunt just for adults or a four-stop hunt that caters to children and families. The event begins and ends at MoLAA, but in between scavenger hunters will travel by bike throughout downtown from Ocean Boulevard to Seventh Street and over to Second Street. “We’re really excited about the different public art stops it will go to,” said Molly Gardner, supervisor of grants and special projects for Arts Council For Long Beach. Many of the hunts will involve getting a picture with the art installation — for example, the Long Beach Recreation Mural — and there also might be some unique activities to finish like hula hooping or singing karaoke. Teams are encouraged to wear themed costumes and decorate their bikes — prizes will be awarded in those categories. “We’re trying to tie in activities and different photo ops to make

WHAT: Bike For Art Scavenger Hunt WHEN: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sunday, April 1 WHERE: MoLAA, 628 Alamitos Ave. COST: $35/$20/free this as fun as possible,” Gardner said. “We’re looking to find synergy between the art and bike community — to get people on their bikes, not just for them to get from point A to point B, but to also show how public art is good for community pride.” Once the scavenger hunt is completed, there will be an after party at MoLAA. There will be a DJ playing music, an awards ceremony and the band La Santa Cecilia will play. Children will have an opportunity for face painting, bike and helmet decorating, art workshops, a drink station and there will be a bicycle safety rodeo. A raffle will yield prizes like gift certificates to local restaurants and even a bike. The money raised will go to helping The Collaborative (421 W. Broadway), which specializes in unique art installations and emerging artists. “It gives Long Beach a great spot for up-and-coming artists,” Gardner said. “Expositions that we have are mostly installation and video and other different art forms that are emerging.” The public is encouraged to sign up for the event ahead of time at www.MoLAA.org. The cost is $35 for adults, $20 for students and free for children ages 5-12.


March 30, 2012 | GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS | PAGE 17

Race Benefits Family, Children Services BY ASHLEIGH OLDLAND EDITOR

When describing the purpose of the Jewish Family and Children’s Service of Long Beach, Executive Director Wendy Puzarne said the JFCS is a safety net — a means of catching and caring for those in the community who are coping with significant life changes. The JFCS provides affordable social services such as private counseling, support group meetings, career guidance and even emergency financial assistance to more than 6,800 people annually. Working in partnership with Long Beach Unified School District as well as the Long Beach Multiservice Center and nonprofit groups such as WomenShelter, the JFCS (located in the Alpert Jewish Community Center) provides on-site and off-site assistance for children, adults and seniors in need. “We were founded in 1958, and we’ve been here, we’re always here to help people facing challenges,” Puzarne said. “We believe in repairing the world and taking care of everyone.” Registration is open now for the 24th Annual Race With A View 5K/10K Walk/Run set to take place this Sunday, April 1, along the beach path starting and looping back to the finish below Bluff Park. The event is one of the largest fundraisers for JFCS each year, and the goal this year is to raise $50,000. “This year the Race With A View is going to be the best ever,” Puzarne said. “We already have 150 people registered, we are going to have food trucks at the

event as well as an April 1 Fool’s Day costume contest.” Puzarne, who started as a social work intern at the JFCS in 1997 and has served as the executive director for nearly eight years now, said she hopes people continue to donate to the cause and register for the event to show their support for a local agency that works to heal one world, one person, one family at a time. “We believe in repairing the world and taking care of everyone,” she explained, and that means providing social services for people who otherwise might not be able to afford getting help from professionals. Services at the JFCS are offered on a sliding scale based on each client’s ability to afford them. Some insurance plans and Medicare are accepted as well. Debbie Freeman, director of clinical services at the JFCS, has overseen the non-spiritual mental health counseling and internship program at the JFCS for the past five years. Freeman said many people still are afraid to come to the JFCS for help because they don’t believe counseling can help them get through a tough situation. “We hope more and more people come here and realize that we are here to help,” Freeman said. “There are people here you can reach out to for support with your challenges. A lot of people are surprised at what they gain from counseling… Our role is not to tell a client what they need — we are here to listen and hear what they need and help them find the answers for themselves. This is a non-judgmental place to talk.”

Freeman added that many people mistakenly believe that the JFCS only offers its services to people who are Jewish. In fact, only about 25% of the clients at JFCS are Jewish. The nondenominational organization is committed to helping all people in the Long Beach community, regardless of age, sex, race or religious beliefs.

