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VISITORS GUIDE 2013


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The path to change starts with you Make a difference in your community simply by choosing to bank with First Federal. We have served the Peninsula for 90 years! • Local Bankers • Local Decisions • Competitive Rates 800-800-1577 ourfirstfed.com Member FDIC

*First Federal was voted Best Place to Bank and Best Customer Service in 2012 Peninsula Daily News ‘Best of the Peninsula’ poll.

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VOLUNTEER PREPARE DONATE

Service to the Armed Forces

International Services

Preparedness and Health and Safety Programs

Disaster Response

The American Red Cross prevents and alleviates human suffering in the face of emergencies by mobilizing the power of volunteers and the generosity of donors. The Olympic Peninsula Chapter has locations in Sequim and Port Townsend. For more information, visit redcross.org/olympic-peninsula or call 360.457.7933. 4

â–

VISITORS GUIDE 2013


Serving...

• Port Angeles • Sequim • Port Townsend • Discovery Bay • Kingston • Edmonds • SeaTac Airport • Seattle Hospitals • Greyhound • Amtrak • Downtown Seattle

Late night or early morning flight? Ask us about special hotel rates!

Complimentary homemade chocolate chip cookies from Cock-a-doodle Doughnuts

Free WiFi aboard!

Olympic Bus Lines is the local agent for Greyhound. You can now purchase your Greyhound tickets with us.

Port Angeles/Sequim 360.417.0700 Outside the area: 1.800.457.4492

www.dungenessline.us Reservations Recommended

VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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Welcome

to the olympic peninsula

VISITORS GUIDE

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The 0.8 mile hike to this bridge over Sol Duc Falls is very rewarding. Photo by Melanie Arrington.

Visitors Guide editor: Patricia Morrison Coate. Contributing photographers and writers: Donna Barr, Sheryl Payseno Burley, Cathy Clark, Jay Cline, Patricia Morrison Coate, Chris Cook, Mark Couhig, Mike Dashiell, Jerry Kraft, Matthew Nash, Leif Nesheim, Denise Westmoreland, Amanda Winters and Joan Worley • Cover Design: Cathy Clark • Special Sections Editor: Patricia Morrison Coate • Editorial: Joan Worley • General Manager: Debi Lahmeyer • Managing editor: Michael Dashiell • Advertising: Debi Lahmeyer, Visitors Guide sales coordinator, with Kim Hughes and Harmony Liebert. • Design: Mary Field with ad design assistance from Cathy Clark, Jay Cline, Holly Erickson, Marcus Oden and Denise Westmoreland. • Circulation: Bob Morris • Administration: Beth Barrett and Mandy Iraha. Send corrections or suggestions to Pat Coate, special sections editor, 147 W. Washington St., Sequim, WA 98382 • 360-683-3311 ext. 5054 or pcoate@sequimgazette.com. This guide published by Sequim Gazette, Sound Publishing Inc. ©2013 ■

VISITORS GUIDE 2013

Table of contents

Directory ........................................................7-15 5-1-1 .................................................................. 8 Discover Pass ..................................................... 10 Maps ............................................................16-19 Quilcene/Brinnon .............................................. 20 Olympic Music Festival ....................................... 21 Port Townsend ................................................... 22 Historic Port Townsend ....................................... 23 Port Townsend Marine Science Center ................. 26 Port Townsend Aero Museum .............................. 29 Northwest Maritime Center ................................. 30 Wooden Boat Festival ......................................... 32 Fun at the Forts ................................................. 34 Centrum ............................................................ 36 Tea and Treasures .............................................. 37 Sequim .............................................................. 39 Downtown day tripping ...................................... 40 Downtown Fun Map ........................................... 42 Sequim Lavender Farm Faire .............................. 43 Olympic Game Farm .......................................... 46 John Wayne Marina ........................................... 47 Sequim Lavender Festival ................................... 48 Sequim Dog Park ............................................... 49 Museum & Arts Center ....................................... 50 Dungeness River Audubon Center ....................... 56 Berry farms ....................................................... 57 Maps ............................................................58-59 In love with lighthouses ..................................... 60 Out and about outdoors ..................................... 62 Sequim Open Aire Market .................................. 68 Dungeness Recreation Area ................................ 69 Roosevelt elk ..................................................... 70 Sequim is for kids .............................................. 70 Golf courses ....................................................... 71 Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge ................... 72 Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe ................................. 74 Tribes welcome visitors ....................................... 75 Centennial Independence Day Celebration .......... 76 Sequim nightlife ................................................ 77 Sequim lodging ................................................. 78 Port Angeles ....................................................... 79 Feiro Marine Life Center ..................................... 80 Antiquing in Port Angeles ................................... 81 Olympic Coast Discovery Center .......................... 82 Hurricane Ridge ................................................. 83 Juan de Fuca Festival ......................................... 87 Olympic National Forest ..................................... 91 Museum at the Carnegie .................................... 92 Olympic Peninsula wineries ................................ 93 Olympic National Park ....................................... 94 Salt Creek Recreation Area ................................. 94 ONP rules and regulations .................................. 95 Olympic Discovery Trail ...................................... 96 Arts in Action ..................................................... 97 Marymere Falls ................................................. 97 West End ........................................................... 99 Twilight territory .............................................. 100 Hoh Rain Forest ............................................... 103 LaPush/Quileute Tribe ..................................... 104 West End Thunder ............................................ 107 Where the continent ends ................................. 108 Makah Cultural & Research Center ................... 109 Cape Alava/Ozette .......................................... 111 West End surfing .............................................. 112 Lake Crescent .................................................. 113


The Olympic Peninsula With a wealth of outdoor activities, cultural experiences and local events, your journey through our region will delight and surprise you. Enjoy, and we hope you have a wonderful experience on the Olympic Peninsula!

North Olympic Peninsula Services Directory special tours/services Adventures Through Kayaking: Guided tours, sea, river and inflatable rentals, classes and sales. 360417-3015, 888-900-3015. www.atkayaking.com. All-Ways Fishing Guide Service: Ocean fishing through September, river fishing in spring, fall and winter. 360-374-2052. www.allwaysfishing.com. Guided Historical Sidewalk Tours: Hour of snooping and gossiping in the historical district. Port Townsend. Call 360-385-1967 for reservations. John Wayne Marina: Permanent and guest moorage, showers, laundry and banquet facilities, restaurant, boat launch ramps, fuel facilities, public beach access, picnic areas. 2577 West Sequim Bay Road, Sequim. 360-417-3440. Mike’s Bikes: Sales, repair, accessories. 150 West Sequim Bay Road, Sequim. 360-681-3868. www. mikes-bikes.net. Norrie Johnson Guide Services: Fall tours of Olympic Peninsula rivers, steelhead and fall salmon. 360-582-9962. Olympic Game Farm: Walking tours during summer and driving tours open year-round. Entrance fee. Snack bar, petting farm, gift shop open during summer. 1423 Ward Road, Sequim. 360683-4295. www.olygamefarm.com. Olympic Raft & Kayak: Raft trips down the Elwha/Hoh rivers; guided kayaking tours in and around Olympic National Park. 123 Lake Aldwell Road, Port Angeles. 360-452-1443 or 888-4521443. www.raftandkayak.com. Port Angeles Boat Haven: Moorage space for more than 520 pleasure and commercial boats, including 75 boathouses. Marine services, adjacent to boat repair and retrofit services, haul-out services, restaurants and more. 360-457-4505. www. portofpa.com. Port Angeles Underground Heritage Tours: Twice daily at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. May-September, except Sunday. October-April, daily at 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Buy tickets at the Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center, 121 E. Railroad Ave., next to the ferry dock. 360-452-2363. 360-460-1001.

Sound Bikes and Kayaks: Sales, service, rentals, instruction. Bike and kayak day trips; weekend and weeklong kayak tours available. 360-457-1240 for reservations. 120 E. Front St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www. soundbikeskayaks.com. Three Rivers Resorts and Guide Service: Regular fishing, bait casting, fly-fishing. Fishing packages. 360-374-5300. www.threeriversresortandguideservice.com. Venture Charters: Diversified charter service specializing in social events, private parties, fishing, scuba diving and meetings. 360-895-5424 or www. venturecharterboats.com. Waters West Fly Fishing Outfitters: Fly-fishing specialty shop, year-round guide service, fly-tying materials, flies for fresh and saltwater. 140 W. Front St., Port Angeles. 360-417-0937.

visitors centers Clallam Bay/Sekiu Visitors Center Information on local businesses, area events and attractions, tides, area history, local parks, beaches and recreational activities in Sekiu, Clallam Bay, Lake Ozette, Neah Bay and within Olympic National Park. 16795 Highway 112, Clallam Bay. 360-9632339, 877-694-9433. Open daily May-October. www.clallambay.com, www.sekiu.com. Forks Visitors Center Information on Cape Flattery, Clallam Bay, Forks, LaPush, Neah Bay and Sekiu, Hoh Rain Forest, Kalaloch beaches, Makah and Quileute tribes, Lake Ozette wilderness hike to Cape Alava, the westernmost point in the lower 48 states, Indian petroglyphs near Wedding Rocks, Lake Crescent, Sol Duc Hot Springs and area waterfalls. 1411 S. Forks Ave., Forks. 360-374-9253, 800-443-6757. Mon.Fri. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. www.forkswa.com. Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center 24-hour recorded information about Hurricane

Ridge snow, road and weather conditions. Concessions hours: Weekend operation in winter, daily operation in summer, closed spring and fall. 17 miles south of Olympic National Park Visitor Center on Race Street in Port Angeles, 360-565-3131. Olympic Peninsula Gateway Visitor Center Information on Port Ludlow, Port Hadlock, Marrowstone Island, Hood Canal communities, Olympic National Forest, western Jefferson County and the Hoh Rain Forest. Near junction of Highways 104 and 19, Port Ludlow, 360-437-0120. Call for hours. www.gatewayver@olympus.net. Olympic National Park Visitor Center, Port Angeles Nature trails begin at parking lot to the west of the visitor center and behind it. Picnic area. Exhibits highlight the park’s natural and cultural history, hands-on discovery room just for children, information desk, award-winning film shown on request, bookstore. 3002 Mount Angeles Road, south of Park Avenue. 360-565-3130. www.nps.gov/olym. Hours vary according to season, daily in summer, Thurs.-Mon. in winter. Olympic National Park Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center Open daily during summer, Fri.-Sun. remainder of the year. Exhibits, information desk, bookstore. Nature trails start at the visitors’ center. Picnic area. Go 32 miles south from Forks on U.S. Highway 101 and Upper Hoh Road, take Hoh River Road east for 18.5 miles. 360-374-6925. Olympic National Park Kalaloch Information Station Open daily during the summer. Exhibits, information desk, bookstore, short nature trails and beach access nearby. At the ranger station on U.S. Highway 101, about 40 miles southwest of Forks. 360-962-2283, www.fs.fed.us/r6/olympic. Olympic National Park & Olympic National Forest information Center Open daily in summer, Fri.-Sun. remainder of VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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Olympic Peninsula residents and visitors alike are invited to use the state’s free 5-1-1 travel information number that builds on the highly successful Washington State Highway hotline (800-695-7623). Call 5-1-1 also for road and traffic conditions, statewide road construction, weatherrelated data, including mountain pass conditions, and the state’s ferry system. Passenger rail and airline 800 numbers also are available by dialing 5-1-1. Those heading to Sea-Tac International Airport can receive valuable real-time information on Interstate 5 traffic conditions between Tacoma and Seattle. Twenty-six land line telephone companies and nine of the most prominent wireless companies are linked to 5-1-1. According to the WDOT, with 5-1-1 travelers can expect to receive considerably more route-specific information than in a 30-second traffic news spot and have the advantage of having access to the information when they need it. From a land line telephone, there is no charge to use 5-1-1 but calls to it from a cell phone do count against the user’s minutes.

the year. Exhibits, information desk, bookstore, bear canisters, wilderness information and overnight wilderness use permits. At Forks Transit Center, 551 S. Forks Ave., Forks. Olympic National Park Wilderness Information Center, Port Angeles Open daily in the summer, intermittent hours in the winter. 3002 Mount Angeles Road, south of Park Avenue, behind the park’s visitors’ center, 360-565-3100. For reservations in high-use areas, call 360-5653100. Park wilderness overnight permits (required for all overnight stays in park back-country), bear canisters and wilderness information.

Port Angeles Visitor Center Information on Port Angeles, Hurricane Ridge, waterfalls in western Clallam County, Hoh Rain Forest, Olympic National Park/Olympic National Forest, Olympic Coast Discovery Center, Native American culture, Strait of Juan de Fuca, Victoria, British Columbia, and ferry schedules. 121 E. Railroad Ave., Port Angeles, 360-452-2363 or www. portangeles.org. Port Townsend Visitor Information Center Provides brochures, maps and information on accommodations, dining and activities in Port Townsend, East Jefferson County and the Olympic Peninsula. 440 12th St., Port Townsend. 360-385-2722, 888-365-6978, www.enjoypt.com. Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sun. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Quilcene/Brinnon Visitor Center Information on Hood Canal, Olympic National Park, Olympic National Forest, seafood harvesting and Dosewallips River estuary. 295142 S. Highway 101, Quilcene. 360-765-4999, www. emeraldtowns.com. Summer: Daily 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Winter: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sat.-Sun. Quileute Tribe Visitor Center Visitor information center, gift shop and information for Oceanside Resort. 196281 Highway 101, Forks. 360-374-2460. Call for hours. Sequim-Dungeness Valley Visitor Information Center Information on Sequim-Dungeness Valley, Lavender Festival Weekend and all of the Olympic Peninsula. 1192 E. Washington St., Sequim. 360683-6197, 800-737-8462. Open May-Sept. Mon.Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Oct.-April, Mon.-Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. www.sequimchamber.com.

festivals MAY

Olympic National Forest/Olympic National Park Quinault Ranger Station U.S. Highway 101 south to Amanda Park, left turn to Quinault Ranger Station, approximately three miles. Open May-September. Call for hours. 360-288-2525, www.fs.fed.us/r6/olympic/. 353 S. Shore Road, Quinault.

May 24-27 Juan de Fuca Festival, check schedule for events, Vern Burton Community Center, 308 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles. This four-day Memorial Day weekend festival features more than 125 performances of music, dance and theater from around the world. 360-457-5411 or www.jffa.org.

Olympic National Forest/Olympic National Park Quinault River Ranger Station, 908 N. Shore Road, Amanda Park. 360-288-2444, www.nps.gov/olym/wic. Open Memorial Day-Labor Day. Call for hours.

May 26 Olympic Art Festival, 9 a.m.- 4 p.m., Olympic Art Gallery, Washington Street and U.S. Highway 101 in Quilcene. At least a dozen artists from the gallery will exhibit additional artwork and do demonstrations. See www.olympicartgallery.com for listing of artists attending and their artwork. 360-5312015 or info@olympicartgallery.com.

Olympic Peninsula Visitor Bureau Offers North Olympic Peninsula travel planner. 338 W. First St. Suite 104, Port Angeles. 800-9424042, 360-452-8552, www.olympicpeninsula.org 8

or e-mail gatewayver@olympus.net.

VISITORS GUIDE 2013

JUNE

June 29-Sept. 1 Olympic Music Festival, 2 p.m. at Concert Barn, 7360 Center Road, Quilcene, watch for signs off U.S. Highway 101. Classical music every Saturday and Sunday, no pets allowed. www.olympicmusicfestival.org, info@olympicmusicfestival. org or call 360-732-4800 for tickets and reserved seating. June 30-July 7 Centrum Festival of American Fiddle Tunes, Fort Worden State Park near Port Townsend. Traditional American music with a week of workshops, dances, three days of main-stage concerts at McCurdy Pavilion. 360-385-3102, 800-773-3608 or info@centrum.org.

JULY

July-Sept. West End Thunder, Forks Municipal Airport, Forks. Monthly weekend drag races. Gates open at 7 a.m., general admission $10. See www.westend thunder.com for schedule. July 4-5 Forks Old-Fashioned Fourth of July, various locations in Forks. Contact info@forkswa.com. July 4 Fourth of July Community Celebration, 6-11 p.m., City Pier, Port Angeles. Food, craft vendors and live music. Grand parade on Lincoln Street to First Street from 5:30-6:30 p.m., fireworks display at dusk (around 10 p.m.). Old-Fashioned Town Picnic, Sequim. 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Water Reuse Demonstration Park and the James Center for the Performing Arts, off Blake Avenue or Rhodefer Road, adjacent to Carrie Blake Park. Music, games and contests begin at 11 a.m. and conclude at 3 p.m. when the Sequim City Band begins its annual 4th of July concert. Picnic food available for purchase. July 4-6 Hoodsport Fourth of July Celebration, street fair 9 a.m. Thurs.-Sat., wine tasting at Hoodsport Winery, fireworks at dusk Saturday, www. hoodsport.com. July 5 The Street Dance of the Century, 6-10 p.m. on Washington Street in downtown Sequim. July 12-14 Clallam Bay & Sekiu Fun Days, 10 a.m. in Clallam Bay/Sekiu. Parades, races, games, food, fun, craft vendors, music and entertainment. Fireworks on Saturday night. www.sekiu.com. July 19-21 Sequim Lavender Festival Weekend, 9 a.m., various locations in and around Sequim. Threeday summer celebration of the joys of lavender. Farm tours, street fair, art tours, food, music. www. sequimlavenderfestivalweekend.com. Sunbonnet Sue Quilt Show, 10 a.m. at Sequim


Middle School gym. Hundreds of traditional and art quilts under one roof. 360-683-2072, www. sunbonnetsuequiltclub.org. Quileute Days, 10 a.m. in LaPush. Tribal festival with parade, canoe races, bone games, arts and crafts, softball tourney and fireworks on First Beach. www.forkswa.com. July 21-28 Centrum’s Jazz Port Townsend, Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend. Centrum’s Jazz Port Townsend, the West Coast’s finest summer jazz festival, features straight-ahead jazz and internationally acclaimed musicians on the grounds of Fort Worden State Park and Jazz in the Clubs, Thurs.-Sat. evenings and Sunday morning in 10 downtown venues. 800-733-3608, 360-385-5320 or visit www.centrum.org. July 26-28 Arts in Action, Fri. 2-8 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Sun. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., City Pier, Port Angeles. This event hosts professional sand sculptors. Also artists, merchants and vendors. Enjoy live music on the pier and car shows all weekend with a street dance on Saturday night. 360-417-0501. Port Ludlow Festival by the Bay at Port Ludlow Marina. Live music from local performers, arts and crafts, food, silent auction, golfing, radiocontrolled model hydroplane demonstration races on the marina pond. Noon-5 p.m. Fri. with a concert from 6-10 p.m., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat. with concert from 6-10 p.m., 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sun. Call 360-437-0175. July 28-Aug. 4 Centrum’s Acoustic Blues and Heritage Festival, Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend. Centrum’s Port Townsend Blues and Heritage 16th year with a free downtown street dance, followed by Blues in the Clubs, eight bands, playing simultaneously in eight downtown Port Townsend venues on Fri. and Sat. nights. 360-385-3102 or www.centrum.org.

AUGUST

Aug. 3 Joyce Daze Wild Blackberry Festival, Joyce. The 31st annual event kicks off at 7 a.m. with a pancake breakfast and lasts until 3:30 p.m. Highlights include homemade pies with the much-heralded local blackberries, a parade, children’s activities, a juried arts and crafts show, salmon bake, vendors’ booths, demonstrations and live entertainment. www.joycewa.com. Aug. 9-11 Jefferson County Fair, 10 a.m. at fairgrounds in Port Townsend. An old-fashioned country fair for the whole family. Free entertainment: 4x4 mud drags, barrel racing, draft horse pulls, magicians, music, 4-H and FFA exhibits. Animals and much more. 360-385-1013, www.jeffcofairgrounds. com. Aug. 15-18 Clallam County Fair, fairgrounds in Port Angeles. Draft horse pull, concerts, rodeo, logging show,

360-327-3225 or hungrybear@olypen.com. Sept. 12-15 Stephenie Meyer Days/Bella’s Birthday, in honor of the “Twilight” series author. Forks. www. forkswa.com.

crafts, art, 4-H and FFA animals and much more. 360-417-2551 or www.clallamcountyfair.com. Aug. 23-25 Makah Days, 10 a.m. Neah Bay. The 88th annual celebration focused around Makah patriotism for the United States with Makah war veterans taking a high seat. Canoe races and bone games, children’s races, royalty, salmon bake, traditional dancing, talent show and fireworks. Aug. 31-Sept. 1 Green River Mountain Men Rendezvous, open to the public from 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Slab Camp Road, 0.6 mile past Lost Mountain Road, southwest of Sequim. History comes to life at re-enactment of early 1800s fur trappers’ gathering. Features historical-style campsites, period-dressed re-enactors, historical skills and lore seminars and hands-on opportunities for the entire family. Free admission to look around. 253-735-5042 or 253-884-6763. Air Affaire, a nostalgic look at barnstorming days coincides with the Sequim Centennial and the 30th anniversary of the Sequim Valley Airport. Antique plane exhibitions, hot air balloon rides, biplane rides and more come to the Sequim Valley Airport from Aug. 31-Sept. 1. For more information or to register an aircraft, call Emily Westcott at 360-670-6294. For hot air balloon rides, call Captain Crystal Stout, Morning Star Balloon Co., at 360-601-2433.

SEPTEMBER

Sept. 6-8 37th Wooden Boat Festival, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Fri.Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun. at Point Hudson in Port Townsend. An internationally acclaimed annual celebration of wooden boats and the people who travel aboard, build, own, sail, row and share a passion for their beauty, craftsmanship and cultural heritage. Authentic activities and demonstrations for all ages. 360-344-3436, www.woodenboat.org. Tickets required. No pets allowed inside the gates or on the docks. Sept. 7 12th annual Chili Cook-off and Feed, all-day, The Hungry Bear Cafe, Motel, & RV Park, milepost 206 U.S. Highway 101 West, Beaver. 3 p.m. free chili feed; 5-10 p.m. live music. Prizes for best chili.

Sept. 14 Celebrate Heritage begins with the 125th anniversary dedication of the last remaining building from the Cooperative Colony – The Independent Bible Church at First and Vine streets, now home to Serenity Thrift Store at 10 a.m. At noon, a community picnic at Jesse Webster Park, Third and Eunice streets, for old-fashioned fun like three-legged races and music. For more information, visit Celebrate Heritage, Inc. on Facebook. Sept. 20-22 Port Townsend Film Festival, 10 a.m. on Taylor Street, Port Townsend. More than 40 art-house, foreign-language, classic, documentary and short films from around the world. Contact 360-3791333, www.ptfilmfest.com. Sept. 21 Quilcene Community Fair, Parade & Classic Car Show, all day at Quilcene School District on U.S. Highway 101. Vendors, entertainment, food, arts/crafts and fun! info@quilcenefair.com.

OCTOBER

TBA Hickory Shirt & Heritage Days, various times in Forks. An event that stretches over two weekends with a host of programs and events highlighting the unique heritage of Forks and the surrounding communities. The annual Fish & Brew Contest with samples and great prizes is on Saturday. www. forkswa.com. Oct. 4-6 North Olympic Fiber Arts Festival, 9 a.m., Museum & Arts Center, 175 W. Cedar St., Sequim. Interactive fiber arts event with a museum juried art show exhibition, educational demonstrations of fiber processes, hands-on projects with children and adults, sale of local artists’ work and information about local fiber activities, groups, businesses and instructional resources. 360-683-8110, www.fiberartsfestival.org. Oct. 5 Harvest Celebration & Farm Tour, call for times, at various farms in the Sequim-Dungeness Valley, Sequim. Sequim’s annual farm tour. Fun, entertainment, organic products and farm tours. Contact 360-681-0169. Oct. 5-6 LaPush Last Chance Salmon Derby, cash prizes are awarded for largest, second largest and third largest coho and chinook and largest bottom fish. www.forkswa.com/events/last-chance-salmonderby. VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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Oct. 11-13 Dungeness Crab and Seafood Festival, 10 a.m., City Pier, Port Angeles. Crab feed complete with Dungeness crab, crab cakes, wild salmon, oysters, mussels, shrimp, clams, clam chowder, seafood and vegetable bisque, fresh organic salads and desserts. Live music throughout the weekend and crab derby. 360-452-6300 or www.crabfestival.org. Oct. 18-20 Forest Storytelling Festival, Peninsula College Little Theater, Port Angeles. Spend the weekend listening to wonderful storytellers from around the world and join in workshops. Public program begins Friday at 7:30 p.m. with a story concert. Call 360-417-5031 for ticket information.

OTHER ANNUAL EVENTS

Other annual events between October 2013 and May 2014 that weren’t scheduled at press time are, by month: November: Passport to Autumn Wine Tour, Port Angeles December: Various holiday events, Sequim Christmas Bird Count, Olympic Art Festival, Quilcene February: Discovery Bay Salmon Derby, Sequim, Gardiner and Port Townsend March: • Soroptimist Gala Garden Show, Sequim. • Annual Victorian Heritage Festival, Port Townsend April: • Sekiu Salmon Derby, Sekiu • Jazz in the Olympics Festival, Port Angeles • Olympic BirdFest, Sequim May: • Rhododendron Festival, Port Townsend • Sequim Irrigation Festival, Sequim, first two weekends of May

arts/cultural centers Learn about the North Olympic Peninsula’s pioneer history, Native American cultures or sea life at the following places:

Arthur D. Feiro Marine Life Center: Port Angeles City Pier. North Lincoln Street at Railroad Avenue. Touch tanks containing North Olympic Peninsula sea creatures, aquariums and exhibits. Small admission fee is charged to support center. Call for hours. 360-417-6254. Commanding Officer’s Quarters: Fort Worden State Park Conference Center, Port Townsend. Victorian furnishings from 1890-1910 provide a glimpse into the life of an officer and his family. Hours: June-Aug., 10 a.m.-5 p.m., daily; MarchMay, Sept.-Oct. weekends, noon to 4 p.m. Tours by appointment for groups. Adults, $2; children under 12 free. 360-344-4452. Fee to park.

at 175 W. Cedar St., includes natural and cultural history displays and showcases the Manis mastodon discovered in Sequim, including a video from the archaeological digs, and the Jamestown S’Klallam Longhouse exhibit. Exhibits reflecting Sequim-Dungeness Valley pioneer life and community history. Free admission. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays and Sundays during the summer months. Closed Mondays and the last Sunday each month. 360-683-8110 for information and tour booking. www.macsequim.org.

Forks Timber Museum: U.S. Highway 101 on the south side of Forks. Logging and the development of the Forks area. Call for hours. 360-374-9663.

Museum at the Carnegie: In the former Carnegie Library, 207 S. Lincoln St., Port Angeles. Operated by the Clallam County Historical Society. Main gallery features “Strong People: Faces of Clallam County.” Exhibits in the lower gallery rotate. Hours 1-4 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday and special tours can be arranged by calling 452-2662.

Jefferson County Historical Society: The Jefferson County Historical Society Museum exhibits illustrate the lively history of communities born in waterfront forests more than 150 years ago. Hours daily 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Adults $4, children 3-12 are $1. Passport to museum and Rothschild House $6. 540 Water St., Port Townsend. 360-385-1003.

Historical Dungeness Schoolhouse: Two-story rural schoolhouse placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988. Operated as a school from 1893-1955, now a Museum & Arts Center facility for community events and programs. 2781 Towne Road, Sequim. Visitors welcome by appointment. Schoolhouse available for event rental. 360-582-0584, www.macsequim.org.

Joyce Depot Museum: A railroad and logging history museum housed in a authentic railroad depot built in 1915 at the Joyce site, about 15 miles west of Port Angeles. Area history and memorabilia, photos of the Joyce-Lake Crescent area and old logging and railroad equipment. Daily 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct.-June or by appointment. 360-928-3568.

Point Wilson Lighthouse: Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend. Originally built in 1879 atop the lightkeeper’s house, the light was moved in 1913 to the present tower. Ranging 16 miles, the light marks the entrance to Puget Sound. Tours during summer 1-4 p.m. on Saturdays or by appointment. 360-385-5520. Fee to park.

Makah Cultural and Research Center: 1880 Bayview Ave., Neah Bay. The largest collection of pre-contact Northwest Coast Indian artifacts with a full-scale replica of a longhouse, dioramas and artifact replicas from one of five traditional villages of the Makah Tribe, buried by a mudslide about 500 years ago. Open daily, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., 360-645-2711.

Port Angeles Fine Arts Center and Webster’s Woods Art Park: 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., Port Angeles. Exhibitions with a Northwest flavor. Hours 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Thurs.-Sun., Webster’s Woods open daylight hours, year-round. 360-417-4590 (recorded information only) or 360-457-3532 (business line); www.pafac.org.

Museum & Arts Center in the SequimDungeness Valley, Sequim: Regional museum,

Port Townsend Marine Science Center : Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend. Touch tanks, aquariums and exhibits, gift shop, boat tours, beach

The Discover Pass is required on vehicles to access all state recreation lands and water-access sites managed by Washington State Parks, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and Washington State Department of Natural Resources. These lands include state parks, water-access points, heritage sites, wildlife and natural areas, DNR and WDFW campgrounds, trails and trailheads and all DNR managed uplands (natural areas and trustlands, but not aquatic lands). Registered campers and others with paid overnight stays in state parks do not need to have the Discover Pass. They simply display their camping registration on their dashboard. The Discover Pass can be purchased in person from nearly 600 vendors across the state, by telephone or online at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov. In addition, the Discover Pass can be purchased from state parks as staff is available. The Discover Pass costs $30 annually and $10 for a daily pass per vehicle. There is an additional processing fee ($5 and $1.50) when purchasing from a vendor, by phone or online. The current fine for not displaying a Discover Pass on a vehicle while on state recreation land or a water-access site is $99. More information on the Discover Pass may be found at www.discoverpass.wa.gov.

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VISITORS GUIDE 2013


walks, summer camps and educational programs. Natural history exhibit, marine exhibit. Seasonal hours. Adults, $5; children, $3, members free. Call 360-385-5582 or 800-566-3932; www.ptmsc.org. Fee to park. Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum: Fort Worden State Park Conference Center, Port Townsend. Dedicated to the preservation and interpretation of coast artillery history with special emphasis on the harbor defenses of Puget Sound. Daily, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., extended hours July-Aug. on Fri.-Sat. $2 adults, $1 children. 360-385-0373. Fee to park. Quilcene Historical Museum: 151 E. Columbia St., Quilcene. Exhibits feature Quilcene life, businesses and events, including logging, agriculture, hearth and home, Native Americans and school. Gift shop and research library are available. Hours: April-September, 1-5 p.m. Fri.-Mon. Tours by appointment. 360-765-3192 or 765-0688. Rothschild House State Park Museum: Taylor and Jefferson streets, uptown Port Townsend. Intact 1868 Greek Revival architecture with original furnishings. Managed by Jefferson County Historical Society. Open May 1-Sept. 30 daily, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $4 adults, $1 children. $6 passport gains entry to JCHS Museum and Rothschild House. 360-379-8076, 360-385-1003. www. jchsmuseum.org.

trails/hikes HIKING OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK Before hiking, you should know: Entry fees apply. Even on short hikes, be prepared for changing weather. Carry food, water, hat, gloves, layers of warm clothing and a raincoat. Use “leave no trace” techniques to help preserve the wilderness. Stay on trails to avoid trampling vegetation and use pit toilets where available or use the cat-hole method and pack out toilet paper. Pets are not allowed on park trails or beaches except on leash (up to 6 feet) from Rialto Beach to Ellen Creek (0.5 miles north), all Kalaloch beaches and Peabody Creek Trail. This helps protect you, your pet and wildlife. Leashed pets are allowed in campgrounds, parking areas and on roads. Pet rules differ on neighboring national forest and state lands. Note: Leashed pets are allowed on trails in Olympic National Forest. Entry fees apply. Pack out everything you pack in including food waste and garbage. Wheelchair accessible trails noted with * Accessible with assistance trails noted with ** Other trails are not recommended for wheelchairs. The term “accessible with assistance” means trails do not meet ADA standards but may be passable by individuals with sufficient upper body strength and balance or a friend to help.

TEMPERATE RAIN FORESTS

Hoh ** Mini Trail. Paved 0.1-mile loop trail near the Visitor Center. Hall of Mosses Trail. 0.8-mile loop trail beginning near the Visitor Center. Spruce Nature Trail. 1.2-mile loop trail beginning near the Visitor Center. Quinault ** Maple Glade Trail. 0.5-mile loop beginning across the bridge from the Quinault River Ranger Station. Cascading Terraces Trail. 1.0-mile loop trailing beginning at Graves Creek campground. Irely Lake Trail. 1.2-mile trail beginning 0.7 mile before the North Fork campground entrance. Quinault Big Cedar Trail. 0.2-mile trail gaining 80 feet in elevation. The trailhead has minimal parking and is located 2 miles up the North Shore Road across from the Lake Quinault Resort. ** Kestner Homestead Trail. Self-guided 1.3mile loop trail starting at the Quinault Ranger Station.

MOUNTAINS Hurricane Ridge ** Meadow Loop Trails. Begin from the parking lot. There are several quarter-mile and half-mile trails. ** Hurricane Hill. 1.6 miles one way, begins at the end of the Hurricane Ridge Road. The rough paved trail gains about 700 feet in elevation, giving panoramic views. Wheelchair accessible first half-mile only.

Klahhane Ridge. Begins near the Visitor Center. First 2.8 miles brings hiker to a junction with the Switchback Trail. Hikers can continue or return to the Visitor Center. Deer Park Rainshadow Loop. Self-guided 0.5-mile loop to summit of Blue Mountain. Starts at the end of Deer Park Road, a steep, one-lane gravel road not suitable for RVs or trailers.

LOWLAND FORESTS

Sol Duc Ancient Groves Nature Trail. 0.6-mile loop beginning 9 miles up Sol Duc Road. Sol Duc Falls. 0.8-mile one way from the end of the Sol Duc Road. Lover’s Lane Loop. 5.8-mile loop connecting Sol Duc campground, Sol Duc Falls and the resort. Mink Lake Trail. 2.6 miles one way from Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort. Lake Crescent ** Moments in Time Nature Trail. Flat 0.6-mile loop trail beginning at Lake Crescent Lodge. ** Marymere Falls. 0.9-miles one way from Storm King Ranger Station. The first 0.5 mile is accessible. Mount Storm King Trail. 2.1 miles one way from turnoff on Marymere Falls Trail. It climbs 2,100 feet. Pyramid Peak Trail. 3.5 miles one way, begins near the North Shore Picnic Area. Climbs 2,350 feet. Spruce Railroad Trail. 4.0 miles one way, begins near the North Shore Picnic Area on the east side of the lake. A designated bike trail. Heart O’ the Hills Heart O’ the Forest Trail. 2.3 miles one way, starts at Loop E in Heart O’ the Hills campground. Park Visitor Center Peabody Creek Trail. 0.5 mile loop trail beginning in the Visitor Center parking area. ** Living Forest Trail. 0.4-mile loop trail behind the Visitor Center. Elwha * Madison Falls Trail. Paved 0.1-mile one-way trail to a waterfall, starts at the Elwha entrance station. Cascade Rock Trail. Steep 2.1-mile one-way forest hike or take the level 0.6-mile loop. Both begin behind the picnic shelter in Elwha campground. Upper Lake Mills Trail. Steep 0.4-mile one-way trail from 4 miles up the Whiskey Bend Road. It descends 400 feet to the Elwha River. West Lake Mills Trail. 1.9-miles one way, begins at the Lake Mills boat launch parking area. West Elwha Trail. 3.0 miles one way in oldgrowth forest near the river; starts at Altaire Campground. Geyser Valley Loop. 6.0-mile loop trail beginning at the end of the Whiskey Bend Road. The trail can be broken down into shorter loops. VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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For more information about fees or trails in Olympic National Park, visit www.nps.gov/olym/ planyourvisit/brochures.htm and click on the destination of choice.

and photography are popular activities in the refuge. Some portions are closed seasonally or permanently to protect sensitive species. Fee to access refuge and Dungeness Spit. No pets allowed on refuge/spit.

day-use parks

Dungeness River Audubon Center at Railroad Bridge Park. 2151 Hendrickson Road, Sequim. Take River Road exit from U.S. Highway 101 west of Sequim, turn north on Priest Road and west on Hendrickson Road to Railroad Bridge Park. 360-683-5847 for information. Tues.-Fri. 10 a.m.4 p.m., Sat. noon-4 p.m. Nature center, restored historical railroad bridge across the river, hiking, picnicking, bicycling, fishing. Bird walk, 8:30 a.m. every Wednesday. Natural history exhibits, classes and presentations all year.

