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Gazette Vol. 48 Number 16 Tuesday, April 17th, 2012 Price $1.00 incl. GST

LET’S MAKE CANCER HISTORY For information about cancer, services or to make a donation phone 1-888-939-3333 www.cancer.ca

Nipigon Fire Fighters Bring Home the Gold! Karen Hardy Staff

Thursday Apr. 5 saw the Nipigon Curling Club hopping with excitement as fans, family and friends waited for the Nipigon Fire Department to deliver the 2012 Canadian FireFighter Curling Champions. Skip Jeff Zechner, Third Ian Brennen, Second Joe Marques (Beardmore), Lead John Zechner Jr, Director Dan “Jake” Jackson (Thunder Bay), and 6th Butch Kovacs represented Northern Ontario and traveled to Truro, Nova Scotia to compete in the 53rd Canadian Firefighters Curling Association Muscular Dystrophy Hydrant Championship. After 2 silver

medals, third time’s a charm for the Zechner rink as they brought home GOLD! Jeff, Ian and John Jr also received the All-Star Award for their team positions which is voted on by all the players. 11 teams representing the provinces and Northwest Territories battled to win the coveted Muscular Dystrophy Hydrant Trophy. The Zechner rink finished 2nd in the round robin, beating Southern Ontario in the 1-2 Page playoff game, then went on to defeat Manitoba in the Championship final 8-5. Emcee Jonah Dupuis and crew did a great job preparing for the return of the champs and invited digni-

The tables all set for the celebration. Photo below is the cake made to celebrate the win. Photos by Karen Hardy

taries and former champions to this prestigious event. Jonah stated that there must be “something in the water” because for some reason, curling champs keep appearing from this area. Al Hackner (World Champion) gave us a playback on his championship game and took us through the world famous “Shot” and what was going on in his mind when he defeated Pat Ryan to go on to the World’s. Red Rock Firefighters (1972 Canadian Firefighters Champs)Ed Asselin, Ollie Imhoff were also in attendance. Other members of that winning team were Earl McKee and Stewart. Jonah then described the “Decade of Dominance” in the 90s…Ross Spencer, Sam Sobush, Dave Parker, Bo Sodergren and Larry Stansell were all introduced. The Red Rock Fire Dept won the Northern Ontario Firefighters crown in every year from ’91-99 except one. Fire Chief James Keay stated how proud he is of the guys and also how hard it is on the nerves (to be following the team online). Skip Jeff couldn’t thank his team, family, friends and fans enough for all being there and the support and emails that came from everybody. Next year ’s championship will take place in Saint John NB. We manufacture curlers in Nipigon! Congratulations!

John Zechner, Joe Marquis, Butch Kovacs (spare), Ian Brennen, Dan Jackson, Norhern Ontario director and Jeff Zechner. Glena Clearwater Photos

The curlers pose with the new banner created to grace the walls of the club – from left, Joe Marquis, Jeff Zechner, Ian Brennen and John Zechner.

Getting off the firetruck to go to the ceremony with trophy in hand. Karen Hardy Photo


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Nipigon-Red Rock Gazette

From My Heart To Yours As we approach the Spring/Summer Season; catalogues and fliers are in circulation. You want it; you’ll find it. From a young child we hear the words; “I want that mommy.” As we get older we hear; “Honey I really like that; it would look or be so nice.” I am sure these words sound familiar. I remember the words; “GIVE ME, GIVE ME, NEVER GETS.” We all can become so caught up in what we want that giving phases completely out of the picture. When we do not learn to give we never really receive. Acts 20:35...”Jesus said; “It is more blessed to give than to receive.” Children can be given an expensive gift; and a half hour later that gift can be thrown in a corner and forgotten. Allow children to help make and bake for others at any time of the year. Take them along when it comes time to deliver. Allow them to participate in the joy of sharing. Filling shoe boxes teaches children how to bring a smile to another child’s face. Sit down and tell them stories. Tell them what the season is really about. The actions you take will be passed on to your family. Acts of kindness are never forgotten. Our Heavenly Father gave us everything. Allow the light of His Spirit to shine through you. Lamps kept in a closet are useless. Let Jesus light your heart anew as you learn to give to Him. 1 Pet. 1:9...”But you are a chosen people, royal priests, a holy nation, a people for God’s own possession.” Allow Jesus to be seen in you. PRAYER: As the season of Summer approaches allow your love to radiate through me. Allow me to be an instrument that brings true glory to your name. Love in Jesus Chaplain Lenora Rowsell

St. Hilary Hosts Spring Social It was a beautiful sunny spring day, when the seniors/grandparents enjoyed the hospitality and entertainment of the students from St. Hilary School. The student’s performed poetry, songs and dances. We tip our hats to all the students and teachers for their performances. Also we tip our hats to the Grade 7/8 students and Mrs. Dohan for serving, being master of ceremonies and for cleaning up. What a great way to interact with the guests and to demonstrate their leadership skills. A really special thanks to Mrs. Bulmer for all her help in setting up the gym and decorating! Photos Submitted