For more details about the Jewish Family and Children Service of Long Beach’s one-on-one counseling services, many regularly meeting support groups or to register or find out more about Race With A View on April 1, visit the JFCS office at 3801 E. Willow St., go to the website www. JFCSLongBeach.org or call the phone number 427-7916.


PAGE 18 | GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS | March 30, 2012

MoLAA’s Latest Exhibits Reaffirm Its Prominence BY JULIAN BERMUDEZ ARTS WRITER

The Museum of Latin American Art’s (MoLAA) digital pres-

ence may leave its online visitors wanting, but this internationallyrecognized institution more than makes up for it by presenting sig-

nificant exhibits year after year. For 2012 alone, the museum has approximately nine shows planned. And, the current three now on view certainly reaffirm MoLAA’s place in the art world. On display in its Project Room through April 29, the museum presents “Marco Maggi: No Idea.” Curated by Selene Preciado, the exhibit features an installation of objects reflecting the artist’s interests — architecture, anthropology, language and mapping. According to MoLAA’s web site, “Marco Maggi is best known for his use of common materials such as Plexiglas, Reynolds aluminum foil, Macintosh apples and paper and cardboard in standard formats.” The artist inscribes “microlandscapes” on these objects as means of encouraging viewers to interact with his works and, hopefully, incite contemplation. “As we are constantly flooded

with information that we have ceased to understand, (Maggi) often resorts to word play in his work and titles due to his interest on language and signs that allow different conclusions and meanings,” MoLAA’s web site states. On a whole, the exhibit will pique one’s interest. Just be prepared to pay close attention as the title, “No Idea,” suggests that each viewer must draw his or her own conclusion to what it all means. “Esteban Lisa: Playing with Lines and Colors,” on view in MoLAA’s Temporary Gallery A through May 27, marks the artist’s first retrospective of his abstract works in the United States. Curated by Barbara Bloemink and Jorge Virgili, the exhibit celebrates Lisa’s 50-year career as a Modernist painter. “Although small, his works are subtly beautiful, from the restrained gradations of abstract form and color of the 1930s paintings, to the surprisingly vivid explosions of color marks across the pages from the 1950s to 1970s,” states MoLAA’s web site. “Through extensive reading and studying, Lisa explored the ideas and theories of abstraction, mysticism and cosmology that were being investigated by contemporary European artists.” Not only does “Playing with Lines and Colors” remind viewers of Modernism’s timeless im-

portance, but the exhibit realizes Esteban Lisa’s contribution as a proficient avant-garde artist. Lastly, “Magdalena Fernandez — 2IPM009,” on view through May 27 in MoLAA’s Temporary Gallery B, presents an impressive, eye-dazzling installation by the Venezuelan artist. Optical and geometric abstractions come to life through Fernandez’s incorporation of light and motion, making her largerthan-life installations worth seeing. According to MoLAA, The similarity between some of (Fernandez s) seminal works and such precedents as the works of Jesús Soto, Gego and Alejandro Otero inhabits the beautiful echoes of her creations.” Each one of MoLAA’s three exhibits highlights the museum’s strength as a cultural institution, while simultaneously allowing the artists the freedom of expression. MoLAA is located at 628 Alamitos Ave. Museum hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday; and 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday. General admission: $9; students and seniors: $6; free for MoLAA members. For more information, call the phone number 437-1689 or visit the museum’s website at www. molaa.org.


March 30, 2012 | GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS | PAGE 21

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Call 562-951-5032

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NAPLES ISLAND 5920 Naples Plaza #204 Cute Spanish Style! 2nd Floor ~ Quiet Studio with Full Bath Refrigerator & Stove + New Carpet, Fresh Paint & Ceramic Tile $775/mo + $800/dep

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Open House Daily 9-6

5465 East 2nd Street Naples Island Studios & Studio Lofts

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Includes All Utilities! only $400 deposit

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5585 E Pacific Coast Hwy

Walk to CSULB

Quiet 2nd Floor Studio Condo Facing Courtyrd Many Upgrades and Amenities plus Secure Enclosed Parking $875

CALL: 562-761-5551 Available April 5th

Full Bath, Full Kitchen New Carpet, Fresh Paint Refrigerator and Stove plus On SiteLaundry in Secure Building $795/month, Gas Paid! Fernando (562) 704-9468 RENTAL ONE BEDROOM