JEFFERSON COUNTY PARKS

For more information, call 360-385-9160. H.J. Carroll Park. In Chimacum, head north on Highway 19 from the stoplight at Chimacum Road intersection, travel approximately 1.5 miles, turn right on H.J. Carroll Park Road. Picnic area, trails, sports fields, shelter, sports courts, playground, native plant gardens.

Staircase Shady Lane Nature Trail. 0.9 mile one way and begins across the bridge from the ranger station. Staircase Rapids Loop Trail has a bridge out, but two 0.9-mile trails explore both banks of the river from near the ranger station. Dosewallips Terrace Nature Trail is a 1.2-mile loop trail from near ranger station.

COAST

Be aware of tides when hiking the coast. Pick up a tide chart at a ranger station or visitor center. Ozette Cape Alava Trail. 3.3 miles one way mostly on boardwalk from near the ranger station to the coast. Sand Point Trail. 2.8 miles one way mostly on boardwalk from near the ranger station to the coast. A 2.9-mile beach walk connects the two trails making a 9-mile loop. Mora-LaPush Rialto Beach: 1.5-mile hike to arch and tide pools at Hole-in-the-Wall. Use caution if continuing north. Second Beach: 0.7-mile hike to tide pools and sea stacks from LaPush Road, 14 miles west of U.S. Highway 101. Third Beach Trail. 1.4-mile hike to a sandy beach from LaPush Road, 12 miles west of U.S. Highway 101. James Pond. 0.3-mile loop to a shallow beaver pond. Kalaloch ** Beach 4. 0.2-mile one-way walk from U.S. Highway 101 to a beach and tide pools, only viewpoint accessible. ** Ruby Beach. 0.2-mile one-way hike from U.S. Highway 101 to the coast and sea stacks, only viewpoint accessible. Kalaloch Nature Trail. 0.8-mile loop through coastal rain forest from near Kalaloch campground. 12

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VISITORS GUIDE 2013

Larry Scott Trail: Trailhead in the Port of Port Townsend. Traveling east on Sims Way, turn right on Haines Street at the Safeway stoplight, follow road around into port, turn right, park near heavy haul-out area. Trailhead on Mill Road; coming into Port Townsend on Highway 20, turn right at the stoplight at Mill Road, approximately ) 0.25 mile to where trail crosses road, park on left. Picnic area, trails.

Marlyn Nelson Park (county), near Sequim. Turn north on Sequim-Dungeness Way and then take a right east on Port Williams Road. Follow road to the end. Picnic area, boat ramp, beach access. Pets allowed. Master Gardeners Demonstration Garden, 2711 Woodcock Road, Sequim. Demonstrations of grasses, herbs, fruits, native plants, shade plants, wetlands, color garden, water-wise gardening.

North Beach: North on San Juan Avenue, follow road to the left, 49th Street, turn right on Kuhn Street, follow to end in Port Townsend. Picnic area, shelter.

Pioneer Memorial Park (city), 387 E. Washington St. Picnic area, historical tombstones, re-created Indian canoe and homesteader’s cabin, meeting hall. Hall rented through garden club.

SEQUIM-AREA PARKS

Robin Hill Farm (county), halfway between Sequim and Port Angeles. North on Dryke Road off U.S. Highway 101, park entrance is 0.25 mile on the right. 195-acre park offering pedestrian and equestrian trails among forests, meadows and wetlands.

For more information, call 360-683-4905. Carrie Blake Park (city), on Blake Avenue at east end of Sequim. Turn north on Blake Avenue, travel about 1.5 blocks to park on right. Picnic, ponds, playground equipment, meeting hall, skateboard park, bandstand. Sequim Dog Park at Carrie Blake Park, located on the east side of the Guy Cole Center on Blake Avenue. Fenced, off-leash park. Separate small and large dog areas; water, on-site pet waste bags and trash receptacles. Restrictions apply. Cline Spit (county). Near Sequim. Take Sequim-Dungeness Way north from Sequim. Follow as it becomes Anderson Road to Marine Drive. About 7 miles from town. Boat launch, beach access, windsurfing. Dungeness Landing (county), north on Sequim-Dungeness Way past Old Dungeness Schoolhouse, 0.5 mile off Sequim-Dungeness Way to Oyster House Road. Take the straight road going right and the park is at the bottom of the hill. Boat launch, birding site, picnicking. Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge (U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service), west of Sequim on U.S. Highway 101, turn right on Kitchen-Dick Road. Continue 3 miles to Dungeness Recreation Area. Go through the recreation area to the refuge parking lot. Open year-round. Hiking, wildlife watching

PORT ANGELES PARKS

For more information, call 360-417-4550. City Pier, north end of Lincoln Street on the waterfront. Views of the harbor and Port Angeles, Arthur D. Feiro Marine Life Center; beach access, park benches, picnic tables, playground, public restrooms, walking paths, viewing tower. For a complete schedule of events, fee information and hours of center operation, call 360-417-6254. Harborview Park, located at the end of Ediz Hook. Views of Port Angeles, the inner harbor and the Olympic Mountains. Picnic tables, wind shelters, restrooms, barbecue pits, beach access. Lincoln Park, west Lauridsen Boulevard, east of Fairchild International Airport. Fishing available for youths 14 and younger. Playground, public restrooms, picnic tables, tennis courts, open fields and trail, youth baseball. The Port Angeles Dog Park, an off-leash park, located along the west side of Lincoln Park. Waterfront Trail, follows the waterfront of Port Angeles, extending from the Coast Guard station entrance gate on Ediz Hook to just west of the old


Rayonier mill site. Five continuous miles of trail, walking path, park benches, public restrooms, beach access. Webster Park, Third and Eunice streets, behind Swain’s General Store. Meeting place for the local Camp Fire organization provides rental space for community gatherings and meeting space, picnic tables, walking paths. William Shore Memorial Park, 321 E. Fifth St. Indoor pool offers six lap lanes, a dive tank, several floating devices. Pool rentals, swimming lessons, exercise classes available throughout the year. 360-417-4595.

WESTERN CLALLAM COUNTY Bogachiel State Park, U.S. Highway 101, 6 miles south of Forks. Six picnic tables in day-use area with restroom nearby, 1-mile hiking trails, 36 standard campsites, six sites have power and water, dump station, restrooms with showers, kitchen shelter without electricity. First come, first served. Group camp for 16-20 people reservable at 360374-6356. East Beach (ONP), about 15 miles west of Port Angeles off U.S. Highway 101 at East Beach Road. Picnic area, swimming. No lifeguard. Hurricane Ridge (ONP), drive south on Race Street from downtown Port Angeles for 19 miles. Picnic, self-guided nature trails, hiking, winter sports, viewpoint, visitor information. Lake Pleasant (County), on U.S. Highway 101 about 10 miles north of Forks. Boat launch, beach, playground (no lifeguards). North Shore (ONP), on the north shore of Lake Crescent. Go around Lake Crescent on U.S. Highway 101, turn at Fairholme General Store and resort. Picnic, lake views. Pillar Point Park (county), north of Highway 112 at Pillar Point, about 10 miles east of Clallam Bay. Open year-round. Launch for small boats, beach area, picnic shelter, tables. Quillayute River Park (County), from U.S. Highway 101 just north of Forks, turn west onto LaPush/Mora Road. Follow to Mora Road and turn right. Follow to River Park Road and turn left. River and fishing access. Rialto Beach (ONP), take LaPush Road just north of Forks and drive 8 miles. Take right at Three Rivers Resort and continue another 3 miles to the beach. Picnic, ocean beach, hiking, nature trails.

campsites The following is information on a variety of campsites on the North Olympic Peninsula. $$/ per night charge.

2013 State Park Fees: Standard campsite $22-$25*. A designated campsite served by nearby domestic water, sink waste, garbage disposal and flush comfort station. Utility campsite $31-$36*. A standard campsite with the addition of electricity. May have domestic water and/or sewer. Primitive campsite $12-$14*. Campsite does not include a nearby flush comfort station. Primitive campsites may not have any amenities of a standard campsite. Sites accessible by motorized/nonmotorized vehicles and water trail camping. *Higher prices include an additional fee for popular destination parks and select premium campsites. Maximum eight per site. Extra overnight vehicle fee $10 Camping at Department of Natural Resources campsites is free. To reserve a state park campsite, visit www.parks.wa.gov or call 888-CAMPOUT. Online reservations: If you make, change or cancel your reservation online, you will pay lower fees than by calling 888-CAMPOUT. Only one online reservation can be made at a time. Agents are available to make reservations between 7 a.m.-8 p.m. daily, except Christmas and New Year’s days. Hours are shortened on Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve.

EAST PENINSULA Chimacum (county), on Rhody Drive in Chimacum. Picnicking, camping, vault toilet, recreational vehicles. Fallsview (ONF), 4 miles south of Quilcene on U.S. Highway 101 on Quilcene River Trail. Five tent, 30 RV campsites. Picnicking, camping, recreational vehicles, hiking, garbage cans. Fort Flagler State Park, 8 miles northeast of Port Hadlock, on the northern tip of Marrowstone Island. 101 standard tent sites, 14 utility spaces, one dump station, four restrooms (one ADA) and eight showers (two ADA). Saltwater shoreline, picnic facilities, hiking and bike trails, water activities, military museum. To arrange guided tours of historical buildings, call 360-385-3701. Fort Worden State Park, Highway 19 to Port Townsend, left on Kearney Street, right on Blaine Street, left on Cherry Street, follow brown park signs. Full-service conference center, dormitories and 80 hook-up campsites (50 beach, 30 upper woods area). Dining facility and meeting rooms. A museum, two miles of beach, marine science center. Point Wilson Lighthouse and miles of trails leading to bunker and batteries. 360-902-8844.

Campsites: 22 primitive sites. Picnicking, camping, recreational vehicles, swimming, fishing, boat launch, outhouse; no drinking water. Oak Bay (county), off Oak Bay Road, 2 miles east of Port Hadlock. Campsites: 24 in upper park and 24 in lower. Picnicking, camping, recreation vehicles, hiking, play area, clamming, boat ramp, beach access. Old Fort Townsend State Park, about 4 miles south of Port Townsend. 40 campsites first come, first served; one dump station, two restrooms, one shower. Saltwater beach, forest, miles of trails; kitchen shelter may be reserved, large area available for group camping by reservation. 360-385-3595. Quilcene (county), U.S. Highway 101 south of Quilcene. Campsites: 13. Picnicking, camping, recreational vehicles, cookhouse, shelter. Rainbow (ONF), U.S. Highway 101 at Mount Walker Pass, 5 miles south of Quilcene. Campsites: nine, group campground by reservation only. Picnicking, camping, hiking, vault toilets. No drinking water. Seal Rock (ONF), on U.S. Highway 101, 2 miles north of Brinnon. Campsites: 19 tents, 16 RV. Picnicking, camping, recreational vehicles, clamming, oysters, swimming, fishing, boating, wheelchair beach-viewing area, interpretive natural trail, beach access, flush toilets, drinking water.

EAST CLALLAM COUNTY Deer Park (ONP), 18 miles south of U.S. Highway 101 on Deer Park Road, 6 miles east of Port Angeles. Last 13 miles is dirt, one-lane road. Not suitable for RVs or trailers. Campsites: 14 (tents only). Picnicking, camping, hiking, drinking water, restrooms. Dungeness Forks (ONF), off U.S. Highway 101, 4.5 miles south on Palo Alto Road, 3 miles southwest of Forest Service Road 2958. Campsites: nine tent sites. Picnicking, camping, hiking, fishing, drinking water and rest areas. Day pass required. Dungeness Recreation Area (county). From U.S. Highway 101, take Kitchen-Dick Road north to the entrance. A 216-acre county park located at the headlands of the Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge at Dungeness Spit. Camping, hiking, beachcombing and picnicking. 67 campsites, picnic

Jefferson County Fairgrounds, Port Townsend. North on San Juan Avenue, follow road as it bends to the left (49th Street), turn left on Jackman Street. 80 campsites, 18 with full hookups, 40 with power and water, 22 tent campsites. Restroom/shower facilities, picnic areas, dump station, sports field, shelter. Leashed pets welcome. 360-385-1013 Lake Leland (county) off U.S. Highway 101 on Leland Valley Road, 7 miles north of Quilcene. VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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tables. Fee for camping, entrance fee collected at trailhead of Dungeness Spit. Sequim Bay State Park, 3 miles east of Sequim on U.S. Highway 101. RV and tent camping, beach access, restrooms with showers, boat launch. One overnight group site for 60 people, picnic shelter and campfire facilities. Reservations.

CENTRAL PENINSULA CAMPSITES Altaire (ONP), west of Port Angeles, follow U.S. Highway 101 to Olympic Hot Springs Road and south to campground. Campsites: 30. Catch and release fishing. Elwha (ONP), west of Port Angeles, follow U.S. Highway 101 to Olympic Hot Springs Road and south to campground. Campsites: 40. Picnicking, fishing. Catch and release for all species except non-native Eastern brook trout. Fairholme (ONP), off U.S. Highway 101 west of Port Angeles at west end of Lake Crescent. Campsites: 88. Fishing, boat launch. Catch and release only. Heart O’ the Hills (ONP), south on Race Street in Port Angeles, 5.9 miles on the way to Hurricane Ridge. Campsites: 105. Picnicking, camping, RVs, hiking, trails, handicap access, restrooms. Sol Duc (ONP), follow U.S. Highway 101 west from Port Angeles around Lake Crescent, turn south at top of Fairholme Hill and follow road to hot springs. Campsites: 82. Hot springs, trails.

Gatton Creek (ONF), south of Forks on U.S. Highway 101 and east at Lake Quinault Road past Lake Quinault Lodge. Campsites: five tent, eight trailers. Picnicking, camping, water access, hiking, fishing, swimming, self-guided tours, restrooms. Hoh (ONP), south of Forks on U.S. Highway 101 to Hoh Rain Forest Road, 19 miles to campground. Campsites: 88. One loop open all year long. Full opening July 1. Picnicking, camping, trailers, hiking, water, fishing, wheelchair access, trails, trailhead for Hoh River Trail, visitor center, restrooms. Hoh Oxbow (DNR), south of Forks on U.S. Highway 101 just south of Hoh Rain Forest Road. Campsite: seven forested campsites. Picnicking, camping, trailers, fishing, restrooms, RV facilities. Kalaloch (ONP), 35 miles south of Forks on U.S. Highway 101. Campsites: 169. Picnicking, camping, trailer, beach access, hiking, fishing, wheelchair access, summer ranger station, nature trail. To reserve a campsite, call the National Recreation Reservation Service at 877-444-6777 up to six months in advance of the day before your arrival date.

WEST PENINSULA CAMPSITES

Klahowya (ONF), off U.S. Highway 101, 8 miles east of Sappho. Campsites: 30 tent sites, 14 RV sites. Picnicking, hiking, water, boat ramp, fishing, restrooms.

Bear Creek (DNR), on U.S. Highway 101, 2 miles west of Sappho on Sol Duc River. Picnicking, camping, RV, trailers, fishing, water access to river, restrooms, no drinking water.

Lyre River (DNR), on Highway 112, 4.5 miles west of Joyce. Picnicking, camping, hiking, water, fishing, restrooms, group, shelter, drinking water, wheelchair access for bank fishing.

Bogachiel State Park, 6 miles south of Forks on U.S. Highway 101. Six picnic tables in day-use area, first come, first served, with restrooms nearby; one-mile hiking trails, 30 standard campsites, five sites have power and water, dump station, restrooms with shower; kitchen shelter without electricity. One site ADA compliant. Group camp for 16-20 people reservable at 360-374-6356.

Mora (ONP), on the Quillayute River, 12 miles west of U.S. Highway 101 on Rialto Beach Road. Full opening July 1. Picnicking, camping, trailers, self-guided trail, hiking, beach access, water, fishing, wheelchair access, summer ranger station, restrooms.

Coppermine Bottom (DNR), take U.S. Highway 101 south of Forks for 14 miles, follow Hoh-Clearwater Mainline for 12.6 miles, then turn right on C1010 Road. Picnicking, camping, RVs, fishing, hand boat launch, restrooms. Cottonwood (DNR), 16 miles south of Forks on U.S. Highway 101, 2.5 miles off Oil City Road on Hoh River. Campsites: seven. Picnicking, camping, trailer, boat launch, river access, fishing, restrooms, no drinking water, hiking. Falls Creek (ONF), south of Forks on U.S. Highway 101 and east at Lake Quinault Road 14

past Lake Quinault Lodge. Campsites: 15 tent and 16 trailer sites. Picnicking, camping, kitchen shelter, trailers, water access, hiking, boat launch, fishing (subject to Quinault Tribe regulations), restrooms.

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VISITORS GUIDE 2013

Ozette (ONP), at Lake Ozette southwest of Sekiu. Campsites: 15. Open year-round, may close in winter, ranger station, camping, picnicking, trailers, water, boat launch, beach access (only with 6-mile round-trip hike), swimming (no lifeguard), hiking, fishing, wheelchair access. Trailhead for Cape Alava and Sand Point trails. Salt Creek Recreation Area (county), about 12 miles west of Port Angeles on the Strait of Juan de Fuca. From Highway 112 about 12 miles west of Port Angeles, turn north on Camp Hayden Road. Follow about 3.5 miles and park will be on the right. 92 campsites, including 39 utility sites, marine life sanctuary and hiking trails. Beachcombing, camping, fishing and picnicking, park

and main gate closed at dark. 360-928-3441 for reservations. South Beach (ONP), on U.S. Highway 101, 2.8 miles south of Kalaloch. Picnicking, beach access, recreational vehicles. South Fork of the Hoh (DNR), north side of U.S. Highway 101, camping, hiking at trailhead 2 miles from camping area. Tumbling Rapids (Rayonier), 11 miles northeast of Forks on U.S. Highway 101. Park borders Sol Duc River, picnicking, camping, covered kitchen, outdoor fireplaces, water, restrooms. Upper Clearwater (DNR), north side of U.S. Highway 101 at milepost 147, South Fork trail. 360-374-6131. Willoughby Creek (DNR), from U.S. Highway 101 east on Rain Forest Road between mileposts 178-179, right-hand side. Three campsites for tents or trailers up to 16 feet long. Picnic tables, fire grills, tent pads, vault toilets available, no drinking water. Leashed pets are permitted. 360-374-6131.

RV Parks Bear Creek R.V. Park, milepost 206 U.S. Highway 101 West, Beaver. 360-327-3225 or hungrybear@olypen.com. 15 miles northeast of Forks and 44 miles west of Port Angeles. 12 full hookups, two electric only, tent sites, fire pits, picnic tables, bathrooms with showers on site. Adjacent to Sol Duc River. Open all year. Cape Motel and RV Park, 1510 Bayview Ave., Neah Bay, 866-744-9944, 53 units, 14 motel units, 50 RV hookups, open space for tenting, restrooms, shower and laundry. Conestoga Quarters RV Park, 40 Siebert Creek Road, Port Angeles. 800-808-4637, RV park, full hookups, pavilion, walking trails, washer/dryer facilities, volleyball net, shower rooms, Internet hookup, www. conestogaquartersRVpark.com. Crescent Beach and RV Park, 2860 Crescent Beach Road, Port Angeles. 360-928-3344, RV full hookups, tent camping, hot showers, clean restrooms, horseshoe pits, 0.5 mile private beach, www.olypen.com/crescent. Elwha Dam RV Park, 47 Lower Dam Road, Port Angeles, 360-452-7054, full service, full hookup, secluded tent sites, RV park sites, restrooms, laundry, www.elwhadamrvpark.com. Forks 101 RV Park, 901 S. Forks Ave., Forks, 800-962-9964, free wireless Internet service, full hookups, 50-/30-amp service, large rig pullthroughs, free cable TV, Wi-Fi, showers, restrooms, botanical gardens, natural history displays, Good


Sam Park with Quality 4-Star service. Close to Hoh Rain Forest, Rialto Beach, Cape Flattery and Sol Duc Falls, www.forks-101-rv-park.com.

Camaraderie Cellars: 334 Benson Road, Port Angeles. Open Fri.-Sun. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. May-Sept. 360-417-3564, www.camaraderiecellars.com.

Forks Mobile Home Park. 621 Calawah Way, Forks. 360-374-5510. RV parking, full laundry, streetlights, some sidewalks, vending machines.

Eaglemount Wine & Cider: 2350 Eaglemount Road, Port Townsend. Call for hours. 360-7324048. www.eaglemountwinery.com.

Gilgal Oasis RV Park, 400 S. Brown Road, Sequim. 360-452-1324, 888-445-4251, 28 sites, 19 pull-throughs, some up to 87 feet long, full hookup, 50-30-20 amp, with free high-speed DSL Internet and cable TV, paved pads, clubhouse, laundry, showers and phones, www.gilgaloasisrvpark.com.

FairWinds Winery: 1984 W. Hastings Ave., Port Townsend. Hours: Memorial Day-Labor Day, noon-5 p.m. daily; Sept.-June Noon-5 p.m. Fri.Mon. 360-385-6899, www.fairwindswinery.com

Hard Rain Café and RV Park, 5763 Upper Hoh Road, Forks. 360-374-9288, 6 water and electric sites, 7 full hookups, rafting and kayaking, gift shop, hamburgers, groceries. Harrison Beach, 299 Harrison Beach Road, 5 miles west of Joyce off West Lyre River Road, Port Angeles, 360-928-3006, camping, tenting, RV sites, rock hunting, seal watching. Hoh River Resort & RV Park, 175543 Highway 101, Forks, 360-374-5566, full hookups, power and water, tents and cabins, showers, full grocery store, propane and gasoline, www.hoh riverresorts.com Lake Pleasant RV Park, 7 miles north of Forks, U.S. Highway 101, 360-327-0714. Open all year, 28 full hookup sites with showers, bathrooms, Laundromat, 30-amp power, pull-throughs, fishing and tent sites.

age, woodcarving/basketry-making classes, seafood in season, sea animals, tribal celebrations, www. ocean-park.org, www.quileuteoceanside.com. Rainbow’s End RV Park, 261831 Highway 101, Sequim, 360-683-3863 or 877-683-3863, 8 pull-throughs, 60-foot long, Wi-Fi, full hookups, laundry, cable, clubhouse, showers, camping, large dog play yard in fenced area, stream, www.rainbowsendrvpark.com. Salt Creek RV Park & Golf, 53802 Highway 112, Port Angeles, 360-928-2488, full-service park, www.olypen.com/scrv. Sequim Bay Resort Waterfront RV Park & Cabins, 2634 West Sequim Bay Road, Sequim, 360-681-3853, cable TV, Wi-Fi, laundry, showers, full hookups, sequimbayresort.com.

Log Cabin Resort Inc., 3183 E. Beach Road, Port Angeles. 360-928-3325, full hookups, RV and tent sites, boat rental, restaurant and gift shop, grocery store. Located on Lake Crescent, www. logcabinresort.net.

Sequim West Inn & RV Park, 740 W. Washington St., Sequim, 360-683-4144, 800-528-4527. In-room coffee, microwave and refrigerator, fully furnished and equipped cottages available for weekly and monthly stays, www.sequimwestinn.com.

The Lost Resort at Lake Ozette, 20860 HokoOzette Road, Clallam Bay, 360-963-2899 or 800950-2899, primitive camping, cabins, small general store, deli, www.lostresort.net.

Shadow Mountain General Store & RV Park, 232951 Highway 101, Port Angeles, 360928-3043, 40 full hookups, 13 tent sites, laundry, mini-golf, showers, gas, propane, diesel, Wi-Fi, some 50-amp spaces, www.shadowmt.com.

Mike’s Beach Resort, 38470 N. Highway 101, Lilliwaup, 800-231-5324, cabins, campsites, private beach, kayaking, scuba, pet friendly. Port Angeles KOA Kampground. 80 O’Brien Road, Port Angeles, 360-457-5916, full hookups up to 70-foot pull-through sites, 50-amp service, LP gas, and Wi-Fi available, RV, tent and Kamping Kabins, full hookups, electric and cable access, pool, hot tub. portangeleskoa.com. Quileute Lonesome Creek RV Park, PO Box 250, LaPush, 360-374-4338, 360-374-4333, full hookups, showers, restrooms, convenience store, groceries, post office, gas/diesel. Quileute Oceanside Resort, PO Box 67, LaPush, 98350, 360-374-5267, 800-487-1267, cabins, motel units, hike trails, marina with moor-

Whiskey Creek Beach, PO Box 130, Joyce, 360-928-3489, Campsites, RV sites, cabins.

wineries Artisan wineries located on the Olympic Peninsula welcome visitors year-round to enjoy their award-winning wines. Most of the wineries listed below are members of Olympic Peninsula Wineries. Information and driving directions for its members are available at 800-785-5495 or at www.olympicpeninsulawineries.org. Black Diamond Winery: 2976 Black Diamond Road, Port Angeles. Hours: March-Dec. Open Thurs.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun.-Mon. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 360-457-0748, www.blackdiamondwinery.com.

Finnriver Farm and Cidery: 62 Barn Swallow Road, Chimacum. 360-732-4084, www.finn riverfarm.com. Harbinger Winery: 2358 W. Highway 101, Port Angeles. Hours: Mon.-Sun., 11 a.m.-6 p.m. 360-452-4262, www.harbingerwinery.com. Hoodsport Winery: 23501 Highway 101, Hoodsport. Hours: Gift shop and wine tasting. Open daily 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Located just south of Hoodsport on U.S. Highway 101. 800-580-9894, www.hoodsport.com. Olympic Cellars: 255410 Highway 101 East, Port Angeles. Hours: May-Dec. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. daily, Jan.-April, Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. 360-452-0160, www.olympiccellars.com. Wind Rose Cellars: 143 W. Washington St., Sequim. Hours: Jan.-April, first Fridays 4-8 p.m.; Saturdays 1-4 p.m.; May-Oct. 1-8 p.m. Mon., Wed., Thurs.; Fri. and Sat., 1-9 p.m.; Sun. 1-4 p.m.

farmers markets Forks Open Aire Market, Forks: Every Saturday 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Late May to mid-October next to Forks Chamber of Commerce Visitors Information Center. 360-374-6789 or contact@ forksopenairemarket.com. Jefferson County Farmers Market: uptown Port Townsend. Every Saturday through midNovember, 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; every Wednesday 3:30-6:30 p.m. June 13-Sept. 26. 360-379-9098. www.ptfarmersmarket.org. Port Angeles Farmers Market: Every Saturday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. year-round and during the summer, every Wednesday 3-6 p.m. June-October, at the Gateway Transit Center on Front Street, Port Angeles. Sequim Open Aire Market: Every Saturday from 9-3 p.m. on Cedar Street, Sequim. Market runs from mid-May to mid-October. 360-6830164. www.sequimopenairemarket.com. Quilcene Farmers Market: Every Saturday, 9-3 p.m. April through September. U.S. Highway 101 and Center Avenue, Quilcene. Locally grown produce, dairy products, honey, sauces, spices, herbs, cut flowers and more. 360-621-3721. VISITORS GUIDE 2013

15


Strait of Juan de Fuca

Passenger Ferry to San Juans

Fort Worden State Park

Port Townsend Port Townsend Boat Haven

Discovery Bay

Port Hadlock

Anderson Lake State Park Anderson Lake

Indian Island

Kilisut Harbor

EAST JEFFERSON COUNTY

Nordland

Chimacum

20

Oak Bay

r Rd R

.

L

arson Lake R

Port Ludlow

ea l

COURT HOUSE

Gis eS t.

Lan de s St. Ku hn St.

SSt.t .

Ro se St. wo Sp od St. ruce Redw St. ood St F

Av e.

MARINE SCIENCE CENTER

Admiralty Inlet

W aln ut

Oly mp ic

Fir St .

St .

STATE FERRY TERMINAL

ROTARY ROTARY PARK

Jefferson Healthcare

Monroe Monroe St. St.

Lincoln St.

Franklin St. Jefferson St. Washington St.

Water St.

St. St.

Garfield St.

Taylor St. Adams Quincy

Polk St.

Tyler St.

UPTOWN

Van Buren St.

Cass St.

Scott St.

Decatur

SEE INSET

VISITORS GUIDE 2013

Lop ez Av e.

Pa cifi cA ve.

Ch er ry

Blaine St. Garfield St. Lincoln St. Lawrence St.

Fillmore St.

COURSE

KAH-TAI LAGOON

20

16

PUBLIC BOAT LAUNCH

V U St. T St. S S St. t.

Pt. Townsend Van Ness St.High School Van Ness St. Blaine St.

Clay St.

101

St St. .

U.S. COAST GUARD STATION

McCURDY PAVILION

Ro se W illo St. Fir w S S t Ch t. . es tn Al ut be rt Oa kS t.

Triton

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V

W

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P O St. N St. QS RS St. t. t. M L S K St. t. St. J H St. Reed St. G St. St Root St. F HASTINGS E St. . S POND t. MORGAN SATHER Foster St. D St. PARK HILL PORT Cosgrove St. B TOWNSEND A St. Taft St. St. GOLF Roosevelt St.

Calhoun St. Benton St. Pierce St.

Coyle

Kerney St. Gaines

Hazel Pt.

Ald er

Brinnon Pleasant Harbor

35 tilla 33 th St. Dr. Wo 32n rd St. odla d S nd D t. 29t h r. Car FS Has St. t. olin ting eS s t. Rd. y r ove c is D

Walker St.

Seal Rock

POINT WILSON LIGHTHOUSE

FORT WORDEN STATE PARK

e ruc Sp Ced Cen ar S ter S t. Mil t. oSt .

37th St.

Sa nJ uan Av e.

Triton Cove State Park

Ku Ha hn ine St. sS t.

ST. MARY'S CEMETERY

a Um

Dosewallips State Park

School

Strait of Juan de Fuca

AAddm mirir altltyy SSt.t .

43r dS t.

Do sewal lips Rd

Airport

POND

Harrison St.

Pt. Whitney Shellfish Lab

51s t 50th St. St.

FA COU IRG N T

Cle vel an Wi d St. lso n Gis St. eS t. Ho lco mb St.

43r dS t.

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101

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Mt. Walker

51s t St.

Thorndyk

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54th St.

R Y Ha ine OUN DS Mc s St. MNce Nilel ilAl v Aev e..

d Coyle R

To Hastings Rd. South

Park

Hood Can

NORTH BEACH

Turtle back Rd.

Boat Ramp

al Bridge

Shine

Point

Quilcene

Shine Tidelands State Park

T

104

Tarboo Lake

St.

ter Rd

19

Ce n

Lake Leland

Paradise Bay

Lak e Rd

d

Dabob Rd

Sandy Shore Lake

Mats Mats

Swansonville

Wi lso Cleve n lan d

104

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MEMORIAL FIELD

To Sims Way Highway 101

20

CHETZEMOKA PARK

Washington St.

Jefferson St.

To Water St. & Ferry

Decatur St.

Rd

Kala Point Irondale

19

Gardiner

101 To Port Angeles

Marrowstone Island

Townsend Bay

Benedict St.

Old Ft. Townsend Port State Park

12th St.

20

Gise S t.

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10th St.

nce Rd

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PORT BOAT HAVEN POINT HUDSON

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O'Brien Rd

101

re

Abbott

Howe

Linderman

Pinnell

Old Franson

DUNGENESS RECREATION AREA

Dungeness Wildlife National Refuge

Viewpoint State Parks

Olympic

Spath

CARLSBORG

Atterberry

Parrish

Solmar

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Marine Dr

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Kendall Rd

Williamson Rd Wright Rd Elliot Ct

SEQUIM

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Bell Hill

Brownfield

Blair

W. Washington St

Happy

Spruce St Cedar St

Alder St

AQUATIC REC CENTER

W. Hendrickson Rd

Fir St

Noman St Eunice St Reservoir Rd

e

itefeather Wh

Coulter

d.

Prairie St Hammond St Hemlock St

Maple St

Bell St

Pine St Pine Ct Lehman St Salal Pl

McCurdy Rd

W Sequim Bay

CARRIE BLAKE Belfield Belfield PARK

E. Fir

Medsker

SunLand

Spencer Farm Place

Silberhorn Rd

101

Old Olympic Hwy

L ou

Rd ella

SEQUIM SEQUIM BAY BAY STATE PARK STATE PARK

Sequim Bay y Rd Ba im qu

Gellor

School House

One Horse Ln

L ewis Rd

Casino School

Museum

Boat Ramp Marina

Airport

Information

Matson

Finn Hall Monterra

Olympic H wy Old Heuhslein

Sie ber t's Cree

Shore Rd

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?

Public Camp

Gunn Vogt

Webb Sherburne

Cameron Dryke

The Bluffs

Gehrke

Blue Mountain

Spring ek

McDonnell C

Pierson Flanders

Kirner

Golf

S. Barr

Vautier

Rd Dick Kitchen

Thornton

Grandview

Du ng e ne ss Sp it Joslin

Ward Rive r Dungeness

Cays Cays Heath Mill

McComb

Valley View Dr

Sequim -Dungeness Way

Klahn Pl

Stone Rd

SEQUIM-DUNGENESS VALLEY

River Rd

Taylor Cutoff

Evans 5th Ave

Towne Rd Priest

Kendall 7th Ave

Palo Verde Loop

3rd Ave

Falcon Rd Sequim Ave North Sequim Ave South

5th Ave 5th Ave

CITY HALL

Bay

Opal Ln Ho Wy

Jade Dr

Brownfield Rd.

RdR low e Rd Hol x st o F Ne Quai l's Ow

Street Map

Hammond

Washington

POST OFFICE

PIONEER PARK

E. Cedar St

E. Oak St

E. Fir St E. Alder St

E. Willow St

icke

n Coop

Rd

Gardiner Beach Rd

Discovery Bay

Diamond Point

ns Ln Faw

Doe Run Rd Miller Peninsula

101

Ch

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Sunshine Acres

Catlake

W. Sequim Bay Rd

CARRIE BLAKE PARK

E. Hendrickson Rd

City of SEQUIM

E. Willow St

LIBRARY

N. Sequim Ave Sequim-Dungeness Way S. Sequim Ave

Cameron Farm

8th Av Brown

4th Pl

Haller

Mariott Ave Va lley

3rd Pl

3rd Ave

7th Ave

7th Av

Ja ke Ha Dr SePebble ll rp Wilc entine ox L n Blake

6th Pl 5th Pl Palo Alt o R

Sunnyside Ave

mee Am A th

Sapphire Pl

Stihl Rd

Sunnyside Ave Knapmann Ave Govan Ave Matriotti Ave Dunlap Ave Ryser Ave Hw y

Rhodefer Rd

N. Brown Rd S. Brown Rd

Rav en's Rid g

Knapp

Rd

W

S

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m qui E. Se

Old Bly n

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Blake Ave

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Strait of Juan de Fuca

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VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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Bean Rd

Air por t Rd

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Winddancer Ln

Hosare Rd

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Tum

Fors

Wellman Rd

ld

ill

Rhodes Rd

Ahlvers Rd

Viewcrest Ave

Oakcrest Ave

Motor Ave Dolan Ave OrcAve Orcas Ave Laurid Hancock Ave sen B Fogarty Ave E Lopez Ave lvd Forest Ave E Whidbey Ave E Vashon Ave Vashon Ave W Pa Park rk Av Avee Park Ave

all ey C re ek

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f the

Airport Rd

+

Campbell Ave

OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK VISITOR INFORMATION CENTER

A

Key Rd

Golf Course Rd

Rd

Baker Farm

Bigelo

Alpine Rd

Harrington

Patterson Rd

Bill Smith Rd

E Arnette E. Arnette Rd

E 2nd St E 3rd St E 4th St E 5th St E 6th St E 7th St Kell er D r

E Port E 3rd PlazaAngeles E 5 4th S St E 6 th S t th t St

C ate C olum r S Gearolin bia t org e St ian St na St 1st St

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Park Ave

Scrivner Rd

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Hurrica n Peabod re y C ek e Rid ge Rd

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White Cr e

N Gaelees sS

MonMon roe roe Rd Rd

U.S. Coast Guard Station

Tara

R

DelGuzzi

Weller

N Brook Ave

Bay St

e

Draper Rd

l

101

Henry Boyd Rd

Tinkham Rd

Viewpoint

Marina

Boat Ramp

Information

Marsden St

?