Tuesday, April 17th, 2012

OPP Releases 2011 Statistics The results are in for the Ontario Provincial Police’s (OPP) 2011 traffic statistics and while most of last year’s statistic categories show an improvement over 2010, the OPP will be looking for ways to improve safety on our roads, waterways and trails in 2012. According to the Commissioner of the OPP, there are a number of ways to interpret the results of the 2011 statistics and it’s not all good news for the OPP and the people who drive in Ontario. “I’m pleased to see a reduction in most of the statistical categories for 2011 but when I look at the big picture, our officers laid more than 1.2-million charges in Ontario over the past two years,” said OPP Commissioner Chris Lewis. “The actions behind each of those charges in some way posed a risk to people’s safety, so there was the potential for fatality and collision numbers to be much higher in every category had our officers not caught up with these people when they did,” added Lewis. According to Lewis, regardless of what traffic statistics look like from year to year, the bottom line is that the overwhelming majority of the collisions, including the fatalities, are dictated by driver behaviour. Eliminating most of these fatalities is very much within the grasp of motorists, said Lewis, and it’s as simple as paying due attention to and respecting our traffic laws. “Since we implemented our award-winning Provincial Traffic Safety Program (PTSP) in 2007, we’ve seen a steady reduction in the rate of fatality and personal injury collisions in Ontario and these rates are the lowest Ontario has seen in 80 years,” said Deputy Commissioner Larry Beechey, Provincial Commander, Traffic Safety and Operational Support. “The difference between the number of charges we laid last year (2011) and those in 2010 is minimal. This means that our officers are doing an excellent job of maintaining a strong presence throughout the province and this contributes to sav-

ing lives,” added Beechey. Impaired driving, lack of occupant restraint, distracted driving and aggressive driving are the “Big Four” causal factors and high-risk behaviours the OPP targets though its highly successful PTSP. The program incorporates high visibility, measurable outcomes, professional traffic stops and public education, and forms part of the OPP’s ongoing efforts to reduce collisions and save lives on Ontario roads, waterways and trails. 2011 Traffic Result Highlights: A total of 285 people were killed in motor vehicle collisions (MVC) on roads in OPP jurisdiction in 2011, compared to 328 in 2010 (13.1 per cent decrease). There were 260 fatal motor vehicle collisions (MVC) in OPP jurisdiction in 2011, compared to 296 in 2010 (12.2 per cent decrease). Alcohol was a factor in 55 of the 2011 MVC deaths, compared to 78 in 2010 (29.5 per cent decrease). Lack of occupant restraint was a factor in 71 of the 2011 fatalities, compared to 93 in 2010 (23.7 per cent reduction), while speed and distraction-related fatalities were only down slightly in 2011 from 2010. The OPP saw an increase in pedestrian deaths, with 29 pedestrians being killed in 2011, compared to 21 in 2010 (38.1 per cent increase). A total of 22 people died in marine incidents last year on OPP-patrolled waterways, compared to 28 in 2010 (21.4 per cent decrease). There were 15 snowmobile fatalities in 2011, compared to 25 in 2010 (40.0 per cent decrease). A total of 14 off-road vehicle (ORV) deaths occurred in 2011, compared to 17 in 2010 (17.6 per cent decrease). The OPP laid a total of 610,390 charges on roads, waterways and trails in OPP jurisdiction in 2011, compared to 612, 419 charges in 2010 (0.3 per cent decrease).


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NWMO Suspension of Expressions of Interest In May 2010, the NWMO initiated a site selection process for Canada’s Used Nuclear Fuel Repository and Centre of Expertise for the long-term management of Canada’s used nuclear fuel in an informed and willing host community. The nine-step process to select a site will take 10 years or more to complete, and begins with a community expressing interest in learning more about the project, the NWMO and the site selection process. Interested communities are the focus of a progressively more detailed set of scientific, technical and community well-being studies, and phases of learning to assess the suitability of the community for the project. Communities may leave the site selection process at any time up until the signing of a final agreement, which is still many years in the future. An expression of interest by a community triggers a process of broad outreach and discussion of the project with neighbouring communities and potentially affected Aboriginal peoples. To date, a number of communities have expressed interest in learning more about the project, the NWMO and the site selection process. At this time, 15 communities are actively engaged in the site selection process, including several that have asked the NWMO to begin more detailed preliminary assessment studies (Step 3). As well, a number of other communities have requested information and briefings and are considering participating in the site selection process. The NWMO is planning to suspend the expressions of interest phase of the site selection process on September 30, 2012. New expressions of interest will not be considered after this date. This will allow the NWMO to focus its efforts on conducting the detailed studies required in communi- ties that have expressed an interest to date, or that express interest on or before the closing date. It will also help the NWMO plan for and fully support the engagement of sur-