1 Bed 1 Bath $850/mo., In Good Neighborhood

1044 Appleton Street

Cozy Lower 1Bed 1Bath with Carpet, Tile, Stove Refrigerator + On Site Laundry, Small Yard &

Parking $975/month inclds some utilities 1 year lease required Pet Friendly! Available Now! David 562-221-6762

Alamitos Beach

1324 1/2 East 1st Street

1 Block to Ocean

1 Bedroom 1 Bath Apt Hardwood & Tile Floors Refrigerator plus Washer/Dryer in Unit Storage and Assigned Parking $1195 a month

no pets (562) 852-9050 termezy@hotmail.com

Alamitos Beach Apt 1745 East 3rd Street 3 Blocks to Ocean

2nd Floor Cozy & Cute Sunny 1 Bed 1 Bath with Hardwood Floors, Fresh Paint, Refrigerator, Stov + On Site Laundry & Yard! $850 a month

CALL 562-619-7507

Bel Ht 4Plx 1bd $860 gar $960 1125 Termino 562-896-7063

BELMONT HEIGHTS 1069 Termino Avenue Classic Spanish Duplex BEAUTIFUL 1BED 1 BATH High Ceilings, Hardwood Floors, Large Living, Dining and Kitchen, Private Patio Laundry, Garage, Backyard $1295/mo., 714-655-5397 or 562-439-0395 email express562@yahoo.com

Belmont Heights 225 Belmont Avenue Charming & Historic GATED BUILDING Absolutely Beautiful 1st Floor 1 Bed 1 Bath On Courtyard with Hardwood Floors

Dishwasher, Microwave Refrigerator & Stove + On Site Laundry and Landscaped with Fountain.

$1150/mo, sml dog ok Call Tritia 562-881-1018

(nice place to live) both Clean and Fresh with Appliances. OTHERS AVAILABLE

CALL 562-436-8888 1 Block To Beach Craftsman Duplex 1 Bed $950 a month

or 1 Bed + Den $1100/month

Email raso4re@aol.com

2 Blocks West of Cherry no smoking - For Appt Call

310-784-5587 SEE...

LBApartment.com/30Gaviota

$750 Large Quiet 1Br Appls near 7th/Gardenia 598-5705

Alamitos Beach

1111 Appleton Street Upper Condo 1 Bed 1 Bath, New Carpet Fresh Paint, Balcony with Garden View! Refrigerator, Stove + On Site Laundry! $1075 a month

Call 562-470-6486 or 562-279-5603 or 277-8014 paul.abelquist@charter.net nanci.abelquist@charter.net

Clean & Quiet Upper 1Bed Blinds, Carpet, Refrig, Stove + On Site Laundry & Parking 3015 East Theresa St., $995. 562-438-6171 or 438-8535

Call Jim 562-209-7045

BELMONT SHORE On Appian ~ Private

DOWNTOWN

Own Bedroom & Bathroom with Bedroom Fireplace Own Living Area, Vaulted Ceilings & 2 Balconies + Secured Covered Parking Nice & Large, All Amenities A Really Nice Place! $1100 a month + utilities

800 East Ocean Blvd

PENTHOUSE SUITE

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BELMONT SHORE Short Term Rental 3655 East Ocean Blvd Fully Furnished Large Recently Remodeled Beautiful Upper Unit 1 Bed 1 Bath with New Hardwood Floors & Carpet 52" Flat Screen TV + On Site Laundry & Garage Parking $1100/mo inc FiOS, cable & utils. Greg 562-212-6860

BIXBY KNOLLS 4569 Banner Drive Completely Remodeled

Lower Large 1 Bed

Hardwood & Tile Floors Stove, Refrigerator and Dishwasher + Sec Gate! $925 a month, no smkrs

Call 562-716-5945

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1 Bed with Hardwood Floors, Microwave Refrigerator and Stove plus On Site Laundry $1075/ mo FREE WiFi

Call 562-900-6817 Frank 562-537-6003

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Large Upper 1Bed 1Bath Carpet, Walk In Closet Refrigerator, Stove, Washer/Dryer plus Small Patio $990/mo

Call (562) 621-1966

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"Adorable / Affordable"

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Bungalow ~ 1 Bedroom 1Bath, Hardwood Floors Fresh Paint, Built In China Cabinet & Shelves Remodeled Kitchen has Dishwshr, Refrig, Stove + Washer/Dryer In Unit $1350/month + deposit Excellent Credit A Must