Public Camp

r

Vi

Shade Tree

Lisel Ln

Harvel Ln

Fer

Terrrryy Mills Te

Wall

Breezy Ln

Olympic National Park School

Museum

Airport

Ferry

Deer

Guy

PORT ANGELES

Bay Vw Ave Leighland Ave Lees Cre k

Alb Eu ert S Fra nice t Ra ncis St Wa ce St St Ch shin Jo ambe gton Lib nes S rs S St t En erty t nis St St Doss Rd

Hauk Rd

d. Mount Pleasant R S Ad er L n

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Hemlock Ln ek C re

Buchanan Dr

Deer Park Rd

Ediz Hook

Bagley

Strait of Juan de Fuca

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WEST END

Tatoosh Cape Island Flattery Lighthouse

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Pacific Ocean

UN

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Neah Bay

Makah Nation Reservation Shi-Shi Beach

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v

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Point of Arches

Bodelteh Islands

Strait of Juan de Fuca

112

Pillar Point

Clallam Bay

k

112 Ozette Indian Reservation

Pysht 112

tte o-Oze Rd. Hok

Cape Alava

Ozette Islands

East & West Twin Beach 113

Lake Dickey

Sandpoint

Lake Ozette

Sappho

Lake Pleasant

101

Olympic National Park

Ca

a law

Olympic National Forest

N

Rialto Beach

Indian Reservation

LaPush

D Sol ver Quilla Ri yute River

sh Rd LaPu

Quileute Indian Reservation

City Area

Klahanie

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Forks

oh Ho h

E St SE G St SE

Gun Club Rd

?

Ruby Beach Destruction Island

Beach 6

101

Forks Timber Museum

Clea rw

Beach 4 Forks Chamber of Commerce Visitors' Center

h

Ho

Hoh Indian Reservation

Peterson Rd

4th Ave

A St SE

Beach 3

ate

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H

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r ve r Ri

? Kalaloch

SF

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Ranger Station Shelter Public Camp Information Marina Hospital Boat Ramp Viewpoint Airport VISITORS GUIDE 2013

Q

S Forks

Russell Rd

5th Ave SW Rd F-2000

N Forks Ave

y uc W

To Hoh Rain Forest

rt

law

Ca

1st Ave SE

Calaw

Sol D

ay iel W E St SW

Hoh

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Tillicum Park

ach

Page Rd

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Division St A St SW B St SW

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Ca

101

FORKS, WASHINGTON

For

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Bogachiel State Park

Street Map

C St NW

SF

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National Wildlife Refuges

Quileute Rd layute Quil uc

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101

Olympic National Forest

Bog

Sol D uc R

Beaver

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CA

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19


A gem along the Hood Canal

20

VISITORS GUIDE 2013

101

19

Eldon

Lilliwaup

Cana l

101

Dewatto

119

106

Union

101

Shelton Carmill Station

303

3

Gorst

3

Belfair State Park

Belfair Sunset Beach

Tahuya

Potlach

Silverdale

Bremerton Port Orchard Bremerton Junction

Hoodsport

Potlatch State Park

307

Keyport

3

Seabeck

H o od

d Nfd 24 R

Lake Cushman

Scenic Beach State Park

Triton Cove State Park

Hamma Hamma

3

Bangor Coyle

16

Sidney Rd

Boat Launch

Port Gamble

Poulsbo

Ba y

Seal Rock

Duckabush

Ranger Station Information

Dabob Shine

Lofall

101

Dosewallips State Park

State Park

104

Hood Canal Bridge

Brinnon abush R iver Duck Camping

Port Ludlow

Shine Tidelands State Park

Quilcene

Da bob

Dosewallips River

DabobRd.

Olympic National Forest

Leland

ShrimpFest 2013

Chimacum

Uncas

Rd

The 7th annual Olympic Art Festival is from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, May 25, at the Olympic Art Gallery, 40 Washington St., Quilcene. Demonstrations include bowl turning, scroll saw art, watercolor painting, photography. See www.olympicartgallery for a list of artists. Call Sally Brown, 360-531-2015, for more information on the free event.

20

Discovery Bay

B ay

Olympic Art Festival set

Blyn

Oak

DISCOVERING THE EMERALD TOWNS of Quilcene and Brinnon is like finding a gem. These quiet towns offer visitors a place to relax and experience life the way it should be lived. Well known for its clams and oysters, this Hood Canal region also offers seasonal crabbing, shrimping and fishing opportunities. For those who would rather let others do the hunting and gathering, there are many seafood retailers and restaurants. Nearby are pristine scuba diving opportunities. There are five public or private boat launch ramps from Quilcene to Triton Cove, south of Brinnon, and three marinas. Consider Homeport Marina and Pleasant Harbor Marina, both located in Brinnon. For those who prefer the RV life or tent camping, opportunities exist in several federal, state, county or private campgrounds. Quilcene and Brinnon are nestled among the trees of the Olympic National Forest. Some sites are in the seclusion of quiet forests, while others are adjacent to or within easy walking distance of the Hood Canal and the three main rivers that flow out of the Olympic Mountains to the Hood Canal — the Dosewallips, Duckabush and Hamma Hamma. And there are a few fishing lakes near Quilcene. Modern accommodations, from well-appointed cabins to lodges to B&Bs, are available. While exploring the beaches, riverbanks and forest roads or trails, visitors can observe an abundance of wildlife including a variety of bird species, seals

16

Purdy

302

Twanoh State Park

Grapeview

Gig Harbor

HOOD CANAL Steilacoom

and perhaps a glimpse of one of the several bands of majestic elk that roam throughout Brinnon’s Dosewallips and Duckabush valleys. Three waterfalls, all within surprisingly easy hiking distance, can be seen and enjoyed in the span of a single day. These are Falls View, Rocky Brook and Murhut. A fourth cascade, Dosewallips Falls, is accessible only by foot. On a day of enjoying the waterfalls, don’t forget to take a drive to the top of Mount Walker for incredible views of Seattle and the Puget Sound to the east or magnificent views

Saturday-Sunday, May 25-26

The Emerald Towns Alliance is pleased to announce that ShrimpFest is returning in 2013 and promises to be bigger and better than ever. ShrimpFest’s new location is approximately 3 miles north of the old location, north of the Yelvik General Store, 251 Hjelvicks Road, Brinnon, and south of Cove RV Park & Country Store on U.S. Highway 101. Live music, local vendors, belt sander races, delicious food, great fun and shrimp! For more information, e-mail shrimpfest@hotmail.com or call 360796-4456.

of the mountains within Olympic National Park to the west. The road to the top of Mount Walker is open seasonally and may be closed due to weather. A year-round option is to park at the base for a two-mile hike. Learn about salmon at the Quilcene National Fish Hatchery, which is two miles south of Quilcene where the river crosses under U.S. Highway 101. Several other hiking and equestrian trails, from easy to challenging, allow the visitor to experience nature and serene vistas. Dosewallips Road is a popular eastern portal to Olympic National Park for hikers and equestrians. Quilcene has a number of galleries that feature quality artwork and crafts. The Saturday of Memorial Day weekend in Quilcene artists present demonstrations at the Olympic Art Gallery. Each autumn features the one-day Quilcene Fair, Parade & Classic Car show. The visitor information center at the Forest Service Ranger Station, 295142 Highway 101, on the south end of Quilcene, is open daily. Additional details and information are available at the North Hood Canal Chamber of Commerce at www.emeraldtowns. com. Don’t forget your camera! The Emerald Towns of Hood Canal welcome you.


Olympic Music Festival A SUMMER SURPRISE along Highway 104 between the Hood Canal bridge and Discovery Bay is the Olympic Music Festival near Quilcene. Founded in 1984 by professional musicians, the festival is a summering celebration of classical chamber music performed in a 100-year-old dairy barn by some of the best and brightest classical musicians in the country. Make your reservations early and you can claim a pew or hay bale to have a front-row seat. Pick a comfortable spot outside the barn in open seating or stroll around the farmstead as sweet sounds of violins and cellos waft in the air. Please note that no pets are allowed on the farm and that it is dangerous to leave them in a vehicle, so it’s best to leave them at home. Now in its 30th year, the festival draws some 10,000 concert visitors throughout the summer and features two dozen guest musicians. The 2013 season runs June 29-Sept. 1 every Saturday and Sunday with concerts at 2 p.m. Concerts typically run several hours. For more information, go to www.olympicmusicfestival.org or call 360-7324800. Tickets are available online, over the phone or at the festival gate at 7360 Center Road, Quilcene. There is a clearly marked turn-off on Highway 104.

Hood Canal Uniquely Local Gifts & Specialty Foods, Espresso & Pastry

A perfect day trip

Fresh roasted organic coffee, chocolate & cocoa, mustards & marinades, jams & jellies. Gourmet Hot Dogs served May to September.

Winery & Gift Shop Open Daily 10-6 Also offering Craft Ciders & Beer

Sample award-winning wines at Hoodsport on Hwy 101 just south of Hoodsport. www.hoodsport.com 360-877-9894 • 1-800-580-9894 North 23501 Hwy 101, Hoodsport, WA

294963 Highway 101, Quilcene, WA

(Next to Habitat for Humanity Store)

theplaidpepper.com

Celebrating 34 years • a Winery Loop® Winery

Established 1994

Visit us at www.the-picketfence.net Lavender Arts and Crafts MONTHLY 4-DAY OPENINGS! Faire in the Par k Check our website for July 19t h, 20t h, 21s t Come see us in the Par k! more information

21 Dutch Lane. Quilcene, WA • 360-774-0444 VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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Port Townsend PORT TOWNSEND, at the eastern end of the Olympic Peninsula on Highway 20, takes pride in being the area’s cultural hub. It is the county seat of Jefferson County, which had a population of about 30,000 in 2012. Artists representing all disciplines seem to gravitate to the town of 9,100 that relishes its eclectic personality. You can find venues for dance, drama/ theater, film/movies, literary and visual arts and music in Port Townsend. Established in 1851, Port Townsend’s character today comes from its boom in the 1880s and 1890s as a major seaport, fishing and lumber area. Town leaders and merchants built ornate and spacious Victorian homes and fine brick or stone buildings for their businesses downtown based on the promise of a railroad line — but the railroad never came. Port Townsend quietly folded back into itself for decades, never losing its Victorian character. It was rediscovered a hundred years later as a retirement mecca, and in 1976 the downtown waterfront and bluff above it were designated as a National Historic District. Port Townsend is one of only three Victorian seaports on the National Register of Historic Places in the U.S. and the only one on the West Coast. As a nod to its heritage, the city hosts the Victorian Heritage Festival every March with tours of its “painted ladies” among the activities. In addition to being on the Olympic Peninsula, Port Townsend also

is on the Quimper Peninsula which is bordered by the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Admiralty Inlet, Port Townsend Bay and Discovery Bay. It is blessed with a temperate marine climate with winter highs in the 40s and summer highs in the 70s and sits in the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains, so annual precipitation is about 18 inches. Port Townsend is home to the Wooden Boat Festival every September and some of the best boat craftsmen in the world. The Northwest School of Wooden Boat Building is just south of the city and the Wooden Boat Foundation maintains a waterfront site for maritime educational programs. Fort Worden State Park and Conference Center is just a few miles outside the city limit — the fort was one of three built in the area in the early 1900s to defend Puget Sound. Its barracks and officers’ quarters have been restored and the site is designated as a National Historic Landmark. Some of the former military buildings are dedicated to Centrum, a statewide center for arts and creativity, which offers workshops, classes, events and performances. Points of interest in or near Port Townsend include the Port Townsend Marine Science Center, the Northwest Maritime Center, the Victorian downtown district and marina, the Port Townsend Aero Museum, the Coastal Artillery Museum, Jefferson County Historical Society Museum and self-guided tours of art studios.

Strollable Seaport

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VISITORS GUIDE 2013


Historic Port Townsend SETTLED IN 1851, Port Townsend’s heyday as a late-Victorian seaport brought wealth and style to the community as upwardly mobile captains and merchants built fine homes for themselves. A leisurely drive around the “uptown” area overlooking Admiralty Inlet reveals about 30 homes built between 1860 and 1900, restored to their late 19th century glory in a variety of styles, including classic Victorian and Victorian Gothic, Italianate, Italianate Villa and Italianate Renaissance, Queen Anne and Georgian. Most are private residences and not open to the public. Every March, Port Townsend pays homage to its background with the Victorian Heritage Festival, which includes tours. For more information, see www.victorianfestival.org. Several homes have been converted into bed and breakfasts and one, the D.C.H. Rothschild house, built in 1868, is part of the state parks system and managed by the Jefferson County Historical Society. It is furnished in period pieces and is open Monday to Saturday 11 a.m.-4 p.m. and Sunday 1-4 p.m. May through September. The house museum is at the corner of Jefferson and Taylor streets. Port Townsend boomed in the 1880s and 1890s with the promise of a railroad, so many of the homes reflect the style of the waning Victorian Age with massive construction and elaborate ornamentation. Tasteful plaques and signs give a mini-history lesson with the original owners’ names and dates built. The state’s oldest Methodist church, from 1871, has a museum open to the public, and the Episcopal church, built in 1860, remains a place of worship today. But the most magnificent Port Townsend structure overseeing the entire city is the classically Victorian Jefferson County Courthouse built in 1892 of red brick with its 124-foot clock tower. The county’s business still is conducted in the building, a National Historic Landmark and one of the two oldest courthouses in the state. In 1976, Port Townsend was designated a National Historic District and is one of only three remaining Victorian seaports in the country. After 15 years with an active Main Street program, Port Townsend was honored in 2000 with the Great American Main Street award from the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Several blocks of buildings restored to their late-Victorian facades and tree-lined streets make ambling downtown a pleasurable activity. So if you’re walking or driving, there’s plenty of history to absorb in Port Townsend.

Northwest Maritime Center Home of the Wooden Boat Foundation

Visit us all year! •Wooden Boat Festival •Learn-to-Sail Programs •Advanced Navigation Simulator Training •Wooden Boat Chandlery •Boat Building Classes •Sailing Regattas •Boating & Cruising Symposia •Global Piracy Summits

Photo Copyright Mark Saran

431 Water Street Port Townsend, WA 98368 nwmaritime.org 360.385.3628 VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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Jefferson County Historical Society The Jefferson County Historical Society Museum is in the magnificently restored 1892 Port Townsend City Hall building. Housed in the former municipal court room, fire hall and jail spaces, the museum’s exhibits illustrate the lively history of communities born in waterfront forests more than 150 years ago. The exhibit also features historical examples of extravagant Victorian regalia. The Fire Hall Gallery features exhibits on Jefferson County’s maritime history and the Port Townsend Fire Department, as well as a Victorian hearse and Gurney Cab. Museum hours are daily 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Admission: Adults $4, children 3-12 are $1. Passport to museum and Rothschild House $6. 540 Water St., Port Townsend, WA 98368. 360-385-1003.

Come to Historic Port Gamble

www.portgamble.com 360-297-8074 24

VISITORS GUIDE 2013

Conferences Weddings Reunions Events

Other Jefferson County historical treasures

The Jefferson County Historical Society also manages the Old Bell Tower, the Native Canoe Shelter, Point Wilson Lighthouse at Fort Worden and the Rothschild House State Park in Port Townsend, which are open for tours. Visitors to the Rothschild House, built in 1868 for merchant David C.H. Rothschild and his wife, Dorette, can see the family’s period furniture, personal belongings, original carpet and wallpaper that have changed little over nearly 140 years. The spare simplicity of the Greek Revival-style house pre-dates the more ornate Victorian architecture common to many old homes in Port Townsend. As the smallest state park in Washington, the Rothschild Historic Home Museum can be visited at Taylor and Jefferson streets in the uptown district.


The house is open for tours May-September from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. daily. Admission is $4 for adults, $1 for children under 12. Nearby is the 1890 Fire Bell Tower on the bluff overlooking downtown Port Townsend. Constructed in a pyramid shape to withstand winter’s strong southwest winds, the tower alerted volunteers of fires and housed a fire engine. In 1999, the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation named the Bell Tower No. 1 on its list of most endangered historical treasures. There is a small admission fee.

Sailing Supplies • Navigational Instruments • Ship’s Bells, Clocks Jackets, Vests, Hats & Scarves • Le Cadeaux “unbreakable” Dinnerware NOAA Charts & Cruising Guides • Maritime Books for all ages Prisms, Port Holes, Oil Lamps • Blocks, Cleats, Oarlocks Shipmate Stoves • Nautical Gifts for all occasions Galleyware & Cookbooks • Pirate Gear & Sailor toys for Li’l Scuppers Located inside the Northwest Maritime Center 431 Water Street, next to Point Hudson | Port Townsend, WA 98368 360.385.3628 x101 • Open 7 days 10-5 website: woodenboatchandlery.org All sales support the youth & adult maritime educational programs of the Northwest Maritime Center.

The Fountain District Natural Skin Care

W o rl d F am o us

... Facials,

Waxing, Exfoliation, Body Wraps, Lash & Brow Tinting, Local Organic Products

F i s h & C hi ps

Connie Segal

S i nce 19 89 !

LICENSED

Open

ESTHETICIAN

360-821-1718 • www.ConnieSegal.com

Gift Certificates

930 Washington St., Port Townsend

Daily 11:30 Sunday Brunch 10:00 Late Night Dining 237 Taylor Street ~ Port Townsend

(360)385-6448 ~ www.SilverwaterCafe.com

Courtyard Café

A cozy little eatery with a heavenly flavor Featuring Home made soups, sandwiches ◊ cinnamon bread made daily ◊ pastries & pies OPEN 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. / CLOSED TUES

230 Quincy St.

360-379-3355

Port Townsend VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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Port Townsend Marine Science Center Port Townsend Marine Science Center Fort Worden State Park

Hours: April 1-June 15 – Fri.-Sun. noon-4 p.m.; June 15-Sept. 5 – Wed.-Mon. 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sept. 7-Oct. 31 – Fri.-Sun. noon-4 p.m.; Nov. 1-March 31 – Fri.-Sun. noon-4 p.m. There is a small fee for non-members. For more information, contact the center at www. ptmsc.org, 360-385-5582 or 800-566-3932. A Washington State Parks Discovery Pass is required.

MANY RESIDENTS AND VISITORS, on their way to the Point Wilson Lighthouse or campgrounds in Fort Worden State Park, take little notice of two buildings that make up the Port Townsend Marine Science Center. Those whose curiosity gets the better of them, however, are rewarded with dynamic displays of intertidal plants and animals indigenous to Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca and an exhibit called “The Land Meets the Sea.” Built on a pier in the 1940s as a supply warehouse, the 50-foot marine science building now gives the illusion of being in an underwater world, thanks to a $1.1 million renovation. The center was founded in 1982 as an educational and scientific organization devoted to understanding and conserving the area’s marine and shoreline environment. The center’s exhibits are in collaboration with the Burke Museum-Seattle and Washington State Parks. Several closed tanks, touch pools and hands-on exhibits allow visitors to observe, up close and personal, marine life in its live-seaweed habitat, which must be replaced every few weeks. Among the colorful sea creatures on exhibit — in touch tanks or closed aquariums — are sea anemones, orange-lipped scallops, burrowing cucumbers, sea squirts and sea urchins, serrated-edge rockfish, pinto abalone, rock scallops and decorator crabs. Have you ever Orca skeleton seen the tide have an ebb-and-flow cycle of 14 minutes? You can see it happen with the push of a button in the intertidal tank. The natural history exhibit focuses on the area’s geology — beach rocks, an interactive Washington geo-puzzle, fossils of mammals and invertebrates millions of years old, including a million-year-old sockeye salmon, and the 12-foot model of a bluff with its distinct layers of sedimentary materials. There’s now a new exhibit on orcas in the natural history exhibit, Learning from Orcas — the Story of Hope, a fully articulated orca skeleton. Every day that the buildings are open, there are interpretive programs at 2:30 p.m. — During the summer, marine science programs are Mondays, Thursdays and Saturdays; natural history programs are Wednesdays and Sundays. Guided beach walks along Admiralty Inlet are offered Fridays at the same time. The Port Townsend Marine Science Center also embraces the “marine” in its name with wildlife cruises on the yacht Glacier Spirit and sailing trips on the schooner Adventuress around Protection Island National Wildlife Refuge at the mouth of Discovery Bay. For dates and prices, see the website or call the center.

RV Campgrounds Campground & RV Park Shadow Mountain

Jefferson County Fairgrounds Campground

Year-round campground RV Group camping with building available 80 Campsites • 18 Full Hookups • 40 Power/Water Campsites • 22 Dry Campsites Full Hookups, $20 • Partial $17 • Dry Camping $15 (per night)

Port Townsend, Washington

jeffcofairgrounds@olypen.com • 4907 Landes St. 360-385-1013 • www.jeffcofairgrounds.com

Mobuilt RV

Close to Olympic National Park

Largest Parts & Accessories Store on the Peninsula

15 miles W. of PA on Hwy 101 • Across from Lake Sutherland

Full Hookups, Tent Spaces, Laundry, Store, Deli, Fuel WiFi Hot Spot • RV available for nightly or weekly rentals

232951 Hwy 101 • Port Angeles (360) 928-3043 • (877) 928-3043

Discounts for Active Military, Police & Firemen

360-681-Duke (3853) 2634 W. Sequim Bay Rd. Sequim, WA 98382

www.shadowmt.com

www.johnwayneswaterfrontresort.com

Crescent Beach & R V Park EVERCHANGING SURF • AWESOME SUNSETS • SAND DOLLARS AGATES • EAGLES • SEASHELLS DAY • TENTS • RVS (w/e/s)

15 miles west of Port Angeles off Hwy 112

HALF MILE SAND BEACH

LAUNDRY • HOT SHOWERS

www.olypen.com/crescent • E-mail: crescent@olypen.com

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VISITORS GUIDE 2013

(360) 928-3344

“Serving you since 1962”

• Parts & Supplies • Awnings & Hitches • Damage & Fiberglass Repair • Propane & Electrical • Free Estimates

Factory Authorized Service for Most Major Brands!

2372 Highway 101 E. • Port Angeles

360-457-4101 • www.mobuiltrv.com

CAMPWOOD $5 a box • $20 piles & up 261361 Hwy. 101 1.5 miles west of Sequim For info., call Craig at

(360) 565-6045


Everything Port Townsend F I N E WAT E R F R O N T D I N I N G PAN

S

SO

TS

SAL A

INI

SE R DES

UP

S

DS

Voted “Best Sandwich” 11 years running.

Shopping is always the answer! 834 Water Street, Port Townsend • 360-385-5887

Locally owned and operated since 1995 929 Water Street, Suite D • Port Townsend • (360) 385-2037 www.jordinis.com

Puzzles, games and other fun stuff!

Make New Memories Here!

Artisan Ice Cream

1013 Water St., Port Townsend • 360-379-1278 • Toll free 888-750-2209

And Handcrafted Truffles & Chocolates Made Here!

Large Inventory of Modern & Estate Jewelry

Handcrafted • Fresh Healthy Delicious!

FLAGSHIP LANDING

Jewelry Repair Rings & Sizing Custom Orders Gemstones

Loose Diamonds Watch Batteries Watch Repair

360-302-0427

Buyer of Gold & Silver Open Daily 10-5, Closed Tuesday & Sunday 1017-A Water Street, Port Townsend

Photo by Al McCleese

Open Daily 10 AM – 10 PM 627 & 631 Water St. Port Townsend 360-385-1156 See our website at www.elevatedicecream.com VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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Everything Port Townsend The “small-town” wine shop with the ‘big-city’ selection!

Fantastic Selection in all Price Ranges

2 for $799

Open 7 days a week 11-7 Sun.- Thurs. 10-8 Fri. & Sat. Wine Tastings Open even later on (Check website for schedule) weekends & holidays www.PTwineSeller.com and during Summer Wine • Beer • Champagne • Cider • Picnic Foods & Cheese

from

1010 Water St., Port Townsend, WA

360-385-7673

Celebrating 30 Years!

June 29th - Sept. 1st 2013 Concerts in the Barn

Saturdays & Sundays at 2PM (360) 732-4800 www.olympicmusicfestival.org

Present this card and recieve

Port Townsend Gallery is a fine arts cooperative featuring original paintings, photographs, fine jewelry, ceramics, sculpture, leather goods, glass art, fiber art, a sculpture garden on the water, and more..... Located on the waterfront, 715 Water Street

(360) 379-8110 porttownsendgallery.com 28

VISITORS GUIDE 2013

10% off one item* *In store only *Not good with other discounts or food items

Apparel ~ Jewelry Heritage ~ Gifts 929 Water St. Port Townsend, WA 98368 360-385-3317

info@wanderingangus.com ♣ wanderingangus.com


Everything Port Townsend

Port Townsend Aero Museum

929 Water Street Port Townsend, WA Phone: 360-385-1633 Open seven days a week, 10am - 6pm.

IF ANTIQUE AIRPLANE AFICIONADOS are anything like their carworshiping counterparts, they’ll hit every museum within a hundred miles. One not to miss on the Olympic Peninsula is the Port Townsend Aero Museum at the Jefferson County International Airport, four miles south of the junction of Highways 19 and 20. About 30 antique airplanes have been donated to the nonprofit and, after meticulous restoration, are displayed on three levels. At any given time, half a dozen are being hand-restored by youth apprentices in the building’s shop, mentored by skilled volunteer craftsmen. The 18,000-square-foot museum is the dream-come-true of Jerry Thuotte, a former commercial pilot for three decades, and his wife, Peggy, also a licensed pilot. The couple founded the museum in 2001 as a program to teach youths craftsmanship and life skills. The Thuottes, their crew and volunteers celebrated its grand opening in August 2008. The museum is open from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday; admission is $10 for adults, $6 for youth 7-12. Most of the planes fly at least once every two weeks. Stay long enough and you might seen some in flight. For more information, call 360-437-0863 or go to www.ptaeromuseum. com.

To Port Townsend Aero Museum

From Seattle take the ferry to Bainbridge Island. Follow Highway 305 to Highway 3. Follow the signs to the Hood Canal bridge (Highway 104). Take a right turn onto Highway 19. Travel through Chimacum, the airport is on your left. Turn left on Airport Road. From Whidbey Island, take the ferry to Port Townsend. As you exit from the ferry, turn left. You will be on Highway 20. Outside of town the road splits: Highway 20 is right and Highway 19 is left/straight. Follow Highway 19 to Airport Road on your right.

VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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A star on the sea

PORT TOWNSEND CELEBRATES ITS MARITIME PAST and future with the Northwest Maritime Center at Point Hudson in the town’s northeast end. The Northwest Maritime Center is a nonprofit organization backed by an impressive cross-section of citizens, nonprofit groups and government agencies. The concept of a public center preserving and celebrating Port Townsend’s rich maritime history began 15 years ago and quickly expanded to include the entire Puget Sound region. As one of only three Victorian seaports in the nation and with some 8,000 vessels sailing by it annually into Puget Sound, Port Townsend welcomed the opportunity to focus on its maritime history and culture, provide maritime experiences for novices to experts and educate the public on the maritime heritage and economics of Puget Sound and the importance of marine trades to the region. The Northwest Maritime Center collaborated with The Wooden Boat Foundation, the Alliance for Northwest Maritime Education, marine trades and marine recreational businesses and the city of Port Townsend on the project. The complex, located in the core of Port Townsend’s National Landmark Historic District, includes the: • Maritime Heritage and Resources Building — 15,840 square feet — with a boat livery, chandlery, information desk, exhibition space, resource library, meeting rooms and offices; • Maritime Education Building — 9,520 square feet — with a craft demonstration area, wood shop, the Learning Lab for hands-on learning, classrooms and a pilothouse tower; • Outdoors public commons area — more than 40,000 square feet — with a beach boardwalk, small-boat staging platform and ADA-accessible, hand-launch boat ramp; • Renovated 289-foot-long, deep-water pier with floats and mooring buoys. The chandlery or store stocks marine supplies, fine hand tools 30

VISITORS GUIDE 2013

The Maritime Heritage and Resource Building is left of the dock and the Chandler Maritime Education Building is to its right. The latter welcomes visitors during the Wooden Boat Festival. The Heritage Building opened in 2010. Graphics courtesy of the Northwest Maritime Center and Wooden Boat Foundation

and an extensive collection of maritime books, artwork, publications and gift items. Facing the water, the large livery stores dozens of small rental vessels with easy access to a floating dock in Point Hudson Marina. On the building’s second floor there are offices for the center’s maritime partners, plus a library of hard-to-find maritime reference materials. A meeting and conference area above the livery offers panoramic vistas of downtown, Port Townsend Bay, Admiralty Inlet and the Cascade and Olympic mountain ranges. The space accommodates up to 185 people and with a full-service catering kitchen. Programs at the Maritime Education Building highlight maritime artisans and craft demonstrations featuring sail making, leather and rope work and hand-tooled, small-craft boatbuilding and maintenance. The Wooden Boat Foundation operates a hands-on learning laboratory for students with a wide array of courses and activities related to nautical science and maritime history. A mezzanine, running the full length of the building, provides a great vantage point to observe the Learning Lab activities and a hoist system anchored there raises small boats and materials to second-floor classrooms. In the building’s east-end tower, there’s a glass-encased pilothouse where students can employ traditional and modern navigational tools and techniques to track vessels in Admiralty Inlet. Both buildings have wrap-around, interconnecting upper level decks. The public commons area is bound to be a popular site for concerts and craft shows. A boardwalk links a city park, the center’s dock and the Point Hudson jetty. Hours are 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday; open Saturdays beginning May 1 through the Wooden Boat Festival in September.


VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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37th Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival

Photos by Mark Saran

All that floats your boat!

WITNESS FIRSTHAND THE SKILLS AND ARTISTRY evident in boatbuilding, see clever new tools and learn new techniques, take in live music, watch demonstrations, attend educational talks, enjoy children’s and family activities and visit, climb aboard and even sail hundreds of wooden boats of all shapes and sizes at the annual Wooden Boat Festival, Sept. 6-8, in Port Townsend. Hours are 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Friday-Saturday; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. Absolutely no pets are allowed inside the gates or on the docks. Since the construction of the Northwest Maritime Center several years ago, the festival campus has expanded in size and the number of presentations and lectures has more than doubled. All presentations and 32

â–

VISITORS GUIDE 2013


The 37th annual Wooden Boat Festival, Sept. 6-8, is the largest gathering of wooden boat enthusiasts on the West Coast and features more than 300 finely crafted boats, plus workshops, demonstrations, live music, crafts and fun! demonstrations during the day are included in the modest ticket donation. More than 200 wooden boats also are available to go aboard and meet the owners, the builders and crew. This three-day educational celebration has grown through the years to include boats on land, all along the Port Townsend waterfront and filling the marina at Point Hudson. Surrounding the marina full of wooden boats are 80 exhibitor tents (an eclectic group of products and services connected in some way to wooden boats) and at least seven demonstration areas: a Woodworking Stage, Kids’ Boatbuilding, Music Stage, Marina Room talks and all-day options to go sailing or rowing. A full Food Court next to the Main Stage provides dozens of delicious local food options. There’s something for everyone — for youth of all ages — with a love of the maritime culture.

GO ABOARD BOATS AND MEET THE OWNERS

At the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival, all boats in the harbor are available for you to go aboard. Owners, builders and crew are there to tell you about the boat and its adventures. See small (12-25 feet) boats of all kinds, from rowing and sailing dinghies to Redfish or Pygmy kayaks and Adirondack guide boats or a range of small “trailer sailers” and kit boats from Chesapeake Light Craft to Grapeview or Callisto Craft.

LEARN ABOUT BOATS, CRUISING, BUILDING

Exhibitors of some of the best hardware, boatbuilding supplies, tools, books, art and clothing for boaters, as well as an increasing number of maritime and environmental educational organizations exhibit and do presentations at the festival. Educators include North America’s best boatbuilding schools, including the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding in Port Townsend.

with the Port Townsend Marine Science Center, the North Star Stage with children’s programs and a pirate treasure hunt on Sunday. There are rowing

Organizations Sequim Valley and Lions Club Clubs Symphony & Chamber Orchestra Concerts and Special Events

Performances in Port Angeles and Sequim

(360) 457-5579

pasymphony@olypen.com www.portangelessymphony.org

Sequim Masonic Lodge #213 F & AM

Meets 2nd Thursday of each month 6:15 Dinner • 7:30 Lodge Thursday Morning Coffee 10 a.m. - 11 a.m.

(360) 504-1180 (Voice Mail) Sojourners Welcome

South 5th Ave. & Pine, Sequim 98382

DATES, TIMES AND TICKETS

The 37th Wooden Boat Festival officially begins at 9 a.m. Friday and ends at 5 p.m. Sunday. However, “locals” start early on Thursday evening as the festival boats and exhibitors are settling in. Music and beer are available that evening from 5-10 p.m. Day tickets are required for Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Cost is $15 per day and $10 for seniors and students. Children under 12 are free. Evening entertainment is free. Three-day weekend passes are $30 ($20 for seniors). There are plenty of activities for youngsters, including children’s boatbuilding, craft activities

and sailing races (26 feet and under sailing, festival rowing race plus the NW Schooner Cup) and the spectacular festival sail-by on Sunday at 3 p.m. For the latest schedule and ticket information, go to www.woodenboat.org or call 360-385-3628, ext. 104. The Wooden Boat Festival is sponsored by and raises funds for the Northwest Maritime Center & Wooden Boat Foundation, which together provide sailing, rowing, boat shop and maritime education programs for people of all ages at the Northwest Maritime Center year-round. The Northwest Maritime Center & Wooden Boat Foundation is at 431 Water St.

Clallam County Republican Party

Meets at 6:30 pm on 2nd & 4th Thurs. at Islander Pizza & Pasta Shack 380 E. Washington Street, Sequim, WA 98382 www.sequimvalleylions.com Contact: Betty Wilkerson 461-6090 or Ken Cram 683-9999

CLALLAM COUNTY GEM & MINERAL ASSOCIATION General Meeting 3rd Tuesday of the month

Lapidary Shop

Ongoing classes in wire chain making, casting, silversmithing, wire wrapping, faceting and others...

Rock and Gem Show - September 14th & 15th

Call for more information: 681-0372 or 681-3994 www.SequimRocks.com

Friends & Fun! Stop by for a tour and a newsletter or call for more information! 921 E. Hammond St. (across from QFC) 360.683.6806

360-417-3035 “Come Join Us for Less Intrusive Govt.” 509 S. Lincoln St., Port Angeles, WA

www.clallamrepublicans.org

Find us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/SequimActivity Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/SequimActivity

Website: www.sequimseniorcenter.org VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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Fun at the Forts

If you want to uncover the best places to romp with your dog on the beach, hike to your heart’s content, be lullabied by waves slapping on the shore and fling open your tent flap to the sun sparkling over the mountains, just ask some Olympic Peninsula residents for their favorite parks. More than likely, they’ll direct you to a trio of former forts, now state parks, that are destinations unto themselves. Fort Flagler State Park, Old Fort Townsend State Park and Fort Worden State Park and Conference Center all are within a short drive from the Hood Canal bridge and Port Townsend on the eastern side of the peninsula.