rounding communities and potentially affected Aboriginal peoples, which is initiated with the entrance of a new community to the siting process. Expressions of interest by new communities must be supported by a resolution of Council, or equivalent, and may take the following forms: request for an NWMO briefing to learn about the project and the site selection process; or request for an initial screening of the potential suitability of the community for the project. The suspension of the expressions of interest phase of the site selection process is intended to help ensure that the best knowledge and expertise are brought to each of the studies that are conducted. It is also intended to ensure that the communities involved in the site selection process continue to be fully supported by the NWMO in their exploration of the project and are informed, as early as possible, whether they are among the short list of strong candidates for the project. The suspension of the expressions of interest phase will also help the NWMO plan for and fully support the involvement of surrounding communities. It will be important for the NWMO to engage potentially affected Aboriginal peoples to understand and fully respect their Treaty rights and how Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge can be applied. The NWMO is optimistic that the studies that have been initiated, or that will be initiated with communities that express interest on or before September 30, 2012, will identify viable options for implementing this project. However, until this work has been completed, the outcome of these studies is uncertain, and it may be necessary to study other communities and sites as potential hosts for this project in the future. The NWMO, therefore, reserves the option of reopening the process to expressions of interest by new communities in the future. BACKGROUNDER What is the Site Selection Process for Canada’s

Used Nuclear Fuel Repository and Centre of Expertise? In May 2010, the NWMO initiated a site selection process for Canada’s Used Nuclear Fuel Repository and Centre of Expertise. The site selection process for this national infrastructure project was developed through dialogue with Canadians to ensure that the site which is selected is in an informed and willing community, and is safe and secure for people and the environment now and in the future. The process involves nine steps that will take 10 years or more to complete, and begins with a community expressing interest in learning more about the project, the NWMO and the site selection process. Once communities have entered the process, several phases of learning and progressively more detailed studies begin to assess the suitability of the community and specific sites for the project. Communities that enter the site selection process may leave the

process at any time up until the signing of a final agreement, which is still many years in the future. The site selection process is designed to ensure: Any community that is selected to host this facility is both informed about the project and willing to host it; Any site that is selected to host this facility will safely contain and isolate used nuclear fuel for a very long period of time, in an appropriate geological formation, and that there is an

acceptable way of transporting used fuel to the site; Any interested host community carefully and thoroughly considers the project’s potential benefits and risks when deciding whether to express interest, and ultimately, willingness to host the project; Involvement of surrounding communities, regions and other jurisdictional levels potentially affected by the project and the transportation of used fuel in the assessment and Continued on Page 5


Our Opinion Tuesday, April 17, 2012

The Nipigon-Red Rock Gazette is published each Tuesday by Lakeshore Community Publishing Ltd. 20 Riverview, Nipigon, Ont. P0T 2J0 Phone 807-887-3583 Fax 807-887-3720 2nd., class mailing permit #0867 Subscription Rates: Seniors (65+) $29.00 Local $39.00. Outside 60km $54.00 USA $69.00 (please add 5% GST) Memberships and Associations The Canadian Community Newspaper Association, The Ontario Community Newspaper Association Columns Policy - Letters to Editor The columns and letters accepted by this newspaper for publication, appear at the discretion of the Publisher. Names, signatures and phone numbers must accompany each submission for verification purposes. It is assumed that each submission fairly represents the opinion of the writer. E-mail address nipigongazette@shaw.ca Advertising and General Manager Linda R. Harbinson Reporter Photographer/Circulation Pamela Behun Managing Editor Paulette Lalonde Forsyth Publisher Linda R. Harbinson

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editorial... Letter to the Editor: NOBEC Meets in Dorion I can still smell snow in the air, so I think it’s not quite over yet, although it won’t be a dumping, just some flurries. And so it should. We often forget that warmer temperatures don’t usually come to stay until May, possibly June. We just got a little spoiled with the unusually beautiful weather experienced a little too soon in the season! But we did enjoy it! I’ve been anchored to the television watching all the stories about the Titanic and the its tragic sinking 100 years ago April 15, 1912. Of course I watched the movie, once, and though it has been released again in 3D, I will not go see it. I found it all too sad, knowing that much of it was true, and so many perished at sea. The unsinkable sank. What they didn’t count on was human error. In Belfast Northern Ireland where the ship was built, they have made a beautiful Titanic museum where one can glimpse the construction of the ship, and stand on a replica of the infamous staircase on the main deck. It is here that Titanic is celebrated for the accomplishment she was-the largest ship ever built. However, in Halifax, Nova Scotia, there is another museum, the Atlantic Maritime Museum, that also honours Titanic, but in a more sullen way. It was Halifax that received the bodies of the dead retrieved from the sea after the ship sunk, and where many pieces of the tragedy are on display, including a small child’s pair of shoes. Titanic will always be remembered as the greatest ship ever built, and the greatest tragedy at sea for the ship that was deemed unsinkable.