Cat OK! no smoking

www.Raso4RE.com Belmont Shore 111 Bennett Ave #F

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Call 310-529 9545 or 310-908-4776 or 310-259-5388

1 Bedroom 1 Bath Hardwood Floors Refrigerator, Stove Wash/Dryer, Garage Front Yard! Pets OK! $1325 a month

Rear Upper 1 Bed 1 Bath with Hardwood Floors Fresh Paint, Refrigerator Stove +On Site Laundry $1200/month sm. pet ok

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1 Bedroom 1 Bath Full Kitchen has Stove & Refrigerator + On Site Laundry! $800/month

Includes Utilities Pet Considered Call 503-307-1631

Call (562) 244-2425

30 Gaviota Avenue

Hardwood Flrs, Small Patio + Washer/Dryer. street parking

Walk To Beach & Shore

3123 Colorado Street Belmont Heights 363 Newport Ave 1Bedrm 1Bath Condo Fresh Paint, Carpet Dishwasher, Disposal Stove plus On Site Laundry, Pool and Garage Parking with Storage ! $1200/mo. Available April 1st Call (562) 743-7781

(lower unit)

1232 East 2nd Street

211 Euclid Avenue

~ COTTAGE ~

CALL 949-305-0196 Circle Area 3115 East 17th Street Totally Remodeled

Rear Cottage ~ 1 Bedrm New Bath New Laminat Wd Floors, Fresh Paint Microwave, Stove, Priv Fenced Yard, Storage & Carport Parking! $1195., inc water 562-430-1161 Clean Belmont Shore 1Bed Good Area, 20 Belmont Ave $925/mo., Call Tyler or Earl 562 438-2902

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Parking Available Call (562) 930-9048

Downtown 823 Linden Avenue

near shopping & buses Upper & Lower Units Large 1 Bedroom 1 Bath New Carpet Fresh Paint Air Conditioning, Stove

plus On Site Laundry Private Storage and Undergrnd Parking $950/mo * 12th mo FREE with Year Lease call Patrisha or Stacey 562-437-4500 Downtown Must See! 1219 East 7th Street #4 Very Clean 1 Bedroom 1 Bath with Fresh Paint, Carpet and Tile +Stove, Refrigerator $740 A Month

714-553-6323 562-591-5335

Dwntwn nr St Mary Hosptal 1 Bed 1 Bath, New Carpet Elevator 800 Linden $900., 310-619-6566 (5)439-9172

EASTSIDE 1512 Sherman Place Large 1Bed 1Bath, Tile Flrs + On Site Laundry $800 Lanc 562-544-3862 2901 Spaulding Street Nice 1 Bed 1 Bath, Tile Flrs + On Site Laundry $800 call 562-743-2565 TLC Properties (562) 434-6000 Eastside Long Beach 1205 Werner Street Duplex ~ Upper 1 Bedroom 1 Bath Fresh Paint, Carpet Stove, Patio and 1 Off Street Parking $735 a month Available NOW! CALL AFTER 9 AM

562-900-9798

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3rd Floor ~ Remodeled Large 1 Bedroom 1 Bath New Carpet, Fresh Paint Refrigerator and Stove plus On Site Laundry in Intercom Entry Bldg w/Elvtr. $800/mo OAC

Call (562) 495-1293 BBradley262@aol.com OCEAN VIEW!

20 - 3rd Place LARGE UPPER 1 Bedroom 1 Bath Right On The Beach! ~ Remodeled ~ $1295 a month street parking only

call 562 . 370 . 7306

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Open House Saturday 12-3

Downtown ~ The Lafayette Super Nice Lrg 1 Bed Condo W/D onsite 140Linden $1275 Tyler or Earl 562 438-2902

Renovated Upper 1 Bed 1 Bath, Designer Paint Wood Flrs, Ceiling Fans Refrig, Stove, Laundry & Gated Courtyard Pet Friendly! $995/mo

www.GAZETTES.com

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call 1-800-400-8030 jwprops@aol.com

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RENTAL ONE BEDROOM

Work & Live

In The Shore!

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BrokerRubyWool@aol.com

Ruby the Realtor

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Call (562) 712-6394 or 562-596-8214

1ST MONTH FREE!