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VISITORS GUIDE 2013

Fort Flagler State Park

Fort Flagler State Park on the tip of Marrowstone Island is more out of the way, but definitely worth the scenic drive as it is surrounded by powerful Puget Sound. Getting there: From the Hood Canal Bridge, head west for five miles on Highway 104 to the well-marked junction with Highway 19 (Beaver Valley Road) and turn right. Travel 10 miles to the Chimacum four-way stop. Continue straight through Chimacum and turn right at the sign for Indian Island and Highway 116. Go straight at the four-way stop in Hadlock and follow Highway 116 for about 10 miles to the park’s entrance. Fort Flagler State Park has about 785 acres on a high bluff with vistas of Puget Sound and the Cascade Mountains. It has 12.5 miles of roads, five miles of hiking/biking trails and more than 3.5 miles of generous, sandy shoreline. For the intrepid, there’s swimming and water skiing as well as saltwater fishing in the brisk water or from the shore. Mammals, birds, fish and sea life enjoy all the island has to offer, too, and it’s a photographer’s paradise. The park has 101 standard tent sites, 14 utility spaces, one dump station, four restrooms (one ADA) and eight showers (two ADA). Forty-seven standard tent sites are in the upper camping area. Since this area is on a bluff above the water and is canopied with trees, it is not suitable for large RVs. Fifty-four sites are in the lower park area and have easy access to the water. Maximum site length is 50 feet (may have limited availability).To reserve a campsite, call 888-CAMPOUT or 888-226-7688. The park is peppered with 19 sheltered and 40 unsheltered picnic tables, most of which are beachside. There are two boat ramps and 256 feet of moorage. Fort Flagler was a working fort from 1897-1953 and became a state park in 1955. A number of its Victorian buildings remain and can be toured by calling the park office at 360-385-3701. Visitors also can explore the military


museum with its interactive, interpretative display. It’s open daily from June 1-Sept. 1 and maintains weekend hours from October through May.

Old Fort Townsend State Park

Getting there: From the Hood Canal Bridge, head west for five miles on Highway 104 to the well-marked junction with Highway 19 (Beaver Valley Road) and turn right. Stay on Highway 19 to its junction with Highway 20 and take Highway 20 north toward Port Townsend. Turn right at the sign for the park. Although the Strait of Juan de Fuca and its inland bays had been explored and named by Capt. George Vancouver in the late 1790s, the settlement of Port Townsend (originally Port Townshend) didn’t begin until about 1850. Old Fort Townsend was established in 1856 on Port Townsend Bay to protect these early settlers from surrounding Native American tribes. Over the next century, the fort was on furlough more than it was in service. In 1895, after Port Townsend’s heyday, the barracks burned and the fort, like its namesake, faded into Jefferson County history for decades. None of the original buildings remain but a history loop has descriptive signage on the site of each of the fort’s buildings. Douglas-firs planted by the soldiers more than 150 years ago stand as sentinels along the path. Owned by the state since 1953, the site has about 370 heavily wooded acres and 3,960 feet of saltwater shoreline offering views of Admiralty Inlet, Port Townsend Bay and the Cascade Mountains. The park covers about one-third of the original fort. There are 6.5 miles of forested hiking trails, including a self-guided nature trail and one highlighting the park’s fort history. The amenities include 40 campsites, a dump station, two restrooms, a shower, 43 picnic tables and three picnic shelters, ball fields and a children’s play area. The nearest boat launch ramps are at Port Townsend, Fort Flagler and Port Hadlock.

Compared to its cousins, Old Fort Townsend State Park offers a more serene and solitary experience, all the better to revel in its flora and fauna. The park is open year-round for day use; camping is permitted from March 28-Oct. 15 and is on a first-come, first-served basis.

Fort Worden State Park and Conference Center

Getting there: From the Hood Canal bridge, head west for five miles on Highway 104 to the well-marked junction with Highway 19 (Beaver Valley Road) and turn right. Stay on Highway 19 to its junction with Highway 20 and take Highway 20 north into Port Townsend. Take Sims Way (Highway 20) to Walker Street and turn left. Keep going straight for about 1.5 miles until you reach the park entrance: The street changes names several times. There is a Visitors Center on Fort Worden Way within the park. Fort Worden State Park and Conference Center draws visitors from across the nation in large part

due to Centrum, the Washington state arts organization, which presents workshops in the arts and seminars in the sciences on site. But it’s also a day trip and camping destination for Olympic Peninsula residents with its two miles of sandy beaches. Upon entering the park, visitors will be swept back a century by three dozen Victorian houses that were used as barracks in the fort’s early years. The houses, ranging from one-bedroom to six-bedroom units with living rooms, dining rooms and kitchens, may be reserved by calling 360-344-4434 or going online to www.parks.wa.gov/fortworden/ accommodations. Fort Worden, along with Fort Flagler on Marrowstone Island and Fort Casey on Whidbey Island, was established in the late 1890s to protect Puget Sound and remained an active military base until 1953. Its 433 acres were opened to the public as a state park in 1973. The park has 12 miles of hiking/ biking trails and five miles of trails that are ADA compliant. The park also features a baseball/softball field, kayak, rowboat and bike rentals, tennis courts, two boat ramps and 235 feet of dock/moorage. Camp near the beach at one of 50 full-service sites with views of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Admiralty Inlet and Mount Baker or go up the hill to 30 more private and primitive camping sites. Reservations are highly recommended — call 360-344-4431 for individual campsite reservations. Along the beachside road are the Port Townsend Marine Science Center with is marine touch tanks, the Natural History Museum, a concession stand with restrooms and the Point Wilson Lighthouse. One of the park’s crown jewels is the Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum housed in Building 201 which chronicles the fort’s 55-year military history and offers tours of the fort’s gun batteries on Artillery Hill. Housing is available for rent year-round and camping is permitted all year at the park. VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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SINCE 1973, CENTRUM’S VISION has been to be a gathering place for artists and thinkers from around the world, students of all ages and backgrounds, and audiences seeking extraordinary cultural enrichment. Located at historical Fort Worden State Park near Port Townsend, the program is a partnership among the Washington State Arts Commission, Washington State Parks Commission and the Office of the Superintendent of Schools. The former military post, built in 1902, now is a place where artists can learn from the masters in their field, including Pulitzer Prize-winners, National Heritage fellows and Grammy winners while in a park-like environment steps away from Puget Sound. Throughout the year, Centrum offers workshops in music — jazz, classical, big band, rock, country and blues — writing, dance, theater, the visual arts, teaching and incorporating the arts and creative communication, plus a variety of classes for students in middle/high school. Workshop participants immerse themselves in their art for a weekend up to 10 days and often share their talents with public performances in McCurdy Pavilion, a former military balloon hanger from the 1920s, now converted into a state-of-the-art theater with 1,200 seats, or the 300-seat Joseph F. Wheeler Theater, both at Fort Worden. Summer is the prime time for Centrum concerts, with music festivals for public enjoyment scheduled from June through August. On the schedule in 2013 are: • Festival of American Fiddle Tunes, concerts June 30-July 7 • Jazz Port Townsend, concerts July 21-28 • Port Townsend Acoustic Blues Festival, July 28-Aug. 4 Go to www.centrum.org or call 360-385-3102 or 800-733-2470 for concert specifics.

Olympic Peninsula RV Parks Association

Elwha Dam RV Park Port Angeles, WA

On beautiful Scenic By-way Highway 112

• Conveniently located for exploring the Olympic National Park • 10 minutes to quaint downtown shoppes • 10 minutes to Victoria ferry • Quiet wooded setting

1-877-435-9421

www.ElwhaDamRVpark.com

36

VISITORS GUIDE 2013

“Newest” RV Park on the Peninsula

• 28 sites, 19 pull-thru • Full hookup • Paved pads & roads • Clubhouse, laundry, showers 400 S. Brown Rd., Sequim

360-681-Duke (3853) 2634 W. Sequim Bay Rd. Sequim, WA 98382

(behind Econo Lodge, across from QFC)

www.johnwayneswaterfrontresort.com

www.gilgaloasisrvpark.com

360-452-1324 • 1-888-445-4251

Dungeness & Salt Creek Recreation Areas

360-417-2291

parks@co.clallam.wa.us

Both parks offer camping, hiking, playgrounds, picnicking, wildlife viewing, full-service accessible restrooms, and easy access to beaches on the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Campsite reservations are being accepted

www.clallam.net/countyparks

Olympic Peninsula RV Parks Invite you to come for a visit and spend time among Tall Trees, Crashing Waves, Quiet Forests’, Thundering Waterfalls, Awesome Glaciers and Wonderful Wildflowers.

Memories made in a moment last a lifetime...

Come and enjoy all that the Olympic Peninsula has to offer. Winery Tours, Divine Dining, Wild ONP Trails Kayaking.

www.OlympicPeninsulaRVparks.com


Tea and

Treasures

JUST A FEW PACES off bustling Water Street in Port Townsend is an eclectic neighborhood of businesses known as the Fountain District, so named for the standout 100-year-old bronze fountain of “Galatea,” the sea nymph from Greek mythology. A baker’s dozen of small independent shops and restaurants in two blocks along Washington Street caters to visitors who want to shop and dine where the locals do for handcrafted goods and personal attention. In its heyday of the 1890s, Washington Street was where middle class merchants constructed their buildings and the fact that many of today’s Fountain District’s stores are still in them adds to its charm. Not as busy, well-worn and touristed as Water Street, visitors can happily meander among the shops where often the proprietors not only are ready to sell their wares, but encourage customers to linger and learn about their products. These Fountain District businesses welcome you: • Port Townsend Antique Mall, 802 W. Washington St. A large building brimming with antiques from tiny pieces of estate jewelry to massive pieces of furniture and everything in between. Specializes in old nautical/fishing items, railroad antiques, Native American items, glassware and china, antique lighting fixtures and chandelier crystals. Hours: 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Monday-Friday; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday; 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. • Forest Gems Gallery, 807 W. Washington St. If it can be configured from wood, this gallery offers it. From palm-sized pieces to slab tables, the store supports the expert craftsmanship of local and Northwest wood artisans from regional woods. • Bergstrom’s Antique Autos, 809 W. Washington St. In the antique auto business for three decades, owner Robin Bergstrom offers a wide array of original, hard-to-find parts to complete many a restoration project and the background to enrich collectors’ knowledge. At any given time, he has a dozen classic cars on display, plus period literature and all matter of automobilia from bygone eras in his building that’s been a garage since 1917. Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays; closed Tuesdays-Wednesdays; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Thursday-Saturday. • Insatiables Books, 821 W. Washington St. A gem of an antique book store — there are treasures to be found. Rare and uncommon books and ephemera, antiques and collectibles. Hours: Noon-4 p.m. Thursday-Monday. • Cheri Raab’s Body Shop, 823 W. Washington St. Major name-brand fitness

and dance apparel and swimwear. Wide selection of legwear and fine hand-knits. And as a surprise, antique dolls! Hours: 10:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. daily. • Alchemy Bistro and Wine Bar, 824 W. Washington St. A fine-dining restaurant with an upscale flair for Spanish Mediterranean fare. Hours: 4 p.m. daily, 5 p.m. dinner. • Bazaar Girls, 919 W. Washington St. Tucked into one of the district’s heritage buildings, this shop caters to the fiber arts. Monthly calendar of classes and events, custom-spun and hand-dyed yarns, roving, buttons, original patterns, supplies and tools for knitting, felting and much more. Hours: 11 a.m.- 5:30 p.m. daily. • Fountain Cafe, 920 W. Washington St. An award-winning restaurant featuring Northwest and international cuisine from appetizers to entrees for lunch and dinner, housed in a turn-of-the-century clapboard building. A favorite of locals for creative sandwiches, salads and pasta. Hours: 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday-Thursday; 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m. and 5-9:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday; 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m. and 5-9 p.m. Sunday. • The Candle Store, 921 Washington St. A cacophony of colors and scents greets visitors to this candle and incense shop ensconced in Victorian building constructed in 1890. Specializes in “handmade indulgences” including incense, incense burners and ritual supplies, perfumes and essential oils, candles in a wide array of scents and designs, candle holders and accessories, fragrant soaps, lotions and lip balms. Hours: 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Saturday; noon-4 p.m. Sunday. • PT Pearl, 926 W. Washington St. An uniquely Port Townsend shop featuring eco-apparel and accessories, fair trade gifts and repurposed, locally produced accessories and home decor. Hours: 11 a.m-5 p.m. Wednesday-Monday, closed Tuesdays, www.ptpearl.com. • Connie Segal Natural Skin Care, 930 Washington St. Provides many skin therapy services, including facials, body treatments, waxing, brow and lash tinting and more. Hours: Call 360-821-1718. • The Wandering Wardrobe, 936 W. Washington St. The store is a consignment clothing shop full of whimsical wear with an eclectic bent toward costumery. Inventory ranges from leather coats to elegant evening attire for men and women, classic favorites and the perfect black dress. Whether your preferences are vintage or contemporary, the Wandering Wardobe has treasures waiting for you. Hours: 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Saturday; noon-5 p.m. Sunday. VISITORS GUIDE 2013

37


Faith Lutheran Church LCMS www.flcsequim.org 382 West Cedar, Sequim (360) 683-4803

Church Directory

Sunday Worship Services: 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Bible Classes: 9:45 a.m. (Cryroom & nursery available) Holy Communion 1st, 3rd & 5th Sundays (both services) Youth Groups • Christian Pre-School Pastor Steve Eaton & Pastor Roger Stites

E.L.C.A. 925 N. Sequim Ave. / 681-0946 dvlcoffice@gmail.com Sunday Worship Services 8:30 and 11 a.m. dvelca.org Pastor Jack Anderson

Sequim Worship Center Sunday Worship 10:45 AM Rev. David L. Westman 640 N. Sequim Avenue • 360-683-7981

Baha’i Faith

A Baha’i is a follower of Baha’u’llah (Glory of God)

An Inclusive Community Celebrating Shared Values & Putting them into Action in the Larger Community

Olympic Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Sunday service and childcare 10:30am Welcoming Congregation 73 Howe Rd., Agnew

Bahai’s are dedicated to: Adoration of One God, Appreciation for the Diversity of the Human Family, Establishment of World Peace, Equality of Women and Men, Cooperation between Science and Religion in the individual’s search for truth, Fostering of Joy and Radiance, and the Promotion of Human Dignity.

off N. Barr Rd., between Hwy 101 & Old Olympic

www.olympicuuf.org (360) 417-2665

Sunday 10am Worship Service, Nursery & Sunday School 5:45pm Awana - 3 years-HS TuESday 10am Precept Bible Study 7pm Young Adult & College Group WEdnESday 6pm Prayer Meeting ThurSday 7pm Ladies “Night Out” Friday 7pm Youth Group

38

VISITORS GUIDE 2013

www.us.bahai.org

or call 1-800-22-UNITE Local information, call: 683-5520

Everyone is welcome at the new home of

Olympic Bible Fellowship

Rich Hay Pastor

Jed Cary

Outreach Pastor 414 N. Sequim Ave. Mailing address: 394 Kirner Road Sequim Meetings throughout the week • Current info go to: www.obfchurch.org

Hendrickson St. Sequim Ave.

Dungeness Valley Lutheran Church

Fir St.

Washington St.

www.sequimworshipcenter.org

TriniTy UniTed MeThodisT ChUrCh 100 South Blake Ave.

Sunday Worship Service: 10:00 a.m. Sunday School & Nursery: 9:30 a.m. Bill Green, Pastor

683-5367

Email: church@sequimtumc.org Web site: www.sequimtumc.org

Peninsula Evangelical Friends Church Old Olympic Hwy. at North Barr Rd. 1291 N. Barr Rd., Port Angeles, WA 98362

(360) 452-9105

Sunday School (Sept. to May) 9:30 a.m. Meeting for Worship 10:45 a.m. jfodge@olypen.com/www.pefcpa.com Listen to sermons online at www.sermonaudio.com/pefc

Applying the Scriptures to our Daily Lives

Peace Lutheran Fellowship ELCA

A Place of Grace Chimacum/Port Ludlow

Sunday Worship at 10 a.m. 2924 Beaver Valley Road • Port Ludlow, WA 98365 Map at: www.peacelutheranfellowhip.org

360.732.0004


Sunny Sequim SEQUIM, PRONOUNCED “SKWIM,” is a growing community of about 6,600 in the Sequim-Dungeness Valley, celebrating its centennial this year. The valley is bounded by Jefferson County on the east, the Strait of Juan de Fuca on the north, Port Angeles on the west and the Olympic National Forest on the south. In the rain shadow of the 8,000-foot Olympic Mountains, Sequim is one of the driest locales in Western Washington, receiving an average of 16 inches annually. The town and valley gladly have adopted the moniker of “Sunny Sequim” as they are blessed by an average of 300 days of sunshine. Sequim also is known as the “Lavender Capital of North America” and draws crowds of 30,000 to its Lavender Festival in July. Approximately two hours from Seattle, Tacoma and Olympia, the Sequim-Dungeness Valley is home to some 27,000 residents, many of whom retired to the area from across the country. Sequim is situated just off of scenic U.S. Highway 101, which connects with state highways to Port Townsend to the east and Washington’s coastline to the west. The area is served by one airline from Fairchild International Airport, connecting to Seattle, and the MV Coho ferry, both in Port Angeles, 15 miles west, and a countywide transit system. Sequim Valley Airfield, four miles north of town, offers charter flights, business courier service and general aviation. John Wayne Marina at Sequim Bay is popular with small boat traffic. The Olympic National Forest and Olympic National Park cover the majority of the Olympic Peninsula, making Sequim and its environs a prime viewing area for birds and wildlife. Just outside the eastern city limits is where a resident Roosevelt elk herd grazes much of the year. Several of the herd’s leaders are tagged with radio collars and occasionally elk-crossing warning signs flash yellow on Highway 101. It’s wise to heed them — bull elk can weigh up to 1,100 pounds. In addition to the federally managed park and forest, several state parks and campgrounds are within a 25-mile radius of Sequim. Points of interest in or near Sequim include Olympic Game Farm, the New Dungeness Lighthouse on Dungeness Spit, the Olympic Discovery Trail, the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribal Center, 7 Cedars Casino, the Dungeness River Audubon Center, area lavender farms, the Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge and the Museum & Arts Center in the Sequim-Dungeness Valley.

SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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Downtown Sequim definitely is a destination for tourists and locals to eat, shop, catch a little culture and enjoy conversation over cups of coffee or glasses of wine. The downtown is a walkable community of locally owned and operated specialty shops anchored by Sequim Avenue and Washington Street. Within its six-square-block area, there are nearly 60 small businesses which are conveniently located, offer plenty of variety and take pride in personalized customer service. The atmosphere is friendly, inviting and relaxing. Just park your car on any of the non-metered streets and stroll to one of downtown’s dozen or so restaurants for home-style cooking to gourmet fare. Once fortified, meander through downtown’s

Downtown day tripping distinctive shops featuring surprising goods such as lavender products, scrapbooking supplies, scented candles, hand-crafted chocolates, fine wines and cheeses, new and used books, and classic, vintage and exotic clothing and linens. Take a break at one of half a dozen coffeehouses/bistros downtown or sample Washington and/or international wines at

a trio of wine sellers. An organic grocery downtown stocks and sells locally produced meat, dairy and produce. Another shop offers custom culinary blends of spices plus a rainbow of flavored teas. Several stores carry Northwest arts and crafts, hand-crafted personal care products, gift items, jewelry and home decor. Two hardware stores and two thrift shops round out the shopping district. Lastly, what makes downtown Sequim unique is its focus on the arts. How many small towns have not one — but multiple art galleries? The city attracts new residents from all over the country and that’s reflected in its celebration of all manner of art. In addition to a private gallery, featuring an ar-

Looking for something FUN to do? Don’t look far! You can find so much to do, all in one place right here on the Olympic Peninsula! Aquatics • Working out • Gym & Racquetball

ALL under one roof!

Try a ride on our wild wonderful water slide, Shoot baskets, play volleyball or take a class... Zumba-Yoga-Tai Chi!

Full Size Olympic Pool • Dry & Steam Saunas • Hydro Therapy Pool

Saturdays • 9 am - 3 pm 2nd Ave & Cedar Street

Open 7 days a week! Mon. - Fri. 5am - 9pm • Sat. 8am – 8pm • Sun. 11am - 8pm

www.sequimmarket.com

Visit our website for classes, pool schedules & more!

Check the website for Live Music and Event Listings

(360) 460-2668 40

SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

610 North Fifth Avenue Sequim, WA 98382 • 683-3344

www.sarcfitness.com Community owned and operated


Olympic Theatre Arts

Sequim has a strong community theater in Olympic Theatre Arts, 414 N. Sequim Ave. “Crimes of the Heart” is the summer production, running July 5-21. For performance and ticket information, visit www.olympictheatrearts. org/ or call the box office at 360-683-7326 between 1-5 p.m. Monday-Friday.

ray of works by its 35 member artists, Sequim’s nonprofit museum and arts center holds exhibits open to amateurs and professionals. Downtown businesses and artists joined forces several years ago to make art available to all with the 5-8 p.m. First Friday Art Walk. The free self-guided walking tour begins with a 5:30 p.m. artists’ reception, with snacks and wine, at the art co-operative and includes more than a dozen venues highlighting more area artists. Maps are available at participating businesses. It’s a great time to mingle, nosh and appreciate all the art downtown Sequim has to offer. Another downtown draw is the Sequim Open Aire Market, every Saturday from May-October. This two-block, pet-friendly market on Cedar Street is abuzz with vendors selling locally caught fish and homegrown meats, fruits, vegetables, honey and crafts as musicians play lively tunes. Something special to note about market artisans is that everything for sale is made by the person selling it and they welcome questions about their goods. Each artisan is juried in by a market committee to assure that every item is a quality hand-made piece. The market is like street fair with booths featuring woodworking pieces, jewelry, lavender products, paintings and photographs, fiber arts, bakery items, pottery, clothing, garden goodies and much more. There’s lots to explore in downtown Sequim! Make it a day trip destination!

Produce

Buying cluB

natural groceries

unique mercantile

• Farm-Direct • Organics • Sequim & Eastern Washington

• Everybody’s a Member!

• Organics • Bulk Foods • Natural Body Care • Nutritional Supplements

oldtyme Butcher

• In-Store Fresh Smoked Meats • Our Own Beef • Fresh Poultry & Seafood

country-style deli

• Daily Soups, Salads, & Sandwiches • Espresso & Fruit Smoothies

• Gifts & Greeting Cards • Kitchen Supply

farm store

• Animal Feeds • Hay & Straw • Pet Supplies • Birdseed

nursery

• Fruit & Veggie Starts • Ornamentals • Flowers • Natural Fertilizers & Soils • Potted & Bare-Root Trees

come see our store in the sequim Village center

• Vitamins • Herbal Remedies • Homeopathy • Skin & Nail Care • Natural Cosmetics • Largest Selection of Domestic & Imported Organic Wines

Monday-Saturday 9am - 5:30pm • (360) 683-6056

SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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42

SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013 1. A-1 Auto 2. A Dropped Stitch 3. Alder Wood Bistro 4. Anne’s Antiques 5. Blondie’s Plate 6. Blue Whole Gallery 7. Cole’s Jewelry 8. Colors of Sequim 9. Co-Op Farm & Garden 10. D&L Convenience Store 11. Doodlebugs 12. Dungeness Bay Wine & Cheese 13. Dungeness Kids Company 14. Ely’s Cafe 15. Fortune Star Chinese Dining 16. Fred’s Hobbies & Guns 17. Fresh Mix Grill & Mart 18. Galare Thai 19. The Good Book

20. Heather Creek 21. Highway 101 Diner 22. Hospital Guild Thrift Store 23. Hurricane Coffee Company 24. Islander Pizza & Pasta Shack 25. Jose’s Famous Salsa 26. Joyful Noise 27. Kettle’s Car Wash & Deli 28. Kiwi’s Fish & Chips 29. LARC Gallery 30. Lavender & Lace 31. Mad Maggi Boutique 32. Moon Palace 33. Museum & Arts Center 34. Oak Table 35. Oasis Sports Bar & Grill 36. Olympic Theatre Arts 37. Over The Fence 38. Pacific Mist Books

39. Pondicherri 40. Purple Haze Lavender 41. R&T Crystals 42. Rainshadow Roasting Coffee Company 43. Red Dog Espresso 44. Red Rooster Grocery 45. Second Chance 46. Sequim Spice & Tea Co. 47. Sofie’s Florist 48. Sunshine Cafe 49. Suzon’s Coffee Lounge 50. Solar City’s Tesa Boutique & Tanning Retreat 51. That Takes the Cake 52. Thomas Building Center 53. Twice Loved Books 54. White Cup Espresso 55. Wind Rose Cellars

Connect the number on the list below with the corresponding number on the map.


Year-round lavender!

2013 BRINGS AN EXPANDED EVENT CALENDAR for the Sequim Lavender Farmers Association featuring the joys of lavender throughout the year! The annual Sequim Lavender Farm Faire is the focus of Sequim Lavender Weekend, but we have much more to offer visitors and local residents throughout the year. To celebrate our new activities, we have launched a Friends of Lavender membership program! Members receive a 15-percent discount on lavender purchases throughout the year at all of our farms and events, two free tickets to the annual Farm Faire, a free poster, and more – all for just $35. You can join online at www.sequimlavender.org! Sequim Lavender Farm Faire July 19-21, 2013 The world comes to see the stunning Sequim lavender farms and their farmers at the annual Sequim Lavender Farm Faire, part of Sequim Lavender Weekend. The Faire gathers together all things lavender with our world-famous Heritage Lavender Farms and Lavender Arts & Crafts Faire in the Park. Our local family owned and operated farms are members of the Sequim Lavender Farmers Association. Our farmers live on the land and are full-time farmers, committed to the highest quality lavender. Each of the Heritage Lavender Farms is a festival all its own with fields of lavender, lavender products, workshops, demonstrations, crafts, food, beverages, music and more. All of the farms have plenty of free parking. The Lavender Arts & Crafts Faire in the Park is your FREE family friendly central source for all things lavender all weekend long. Spend a day at the park and enjoy a juried crafts show, arts, music, food, a wine and beer garden, hot air balloon, Sequim Centennial Antique Tractor & Logging Exhibit, Boys & Girls Club kids’ fair, and more! Tour de Lavender - Aug. 3-4, 2013 A cycling event for experienced cyclists, as well as families with kids, including a 100-kilometer ride from Kingston to Sequim using back roads at the end of Olympic Discovery Trail, and a relaxing ride through the gorgeous Sequim-Dungeness Valley, plus the famous Ride The Hurricane, all on one Pedal Power Weekend! Lavender Distillation Celebration - Aug. 31-Sept. 1, 2013 Join the farmers as the lavender season culminates with the distillation of lavender into oil.

Sequim Lavender Farm Faire Seven Festivals in One Faire!

July 19-21, 2013 Poster art by Lee Oskar

Celebrating the Heritage Lavender Farms That Have Made Sequim Famous For 17 Years! Part of Sequim Lavender Weekend.

NEW THIS YEAR! - SAVE 15% ON LAVENDER! Become a “Friend of Lavender” and save 15% on lavender plants and products year round! Plus 2 Heritage Farm tickets/buttons, and a Faire poster. Buy online, at the farms, and at the Faire. Angel Farm – Cedarbrook Lavender & Herb Farm Jardin du Soleil Lavender Farm – Lost Mountain Lavender Farm Moosedreams Lavender – Port Williams Lavender Olympic Lavender Farm – Purple Haze Lavender Farm Victor’s Lavender Farm & Nursery – Washington Lavender Farm Willow Farm/The Weary Gardener

Heritage Lavender Farm Tour

Each farm is a festival all its own with fields of lavender, plenty of free parking, lavender products, workshops, demonstrations, u-cut, crafts, food, beverages, music & more! Advance weekend tickets: $10 ($15 during the Faire) Active duty military and their dependents: $10 Children 12 & under: FREE Hours: Fri. - Sun. 10am-6pm

Lavender Arts & Crafts Faire in the Park

Carrie Blake Park Your FREE family-friendly central source for all things lavender. Spend a day at the park, picnic, and enjoy the food, wine & beer garden, hot air balloon, and antique tractor and logging exhibit. No admission charge! Hours: Fri. - Sat. 9am-7pm; Sun. 9am-6pm

Plus a free in-city Shuttle Bus connecting the lavender events, downtown and parking lots.

Winter Lavender Faire - Saturday, Nov. 30, 2013 A winter celebration for the entire family at the Boys & Girls Club with lavender products, hands-on holiday activities, food, music, gingerbread house competition and more. For more information, visit www.sequimlavender.org, e-mail: info@ sequimlavenderfarms.org or call 360-452-6300. The Sequim Lavender Farmers Association is a Washington nonprofit corporation.

www.sequimlavender.org www.sequimlavenderweekend.com SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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A nonprofit association of lavender farms dedicated to the sustainable farming and production of premium quality lavender, to maintaining the region’s agricultural legacy, and to being a significant contributor to and destination for the Sequim-Dungeness Valley agri-tourism industry.

www.sequimlavender.org info@sequimlavenderfarms.org

PURPLE HAZE LAVENDER FARM

180 Bell Bottom Rd., Sequim • 1-888-852-6560

Organic Blossoms Natural Products Lavender Products for Gifts, Decorating, Crafts & Cooking

May - Sept. 10-5 daily Bring your summer guests to our farm for lavender ice cream, and U-pick lavender.

PURPLE HAZE DOWNTOWN

troll acres of fragrant lavender fields...Pick your own bouquet, choose a plant for your garden and find the perfect gift in our distinctive shop. Summer hours (April-Sept.) Open Daily 10am-5pm.

127 W. Washington St., Sequim 360-683-1714 • Open daily

www.purplehazelavender.com

World famous

Offering consulting all over the world including the USA and Canada for those who wish to be in the lavender industry. Assignments from Lebanon to Morocco, Africa.

We create hand-harvested and hand-crafted products from the finest organic lavender grown. No pesticides or artificial fertilizers are used on our lavender fields!

Located at George Washington Inn & Estate 939 Finn Hall Rd., Port Angeles, WA 98362

(360) 452-5207 www.walavender.com

Wholesale and retail. We have a complete line of lavender products for people and pets.

Farm and gift shop Open to the public from June through September.

(360) 681-7930 44

www.victorslavender.com

SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

See us on the farm tour during Lavender Weekend!

U-Pick Lavender • Lavender Products Live Plants • Lavender Still Open to the public during 2013 Sequim Lavender Farm Faire July 19, 20, 21st

1432 Marine Dr., Sequim (360) 683-4475 www.olympiclavender.com


Sequim Lavender Farm Fair July 19, 20 & 21, 2013

Jardin du Soleil

Purple Haze Lavender

180 Bell Bottom Lane 1-888-852-6560 1-360-683-1714 www.purplehazelavender.com

B

C

E

★ A

Arts & Crafts Faire in the Park

Carrie Blake/James Center

Olympic Lavender Farm D

Washington Lavender Farm

Victor’s Lavender Farm 3743 Old Olympic Hwy. 360-681-7930 www.victorslavender.com

3932 Sequim-Dungeness Way 360-582-1185 1-877-527-3461 www.jardindusoleil.com

F

939 Finn Hall Road 360-452-5207 www.walavender.com

1432 Marine Drive 360-683-4475 www.olympiclavender.com

Lost Mountain Lavender

G

1541 Taylor Cutoff Road 360-681-2782 www.lostmountainlavender.com

Part of Sequim Lavender Weekend New This Year! Save 15% www.sequimlavender.org on Lavender Plants and Products! www.sequimlavenderweekend.com Join Friends of Lavender and save 15%

on all of your lavender plant and products Lavender, juried crafts, food, throughout the year at our farms and events! music, family activities, Plus 2 tickets to the farm tour, and more. 2 Faire buttons, and a lavender poster. FREE ADMISSION Buy online, at the farms, and at the Faire.

Farm hours vary during the year; always check for days and hours of operation.

Advance Farm Tour Tickets $10, $15 during the weekend. Children 12 and under are free, active duty military and their dependents are always $10.

New Programs for 2013 Tour de Lavender Pedal Power Weekend

Sat. & Sun., August 3-4 www.tourdelavender.com

Lavender Distillation Celebration Sat. & Sun., Aug. 31-Sept. 1

Free Admission Lavender Winter Faire Sat., Nov. 30, Boys & Girls Club

Free Admission

SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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Olympic Game Farm A FAMILY RUN BUSINESS BUSINESS, Olympic Game Farm at 1423 Ward Road, Sequim, is home to many animal species, both endangered and non-endangered. Many of its animals are veterans of television and movies. The Olympic Game Farm has been entertaining families for four decades. For more than 28 years, the Olympic Game Farm worked exclusively with Walt Disney Studios and many others on features for theater and television including “The Grizzly Adams Series,” “The Incredible Journey” and many more. Today, the farm is home to more than 20 different exotic and non-exotic species, with hundreds of animals on site for families to “get face to face with wildlife” from the comfort of their vehicles on the farm’s driving tour. The farm also has walking tours for groups of 10 or more. Reservations are required between Memorial Day and Labor Day. Also visit its historical studio barn and freshwater aquarium. The driving tour leaves visitors with vivid memories of these amazing creatures. There are friendly llamas that eat bread from your hand, performing bears, grazing elk and buffalo. You also will see many animals which are on the endangered species list, such as timber wolves, Bengal tigers and African lions. In addition to the endangered species, the farm is home to coyotes, bobcats, cougars and many more species. Driving tours are open year-round from 9 a.m.-4 p.m., except Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. There is an admission fee for the tours. Go online to www.olygamefarm.com or call 360-683-4295 or 800-778-4295 for rates. Local chambers of commerce have brochures on the farm and directions to it.

�remie� Mem�ry ���e

ON THE OLYMPIC PENINSULA

Bed & Breakfast at The Lodge

• Specializing in all forms of Dementia • 24-Hour Professional Licensed Nursing

Enjoy a night at The Lodge located in the Sequim Dungeness Valley offers you quiet

• Health & Physical Fitness Programs • Adult Daycare and overnight short-term respite care offered 7 days a week • Interior courtyard and large secured backyard with fruit orchard • Conveniently located in the heart of the medical community

Luxury Accommodations with beautifully When you walk into Dungeness Courte Memory Care, you immediately feel the compassion, understanding and warmth that so many have come to know over the fourteen years Dungeness Courte has been a part of the Sequim Community. Our residents and their families truly experience “A Better Way of Life”, even during the most challenging times in the disease process. Our team’s commitment to care, honor and respect each resident is evident in all that we do. We invite you to visit Dungeness Courte and experience excellence in first-class Dementia care. 651 Garry Oak Dr. Sequim, WA

360-582-9309

www.dungenesscourte.com

46

SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

decorated rooms, full kitchens and patio or balconies.

Enjoy gourmet breakfast and visit The Lodge Espresso

Luxury Retirement Living

660 Evergreen Farm Way Sequim, WA 98382 www.thelodgeatsherwood.com

360-681-3100


• John Wayne Marina

2577 West Sequim Bay Road, Sequim 360-417-3440

• The Dockside Grill:

Reservations recommended. Phone 360-683-7510/888-640-7226 Hours: Lunch: 11 a.m-3 p.m. Dinner: 4-9 p.m. Closed Monday and Tuesday.

John Wayne Marina

LOCATED ON PITSHIP POINT in Sequim Bay (Longitude 123 02’ 18” W/Latitude 48 03’ 43” N), the John Wayne Marina is of course named for “The Duke,” but since opening in 1985, the marina has made a reputation for itself as a fullservice facility in a superb location. The marina offers both permanent and guest moorage, on a first-come, first-served basis, parking and a launch for smaller craft and boat rentals. Ashore, the John Wayne Marina includes a restaurant, restrooms, showers, laundry and even a public meeting room with kitchen. Film actor John Wayne loved sailing his Wild Goose in the area of Sequim Bay, which he considered a prime place for a marina. Wayne himself donated the land in 1975. Owned and operated by the Port of Port Angeles, the marina is a popular stop, included as “Best of the West” by Sea Magazine. Boaters can take advantage of a fuel dock open seven days a week and the marina offers electric and water hookups. Trash disposal, a sewage pump-out and waste oil disposal also are available. Award-winning chefs prepare lunch and dinner at the marina’s restaurant, The Dockside Grill. Along with fresh seafood and cedar-planked salmon, the restaurant serves steaks and poultry, salads, sandwiches and appetizers. Full bar and great selection of wines. The marina and its beautiful park areas are popular walking and picnicking places for nonboaters. Dozens of species of waterfowl make for good birding, and the Olympic Discovery Trail runs nearby. Pets on leashes are welcome.