NOBEC (Northwestern Ontario Bio Economy Corporation) held its regular monthly meeting Thursday, March 29 at the Dorion Wood Products’ office. NOBEC’s vision is “to be the catalyst in creating sustainable and diverse business opportunities resulting in economic growth and vibrant communities.” Recently, NOBEC cooperated with some local farmers and landowners in investigating the possibility of raising “switch grass”, a special type of low maintenance hay, for energy. Several options were investigated including setting up a pelleting

plant to produce and market pellets from the grass, constructing a generator to produce and sell electricity and building a greenhouse to utilize waste heat from the manufacture of electricity. Problems were encountered when Hydro One announced it had no further capacity to purchase more electricity. Last month, Sandi Boucher from Thunder Bay Centre of Change gave a presentation of work that has been done in Thunder Bay. Her group has turned the former Hillcrest High School into a business incubator where each classroom is rented to a business

Use Caution when Travelling on Resource Access Roads in District.... The Ministry of Natural Resources advises that due to the early spring thaw, road washouts are occurring on many resource access roads in Nipigon District. The public is asked to exercise caution when traveling on these roads. Water on the road, washouts and heavy rutting pose a risk to traveler safety. The public should avoid traveling on unfamiliar roads or crossing any submerged roadbeds. Barricades will be erected at roads where known washouts or dan-

Do you have your Subscription to the Nipigon-Red Rock Gazette? To start your Subscription, contact the Gazette office at 887-3583. Call Today!

gerous driving conditions have been observed. To report a new or potential road washout, please contact the Ministry of Natural Resources office in Geraldton at 807-8541826.

at a very affordable rate. The concept was exciting so now NOBEC, in partnership with some local entrepreneurs, is investigating the possibility of setting up a Center of Change in the Dorion, Hurkett, Nipigon, Red Rock area. At present, the group is investigating what possible buildings may be available, the cost to purchase and operate the buildings, how many tenants would be needed and what businesses may possibly be interested. In the near future, area entrepreneurs and potential entrepreneurs will be asked to complete a brief survey regarding this project. NOBEC has hosted two conferences relating to the bio economy and is continually searching for ideas that will improve our communities. “Meetings are held monthly and all are welcome, whether they are a member or not,” says NOBEC chairperson, Marvin Broughton.

We would love to hear from our readers...

Send your Letters to the Editor to: Nipigon-Red Rock Gazette Box 1057 Nipigon, ON POT 2J0. Or fax us at 887-3720 better yet, e-mail us at nipigongazette@shaw.ca


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Tuesday, April 17th, 2012

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Paulette Lalonde Forsyth

My World.......And Welcome To It

Do you ever find that when passing a mirror or any surface that allows a reflection, we look? No matter what, we look. We need to know if our hair is right, if our clothes are on straight, and we really need to know that other nagging question...do we look fat? And to be honest, that side profile is really not kind. The angle is not flattering with a shoulder blade directly under the chin, and a back and front end that extend far past what we expected. If a store was really thinking about their patrons, they would place ‘skinny’ mirrors up and make us all feel so good about ourselves that we’d probably purchase something just to celebrate! Anyway, despite our fear, we look. And sometimes, it’s a good thing we do. On a recent trip shopping, I felt this unease that something was not quite right. I couldn’t put my finger on it until I realized that there was a Bounce sheet waving hello to

everyone that passed by as it poked out the front of my shirt about mid-section. I thought everyone was staring at my Easter belly filled with turkey and chocolate! Turns out they were trying to figure out what was desperately making an attempt to escape the confines of my clothing! I’m sure you are thinking about your moment in the embarrassing spotlight as you read this. The lady with the price tag still dangling off her new coat, the man who has the buttons of his shirt done up wrong, the young mother with a sucker stuck on her pants. We’ve all had our red faced moments, either as the embarrassed or the witness, but one thing is the same-the laughter that follows! And so it was just another day of shopping when I targeted something out of the corner of my eye. A woman standing between the Lay’s Salt and Vinegar Chips and Kit Kat chocolate bars was reaching up to get a large bag of Natcho Cheese tacos when it appeared. At first, I wasn’t able to identify the foreign garment until she walked ahead and it slithered out further. My first reaction was to gulp a giggle because it was obvious she

was oblivious to what was now retreating from the bottom of her pant leg. But as she gained momentum, it gained length. I began to debate what action I should take...whether I approach her and inform her about the hitchhiker, or perhaps if I stepped on it, it would fully extract itself and I could just kick it to the curb. In the meantime, she was just about to enter heavy shopping traffic and I had to act quickly. So I stepped on it. And she came to a complete halt and turned to look in my direction. Both of us had an appearance--me of surprise with my foot on the leg of the nylon and her mortified at the very sight. “Ohmygosh,” she stammered, twining the nylon around her hand as she walked toward me, “I didn’t realize they were still in my pants!” she offered as explanation. And then the giggling started until the both of us were in tears and holding our stomachs in pain. They say you should have one good belly laugh everyday to maintain health. I believe on that day, we over medicated!