915 Coronado Avenue HISTORIC ROSE PARK

Renovated Upr 2Bed 2Bath Wd flrs, New designer paint Ceiling Fans, Refrig, Stove DW, Laundry, Gated Courtyd plus Pet Friendly! $1395/mo GARAGE AVAILABLE

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+ On Site Laundry

$975/mo., Garage Avail.

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Alamitos Heights 420 Havana Avenue 1500 Sq Foot House 2 Bedrooms 2 Baths Hardwood Floors

Fireplace, Dishwasher Microwave, Stove plus Washer/Dryer Hook Up Large Fenced Yard and Double Garage! $2695.,

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SIGNAL HILL Crestview Apartments 2251 East 21st Street OCEANS VIEWS! 1 Bedroom 1 Bath New Carpet & Paint Stove plus On Site Laundry, Carport 2 Swimming Pools & Garden Courtyard ~ No Pets Please ~

Belmont Heights

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The Peninsula 6515 Seaside Walk Ocean View 1 Bedroom Remodeled Bath/Kitchn Fresh Paint, Hi Ceilings Tile Floors, Kitchen has Dishwasher, Microwave Refrigerator, Stove FREE Laundry, Storage & small car parking. $2000/month ~ Pets OK! CALL 310-962-5202

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Classic Duplex ~ Upper

2 Bedroom 1 Bath with Private Balcony

Hardwood Floors and Original Crown Moldng Washer/Dryer, Storage Gar +Driveway Parking! $1500 a month includes water & -trash

Call 760-484-0991

Call Mike 562-426-6787

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Villa Versailles 3503 Linden Avenue 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts All Electric. A/C DW, Stove, Controld Entry, Spa, Sauna and Covered Parking $995 to $1295 a month

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Best Deal Shore 2 Bed W/D Hook Ups & Garage! 5354 The Toledo ~ $1425., Tyler or Earl 562 438-2902 COTTAGE STYLE HOUSE 2bd 1ba, parking, w/d hk ups stv, new paint 846 Coronado $1495. Jackie 714-693-9045

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March 30, 2012 | GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS | PAGE 25 PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): JOSE BORBOA, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY Recorded: 1/30/2007 as Instrument No. 20070193285 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California; Date of Sale: 4/20/2012 at 9:00 A.M. Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza Pomona, CA Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $381,868.71 The purported property address is: 271 E LOUISE ST, LONG BEACH, CA 90805 Assessor’s Parcel No. 7126031-024 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-573-1965 for information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web site http://www. qualityloan.com , using the file number assigned to this case CA09-300867-BL . Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. Date: Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-6457711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 714-573-1965 Or Login to: http://www.qualityloan. com Reinstatement Line: (866) 6457711 Ext 5318 Quality Loan Service Corp. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECTING A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE NOTE. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED BY OR PROVIDED TO THIS FIRM OR THE CREDITOR WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. TS No.: CA-09-300867-BL IDSPub #0024322 3/30/2012 4/6/2012 4/13/2012 3/30, 4/6, 4/13/12 CNS-2280817#

CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made in “as is” condition without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: MARIE A. DIETRICH, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN Duly Appointed Trustee: Investment and Trustee Service, Inc. Trustee’s Address: 111557 W Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 Phone: 310 204-5714 Recorded 3/20/2008 as Instrument No. 20080477779 in book xxx, page xxx of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, Date and Time of Sale: 4/9/2012 at 1:00pm Place of Sale: At the Pomona Valley Masonic Temple Building, located at 395 South Thomas Street, Pomona, California The bidding may start as low as $50,000.00 The expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number: 714277-4845 or you may access sales information at www.usa-foreclosure. com Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $82,025.83 Street Address or other common designation of real property: 3734 PINE AVENUE, Long Beach, CA 90807 APN #: 7141-009-044 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incompleteness or incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown above, directions may be obtained pursuant a written request submitted to trustee at the address stated herein within 10 days from the first publication of this notice. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located on 11/15/2011 as Inst. No. 20111542131 Date: 3/13/2012 Investment and Trustee Service, Inc., as Trustee Timothy Yeo, Trustee Sale Officer We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. FEI # 1057.00050 PUB DATES: 03/16/2012, 03/23/2012, 03/30/2012 3/16, 3/23, 3/30/12 CNS-2279529#

shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (916) 9390772 or or visit this Internet Web site www.nationwideposting.com, using the file number assigned to this case 11-16346. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Dated: 3/14/2012 Law Offices of Les Zieve, as Trustee 18377 Beach Blvd., Suite 210 Huntington Beach, California 92648 For Non-Automated Sale Information, call: (714) 848-7920 For Sale Information: (916) 9390772 or www.nationwideposting. com Christine O’Brien, Trustee Sale Officer THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE NPP0198438 03/16/12, 03/23/12, 03/30/12 3/16, 3/23, 3/30/12 CNS-2279402#

RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-91401-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone/Sale Information: (800) 281 8219 By: Trustee’s Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. FEI # 1006.154622 3/16, 3/23, 3/30/2012 3/16, 3/23, 3/30/12 CNS-2279304#

THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): SYDNEY J HOLT, A SINGLE MAN A SINGLE WOMAN Recorded: 3/15/2007 as Instrument No. 20070577808 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California; Date of Sale: 4/20/2012 at 9:00 A.M. Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza Pomona, CA Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $274,658.94 The purported property address is: 550 ORANGE AVE UNIT 126, LONG BEACH, CA 90802 Assessor’s Parcel No. 7266-013-053 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. Date: Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 714-573-1965 or Login to: www. priorityposting.com Reinstatement Line: (866) 645-7711 Ext 5318 Quality Loan Service, Corp. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECTING A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE NOTE. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED BY OR PROVIDED TO THIS FIRM OR THE CREDITOR WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. TS No.: CA-10-406354-VF IDSPub #0023598 3/30/2012 4/6/2012 4/13/2012 3/30, 4/6, 4/13/12 CNS-2272271#

return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the MortgageeÐs Attorney. Date: Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-6457711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 714-573-1965 or Login to: www.priorityposting.com Reinstatement Line: 619-645-7711 Quality Loan Service, Corp. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders rightsÐ against the real property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECTING A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE NOTE. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED BY OR PROVIDED TO THIS FIRM OR THE CREDITOR WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. IDSPub #0023131 3/23/2012 3/30/2012 4/6/2012 3/23, 3/30, 4/6/12 CNS-2266852#

SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): ARMANDO LINARES AND MARIANA LINARES, HUSBAND AND WIFE Recorded: 12/20/2007 as Instrument No. 20072797527 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California; Date of Sale: 4/12/2012 at 9:00am PST Place of Sale: At the Doubletree Hotel Los AngelesNorwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, in the Vineyard Ballroom Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $358,563.88 The purported property address is: 1335 E 68TH STREET, LONG BEACH, CA 90805 Assessor’s Parcel No. 7116-005-047 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. Date: Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 800-280-2891 or Login to: www. auction.com Reinstatement Line: (866) 645-7711 Ext 5318 Quality Loan Service, Corp. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECTING A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE NOTE. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED BY OR PROVIDED TO THIS FIRM OR THE CREDITOR WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. TS No.: CA-11-486881-EV IDSPub #0022853 3/16/2012 3/23/2012 3/30/2012 3/16, 3/23, 3/30/12 CNS-2263782#

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE T.S. No.: 84124 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 02/27/2008. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD

T.S. No. 11-16346 APN: 7258-001029 Loan No. 219546819 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 7/1/2008. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: JEFFREY E. LORE, A SINGLE MAN Duly Appointed Trustee: Law Offices of Les Zieve Deed of Trust recorded 7/11/2008 as Instrument No. 20081233805 in book , page of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, Date of Sale:4/5/2012 at 11:00 AM Place of Sale: Inside the lobby of the building located at 628 North Diamond Bar Blvd., Suite B, Diamond Bar, CA Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $334,649.45 Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt owed. Street Address or other common designation of real property: 1070 TEMPLE AVENUE #102 LONG BEACH, CA 90804 Described as follows: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED ON SAID DEED OF TRUST A.P.N #.: 7258001-029 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any,

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. 11-0125471 Title Order No. 110105929 APN No. 7123-006-017 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 07/21/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by SERRAH ROBERTSON AND OLIVER ROBERTSON, WIFE AND HUSBAND, AS JOINT TENANTS, dated 07/21/2006 and recorded 7/28/2006, as Instrument No. 06 1678142, in Book , Page ), of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles, County State of California, will sell on 04/09/2012 at 1:00PM, At the Pomona Valley Masonic Temple Building, located at 395 South Thomas Street, Pomona, California at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 5946 ROSE AVE, LONG BEACH, CA, 90805. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $484,677.83. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier’s checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an “AS IS” condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. If required by the provisions of section 2923.5 of the California Civil Code, the declaration from the mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent is attached to the Notice of Trustee’s Sale duly recorded with the appropriate County Recorder’s Office. DATED: 03/16/2012