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Sequim Lavender Growers AssociationTM

Sequim Lavender Festival

®

Welcome to the Lavender Capital of North America® July 19, 20, 21, 2013 FREE FARM TOURS FREE STREET FAIR DOWNTOWN SequimLavenderFestivalWeekend.com JOIN US THIS SUMMER FOR OUR 17TH YEAR! WE’LL KEEP THE LAVENDER BLOOMING!

Growers Celebrate Lavender

®

SMELL THE FREE! The Sequim Lavender Festival® celebrates its 17th year in the heart of Sequim and in the surrounding Dungeness Valley during the July 19-21 weekend. Solely produced and managed by the member-growers of the Sequim Lavender Growers Association, the Sequim Lavender Weekend will expand its production to include activities and regional attractions for the modern family and multi-aged visitors. The growers who are most responsible for the success and heritage of the festival will be showcased and made available all weekend when you take the self-guided and FREE “U-Tour.” SIX farms and a commercial nursery make up the free farm tour. With a map, camera and picnic lunch in hand, singles, couples, families and the young-at-heart can leisurely drive at their own pace and visit the smallest and largest lavender farms located in the Lavender Capital of North America®. Lavender-themed gifts and fresh-cut bouquets will be available for purchase. As always, admission, advice and fragrance at the farms and nursery are free. Don’t be camera shy. Lavender is the most distinctive backdrop for any personal or family photograph. Additional regional attractions will be highlighted on the map. The most community-spirited Lavender Festival Street Fair in this part of the world occurs on Fir Street and admission is FREE. Visitors will be surrounded by three days of continuous musical entertainment, known as Lavenderstock, and greeted with the fragrance of the Sequim lavender brought to you by the local growers. The best-ever food court and beer and wine garden will feature a Northwest menu consisting of barbecue, Thai, Greek and hot dog selections, crab and salmon cakes, coffee, lavender ice cream, pizza and desserts along with regional wine and beer. A talented group of artists will complement the growers’ lavenderthemed gifts and products with works produced on film, paper and S�����’� F����� canvas and with jewels, precious metals and stones, fiber, wood, leather, L������� P������� metal and more — all available for viewing, inspiration or purchase. A quilter’s conference and an offering of regional attractions will round Call to order: out your visit. Free parking and free shuttle service for the street fair will be offered at convenient locations to accommodate every need. 3 6 0 . 6 8 3 . 2 4 2 6 Our No. 1 and longest running lavender festival is a part of Sequim Visit Our Website: Lavender Weekend. Visit www.lavenderfestival.com, www.sequim lavenderfestivalweekend.com and sequimlavenderweekend.com for lordjensenlavender.com more information. email: lordjensenlavender@wavecable.com

LordJensen Lavender

48

SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013


Visit our Online Resource Guide to find

Licensed Contractors, Suppliers and Building Industry Professionals NPBA 2 0 MEMBE 13 R DIRECT SHIP ORY

Welcome to the Sequim Dog Park! AFTER A LONG TRIP to the Olympic Peninsula, owners and their canine companions will yearn to stretch their legs and the Sequim Dog Park is a perfect place to enjoy the fresh air in a safe environment. The Sequim Dog Park is a community park that is over one acre in size on the east side of Carrie Blake Park, two blocks north on Blake Avenue from Washington Street. The park encourages people to bring their dogs for exercise and off-leash doggie play. There is a fenced area for large dogs and one for small dogs. The park is well-groomed and clean and its users are self-policing and friendly. Restrooms, doggie clean-up bags and benches are available for visitors’ use. Park rules are posted onsite and online at www.sequimdogparks.org. Also on the website, see dog-friendly lodging available in Sequim. A portion of the Olympic Discovery Trail runs by Carrie Blake Park and there also is a walking trail for dogs and their people around the park. Hours for both parks are from dawn until dusk.

A handy referenc e guide to contrac tors and othe r valuable building services .

www.npba.info

DO BU SIN

PULL OUT

AND ALL OF SAVE DIRECTORY YOUR BUI LDING NEEFOR DS! A ME MBER !

ESS W ITH

Building Value & Community on the Olympic Peninsula Since 1976

Tires • Brakes Alignment • Wheels Batteries • Shocks

The LES SCHWAB Warranty

FREE

• Road Hazard Warranty • Mounting • Air Checks • Rotations • Flat Repair - Passenger & Tubeless Light Truck Tires

“If We Can’t Guarantee it, We Won’t Sell It! Serving The West Since 1952 With Over 400 Locations Sequim 802 E. Washington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360.683.7261 Port Angeles 2527 E. Hwy 101 . . . . . . . . . . 360.452.7691 Port Townsend 355 Sims Way . . . . . . . . . . 360.385.0124 Monday-Friday 8am - 6pm • Saturday 8am - 5pm

lesschwab.com

Les Schwab Credit Plan 90 days same as cash (OAC)

Real Estate Sequim

SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

49


Museum and Arts Center exhibit building

THE MUSEUM & ARTS CENTER in the Sequim-Dungeness Valley operates four facilities in the Sequim area – the MAC Exhibit Center, historical Dungeness Schoolhouse, DeWitt Administration Center and Second Chance Con-

S

IN

signment Shop. Owned and operated by the MAC for 18 years, the 1892-built Dungeness Schoolhouse is located amid farmland a few miles north of Sequim in the community of Dungeness. A Washington State

CE 198 0

Live theatre at its best!

414 N Sequim Ave Sequim, WA 98382

360-683-7326

Experience it in Sequim

w w w. o l y m p i c t h e a t r e a r ts . o r g

Sequim Travel and Cruises

Historic Site and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the two-story landmark at 2781 Towne Road includes two downstairs classrooms and an upstairs auditorium, is ADA accessible and available for event rental by calling 360-683-4270 or e-mailing schoolhouse@macsequim.org. The MAC Exhibit Center, 175 W. Cedar St. in Sequim, features rotating art and local history exhibits, permanent installations highlighting Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe culture and heritage and the locally uncovered Manis Mastodon, and a gift shop stocked with locally produced items. Summer hours from May-September are 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. Admission is a suggested donation of $2/adults, children free. Call 360683-8110 for more information. The MAC-operated Second Chance Consignment Shop, 155 W. Cedar St., specializes in quality women’s accessories, shoes and clothing ranging from size 6 to 20. The shop is open 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Monday-Saturday. Contact the shop at 360-683-9201. The MAC also operates a public-accessible history and genealogy research library at its DeWitt Administration Center, 544 N. Sequim Ave. The library is open 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, per volunteer availability. Call 360-681-2257 or e-mail research@macsequim.org to schedule an appointment. Visit www.macsequim.org or call 360-6838110 for more information about the MAC and its programs, events and services.

Farms

“A Little Takes You A Long Way” Blueberries

Sandra Little, Owner

424 E. Cedar St., Sequim • 360-683-2608 • sequimtravel.com 50

SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

WSDA Certified Organic

582-1128

www.DungenessMeadowFarm.com


Get the free mobile app at

http:/ / gettag.mobi

SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

â–

51


Dining

in Sequim Visit Mexico Without Leaving Sequim!

EXCELLENT FOOD • ORDERS TO GO • FULL MENU Open 7 days a week for lunch & dinner, cocktails, great margaritas, beer & wine

Welcome to the Finest Thai Cuisine in Sequim! “Dine with us here at Galare Thai and travel to my hometown of Chiang Mai without ever having to leave the country.”

Banquet Room for up to 50 Senior Citizens Discount Tuesdays

Suree Chommuang, Proprietor & Chef An artful dining experience

120 West Bell St. • Sequim, WA

681-3842

1085 E. Washington Street, Sequim (Next to Days Inn)

Open Daily 11 a.m. -9 p.m

360-683-8069

www.galarethai.com

Open Monday-Saturday • Lunch 11 am - 3 pm • Dinner 4 pm - 9 pm

Waterfront dining atJohn Wayne Marina

We��in� Cake�

Happy memories begin here!

Cupcake� Spec�alt� Cake�

171 West Washington St. • Downtown Sequim

360-565-6272

Open Monday - Saturday, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sunday Summer hours 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.

www.thattakesthecakes.com • thattakesthecake@hotmail.com

Carlsborg’s

Old Mill Cafe

ow

ok

D

in’

Take a stroll back in time and enjoy a home-cooked

n Home

Co

BREAKFAST, LUNCH or DINNER

Steaks ~ Seafood ~ Pasta ~ Burgers ~ Salads & Sandwiches Cocktails ~ Beer ~ Wine ~ Homemade Desserts ~ Vegan Choices Tues. 8am - 3pm • Wed., Thurs. Sun. 8am - 8pm Fri. & Sat. 8am - 9pm • Closed Mondays • Hours may change seasonally

721 Carlsborg Rd. 52

SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

582-1583

COCKTAILS, WINE AND LOCAL MICROBREWS STEAKS, FRESH LOCAL SEAFOOD, PASTA, GLUTEN-FREE AND MORE! Lunch 11:30-3, Dinner 4-9 Wed. thru Sun.

www.docksidegrill-sequim.com

360-683-7510


Specializing in Handcrafted Breakfasts and Creative Lunches Since 1981

Dining

in Sequim

Also visit our kids at

The Oak Table Cafe

Corner of S. 3rd & Bell St. Sequim

in Kingston or

Open Daily 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

(360) 683-2179

The Maple Counter Cafe in Walla Walla

www.oaktablecafe.com

is “Cooking Mama s’ Passion” 10am - 10pm

Open till 11pm Fri & Sat

• Fresh Authentic Food • Friendly Service • Homemade Flower & Corn Totillas

Lunch • Dinner • Bar • Banquet Facility Open 7 Days a Week

360-681-2822

820 W. Washington St. Ste. B

In the mood for teriyaki?

~Fast and Fresh~ We use only the freshest ingredients!

Now offering

Open 6 Days a Week 11am-9pm (Closed Wed) Special Lunch Menu 11am-3pm

Dine where the locals know best!

Dinner 4:30-9pm

271 S. 7th Ave., Suite #31, Sequim (Behind McDonald’s)

Orders to Go Welcome

(360) 683-8188

Fresh Local Seafood

Traditional Korean Food

Bibim Bap, Tofu Soup and More!

BENTO TERIYAKI

Open Mon.-Sat. 11-9 Sun. 11-8

1243 W. Washington Street, Sequim In the “Home Depot” Shopping Center 360

683-5668

540 W. Washington St. Sequim 360-681-0664 Sunday Brunch 9 a.m.-2 p.m. • Tues - Sat. 11 a.m. - 8 p.m.


1 Family Dining Restaurant in America

#

Dining

Senior Night 3pm to close Tues. & Thurs.

Kids Eat Free 4pm-Close Daily (see store for details)

in Sequim

(see store for details)

Open For Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Serving Breakfast All Day

*Locally Owned and Operated

1360 W. Washington St., Sequim, WA 98382 • (360) 683-2363 (River Road exit, next to Walmart) Sun-Thur 6am-10pm Fri-Sat 6am-10pm

Sequim’s Finest

Sequim

150 W. 5th Ave. 360.681.3280

Port Townsend 617 Tyler St. 360.385.1199

Bainbridge Island

4569 Lynnwood Ctr. Rd. NE 206.780.1902

Chinese Cuisine Lunch • Dinner • Take Out Mon.-Fri. 11am-9:30pm Sat. Noon-9:30pm Sun. 11:30am-9:30pm

“Fine Dining & True Hospitality set in a lovely atmosphere”

www.panedamore.com

145 East Washington St. • Sequim • 360.681.6888

Sequim and Port Angeles

Open Daily 10am-10pm

Sequim 110 River Road (360) 683-7082

Port Angeles 1105 E. First St. (360) 452-8954

www.tacotimenw.com

Welcome to our

Family-Style Restaurant! Award-Winning Mexican Cuisine

Moon Palace Authentic Chinese Cuisine

Banquet Room available for any occasion

Air Conditioned • Cocktail Lounge Outdoor Patio Dining Open 7 days for lunch and dinner 531 W. Washington, Sequim

360-683-4788 360-683-2203

Fax

www.el-cazador.com

~ Sunday Buffet - only $825 ~ No MSG - Orders To Go Welcome!

Tues. - Thurs. ~ 11:30am to 8:30pm • Fri. ~ 11:30am to 9:00pm Saturday ~ 1:00pm to 9:00pm • Sunday ~ Noon to 8:00pm

Creamery Square, 323 E. Washington St., Sequim, WA 98382 (360) 683-6898


Dining

in Sequim

R E S TAU R A N T

Casual Elegant Dining

360-683-1977

703 N. Sequim Ave., Sequim

Early Bird Dinner Menu 11am–6pm Full-Service Lounge Happy Hour In Lounge 4pm–6pm Banquets To 50 Tues. – Fri. 11 am – 9 pm Serving Sat. 4 pm – 9 pm Sequim for Sun. 11 am – 9 pm over 24 years Closed Monday

4th Anniversary! See our ENTIRE MENU at www.islanderpizza.com “We’re a lot more than pizza and pasta” • Video Arcade • Full Service Catering 380 E. Washington Street Downtown Sequim

683-9999 HOURS:

Sun.-Thurs. 11 am to 10 pm Fri. & Sat. 11 am to 11 pm

• Enjoy our Full-service Lounge • Bar Stool Bingo every Tuesday 4:30-7pm Find us on • Watch your sporting events on our big screen TVs Facebook!

and Award-Win ning t Pasta s e B Pi d z ote

za!

Fresh Oysters • Dover Sole 16 oz. T-Bone • Prime Rib Fresh Dungeness Crab Meat

V

SEAFOOD – STEAKS – PASTA

Fresh Seafood and Steaks

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner • Cocktails You’ll love our Salad & Soup Bar!

Open Daily at 8 a.m.

609 W. WASHINGTON ST. • SEQUIM • 683-5809

Coziest Coffee Shop on the Peninsula!

Relax on our patio, or cozy up to the fireplace Chess table tops, bocce ball and croquet available for guest use Local farm family owned • Friendly & Fun Staff! Graysmarsh Farm Raspberry Smoothie Breakfast & Lunch Sandwiches, Salads, Baked Goods & Desserts Gift Certificates

Loose Leaf Teas

Call in your order to go

(360) 582.0024

981 E. Washington Street, Sequim | Open 7 days a week from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m.

SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

55


Hands-on learning KEY TO THE DUNGENESS RIVER AUDUBON CENTER

WHY DOES A STELLAR JAY’S FEATHER look blue when there is no blue pigment in it? Why does the murre’s egg have that odd shape? How do you tell a lynx from a bobcat? All kinds of answers — and a wonderful place to ramble — are found at Railroad Bridge Park. With its stunning displays, hands-on exhibits and knowledgeable staff, the Dungeness River Audubon Center is a must-see, a focal point for study and education concerning the Dungeness River Watershed and its environs. Families, as well as natural science enthusiasts, will find a warm welcome and plenty to intrigue in the collections at the center. The main room is lined with cases housing hundreds of examples of birds of the area, along with lynx, black bear, raccoons and mountain lion. (The late Claude Ritze and his wife Edna did much of the taxidermy.) Hands-on exhibits include drawers full of the fascinating and the curious: bones, feathers, eggs and teeth of species from songbird to mammoth. Stroke-able pelts of local fur-bearing animals are arranged in front of a “can-you-spot-it” mural of Olympic Peninsula wildlife painted by Sequim artist Tim Quinn. A binocular microscope invites visitors to view the intricate mysteries of natural objects. Other displays profile the “Life Story of a River” and the reference library includes a complete herbarium of local plants. The Audubon Center’s staff and docents are eager to show visitors the collection and answer questions. Children will enjoy going on a scavenger hunt through the park, and the Audubon Center is a great place to begin a ramble along the riverside trails through the forest or over the stony shore of the Dungeness River. In any given week the center is sure to offer a special program. Birders, of course, will want to attend the Wednesday morning bird walks or the monthly Audubon Society meetings. In certain seasons, songbird walks and “owl-prowls” are popular. Guides on these walks bring spotting scopes; the center also has “loaner” binoculars. Now a tradition since 2003, the annual Olympic Peninsula BirdFest, is going strong in its 10th spring. In alternate Septembers, the center sponsors a River Festival. Both events feature unusual field trips, expert presentations and a great deal of fun. History buffs will enjoy the park’s namesake railroad bridge. The Howe through-truss bridge served the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway line from 1915 until the mid1980s. Now transformed by board planking, the bridge is accessible by ramp as well as by stairs. During vacation season, summer river talks cover specific subjects, from bats to birds to bugs, with a butterfly walk scheduled to coincide with July’s Lavender Festival. Throughout the year, the Dungeness River Audubon Center sponsors workshops and presentations. Among the topics are global warming, volcanoes/earthquakes and the Conservation Service snow-pack monitor system. The wealth of programs offered by the center is a collaborative effort built over the years by several groups. The Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe has taken a lead in monitoring and restoring habitat in the area and is a key sponsor of the River Center Foundation, along with former members of the Sequim Natural History Museum. The other two sponsors are the Olympic Peninsula Audubon Society and the National Audubon Society (through Audubon Washington).

Dungeness River Audubon Center

2151 W. Hendrickson Road, Sequim (At Railroad Bridge Park) Phone: 681-4076 Hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. TuesdayFriday and noon-4 p.m. Saturday. Closed Sundays, Mondays and holidays To east side parking: Take the River Road exit off U.S. Highway 101, north into Sequim, then left onto Priest Road and left onto Hendrickson Road, all the way to the end. To west side parking: Turn north on Carlsborg Road off U.S. Highway 101, then right onto Runnion Road to parking area. Walk over the bridge to the center. The center is open from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and noon-4 p.m. Saturday. • 8:30-10:30 a.m. every Wednesday, bird walks with volunteers from the Dungeness River Audubon Center. Meet at the center in Railroad Bridge park. • Other one-day and ongoing classes, as well as field trips, occur throughout the year. Drop into the center for a complete schedule.


Sweet treats on hand AT SEQUIM BERRY FARMS THE U-PICK BERRY FARMS of Sequim are travelers’ treasures, opportunities to stop, stretch and snack in the fresh air. A low-cost, low-tech activity for hosts and their visitors, especially children, berry picking creates memories of shared work and sweet rewards. For year-round residents, berry farms promise the midwinter riches of preserves, syrups and frozen whole berries. This summer the pickings are good around Sequim, with farms opening their U-pick stands throughout the season to offer a variety of berries. Most farms will provide containers or pre-weigh customers’ containers, but it’s always wise to bring light, flat containers that keep berries from stacking up and squishing. A sun hat, a long-sleeved shirt and a handy water bottle make picking in summer sun much more comfortable. The berry farms invite the public to phone ahead for further information or to request special picking times. Following are some of the local farms and their offerings: Cameron Berry Farm (Strawberries) Corner of Woodcock and Wheeler roads U-pick open mid-June to mid-July Hours: Open daily Phone: 360-683-5483 Dungeness Meadow Farm (Blueberries) 135 Meadowmeer Lane U-pick open second week of July-second week of August. Hours: Phone ahead (after 7 a.m.) or see ad in newspapers, 360-582-1128 Pre-picked berries also available. Noncertified organically grown Reka, Blue

Crop, Spartan and Duke blueberries. Graysmarsh Farm (Five varieties) 6187 Woodcock Road U-pick open June through September Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Sun. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Phone: 360-683-5563 Graysmarsh picking calendar: Strawberries — June, Raspberries — early July through early August, Loganberries — early July through early August, Blueberries — early July through mid-August, Blackberries — early August through September. Also available: Lavender — July through August and Graysmarsh Preserves Nelson’s Blueberries 1556 Atterbury Road U-pick blueberries mid-July to September Hours: Please phone ahead 360-683-8055 Bring pre-weighed basket or plastic containers. Robert and Laurel Ann’s Rainbow Farm (Blackberries) 142 Towne Road U-pick open June to October Hours: Tues.-Sun. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and by appointment Manager: Ronald McDonald Phone: 360-461-3043 Specializing in Certified Organic Blackberries Picking Calendar: Marionberries — June-July Olally blackberries — June-July Black Douglas blackberries — July Triple Crown blackberries — July-October Also available: Lavender, organic vegetables, flowers.

The Hottestthing on the Peninsula Hot Air Balloon Flights of Fantasy Adventures • Weddings • Events

get face to face with wildlife. Over 3 miles of Drive-Thru Adventure! Petting farm Observation tower & picnic area Driving tours available 363 days a year Snack bar in summer

OLYMPIC GAME FARM Open Daily 9:00 am 1423 Ward Road • Sequim

800-778-4295 360-683-4295 w w w. olygamefarm.com

Morning Star Balloon Co. (360) 601-2433

www.nwplace.com

Family Fun Since 1972

HOME OF THE WAVING BEARS!

SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

57


?

O'Brien Rd

The Bluffs

Boat Ramp

101

re

Abbott

Howe

Linderman

Pinnell

Old Franson

DUNGENESS RECREATION AREA

Olympic

Spath

CARLSBORG

Atterberry

Parrish

Solmar

Hwy

i ew Dr

Runnion

ll z g ese Lot H og back

Anderson Libby Nelson

Marine Dr

Dungeness Harbor

Lotzgesell

Bear Creek

Hendrickson

101

ra

Deytona

py Haplley Va

Bell

Washington St.

W. Fir

Taylo rR

Jamestown

Comet Ct

Silberhorn Reservoir Dungeness

Meadows

TThhrre eee C

Woodcock

Old Olympic Hw y

Fis hH a

Gupster

Twi nvie wD r

Dungeness Bay

a

Alder Ct Spruce Ct Deseret Av

Oak Ct

Wright Ln

Williamson Rd Wright Rd Elliot Ct

SEQUIM

Holl and

?

un Doe R

Bell Hill

Brownfield

Blair

Happy

5th Ave

W. Washington St

Spruce St Cedar St

Alder St

AQUATIC REC CENTER

W. Hendrickson Rd

Fir St

Noman St Eunice St Reservoir Rd

e

itefeather Wh

Coulter

d.

Prairie St Hammond St Hemlock St

Maple St

Bell St

Pine St Pine Ct Lehman St Salal Pl

McCurdy Rd

W Sequim Bay

CARRIE BLAKE Belfield Belfield PARK

E. Fir

Medsker

SunLand

Spencer Farm Place

Silberhorn Rd

101

Old Olympic Hwy

L ou

Rd ella

SEQUIM SEQUIM BAY BAY STATE PARK STATE PARK

Sequim Bay y Rd Ba im qu

Gellor

School House

One Horse Ln

L ewis Rd

Dungeness Wildlife National Refuge

Viewpoint State Parks

Matson

Finn Hall Monterra

Olympic H wy Old Heuhslein

Sie ber t's Cree

Shore Rd

Casino School

Museum

Information Marina

Airport

Public Camp

Gunn Vogt

Webb Sherburne

Cameron Dryke

ce of Amer Voi ica Blv d Ridg ev

Strait of Juan de Fuca

Gehrke

Blue Mountain

Spring ek

McDonnell C

Pierson Flanders

Kirner

Golf

S. Barr

Vautier

Rd Dick Kitchen

Thornton

Grandview

Du ng e ne ss Sp it Joslin

Ward Rive r Dungeness

Cays Cays Heath Mill

McComb

Valley View Dr

Sequim -Dungeness Way

Klahn Pl

Stone Rd

SEQUIM-DUNGENESS VALLEY

River Rd

Taylor Cutoff

Evans 5th Ave

Towne Rd Priest

Palo Verde Loop

3rd Ave

Falcon Rd Sequim Ave North Sequim Ave South

Kendall 7th Ave

Kendall Rd

Cameron Farm

8th Av Brown

4th Pl

CITY HALL

Bay

Opal Ln Ho Wy

Jade Dr

Brownfield Rd.

RdR low e Rd Hol x st o F Ne Quai l's Ow

Street Map

Hammond

Washington

POST OFFICE

PIONEER PARK

E. Cedar St

E. Oak St

E. Fir St E. Alder St

E. Willow St

icke

Rd n Coop

Gardiner Beach Rd

Discovery Bay

Diamond Point

ns Ln Faw

Doe Run Rd Miller Peninsula

101

Ch

d tR

Sunshine Acres

Catlake

W. Sequim Bay Rd

CARRIE BLAKE PARK

E. Hendrickson Rd

City of SEQUIM

E. Willow St

LIBRARY

N. Sequim Ave Sequim-Dungeness Way S. Sequim Ave

Mariott Ave Va lley

3rd Pl

3rd Ave

7th Ave

7th Av

Ja ke Ha Dr SePebble ll rp Wilc entine ox L n Blake

6th Pl 5th Pl Palo Alt o R

Sunnyside Ave

mee Am A th

Sapphire Pl

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N. Brown Rd S. Brown Rd

Rav en's Rid g

Stihl Rd

Sunnyside Ave Knapmann Ave Govan Ave Matriotti Ave Dunlap Ave Ryser Ave Hw y

d

Blake Ave

l's Ro os

5th Ave W

S Old Bly n

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SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013 Rhodefer Rd

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City Area

National Wildlife Refuges

Indian Reservation

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Kalaloch

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SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013 e ue ts River

Quinault Indian Reservation

Ocean City

Pillar Point

?

112

East & West Twin Beach

TAT ES

ADA

DS

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UN

CAN

Squally Reach

Sooke

Boat Ramp Marina Public Camp

101

Highway 101 (2-lane highway with pullouts) apprx. 10 miles

Winery

Drive-on ferries Shelter Information Visitors Center

Mount Queets

Mount Carrie

Elwha Valley

Lake Mills

Madison Falls

?

Hurricane Ridge

San Juan Island

Mount Duckabush

Amanda Park

Quinault

Lake Quinault

Accessible to disabled

State Park Viewpoint Mountains

Casino

City marker

Museum

er

ew a

llip s

Hoodsport

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Potlach

101

Lilliwaup

Lake Cushman

Potlatch State Park

er

LE T OV ICT

Lopez Island

Dewatto

?

Tahuya

Union

Brinnon

Holly

106

Twanoh State Park

Sunbeach

101

Duckabush Triton

101

?

Seabeck

Scenic Beach State Park

3

Minter

Sunset Beach

Belfair State Park

Belfair

16

Wauna

Gorst

Bremerton

3

3

Kitsap Peninsula

West

Shaw

K

Banner

To Gig Harbor & Tacoma

Purdy

Burley

Olalla

Bethel 16

B

Port Blak BREMERTON TO SEATTLE FERRY

Port Orchard

303

Agate Po

Kingston

KINGSTO EDMONDS

Bainbridg Island

104

Port Gamble

Poulsbo

3

Hood Canal Bridge

Freelan

Beverly B

Austin

525

Shine Tidelands State Park

Nordland

Kitsap Memorial State Park

Silverdale

Toandos Peninsula Coyle

104

Port Ludlow

Olympic Peninsula Gateway Visitors Center

Center

Anderson Lake State Park

Madrona Beach

Saratoga Sh Br Fort Greenbank Flagler

Fort Flagler State Park

Fi

Avo

B

Terrys Corn

KEYSTONE FERRY LANDING

Ebey's Landing

Oak Harbor

Whidbey Island

20

Cornet

Slmilk Beach Dewey

20

Anacortes

Port Hadlock 20 Irondale 19 Fairmont Chimacum

Discovery Bay

Quimper ? Peninsula

Bremerton Junction

Quilcene

Gardiner

Dosewallips State Park

Blyn

101

Coveland

Port Fort Worden Townsend State Park

B.C .F ER RY

Miller Miller Peninsula Peninsula

OR IA

Protection Island Diamond Pt.

Olympic National Forest

Triton Cove State Park

Eldon

Riv

? Sequim Bay State Park

Hamma Hamma

River

Dos

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Dungeness Bay

Sequim

Carlsborg

Agnew

Dungeness Spit

Duc sh kabu

Mount Deception

Port Angeles

Victoria

Mount Anderson

Airport

Golf

Hospital

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Ediz Hook

Lake Aldwell

Olympic National Park

Ranger Station

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101

Lake Aldwell

Olympic Hot Springs

Mount Olympus

Marymere Falls

Sol Duc Hot Springs

112

Lake Sutherland

Piedmont

Salt Crescent Creek Bay Freshwater Lower Elwha Indian Reservation Bay Joyce

Strait of Juan de Fuca

Lake Crescent

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Hoh Rain Forest Visitors Center

Olympic National Forest

ah River

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101

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Queets

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Forks

Beaver

113

112

Sappho

112

Clallam Bay

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101

Hoh

101

Hoh Indian Reservation

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101

Lake Pleasant

112

w

Olympic National Forest

Olympic National Park

Pacific Ocean

Quileute Indian Reservation

La Push

Quileute

110

Lake Dickey

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Lake Ozette

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Makah Nation Reservation

Neah Bay

Cape Flattery R d

Rialto Beach

Ozette Indian Reservation

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Lyre River

Tatoosh Island

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59


Lighthouses IN LOVE WITH

PRESERVING AND CHERISHING the North Olympic Peninsula’s maritime heritage also extends to its lighthouses. In 1850, Congress authorized 16 lighthouses along the Pacific coast and Strait of Juan de Fuca as shipping and passenger traffic surged with settlement of the Northwest. Clallam County, established in 1854, has a lighthouse heritage going back to 1857 when Congress appropriated about $40,000 to build the Cape Flattery (Tatoosh Island) and New Dungeness lighthouses, both of which are functional as automated navigational aids today. Others, such as Slip Point Lighthouse at Clallam Bay and Ediz Hook, exist only in historical records. The lighthouses of Jefferson County (1852) — Point Wilson (1879), Destruction Island (1891) and Marrowstone Point (1912) — came considerably later and all three remain active, but with automated equipment. The Point Wilson Lighthouse and tower are open to visitors from MaySeptember on Saturdays between 1-4 p.m. For information, call 360-3855520. The lighthouse is owned by the Coast Guard and is managed by Fort Worden State Park and Conference Center. A Discovery Pass is required but the tour is free. Marrowstone Point Lighthouse at Fort Flagler is closed to the public. Destruction Island Lighthouse, three miles off the coast in western Jefferson County, is visible from U.S. Highway 101 at Ruby Beach, LaPush, and is closed to the public. The Cape Flattery Lighthouse on Tatoosh Island is the northwesternmost spot in the continental United States. The island is part of the Makah Nation. Then lighthouse marks the entrance to the Strait of Juan de Fuca, that wide and deep passage from the open Pacific Ocean to Puget Sound at Point Wilson. Tatoosh Island is not open to the public but it and the lighthouse can be seen from high cliffs at the end of Cape Flattery Trail near Neah Bay. 60

SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013


Tatoosh Island

Slip Point Lighthouse

Cape Flattery R d

Victoria

Strait of Juan de Fuca

Fish Town

113

Lake Pleasant

101

Duc

Dungeness Spit

r ve

Agnew Carlsborg

Sequim

Lake Aldwell

r

Quileute

S

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Stanwood

Terrys Corner

Diamond Pt.

Miller Peninsula 101

Gardiner Blyn

Quimper Peninsula Discovery Port Bay

Hadlock 20 19

Marrowstone Point Lighthouse KEYSTONE FERRY LANDING

Saratoga Shores Bretland

Fort Flagler

Greenbank 525

Mabana

Beverly Beach

Tyee Beach

Nordland Langley Freeland

Fairmont Chimacum

Sol Duc Hot Springs

ala

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Port Townsend

Dungeness Bay

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Olympic Hot Springs

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Port Angeles

ss ene D u u ng

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112

Piedmont

Lake Crescent er h Riv lawa Ca

Freshwater Bay

Joyce

101 Beaver

101

Crescent Bay

112

Olympic National Forest Sappho

Lake Dickey Lake Ozette

Miltown

Oak Harbor

Madrona Beach

r

112

20

Avon

Point Wilson Lighthouse

(Demolished) East & West Twin Beach

Rive

Pysht

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H

112

. -Ozette Rd oko

Elwah

r Riv e Ho ko

Clallam Bay

Allen

Whidbey Island

New Dungeness Light Station

Ediz Hook Lighthouse

Pillar Point

Deer Park Rd.

112

Sekiu

Quile ut

Cornet

20

Makah Indian Reservation

Ozette Indian Reservation

Slmilk Beach Dewey Rosario Beach

(Demolished)

Neah Bay

Sedro Woolley

Bay Town

20

Sooke

v Lyre Ri

Cape Flattery

Anacortes

Lopez Island

San Juan Island

Squally Reach

Lighthouses

Cape Flattery Lighthouse

Stretching 5.5 miles to the New Dungeness Light Station and several hundred yards beyond, the Dungeness Spit is one of the world’s longest natural sand spits, growing at a rate of about 20 feet per year. At the head of the trail in the Dungeness Recreation Area, pay the $3 fee and leave your pet in the car — pets are not allowed on the trail to the spit or on the spit as they both are part of the 631-acre Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge. Stroll through the cathedral-like canopy of green down to the turquoise waters of the Strait of Juan de Fuca. To the right, the lighthouse is a tiny blip on the horizon. The inner shore of the spit on Dungeness Bay is a wildlife refuge for a variety of nesting birds and hiking is not permitted on the bay side so as not to disturb parents and their fledglings. More than 250 species of birds, 41 species of land mammals and eight species of marine mammals have been recorded in the refuge. It provides critical habitat for a number of species, some of them threatened or endangered, and is an important stop for many birds during migration. Upon reaching the lighthouse, the lush emerald lawn and the stunning white buildings trimmed crisply in green and red make the grounds seem almost otherworldly amid the wild natural surroundings. The New Dungeness Light Station, in service since 1857, is a gem of history and a perfect place for a picnic and a tour of the lighthouse before the hike back along the spit.

Java Joints Gabby’s Java

espresso blended coffees smoothies spritzers

Gourmet & Grub

681.2560

471 Business Park Loop Carlsborg (360) 683-8839 www.gabbysjava.com

10191 Old Olympic Hwy (at the roundabout) Sequim Lord Jensen Lavender sold here!

TROUBLE’S BREWING ESPRESSO

• Deli items • Espressos • Homemade pastries

Great coffee at the best price!

110 North Lilac Ave. Port Angeles, WA Between Blue Flame BBQ & Hartnagels on Hwy. 101

660 Evergreen Farm Way • Sequim, WA

360.460.1000 Luxury Retirement Living

Hours: Mon-Fri 7:30am-6pm Sat 9am-5pm • Sun 11am-3pm

ESPRESSO QUALIT Y ESPRESSO

ICE CREAM!

We serve

and

Coffee!

• Soft-Serve Ice Cream • Over 60 Milkshake Flavors • Coffee Frappes • Fruit Smoothies • plus Food Items

360-683-1232

Drive-thru at corner of 3rd Ave. & Washington St. in Sequim SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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outdoors

Out and about

• Carrie Blake Park, at 202 N. Blake Ave., is a Sequim gem for all ages that’s used year-round, no matter what the weather. You’ll find walkers and joggers on the blacktopped trail looping through the north side of the park, many with their canine pals who are welcome to romp in the fenced off-leash dog park — it’s set up with small and large dog areas. Have a family reunion or get-together with friends under the large shelter and fire up the grills nearby. There are two playground areas with swings and climbing things. Older youth will enjoy the adjacent BMX track and skateboard park. The softball fields are first-come, first-served. Stroll around the ponds or sit a spell and watch several breeds of ducks feed and preen. At 3 p.m. on the third Sundays from May-September, the Sequim City Band plays rousing music in free outdoor concerts at the James Center for the Performing Arts, also on the north side of the park. For parking, enter from Rhodefer Road off East Washington Street, a few blocks east of Blake Avenue. The park is open from dawn to dusk. • Railroad Bridge Park, on the opposite end of town, is a bit of forest in the city. At 2151 Hendrickson Road, north and west of Walmart off Priest Road, the park has toe-dipping access to the Dungeness River, which can be calm or churning, but is relentlessly cold. The refurbished 1900s railroad bridge is part of the Olympic Discovery Trail that runs through the park. It’s wheelchair and bicycle friendly with wide access ramps and a favorite of leashed pets and their people. On the bridge there are benches and lookout nooks to watch the river. The park has several picnic tables, an outdoor stage and numerous side trails through the foliage. Big leaf maples and several varieties of evergreens provide a forest feel. The park is open from dawn to dusk and no pass is required. The Dungeness River Audubon Center within the park features many examples of birds and other native animals and serves as an educational center. Even if you’re just visiting, you’re invited to join the bird walks at 8:30 a.m. every Wednesday, rain or shine, led by a center birding expert. The center is open from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and noon-4 p.m. Saturday. 62

SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

• The Sequim area offers a variety of prime kayaking locations in the Strait of Juan de Fuca with the bonus of seeing birds and wildlife closer to their habitat. Kayak launch sites

are as follows: • Cline Spit on Marine Drive • Diamond Point on the northeast Miller Peninsula • Dungeness Landing on Marine Drive near Oyster House Road • Gardiner off U.S. Highway 101 to Gardiner Beach Road • John Wayne Marina on West Sequim Bay Road • Marlyn Nelson County Park on Port Williams Road • Sequim Bay State Park between Gardiner and Sequim From Cline Spit you can kayak to the New Dungeness Light Station. However, advance notification is required for boating in as a safety precaution; call 360-457-8451. Entry fee applies.