NWMO Suspension of expressions of interest con’t... Continued from Page 3

planning of the project; Involvement of First Nations, Me! tis and Inuit who will be potentially affected by the implementation of the project; and An ongoing conversation on questions to be answered and issues to be addressed throughout the site selection process. How have communities been involved to date? Since May 2010, the site selection process has been open to all communities that are interested in learning more about Canada’s plan for the long-term management of used nuclear fuel, the NWMO and the site selection process. During this expression of interest phase, a number of communities have expressed interest in learning more. At this time, 15 communities are actively engaged in the site selec-

tion process: Blind River, Brockton, Ear Falls, Elliot Lake, Hornepayne, Ignace, Nipigon, North Shore, Schreiber, South Bruce, Spanish and Wawa in Ontario; and Creighton, English River First Nation and Pinehouse in Saskatchewan. As well, a number of communities have requested information and briefings, and are considering their interest in participating in the site selection process. Communities that successfully pass an initial screening of the potential suitability of the community for the project must then decide whether they wish to proceed to more detailed preliminary assessment studies and broad engagement (Step 3). A number of communities have already expressed interest in proceeding to this next step. In response to this interest, the

NWMO has launched the next phase of the site selection process with the initiation of preliminary assessment studies with interested communities that have successfully passed an initial screening. Why is the NWMO planning to suspend the expressions of interest phase of the site selection process? The NWMO is now planning to suspend the expressions of interest phase of the site selection process in order to focus its efforts on conducting the detailed studies required in communities that express an interest on or before September 30, 2012. The suspension of the expressions of interest phase of the site selection process is intended to help ensure that the best knowledge and expertise are brought to each of the stud-

ies that are conducted. It is also intended to ensure that the communities involved in the site selection process continue to be fully supported by the NWMO in their exploration of the project and are informed, as early as possible, whether they are among the short list of strong candidates for the project. The suspension of the expres- sions of interest phase will also help the NWMO plan for and fully support the involvement of surrounding communities and potentially affected Aboriginal peoples. The NWMO respects and is greatly appreciative of the professionalism of the communities that have involved themselves in the site selection process to date, the efforts they have made to learn about and consider this project, and

the leadership they have shown in exploring the role they might play in this important national infrastructure project designed to protect people and the environment today and for future generations. The NWMO looks forward to working with these communities and other communities which may come forward in the next few months. Until what date will new expressions of interest be received? New expressions of interest will be received on or before September 30, 2012. New expressions of interest, supported by a resolution of Council or equivalent, may take the following forms: request for an NWMO briefing to learn more about the project and the site selection Continued on Page 6


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Nipigon - Red Rock Gazette

Tuesday, April 17th, 2012

Students Learn about Restorative Justice.......... The Drug Awareness Committee of Thunder Bay and the Restorative Practices Working Group, with funding from the Law Foundation of Ontario, present “Tough Case”; a theatrical tour aimed at increasing understanding of restorative justice among teachers and students in Thunder Bay and District. Tough Case is a powerful vehicle for students and

NWMO will continue to provide information after Sept. 30th Continued from Page 5

process; or request for an initial screening of the potential suitability of the community for the project. The potential suitability of a community for this project will be assessed through progressively more detailed scientific, technical and community well-being studies. These studies are designed to ensure that there is a site with geology that can safely contain and isolate used nuclear fuel for the long periods of time for which it remains hazardous, and that the project can be implemented in a way that

fosters the well-being of the local community and region. Broad awareness building, learning and engagement of community members, surrounding communities and Aboriginal peoples is an important component of the site selection process. The NWMO is optimistic that the studies that have been initiated, or that will be initiated with commu- nities that express interest on or before September 30, 2012, will identify viable options for implementing this project. However, until all work has been completed, the out-

come of these studies is uncertain, and it may be necessary to study other communities and sites as potential hosts for this project in the future. The NWMO, therefore, reserves the option of reopening the process to expressions of interest by new communities in the future. Will the NWMO continue to provide information to new interested communities after September 30, 2012? Yes. The NWMO has committed to providing information, regular updates and briefings upon

teachers to learn about and understand restorative practices. The play is an invitation for students to think, feel and challenge existing assumptions about justice and retribution, the role of the community in nurturing and protecting members, the need for dialogue and negotiation in dealing with all community members: both victims and those who bring harm. Mr. Mark Sandler, Chair of the Board of Trustees, The Law Foundation of Ontario states “Research and experience have shown that restorative justice is an effective way to bring positive, constructive resolutions to conflicts, especially in a school environment. By providing this mechanism for finding solutions at the community level, request to communities and others that are interested, throughout the site selection process. However, no additional screenings or preliminary assessment studies will be initiated with communities that express interest after September 30, 2012, during the suspension.