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. CA-09-296220-AL Order No.: 131063 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 9/12/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): FULBIA ENGLETON, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN Recorded: 9/21/2006 as Instrument No. 06 2102405 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California; Date of Sale: 4/13/2012 at 9:00 AM Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $393,096.04 The purported property address is: 55235523 1/2 LIME A VENUE, LONG BEACH, CA 90805 Assessor’s Parcel No. 7127-009-026 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. Date: Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 714-573-1965 or Login to: www.priorityposting.com Reinstatement Line: (866) 6457711 Ext 5318 Quality Loan Service, Corp. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECTING A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE NOTE. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED BY OR PROVIDED TO THIS FIRM OR THE CREDITOR WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. TS No.: CA-09-296220-AL IDSPub #0023920 3/23/2012 3/30/2012 4/6/2012 3/23, 3/30, 4/6/12 CNS-2276638# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. CA-10-406354-VF Order No.: 100724774-CA-GTI YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 3/8/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN

NOTICE OF TRUSTEEÐS SALE TS #: CA-11-434605-RM Order #: 110161701-CA-GTO YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 10/28/2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): GEORGE EDWARD DENNIS, SR. AN UNMARRIED MAN Recorded: 11/4/2004 as Instrument No. 04 2859436 in book xxx , page xxx of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California; Date of Sale: 4/13/2012 at 9:00 A.M. Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza Pomona, CA Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $217,140.46 The purported property address is: 5656 CALIFORNIA AVE CITY OF LONG BEACH, CA 90805 AssessorÐs Parcel No. 7127-002-025 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, please refer to the referenced legal description for property location. In the event no common address or common designation of the property is provided herein directions to the location of the property may be obtained within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale by sending a written request to JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. 7301 Baymeadows Way Jacksonville FL 32256. Pursuant to California Civil Code §2923.54 the undersigned, on behalf of the beneficiary, loan servicer or authorized agent, declares as follows: [1] The mortgage loan servicer has not obtained from the commissioner a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the notice of sale is filed; [2] The timeframe for giving notice of sale specified in subdivision (a) of Section 2923.52 does not apply pursuant to Section 2923.52 or 2923.55 . If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. CA-11-479742-LL Order No.: 110524519-CA-GTI YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 7/17/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): ERIC CASTILLO, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY AND CARLOS MINANO AND YVONE MINANO, HUSBAND AND WIFE ALL AS JOINT TENANTS Recorded: 7/24/2007 as Instrument No. 20071745075 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California; Date of Sale: 4/9/2012 at 9:00 A.M. Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza Pomona, CA Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $363,832.85 The purported property address is: 718 WEST 33RD WAY, LONG BEACH, CA 90806 Assessor’s Parcel No. 7203-008-022 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. Date: Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 714-573-1965 or Login to: www. priorityposting.com Reinstatement Line: (866) 645-7711 Ext 5318 Quality Loan Service, Corp. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECTING A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE NOTE. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED BY OR PROVIDED TO THIS FIRM OR THE CREDITOR WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. TS No.: CA-11-479742-LL IDSPub #0022981 3/16/2012 3/23/2012 3/30/2012 3/16, 3/23, 3/30/12 CNS-2265763# NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. CA-11-486881-EV Order No.: 6305647 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 12/7/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING POLICY Gazette Newspapers strives for customer satisfaction. Please review your ad for accuracy and notify us of any corrections. We are not responsible for errors or omissions after the first publication. Ad change limited to price & phone number only. $5.00 production charge per change. NO REFUNDS will be issued for ads canceled after the first insertion. All real estate advertised herein for sale or for rent is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, such preference, limitation or discrimination. Gazette Newspapers will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. California law requires that contractors taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor and/or materials) be licensed by the Contractors State License Board. State law also requires that contractors include their license numbers on all advertising. Gazette Newspapers reserves the right to edit, cancel, reject and determine the category for all classified ads. Deadlines for new ads, cancellations and changes: Tuesday at 6:00 p.m. for Thursday's Grunion Gazette. Wednesday at 5:00 p.m. for Friday’s Uptown and Downtown Gazettes.


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