Bring your own kayaks or rent them from these area businesses: Adventures Through Kayaking, 360417-3015; Dungeness Kayaking, 360-681-4190; or Olympic Raft and Kayaking, 360-452-1443. Tours are available, too. • For the ultimate outdoor activity, hike the 11-mile round trip on the Dungeness Spit — the longest natural sand spit in the U.S. — to the New Dungeness Lighthouse, first illuminated in 1857. The property has a small museum, picnic tables, restrooms and a million-dollar view of the Strait of Juan de Fuca from the lighthouse’s catwalk. Lighthouse keepers are on hand to answer questions. To access the spit, park at the Dungeness Recreation Area and follow the signs. Pets are not allowed on the spit. • A 30-mile section of the popular Olympic Discovery Trail runs from Blyn to Port Angeles, passing through Sequim. The wide trail, either paved or with packed composite, is suitable for walkers, hikers and bicyclists; leashed pets are allowed. The scenery ranges from canopied forest to wide-open prairie with benches to rest on along the way. Just off Whitefeather Way at U.S. Highway 101 is Johnson Trestle, a magnificent 410-foot-long bridge 100 feet above Johnson Creek.


Lodging in Sequim

Deep in the Forest at the Foot of the Mountains on the Edge of the Sea

• Close to John Wayne Marina & State Park • Fridge & Microwave in all rooms • Corporate Rates • Special Golf Packages

Private hot tub or spa rooms available

360-683-0691

For info & reservations, call toll free 2½ miles east of Sequim 800-622-0691 www.sequimbaylodge.com 268522 Highway 101 • Sequim, WA

www.johnwayneswaterfrontresort.com 360-681-Duke (3853) | 2634 W. Sequim Bay Rd. | Sequim, WA 98382

Olympic View Inn Located in Sequim

(Formerly Red Ranch Inn) Totally Renovated 100% non-smoking King Beds • Wi-Fi • Laundry Refrigerators/Microwaves in all rooms.

We’re proud to serve our guests.

830 W Washington St • Sequim, WA

Enjoy an indoor pool and hot tub, fitness room, business center, hi-speed internet and free deluxe-continental breakfast. Everything you need to relax.

(360) 683-4195• 1 (877) 921-8439

Sequim Quality Inn & Suites

www.RedRanchInn.com www.OlympicViewInn.com

134 River Road, Sequim WA 98382 (360) 683-2800 www.sqis.net


Shopping

Welcome th

Sequim

Join us for 1st Fr

Gue Barb Boerig Mary Franchi

Fine Art by Local Artists Featuring paintings, photography, sculpture, ceramics, fused glass, jewelry, prints, cards and more by 30 Olympic peninsula artists.

Join us for 1st Friday Artwalks, 5-8 p.m. every month. 129 W Washington, Sequim • 681-6033 • BlueWholeGallery.com

Karen’s Quilt Shop • Sewing machines • Sewing Tables • Quilters’ Fabrics • Scissors, Notions • Embroidery • Gift Certificates Designs

ILTERS QU

Stop in. Say “Hi!”

Come see what country living is all about.

LO V E US!

Repairs • Parts • New & Used • All Makes 609 W. Washington #12 • 681-0820 • sequimsew@yahoo.com www.sequimsewingcenter.com

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Welcome! Shop Local! Shop The Co-op! 216 East Washington, Sequim (360) 683-4111 • (800) 300-3885 www.theco-opfarmandgarden.com

Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-5, Sun. 9-4


Shopping Sequim

Come have fun and relax with us! Everything for knitters, crocheters, weavers & spinners Check out our assortment of

Local Yarns & Roving Remote Control Hobbies

680 West Washington St. Suite B #105, Sequim 360-681-0506 web: www.rc-hobbies.com/sequim E-Mail: sequim@rc-hobbies.com

• Cars • boats • planes • helICopters

KNITTING MACHINES LOOMS 170 West Bell St. • Sequim, WA 98382 360-683-1410 Hours: Mon. - Sat. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. www.adroppedstitch.net

YARN

B O O K S • Fine new books • Puzzles and Gifts • Unique greeting cards • Selected used fiction • Local authors and area publications

“Your Hometown Bookstore”

360-683-1396 • 121 W. Washington • Sequim pacmist@olypen.com

• Top-of-the-line Ergoline Tanning Beds • Apparel • Purses • Jeans • Lotions & more! 10159 Old Olympic Hwy (Rock Plaza) Sequim

683-2200

• Silvers • Rock Revival • MEK Denim • Big Star Jeans We carry a variety of ”Bling” handbags 715 E. First Street Port Angeles

452-9715

SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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Shopping Sequim

Experience Makes The Difference Commercial, Residential & Automotive

LOCKOUT SERVICE • Locks Re-Keyed for Security & Peace of Mind • High-Security Locks & Solutions • Home, Vehicle, RV, Large & Small Tractor Keys

www.masterlocksmith.com

360-683-8817 445 W. Washington, Sequim WA 98382 | sales@masterlocksmith.com

Take Home a Little Piece of Sequim building supplies, home Used furnis hings and lots more!

PLAZA JEWELERS

511 E. Washington Street, Sequim (Next to Sequim Sunnyside Mini-Storage) Open Tues. - Fri. 10 - 5; Sat. 10 - 4

~ Enjoy the beauty of ~

FINE LINENS & UNIQUE GIFTS FROM INDIA Mon. - Fri. 10-5:30, Sat. 11-5 Open Sun. for Lavender & Irrigation Festival 119 E. Washington Street 360-681-4431

Now Celebrating 20 Years in Downtown Sequim! www.pondicherrionline.com

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SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

Recycle — Re-Use — Re-Purpose We pick up for FREE!

Your destination for one-of-a-kind custom designs, remounts, repairs & restoration

(360) 683-1418 Kids lo C thes Bedding Nightwear Kimonos Jackets Napkins Tablecloths Runners ...and so much more!

On the web: www.aroundagainstore.org

683-7862

501c3 Non Profit

22 Gilbert Road • Sequim

(Just west of the Dungeness River on Highway 101)


Shopping Sequim

&T R CRYSTALS

Hours: Monday - Friday 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Sunday 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.

www.qfc.com

Sequim QFC

QFC offers a large selection of fresh produce for a nutritious snack the whole family will enjoy. Visit us today for everything you need to enjoy the nice weather.

990 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 Phone: 360.683.1151 Hours: 6am-11pm

Gemstone Carvings • Tumbled Stones Natural and Polished Crystals Mineral Specimens • Books Jewelry Findings/Wire • Toho Seed Beads Large selection of Beads • Jewelry Classes

681-5087

www.rtcrystals.com

158 E. Bell St, Sequim (across from post office)

Art Gallery & Gift Shop

Located at the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribal Center

• Jewelry • Handcrafts • Plaques • Books • Cards • DVDs/Music

• T-shirts • Baskets • Scarves • Blankets • Jackets • Dream • Masks Catchers • Spirit Boxes • Prints

Daily 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. (360) 681-4640 gallery@jamestowntribe.org

Cinnamon Rolls

Offering Unique Forms of Northwest Native American Art

Gift Cards Available

Shop Online

www.NorthwestNativeExpressions.com

Got A Sweet Tooth?

Yummy Soups & Chili

Daily Specials, Pies & Cheesecake, Ice Cream & So Much More!

751 Carlsborg Road • Sequim • 360-681-8014

Sequim Dry Cleaning Dry Cleaning Laundry Service Alterations 683-2642 225 East Washington • Hours: M-F 7:30-6:30 / Sat 9-2

We Rent Bikes!

360-683-2666 1251 W. Washington Street, Sequim SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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Sequim Open Aire Market From the beginning of May until the cold weather runs them off, about 75 local produce growers and vendors selling juried arts and crafts flock to the Sequim Open Aire Market held on Cedar Street from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. every Saturday. It’s a great place to find freshly harvested fruits, vegetables, fish and meats and even natural honey. Take home some of Sequim’s homemade baked goods, barbecue sauce, salsa and guacamole, as well as other herbs and spices. Save your groceries for later and chow down at the market with barbecue, freshly roasted coffee, pizza, caramel corn and caramel apples. Handmade Belgian chocolate truffles make a perfect end to a meal. Local artisans display hand-crafted items such as soaps and lotions made with Sequim’s famous lavender; fiber arts including funky hats; unique jewelry crafted from sea glass found nearby; colorful pottery and paintings; intricate wood carvings and sparkling gems and minerals. Between 11 a.m.-2 p.m. enjoy entertainment by local musicians. Polite pets are welcome to browse the market with their people.

Bed & Breakfast Domaine Madeleine House Boats for Two A Truly Romantic Getaway

Sense the Romance . . . Absorb the majestic beauty of the mountains . . . Soothe your spirit with the rhythm of the ocean. Stroll the gardens while listening to the call ofn eagles. Rooms include whirlpool tubs, TV/DVD. Our renowned 5-course breakfast is a work of art.

“One of Top 20 getaways” – Sunset Magazine

146 Wildflower Lane, Port Angeles, WA 98362

(360) 457-4174

www.domainemadeleine.com

Houseboats@olypen.com • (360) 796-3440

A Hidden Haven

Private, Fully Equipped, Luxury Cottages A serene oasis from which to explore the Olympic Peninsula and so much more!

E-mail: stay@ahiddenhaven.com 1428 Dan Kelly Rd. Port Angeles, WA 98363

1-877-418-0938 www.ahiddenhaven.com

Ten Acre Oceanfront Estate Luxurious Accommodations Oceanfront King Suites Romantic Fireplaces Two Person Jacuzzi Spas Gourmet Breakfast Toll Free: 1-877-457-9777 Local: 360-457-9197 www.colettes.com

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Dungeness Recreation Area DUNGENESS RECREATION AREA is another of Clallam County’s favorite recreational destinations and the gateway to Dungeness Spit. The 216-acre county park has upland forest, wetlands, sandy bluffs, campsites and spectacular vistas of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Vancouver Island and Mount Baker. Park amenities include a group camp with picnic shelter, play equipment and miles of trails for pedestrians and equestrians. How to get there: From U.S. Highway 101, between Sequim and Port Angeles, turn north onto Kitchen-Dick Road (near milepost 260). Travel approximately 3.5 miles; the road takes a 90-degree turn becoming Lotzgesell Road and the park entrance will be on your left. Camping info: 66 standard campsites are located within the park ($17 for county residents, $20 for non-county). Half of the sites may be reserved in advance (sites 34-66), the remaining are open on a first-come, first-served basis (1-33). In addition, two restrooms are available with showers, there’s a limit of six people per campsite, pets are allowed on leashes and firewood is available for a fee. Campsite reservations are done only by mail. Reservations begin to be accepted in January for that year. The sooner campers get in the completed forms, the reservation fee and the first night’s camping fee, the better their chance of getting their reservation confirmed. All reservations must be received at the park a minimum of two weeks prior to their desired camping date. Adjacent to the county park is the Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge. A trail wanders through the trees and eventually drops down to the Dungeness Spit. An entrance fee must be paid before entering the refuge. The spit is approximately 6 miles long. Drive through the county park to reach the refuge parking area. No pets are allowed on the trail or the spit, but leashed pets are allowed in the recreation area. For more information on the Dungeness Recreation Area, see www.clallam.net/Parks/Dungeness. html or call 360-683-5847.

Contributions Cheerfully accepted! Requests & Donations

(360) 681-0000 Non-profit 501(C)3 Tax ID# 20-2816387

Everything for theChef in Your Home! OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

“Coolest” Kitchen Store on the Peninsula!”

COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL • NEW & USED APPLIANCES • KITCHENWARE & EQUIPMENT

Everyday low prices! 51 Dryke Rd., Sequim WA • 360.582.1050 • http://www.olympicrestaurantequipment.com SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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Sequim is for Kids BE ON THE LOOKOUT for Sequim’s famous Roosevelt elk herd as you enter town from the east. Elk crossing signal lights on U.S. Highway 101 are triggered by herd members wearing transmitting radio collars and from time to time, they do cross the road en masse, halting traffic. Roosevelt elk are native to the Olympic Peninsula, with bulls weighing up to 1,100 pounds and cows in the 600-pound range. One herd, comprised of about 100 animals, considers the Sequim area part of its range. When not in the forest, they graze in farm fields and on lawns. Although the Sequim elk appear to be tame, they are not. Normally, they avoid close contact with people and move away when approached. However, they may show signs of agitation if people get too close, throw things or when people or cars block what the elk consider to be an escape route. Caution should be used at all times when viewing the herd. Favorite spots for elk viewing seem to be along Happy Valley Road, West Sequim Bay Road and Port Williams Road. Courtesy of the Sequim Elk Habitat Committee

Specialized Terra Trike Recumbent Trikes

“We are a full service bicycle repair shop – from basic repairs, to servicing suspension and hydraulic brakes, we can do it all!” ~ Mike Wanner

Kid’s Bicycles

• REN TA L S

Comfort Bikes

• SALES

High-end Road & Mountain Bikes Complete line of replacement parts, apparel & accessories

• R E PA I R S

360-681-3868 • www.mikes-bikes.net 150 W. Sequim Bay Rd., Sequim • M - F • 10am - 5:30pm / Sat • 10am - 5pm

Quality Fitness For Quality Life

Your hometown gym in downtown Sequim Very affordable • No long-term contracts 24/7 key card access

Plenty of parking • Classes included with membership

681-2555

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SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

NOTED AS ONE OF THE BEST PLACES in the country to retire, Sequim also provides much for visitors with children: playgrounds, animals, old bones, music, and enough activities to settle even the most tireless in bed peacefully come nightfall. The Olympic Game Farm offers a chance to meet animals up close on drive-through or walking tours. Animals represent a great variety of species and many are retired film “actors.” Olympic Game Farm: (1423 Ward Road; 360683-4295 or 800-7784205; www.olygamefarm. com. Open nearly every day; fee for tours.) Fishing also is available at the on Ward Road at Jubilee Farm’s trout pond. On the other side of town, Carrie Blake Park (on Blake Avenue near the QFC shopping center) is a family playground, with woodsy groves, trails, dog runs and duck ponds. Colorful playground equipment appeals to the younger set. Next door to the south, the Sequim Skateboard Park offers challenges and thrills for older children and two ball fields offer space for a game. Just north of Carrie Blake Park, the Water Reuse Demonstration Park has walking and biking trails, exercise stations and a pond for radio-controlled boats where children under 14 also can fish. In summer, concerts and family films are offered free at the city band shell here. Concerts are at 3 p.m. the third Sunday of the month through the summer. (These public parks are open during daylight hours only.) Along with vibrant local history exhibits, the main attractions for children at the Museum and Arts Center are the bones of a mastodon found at the Manis site near Sequim in 1977. The bones are displayed in their proper positions on a large artist’s rendering of the mastodon, with the tusks displayed separately. A short video covers the archaeological excavation of the site. Admission by donation; museum store. (175 W. Cedar St.; 360-683-8110; open Tue.-Sat. 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m.) The Dungeness River Audubon Center at Railroad Bridge Park offers indoor and outdoor adventure. Outdoors, the old railroad bridge, a wooded segment of the Discovery Trail, and the Dungeness River are open to explore. Indoors, the Dungeness River Audubon Center overflows with family-friendly exhibits. Children can look through a microscope to discover what gives the blue color to a jay’s feather or they can explore drawers full of bones, feathers, eggs and teeth of species from songbird to mammoth.


Golfing

on the Peninsula They are invited to stroke the pelts local fur-bearing animals and locate the animals themselves in a mural of Olympic Peninsula wildlife. Hundreds of mounted examples of area birds line the shelves, along with black bear, lynx and mountain lion. Knowledgeable staff and docents are happy to answer questions and assist visitors. Railroad Bridge Park is open every day during daylight hours. The Audubon Center is open Tuesday-Friday from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. and Saturdays noon-4 p.m. (Phone: 360-681-4076; www.dungenessrivercenter.org.) On Wednesdays, a free guided bird walk in the park starts at 8:30 a.m. Active family adventures go forward on land and sea in Sequim. The walk out Dungeness Spit to the lighthouse is a favorite. Rest, snack and take a volunteer-guided tour of the lighthouse before beginning the walk back. (Best walking is at low tide. It’s wise to pack water, snacks and jackets and allow half a day for this 11-mile round-trip hike.) The Olympic Discovery Trail features great hiking, jogging and bicycling through scenic areas. (Bicycles available for rental at Mike’s Bikes, near the trail at 150 West Sequim Bay Road; 360-6813868. Sequim is home to protected waters perfect for boating and kayaking. A great family day-trip is a kayak tour of the Dungeness Spit, with a stop at the Dungeness Lighthouse. Tours and rentals can be booked through Dungeness Kayaking (360-681-4190) or Adventures Through Kayaking (360-417-3015). The Sequim Aquatic Recreation Center at 610 N. Fifth Ave. offers swimming (including a children’s pool, rope jump and a water slide), basketball, volleyball and racquetball. Call ahead to check best pool times. (360-683-3344.) As family energy winds down, quieter fun is available at the area’s many U-pick berry farms (June-October) and at the weekly Open Aire Market held on Saturdays (May-October) in downtown Sequim. The market offers local crafts, produce, snacks galore and music. Throughout the spring and summer, watch the Sequim Gazette for other festivals and events, as well as pancake breakfasts, ice cream socials and spaghetti or salmon dinners.

THE CEDARS AT DUNGENESS 1965 Woodcock Road, Sequim 800-447-6826, 360-683-6344 www.dungenessgolf.com Length: 6,035-5,350 yards Public golf course

SKYRIDGE GOLF COURSE

7015 Old Olympic Highway, Sequim 360-683-3673 www.skyridgegolfcourse.com Length: 2,700-3,400 yards for nine holes. Public golf course

SUNLAND GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

109 Hilltop Drive, Sequim 360-683-6800 www.sunlandgolf.com Length: 6,265 yards. Private golf course; open to public Saturdays-Sundays

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Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge

To get to Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge: Take U.S. Highway 101 west of Sequim about

four miles and turn north on Kitchen-Dick Road and continue three miles to the entrance on Voice of America Road. Go through the recreation area to the refuge parking lot to access Dungeness Spit. There is a small entrance fee per individual or family. No pets or mountain bikes are allowed on the spit and fires are prohibited. 72

SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

EVERY HIKE on the Dungeness Spit is different. Every hike is the same. Weather, tide and time of year make each visit unique, but there’s something familiar on every trip. The spit is part of the Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge, which is home to more than 250 species of birds, 41 species of land mammals and eight species of marine animals. The refuge is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and covers 631 acres. Hikers are restricted to the north shore of Dungeness Spit to reach the New Dungeness Light Station and must arrive and depart between sunrise and sunset, avoiding high tides. For a tide schedule, go to www.newdungenesslighthouse.com. Camping and beachcombing are not permitted in the refuge. Stretching 5.5 miles to the New Dungeness Light Station and several hundred yards beyond, Dungeness Spit is the world’s longest natural sand spit, growing at a rate of about 20 feet per year. At the head of the trail in the Dungeness Recreation Area, pay the $3 per group fee and leave your pet in your car — pets are not allowed on the trail or the spit. Some 6,000 visitors annually make the trek. If you’re not up for a strenuous hike, take your pet and stroll along the straitside bluffs of a fourmile loop in the Dungeness Recreation Area for a bird’s-eye view of the spit. Picnic tables and 66 camping sites are available. The first half-mile of the refuge is a picturesque trail through the upland conifer forest before reach-


ing a pair of overlooks that give a spectacular view of the narrow ribbon of the sand spit. The lighthouse is a tiny beacon that appears to be far, far away. The inner shore of the spit is a wildlife refuge for nesting birds and lucky hikers will be favored with seeing a variety of feathered critters. At its highest point, the spit is about 15 feet above sea level and parts of it are under water during winter storms. Stones of all sizes and colors — black, white-striped, amber, green and black, gray, rust red — are strewn upon the dark sand. The pebbles are larger the closer one gets to the crest. Water-worn logs and root wads provide an infinite variety of shapes and angles to interest the eye. Upon reaching the lighthouse, the lush green lawn — well-tended and manicured — and the bright, white cheeriness of the buildings make the grounds seem almost otherworldly amid the wild, near-desolate natural surroundings. The New Dungeness Lighthouse, first lit in 1857, is a gem of history and a perfect place for a picnic before the hike back along the spit. Tour the museum in the former keeper’s quarters to learn about the history of the spit, the lighthouse and local Native American tribes — then climb the 74 spiraling steps to a million-dollar view. Volunteer keepers are on hand to answer questions. The website at www.newdungenesslighthouse.com indicates the New Dungeness Light Station has one of the oldest lighthouses in the Northwest with several of the buildings intact. The lighthouse has been in continuous operation, providing navigational aids for more than 150 years. The light station is maintained and operated by the New Dungeness Light Station Association. The New Dungeness Light Station is open to the public and tours of the lighthouse are available daily from 9 a.m. to two hours before sunset. Boat access is permitted by reservation only through the refuge office, 715 Holgerson Road, Sequim (360-457-8451).

Pet Services Jane Elyea owner

Cozy Care Pet Boarding

Dog & Cat Boarding with a Professional & Compassionate Touch Excellent rural Sequim location minutes from downtown By appointment only

(360) 681-0113

www.cozycarepetboarding.net

Westside Grooming & Pet Sitting Mary Ellen Zalewski-Williams, Dani Lindstrom Certified Groomers

Office: 360-457-6997 Mobile 360-808-4327

Doggie Daycare with covered runs and indoor accommodations

Veterinarian Recommended • Live on site/24-Hour Care

Serving Clallam County for more than 60 years

Luxury Lodging for Dogs & Cats

Open 7 Days a Week/24 Hours a Day By Appointment • Pick-Up/Delivery available

Five Biscuit Rating In-home boarding and luxury lodging for special dogs, cats, birds and other small animals

Dogs $25 /nt • Cats $14-18 /nt Keith Franklin slpetresort@gmail.com

(360) 417-8272 (360) 775-7073 sassyladypetresort.net

2105 W. Hwy 101, Port Angeles 360-457-8206 Monday thru Saturday 11 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

www.ophumanesociety.org

Uptown Cats

Custom care at our cats-only facility in a quiet country setting. Daily one-on-one love, play, and conversation. Short and long-term boarding in large, multi-level private suites. Cats are our passion, not just our business!

Feline Fun Resort Purr Parties View Window Suites Cat Gym

1076 Towne Road, Sequim

(360) 681-4770 www.uptowncats.net

“We‛re all about mew”

Doreen Emerson, Owner

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Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe

Northwest Native Expressions Art Gallery 1033 Old Blyn Highway 360-681-4640 Mon.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

7 Cedars Casino, operated by the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe, is a local center for entertainment, fine food, art and gifts. A free shuttle bus runs to Sequim and Port Angeles.

WITH ITS HEADQUARTERS just east of Sequim at Blyn, the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe supports peninsula residents through business enterprises, health care centers and leadership in natural resources conservation. The campus of the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe also is one of the area’s most rewarding stops for visitors, with entertainment, great food and a glimpse into Northwest Native American culture.

THE JAMESTOWN S’KLALLAM TRIBE

Resisting pressure to move from their traditional lands to a reservation at Skokomish, several S’Klallam communities under the leadership of Lord James Balch pooled their resources and in 1874 purchased 210 acres of land north of Sequim at a place they named Jamestown Beach. This group, the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe, remained organized and involved in the local economy. In 1981, the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe achieved federal recognition. Purchasing more land in a central location on U.S. Highway 101, the tribe established its governing offices. Services at the Blyn campuses include health and dental care, a tribal library, social services and an elder center.

7 CEDARS CASINO

Perhaps the first place to draw the visitor’s eye, 7 Cedars Casino offers fine dining and entertainment, along with casino table games, slots, keno and off-track betting. Full-service dining is available at the Salish Room, Napoli’s or the Totem Grill. Club 7 offers live music several nights a week and books various entertainers throughout the year. The casino also sponsors all 7 Cedars Casino kinds of special events, from 270756 Highway 101 • 360-683-7777 karaoke to sports action, on Sun.-Thurs. 10 a.m.-3 a.m., a regular basis. Fri.-Sat. 10 a.m.-4 a.m. The casino gift shop www.7cedarscasino.com offers souvenirs, local products and Native American 74

SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

art. 7 Cedars Casino runs a free shuttle to Sequim and Port Angeles. Phone the casino for the schedule.

NORTHWEST NATIVE EXPRESSIONS ART GALLERY

Located across Highway 101 about a quartermile east of 7 Cedars Casino, Northwest Native Expressions specializes in first-rate work by Northwest Native American artists. The gallery stocks souvenirs, clothing, music and books. The children’s book selection is worth a stop in itself.

THE HOUSE OF MYTH CARVING SHED

Just down a flight of steps from Northwest Native Expressions is the center of operations for the artisans, headed by lead carver Dale Faulstich, who create totem poles and other artwork for the tribe. Visitors always are made to feel welcome at the carving shed. The carvers will answer questions and tell some of the history of the poles and photographs are encouraged. (Usually open to visitors weekdays 8 a.m.-5 p.m.) The carving shed is a great place to start a walking tour of the tribe’s totem poles.

LONGHOUSE MARKET & DELI

The Longhouse Market & Deli sits halfway between 7 Cedars Casino and the main Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe campus. In addition to gasoline and groceries, the store offers fresh seasonal produce and seafood. A walk-in tobacco humidor and a wine shop also are part of the Longhouse Market. Open 24 hours daily. The Cedars at Dungeness, also owned by the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe, is a championship 18-hole golf course located just west of Sequim on Woodcock Road. Open to the public, The Cedars at Dungeness offers a pro shop as well as food at the Double Eagle Steak and Seafood Restaurant, open for breakfast, lunch and dinner.


Tribes welcome visit0rs

Native Americans have lived on the Olympic Peninsula for 4,000 to 12,000 years and continue to be a strong part of the North Olympic Peninsula’s fabric, culturally and economically. Today, the tribes are active in providing social services for their members by building health clinics, enterprises and entertainment venues such as casinos. You are welcome on all Olympic Peninsula Indian reservations.

JAMESTOWN S’KLALLAM TRIBE

On the southern end of Sequim Bay, between Port Townsend and Sequim at Blyn, are tribal headquarters for the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe. The public art here is spectacular with authentic totems in front of the tribal center and artwork on most of the public buildings, at the visitors’ center and on highway signs. Northwest Native Expressions Art Gallery has two locations, one inside the casino and one showcasing fine art near the tribal center.

LOWER ELWHA KLALLAM TRIBE

The Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, which has become internationally known since the ancient village of Tse Whit Zen was uncovered in 2004 at

the base of Ediz Hook in Port Angeles, has worked tirelessly for fish restoration and the removal of the Elwha River dams. You are welcome to visit its fish hatchery in the beautiful Elwha Valley on the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The tribe’s small reservation is just west of Port Angeles — its Elwha River Casino is on Stratton Road.

QUILEUTE NATION

Visitors can spend hours sitting on the end of a jetty at La Push watching eagles, osprey, brown pelicans, seals and whales (that spout and breach just offshore in March and April). Surrounded by Olympic National Park, with nearby trails to Second Beach and Third Beach, the Quileute Tribe has hosted visitors quietly here for years, allowing campfires and camping on their beautiful crescent beach facing the Pacific Ocean. They now offer luxury cabins with whirlpool spas and gas fireplaces at the Quileute Oceanside Resort.

HOH TRIBE

This small tribe lives at the mouth of the Hoh River that runs untouched by dikes or diversion into

the Pacific Ocean. The Hoh, famous for its king salmon run, is jammed at its mouth with a maze of massive spruce, hemlock and cedar old-growth driftwood. The meandering river today, however, threatens to overtake the reservation. The Hoh Visitor Center has exhibits on the temperate rain forest and offers a flat, 0.25-mile trail that gives users a taste of the rain forest.

MAKAH NATION

The Makah Nation at Neah Bay occupies the northwesternmost area in the contiguous U.S. The nationally renowned Makah Cultural and Resource Center museum displays about 5,500 artifacts recovered from a village buried in a mudslide 500700 years ago. Nearly 15,000 visitors find their way to the museum’s exhibits annually, 70 miles west of Port Angeles at the end of Highway 112 at Neah Bay. Also on the reservation, from the Cape Flattery Trail, are sweeping views of the Pacific Ocean and Tatoosh Island. SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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Centennial Independence Day Celebration! SEQUIM IS THE PLACE TO BE the 4th of July weekend. As part of the City of Sequim Centennial Celebration, the organizing committee plans a series of events over the Independence Day holiday, including an old-fashioned town picnic, a street dance on Washington Street and a Centennial Golf Scramble. • Thursday, July 4 – Old-Fashioned Town Picnic 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Water Reuse Demonstration Park and the James Center for the Performing Arts, off Blake Avenue or Rhodefer Road, adjacent to Carrie Blake Park. Fun and games for the entire family are in store during this full day of old-fashioned community cheer. Relay races, bean bag toss, pick-up sports games, checkers, horseshoes, croquet and great music will highlight the day. And don’t miss out on the beard, mustache and vintage hat contests. Picnic food will be available for purchase. Opening ceremonies start at 10:30 a.m., followed by a community photograph at 10:45 a.m. Music, games and contests begin at 11 a.m. and conclude at 3 p.m. when the Sequim City Band begins its annual 4th of July concert. • Friday, July 5 — The Street Dance of the Century 6-10 p.m. on Washington Street in downtown Sequim In conjunction with the First Friday Art Walk, the city will close Washington Street and throw a musical party. Dance to the tunes of retro rock and roll band Magic Bus with special guest the Guy Johnson Band. There will be a beer and wine garden open and food available for purchase. Be sure to be a part of the Sequim Community photograph

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to be taken at 5:30 p.m. • Saturday, July 6 – The Cedars at Dungeness Sequim Centennial Scramble 8:30 a.m. Shotgun start at The Cedars at Dungeness Golf Course with two-man teams; $80 per person includes lunch and tournament prizes.

CENTENNIAL TOWN PICNIC CONTESTS

The Sequim Centennial Committee will host a series of contests as part of the Old-Fashioned Town Picnic on the 4th of July at the Water Reuse Demonstration Park and James Center for the Performing Arts. It’s not too early to prepare for these all-in-good-fun competitions. • Beard Contest – Are you sporting the best beard in the Sequim Dungeness Valley? If you’re not yet growing a beard, it’s not too late to start. See how your facial fuzz stacks up by entering this hairy competition. Creative grooming is encouraged! • New Beard Competition – Contestants will be judged on the best beard that can be grown in just 30 days. Participants must submit a clean-shaven photo taken on June 4 to enter the contest. • Mustache Growing Competition – Is it the fullest? The fanciest? What makes your mustache special? Find out how your whiskers compare! • Vintage Hat Contest – Ladies (and gentlemen) it’s time to start designing the perfect picnic hat. Hats can be historically accurate or just plain fun and fancy. There is a $5 entry fee for each contest. Proceeds will be used for prizes and to help support Sequim Centennial activities. Contact Patsy Mattingly at piccolo34@ hotmail.com or 683-8226 with questions. • Air Affaire slated for summer — A nostalgic look at barnstorming days coincides with the Sequim Centennial and the 30th anniversary of the Sequim Valley Airport. Antique plane exhibitions, hot air balloon rides, biplane rides, remote-control aircraft, aerial demonstrations, aviation crafts and food come to the Sequim Valley Airport from Aug. 31-Sept. 1.


Sequim

Nightlife

• Applebee’s. 130 River Road, Sequim. 683-9090 11 a.m.-midnight, Monday-Thursday; 11 a.m.-1 a.m. Fridays; 10 a.m.-1 a.m. Saturdays; 10 a.m.-midnight Sundays. Restaurant and bar. • Alder Wood Bistro. 139 W. Alder St., Sequim. Tuesday-Saturday, 4:30-9 p.m. Dinner, wine/beer/cider. • Club Seven and 7 Cedars Casino, 270756 Highway 101, Blyn. 683-7777. www.7cedarsresort.com. Casino gaming, dining, music, dancing, comedy Wednesdays, special parties and events. • Dockside Grill on Sequim Bay. 2577 West Sequim Bay Road. 683-7510. Dinner 4-9 p.m. Pelican Room bar. Call for availability.

Large Lavender Gift Shop / Lavender Plants Lavender Ice Cream, Espresso

ll A n e Op ar! Ye

• Dungeness Bay Wine & Cheese, 123 E. Washington St., Sequim. 6812778. Music most Saturdays. • Islander Pizza & Pasta Shack, 380 E. Washington St. Sequim. Pizza, pasta, bar. 683-9999 • Oasis Sports Bar & Grill, 301 E. Washington St., Sequim. 582-3143. Music, dancing, dinner, sports events, Sunday trivia contests, special dinners.

Come and experience the “essence of the valley” at

• Paradise Restaurant, 703 N. Sequim Ave. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and Sunday. 4-9 p.m. Saturday. 683-1977. • Rainshadow Roasting Company. 157 W. Cedar St. 681-0650. Open most days until 5 p.m. with occasional weekend music and later hours. • Stymie’s Bar and Grill, 1965 Woodcock Road, Sequim. 683-6344. Friday night live music, 6-9 p.m. • Wind Rose Cellars tasting room, 143 W. Washington St. Music on weekends. No cover. 360-358-5469. Occasional events: • First Friday Art Walk Sequim. First Friday of each month: 5-8 p.m. Free self-guided art tours downtown, with receptions, snacks and music on the route. www.sequimartwalk.com. • Olympic Theatre Arts, 414 N. Sequim Ave. 683-7326 or www.olympictheatrearts.org. Stage plays; “At the Movies” series.