participants gain a sense of involvement, responsibility, and justice. The Law Foundation of Ontario is pleased to support this important initiative.” The tour is part of a larger effort to increase awareness of restorative practices and encourage the adoption of restorative approaches within the larger community, including schools. The leading practitioner of restorative practices in North America is the International Institute for Restorative Practices. "Restorative Practice is about creating safer, more connected communities. It is a way of thinking and being that focuses on strengthening relationships and building and sustaining healthy, respectful environments. If we truly believe that relationships are important and put this thinking into practice, then when harm occurs we need effective ways for persons affected by the harm and those causing the harm to safely process those events, and be able to move on and have relationships restored where possible. We cannot Continued on Page 7


Tuesday, April 17th, 2012

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Cell Phone Legislation to be Adopted by Provincial Government

Easter at the Library The 5th annual Easter Egg hunt at the Nipigon Library was once again a resounding success, with eggs all over the library shelves for the little ones and a scavenger hunt for the older ones. Board members helped empty the plastic eggs (full of all kinds of candy - but NOT chocolate this year) into bags and to check for the winning coupons hidden in a half dozen. Winners of the Easter baskets and other Easter related prizes were Caleb Mangoff, Devon Ray, Teeny Bean, Angel Almquist, Bentley Airey. A total of 58 children took part. Board members also baked Easter goodies for a fund raising bake sale, manned by Bonnie Cordone, Bruce Fox, Rosie Ray and Nola Robitaille. The event went smoothly with 15 volunteers and 7 sponsors. Glena Clearwater - Photos

On April 12, the provincial government announced plans to adopt protections for consumers of wireless phone services, including measures originally introduced in the Ontario Legislature by David Orazietti, MPP for Sault Ste. Marie. “Millions of Ontarians subscribe to wireless phone services and, given the unwillingness of the federal government to protect consumers from costly one-side contracts, we are moving forward with important legislation that reaches the same objectives as those proposed in two bills I previously introduced,” said David Orazietti, MPP for Sault Ste. Marie. “This is a pocketbook issue that consumers want addressed, and our government bill contains measures that will reduce costs, cap cancellation fees, prevent automatic renewal and make cell phone contracts considerably more fair and transparent.” The Wireless Services Agreement Act, 2012 will contain measures to bring greater fairness to agreements for wireless services. Specifically, the Bill will allow consumers to cancel agreements at any time, with limits on cancellation changes; require the express consent of the consumer to renew, extend or amend a contract; and require greater disclosure and clarity in contracts for wireless services, among other provisions. The Legislation, if passed, will benefit consumers by: • Allowing consumers to cancel their wireless phone agreements at any time, with caps on cancellation costs; • Ensuring companies clearly disclose which services are included in the minimum cost of an agreement and which services would result in added costs; • Requiring companies to use clear and plain language in their agreements so consumers have a better understanding of their contract; • Requiring the express

consent of the consumer before a service provider may renew, extend or amend a consumer’s contract for wireless service; • Introducing all-inclusive price advertising for cell phone service plans; • Prohibiting providers from charging consumers for services while devices under warranty are being repaired; • Requiring suppliers to give notice to consumers who are about to incur additional charges for exceeding service limits; • Strengthening consumer remedies and rights to triple recovery if forced to make a claim or sue the company. Continued on Page 8

Do you know someone who is celebrating a birthday, anniversary, graduation or any other special occasion? If you do, why not place an ad in the Nipigon Red Rock Gazette!

Phone 887-3583 for more details. For all your advertising needs, contact the friendly staff at the Nipigon-Red Rock Gazette. For more information call

887-3583 Restorative Justice through Theatre Continued from Page 6

be truly accountable and make things right when we do not really understand the impact of our actions. Restorative practices help that happen." states Bruce Schenk, Director, International Institute for Restorative Practices – Canada Restorative practices have been shown to increase students’ engagement in school and their ability to maintain positive relationships, leading to

better health and academic outcomes. Using restorative approaches to keep students connected to school is one of the priority actions of the Thunder Bay Drug Strategy. Tough Case is touring Thunder Bay and District high schools from April 10 – April 19 with 8 shows booked in Thunder Bay and 4 in the district including Red Rock, Terrace Bay, Marathon and Manitouwadge.