FREE ENTRANCE

360.683.6453

274154 Hwy 101, Sequim www.SunshineLavender.com SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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Sequim Lodging 2013 Bed & Breakfasts & Inns Bond Ranch Retreat 360-461-2156 www.bondranchretreat.com Clarks Chambers Bed & Breakfast Inn 360-683-4431 www.olypen.com/clacha Colette’s Bed & Breakfast 360-457-9197/877-457-9777 www.colettes.com Diamond Point Inn 360-797-7720/800-310-6322 www.diamondpointinn.com Domaine Madeleine Bed and Breakfast 360-457-4174/888-811-8376 www.domainemadeleine.com Dungeness Barnhouse B & B 360-582-1663 www.dungenessbarnhouse.com Eden by the Sea 360-452-6021 www.edenbythesea.net George Washington Inn 360-452-5207 www.georgewashingtoninn.com Greywolf Inn 360-683-5889/800-914-WOLF www.greywolfinn.com Helga’s Edelweiss Bed & Breakfast 360-681-2873 www.helgasedelweissbnb.com/ Juan de Fuca Cottages & Suites 360-683-4433 www.juandefuca.com Kathleen’s Mountain View Lodge 888-596-0924 Lavender Inn 800-397-2256 www.sequimrentals.com The Lodge Bed and Breakfast 360-681-3100 www.thelodgeatsherwood.com

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Lost Mountain Lodge Phone: 360-683-2431 www.lostmountainlodge.com Meadows Inn 360-417-8074/866-417-8074 www.themeadowsinn.com Red Caboose Getaway 360-683-7350 www.redcaboosegetaway.com Riverside House 360-582-0339 Sea Cliff Gardens Bed & Breakfast 360-452-2322/800-880-1332 www.seacliffgardens.com Williams Manor 360-504-2512 www.williamsmanor-sequim.com

Hotels & Motels Days Inn 360-683-1775 www.daysinn.com Dungeness Bay Cottages 360-683-3013/888-683-3013 www.dungenessbay.com Econo Lodge 360-683-7113/800-488-7113 www.sequimeconolodge.com Holiday Inn Express Suites & Conference Center 360-681-8756 www.hiesequim.com Quality Inn & Suites 360-683-2800 www.sqis.net Red Ranch Inn 360-683-4196 Sequim Bay Lodge 360-683-0691 www.sequimbaylodge.com Sequim West Inn 360-683-4144/800-528-4527 www.sequimwestinn.com Sundowner Motel 360-683-5532/800-325-6966

SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013

www.sequimsundowner.com

RVs & Camping

Diamond Point RV Resort 360-681-0590 www.kmresorts.com

Discovery View Cottage 360-808-8005 www.home.earthlink.net~lucybailey/ Fern Hollow 360-504-2323 www.fernhollowvenue.com

Dungeness Recreation Area 360-683-5847

Hillside Haven 360-683-1580 www.hillside-haven.com

Gilgal Oasis RV Park 360-452-1324 www.gilgaloasisrvpark.com

Karen’s Guest Cottages 360-681-5080 karensguestcottages.com

Home Away Home 360-681-5291

Kinder Farm Vacation Rentals 360-683-7397 www.kinderfarm.com

John Wayne’s Waterfront Resort 360-681-3853 www.johnwayneswaterfrontresort. com KOA Kampground 360-457-5916 www.koa.com Olympic Paradise 360-683-1264 www.olympicparadise.com Sequim Bay State Park 360-683-4235 www.parks.wa.gov/parks/? selectedparks=Sequim%20Bay

Vacation Rentals 1920 Farm House 360-683-3564 www.realestatesequim.com Action Property Management 360-681-4737 www.sunnysequim.com Beach Garden Cottage 360-683-2585 www.beachgardencottage.com Brigadoon Vacation Rentals 360-683-2255 www.sequimrentals.com Cedarbrook Seaview Vacation Rentals 360 683-7733 www.cedarbrooklavender.com

Lightkeeper’s Cottage 360-681-2055 www.thelightkeeperscottage.com Nelson’s Duck Pond and Lavender Farm 360-681-7727 www.nelsonsduckpond.com Purple Haze Farm House 360-683-1714/888-852-6560 www.purplehazelavender.com Rancho Lamro 360-683-8133 Sequim Bay Resort 360-681-3853 www.sequimbayresorts.com Sequim Valley Vacation Home Rentals 360-683-3565/800-879-8859 www.sequimvalley.com Sunset Marine Resort 360-591-4303 www.sunsetmarineresort.com Three Crabs Beach House 800-879-8859 www.sequimvalley.com


Port Angeles: Port Angeles is the county seat of Clallam County, tucked between the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the Olympic Mountains. In 2012 approximately 19,200 of the county’s 71,800 residents live within the city that markets itself as “Port Angeles — the Center of It All.” The S’Klallam Tribe lived along the Strait of Juan de Fuca’s shoreline for centuries before the Spanish discovered the deep harbor in 1791. President Abraham Lincoln designated Port Angeles as a town site for a customs house in 1862, but there was little settlement by newcomers until the 1890s. U.S. Highway 101 is the only major highway serving the Olympic Peninsula with Highway 112 (Strait of Juan de Fuca Highway) taking travelers to Washington’s coast, known as the West End to locals. A commercial carrier serves Port Angeles from Fairchild International Airport, landing at Boeing Field with shuttle service to Sea-Tac International Airport. The MV Coho, a car/passenger ferry, shuttles between downtown Port Angeles and Victoria, British Columbia. The Clallam Transit System, a countywide bus system, serves Forks, Port Angeles and Sequim. The Dungeness Line makes two round-trips daily from Sea-Tac. Because of the rain shadow effect of the Olympic Mountains, Port Angeles has a temperate coastal climate with winter lows in the 40s and

summer highs in the 70s. Average rainfall in Port Angeles is 25 inches annually. At Port Angeles’ back door are the Olympic Mountains, cresting to some 8,000 feet, and the gateway to Olympic National Forest and Olympic National Park. Hurricane Ridge, which offers a stunning views of the mountains and strait, is a 35-minute and 17-mile drive up switchbacks to an altitude of 5,230 feet. The Port Angeles area is outdoor-friendly with scores of campgrounds, hiking and biking trails. The Olympic Discovery Trail spreads out 30 miles from Ediz Hook near downtown Port Angeles to Blyn, east of Sequim, and is suitable for walkers and road bikes. Port Angeles is served by Olympic Medical Center (360-417-7000) with 126 inpatient beds, a Level III trauma center, a state-of-the-art surgery suite, 22 private short-stay rooms, laboratory, imaging and rehabilitative departments. The medical center also has its own cancer center in Sequim and home health agency. Points of interest in or near Port Angeles include the Arthur Feiro Marine Life Center at Hollywood Beach downtown, the Gateway Plaza for the summer farmers market, the Clallam County Historical Society’s Museum at the Carnegie, Port Angeles Fine Arts Center, Olympic Coast Discovery Center, Ediz Hook and Hurricane Ridge.

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Magical marine life FEIRO MARINE LIFE CENTER THE TANKS AT THE FEIRO MARINE LIFE CENTER are gurgling and sweating, the 45-degree water siphoned from Port Angeles Harbor at odds with a warm summer morning. The marine life within them seems static until center coordinator Bob Campbell points out a scallop filtering plankton and several starry flounders and great sculpins blanketed in sand. “If you stand in front of the tanks long enough, you’ll be amazed at what comes out — not because it’s A great Pacific octopus presses against the glass in its own aquarium. When mature, each of become more active, but because you’re more aware,” its eight arms can reach up to 6 feet long. As with all other creatures in the center, the octopus Campbell said. This and other lessons are what Arthur was captured from the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Photo by Patricia Morrison Coate Feiro, a Port Angeles biology teacher with a passion for two view tanks and bank of 16 aquariums, including one with a young giant marine life, wanted his legacy to be in establishing the center a stone’s throw Pacific octopus captured in the strait. Among the marine life visitors can see from Hollywood Beach. The aquarium was dedicated in November 1981, and/or touch are starfish, sea cucumbers, sea urchins, several types of small but Feiro died in early 1982 before it opened to visitors. In January 2008 it crabs and shrimp, scallops, tubeworms, sculpins, eel-like gunnels, sponges, achieved nonprofit status and has 16,000 visitors annually. mussels and starry flounders. A new addition to the center is a hands-on Nearby, in The Landing Mall, is the Olympic Coast Discovery Center interactive display of the Elwha River Restoration project and the removal for information on the 3,330-square-mile Olympic Coast National Marine of two dams on the Elwha River. The dam removal began in September 2011 Sanctuary, including its biodiversity, the importance of conservation and is the largest dam removal in the United States. man-made challenges the sanctuary faces. As a public aquarium, the center is open from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily from Visitors can observe local marine life in the Feiro’s three touch tanks, Memorial Day through Labor Day weekends. During the October-April off-season, it’s open from noon-4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday or by special arrangement. There is a small admittance fee. About a dozen docents are attuned to whether or not visitors want to interact or just browse the marine life. Campbell said they donate between 1,300 and 1,500 hours per year to the center. “All you really have to do is call us if the grandkids are visiting and if we’re around, we’ll let you in,” Campbell advised. “It’s a great place to get insight into the beauty of the area we live in, the magical biodiversity. It’s a great place to come to do tidepool watching, something I consider a contemplative experience,” Campbell said. Contact the center at 360-417-6254.

Art Galleries

ART INSIDE & OUTSIDE STROLL THE WOODS SUNRISE TO SUNSET YEAR ROUND

P A F AC

FREE ADMISSION

360 457 3532

A R T + N AT U R E PAFAC.ORG

1203 E. LAURIDSEN BLVD. PORT ANGELES WA 98362

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Antiquing PORT ANGELES

Port Angeles has several stores conveniently located on First Street downtown that offer excellent antique shopping, including Unique Treasures Mall, 105 W. First St.; Port Angeles Antique Mall, 109 W. First St.; E-Z Pawn Inc., 113B W. First St.; The Trading Post, 114 W. First St.; Cottage Queen, 119 W. First St.; Zeller’s Antiques, 129 W. First St.; and Elliott’s Antique Emporium, 135 E. First St.

Walk-In Clinic

840 N. 5th Avenue in Sequim Providing same day care for patients with non-life-threatening medical concerns.

360.582.2930 | OlympicMedical.org Open weekdays 8:30am-5:30pm. Please call for weekend hours.

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Olympic Coast Discovery Center Lodging

in Port Angeles Minutes from downtown, Victoria Ferry and Olympic National Park, with nearby restaurants and service stations O O O O O O O O • 16 large non-smoking/smoking units with queen beds, kitchens or microwave/refrigerators • Single or 2 bed UNITS • Cable TV • Guest Laundry • Ample parking for boats & trucks • Mtn view • Commercial and weekly rates available October 1st to Memorial Day

Sportsmen O O O O O O O O

MOTEL

www.sportsmenmotel.com

2909 Hwy. 101 E. • Port Angeles, WA 98362 • (360) 457-6196

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Sorry, No Pets

OLYMPIC COAST NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY is located in Washington’s northwest corner, where the Strait of Juan de Fuca meets the Pacific Ocean. The sanctuary has a total area of more than 3,300 square miles with 135 miles of coastline. Each year, more than 3 million visitors find their way here, attracted by Olympic National Park and other natural and cultural amenities. However, before heading west, your first stop should be the Olympic Coast Discovery Center at 115 E. Railroad St., on the waterfront in Port Angeles. It’s a great place to begin your learning adventures on the Olympic Coast. The center is open daily, Memorial Day through Labor Day, and by appointment. To schedule a tour, call 360-457-6622 ext. 31 or e-mail janet.lamont@noaa.gov. Admission is free. At the center you can plan your trip to Neah Bay, La Push, Kalaloch or other coastal destinations. Trained staff will provide detailed information on where to hike, where to see whales, the best views or secluded beaches. You’ll get road distances and driving times and tips for getting the most out of your visit. Find out what makes national marine sanctuaries so important in the efforts to protect the oceans, marine ecosystems and marine wildlife. Because each national marine sanctuary is a unique world of its own, you’ll discover why the Olympic coast is so important. You’ll meet its marine mammals, seabirds and its habitats, including tide pools and deep-sea canyons. At the center, learn about the history of the Olympic coast and the many tools that researchers use to understand the underwater landscapes, living communities and ocean processes that make Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary the treasure it is. Hop into the center’s “deepwater theater” to see actual underwater videos. Before there was written history, Native Americans thrived on the ocean’s bounty. Today, fishing, transportation and recreation are the keystones to the region’s wealth. Discover what it means to have an Olympic coast way of life. Visit the Olympic Coast Discovery Center — then launch your own journey of discovery to the wild Olympic coast. Information courtesy of the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration and Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary


Hurricane Ridge

Rising a mile high, Hurricane Ridge offers winter recreation and activities and features winter vistas unmatched anywhere in the Pacific Northwest. It is a small, family oriented ski area, offering to residents and visitors alike a quality winter sports experience, without the high cost or congestion of most ski areas. The ridge boasts some groomed areas, but for the accomplished skier or snowboarder the steeps, bowls and glades are well worth the effort it takes to get there. With a summit elevation of 5,240 feet, the average annual snowfall is 400-plus inches.

Hurricane Ridge has a mountain experience for everybody. Seventeen miles south of Port Angeles at an elevation of 5,242 feet, the ridge is Olympic National Park’s most easily reached mountain destination. Paved meadow loop trails traverse the ridge top near the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center. Black-tailed deer often are seen browsing among the meadow flowers. The trails are handicapped accessible with some assistance and provide magnificent views. Stretching from the east to the south, the snowcapped peaks of the Olympics have an awe-inspiring alpine majesty, especially Mount Olympus at 7,980 feet. The fresh scent of hemlock and fir wafts on the breezes that sweep Hurricane Ridge. Delicate mountain flowers, from early-blooming alpine lilies that poke their drooping white heads from melting snow patches to the bright red Indian paintbrushes and tiny pink phlox blossoms, there is a panoply of pretty. The Big Meadow Loop leads to the Cirque Rim Trail, with scenic overlooks past the Elwha Valley to the west. The deep blue water of the Strait of Juan de Fuca is visible past fire-scorched Griff Peak. Because there is so much to see so easily, summer crowds can seem overwhelming. Fortunately, there are two easy ways to get beyond the crowds. In the summer, the sun rises early, providing light to even the earliest risers. Beat it — and you beat the crowds. The longer you sleep in, the more elbows there are to bump. If early rising isn’t for you, but you’re willing to foray a little farther, there are two eye-popping trails that head out from Hurricane Ridge. The first is the 3.8-mile trail leading from Sunrise Point to Klahhane Ridge. The steep High Ridge Trail climbs to a stunning view before dropping to a four-way juncture. To the left, the trail loops back to the meadow trails, ahead is a short climb to Sunrise Point (worth the detour) and to the right is the Mount Angeles Trail. This trail parallels Sunrise Ridge to Mount Angeles. It offers gorgeous mountain views as it traverses flowered meadows and stands of sub-alpine forest. It also offers relative solitude as few venture far from the meadow loops. After about 2.8 miles, the trail encounters the Switchback Trail for a steep 1-mile climb up Klahhane Ridge and a perfect picnic point. The trail continues down the shale slope past Lake Angeles to the park entrance but it’s a long trek and might be best to turn back here. The second option involves a drive beyond the Visitor Center to Hurricane Hill. The road is narrow and winding and deters many would-be hikers. The 1.6-mile trail is paved for much of the way and is accessible, with assistance, though there are no guardrails. For a relatively easy hike with beautiful views, scenery and a modicum of isolation, Hurricane Hill is a pleasant option. There is an entrance fee of $15 per car. VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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Dining Port Angeles • Weddings • Fundraisers • Class Reunions

Ice Cream, Shakes, Desserts, Malts, Cakes & more.

Award Winning

C’EST SI BON

Dinners 5 pm - 10 pm Come check out our Beautiful Facilities Reasonable Prices!

To Go orders available. (360) 452-7777

1611 E. Front St. • Port Angeles Hours • 10am-11pm • 7 days/week Winter Hours • 10am-10pm • Sun-Thurs • 10am-11pm • Fri-Sat

Over 30 Years in Business On Hwy 101-Across from Deer Park Cinema www.cestsibon-frenchcuisine.com

French Restaurant 360

452-8888

RESTAURANT

Great food you can afford to enjoy!

Award-Winning Italian Cuisine Fresh Olympic Coast Cuisine Home of Edward and Bella’s first date!

118 E. First St. • Port Angeles, WA • 360.457.5442 Open 4pm Daily • www.bellaitaliapa.com

BREAKFAST: From traditional to creative favorites. LUNCH: Large salads, pastas as well as deli, gourmet sandwiches, and sauteés. DINNER: Creative, affordable comfort-food menu DESSERTS: From our in-house baker EXTENSIVE VALUE-PRICED BEER & WINE LIST

1506 E. First St., Port Angeles, 360-457-4611• www.cafegardenpa.com

SMUGGLERS LANDING Port Angeles’ great waterfront eatery

Serving northwest seafood and casual dining 115 E. Railroad Ave., Port Angeles In the Landing Mall at Lincoln and Railroad Ave. Reservations or information: (360) 452-9292

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Dining Port Angeles

u

e m’

Cockadoodle Doughnuts are Dee-licious!

Home of

Lemongrass Kobe Sliders Spicy Northern Thai Sausage & much more

em ’

D

nk

Serving Thai Tapas & Traditional Thai Fares

ot g if yo u cockadoodledoughnuts.com

105 East Front Street, Port Angeles • 360-477-8144

Drake’s Pizza & subs

Beer, Wine & Cocktails 222 N. Lincoln • 452-6148

(In Port Angeles across from Red Lion Inn)

Open 7 days a week from May through October

Come see the finest collection of Wildlife Art in the state

piz za

Party subs - souPs - salaDs - sanDwiches

e ak U-B

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Family Dining • Children’s Menu

call ahead orders welcomed

(360) 452.4955

819 s. lincoln - Port angeles, wa 98362

Room For Large Groups Salad Bar • Happy Hour Daily

OPEN 6 AM 113 Del Guzzi Dr. • Port Angeles • 360-452-6545 at Hwy. 101 (between Super 8 & The Olympic Lodge)

GOURMET BURGERS FISH & CHIPS, POUTINE NW BEERS, MILKSHAKES skeeball~foosball~super chexx hockey 536 MARINE DRIVE PORT ANGELES 360-452-0999 COLONELHUDSON.COM

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Dining Port Angeles

Serving Breakfast & Lunch Breakfast ‘til 11:00 Weekdays HOMEMADE DELI SALADS • SOUPS & DESSERTS • CATERING • TO-GO ORDERS WELCOME! Hours: 8am – 3pm Tues. thru Sat.

704 Marine Dr., P.A.

• 417-6961

Treat Yourself to a Culinary Tour of Asia Open 7 days a week 11 am - 9 pm 134 W. Front Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Tel: 360-417-8966

Vietnamese Cuisine Dine–In and Take-Out “Come try our Special Bubble Tea”

Tue. – Sunday: 10:30am–9:00pm, Closed Monday 360.457.9375 • 2365 E. Hwy 101, PA, WA 5 minutes to Victoria Ferry

John Hammond Owner (360) 775-5379

Kelli Hammond Owner (360) 775-5386

Gluten Free • Vegan Options 102 W. Front Street • Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 504-2924 cafenewday102@yahoo.com 86 ■■ VISITORS GUIDE 2013 SEQUIM VISITORS GUIDE 2013


Juan de Fuca Festival

The Juan de Fuca Festival of the Arts in Port Angeles is the premier arts event on the Olympic Peninsula. In fact, as it reaches its 20th year, the event is widely acknowledged as one of the best music festivals on the West Coast. As its website indicates (jffa.org), the lineup at this festival features some of the greatest artists in the country, if not the world. Even so, the festival retains its small-town roots and community feeling. Families will particularly enjoy many of the family friendly performances offered at the festival. Held each year over Memorial Day weekend, this year’s four-day festival is scheduled for May 2427. The festival features four major stages and more than 100 performances. Also, continuing the fun after the main festivities wind down each evening at 10 p.m., the “Juan de Fuca After Hours in the Clubs” program ensures continuing entertainment for as long as 14 hours each day. Another highlight of the festival is the Juan de Fuca Street Fair which features dozen of artisans plying their crafts along with a wide selection of food and refreshments. You also can enjoy local performers lending whimsy and song to the Street Fair festivities. With a beautiful setting nestled snugly between the Olympic Mountains and the Strait of Juan de Fuca, four days and nights of unparalleled artistry, a street fair filled with a garden of earthly delights, a fun after-hours program and so much more, it’s easy to see why the International Festivals and Events Association considers this event to be “one of the best small-town festivals in the country.” See jffa. org for more information.

Olympic Peninsula

Senior Games

Sports Competition for those 50 & Better Fri.–Sat.–Sun., Aug. 23-24–25 Register by Aug. 16 16 SPORTS • 60 EVENTS • 3 DAYS Come for the Sport, Stay for the Fun! Port Angeles Senior Center • 328 E. 7th Street, Port Angeles 360-457-7004 • www.olympicpeninsulaseniorgames.com VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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Shopping Elliott’s Port Angeles

Antique Emporium Store, Estate Sales & Appraisals Email: EAEmporium@aol.com (360) 504-2890 Phone & Fax

135 E. First St. • Port Angeles, WA 98362

EAE

InSpired!

Corner of First & Lincoln - 3 blocks from ferry dock

All the things that you Want All the things that you Need

217 N. Laurel, Port Angeles

(360) 457-6400

Mon. – Sat. 7am – 6pm Sun. 11am-6pm Email: nectemp@olypen.com

www.facebook.com/NecessitiesAndTemptations

Fiddleheads

Home  Gift  Garden A Storied Collection Celebrate the nature of imperfection in a perfectly beautiful way. OPEN DAILY

(360)

452-2114

126 West First Street Port Angeles, WA 98362

Local, Natural & Organic Products

Walk-in, drive thru....grocery, deli, espresso bar, craft beers & wine, baked goods, smoothies and gluten-free products Corner of Lauridsen and Eunice, Port Angeles • www.goodtogopa.com

Mon.-Fri. 8-5:30 - Sat. 8-4 • 360-457-1857

200 W. First St., Port Angeles

452-7175

www.countryairemarket.com facebook.com/countryairemarket


Shopping Port Angeles

WATERS WEST Fly Fishing Outfitters

The Premier Fly Shop on the Olympic Peninsula “Serving the Olympic Peninsula Since 1998”

• Year-round guide service • Flies for freshwater & saltwater • High Quality fly-tying materials • Online Store • Rentals and classes

(360) 417-0937

www.WatersWest.com

140 W. Front St., • Downtown Port Angeles • 9:30-6:30 Mon.-Sat., 11-5 Sun.

We’re More than a Drug Store GIFTS

• Northwest gifts • Locally produced gifts & food items

PHARMACY

cabled fiber Studio ...not your mother’S

behind the Post Office

106 N. Laurel Street Port AngeleS, WA 98362 phone 360.504.2233 www.cabledfiberstudio.com

HOME HEALTH

360.452.4200

Store

Open 6 days a week!

• Full-service pharmacy • Two drive-thru windows

424 E. 2nd Street, Port Angeles

yarn

• Daily & weekly wheelchair rentals • Crutches & Canes • Orthotics

closed Mondays

Authorized dealer for Mountain & Road Bikes Full line of Accessories & Apparel Full Service - All Makes 24-Hour Turnaround Open 7 days a week 403 S. Lincoln St., Suite 2 • Port Angeles (360) 504-2040

The oldest anime & manga store on the Olympic Peninsula Now Featuring

110 W. First St., Port Angeles

360-797-1313

Open Tues-Sat 11-7 www.animekat.com

Joe’s • 7 for all mankind Lucky • Miss Me • Kensie Free People 123 W 1st St • Port Angeles Since 1997

417-8097 Open 7 Days


Shopping Port Angeles Souvenirs

Twilight Merchandise

Washington & Canadian T-shirts • Jackets • Gifts Jewelry • Red Hat Accessories • Imported Clothing and gifts

What’s In Store Located in the Landing Mall

Key chains, magnets, clothing, mugs, shot glasses

115 East Railroad Ave., Port Angeles

360-457-1427

An independent Full-Service Bookstore Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sundays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

NEW & USED BOOKS • GREETING CARDS TOYS • GIFT ITEMS • JOURNALS • CDs Special Orders & Phone Orders Welcome

360-457-1045

114 West Front Street, Port Angeles

Shop Dine Experience DOWNTOWN PORT ANGELES

almost 200 businesses to welcome you www.portangelesdowntown.com

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Olympic National Forest is a distinct area, its 633,000 acres in two sections bordering the much larger Olympic National Park (922,000 acres) west of Hood Canal and south of Sequim and at the northwest corner of the park. It was established in 1897 as a reserve and was designated as a national forest in 1907, some 30 years before the park was established. The forest’s topography includes a temperate rain forest where annual precipitation often exceeds 120 inches, yielding ferns the size of dining room tables and sky-scraping Sitka spruce and Douglasfir; the Olympic Mountains with Mount Olympus looming to about 8,000 feet; large lowland lakes with Lake Crescent, a turquoise gem 12 miles long and 625 feet at its maximum depth; cascading rivers and waterfalls. A green cathedral, the forest has 2,178 miles of canopied roads, 200 miles of trails for hikers, bicyclists and horses, several providing access to Olympic National Park, and 19 developed campgrounds. It also has five boating sites, four nature trails and one viewpoint. Five wildernesses in the forest, totaling 88,480 acres, provide solitude and scenic beauty where the only access is by foot or horseback. Leased pets are permitted in the forest but not in the park. The forest receives more than 1.2 million visitor days annually. See www.fs.fed.us/r6/olympic.

Forest, park entrance fees Olympic National Forest

Day pass $5: Admits driver and passengers; multiple days require multiple daily passes or: Annual pass $30: Admits driver, passengers Olympic National Park Single visit: (good for up to seven consecutive days at any Olympic National Park entrance.) Vehicle: $15 Individual: (on foot, bicycle, motorcycle) $5. Children 15 years old and younger are admitted free of charge. Annual pass: Vehicle: $30 — any Olympic National Park entrance station for one year from the month of purchase. Purchase passes at forest and park entrances, ranger stations, visitors centers and select retailers.

Olympic National Forest

Campground Fees

The nightly fee for camping in one of Olympic’s established campgrounds ranges from $12-$24, depending on location and season. For a complete listing of campground fees, check the campground pages at www.nps.gov.

Wilderness Overnight Use Fees

Permits are required for all overnight trips

into the Olympic wilderness backcountry. Permits (good for the entire hiking group) cost $5, plus $2 per person per night. For more information about backpacking in Olympic, check the overnight hiking pages at www.nps.gov.

Other Use Fees

RV dump station fee: $5 per use (dump stations available at Fairholme, Hoh, Kalaloch, Mora and Sol Duc campgrounds)

Sherry Grimes Designs

Distinctive & Unique

We work within your budget on.. Custom Home Plans Renovations & Additions Interior Design/Space Planning Lighting Plans Handicap/Elder Aging in Place Design

Call us!!! You’ll be so glad you did! Sherry L. Grimes, A.I.B.D., A.I.B.D.W.A. Member of National Builders Association National Historic Preservation Society

(360) 460-5303

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Museum at the Carnegie The Clallam County Historical Society’s building at 207 S. Lincoln St. in Port Angeles is a piece of history itself. Built as one of 2,500 libraries funded by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie between 1883 and 1929, the library was built in 1918 for $13,000 in the Arts & Crafts style of classic brick with large arched windows, golden oak beams and tandem fireplaces. After a $1 million restoration to undo modern renovations, the Museum at the Carnegie opened in 2004. The Historical Society decided early on that the main floor of the Museum at the Carnegie would house its permanent exhibits while a large room in the basement would be home to temporary ones rotated on an annual basis. The professionalism in the library’s restoration and historical exhibits is readily apparent — the museum has the look and feel of a well-funded state project. Visitors are greeted in the main gallery by the museum’s theme — Strong People: Faces of Clallam County — and are directed in a logical fashion through the seven, carefully designed and informative exhibit areas. They are: • Our Ancestral Heritage — Early explorers and Clallam County’s four Native American tribes; • Body, Mind, Spirit — Education, performing and visual arts; • This Land Is Your Land — The history of Olympic National Park; • Homegrown — The history of local industries; • Our Strategic Coastline — The county’s naval and shipbuilding legacy; • Creating Communities — Tidbits about former villages and an ongoing slide show of photos from the early 1900s; • Charting the Last Frontier — Explorations and settlements. The Museum at the Carnegie is open from 1-4 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday and special tours can be arranged by calling 452-2662.

Taste the bounty of the Olympic Peninsula....

Outfitting the Olympic Peninsula since 1919 Men & Women Outdoor Clothing • Boots • Backpacks Kid Carriers • Tents • Sleeping Bags • Binoculars • Headlamps USGS Maps • Stoves & Fuel • Knives • Food Treking Poles • Day Packs • Travel Dept.

Celebrate the ancestral home of the Dungeness Crab

12th Annual

Dungeness Crab & Seafood Festival October 11-13, 2013

Free Admission

On the water at the Port Angeles City Pier, the Gateway Plaza and Red Lion Hotel

Everything under cover. Old-fashioned crab feed and 15 restaurants!

(360) 457-4150

www.brownsoutdoor.com 112 W. Front Street • Downtown Port Angeles • Open Mon.- Sat. 9:30-6 • Sun. Noon-4 92

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Music • Grab-A-Crab Derby Olympic Peninsula Wine Tasting Cooking Demonstrations NW Crafts, Merchandise & Food Products Sunday Gospel Brunch 5k Fun-Run

www.crabfestival.org 360-452-6300


WITH SUPERB LOCAL WINE, fresh regional cuisine and spectacular scenery, a visit to the Olympic Peninsula wineries is the quintessential Northwest experience. The artisan wineries of the Olympic Peninsula Wineries Association invite you to enjoy this beautiful part of Washington wine country and taste award-winning wines that are as distinctive as their locations. Explore hidden back roads and the spectacular countryside as you visit these locally famous wineries that offer some of Washington’s finest wines. Nestled close to Olympic National Park, the scenic shores of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and fertile farmlands and countryside are eight artisan Washington wineries with a rich heritage. They are Harbinger Winery, Port Angeles (1); Camaraderie Cellars, Port Angeles (2); Black Diamond Winery, Port Angeles (3); Olympic Cellars, Port Angeles (4); Wind Rose Cellars, Sequim (5); Eaglemount Wine & Cider, Port Townsend (6); Fairwinds Winery, Port Townsend (7); and Finnriver Farm & Cidery, Chimacum (8). All are family owned with a personality and character unique to each. Many days you’ll find the winemakers themselves pouring their hand-crafted wines in the tasting rooms, greeting their visitors and sharing their passion about wine. The atmosphere of the tasting rooms is casual — hikers and bikers are welcome off the trail or highway to sample wines. Visitors on a self-paced tour of the eight wineries will find a broad range of types for the discerning palate — from fruit wines fermented from local berries to highly awarded, medal-winning wines of a more classical type made with Eastern Washington grapes. When tourists find a favorite blend at one of the wineries, owners will be glad to recommend local restaurants that serve it — and vice versa. The Olympic Peninsula Wineries are conveniently located about two hours northwest of Seattle on the northern shores of the Olympic Peninsula between Port Townsend and Port Angeles. The association hosts wine-focused events such as Red Wine & Chocolate in February; the Northwest Wine & Cheese Tour in April; wine gardens during Sequim Lavender Weekend (July 19-21) and the Dungeness Crab Festival (Oct. 11-13); and the Harvest Wine Tour (Nov. 9-10). The wineries of the Olympic Peninsula welcome you to stop and sip awhile! For more information, see www.olympicpeninsulawineries.org. See Page 15 in the directory for contact information on the wineries.

Savor the Peninsula’s fine wines

Premium Hand Crafted Wines Hours: May-Sept Mon, Wed & Thur 1-8 Fri/Sat 1-9 (Live Music) Sun 1-4

360-681-0690 windrosecellars.com Tasting room 143 W Washington Sequim, WA

Crafted wine excellence in a beautiful garden setting. Visit us at 334 Benson Rd. Port Angeles www.cameraderiecellars.com

360-417-3564

Come for a Unique Experience! q p

Wine & Beer  Tasting

Tasting Room Open TTasting i Mon. - Sat. 11am-6pm Sun 11am-5pm

2358 Highway 101 West (360) 452-4262

We specialize in Fruit & Grape Wines Come and taste our wine!

ARTISAN HARD CIDERS & WINES

Open Daily 12-5 (360) 732-4337

Winery Hours Thursday - Sunday 12 - 4 p.m. or call for an appointment 2976 Black Diamond Rd. Port Angeles

360-457-0748

www.blackdiamondwinery.com

Visit our website for our events: www.olympicpeninsulawineries.org VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK VISITORS TO OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK often come to experience the beauty of a true wilderness. With 95 percent of its 1,400 square miles undeveloped, the majority of this magnificent landscape is accessible only by trail, although there are many extraordinary sites that can be visited by car and many other locations fully accommodating to those with disabilities and physical limitations. Whether the goal is to see snow-capped mountains, rugged Pacific coasts or etherial old-growth rain forest, the park is a treasure trove of beauty. Once at the lookout, however, the view is awe-inspiring. Snowcapped mountains and deep,

forested valleys, often swathed in low-hanging clouds, present a vast landscape. On summer nights star-gazers often come to the ridge to watch the heavens from a viewpoint above the reach of the city’s ambient light. It also is the taking-off point for many back-country hikes and snowshoe trails. Part of what makes Olympic National Park so unique is that it contains three distinct ecological systems: glacier-capped mountains, Pacific coastline and temperate rain forest. Each contains varied plant and animal life and each offers unforgettable sights and experiences. The high mountain areas topped by mighty

Mount Olympus are best explored on foot, along the miles of high country trails. Glaciers are one of the favorite destinations. There are about 266 glaciers crowning the Olympics peaks, most quite small. The prominent glaciers are those on Mount Olympus, covering approximately 10 square miles. Beyond the Olympic complex are the glaciers of Mount Carrie, the Bailey Range, Mount Christie and Mount Anderson. The most visited glaciers in the park are the Blue and Anderson. From the Hoh Rain Forest southeast of Forks, the upriver hiking trail leads 18 miles up to the snout of Blue Glacier. Anderson Glacier can be reached by hiking the Dosewallips River Trail, on the west side of the Hood Canal, for 11 miles or from the west side by the East Fork of the Quinault River for 16 miles. Surrounded on three sides by water, the Olympics retain the distinctive character that developed from their isolation. The temperate rain forest provides one of the most lush and vibrant environments in the park. This ecosystem stretches along the coast from Oregon to Alaska and it is home to astonishingly dense and prolific flora and fauna, including some of the largest trees in the world. Several specimens reach record sizes. In some locations, the forest canopy is so thick that falling snow is caught in the trees and never reaches the ground. Sixty miles of good highway along the coast make this one of the most accessible and most popular areas of the park. For visitors, the beautiful beaches, dramatic arches and rock towers on the many beaches and the constantly changing moods and conditions of the Pacific and Strait of Juan de Fuca coasts make these shorelines a constantly evolving and thrilling place. Whether visiting one or all of these unique ecosystems, Olympic National Park is a place of discovery and natural wonder. Hiking, camping, beach-combing or just driving through, the variety and breathtaking natural beauty will provide an unforgettable experience.

Salt Creek Recreation Area

SALT CREEK RECREATIONAL AREA is one of Clallam County’s most popular camping sites for families. The 196-acre county park has upland forests, rocky bluffs, rocky tide pools, sand beach, Salt Creek access, campsites and panoramic views of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Crescent Bay and Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Park amenities include one picnic shelter with a fireplace, play equipment, basketball, volleyball and horseshoe courts and a softball field, plus several trails. How to get there: U.S. Highway 101 west to state Highway 112, about 3 miles west of Port Angeles. After 12 miles on Highway 112, turn right on Camp Hayden Road and follow it for 3 miles directly to the recreation area. Camping info: 39 utility sites ($22 for county residents, $25 for non-county) and 53 standard sites ($17 for county residents, $20 otherwise). Half of 94

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the sites may be reserved in advance; the rest are open on a first-come, first-served basis; two bathrooms are available with showers; limit six people per campsite; pets allowed on leashes; firewood available for fee. Campsite reservations are done only by mail. Reservations begin to be accepted in January for that year. The sooner campers get in the completed forms, the reservation fee and the first night’s camping fee, the better their chance of getting their reservation confirmed. All reservations must be received at the park a minimum of two weeks prior to their desired camping date. Utility sites 1-15 are available on a first-come. first-served basis; utility sites 16-39 may be reserved in advance. Standard sites 40-92 don’t have utility hook-ups and sites 50-68 and 71-72 may be reserved in advance. For more information, see www.clallam. net/Parks/SaltCreek.html or call 360-928-3441.


AS ONE OF A MERE FEW temperate rain forests in the Western Hemisphere, Olympic National Park definitely is a national and international destination. There are entry points to it and Olympic National Forest off U.S. Highway 101 from the Hood Canal, Sequim, Port Angeles and Forks. ▲ Seventeen campgrounds operate on a firstcome, first-served basis, with the exception of Kalaloch Campground, which takes reservations for a limited time (see information below for details). ▲ Summers are most popular and more crowded. Plan to arrive early to obtain space, especially on weekends. Entrance fees (good for seven days) are collected at Elwha, Heart O’ the Hills/Hurricane Ridge, Hoh, Sol Duc and Staircase entrance stations from May-September or later. Camping is limited to 14 consecutive days. ▲ Camping fees are subject to change. Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Most campgrounds provide water, toilets and garbage containers. Individual campsites offer a picnic table and fire pit or grill. No hook-ups, showers or laundry facilities are available in park campgrounds. Sites best accommodate trailers 21 feet or less. Major campgrounds have a few sites, which will accommodate larger RVs. ▲ Higher elevations are snow-covered from early November to late June. Some campgrounds and comfort stations are closed and water systems drained during off seasons. The number of sites also may be limited at that time. Inquire about open facilities upon arrival during the off-season. ▲ Water repellent clothing is advisable. Include warm clothing and a windbreaker for higher elevations and cool evenings. ▲ Group reservations are available at Kalaloch and Mora by contacting the ranger stations. ▲ Firewood — In campgrounds where wood is not available for sale, visitors may collect dead wood on the ground within one mile of the campgrounds. Wood gathering is permitted along road corridors within 100 feet of the road. In the Deer Park area, firewood may be collected only in designated areas. ▲ Hunting and firearms — Hunting or disturbance of wildlife in any manner is prohibited. Firearms may be transported on park roads in vehicles, provided they are adequately sealed, cased or otherwise packed to prevent use, and out of sight. Firearms are not necessary for protection from wildlife. ▲ Laundry facilities — Available in Port Angeles, Sequim, LaPush, Forks and some smaller towns along U.S. Highway 101. ▲ Pets — Pets are permitted on a leash (up to 6 feet in length) in park campgrounds and parking areas. Pets are prohibited in all park buildings, in the backcountry and generally all park trails. Leashed pets are permitted on trails in Olympic National Forest. ▲ Feeding wildlife is prohibited for the health of the animals and your safety. ▲ Showers - Available at Sequim Bay, Bogachiel, Dosewallips and Lake Cushman state parks.

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ROBIN HILL FARM COUNTY PARK

The Olympic Discovery Trail MOTORIZED VEHICLES ARE FORBIDDEN today, but the Olympic Discovery Trail often is thought of as a rail trail. That’s because of its history. Most of it was built over the rights of way for several defunct railroads such as the Port Townsend and Southern; the Seattle, Port Angeles ADVENTURE and Western; and the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific. Those were abandoned and their rails lifted by WITHOUT A 1988, when the Peninsula Trails Coalition organized for MOTOR the purpose of incorporating the old rail beds into a hiking/biking/equestrian trail. The ODT between Port Angeles and Sequim now is open. Bikers and hikers are able to travel more than 30 miles of the ODT from Ediz Hook to Blyn and points east of Sequim Bay State Park, negotiating public roads for only a few short distances. Eventually, the ODT will extend about 125 miles from Port Townsend in the east to LaPush on the Pacific Ocean. The trail will be hard-surfaced, mostly flat and suitable for hiking, bicycling and — in many places — horseback riding. Travelers can enjoy the ODT in small bites also. In the Sequim-to-Port Angeles segment, distances between trail nodes — places where the ODT crosses public roads — often are short. Look for map handouts at these points.

STOPS ON THE ODT

Someday, with 125 miles of ODT open, books will be written about it. In view of the space available in this Visitors Guide, however, this article will limit itself to a few enjoyable stops along the trail route between Port Angeles and Sequim. 96

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Part of the county’s park system, Robin Hill Farm, approximately halfway between Sequim and Port Angeles, is a recreational park and demonstration area of about 195 acres. The park contains 2.5 miles of equestrian trails and about 3.5 miles of foot trails. The terrain includes forest, meadow and wetland. Picnic areas and toilet facilities are available. (Pets must be leashed everywhere on the ODT). Trails within the farm usually are too soft for wheels; it’s best to lock up the bikes and walk. There are two road routes to the farm and they lead to parking lots: South side: Follow Old Olympic Highway west of its intersection with Kitchen-Dick Road and turn left (south) on Vautier Road. Take the next right turn onto Pinnell Road and follow the signs to the Pinnell Road parking lot at Robin Hill Farm. North side: From U.S. Highway 101 just west of its union with Kitchen-Dick Road, go north on Dryke Road one-quarter mile; turn right at the Robin Hill Farm gate. In addition to beautiful trails in dense forests, visitors will see farm animals and farming practices (e.g., fine pastures, agricultural research plots/gardens) managed by Washington State University’s Cooperative Extension personnel. This is a fine place to take children. It’s only a few miles, via the paved (chipsealed or asphalt) ODT from here to the Dungeness River and to …

RAILROAD BRIDGE PARK

There are restrooms every 2-3 miles along the way. Aircraft traffic may be visible at Sequim Valley Airport to the north. About one mile farther east, the ODT crosses Carlsborg Road. A few parking places are available here. Railroad Bridge, once part of the rail line, is now part of the trail. It is a magnificent structure, a challenge for photographers and a wonderful vantage point from which to view the river and, at times, scores of migrating salmon. There are several informative exhibits on the grounds, such as those on geology, the rain shadow effect and river management. At the east end of the bridge, travelers will find an unforgettable place to spend time — the Dungeness River Audubon Center with its many specimens of area birds and mammals. Ornithologists of every level will want to investigate the center’s special activities. As the Audubon Center website notes, “Knowing the sounds of birds opens up a new world of bird identification. This is a chance to tune your observational skills.” See the Dungeness River Center website for more information on this and other programs. The last stop to be considered in detail is …

CARRIE BLAKE PARK

Turn north on Blake Avenue off Washington Street. Here, visitors will find picnic tables, a meeting hall, playground equipment, paved paths, ponds and lovely gardens. There’s also a very popular off-leash dog park — just follow your nose.

ON TO PORT TOWNSEND?

Well, not quite yet. But someday the entire 125-mile trip will be possible, via bicycle or by shoe leather. For the summer of 2013, however, visitors are asked to content themselves with the 30-mile portion of the Olympic Discovery Trail that lies between Ediz Hook on the Port Angeles waterfront and Blyn, east of Sequim.

■ JESS MCKENZIE


Arts in Action From July 26-28, Nor’Wester Rotary will present Arts in Action and the Windermere Sand Sculpture Classic on the City Pier in Port Angeles. Festivities include approximately 45 juried arts and crafts vendors, entertainment, a food court, beer garden, commercial vendors and children's activities. Master sand sculptors and up to five corporate teams will vie for the public’s approval with their works. The master sculptors are some of the finest sculptors in the world and you’ll be able to watch as each transforms a semi-load of sand into a museum-quality work of art that reflects the year’s theme. Visitors can watch the process on Friday and Saturday with the finished works on display in the gallery on Sunday. The corporate teams are not required to adhere to the theme as most of the team members are townsfolk there to create and have fun with what has been called the most temporary of all media. The street fair is open to the general public at no charge. There is a nominal adult admission fee for the sand sculpture gallery. Children under 12 accompanied by an adult are free. Additional Sunday events include a Porsche car show and art activities for children at the Gateway (noon-3). Daily hours are Friday 2-7 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Sunday 11 a.m.-4 p.m. A street dance will be held on Saturday at 6 p.m.

Marymere Falls

IF YOUR PLANS have you heading west from Port Angeles, be sure to stop and hike to breathtaking Marymere Falls, which cascades 90 feet into a small plunge pool. The 1.5-mile hike to the falls is a mixture of flat bottomland (handicapped accessible) and steep stair climbs through old growth Douglas-firs. After a half mile, the trail turns right toward a log footbridge over Barnes Creek. From this point it begins a gentle ascent through a red cedar woodland. You will come to a steep staircase that leads up to the viewing platform for the falls. An alternative route has natural steps up the slope. This is a popular, accessible hike so expect to share the trail and the view with others. There are lower and upper viewing areas of the falls. From Port Angeles, follow U.S. Highway 101 west for 20 miles to Barnes Point at milepost 228 and turn right (signed Lake Crescent Lodge and Marymere Falls). In 0.2 mile, at a stop sign, turn right and proceed to a large parking area. The trail begins on the Marymere Falls Nature Trail near the rustic Storm King Ranger Station. Picnic site and are restrooms available.

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FORKS A Wet, Wild & Wonderful Place to Live • Pristine wilderness beaches • Short drive to the Olympic National Park • A million acres of forest and mountains • Hikes and camping • Visitors amenities • Food and lodging • Tourist sites • Senior Center • Community Center

• High Tech High School • Hospital/Medical Clinics • Affordable Housing

Forks offers a different quality of life to those weary of heavy traffic and crowded neighborhoods

City of Forks

500 E. Division St. | Forks, WA 98331 | 360-374-5412

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www.forkswashington.org


W ILD WONDERFUL AND

THE WEST END OF THE OLYMPIC PENINSULA is rugged and rural as its logging heritage; spectacularly scenic from towering Mount Olympus to the Quillayute Prairie on down to the sea-stack lined Pacific Coast and placid Strait of Juan de Fuca. The West End is home to descendants of Old West pioneers who homesteaded the West End in the late 1800s and to indigenous Pacific Coast tribes. Neah Bay is the home of the Makah and oceanfront LaPush to the Quileute, with the Hoh and Quinault tribal lands all south of Forks along U.S. Highway 101. Friendliness is a common trait in the community-minded towns. This year the annual Northwest tribal Paddle Journey is heading for Quinalt south of Forks. The Quileute Tribe will host throngs of visiting canoe paddlers and their support teams from Sunday-Tuesday, July 28-30. Extremes of geography highlight the wilderness environment: the northwest tip of the lower 48 states is found at Cape Flattery near Neah Bay; Forks has the highest annual rainfall of any town in the United States, some 120 inches annually; towering spruces here are among the tallest trees in the world. No shopping malls nor multiplexes are found in the rural communities of the West End. That’s a distinctive plus for those seeking an outdoors experience as an escape from the complex world of the 21st century buzzing in Seattle and cities beyond. Clallam Bay, Sekiu and Neah Bay dot its north coast along the Strait of Juan de Fuca. West of Lake Crescent a string of former logging towns and villages line Highway 101 on the way to Forks (pop. 3,500), the West End’s largest town, and also run south of town, into western Jefferson County. Forks is proud to be the self-proclaimed “Logging Capital of the World.” The town provides a great base for exploring the region, with a variety of restaurants, a large grocery store with a deli, camping supplies, clothing and shoe departments. Forks Community Hospital, a pharmacy and banks, fishing supply shops, an Olympic National Park information center plus a wide range of visitor accommodations are in Forks, too. Hikers, surfers, ocean and river anglers, bird watchers, outdoor photographers, campers, beach explorers and other outdoor enthusiasts enjoy the West End wilderness experience. The peaks and forests of Olympic National Park are accessible at the Hoh Rain Forest with its towering moss-covered trees, along trails leading to incredibly scenic Second and Third beaches, and by car at Rialto Beach, and through the emerald forest leading to the hot springs at Sol Duc. The United Nations has named the park a World Heritage site and its temperate climate rain forest is one of a few in the continental U.S. The best-selling “Twilight” series of books is set in Forks and “Twilight” fans from across the globe become ecstatic when they find their way to the West End. Stop by the Forks Chamber of Commerce for a “Twilight” visitors’ packet and watch for local scenes in Hollywood’s film version of the story released in late 2008. Accommodations range from oceanfront cabins and bed and breakfast operations with a local touch, to motels and RV camps. Local seafood and game highlight West End menus and a wide variety of dining options cover every taste and pocketbook. For information and advice on planning a West End visit, call the Forks Chamber of Commerce at 800-443-6757 (www.forkswa.com). For the north side of the West End, call the Clallam Bay-Sekiu Chamber of Commerce at 877-694-9433 (www.sekiu.com).

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Twilight phenomenon still strong on West End THOUSANDS OF ADOLESCENT GIRLS are heading to Forks and LaPush this year. They are coming from across Washington, the nation and the globe with moms, dads and siblings tagging along. The rural “Logging Capital of the World” and the scenic Quileute village are now international travel destinations thanks to the phenomenon known as “Twilight.” Local residents sometimes feel they are living in two worlds, their own everyday community and what some jokingly call the Twilight Zone. Author Stephenie Meyer’s mega-best-selling “Twilight” book series lit this fire and the release of five Summit Entertainment film versions has kept spreading the blaze. The Twilight followers often are spotted taking snapshots of each other all over town, following a guide map produced and handed out by the Forks Chamber of Commerce. You’ll see them (or join them) at LaPush’s First Beach and in front of the rural town’s welcome signs. “Twilight” is the title of the book series and the first book. In the books, 17-year-

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Located in the center of downtown

FORKS

old Bella, the daughter of the Forks Chief of Police, moves to Forks from Arizona to live with her father. At Forks High School she is attracted to Edward Cullen, a mysterious classmate who turns out to be an ageless member of a vampire clan that has settled on the West End. Adding to the mystery is werewolf Jacob Black, a Quileute Tribe youth who lives at LaPush and is attracted to Bella when Edward mysteriously leaves town. About a 20-minute drive down Highway 110 to the coast takes Twilighters to the Quileute coastal village of LaPush, the domain of Jacob Black and his werewolf clan. A walk along First Beach takes fans past a huge drift log that serves as Jacob’s learning tree. Jacob is Bella’s leading man in the film “New Moon.” Quileute-styled Twilight souvenirs and gifts are available in the lobby of the Oceanside Resort. The Forks Chamber of Commerce, located just south of Forks, across U.S. Highway 101 from the Forks Municipal Airport, is providing Twilight packets to interested visitors who stop in. Chamber greeters know their Twilight trivia inside and out. Local businesses and community groups are holding the annual Stephenie Meyer Day/Bella’s Birthday Celebration from Friday-Sunday, Sept. 13-15, at locations in downtown Forks.

Rialto Beach

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“Twilight Territory – A Fan’s Guide to Forks and LaPush” is the Forks Forum newspaper’s insider guide to the Twilight phenomenon on the West End. Featured are more than 150 local Twilight-related photos and a detailed look at all things Twilight in Forks and LaPush. The book is available at www.forksforum.com/ Twilight and at stores on the West End.

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352 Forks Ave., Forks, WA. VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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Twilight Headquarters

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• Hunting & Fishing Licenses • Ammo/Camping Gear • Espresso Bar • Sit down & enjoy something from the bakery with your Espresso


Hoh Rain Forest L e t

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t a k e

c a r e

o f

t h e

r o a d

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ONE OF NORTH AMERICA’S temperate rain forests can be explored easily at the Olympic National Park’s Hoh Rain Forest campground and hiking trail terminus located at the end of the Upper Hoh Road. The park’s Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center is set in a pocket of deep forest easily accessible to visitors. Drive south of Forks for about 12 miles along U.S. Highway 101 and watch for the Upper Hoh Road. Take a left turn there and head another 12 miles up the scenic road. For casual hikers, a look at the interpretive exhibits mounted inside the Hoh RainForest Visitor Center and a walk through the Hall of Mosses (just under a mile with little change in elevation) adds up to a complete visit that takes about a half day to complete. A wheelchair-accessible 0.1-mile trail provides an up-close look at the old-growth forest and its ethereal, moss-covered bigleaf maple and vine maple trees. For veteran hikers ready for a challenge, a summertime trek 18 miles up the Hoh River Trail to the Blue Glacier in the upper reaches of the Olympic Mountains begins at the visitor center here. Campers will find 88 year-round campsites decked out with everything but a grocery store or gas station. The park provides fire pits, picnic tables, restrooms, clean drinking water, animal-proof food lockers and even an RV dump station. In all, camping in the Hoh Rain Forest campground is an amazing convenience considering a walk of 100 yards in any direction takes you into a primitive wilderness of first-growth forest of giant Sitka spruce and western hemlock trees. There is a park fee for permits needed for both the campsites and for wilderness camping. The road out to the park’s visitor center runs along a section of the 50-mile Hoh River. Hard-fighting steelhead live in the misty, opaque bluish-green glacial waters of the river and bald eagles often are seen soaring over the fast-moving river. On the way into the park you’ll find an outfitting shop, a gas station with a drink and food shop, a casual restaurant plus cabins and vacation accommodations. You also pass homesteads cleared more than 100 years ago, some with period frontier homes and barns still standing. Herds of stately Roosevelt elk are commonly seen in the Hoh Valley, with about 400 of the animals said to be dwelling in this area. There is a fee of $15 per vehicle to enter Olympic National Park, with an annual pass costing $30. Make sure you bring wet weather gear along, as the rain forest usually lives up to its name.

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Waves, wildlife and ‘werewolves’

THE HOMELAND of the Quileute Tribe is a coastal area of one square mile commonly known as LaPush (the place name La Push comes from the traders who once traveled the coast and derives from the French language-inspired Chinook trade jargon word “la bouche” or river mouth). Author Stephenie Meyer discovered the Quileute’s rich heritage when she chose the West End of Clallam County as the setting for her mega-selling “Twilight” saga books. Fictionalizing their wolf clan heritage, Meyer pictured the Quileute as heroic werewolves and made Jacob Black, a fictitious Quileute youth, a love interest and savior of “Twilight’s” leading lady Bella Swan. This phenomenon is drawing thousands of visitors to LaPush leading to year-round

We stand out from the herd. How? We focus on the West End. Photo by Diane Cowles

If it happens here, you’ll hear about it first from

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Your locally focused newspaper. ■

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360-374-3311


activities and building upon the busy summer tourism season. Visitors also can spend hours sitting on the end of jetty at LaPush watching eagles, osprey, brown pelicans, seals and whales (who spout and breach just offshore in March and April). Surrounded by Olympic National Park, with nearby trails to Second Beach and Third Beach, the Quileute Tribe has hosted visitors quietly here for years, allowing campfires and camping on their beautiful crescent beach facing the Pacific Ocean. They now offer luxury cabins with whirlpool spas and gas fireplaces at the Quileute Oceanside Resort. The Quileute Marina serves as home for a commercial fishing fleet and recreational boats. Watch catches being moved to a fresh seafood processing plant located adjacent to the River’s Edge restaurant, which is open seasonally.

The Quileute Tribe continues to support economic development at LaPush and is promoting the 26-room Thunderbird Hotel and 24 RV spaces in response to a significant number of people choosing to vacation at LaPush. The Quileute Days celebration is scheduled for Friday-Sunday, July 19-21, in LaPush, with a parade Saturday morning. It is a celebration of Quileute tribal cultural heritage and modern lifestyles. Enjoy a street party, traditional salmon bake, street dances, fire works, native arts and crafts displays and much more. Also, this year, the Quileute Tribe is one of the hosts of the Tribal Paddle Journey to Quinault from Aug. 1-6, where canoeists from more than 90 U.S. tribes and Canadian First Nations will converge.

Makah Museum

Thousands of years of Makah Indian history as whalers and hunters on the North Pacific Coast are dramatically presented at the Makah Museum. The Museum houses artifacts from the Ozette Archaeological site, partially covered by a mudslide 500 years ago. In the Museum you will see perfectly preserved fish hooks and seal clubs, harpoons and nets, paddles, boxes and baskets, combs and looms. Dioramas with realistic sound depict sea lions and the Ozette beach. Whaling and sealing canoe replicas, complete with gear, provide a hands-on experience. In the longhouse, you will see fish drying on overhead racks and hear a conversation in Makah. Admission is $5.00 for adults; $4.00 for students and senior citizens; and free for children 5 and under. Please call for more information or to arrange group tours. OPEN DAILY: 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Makah Cultural & Research Center P.O. Box 160, Neah Bay, WA 98357

360-645-2711

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“We carry everything YOU need for the West End” VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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Northwest Coast Neah Bay

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Enchanting cabins, suites and studios by the sea. This unique guest lodging is the perfect getaway for those who seek nature, comfort & charm. Great fishing, moorage available. No smoking • No pets • Computer Friendly

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Forks

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Forks

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Market

16795 Hwy 112, Clallam Bay, WA • 360-963-2189 106

VISITORS GUIDE 2013


Beaver • Luxury cabins on banks of Sol Duc • Fireplaces • Hot Tubs • Wi-Fi • Satellite TV

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Clallam Bay

• Cabin Rentals • General Store • Espresso • Deli with Dining Area • Camp Sites & Camping Supplies • Microbrews • Ice • Showers WIFI - wireless internet access

at Lake Ozette

20860 Hoko-Ozette Road Clallam Bay, WA 98326 (360) 963-2899 1-800-950-2899 E-mail: lostresort@hotmail.com

West End Thunder drag racing THE WEST END THUNDER drag racing club is staging races on three weekends during the 2013 summer season. The races are held at the Forks Municipal Airport on the south side of Forks. A runway at the airport is used as a one-eighth-mile track. The West End Thunder Club races are on a spread of weekends that runs this year on July 6-7, Aug. 17-18 and Sept. 14-15 with races on Saturday and Sunday, weather permitting. The Northwest Nostalgia Top Eliminator dragsters are featured in the last race of the year. The drag races are colorful, well-attended events with racers trailering and driving their cars and motorcycles in from West End towns and across the Olympic Peninsula and Puget Sound region. Adding to the fun at the West End Thunder drags are “Show and Shine” vintage car shows with vehicles on display ranging from restored 1920s logging trucks to 1960s-style rail dragsters and contemporary hot rods. Racing starts at 10 a.m. and runs throughout the day. Parking is located at the south end of the airport. Camping and RV facilities are available nearby. Enjoy a “Burnout Burger” at the concession stands which are run as fundraisers by community and school organizations. There is an admission to attend. For more information and a look at race photos go to www.westendthunder.com.

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Come stay at the Westernmost outpost in the lower 48!

Northwest Coast

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Where the continent ends ...

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Milepost 206 • Beaver, WA 98305 108

VISITORS GUIDE 2013

The Olympic Peninsula offers an amazing variety of both fresh and saltwater attractions. For the hiker, there is an abundance of extraordinary rivers, waterfalls, lakes, beaches and forested lakesides. For the casual traveler, many equally scenic locations are readily accessible by car. The drive along Lake Crescent on U.S. Highway 101 skirts the very edge of the deep lake’s incredibly blue water, with 1,500-foot mountains rising steeply from the side of the road. Starting from Barnes Point, the Moments in Time Natural Trail is an easy half-mile walk along the banks of the lake. The old-growth forests are decorated with countless small waterfalls providing a constant supply of freshwater from the mountains to the lake. The Storm King Ranger Station is the starting point for the trails that lead to the magnificent Marymere Falls, one of the most popular and impressive locations in Olympic National Park. Dropping from a height of more than 90 feet, the waterfall cuts through deeply green forest and sends a spray of mist across the two observation areas. Farther north, the drive along Highway 112 takes you from Port Angeles to the northwesternmost point in continental North America, Cape Flattery. That easy scenic drive also takes you past Salt Creek Recreation Area, a nearly 200-acre waterfront with rocky tide pools, sand beach access and panoramic views of the Strait of Juan de Fuca. It’s a great place for a weekend camping trip, a picnic or day trip. From there, the highway continues through the small towns of Joyce, Clallam Bay and Sekiu. Visit the historical Joyce General Store and Joyce Depot Museum with railroad memorabilia. The depot was built about 1915 and is the last remaining log depot from the Milwaukee line. If you’re there the first weekend in August, try the town’s famous wild

blackberry pies. At Clallam Bay are some of the best tide pools in Washington, especially at Slip Point. In Sekiu there is an excellent marina and merchants selling fish and seafood so fresh it’s practically still swimming. Sekiu also is the starting point for the Sekiu Trail, a saltwater beach trail that leads to Eagle Point. Beginning at the scenic Three Sisters rock formation, One Mile Beach and Half-mile Beach both feature sea caves and tide pools left atop high rocks when the tide goes out. Those tides can be treacherous, so the explorer should remain very aware of the tide tables when hiking in this area. All along Highway 112 are breathtaking views of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and Vancouver Island on the opposite shore. Often, gray whale migrations come close enough to shore that you can see them from the roadside. Whether calm or stormy, the waters of the strait are a striking contrast as the road winds in and out of the lush green of the forests. Finally, at Neah Bay the Makah Cultural & Research Center museum celebrates the native peoples who have lived on this rugged coast for thousands of years and definitely is worth a visit. Just beyond Neah Bay is the boardwalk trail leading to Cape Flattery. From four observation decks, there are breathtaking vistas of Tatoosh and Vancouver islands and the open waters of the Pacific Ocean. Shi Shi Beach is the northernmost beach, bounded by the Makah Nation on the north and Point of Arches on the south. All along this most northern route of the Olympic Peninsula, the meeting of woods and water accents the beauty and wildness of the natural world. Ocean, strait, bay, river and stream, the waters here are a constant reminder that this dramatic place is where the continental United States ends and becomes the Pacific.


Step back 500 years ...

The skeleton of a gray whale floats above two hand-carved cedar canoes in the Makah Cultural and Research Center museum. Photo by Joan Worley

At Cape Flattery on the northwest tip of the Olympic Peninsula, the town of Neah Bay is the center of Makah Nation land and the site of a world-class museum. The Makah Cultural and Research Center houses artifacts, 300-500 years old, from local archaeological digs, most notably the Ozette Village site at Cape Alava. In 1970, fierce storms at this site clawed out the bank of beach at Cape Alava and exposed a paddle, an inlaid box and some house planks. Seeing the importance of these early finds, the Makah Tribal Council invited archaeologist Richard Daugherty to study the site and created a research laboratory/ storage facility at Neah Bay. The dig uncovered a village — complete with longhouses — which had been buried by a landslide 500 years before. The results of the next 11 years of study — more than 55,000 artifacts and 40,000 structural fragments — are the core of the collection at the Makah Cultural and Research Center in 18 showcases and three dioramas. The displays in the center’s museum fascinate residents, scholars and visitors alike because the Ozette site yielded so many examples of tools and implements in various stages of construction. It’s possible to see how bone points, cedar boxes and mussel-shell blades were created as well as how they were used. The Makah Cultural and Research Center’s mission includes education, with programs in Makah history, culture, crafts and language. A destination for scholars, the center also conducts joint studies with archaeological staff from Olympic National Park. In addition to the displays of artifacts, the museum houses full-size replicas of a Makah longhouse and of seagoing cedar canoes. Makah paddlers take to the water in similar hand-hewn canoes for an annual summer Paddle Journey joined by other Northwest tribes. The museum gift shop offers works by talented local weavers, carvers and other artisans, along with prints, clothing, souvenirs and a terrific collection of books. Neah Bay is a commercial fishing town with an excellent marina; lodgings, campgrounds, galleries, shops and restaurants welcome visitors. From Neah Bay, a road leads to the Cape Flattery Trail, a three-quartersmile hike via boardwalk and gravel steps to the most northwesterly point of the lower 48 United States. At trail’s end, walkers are rewarded with view cliffs of the Olympic Coast Marine Sanctuary and of Tatoosh Island with its picturesque lighthouse. Also near Neah Bay, the 3.3- mile Shi Shi Trail leads to one of the coast’s loveliest beaches and a great surfing area. For more information, see www.makah.com.

Makah Cultural and Research Center Museum

Highway 112 and Bay View Avenue, Neah Bay, 360-645-2711 Hours: Every day 10 a.m.-5 p.m. (Summer months), Wed.-Sun. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.(Sept. 16-Memorial Day) Web site: www.makah.com E-mail: makahmuseum@centurytel.net

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QUILEUTE DAYS 2013 FRIDAY . SATURDAY . SUNDAY

July 19th-21st, 2013 LA PUSH, WASHINGTON •

Salmon Bake

Traditional Dancing & Singing

Stick Games

Softball Tourneys

Canoe Races

Parade

Fireworks

Live Performances

Reservations: Oceanside Resort www.quileuteoceanside.com QUILEUTE DAYS Photo courtesy of Cherly Barth Photography

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FOR MORE INFO: QUILEUTE TRIBE 360.374.5091 or 360.374.6163 events@quileuenation.org


Cape Alava/Ozette

THE 3.3-MILE HIKE TO THE CAMPGROUND at Cape Alava sounds easy: a short jaunt on a boardwalk to the ocean shore. The stroll along the beach to the petroglyphs at Wedding Rocks to the south sounds equally inviting. Don’t be fooled. The boardwalk can be treacherous in spots. It is quite slick when wet and the beach is an ankle-bending jumble of rock and gravel. The trail starts at the Ozette Ranger Station with a bridge crossing the tranquil, tannin-stained water of the Ozette River. The path soon splits in the woods, one branch heading west toward Cape Alava, the other southwest to Sand Point. Each trail forms a leg of a triangle loop hike, with a 2.9-mile stretch of beach forming the third leg. The path traverses an up-and-down path through young spruce and hemlock packed tight with ferns and other greenery. Part way through the hike, the trail enters a clearing, once the site for homesteader Lars Ahlstrom. After the prairie, the boardwalk plunges into the dark heart of a forest of Sitka spruce and fern. The sound of ocean surf and the fresh whiff of ocean air soon spur weary legs to a scenic overview of the rocky coast: the many weather-beaten rock formations and the several tree-capped islands near the shore draw the eye’s attention. Rather than carry heavy backpacks any farther, hikers can pick a campsite among the twisted spruce and shoulder-tall grass just north of the trail. Then unburdened, they can head off with light daypacks for the one-mile trek of hopping tide pools and avoiding shifting rocks south to Wedding Rocks — named after a pictogram depicting a man and a woman with a sexual symbol of a bisected circle. The carvings are estimated to be 300-500 years old. Continuing south, the going makes its laborious way across wave-tossed stone past a headland to Sand Point, where stately spires jut out of the sea. A circular sign just past the point marks the trailhead back to the ranger station. Pets, use of weapons and wheeled devices are prohibited on coastal beaches and trails. Reservations are required for overnight camping between May 1 and Sept. 30. Call 360-565-3100.

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West End surfing SUMMERTIME IS THE SEASON for most surfers traveling out to First Beach at LaPush. Huge winter waves and especially frigid ocean water temperatures wintertime paddles out, while warm weather brings more inviting small waves breaking over nearshore sandbars and water temperatures above 50 degrees F. Surfers and other beach-goers will find parking at several areas along the coast at LaPush, however vehicle access is limited at the Quileute Tribe’s Lonesome Creek RV campground located on the south, and more popular for surfing, side of the beach. Comfortable, modern beach cottages located just a short walk from the beach are available for vacation rental at the Ocean Park Resort in LaPush (www.oceanpark.org). Surfboard and wet suit rental for those wanting to try out

Located in the heart of downtown

surfing are available at the Three Rivers Resort located about half way between the beach and U.S. Highway 101 on LaPush Road. Custom surfboards and a full range of professional surfing gear are found at West End Surf & Skate on Division Street in downtown Forks and at North By Northwest Surf Company on Highway 101 in Port Angeles. North by Northwest also provides surfing rentals and a mini-surf shop out of a trailer parked in the Lonesome Creek RV area. The annual Surfing and Traditions surfing competition, beach cleanup and gathering is in early July. There are no lifeguards at First Beach nor anywhere else along the West End’s Pacific Coast.

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VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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FOR THOSE WHO SEEK a relaxing, serene weekend getaway, they need venture no further than the gateway to Olympic National Park. ONP’s Lake Crescent, with its pristinely clear, teal-tinted water and majestic mountain views, is just a 20-minute drive from Port Angeles. Lake Crescent is one of the deepest in Washington at nearly 650 feet. The bottom of the lake is 100 feet below sea level. Visitors to Lake Crescent get to experience the uniqueness of the lake in several different ways. Though personal watercraft have been banned on the lake since 1997, the lake offers an easily accessible boat ramp for motorboats for water skiers, fishermen and sailors. Kayakers, row boaters and canoeists are welcome on the lake as environmentally friendly alternatives that match the peace and serenity of Lake Crescent’s setting. Olympic National Park offers five hiking trails along the shores of Lake Crescent, with varying degrees of difficulty and length. Source: www.nps.gov/archive/olym/dayhike.htm. • Moments in Time Nature Trail — 0.5mile loop trail, winding through old-growth forest and former homestead sites. Exit off U.S. Highway 101 at the Storm King Ranger Station exit, follow signs. • Marymere Falls — approximately 2-mile round trip. Follow U.S. 101 west of Port Angeles to turnoff for Marymere Falls. Trail leads through old-growth forest to a 90-foot waterfall. • Mount Storm King Trail — 1.7-mile extension from Marymere Falls trail. A steep climb, the trail offers great views of Lake Crescent from above. • Pyramid Peak Trail — 3.5 miles. Climbs 2,600 feet with a World War II aircraft spotter station at the summit and amazing views of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the lake. From Port Angeles follow U.S. Highway 101 west for 27 miles to Fairholm on the western end of Lake Crescent (milepost 221). Turn right on Camp David Jr. Road (aka North Shore Road) and proceed for 3.2 miles to a small pullout adjacent to the North Shore Picnic Area. The trail begins on the opposite side of the road.

Lake Crescent • Spruce Railroad Trail — 4 miles each way. From Port Angeles, go west on U.S. Highway 101 for about 15 miles. At milepost 232, take a right onto the East Beach Road. Continue on this narrow two lane road for 3 miles. Just past the signs for Log Cabin Resort, take a left at the sign for the Spruce Railroad Trail. Cross the one-lane bridge over the Lyre River. Stay left and continue on 0.3 mile to the trailhead parking area on the left side of the road. The trail begins just on the other side of the road. A relatively flat hike, it runs along a former World War I railway bed. The trail is a designated bike trail and leads the way to Devil’s Punchbowl, a popular swimming spot on Lake Crescent.

...the REST of the Olympic Peninsula Forks, Washington is home to Olympic National Park & Forest, Pacific Ocean beaches, beautiful rivers, pristine rainforests and the setting for the Twilight book series.

1411 South Forks Ave. Forks, WA 98331 360-374-2531 800-443-6757 info@forkswa.com

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Forest

FREE WI-FI INDOOR/OUTDOOR AVAILABLE 24/7

VISITOR INFORMATION CENTER

Please stop for area information. Located at the south end of town, next door to the Timber Museum & across from the airport. Open daily, super-friendly staff, clean restrooms available during business hours, picnic area & ample parking for RVs!

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89TH ANNUAL

MAKAH DAYS 2013 NEAH BAY

Home of the Makah People People of the Cape

FRIDAY - SATURDAY - SUNDAY AUGUST 23, 24, 25, 2013 Talent Show...................................... 7:00 p.m. Friday Fireworks immediately following talent show

Parade........................................ 10:00 a.m. Saturday ‘12 - ’13 MAKAH DAYS ROYALTY Queen Alisha Kallappa Junior Miss Jaylin Jimmicum Princess Aiyanna LaChesterWachendorf Baby Queen Mela Shea Maddalena Warrior Everett Green-Maddalena Junior Warrior Elijah Buckingham Baby King Jezriah Tejano Contact Rose Jimmicum, Makah Days Chairperson at 645-3101 114

VISITORS GUIDE 2013

Raising of the flag immediately following parade

Traditional Dances

................................ Sat. a.m. & p.m.

Salmon Bake ....................... Sat. & Sun. Canoe Races ..................Sat. & Sun. Arts & Crafts Fair .....Fri., Sat. & Sun. Bones Games (Indian Gambling) Fri., Sat. & Sun. Field & Sport Races................. Sat. & Sun. Modern Dances ........ Fri. & Sat.


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www.thelodgeatsherwood.com VISITORS GUIDE 2013

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Slow your pace. Renew your energies. Come away.

Quileute Oceanside beckons. Ancient spirits calm your senses. Quileute hospitality warms your heart.

A unique experience awaits you at Quileute Oceanside on the Pacific Coast. • The Convenience Store. Quileute Lonesome • The Resort. Quileute Oceanside Resort offers Creek Store boasts all the essentials — plus a a range of accommodations, from camper cabins and deli, espresso, gas and much more. comfy family units to luxurious ocean-view suites. 360-374-4338 800-487-1267

• The Marina. Quileute Marina offers transient moorage, charters, fuel and marine services. 360-374-5392

• The RV Park. Oceanside RV Park features spacious, ocean-front sites with pump-outs, a clubhouse, laundry, and shower facilities. 360-374-4338

• The Experience. No phones. No TV. Just all you need for an invigorating experience. Right on First Beach, wildlife abounds. Olympic National Park is within walking distance, rain forests a short drive away.

• Espresso Stand coming soon! Spring/Summer 2013 Located on Oceasnide Report property.

Open year round, Quileute Oceanside Resort is located just off Highway 101 on the Olympic Peninsula’s west end in the Quileute Village of LaPush, Washington.

For reservations and more information, call today at

(800) 487-1267 or visit

www.quileuteoceanside.com View our new packages online.

P.O. Box 67 LaPush, WA 98350

Join us for Quileute Days! 116

VISITORS GUIDE 2013

RESORT & RV PARK

North Olympic Peninsula Visitor's Guide 2013  

A guide to the communities of the North Olympic Peninsula in Washington State/