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Tuesday, April 17th, 2012

Provincial Government to adopt cell phone legislation continued.......... Continued from Page 7

The legislation will affect new contracts for wireless phone and data services and would take effect six months after being passed. The legislation will also cover existing agreements that are amended, renewed or extended after that date. Orazietti has twice introduced legislation calling for greater protection and transparency for consumers of wireless phone and data services. In November 2010, Orazietti

introduced Bill 133, the “Wireless Phone, Smart Phone and Data Service Transparency Act,” which passed Second Reading in the Legislature with support from all political parties. In 2011, Orazietti reintroduced the proposed legislation as Bill 5, which again passed Second Reading with all-party support. “For too long large telecom companies have been gouging consumers on their cell phone bills,” said Orazietti. “Today represents a great milestone for con-

sumers and I am looking forward to these new measures being introduced in the Ontario Legislature this session.” QUICK FACTS • 77 percent of Ontarians subscribe to cell phone services • More than 80 percent of wireless service agreements are post-paid, meaning that people are billed after they sign agreements and use the services • The Ontario wireless services market is dominated by three companies

(Bell, Rogers, Telus) which provide 97 percent of all wireless services in the province. Six companies occupy the remaining three per cent of the market. • A 2010 report by the New American Foundation comparing wireless plans from around the world found Canadian consumers pay the highest minimum monthly charge for cell phone services out of the eleven countries • Complaints about wireless carriers comprised 62 percent of Continued on Page 9

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Nipigon-Red Rock Gazette. Call today for more information

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Tuesday, April 17th, 2012

Nipigon - Red Rock Gazette

Grown up Grilled Cheese Sandwiches................ By John Placko While the grilled cheese sandwich is nothing new, it’s enjoying a huge resurgence in popularity across North America. Grilled cheese restaurants, specialty grilled cheese food trucks, and gourmet recipes are turning up everywhere. In fact, Canadians eat over 200 million grilled cheese sandwiches a year. That’s 400 million slices of bread! In keeping with this hot food trend, here is a gourmet grilled cheese sandwich recipe you can make at home. The caramelized onion combined with fresh tomatoes, cheese and basil on fresh bread, makes a delicious meal and can even be used as an appetizer if cut up into bite size sandwiches: Caramelized Onion Grilled Cheese Panini Ingredients: 1 tbsp (15 mL) olive oil 1 medium red onion,

peeled and thinly sliced 1 tsp (5 mL) brown sugar 2 tsp (10 mL) balsamic vinegar 1 tbsp (15 mL) butter, softened 8 slices Dempster ’s Stays Fresh white bread 2 small tomatoes, thinly sliced Thin slices Mozzarella cheese 1/2 cup (125 mL) fresh basil leaves Salt and paper to taste Directions: Heat oil in a non-stick frying pan over medium. Add onion and sugar and saute for 10 minutes, stirring often. Reduce heat to medium low and add balsamic vinegar. Saute 2 minutes more, remove from heat and set aside. Preheat Panini press on high. Spread butter on one side of each slice of bread and place butter side down. Layer 4 slices of bread with tomato and Mozzarella cheese. Top with equal amounts of

Cell Phone legislation continued....... Continued from Page 8

the complaints it received by the federal Commissioner for Complaints for Te l e c o m m u n i c a t i o n s Services (CCTS) reports that in 2010-2011. Ontario accounted for 41.4 percent of all complaints • 75 percent of the complaints about post-paid wireless services received by the CCTS for 2009 fell within the following categories: billing errors, termination disputes, customer service grievances and terms and conditions changes • Cellular phone service is the business category for which Better Business Bureaus in Canada have processed the most complaints in 2010 • In 2007 David Orazietti, MPP introduced Bill 11, “Protecting Children and Youth from Second-Hand Smoke in Automobiles Act, 2007.” The Bill was adopted by the Ministry of Health Promotion and Sport and amended the Smoke Free Ontario Act in 2009 • In 2008, Orazietti

introduced Bill 59, the “Apology Act, 2008,” which enables individuals and organizations, such as hospitals and other public institutions, to apologize for an accident or wrongdoing, without it being used as evidence of liability in a civil legal proceeding under provincial law. The Bill was adopted by the Ministry of the Attorney General and the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care as the Apology Act in 2009 • In 2010, Orazietti introduced Bill 56, the “Breast Cancer Screening Act,” which proposed increased access to breast cancer screening. Bill 56 passed Second Reading and was referred to the Standing Committee on Social Policy. In the 2011 Ontario Budget the province announced the largest investment and expansion to the Ontario Breast Screening Program (OBSP) since it began more than 20 years ago and included reducing the age of entry to the OBSP

basil and caramelized onions and season with salt and pepper. Top with the remaining slices of bread. Place sandwiches on Panini press and close. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes or until cheese is melted and bread is golden. Sandwiches can also be cooked in a large non-stick frying pan at medium heat for 2-3 minutes per side. Serve warm. Canada’s Food Guide recommends that we should eat six to eight servings of grains per day. Additional recipes to achieve this are available at online www.dempsters.ca.

CLASSIFIED ADS They really work and for a great price! Do you have something to sell? Are you looking for something, or did you lose something? Put it in a Classified Ad for quick results at a great price. Contact the office today at 887-3583, or pay us a visit.

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Nipigon - Red Rock Gazette

Call 824-2021 for rent FOR RENT - Schreiber, 206 Walker Street. 2 Bedroom house with garage. Appliances are included. For more information please call Mary or Peter at (807) 824-2339 or (807) 8242351

for sale or rent FOR RENT OR SALE 107 Drummond St. Schreiber, 3 Bedrooms. Available March 1st. For more information please cal Cos at (807) 824-2281 or (807) 823-0025

retail sales SALES - When was the last time you saw TUPPERWARE! For a FREE catalog or for more information on full/part time business opportunities call: Joan (807) 229-0712

marketplace Call 911 in an emergency situations only!!! Be Animal Wise - Fill bird feeders only through the winter months - Keep meat scraps in the freezer until garbage day. - Do not leave pet food outdoors - Clean fish and store remains away from your campsite or trailer!

Tuesday, April 17th 2012

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Tuesday, April 17th, 2012

Nipigon - Red Rock Gazette

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Canada’s Military History Recognized with New Historical Designations The Honourable Peter Kent, Canada’s Environment Minister and Minister responsible for Parks Canada, today announced the designation of ten new national historic sites, persons, and events that define significant moments in Canada’s military history. “From the Siege of Que! bec in 1759 to Canada’s contributions to the Allied effort during the Second World War, each of these designations represents a significant to the contribution development of Canada as a nation,” said Minister Kent. “Our national historic designations connect us to the cultural forces that made Canada what it is today. By understanding and appreciating our shared history and a sense of common purpose, we become a stronger Canada,” said Minister Kent. The recognition of these historically important places, people, and events enhances our understanding of our history and speaks to the founding of our military institutions, the training of our forces, and early battles on Canadian soil. These new historical designations

will be included in Canada’s family of national historic sites, persons, and events on the recommendation of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada. “Canadians can rightly be proud of their military heritage,” said the Honourable Peter Mackay, Minister of National Defence and Regional Minister for Nova Scotia. “These designations show significance of the Canada’s military history, as well as the contributions and sacrifices of men and women, past and present.” historical Today’s designations include Manitoba’s Camp Hughes, the Crow’s Nest Officer’s Club in St.John’s, Newfoundland, secret intelligence activities at Camp X in Whitby/Oshawa, Ontario, the Siege of the City of Que! bec in 1759, and the Battle of Sainte-Foy in 1760 in the City of Que! bec, Quebec. Canadian naval aviation during the Cold War, Canada’s Voluntary Aid Detachments, and the detention of Second World War military prisoners of war and enemy aliens sent from Great Britain are also recognized.

Established in 1919, and supported by Parks Canada, the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada advises Canada’s Environment Minister regarding the national historic significance of places, persons and events that have marked Canada’s history. Parks Canada manages a nation-wide network of national historic sites that make up a rich of Canada’s tapestry cultural heritage and which offers visitors the opportunity for real and inspiring discoveries. The Detention of Second World War Military Prisoners of War and of Enemy Aliens Sent to Canada from Great Britain From 1940 to 1947, Canada was the wartime “home” for more than 38,000 prisoners of war and of “enemy aliens” sent from Great Britain. This detention constitutes an important element of Canada’s contribution to the Allied war effort and defense strategy, as camps located throughout the country were used to hold combatants from the German armed forces, as well as merchant mariners and Great Britain’s enemy aliens. This is of particular

significance in Northern Ontario, where there were four internment camps: - Camp 100, Neys - built in Neys, and property is now within a provincial park (some built features can still be identified); - Camp 101, Angler Lake - built on the shore of Lake Superior (foundations and scattered items can still be found); - Camp R, Red Rock built on the property of the former Lake Sulphite Pulp and Paper Company; and - Camp 21/E, Espanola established at the old mill and company townsite. The historic plaque in honour of this national designation is to be located in Neys Provincial Park, near the town of Marathon. Please note, that the Thunder Bay Military Museum has a model of the Angler Lake Camp, donated by a former detainee, who now lives in Longlac. The museum also has an extensive display of original artwork done by another PoW, during his interment at various camps across Canada, including the Red Rock Camp. The museum can be reached at 343-5175. I can assist with accessing some photos from the museum.

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Tuesday, April 17th, 2012


Nipigon - Red Rock Gazette